• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Legend
 Space requirements
 Appendices
 Functional relationship diagra...
 Activity's plot diagrams
 Space calculations
 Equipment lists
 Bibliography
 Footnotes






West Tampa Health and Social Services Center : a building design for a fixed architectural environment
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098237/00001
 Material Information
Title: West Tampa Health and Social Services Center : a building design for a fixed architectural environment
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Rigney, David P.
Publisher: David P. Rigney
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1977
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre:
Coordinates: 27.961798 x -82.482295
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00098237:00001

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Acknowledgement
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Legend
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 1
        Page 2
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        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Space requirements
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Appendices
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        B-1
        B-2
        B-3
        B-4
        B-5
        B-6
        B-7
        B-8
        B-9
        B-10
        B-11
        B-12
        B-13
        B-14
        B-15
        B-16
        B-17
        B-18
        B-19
        B-20
        B-21
        B-22
        B-23
        B-24
        B-25
        B-26
        B-27
        B-28
        B-29
        B-30
        B-31
        B-32
        B-33
        B-34
        B-35
        B-36
        C-1
        C-2
        C-3
        C-4
        C-5
        C-6
    Functional relationship diagrams
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Activity's plot diagrams
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Space calculations
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
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        Page 59
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Equipment lists
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Bibliography
        C-7
        C-8
    Footnotes
        C-9
Full Text
WEST TAMPA HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES CENTER
A Building Design for a Fixed Architectural Environment
by David Paul Rigney May 30, 1977
This Terminal Project is presented to the Graduate School and the College of Architecture in partial fulfillment for the requirements leading to the Degree: Master of Arts in Architecture, Preservation Option.
University of Florida Gainesville, Florida


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Gary Engelhardt, Director, H. T. H. P. B. Ken Garcia, Planner, U. C. P. C. Anne Porter, Social Services Planner, C. A. A. Rick Smith, Director of Planning, M. D. A. Gary Yellin, Planner, M. D. A.
Special thanks to my committee members: F. Blair Reeves, Professor of Architecture, and Carl Feiss, Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning, and my wife, Gail, without whom this project would never have been completed.
David P. Rigney


TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTORY MAP AND LEGEND PROPOSAL
NEIGHBORHOOD DESCRIPTION
West Tampa's Development
Centro Espanol West Tampa Branch
West Tampa After the Cigar Industry's Decline
Proposed Service Center's Role and Its Clientele
SOCIAL SERVICES ANALYSIS
Community Action Agency and Its Neighborhood Centers
C.A.A.'s Existing West Tampa Neighborhood Center
M.D.A. Neighborhood Center Pilot Project
Medical Services Evaluation
Planning for Needed Services in West Tampa
Need for Services in West Tampa
SITE ANALYSIS Location Access Parking
Existing Improvements Terrain and Vegetation Utilities Zoning
Siting Concept BUILDING DESIGN CONCEPT


SPACE REQUIREMENTS 29
Functional Relationship Diagrams 36
Flow Diagrams 42
Design Criteria for Individual Spaces 48
Medical Services Equipment List 67
CHANGES IN PROGRAMMING 73
APPENDICES
Population Density By Census Tract A-l
Population Change During 1975 By Census Tract A-2 Social Indicator Maps
Income Levels: 1970 B-1
Poverty Pattern: 1975 B-3
Welfare Families B-5
Poor Families, Female Head B-7
Limited-Skill Workers R-9
Low Educational Level B-ll
Negro Population B-13
School-Age Children (5-14) B-15
Elderly Population B-17
Birth Rates B-19
Infant Death Rates B-21
Immunization Polio, Under 5 B-23
Measles, Under 5 B-25
DPT, Under 5 B-27
Heart Disease Death Rates B-29
Stroke Death Rates B-31


Tuberculosis Rates B-33
Syphilis Rates B-35
Overview of the Development of West Tampa C-l
BIBLIOGRAPHY


MEDICAL SERVICES LEGEND
A Tampa General Hospital
B Hillsborough County Health Department
C Lee Davis Health Clinic
D Saint Joseph's hospital
E Centi'O Espanol Hospital
E Hillsborough County Mental Health Center G Sulfur Springs Health Clinic II Port i'ampa Health Clinic




1
Proposal
This Terminal Project will be primarily concerned with the design of a combination social and medical services neighborhood center for the West Tampa Area, Tampa, Florida. The proposed center will enclose approximately 10,000 square feet of net area.
The medical services to be rendered at the proposed neighborhood center will be as follows strictly on an out patient basis:
Adult medical treatment
Child medical treatment
Prenatal care and pregnancy testing
Family planning
Health screening for glaucoma, diabetes and hypertension
Chest X-rays and tuberculosis testing
Cardiovascular screening
Children's school physicals
Child immunization
Weight control
Sickle cell screening and counseling Dental maintenance program Vision program
In addition to the listed physical health services; crisis counseling, marriage and family counseling and referral for services not provided at the center will be functions of the proposed neighborhood center.
In addition to health services the proposed neighborhood center would offer legal counseling, employment counseling and daycare for preschool children, ages one to five, of working parents. Supervision of the children of parents participating in the proposed center's programs would also be provided.


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The location for the proposed center will be on the 2300 block of North Howard Avenue on the site of Rey Park, established as a recreation center by the Tampa Recreation Department in the 1950's. A proposal will be made for the relocation of Rey Park's facilities within the same general area but off the major thoroughfare. Of primary importance in the siting of the proposed center is the location of the West Tampa Centre Espanol building immediately to the west across Howard Avenue. It is intended that the Cent.ro Espanol in combination with the proposed "Neighborhood Center" and an intervening plaza will form the northern terminus for the West Tampa "Commercial Strip" on North Howard Avenue. Secondly but equally important will be the transition provided by this complex between the Howard Avenue commercial strip and the adjacent, residential area.
It is anticipated that, the West Tampa Cent.ro Espanol could be revitalized as an activities center for the West Tampa community. This could possibly occur under the auspices of the Centro Espanol, but very likely funding and administration through the City of Tampa's recreation programs would be necessary. The West Tampa community is in need of facilities to bring its members together in the solidarity of community pride and the Centro Espanol building could serve in housing functions to this end with little modification. This building has specific potential for housing social functions, theater group activities and entertainment functions, all of which could help bring the West Tampa community together.
In programming for a services facility like the one proposed the contracting agency would normally go through a survey procedure that could hardly be undertaken in the time alloted for completion of this project by one individual. Consequently, the need for the proposed facilities is based largely on observation of the West Tampa area and on examination of existing


data and social indicators for the West Tampa area. In programming for thi project I was able to make comparisons between West Tampa's potential needs and those of an adjacent area, characterized by similar social indicators, for which a neighborhood social services center is currently being planned.
*See appendices B-1 through B-36


4
NEIGHBORHOOD DESCRIPTION
West Tampa's Development
West Tampa is that area northwest of downtown Tampa, which at the peak of its development was bounded as follows: the Hillsborough River on the east; Columbus Drive on the north; Himes Avenue on the west; and Fig Street on the south. The development of the area was the brainchild of Hugh C. McFarlane, lawyer and investor, and was the Anglo answer to Ybor City. During the 1890's McFarlane and his associates carried out their grand scheme to make West Tampa a major contender in the cigar manufacturing industry. The West Tampa community grew up around the resulting cigar factories and the rows of cottages built for the workers. The details of this development are outlined in more detail in "Overview of the Development of West Tampa", prepared for the Tampa-Hillsborough Historic Preservation Board, which is included in the appendices to this program.
The West Tampa area developed into a complete community during the 1890's and the first two decades of the Twentieth Century. Supporting the community's cigar industry were the entire gamut of business enterprises and civic facilities that, make a community complete.- The community's early development centered on the intersection of Howard Avenue and Main Street just north of the present location of Interstate 275. A community plaza was originally planned for this location but never came about. West Tampa was laid out in a simple grid with civic functions planned for the central intersection. Commercial development occurred primarily along Howard and Armenia Avenues, running north-south, and Main Street, running east-west. The majority of the area as previously delineated was devoted to residential use, characterized


5
by small but sometimes ornate frame cottages. The two and three story brick cigar factories were dispersed throughout the area with groups of workers' cottages in close proximity to the factory in which the residents worked.
Of particular importance within the community were the men's social
7
clubs. This is true in terms of architecture as well as social organization. These clubs were generally ethnic in orientation as indicated by the two remaining examples in West Tampa the Centro Espanol and the Sicilian Club. The Buildings that housed these two organizations are both located on North I toward Avenue. The Centro Espanol, its ornate 1912 building located at 2306 North Howard Avenue was of particular importance due to its membership's participation in community affairs and organization. The Centro Espanol founded a Hospital north of West Tampa devoted to the physical well being of all Tampa's Latin residents. The Centro Espanol building is certainly one of, if not the most significant building socially, historically and architecturally in West Tampa. It is for this reason that the site for the proposed "Service Center" across Howard Avenue from the Centro Espanol should hold considerable significance for the West Tampa community.
Centro Espanol West Tampa Branch
The Centro Espanol building encloses approximately 19,500 square feet of space which includes a theater with eight boxes, a cantina and recreation area, and a ballroom. In addition to the major spaces there are numerous smaller spaces intended for support functions. It would be desirable to maintain the integrity of the building's original design. The potential seems to be for use for a combination of recreational and entertainment functions. The cantina along with its adjoining recreation


6
area and the ballroom could easily function as teen and adult recreation facilities as well as provide space to accommodate the meetings of various organizations. These spaces would also be ideal for the accommodation of meetings between the West Tampa residents and agency representatives for the exchange of ideas on plans for the community. The theater at the rear of the building should retain this function. Theater-related activities could be carried out in the space for the entire range of age groups represented in West Tampa. Likewise professional entertainment could be staged in this space with the possibility of attracting people from outside West Tampa as well as area residents. In addition, this theater provides a place where a large group can meet and be addressed. The whole building has great potential for generating activity and community interest.
West Tampa Today
West Tampa's economic base, the cigar industry, began to decline in the 1920's. In 1925, West Tampa was annexed by the City of Tampa and so began the integration of the West Tampa Latin community into the greater social organization of Tampa.^ Since that time the physical, economic, social and ethnic character of West Tampa has changed drastically.
Witli the exception of an area two blocks on either side of Howard Avenue between Columbus Drive and Cypress Street, "progress" has taken its toll on old West Tampa. This area which reamins relatively intact physically is being considered for recommendation as an architectural conservation area by the Tampa-Hillsborough Historic Preservation Board. The area to the east along the Hillsborough River was worked over by the heavy hand of Urban Renewal after 1940. The area to the west has been developed over the years since 1930 into row after row of concrete block homes. The area that retains the physical endowment of its past has


