• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Figures
 Abstract
 Introduction
 An evolving theory of agricultural...
 Theoretical and methodological...
 Production and distribution...
 Traditional and commercial farm...
 Summary, conclusions, implications,...
 Reflections on the theory...
 Glossary
 Appendix
 References
 Biographical sketch






Group Title: Traditional and commercial farm supply response in agricultural development : the case for basic grains in Guatemala /
Title: Traditional and commercial farm supply response in agricultural development
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097479/00001
 Material Information
Title: Traditional and commercial farm supply response in agricultural development : the case for basic grains in Guatemala
Physical Description: xviii, 211 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Alvarez, Jose, 1940- ( Dissertant )
Andrew, C. D. ( Thesis advisor )
Polopolus, Leo ( Reviewer )
Ward, R. M. ( Reviewer )
McPherson, Woodrow W. ( Reviewer )
Carvajal, M. J. ( Reviewer )
Fry, Jack L. ( Degree grantor )
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1977
Copyright Date: 1977
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Food and Resource Economics thesis Ph. D
Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- Guatemala   ( lcsh )
Grain trade -- Guatemala   ( lcsh )
Dissertations, Academic -- Food and Resource Economics -- UF
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Abstract: A growing population with about two-thirds employed in agriculture, a limited arable land base, and poverty stricken farmers experiencing unemployment and low levels of food production are characteristics that portray Guatemala as a developing country. The nation's development efforts focus on the implementation of programs designed to alleviate those detrimental characteristics. Program objectives at the Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology ( I CTA) of Guatemala intend to develop new technologies designed to generate productivity increases especially for basic grains in the traditional farm sector. These programs will enable the country to augment supply without expanding the area committed to production. Two types of problems, however, may result from productivity advances. Small farmers could use the new technology to produce the A growing population with about two-thirds employed in agriculture, a limited arable land base, and poverty stricken farmers experiencing unemployment and low levels of food production are characteristics that portray Guatemala as a developing country. The nation's development efforts focus on the implementation of programs designed to alleviate those detrimental characteristics. Program objectives at the Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology ( I CTA) of Guatemala intend to develop new technologies designed to generate productivity increases especially for basic grains in the traditional farm sector. These programs will enable the country to augment supply without expanding the area committed to production. Two types of problems, however, may result from productivity advances. Small farmers could use the new technology to produce the Total production differs among enterprises witii respect to yields and product distribution. Variations in cash sales are the result of differences in farm demand for production and consumption purposes; the more traditional the crop, the lower will be sales. The results of the regression equations support the conceptual model; in general, the estimated coefficients behave as hypothesized. Traditional crops generally appear at near zero income and farm size levels while commercial crops are cultivated when higher levels of income and farm size have been attained. Elasticities of market supply for traditional and commercial crops are high at low levels of income and farm size. However, while commercial crops still show some responsiveness at higher income and farm size levels, the traditional crop response becomes almost perfectly inelastic. This behavior is the result of farmers becoming involved in the activities of the market economy once self-sufficiency has been secured, and shifting into commercial crop production at higher levels of income and farm size. Thus, since traditional crops pervade the basic grains production system in Guatemalan agriculture, little hope prevails for the attainment of massive increases in supply of basic grains. Although corn in regions three and four and rice in regions four and five seem to have a slight potential for increased production, the resulting increases would fall far behind the goal of the Guatemalan government.
Thesis: Thesis--University of Florida.
Bibliography: Bibliography: leaves 200-210.
Additional Physical Form: Also available on World Wide Web
General Note: Typescript.
General Note: Vita.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jose Alvarez.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00097479
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000011396
oclc - 03386412
notis - AAB3889

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Dedication
        Page iii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    List of Tables
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
    List of Figures
        Page xiv
        Page xv
    Abstract
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
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        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
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        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    An evolving theory of agricultural development
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
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        Page 50
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        Page 54
        Page 55
    Theoretical and methodological framework for investigating traditional and commercial farm supply response
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
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        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
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        Page 71
        Page 72
    Production and distribution activities
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
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    Traditional and commercial farm supply response
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
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    Summary, conclusions, implications, and recommendations
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
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        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Reflections on the theory of development
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Glossary
        Page 158
        Page 159
    Appendix
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
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        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
    References
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
    Biographical sketch
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
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