Group Title: Utilization of non-protein nitrogen by ruminants consuming a low quality forage /
Title: Utilization of non-protein nitrogen by ruminants consuming a low quality forage
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098152/00001
 Material Information
Title: Utilization of non-protein nitrogen by ruminants consuming a low quality forage
Physical Description: xiii, 149 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Martin, Lethal Conrad, 1945- ( Dissertant )
Ammerman, C. B. ( Thesis advisor )
Koger, Marvin ( Reviewer )
Moore, John E. ( Reviewer )
Loggins, P. E. ( Reviewer )
Himes, James A. ( Reviewer )
Sander, Eugene G. ( Reviewer )
Fry, Jack L. ( Degree grantor )
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1975
Copyright Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Nitrogen in animal nutrition   ( lcsh )
Animal Science thesis Ph. D
Ruminants -- Feeding and feeds   ( lcsh )
Dissertations, Academic -- Animal Science -- UF
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Abstract: Seven experiments were conducted: three were undertaken to evaluate urea and biuret as sources of supplemental nitrogen for beef cows being wintered under practical range conditions; three to study the utilization of low-quality forage and nitrogen by sheep when supplemented with varying forms and levels of NPN (biuret and urea) and varying forms and levels of energy (molasses and corn); and one for comparison of formaldehyde treated soybean meal with untreated soybean meal and biuret as sources of supplemental nitrogen for sheep consuming a low-quality forage. Wintering studies were conducted over 1-,2-and 3-year periods. During the first year mature Angus cows received supplemental nitrogen as cottonseed meal cubes (CSM) (44.9% crude protein) or cubes containing cottonseed meal, citrus pulp and urea (50% of the nitrogen fromurea) (43.0% crude protein). During the following 2-year study supplemental nitrogen was provided as either CSM cubes (44.8% crude protein) or citrus pulp cubes (41,3% crude protein) containing feed grade biuret. Supplemental forage was provided as either Pangola digitgrass (Digitaria decumbens ) hay or sorghum ( Sorghum vulgare ) silage in both studies. During the third study cows were provided supplemental nitrogen as either CSM cubes (41.0% crude protein) or citrus pulp cubes with biuret (CPB) (38.0% crude protein). In addition, a third group of animals received citrus pulp cubes (CP) without biuret (7.0% crude protein) and served as a negative control. Performance of cows receiving urea cubes was equivalent to that of cows receiving CSM cubes during the first study. However, it was suggested that over-all nutritional stress was not sufficient during this study for animals to derive benefit from either source of supplemental nitrogen. Cows receiving CPB during the following 2- and 3-year studies had greater winter weight loss than did cows receiving CSM supplement . Weight losses for animals receiving CPB were not as great during the final 3-year period, however, as those for cows receiving negative control supplement (CP) . Conception rate was 86 and 93% (P<.07) for cows receiving CPB cubes and CSM cubes respectively during the 2-year study and cows receiving biuret cubes weaned lighter calves during the 3 years of the third study. Final cow (August) weights were lower for cows receiving biuret cubes in only one of the 5 years. It was concluded that biuret was utilized by wintering beef cows. Performance of cows receiving CPB cubes was not equal, however, to that of cows receiving CSM cubes. Three voluntary intake and metabolism studies were conducted to compare varying levels and forms of NPN (urea and biuret) and varying levels and forms of energy (corn and molasses) as supplements for sheep consuming a low-quality forage. No combination of supplemental nitrogen or energy increased hay intake above that of control animals receiving no supplemental energy or nitrogen. In general increasing nitrogen levels as either biuret or urea (with equal supplemental energy levels) tended to improve hay and organic matter intake; digestibility of cellulose, organic matter and nitrogen; and nitrogen balance. Increasing energy levels tended to decrease hay intake and cellulose digestibility and increase organic matter digestibility. When supplemented with urea, 80 g of molasses promoted better hay utilization and greater nitrogen balance than did 160 g of molasses. Supplemental energy as corn resulted in a more positive nitrogen balance than did molasses. Results when 0, 5 or 10 g of biuret nitrogen was fed with 0, 80 or 160 g of molasseswere highly variable. A voluntary intake and metabolism study was conducted to compare formaldehyde treated soybean meal (F-SBM) to normal soybean meal (N-SBM) and biuret as sources of supplemental nitrogen for sheep consuming a low-quality forage. A negative control treatment was also utilized. All nitrogen supplements improved hay intake, organic matter and cellulose digestibility and nitrogen balance. The greatest improvements were with F-SBM.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Florida, 1975.
Bibliography: Bibliography: leaves 137-147.
Original Version: Typescript.
General Note: Vita.
Statement of Responsibility: by Lethal Conrad Martin.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00098152
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000566459
oclc - 24786534
notis - ACZ2891

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