7
been allowed to deteriorate over the years. The entire area that was West Tampa is now part of the belt of poverty and social deprivation that runs across Tampa to the north of the downtown area.
West Tampa can no longer be said to have an economic base of its own. Many of its once-thriving cigar factories are vacant or under-utilized. What was once a close-knit community is now a slum and a place for Tampa's poverty stricken residents. Vandalism and crime discourage businessmen from investing in the area's future.
The Latin community Spanish, Cuban and Italian for the most part no longer reside in West Tampa. Those that have remained in the area have set up housekeeping in the newer subdivisions to the west. The current population of West Tampa is predominantly black. Exceptions to this are found in pockets. The area south of Interstate 275 and west of Armenia Avenue is one area that is predominantly white and is seemingly unaffected by the decline of the area north of the Interstate.
Proposed Service Center's Role
This program is primarily concerned with those residents of West Tampa that exemplify the effects of poverty, young and old alike. While a large segment of West Tampa is characterized by the highest population density to be found in Tampa (see map tA?0 the age distribution is not over-weighted with any particular age range. Day care facilities will benefit the very young (ages one through five). Employment and Legal Sendees will be addressed to a wide range of ages (teenagers to senior citizens). Medical services will be addressed to the entire range of the neighborhood's population from before birth through adulthood. Senior citizens (above age sixty) are the only age group that can be considered marginally under-represented in West Tampa. For this reason,
*See appendix B-13


8
a wide range medical services specifically for this age group will not be offered by the proposed "Service Center".*
It is anticipated that the proposed "Service Center" can help produce a number of results for the well being of the West Tampa Neighborhood. First and foremost the center should have as its goal a contribution in helping the area residents become self supporting. This is accomplished by services related to the physical maintenance of residents as well as those services more directly related to the performance of a job for financial consideration. It is far easier for a person to be concerned with his community and his environment when he knows where his next meal is coming from and is not hampered by the degradation of public support. Beyond this is the center's importance within the context of West Tampa's history and architectural heritage. The complex that will be formed by the proposed "Service Center" and the Centro Espanol lias great potential for generating activity and interest. From this a true community bond can begin to emerge once again. In the long run this potential sense of community pride may be the most important factor in the future of West Tampa. As long as it is lacking the neighborhood will only decay further, but with it West Tampa can come to life once again.
*See appendix B-17


SOCIAL SERVICES ANALYSIS
Community Action Agency and Its Neighborhood Centers
In Tampa the range of social services provided by the various levels of governmental authority tend to be regional in their dispensation. Central offices or dispensing points are expected to service the entire metropolitan area of Tampa in some cases. This is particularly true of most services rendered by the City of Tampa and the State of Florida. The most notable deviation is represented by the Community Action Agency (C. A. A.) Neighborhood Service Centers which are operated by Hillsborough County in five locations: Plant City, Sulfur Springs, West Tampa, Ybor City and Ruskin. The C. A. A. main office is located in the West Tampa Neighborhood Service Center at 2103 North Rome Avenue.
In the case of the County Neighborhood Service Centers the designation "Neighborhood" is inappropriate, especially in the case of the West Tampa Neighborhood Service Center. The area designation refers literally to the western half of Tampa rather than to neighborhood "West Tampa" in which the Neighborhood Service Center is located. This center is intended to serve an area bounded on the north by West Hillsborough Avenue; on the east by Florida Avenue and Hillsborough Bay; on the south by MacDill Air Force Base; on the west by Old Tampa Bay. In addition a lobe extends to the north bounded by Waters Avenue on the north, Dale Mabry Highway on the east and Sheldon Road on the west. Such a large area can hardly constitute a single neighborhood. To further complicate the problem of target service area for this "Center" is the fact that the total service area encompasses two major high risk poverty areas in addition to West Tampa. These are located in Hyde Park and POrt Tampa, both to the south
*See appendix B:l through B-4


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and far enough removed to create a transportation problem. While not specifically related to the delivery of social services to West Tampa, this problem illustrates the fallacy of the premise that a single facility can reasonably be expected to deliver services to individuals beyond a point to which transportation can be efficiently and conveniently provided. Consequently, people in need of services forego those services; those employed in the delivery of services may be underutilized; and most significantly fallacious statistics are generated to stifle planning efforts for delivery of services in the future.


11
C.A.A.'s Existing West Tampa Neighborhood Center
The West Tampa Neighborhood Service Center is the major source of non-medical social services for the West Tampa Area. Included are:
1. Headstart pi'e-school child development program
2. Senior Citizen's Services
a. Companionship
b. Activities
c. Home repairs
d. Nutritional program
e. Transportation
3. Community Development
a. Organizational opportunities
b. Civic action programs
4. Housing Services
a. Information and locational service
b. Moving assistance
c. Financial and home management counseling
5. Home Economics Program
6. Home Improvement, Repair and Weatherization Program
7. Community Food and Nutrition Program
8. Passenger Van Transportation Program
9. Job Training and Skills Improvement Program 10. Volunteer Referral Service
In addition to these services and programs, coordination and referra is provided for service programs outside the County's jurisdiction. Cert fication for the state food stamp program is among the most notable of


12
these. It is important to understand that the services coordinated and administered through the Neighborhood Service Center are not necessarily delivered there. It is due to this aspect of the program that the center fails to function as a "Neighborhood Center". The problem is further complicated by the large service area involved, as outlined previously.
The services program for the proposed "Neighborhood Service Center" will not overlap with the services offered at the existing C.A.A. facility. While overlapping services will be avoided, services may be provided at the proposed "Neighborhood Service Center" for which referral service is currently provided at the existing C.A.A. Center.


13
M. D. A. Neighborhood Center Pilot Project
The Metropolitan Development Agency, Tampa's social services planning agency, is currently investigating the need for true neighborhood-oriented social services delivery. This investigation is being carried out through a pilot program which will provide a variety of services to a target area north of Ybor City. This target area measures approximately lh miles by 2h miles. The target area corresponds closely to the primary target for the Model Cities and Planned Variation Programs which preceded the current attempts by the City of Tampa to deal with its socially blighted areas. Except for the physical obstacle imposed by the Hillsborough River, it might have been possible for this pilot neighborhood center to service the West Tampa area as well, at least to a greater extent than it is served now. The services to be provided in this pilot program are being determined by three basic factors: need for specific services determined by problem incidence, deficiency of service indicated by high frequency of unsolved problems and the willingness and ability of existing service delivery agencies to set up operations in the pilot neighborhood center/1 These factors were determined as outlined in "Area Resident Service Needs" prepared for the Metropolitan Development Agency, City of Tampa by Harvey, Green and Associates, Inc., Architects and Planners with the assistance of L. G. Smith and Associates, Inc. The process involved target area saturation with program information and a survey of area residents' need profile. In addition, a survey was conducted to ascertain the interest of all agencies that might be involved in the delivery of services to the target area residents.


14
Medical Services Evaluation
Within the area iimiediately surrounding West Tampa there are four major sources of physical medical care: St. Joseph s Hospital, Centro Espanol Hospital, Hillsborough County Health Department and Tampa General Hospital in order of accessibility by way of Tampa's public transportation system. Since subsidized service requirements for those residents of West Tampa subsisting on income near or below poverty level are the object of this study, the offices of private medical practitioners have been excluded from consideration as major sources of primary medical care for the target area. The nearest source of a complete range of mental health services for the target area is the Hillsborough Community Mental Health Center which is located north of Ybor City. The absence of a direct bus route between West Tampa and the H. C. Mental Health Center makes use of the Center by the targeted West Tampa residents highly improbable.
It should be noted that Tampa General and St. Joseph's Hospitals are only marginally applicable as sources of routine primary health care that is needed by the near-poverty level residents of West Tampa. While both of these hospitals have limited subsidized health care programs, eligibility and the associated bureaucratic procedures combined with transportation oriented locational problems would tend to eliminate both of these hospitals as sources of medical care for West Tampa residents. This is especially true of St. Joseph's Hospital which is a private hospital of religious affiliation and provides a more limited range of subsidized medical care than Tampa General Hospital.
*See Introductory Map


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The medical services of the Centro Espanol Hospital are more in line with those being sought for the West Tampa community in general and may adequately serve part of the Latin segment of West Tampa's residents. The ethnic orientation of the services provided by the Centro Espanol coupled with the animosity between segments of the black and Latin residents of West Tampa makes improbable the provision of medical services to the West Tampa corrmunity in general. It is however, possible that representation of the Centro Espanol would be desireable in the operation of a facility designed specifically for the service of West Tampa's needs, medical and otherwise.
On first observation the Hillsborough County Health Department would seem to be a relatively accessible source of health care for West Tampa residents. On the surface this is true. The Health Department can be reached by bus from the intersection of Main Street and Howard Avenue in less than thirty minutes if the potential patient is willing or able to walk several blocks; if the bus is on time; and if the potential patient is able to utilize the Health Department's services during business hours. If for some reason it is necessary for the potential patient to be bussed to the normal route stop at the Health Department, the trip from West Tampa could take as long as 1% hours or more. This is due to the scheduling of the two routes that must be utilized to make the trip from a central location in West Tampa to the Health Department on the eastern extremity of the downtown area.
A major problem in the use of County Health Department facilities by West Tampa residents stems from the regional character of this Department1s service area and its inability to focus on the problems specific to an area as small as West Tampa. A major factor in the


16
placement of County-operated neighborhood or area oriented medical facilities has been proximity to the main Health Department location. The factor that has not been sufficiently considerd is that two miles may as well be ten miles if a potential patient has to rely on public transportation that does not provide coordinated service between starting point and destination.
The West Tampa area represents one extremity of the low income high risk area to the north of downtown.* West Tampa's separation by the Hillsborough River from the rest of this target area for social services necessitates its consideration as a separate target area. This is especially true in the area of medical services. The inability of West Tampa residents to receive adequate health care due to locational and transportation-oriented barriers tends to mdermine the goal of the entire range of social services to the area. If an individual does not receive necessary health care, how can he or she take advantage of the range of programs aimed at raising the standard of living for West Tampa residents?
*See appendix B-1 through B-36


