• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Abstract
 Introduction
 Approach to the IWR problem
 Data collection and preprocess...
 Acoustic segmentation and...
 Equivalence class formation and...
 Detailed pattern matching
 Evaluation of the IWR system
 Concluding remarks
 Appendices
 References
 Biographical sketch






Title: Toward speaker independent isolated word recognition for large lexicons
CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097407/00001
 Material Information
Title: Toward speaker independent isolated word recognition for large lexicons : a two-channel, two-pass approach
Physical Description: vii, 172 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Larar, Jerry N., 1960- ( Dissertant )
Childers, Donald G. ( Thesis advisor )
Couch, Leon W. ( Reviewer )
Moore. Paul G. ( Reviewer )
Rothman, Howard B. ( Reviewer )
Smith, Jack R. ( Reviewer )
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1985
Copyright Date: 1985
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Automatic speech recognition   ( lcsh )
Speech processing systems   ( lcsh )
Electrical Engineering thesis Ph. D
Dissertations, Academic -- Electrical Engineering -- UF
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Abstract: A phonetic feature based strategy is an alternative to the classical pattern matching approach to isolated word recognition. High performance recognition can be achieved using detailed phonetic knowledge. For large vocabulary recognition, partial phonetic information can be used to reduce the number of likely match candidates before a detailed phonetic analysis is performed. Phonetic labeling, however, is nontrivial for a multispeaker application. This study is an example of an intermediate step in the transition to a solely feature based system. The emphasis is on lexical access via broad acoustic-phonetic feature representation, but pattern matching is still employed in the final decision process. A manageable subset of the lexicon is retrieved in the first stage of recognition using a speaker independent word representation indicative of manner of articulation, stress, and fricative location. The second stage utilizes dynamic time warping (DTW) techniques for detailed pattern matching. The synchronized electroglottographic (EGG) signal is used as a second channel of data to ensure reliable first pass utterance representation. The glottal sensing characteristics of the EGG aid endpoint detection, voiced-unvoiced-mixed-silent classifications, and pitch tracking. Simple algorithms for these functions are described. Lexical entries with the same initial representation are grouped together to form equivalence classes. The within class ordering considers the relative frequency of occurrence of the words. Further search space reduction is shown to be possible using only the most likely candidates. The pattern matching stage can use class specific matching techniques since the word representation is known from the first pass. The recognition techniques are evaluated using eight speakers and a difficult 100 word vocabulary. Results show that performance can be made to depend solely on the detailed matching stage at the cost of an increased number of DTW comparisons. This number is still significantly less than the size of the vocabulary. Alternatively, very few candidates can be matched with a predicted increase in lexical access error. Class specific local weighting techniques improve performance for the alpha subset of the vocabulary.
Thesis: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Florida, 1985.
Bibliography: Bibliography: leaves 163-171.
Additional Physical Form: Also available on World Wide Web
General Note: Typescript.
General Note: Vita.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jerry N. Larar.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00097407
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000863574
notis - AEG0302
oclc - 014286165

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PDF ( 5 MBs ) ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Dedication
        Page ii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page v
    Abstract
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Approach to the IWR problem
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Data collection and preprocessing
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Acoustic segmentation and analysis
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Equivalence class formation and lexical access
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Detailed pattern matching
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Evaluation of the IWR system
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Concluding remarks
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Appendices
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
    References
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Biographical sketch
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.9 - mvs