17
Planning for Needed Services
Examination of the "Social Indicator Maps" included in the "Social/ Human Services Plan for Tampa" prepared for the Metropolitan Development Agency, City of Tampa by The Planning/Design Group make obvious the reasoning behind the selection of the area north of Ybor City for the M. S. A.'s pilot neighborhood service center. This area represents the largest and most intense concentration of "High Risk" social indicators in the City of Tampa. The most obvious of these indicators are low income level, limited job skills, low educational level and incidence of families receiving public assistance.*
Equally as obvious as the need for social services in the M. D. A.'s pilot neighborhood center target area is the coincidence of the same basic social problems in the West Tampa area. The M. D. A.'s Social Indicator Maps reflect these problems most prominently in Census Tracts 43, 44, 49, 50. Examination of Block Statistics from the 1970 Census and physical examination of the area indicate that the "High Risk" area in West Tampa extends well into the eastern halves of Census Tracts 45 and 48 as well as the southern half of Census Tract 27.
It is primarily from this coincidence of "High Risk" social indicators that the target area potential for the West Tampa area is delineated. This is tempered by opinions expressed by members of Metropolitan Development Agency staff, case workers on the West Tampa Neighborhood Service Center staff and members of the Hillsborough County Planning Commission staff.
A major obstacle in determining where a service need exists and how to serve that need is the overlap and coincidence of the jurisdictions of servicing agencies. Since it is not the object of this project to *See appendix B-1 through B-12


18
restructure the delivery of social services within the existing or potential governmental hierarchy this program will not deal specifically with what agency will deliver what service. An exception is the inclusion of the Florida State Employment Service as a unique agency which has indicated an interest in participating in neighborhood centers, specifically the M. D. A. pilot project for its Neighborhood Centers Program.


19
Need for Social Services in West Tampa
Health-Related Services
The most obvious deficiency in social services to the West Tampa Area is in the field of health related services, both physical and mental. The deficiencies in this type of service to West Tampa residents are outlined in the section on the availability of medical services. The choice is use of expensive hospital facilities with limited subsidy programs combined with the confusion associated with these facilities, or use of the downtown Health Department Facility. The basic problem with both options tends to be locational. The distance is not as great as from many parts of Tampa, However, the higher dependency of West Tampa residents on public
7
transportation enhances the problem. Add to this the increased problem a low skilled employee encounters in losing work time, and consequently pay, and the result is neglected health care. This is indicated in the M. D. A. Social Indicator maps included in the appendices to this program.*
The indicated need is for a facility, providing general primary health care, located in the target service area. In addition to the general health services for children and adults, special attention should be given to planning for the diagnosis and treatment of health problems prevalent in low income areas, especially diabetes, venereal disease, high infant mortality, inadequate prenatal care and susceptability to immunizable diseases. Also requiring special attention in the provision of medical services in the West Tampa area are those health problems which are more prevalent among black people sickle-cell anemia, hypertension and ailments related to high blood pressure.
*See appendix R-l through B-36


Non-medical Services
The evaluation of deficiencies in non-medical services is more complicated and for the most part beyond the scope of this project. As outlined in the section on available services the deficiencies tend to be related to overlapping jurisdiction and organizational deficiencies within the agencies themselves. To a large extent the whole problem rests with limited budgets and will continue to be this way.
Two areas almost totally lacking in the services available in the West Tampa area are subsidized day care for preschool children and legal aide. Referral service for legal service related to housing and credit problems is provided through the existing West Tampa Community Center, but a potential aide recipient must go outside the West Tampa area to receive consultation. At this point scheduling and transportation problems are the same as outlined in previous sections.
The day care service will provide for the care of up to fifty preschool age children over age one. Of these no more than fifteen percent can be under age two.
The legal aide service will provide counseling not only in matters of housing and credit, but also for a broad range of civil and criminal legal problems. The program could be administered through the Community Action Agency. Affiliation with the State Public Defender's office is also a possibility.
A third non-medical service requirement that seems to be indicated is that of the Florida State Employment Service. While the F.S.E.S. is re-orienting to avoid the posture of a welfare agency it coordinates several programs of special interest to West Tampa residents. The WIN program for individuals with dependent children is one of these. With


21
a relatively high number of female heads of households, the West Tampa area could benefit from programs such as this.* Also of potential benefit to West Tampa residents are the forthcoming Public Works Programs for certain categories of the unemployed. A small branch office of the F.S.E.S. staffed by individuals specializing in these programs could be of special benefit to West Tampa by delivery of an applicable service at the place where it is needed most.
It is anticipated that the Neighborhood Service Center, proposed in this program, would be jointly administered by Hillsborough County's Health Department and Community Action Agency and Tampa's Metropolitan Development Agency with input from any participating agencies of the State of Florida. For this reason it will be assumed that space for administration beyond that specifically required for the function of the proposed "Center" will not be programmed for or designed into the "Center".
*See appendix B-7


SITE ANALYSIS
Location
The proposed site, currently that of Rey Park, is the 200' x 275' block facing the 2300 block of North Howard Avenue and the 55' Twitt Street right-of-way between Cherry and Palmetto Streets located in West Tampa, Tampa, Florida.
Access
The major routes of access to the proposed site run north and south -Howard Avenue (one-way north) and Armenia Avenue (one-way South). Columbus Drive is the major east-west thoroughfare providing access to the general area of the proposed site and Interstate 275 runs east-west approximately 3/8 mile south of the proposed site.
More important are the secondary routes of access that provide circulation within the West Tampa neighborhood. Of special importance are. Albany, Fremont and Rome Avenues, two-way streets running north and south to the east of Howard Avenue. The secondary east-west thorough fares that provide direct access to the proposed site are Cherry and Palmetto Streets.
It is anticipated that the majority of travel to and from the proposed site will be by way of the Tampa Transit System, on foot, and by the Community Action Agency bus service. Two of the municipal transit system routes run north and south through West Tampa on Howard and Armenia Avenues, stopping at each block if signalled by passengers.
Parking
On-street parking is permitted throughout most of West Tampa including the area immediately surrounding the proposed site. Off-street


23
parking may or may not be provided at the proposed site.**If provided, it will be confined to fifteen spaces or less for staff only. One block to the south of the proposed site is vacant space for the provision of up to 50 parking spaces. While Tampa's zoning code is not specific as to parking requirements for this type of facility, fifty spaces satisfies the requirement for medical office space and exceeds space for other office uses. Since access is not expected to be primarily by private auto, this parking area could be designated as muncipal parking and use allowed for access to the West Tampa area in general.
Improvements
The major improvement on the proposed site is a rectangular 55' x 70' concrete block and steel frame building over slab-on-grade. In addition to this there is a band shell of temporary construction at the east end of the site. There are a variety of paved playcourts and playground equipment including swings, slide, climbing bars and merry-go-round. The proposed site is bordered by 5' concrete walkways on the north, south and west. The walks are located on the street right-of-ways adjacent to the site. A six foot chain link fence with barbed wire runs along the proposed site's lot line.
Terrain and Vegetation
The proposed site is essentially flat with drainage accommodated by sandy soil and minimal ground slope. The majority of the proposed site is covered in grass. There are four large oak trees on the north and west sides of the property and five palm trees scattered across the site.
*Changes in Programming #1


24
Utilities
Water service is provided by 6" pipelines on Howard Avenue and Cherry Street. Sewerage connections are likewise located on these streets. Natural gas is available at the site. Power and phone lines are currently run overhead along Howard Avenue. It is recommended that these overhead lines be reinstalled underground at the proposed site. Street lighting is currently provided on Howard Avenue mounted on existing power poles, located at the northwestern and southwestern corners of the proposed site.
Zoning
The proposed site is currently zoned for public use and would continue under this category with a variance for the specific type of use changed from recreation to social services delivery. There are two additional land use categories, commercial and residential, in the immediate vicinity of the proposed site. These uses are represented by four zoning categories: C-l, C-2, R-2, R-3.
C-l: Neighborhood and Convenience Commercial
C-2: General Commercial
R-2: Medium Density, Multiple-Family Residential, (primarily duplexes)
R-3: High Density, Multiple-Family Residential All of these zoning categories are generally compatible with the proposed "Service Center". The least desirable land use adjacent to the proposed site is an auto repair shop immediately to the south across Cherry Street. It would be desirable if this non-descript building characterized by the stucco and rolled tile of the pseudo-Spanish style could be eventually replaced by a building of function more complimentary to the proposed "Sendee Center" and the Centro Espanol.


25
Siting Concept
The proposed location for the proposed Social and Medical Services Center is the 200' x 275' block bounded by Palmetto Street on the north, Twitt Street on the east, Cherry Street on the south and facing the 1900 block of Howard Avenue. The site is directly opposite the West Tampa Branch of the Centro Espanol, the two separated by North Howard Avenue.
The Centro Espanol, which is probably the most significant piece of architecture in the West Tampa area, plays an important part in the siting of the proposed "Service Center". It is intended that the proposed "Service Center" be joined with the Centro Espanol building in forming the northern terminus for the Howard Avenue comnercial strip in West Tampa.
A large portion of the proposed site will be unobstructed to provide an open space from which the Centro Espanol building can be perceived at best advantage. This open area will serve as a spatial tie between the Centro Espanol building and the new Service Center.
Architectural devices Street planting, overhead walkway across Howard Avenue, and possibly the extension of a portion of the Service Center building to streetside will be used to emphasize the combination of these two buildings as the northern terminal point for West Tampa's Howard Avenue commercial strip. The primary reason for this is to provide architectural definition for this comnercial strip that is central to the area that has been preliminarily delineated as a potential "Conservation Area". The primary weakness that may hinder the official designation and recognition of the West Tampa Conservation Area is the decimation of the commercial strip and the lack of architectural continuity to define and tie down this commercial strip which


26
is central to the West Tampa neighborhood. The northern extremity of

this strip is weakest in terms of architectural definition and continu-ity. It is to help alleviate this problem that I wish to establish the northern limit of this commercial strip using the architectural relationship between the Centro Espanol building and the proposed "Service Center".
Equally as important as definition of the Howard Avenue commercial strip is the transition the proposed siting of the "Service Center" will provide between the commercial strip and the residential areas adjacent to the commercial area. The low key one-story scale of the proposed center will be one step in accomplishing this transition. Set back and the relationship of the siting of the "Service Center" to the siting of surrounding residences will be another important determinant in this transition. Finally the use of open space in the immediate vicinity of the proposed "Service Center" and the Centro Espanol for relocation of existing Rey Park playground facilities can contribute to the transitional character of the complex while generating additional activity that will help give the proposed center identity as a true community space.
The last and possibly the most important consideration in the siting concept for the proposed "Service Center" is that of the transitional open space or plaza between the Centro Espanol and the "Service Center". This plaza will in effect be the physical manifestation of the potential functional relationship between these buildings. This open space must reflect a balance of formality and casual atmosphere. The formality should acknowledge the dominance of the space by the Centro Espanol. On the other hand the space should be comfortable, usable and


27
should acknowledge the design of the "Sendee Center". A portion of thi plaza will function as an outdoor waiting area for the "Service Center". The remainder of the plaza should appeal to the community as "a place to go".


BUILDING DESIGN CONCEPT
The proposed "Service Center" will have four distinct service functions medical, legal, employment and day care. It is desirable that all of these functions except day care be served by a central reception and waiting area.**This brings to mind two basic patterns which the "Service Center" design might follow: the service functions in a satellite relationship to the central hub designated for receiving all potential service recipients; or a mall configuration in which service functions branch from an oversized corridor which serves as both major circulation path and receiving area for potential service recipients. Both possibilities will be investigated.
In their potential forms these two design approaches could become so similar so as to be indistinguishable, and will be treated as such in this discussion.
The existing building on the proposed site corresponds closely in area to that required for the "Center's" day care function. Since the day care function need not relate directly to the remaining functions and since the existing building's placement has been observed to have potential in the scheme outlined in "Siting Concept", it is anticipated that the existing building will be utilized in the design scheme for the proposed "Service Center". Should this prove to be a problem during the development of the design, a proposal for the building's elimination will be made. The economic benefit of re-using this building should not be overlooked. The cost of the demolition and replacemnt of the building would most probably exceed $50,000 while its redesign could be achieved for one third to one half that amount. This approach is supported by the ease with which a separate controlled outside play **Changes in Programming #2


29
area for day care participants and for children of service recipients visiting the "Service Center" could be provided.
The most important design consideration will be the central reception area. This area should invite service recipients and make clear where the various service functions are located. A strong relationship should be developed between the interior waiting area and adjacent exterior space in order to provide an alternative outside waiting area. The waiting area should have a direct connection with all service delivery areas and with the supervised play area for the children of service recipients. It would be desireable to use a maximum of natural lighting in the reception area maximizing the interior-exterior inter-relationship.
The functional relationships involved in designing the service center are adequately illustrated in the accompanying flow and function diagrams* Beyond this it will be desirable to make working areas as open and pleasant as possible without diminishing their functional ism. Where privacy or screening of unpleasant views is necessary, high windows or clerestories can be used to introduce light from outside.
The various functions within the medical services area will require an almost machine-like inter-relationship in order to function. Those areas for support must be distinctly separated from the areas directly involved in service delivery. Service functions to service delivery areas must be clear and straight forward. Maximum effort should be made to avoid patient confusion and to minimize patient intrusion into areas not directly related to service delivery. At the same time access between service delivery areas and support functions must be direct and unobstructed.
*See pages 37 through 47


30
Exterior treatment of the proposed Sendee Center will be of special importance considering its relationship and proximity to the Centro Espanol. The use of materials and textures compatible with the vitrified brick, yellow pressed brick and the terra cotta detailing of the Centro Espanol will be very important in the design of the proposed "Service Center". These materials could also play an important part in the articulation of the site. It may or may not be possible to use the arched motives of the Centro Espanol in the design of the"Service Center". Ir-regardless, this should be considered along with rhythm of fenestration and the other aspects of the articulation of the Centro Espanol \s facade.
In conclusion the design of the proposed center should be considered very carefully in terms of its surroundings. Of particular importance is the way in which the building will be perceived when approached from the south, since Howard Avenue is a one-way street. The proposed building should compliment its surroundings without denying the fact that it is of contemporary design.


SPACE REQUIREMENTS
I. Health Facilities
A. Physical Health
1. (3) General Examination Rooms 120 s.f. each
2. EKG Exam Room 100 s.f.
3. X-Ray Room 50 s.f.
4. X-Ray Processing Room 70 s.f.
5. Dental Exam Room 100 s.f.
6. Vision Exam Room 70-100 s.f.
7. (3) Screening and History Rooms** 30-50 s.f. each
8. Laboratory and Secured Storage 250 s.f.
9. Conference and Consultation Room 150-200 s.f.
10. Medical Files and Records Area 100 s.f.
11. General Work-Office Area 350-500 s.f.
1690-1980 s.f.
B. Mental Health and Counseling
1. (3) Private Consultation Rooms 100 s.f. each
2. (2) Group Counseling Areas 250-300 s.f. each
800-900 s.f.
II. Non-Medical Social Services A. Legal Aide
1. Group Legal Counseling Area 300 s.f.
2. (2) Legal Counselor's Offices 100 s.f. each
3. Screening Area 100 s.f.
4. Legal files and Records Area 70 s.f.
Changes in Programming #3
670 s.f.


32
B. Employment Counseling
1. Job Training and Interviewing Seminar Area 500 s.f.
2. F.S.E.S. Branch Office 200 s.f.
700 s.f.
C. Day Care Facility
1. (2) Inside Activity Areas** 1200 s.f. each
2. Office and Records Area 100-150 s.f.
3. (2) Children's Restrooms _75 s.f. each
2650-2700 s.f.
Total Facilities Area 6510-6950 s.f. III. Commons Area
A. Reception and Waiting Area 500-600 s.f.
B. (2) Public Restrooms 100 s.f. each
C. (2) Employee Restrooms 100 S.F. each
D. Employee Lounge _250 s.f.
1150-1250 s.f.
Sub-Total 7660-8200 s.f.
Circulation @ approx. 10% 800 s.f.
Mechanical and Equipment 300 s.f.
General Storage and Janitorial 500 s.f.
Total 9550 s.f.
**Changes in Programming #4


33
Space Functions General Exam Rooms
1. Physical examinations for infants, children and adults
2. Prenatal and post-natal examinations
3. General diagnosis and treatment
4. Cardiovascular screening
5. Hypertension screening
EKG Exam Room
1. EKG examinations
2. Basal metabolism examinations
X-Ray Room
1. Diagnostic radiography
2. Follow-up x-rays for fractures
3. Chest x-rays
Dental Exam Room
1. Dental examinations
2. Dental prophylaxis
3. Dental x-rays
4. General dental repair
5. Minor dental surgery
Vision Exam Room
1. Vision testing and prescription for corrective lens
2. Glaucoma screening
Screening and History Rooms 1. Medical history


34
2. Financial information and payment arrangements
3. Blood samDline
Laboratory
1. Blood testinc
2. Urinalysis furine sampling vestibule included)
3. Pregnancy testing
4. Diabetes testing
5. Sickle cell identification
6. General diagnostic microbiology
7. General diagnostic biochemistry
8. General diagnostic toxology
9. General pharmaceutical preparation 10. Pharmaceutical storage
Consultation Rooms
1. Parent consultation
2. Post-exam consultation
3. Mental health therapy (group and individual)
4. Family counseling
Medical File Room
1. Mental and physical health records
2. Work area
Work-Office Room
1. Diagnostic and treatment research
2. Dictation
3. File update and related work


35
Legal Counseling Area
1. Criminal and civil legal consultation
2. Housing counseling
Employment Counseling Area
1. Employment counseling
2. Public work program coordination
3. WIN program coordination
Employment Seminar Area
1. Employment-employee seminars
2. Employment related programs
3. Any public meeting, program or presentation suitable for this space Day Care facility
1. Day care for children ages one to five
2. Care for children of parents utilizing other services at the "Center"
3. Outdoor activities
4. Indoor group activities
5. Indoor individual activities


APPENDICES
Location of Proposed Service Cent


POPULATION DENSITY IN TAMPA BY CENSUS TRACT JAN. 1,1976
TTTTT
0.1 4.9 PERSONS / ACRE 5.0 7.9 PERSONS / ACRE 8.0-9.9 PERSONS /ACRE 10.0 or more PERSONS / ACRE


PERCENT CHANGE IN TAMPA'S POPULATION BY CENSUS TRACT DURING 1975
DECREASE
0.0-0.9% INCREASE
1.0-4.9% INCREASE
5.0% AND OVER INCREASE


B-1
INCOME LEVELS; 1970
CITY OF TAMPA CENSUS TRACTS
Tompa
$12,675 $15,523 ] $9,811 $12,674 $6,947 $9,810 IT7"] $1,082 $6,946 $1,218 $4,081 "
SOURCE: 1970 Census of Population
MOTE: Defined as "median incomes for families and unrelated individuals." Income ranges stated in terms of median values with each census tract assigned to a category on the basis of its median income level.


B-2
CONDITIONS
1. HEAVIEST CONCENTRATION OE LOWEST-LEVEL MEDIAN INCOMES LOCATED IN INNER-CITY AND EAST TAMPA.
2. INNER-CITY AREA CONTAINS FIVE CONTIGUOUS CENSUS TRACTS IN WHICH THE MEDIAN INCOME IS LESS THAN 50% OF THE CITYWIDE MEDIAN.
3. A SECONDARY CONCENTRATION OF LOW MEDIAN INCOMES IS LOCATED ON EITHER SIDE OF NEBRASKA AVE., SOUTH OF BUSCH BLVD. AND NORTH OF SLIGH.
AREAS WITH SERIOUSLY DEFICIENT INCOME LEVELS ARE CLOSELY CORRELATED WITH A NUMBER OF OTHER INDICATORS OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS, E.G. LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVEL, LIMITED WORK SKILLS, WELFARE RECIPIENTS. OVERCROWDED HOUSING CONDITIONS, ETC' SOME TRACTS KITH HIGH LEVELS OF POVERTY FAMILIES ALSO CONTAIN PUBLIC HOUSING COMPLEXES.
IMPLICATIONS
1. Areas showing low median incomes indicate
a clear need for subsidized social services-based on ability to pay for services 1n the private market place.
2. Coordinated delivery of a wide variety of social services in areas with low Incomes could attack many problems simultaneously. Location near public housing complexes might contribute to efficiency.
3. Many urban physical problems are associated with low-income population groups--often as a result of sharply constrained "purchasing power" of poor residents.
4. Increased income levels can have many spin-off benefits to the c1ty--more taxes, better maintained homes, lowered costs of fire and police services, etc.
5. Programs designed to raise family incomes would have many positive effects on a large number of other city concerns.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Child day care
Day care for adults
Training and Related services
Education programs
Employment services
Family planning services
Counseling (casework)
Home management services
Consumer education and protection
Housing Improvement services If needed
Health related services
Ileal th education
Nutrition education
Legal services
Protective intervention
Emergency shelter services for children
Protective supervision of children
Transportation
Escort services
Information/Outreach (for use of services) Drug abuse, alcoholism, suicide/crisis programs Adolescent recreatfon and jobs Crime prevention, fire prevention programs


B-3
POVERTY PATTERN: 1975
CITY OF TAMPA CENSL6 TRACTS
I I 0 299 persons (. : | 300 499 persons Will 500 899 persons 900 1299 persons A^j 1300+ persons
NOTE: Each "range" refers to the number of families having incomes below the "poverty level" as defined by the Census Bureau, based on applying 1970 proportions by Tract to 1975 tract population estimates.
SOURCE: 1975 Estimate by Hillsborough County Health Planning Council


B-4
CONDITIONS
1. NEARLY ONE-HALF OF ALL CITY RESIDENTS EARNING INCOMES BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL ARE LOCATED IN 18 CENSUS TRACTS.
2. EAST TAMPA, THE AREA CONTAINING A LARGE NUMBER OF ADVERSE SOCIAL INDICATORS, CONTAINS 31.5 PERCENT OF THE CITYWIDE TOTAL IN ELEVEN TRACTS--TOTALLING NEARLY 16,500 POOR PEOPLE.
3. WEST TAMPA AND OLD HYDE PARK HAVE A COMBINED TOTAL OF 10.5 PERCENT (5500 PERSONS).
4. TRACT 26 SHOWN AS A TALSE CONCENTRATION DUE TO STATISTICAL CATEGORY"DIVISIONS ALTHOUGH FAMILY INCOME IS IN THE SECOND LOWEST CATEGORY--SEE MAP ON INCOME LEVELS-ONLY ABOUT 23% OF ESTIMATED POPULATION HAVE INCOMES BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL AND THIS IS A LARGE LAND AREA.
IMPLOTIONS
1. Areas showing low median Incomes Indicate
a clear need for subsidized social services-based on ability to pay for services in the private market place.
2. Coordinated delivery of a wide variety of social services In areas with low Incomes could attack many problems simultaneously. Location near public housing complexes might contribute to efficiency.
3. Many urban physical problems are associated with low-Income population groups--often as a result of sharply constrained "purchasing power" of poor residents.
4. Increased Income levels can have many spin-off benefits to the c1ty--more taxes, better maintained homes, lowered costs of fire and police services, etc.
5. Programs designed to raise family Incomes would have many positive effects on a large number of other city concern.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Child day care
Day care for adults
Training and Related services
Education programs
Employment services
Family planning services
Counseling (casework)
Home management services
Consumer education and protection
Housing Improvement services
Health related services
Health education
Nutrition education
Legal services
Protective Intervention
Emergency shelter services for children
Protective supervision of children
Transportation
Escort services
Information/Outreach (for use of services) Drug abuse, alcoholism, suicide/crisis programs Adolescent recreation and Jobs Crime prevention, fire prevention programs


B-5
CITY OF VWPA CENSUS TRACTS
SOUP.CE: 1970 Census of Population
T*0TE: Classified in census as "families receiving public assistance." Distribution of iltywlile tut ill by cimimis tracts, with 1ud1vldu.il ti.ut percentages ranging from 0.00 1u ',.70.
WELFARE FAMILIES


B-6
CONDITIONS
2.
AN ESTIMATED 6,100 TAMPA FAMILIES RECEIVED PUBLIC ASSISTANCE IN 1975 ... 133 PERCENT OF THE 1970 TOTAL.
SEVEN TRACTS CONTAIN 35 PERCENT OF ALL WELFARE FAMILIES . WITH FIVE BEING CONTIGUOUS AND HAVING ONE-FOURTH OF THE CITYWIDE TOTAL.
3. ELEVEN CENSUS TRACTS NORTHEAST OF CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT (19, 30-36 AND 38-40) MAKE UP A COMPACT AREA CONTAINING 40.43 PERCENT OF ALL WELFARE FAMILIES.
4. STRONG L0CAT10NAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THIS FACTOR AND OIHER INDICATORS Or SOCIAL PROBLEMS, I.E. POOR HOUSING QUALITY, LOW INCOME, OVERCROWDING, ETC.
IMPLOTIONS
1. Inability of families to pay for services on open market.
2. Incomes not sufficient to properly maintain housing and neighborhood quality.
3. Establishes need for subsidized housing and other housing assistance programs.
4. Concentration of poverty families magnifies existing social problems, causes additional ones (anger, frustration lead to child abuse, personal violence, etc.)
5. National research data show the poor are the major victims of crimes.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Child day care
Day care for adults
Training and related services
Education programs
Employment services
Family planning services /
Counseling (casework)
Home management services
Consumer education and protection
Housing improvement services If needed
Health related services
Health education
Nutrition education
Legal services
Protective intervention
Emergency shelter services for children
Protective supervision of children
Transportation
Escort services
Information/Outreach (for use of services) Drug abuse, alcoholism, sulcide/crlsis programs
Tot lots


B-7
POOR FAMILIES, FEMALE HEAD
CITY OF TAMPA CENSUS TRACTS r
0 .99% 1.00 1.99% Hill 2.00 2.99% I j 3.00 3.99% 4.00+
Over 5.00%
SOURCE: Estimates by The Planning/Design Group from R. L. Polk Survey and distributions reported by 1970 Census of Population.
NOTE: Distribution of dtywide total by census tract.


B-8
CONDITIONS
1. TWO MOST SIONirICANT CONCENTRATIONS ARE IN WEST TAMPA AND YDOR CITY.
2. ALMOST 38 PERCENT OF THE CITY TOTAL IS LOCATED IN YBOR CITY AND 12 PERCENT IS IN WEST TAMPA.
3. EXCEPTING A SIGNIFICANT CONCENTRATION (4.4%) IN CENSUS TRACT 12. THE REMAINING FAMILIES OF THIS TYPE ARE SCATTERED WIDELY THROUGHOUT THE REST OF THE CITY.
4. MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS ARE SAME AS THE LOCATION Or NUMEROUS OTHER INDICATORS OF ADVERSE CONDITIONS, E.G. LOW INCOMES, LIMITED WORK SKILLS, ETC. AND WITH LOCATIONS OF PUBLIC HOUSING.
5. CHILDREN PRESENT IN HOUSEHOLD.
IMPLICATIONS
1. One of the most significant target groups for delivery of a variety of social services directed to families, youth and young children.
2. Heavy concentrations 1n small areas compound the problems brought about by this condition but make It easier to devise effective across -the-board- service delivery effort.
3. Types of social service programs indicated by this situation are family financial counseling, family planning for young mothers, crime prevention, day care for preschool children, food stamps, medicaid and other health programs, and a broad range of subsidized services.
4. When in association with elderly households, indicates some probability of need of protective, companionship and home care services.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED Child day care
Day care for adults (elderly, handicapped)
Training and Related services
Education programs
Employment services
Family planning services
Counseling (casework)
Home management services
Consumer education and protection
Housing improvement services if needed
Legal services
Protective Intervention
Emergency shelter services for children
Protective supervision of children and adults
Transportation
Escort services
Information/Outreach (for use of services) Child support program


B-9
CITY OF VMPA
SOURCE: 1970 Census of Population
NOTE: Defined as "laborers, farm workers, cleaning and food service workers, and private household workers." Distribution uf cltywide total by < iti'.ij', 11.11 I Tnirt |HT'(.cril iiyws rmi'/" 11 oiii '/ 'ill to \,A I.
LIMITED-SKILL WORKERS


B-1P
CONDITIONS
i. VERY HIGH CONCENTRATION IN NORTHEAST TAMPA, 4. THESE TWO CONCENTRATIONS CONTAIN NEARLY
CLOSELY CORRELATED WITH CONCENTRATIONS OF HALF OF THE LIMITED-SKILL WORKERS IN CITY.
NEGROES AND ADULTS WITH LOW EDUCATIONAL
LEVELS. 6. REMAINING TRACTS HAVE MINOR CONCENTRATIONS
OF THIS OCCUPATIONAL GROUP.
2. NEARLY 36 PERCENT OF CITY TOTAL IN 12
CENSUS TRACTS.
3. SECONDARY CONCENTRATION WEST OF CBD IN
TRACTS 43, 44, 50 AND 55 (10.74 PERCENT OF
CITY TOTAL).
IMPLICATIONS
1. Pronounced concentrations allow consolidation of services area for effective vocational training program through existing school facilities.
2. Increased job skills neccessary to raising Income levels and reducing unemployment rates.
3. Higher quality work force would have .better economic status and contribute
directly to Improvement of neighborhood conditions and overall economic level of dty.
4. Higher Incomes from more and better Jobs would reduce needs for public assistance payments and other welfare services and would Increase business receipts.
5. Financial assistance needed for initial job training program, and program must
be available at times suitable for workers.
6. Low skill workers are attracted to property crimes to increase incomes.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Education programs Training and related services Employment services Counseling (casework)
Information/Outreach (for use of services)
Legal services
Transportation


B-ll
CITY OF VMPA CENSUS TRACTS
SOURCE: 1970 Census of Population
NOTE: Defined as persons over 25 years of age with fewer than five years' schooling. Distribution of citywide total by census tracts, with individual tract percentages ranging fro:n 0.0 to 4.35.
LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVEL


B-12
CONDITIONS
1. TWO MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS--WEST TAMPA AND AN EAST TAMPA AREA CENTERED ON 22ND STREET AND EXTENDING FROM ADAMO TO HILLSBOROUGH.
2. COMBINED, THE TWO MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS CONTAIN MORE THAN ONE-THIRD OF THE SERIOUSLY UNDER-EDUCATED PERSONS IN TAMPA, WITH THE EAST TAMPA CONCENTRATION CONTAINING MORE THAN ONE-FOURTH OF THE CITYWIDE TOTAL.
3. VERY LIMITED SHARES OF SERIOUSLY UNDER-EDUCATED LIVE IN INTERBAY AREA.
4. HIGH COINCIDENCE IN LOW-EDUCATION AREAS WITH POVERTY, LIMITED JOB SKILLS, WELFARE RECIPIENTS, BLACK POPULATION, ETC.
IMPLICATIONS
4.
Low educational level can be underlying cause of many other social problems becuase of obstacles It places on earning a decent income and adequately coping with many complex demands of urban life.
Presence of limited number of major concentrations will facilitate delivery of remedial and vocational adult educational programs.
Special educational programs can be integrated with other social service activities in a comprehensive application of strategies for Improving social and economic well-being.
Spin-off benefits from Improving adult educational levels are great in Improving neighborhood life styles and reducing the demands for other social services as well as municipal services such as law enforcement, fire combat, housing code enforcement, etc.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Education programs
Training and related services
Counseling (casework)
Home managment services
Consumer education and protection
Health education
Nutrition education
Legal services
Information/Outreach (for use of services)


B-13
CITY OF 1AMPA
SOURCE: 1970 Census of Population
NOTE: Distribution of dtywide total by census tract, with individual tract percentages ranging from 0.0 to 8.65.
NEGRO POPULATION


B-14
CONDITIONS
I. VERY HIGH CONCENTRATION OF BLACK POPULATION IN EAST TAMPA--60 PERCENT OF THE CITYWIDE TOTAL.
ALMOST EVERY OTHER SOCIAL PROBLEM EXAMINED IN THIS ANALYSIS ALSO SHOWS HIGH CONCENTRATION IN THIS AREA.
IMPLICATIONS
1. High concentration of Negro population, though clearly not a causal factor, Is a major Indicator of a pronounced or high need for a wide variety of social services.
2. Maximum cost-effectiveness of physical Improvements 1n East Tampa can be realized only by concurrently providing an adequate level of social services directed toward Improving family conditions and self-sufficiency of the residents.
3. National research data show the poor are the major victims of crime.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Child day care
Day care for adults
Training and related services
Education programs
Employment services
Family planning services
Counseling (casework)
Home management services
Consumer education and protection
Housing improvement services if needed
Health related services
Health education
Nutrition education
Legal services
Protective intervention
Emergency shelter services for children
Protective supervision of children
Transportation
Escort services
Information/Outreach (for use of services) Drug abuse, alcoholism, suicide/crisis
programs Adolescent recreation and jobs Crime prevention, fire prevention programs


B-15
SOURCE: 1970 Census of Population
NOTE: Distribution of citywide total by census tract. Tract percentages range from 0.01 to 3.03.
6134
SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN (5 -14)


B-16
CONDITIONS
1. BAND THROUGH CENTRAL TAMPA FROM CBD TO SLIGH AVE. (ALONG NEBRASKA) HAS LOW CONCENTRATION Or AGE GROUP.
2. MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS IN TWO LOCATIONS-ONE SOUTH OF GANDY AND EAST OF 22ND STREET-CONTAIN ALMOST 24 PERCENT OF ALL 5-14 YEAR OLDS IN CITY.
3. REMAINDER OF CITY SHOWS RELATIVELY EVEN DISTRIBUTION.
IMPLICATIONS
1. Areas having higher concentrations of age group Indicate primary targets for variety of youth services.
2. Potential for high juvenile crime rate 1n low-income East Tampa concentration.
3. Special efforts should be directed toward fenale-headed households with children in this age group. Note especially the map entitled Poor Families, Female Head; 1975
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
After school care Counseling (casework) Foster care services Homeinaker services
Respite care (for caretakers of handicapped
children) Legal services Protective Intervention Emergency shelter services Protective supervision of children Transportation for children Youth recreation programs Juvenile delinquency prevention programs Fire prevention programs


B-17
SOURCE: 1970 Census of Population
NOTE: Distribution of total "60+" aqe group In City, li.ict percent ages range from O.OD to II;
ELDERLY POPULATION


B-18
CONDITIONS
1. MAJOR CONCENTRATION CENSUS TRACTS 55 AND 61 IMMEDIATELY SOUTHWEST OF CBD--6.7 PERCENT "F TOTAL ELDERLY IN CITY.
2. OTHER CONCENTRATIONS FOUND IN NORTH TAMPA, DAVIS ISLANDS, AND HYDE PARK.
3. GENERALLY EVEN DISTRIBUTION OF AGE GROUP THROUGHOUT CITY ESPECIALLY IN OLDER SECTIONS OF COMMUNITY.
4. SIGNIFICANT CONCENTRATION OF ELDERLY POOR IN TRACT 33.
5. LIMITED PRESENCE OF ELDERLY IN VICINITY OF MACOILL AFB, IN NORTHEAST AREA OF TAMPA NEAR UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA, AND
IN EXTREME EAST PART OF CITY.
IMPLICATIONS
1. Economics from compact service area possible In only limited locations.
2. Mixture of elderly poor with younger poverty families indicates need for across-the-board approach to service delivery to specific target areas.
3. Distribution of elderly also Indicates that physical facilities geared to their needs (recreation, social, health care, etc.) should be developed on dispersed basis In conjunction with other neighborhood service facilities.
4. Present pattern indicates that the strongest "market" for centralized facilities and services Is In downtown area.
5. Dispersed patterns of elderly might reduce efficiency of public transportation service geared specifically to their needs.
6. Elderly persons often unable to repair homes, do all needed housekeeping, clean yard, etc.
STRATEGIES
protection low Income elderly
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Day Care for adults (poor) Counseling (casework) Companionship services Chore services for low income elderly Home delivered meals Consumer education and Homemaker services for Respite care for caretakers of aged Housing improvement services for low Income Health related services Nutrition services for low Income Protective supervision of elderly Transportation Escort services Legal services Crime Prevention Programs Information/Outreach (for use of services)


B-19
BIRTH RATES
CITY OF JAMPA
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
NOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are a part of the area covered by the figure shown in one place.


B-20
CONDITIONS
HIGH CORRELATION BETWEEN HIGH BIRTH RATES, HIGH INFANT DEATH RATES, CONCENTRATIONS OF LOW-INCOME FAMILIES, FEMALE-HEADED FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN, NEGRO POPULATION. POOR HOUSING. SOME AREAS OF SEVERE OVERCROWDING, LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVEL AND OTHER INDICATORS OF SOCIAL SERVICE NEEDS.
CENSUS TRACTS 31, 32. 33, 34, 35, 51 AND PARTS OF 30 AND 39 EXHIBITED THE HIGHEST RATE (OLDER NORTHEAST TAMPA); RATE SUBSTANTIALLY ABOVE THAT OF THE STATE FOR NON-WHITE POPULATION.
3. TWO REMOTE CONCENTRATIONS WITH THE SECOND HIGHEST RATE OCCURRED IN TRACT 72 (OLD PORT TAMPA) AND TRACT 7 (A LOW-INCOME TRACT)..
4. MOST PUBLIC HOUSING COMPLEXES LOCATED IN AREAS OF TWO HIGHEST BIRTH RATE CONCENTRATIONS.
5. LOW RATES IN INTERBAY AREA AND BALANCE OF CITY, BUT ONLY THE LOWEST RATE WAS BELOW THE FLORIDA RATE.
6. RATES EXPRESSED PER 1000 PERSONS.
IMPEOTIONS
1. Higher birth rates are generally associated with low educational levels, low Income levels and (because of these factors) with concentrations of poor Negro families.
2. High birth rates, 1n association with the above factors, also linked to substantial numbers of very young mothers, often unmarried or with fathers absent.
3. Concentrated pattern provides opportunity for efficient development of service programs to provide family planning and other needed social services.
4. May be associated with child abuse.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Child day care Family planning services Counseling (casework) Health services
Foster care services for children Protective intervention Emergency shelter services for children Adoption services
Protective supervision of children Child abuse prevention programs
TAMPA METROPOLITAN DEVELOPMENT AGENCY-THE PWNNING/DESIGN GROUP


B-21
CITY OF TAMPA
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
NOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are a part of the area covered by the figure shown in one place.
INFANT DEATH RATES


B-22
I CONDITIONS
1. SAME DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH AND LOW RATES AS WITH BIRTH RATES.
RATES EXPRESSED PER 1000 BIRTHS.
MPLOTIONS
Same associations with other social service need Indicators as birth rates.
Indicates need for concentrated provision of pre-natal and post-natal care 1n areas with high Infant death rates.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Child day care Family planning services Counseling (casework) Health services
Foster care services for children Protective intervention Emergency shelter services for children Adoption services
Protective supervision of children Child abuse prevention programs


B-23
CITY OF VWPA
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
NOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are n p.irt of the area covered by the figure shown In one place.
IMMUNIZATION-POLIO, UNDER 5


B-24
CONDITIONS
1. TRACTS WITH LOW IMMUNIZATION RATES ARE THE SAME AS THOSE HiTH HIGH BIRTH RATES AND HIGH INFANT DEATH RATES, (31, 32, 33, 34, 31, 41, PARTS OF 30 AND 39 WERE LOWEST).
2. TRACTS WITH LOW IMMUNIZATION RATES CONTAIN HIGH PROPORTIONS Or TAMPA'S POPULATION Willi LOW INCOME, LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVELS. LOW JOB SKILLS, POOR HOUSING AND OTHER PROBLEM CATEGORIES.
4.
tracts with high immunization rates are the same as those with low birth rates ano low infant death rates".
tracts with high immunization rates contain lower proportions of tampa's poor persons, Welfare families, persons with low educational levels, etc.
IMPLICATIONS
1. Immunizations are a health service. They must be understood; there must be funds to pay for them or transportation to a free clinic, perhaps escort or other services, and often casework for persuasion, to qet low-Income persons to utilize these services.
2. Lack of imnunlzations by one part of a ccxmiunl ty' s population creates hazards for other parts. This is a public health problem.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Information/Outreach Counseling (casework) Health related services Health education Transportation
Escort Services /
3. All taxpayers assume the burden of costs due to Illnesses not prevented.
4. Disabilities due to complications of disease limit individual's ability to produce and be Independent and reduce community's productivity, increase tax burden.


B-25
CITY OF VM?A
SOURCE: Florida Reyional Medical Program, 1970 data.
NOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are a part of the area covered by the figure shown 1n one place.
IMMUNIZATION-MEASLES, UNDER 5


B-26
CONDITIONS
1. TRACTS WITH LOW IMMUNIZATION RATES ARE THE SAME AS THOSE "W'lTH HIGH BIRTH RATES AND HIGH INFANT DEATH RATES, (31, 32, 33, 34, 3T, 41, PARTS OF 30 AND 39 WERE LOWEST).
2. TRACTS WITH LOW IMMUNIZATION RATES CONTAIN HIGH PROPORTIONS OF TAMPA'S POPULATION WITH LOW INCOME, LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVELS, LOW JOB SKILLS. POOR HOUSING AND OTHER PROBLEM CATEGORIES.
3. TRACTS WITH HIGH IMMUNIZATION RATES ARE THE SAME AS THOSE WITH LOW BIRTH RATES AND LOW INFANT DEATH RATES.
4. TRACTS WITH HIGH IMMUNIZATION RATES CONTAIN LOWER PROPORTIONS OF TAMPA'S POOR PERSONTTHELFARE FAMILIES, PERSONS WITH LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVELS, ETC.
IMPLICATIONS
Immunizations are a health service. They must be understood, there must be funds to pay for them or transportation to a free clinic, perhaps escort or other services, and often casework for persuasion, to get low-Income persons to utilize these services.
Lack of immunizations by one part of a community's population creates hazards for other parts. This is a public health problem.
All taxpayers assume the burden of costs due to Illnesses not prevented.
Disabilities due to complications of disease limit individual's ability to produce and be Independent and reduce community's productivity, increase tax burden.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Information/Outreach Counseling (casework) Health related services Health education Transportation Escort Services
TAMPA METROPOLITAN DEVELOPMENT AGENCY-THE PANNING/DESIGN GROUP


B-27
CITY OF m/PA
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
NOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are a part of the area covered by the figure shown in one place.
IMMUNIZATION-DPTtUNDER 5


B-28
CONDITIONS
1. TRACTS WITH LOW IMMUNIZATION RATES ARE THE SAME AS THOSE TilTH HIGH BIRTH RATES AND HIGH INFANT DEATH RATES, (31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 41, PARTS OF 30 AND 39 WERE LOWEST).
2. TRACTS WITH LOW IMMUNIZATION RATES CONTAIN HIGH PROPORTIONS OF TAMPA'S POPULATION WITH LOW INCOME, LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVELS, LOW JOB SKILLS, POOR HOUSING AND OTHER PROBLEM CATEGORIES.
3. TRACTS WITH HIGH IMMUNIZATION RATES ARE THE SAME AS THOSE WITH LOW BIRTH RATES AND LOW INFANT DEATH RATES.
4. TRACTS WITH HIGH IMMUNIZATION RATES CONTAIN LOWER PROPORTIONS OF TAMPA'S POOR PERSONS, WELFARE FAMILIES, PERSONS WITH LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVELS, ETC.
D1phther1a-Pertuss1s-Typho1d
IMPLOTIONS
4.
Immunizations are a health service. They must be understood, there must be funds to pay for them or transportation to a free clinic, perhaps escort or other services, and often casework for persuasions, to get low-Income persons to utilize these services.
Lack of immunizations by one part of a community's population creates hazards for other parts. This is a public health problem.
All taxpayers assume the burden of costs due to Illnesses not prevented.
Disabilities due to complications of disease limit individual's ability to produce and be independent and reduce coimiuni ty' s productivity, increase tax burden.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Information/Outreach Counseling (casework) Health related services Health education Transportation Escort Services


B-29
HEART DISEASE DEATH RATES
CITY OF TAWPA fl I i W:
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
MOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern arc a part of the area covered by the figure shown In one place.


B-30
CONDITIONS
I. HIGHEST RATES SHOWN FOR AREAS HAVING HIGH 3. LOWEST RATE SHOWN for INTERBAY AND SEVERAL
PROPORTIONS OF TAMPA'S FAMILIES WITH MANY NORTH TAMPA TRACTS.
SOCIAL SERVICE NEEDS--EAST TAMPA, YBOR CITY, NEAR WEST SIDE AND OLD PORT TAMPA AND TRACT 7.
2. VERY HIGH RATE (165?: HIGHER THAN LOWEST RATE) WAS SHOWN FOR TRACTS 31. 32, 33, 34, 35. 41 AND PARTS OF 30 AND 39.
IMPLOTIONS
2.
Health problems associated with deprivation of health care, proper nutrition, or adequate housing and with poor working conditions often Increase likelihood of more serious health problems.
With elderly and retired persons fairly uniformly distributed throughout the city, this factor cannot be considered a principal cause of the concentration of the highest rates in limited numbers of census tracts.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Health services (subsidized) Health related services Health education Income improvement Nutrition education Information/Outreach Transportation Escort Services
3. Although the tracts with the highest rate have a concentration of Negro population, Tract 10--high Negro population--has a low rate, while many tracts in the central city and southeast Tampa areas have very low numbers of Negroes yet show a high death rate by this factor.


B-31
CITY OF TAMPA
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
N01E: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are a part of the area covered by the figure shown in one place.
STROKE DEATH RATES


B-32
CONDITIONS
1. HIGHEST RATES SHOWN FOR AREAS HAVING HIGH 3. LOWEST RATE SHOWN FOR 1NTERBAY AND SEVERAL
PROPORTIONS OF TAMPA'S FAMILIES WITH MANY NORTH TAMPA TRACTS
SOCIAL SERVICE NEEDS--EAST TAMPA, YBOR CITY, NEAR WEST SIDE AND OLD PORT TAMPA AND TRACT 7.
2. VERY HIGH RATE (201% HIGHER THAN LOWEST RATE) WAS SHOWN FOR TRACTS 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 41 AND PARTS OF 30 AND 39.
IMPLOTIONS
1. Health problems associated with deprlvatl of health care, proper nutrition, or adequate housing and with poor working conditions often increase likelihood of more serious health problems.
2. With elderly and retired persons fairly uniformly distributed throughout the city this factor cannot be considered a principal cause of the concentration of the highest rates in limited numbers of census tracts.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIEO
Health services (subsidized) Health related Services Health education Income improvement Nutrition education Information/Outreach Transportation Escort Services
3. Although the tracts with the highest rate have a concentration of Negro population, Tract 10--high Negro population has a low rate, while many tracts in the central city and southeast Tampa areas have very low numbers of Negroes yet show a high death rate by this factor.


B-33
CITY OF JAMPA
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
NOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are a |Mrt of the area covered by the figure shown in one place.
TUBERCULOSIS RATES


B-34
CONDITDNS
1. AGAIN, AS WITH OTHER HEALTH FACTORS ILLUSTRATEO, THE TWO HIGHEST RATES OCCURRED IN CENSUS TRACTS FOUND. IN OTHER DATA ANALYSIS, TO CONTAIN CONCENTRATIONS OF POVERTY, NEGRO POPULATION, POOR HOUSING, OVERCROWDING, LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVEL AND/OR SIMILAR CONDITIONS.
2. THE SAME CRITICAL CENSUS TRACTS (31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 41, WITH PARTS OF 30 AND 39) HAD A 1970 RATE 927* ABOVE THE LOWEST RATE IN TAMPA AND 139% ABOVE THAT OF THE NEXT HIGHEST RATE AREAS.
3. THE BALANCE OF THE CITY HAD VERY LOW RATES.
IMPLICATIONS
Same as for Immunization Rates.
STRATEGIES
APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO BE APPLIED
Same as for Immunization and Deaths from Stroke or Heart Disease.


B-35
SYPHILIS RATES
CITY OF 1AMPA
SOURCE: Florida Regional Medical Program, 1970 data.
NOTE: All tracts showing the same graphic pattern are a part of the area covered by the figure shown in one place.


B-36
CONDITIONS
1. AGAIN, AS WITH OTHER HEALTH FACTORS 2. THE SAME CRITICAL CENSUS TRACTS (31, 32,
ILLUSTRATED, THE TWO HIGHEST RATES 33, 34, 35, 41, WITH PARTS OF 30 AND 39)
OCCURRED IN CENSUS TRACTS FOUND. IN OTHER HAD A 1970 RATE 298* ABOVE THE LOWEST
DATA ANALYSIS, TO CONTAIN CONCENTRATIONS RATE IN TAMPA AND 1281 ABOVE THAT OF THE
OF POVERTY, NEGRO POPULATION, POOR HOUSING, NEXT HIGHEST RATE AREAS.
OVERCROWDING, LOW EDUCATIONAL LEVEL AND/OR
SIMILAR CONDITIONS. 3. THE BALANCE OF THE CITY HAD VERY LOW
RATES.
4. DIFFERENTIAL REPORTING RATES MAY
BUILD IN BIAS TOWARD UNDER-REPORTING
OF VD CASES IN HIGHER INCOMES GROUPS.
IMPLOTIONS
Same as for Immunization Rates.
STRATEGIES
Same as for Immunization and Deaths from Stroke or Heart Disease.


C-l
Overview of the Development of West Tampa
In the spring of 1892, Hugh C. Macfarlane, a prominent Tampa lawyer and real estate investor, formed the Macfarlane Investment Company to develop a new cigar manufacturing area west of the Hillsborough River. Beginning with his own 200 acre tract of land, Macfarlane assembled between 1892 and 1895 other interested businessmen, who would soon own eighty per cent of the property which became the City of -/est Tampa.
While Macfarlane*s subdivision formed the center of West Tampa, the participation and investment of his partners were essential to the area's development, from Columbus Drive on the north to Fig Street on the south, from the Hillsborough River on the east to Himes Avenue on the west. Dr Philip H, Collins owned the subdivisions of El Cerro, Collins' Addition, and Collins* Second Addition. His son-in-law George Nelson Benjamin obtained two large subdivisions in 1892 from William B. Henderson. He ended these orange grove properties and promoted the growth of West Tampa's industry, serving also as Treasurer in the West Tampa Land Improvement Company and as Director of the Bank of West Tampa,
Agri-businessman Matthew Hooper and realtor William W. Hooper owned the Ilunro and Clewis subdivision land and the property which became C. B. Bouton's Addition to West Tampa. Alonzo C, Clewis, owner of the Tampa Abstract Company and an organizer of the Exchange National Bank, was a key financial promoter of many West Tampa projects. Two other key associates in the Macfarlane organization were landholder Christopher B, Bouton and builder Lee B. Skinner.


C-2
In order to develop West Tampa as Hillsborough County's second cigar manufacturing area, Hacfarlane and his partners financed the first bridge across the Hillsborough River, the iron Fortune Street drawbridge. In the fall of 1892, the Macfarlane Investment Company helped start a street car route from downtown Tampa into 'Jest Tampa, as part of the Consumers Electric Light and Power Company system. By 1900, good transportation and communication between West Tampa and Tampa's port facilities were essential factors in making the new community competitive with Ybor City and Tampa for new factories and businesses.
Duplicating many of the successful methods utilized by Vicente Martinez Ybor and his Ybor City Land and Development Company, the Macfarlane group constructed numerous two and three-story brick factories and hundreds of cigar workers' cottages, which they offered to cigar firms from Hew York City to Havana. Long'term leases and specially designed facilities were common practices offered as inducements by most West Tampa developers. The Tampa Building and Loan Association, headed by A. C. Clevis and li. M. Dobson, constructed many of the larger commercial buildings along Howard and Armenia Avenues.
Lee B. Skinner, operating from his office at the First National Bank, offered residential lots at moderate prices, at twenty per cent down and monthly installments catering to the workers' salaries. In 1895 Skinner built the Havana and Key West Cigar Company plant:,' at Beach and Howai-d, ajid the Barranco, Rico, and Guerra factory in Block 11 of the Bouton and Skinner subdivision, George Benjamin constructed dozens of $400 cottages for cigar workers in his successful subdivisions.


C-3
The lure of these attractive and well-advertised developments quickly made './est Tampa an immediate rival to Ybor City as a cigar manufacturing center. Beginning with the construction in 1892 of the factories for the O'Hara and Company and the large Julius Ellinger Company, the Macfarlane Investment Company attracted over two dozen large cigar firms and fifty small, family-operated companies to ".Test Tampa during the next thirty years. Two of the most important firms in West Tampa's early development were v O'Kalloran and Company, with headquarters at Main and Howard and property on thirty different blocks in 18941 and the A. del Pino Company, which was the largest property owner in the area, in 1892. Equally important to the growth of the Collins' subdivisions was the Monroe Cigar Company with extensive holdings on every block.
The most impressive structures in 'Jest Tampa today are the cigar factories which have survived the decline in the industry after 1920. The two most significant factories are the Cuesta-Rey plant (I896) at 2^16 Howard Avenue and the A. Santaella factory (190*0 at i9o6 Armenia, Angel L, Cuesta, and Peregrino Rey were two leaders in the Tampa Latin community, whose civic contributions bonded relations between the Anglo and Latin communities. The cigar plants of Antonio Santaella were among the most important economic institutions of West Tampa during the turn of the century.
The Bonded Havana Cigar Company fa,ctory at 312 North Armenia has the impressive date of 1832 on its walls. The factory's age has not been verified, since the State of Florida first granted the land to Antonio Perria on March 10, I88;l, before John 11. Drew's subdivision


C-4
was established. When Drew obtained the property, he sold the land in 1907 to Alvaro Garcia and Jose Vega, founders of the cigar firm of Garcia & Vega, Among the important existing West Tampa cigar factories are the Berriman Brothers factory (I9O3) at 1403 H Howard, the Bustillo Brothers & Diaz plant (I9O3) at 2111 K. Albany, and the Leopold Por,rell & Company factory (1904) at 2200 N, Howard.
Between 1895 and 1910 the largest building and investment firms, founded by alliances between West Tampa land developers and the downtown Tampa banking community, constructed dozens of commercial structures. Most of the larger structures stand today, along Main Street and the major north-south arteries of West Tampa. The earlier commercial structures on Main Street were two-story frame buildings, but the Tampa Building and Investment Company and the Macfarlane Investment Company constructed after 1900 imposing two-story brick stores, particularly along Howard and Armenia Avenues. A representative wooden building is located at 2202-2206 Korth Armenia, built c. 1893 for Juan La Paz and used in the 1920's by the Enrique Kenriques Cigar Company.
A typical brick building is the 1902 North Howard structures, built by the Macfarlane Investment Company in 1905. The twin of this building in the 1900 block of Armenia recently burnt down, but the structure reflects the diversity of '.'est Tampa's business section. The 1902 address served as a restaurant for fifty years; the 1904 section was a second floor hotel; I906 was a series of small shops; and 1908 served primarily as a drug store during its long history.
Many of these commercial buildings housed family cigar companies, the beginnings of dozens of later manufacturing firms.


C -5
The Macfarlane Investment Company building (c. 1903) at 181*1-1822 IT. Howard began as the Prisciliens C. Fernandez Cigar Company. The attractive Andres Diaz building (1908) at 3102 IT. Habana, was originally a family cigar business.
Hugh C. Macfarlane established the intersection of Main Street and Howard Avenue as the commercial center of '.Jest Tampa and planned a plaza for the district. No zocalo developed, but the intersection became the site of some of West Tampa's more important buildings. The '/est Tampa Public Library, a 1913 Carnegie project, is located here, as is the Bank of West Tampa, established in I906 by the Macfarlane group, headed by Alonso C. Clewis.
West Tampa developed the same vital Latin environment of
Cubans, Spaniards, Italians, Afro-Cubans, and Anglos, that made
Ybor City a. unique community. Each group maintained its cultural
identity with the creation of social and men's organizations, churches,
and labor groups. Although the developers of West Tampa with downtown
Tampans, Latins had an immediate role in the government of West Tampa
when the city was started in 1895 and were partners in all major
b
developments. Many of the important etnic buildings, such as
John Drew's three-story Cespedes Hall have been destroyed, duplicated
the structures of Ybor City in their architecture and design.
The most important remaining ethnic building is El Centro Espanol de West Tampa located at 2306 North Howard Avenue, When the club opened in Jo.nuary 11, 19131 it was the largest and finest of the many men's clubs in the city. The structure is a National Register building. The Sicilia Club at 2001 North Howard was completed in 1930, after two decades existence on Main Street.


0-6
Although West Tanpa's predominance as a historic district is due primarily to its outstanding cigar factories and commercial buildings, the area contains many rows of well-preserved cigar workers' cottages and interesting frame residences. Some of the older homes are located along Green, Laurel, Main, and Union Streets, Unfortunately, a major fire on April 8, 1918, destroyed a large residential area in the southeastern section of Macfarlane's subdivision, A good example of an outstanding residence is the one and one-half story frame house at 2530 Main Street. Built in 1904 by Sstauislas F, O'Halloran, the house Has the home of Bias F, O'Halloran, manager of the O'Halloran Factory at the corner of Main Street and Howard Avenue,
'/est Tampa maintained its seperate economic and social identify even after the city was incorporated into Tampa on January 1, 1925. The decline of the cigar industry, the gradual acculturation of the Latin population into the greater Tampa society, and the extension of urban renewal westward from the Hillsborough River since 1940 were major factors in the economic fall of West Tampa. The lack of new investment in West Tampa since 1950 and the age of most of the area's structures have been major problems in West Tampa's decline as a bustling commercial and industrial section of the city. The remaining historic buildings, particularly those north of the Interstate are endangered by urban deterioration.
An extensive collection of historic descriptions of dozens of 'Jest Tampa cigar factories, stores, and residences, is available in the files of the Tampa-Uillsboroxigh Preservation 3oard, Due to the significance of the cigar industry in West Tampa's development, a chronological list of data on the area's cigar factories, past and present, has also been compiled.


36
PUNC TI ON AL RE'LATT ON SHI P DIAGRAMS


37
'feeeh, equip.
are;
Eajplwee restrooms
rJanitrwsial areas
mpx-oyee [lounge
?hys. Health lervices
Ire gal services
(fcmploymerr (services
Day c are services
fklent. Re all
services
bh
Reception
Publi
room:
AIL SERVICES


MEDICAL SERVICES


39
LEGAL SERVICES


40
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES


41
DAYCARE SERVICE


42
ACTIVITY'S FLOW DIAGRAMS


43
genera! SE vVICE RECT. :ieht ft
Arrival
C al- (streetside or Bus Afoot
lot paricLng)
Main Entry
I ni'or iiiation Reception
Waiting Area
Day g are He a d start (enroll e e a bypass Reception area)
eutics disp. r opri ate)
Departure by car, bus or on foot; ox- phone fox* pick-in
Appr opriate aervice area
Reception Entr
f-harinac (if app:


44
MEDICAL SERVICES FLOW
'atient to Reception
Patient to Waiting ax'ea
Specimen: to lab

Results to Records
Records to < ii'eenihg t : History
and patient } )aged
Vital qi':;ns checked
Patient to Exam & ^treatment
Exam by e oct or

Waiting Ai'ea
Rv to Lab
Dispensing & Cashier1s bo oth
Departure


45
LEGAL SERVICES PLOW
Service recipient to Reception
Recipient to Wattin
Records to Screening area & recipient paged
pre-arranged c onsultati on or presentation for groups
Le gal c on sul tati on
deception & Waiving
Departure


46
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PLOW
Service recipient to Reception area
Recipient to
pre- arr an / ;e d gr cup c onsuitati on or presentation
Service Representative notiii e d
Recipient paged
Employment c on sultation
Re c ep ti on ar e a
Departure


47
DAY CARE SERVICE PLOW
Drop-off area
Inside activity are;
Concentrated activity (ages 3-5)
Outside activity are;
Pick-up
Office
Re stroow
Nursery
Clean-up area
Napping
Children's restr
ooiin
Storage


48
SPACE: Examination and Treatment Room
Environmental Criteria Temperature Summer: 75
Winter: 72 Relative Humidity Summer: 60%
Winter: 30% Vent i 1 a i i on ftequ i reorient (GFM/S. F.): 1 Outside Air (Ci/Person): 25 Air Velocity (FPM): 15-30 Room Pressure: Negative
Approximate Room Capacity: 60-75 S.F./Person
Y isurj 1 V- eciuireine; its
Lighting Level: 70 f.c. Level Control: no Daylight: opt.
Blackout: opt. View Out: opt. View In: no
Accoustical Criteria ambient noise level: NC 35
Mechanica1 Reyuircments Cold Water: yes Hot Water: yes Floor Drain: yes
Has:
no
Exhaust Hood: no Distilled Water: no
Power Requi foments -120v-lph
Commimications Telephone: no Intercom: yes C3ik.k: yes
Surface Rcquifoments Floor: non-porous Walls: cleanable Collins: accoustical


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