<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 August 1930
 September 1930
 October 1930
 November 1930
 December 1930
 January 1931
 February 1931
 March 1931
 April 1931
 May 1931
 June 1931
 July 1931
 Index
 Back Cover


PCANAL DLOC



Panama Canal record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097368/00034
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal record
Physical Description: 34 v. : ill., tables, diagrs. ; 24-30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States
Publisher: The Panama Canal etc.
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Canal Zone etc
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone etc
Frequency: monthly[july 1933-1941]
weekly[ former 1907-june 1933]
monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-34, no. 9; Sept. 4, 1907-April 30, 1941.
Numbering Peculiarities: No more published.
Issuing Body: Published under the authority and supervision of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 1907-Mar. 1914; of the Panama Canal, Apr. 1914-1941.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01761828
lccn - 07035378
oclc - 1761828
sobekcm - UF00097368_00034
System ID: UF00097368:00034

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    August 1930
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    September 1930
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    October 1930
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    November 1930
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
    December 1930
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
    January 1931
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
    February 1931
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
        Page 384
        Page 385
        Page 386
        Page 387
        Page 388
        Page 389
        Page 390
        Page 391
        Page 392
        Page 393
        Page 394
        Page 395
        Page 396
        Page 397
        Page 398
        Page 399
        Page 400
        Page 401
        Page 402
        Page 403
        Page 404
        Page 405
        Page 406
        Page 407
        Page 408
        Page 409
        Page 410
        Page 411
        Page 412
        Page 413
        Page 414
        Page 415
        Page 416
        Page 417
        Page 418
        Page 419
        Page 420
        Page 421
        Page 422
        Page 423
        Page 424
        Page 425
        Page 426
        Page 427
        Page 428
        Page 429
        Page 430
        Page 431
        Page 432
        Page 433
        Page 434
        Page 435
        Page 436
        Page 437
        Page 438
        Page 439
        Page 440
        Page 441
        Page 442
        Page 443
        Page 444
        Page 445
        Page 446
        Page 447
        Page 448
    March 1931
        Page 449
        Page 450
        Page 451
        Page 452
        Page 453
        Page 454
        Page 455
        Page 456
        Page 457
        Page 458
        Page 459
        Page 460
        Page 461
        Page 462
        Page 463
        Page 464
        Page 465
        Page 466
        Page 467
        Page 468
        Page 469
        Page 470
        Page 471
        Page 472
        Page 473
        Page 474
        Page 475
        Page 476
        Page 477
        Page 478
        Page 479
        Page 480
        Page 481
        Page 482
        Page 483
        Page 484
        Page 485
        Page 486
        Page 487
        Page 488
        Page 489
        Page 490
        Page 491
        Page 492
        Page 493
        Page 494
        Page 495
        Page 496
        Page 497
        Page 498
        Page 499
        Page 500
        Page 501
        Page 502
        Page 503
        Page 504
    April 1931
        Page 505
        Page 506
        Page 507
        Page 508
        Page 509
        Page 510
        Page 511
        Page 512
        Page 513
        Page 514
        Page 515
        Page 516
        Page 517
        Page 518
        Page 519
        Page 520
        Page 521
        Page 522
        Page 523
        Page 524
        Page 525
        Page 526
        Page 527
        Page 528
        Page 529
        Page 530
        Page 531
        Page 532
        Page 533
        Page 534
        Page 535
        Page 536
        Page 537
        Page 538
        Page 539
        Page 540
        Page 541
        Page 542
        Page 543
        Page 544
        Page 545
        Page 546
        Page 547
        Page 548
        Page 549
        Page 550
        Page 551
        Page 552
        Page 553
        Page 554
        Page 555
        Page 556
        Page 557
        Page 558
        Page 559
        Page 560
        Page 561
        Page 562
        Page 563
        Page 564
        Page 565
        Page 566
        Page 567
        Page 568
        Page 569
        Page 570
        Page 571
        Page 572
    May 1931
        Page 573
        Page 574
        Page 575
        Page 576
        Page 577
        Page 578
        Page 579
        Page 580
        Page 581
        Page 582
        Page 583
        Page 584
        Page 585
        Page 586
        Page 587
        Page 588
        Page 589
        Page 590
        Page 591
        Page 592
        Page 593
        Page 594
        Page 595
        Page 596
        Page 597
        Page 598
        Page 599
        Page 600
        Page 601
        Page 602
        Page 603
        Page 604
        Page 605
        Page 606
        Page 607
        Page 608
        Page 609
        Page 610
        Page 611
        Page 612
        Page 613
        Page 614
        Page 615
        Page 616
        Page 617
        Page 618
        Page 619
        Page 620
        Page 621
        Page 622
        Page 623
        Page 624
        Page 625
        Page 626
        Page 627
        Page 628
        Page 629
        Page 630
        Page 631
        Page 632
    June 1931
        Page 633
        Page 634
        Page 635
        Page 636
        Page 637
        Page 638
        Page 639
        Page 640
        Page 641
        Page 642
        Page 643
        Page 644
        Page 645
        Page 646
        Page 647
        Page 648
        Page 649
        Page 650
        Page 651
        Page 652
        Page 653
        Page 654
        Page 655
        Page 656
        Page 657
        Page 658
        Page 659
        Page 660
        Page 661
        Page 662
        Page 663
        Page 664
        Page 665
        Page 666
        Page 667
        Page 668
        Page 669
        Page 670
        Page 671
        Page 672
        Page 673
        Page 674
        Page 675
        Page 676
        Page 677
        Page 678
        Page 679
        Page 680
    July 1931
        Page 681
        Page 682
        Page 683
        Page 684
        Page 685
        Page 686
        Page 687
        Page 688
        Page 689
        Page 690
        Page 691
        Page 692
        Page 693
        Page 694
        Page 695
        Page 696
        Page 697
        Page 698
        Page 699
        Page 700
        Page 701
        Page 702
        Page 703
        Page 704
        Page 705
        Page 706
        Page 707
        Page 708
        Page 709
        Page 710
        Page 711
        Page 712
        Page 713
        Page 714
        Page 715
        Page 716
        Page 717
        Page 718
        Page 719
        Page 720
        Page 721
        Page 722
        Page 723
        Page 724
        Page 725
        Page 726
        Page 727
        Page 728
        Page 729
        Page 730
        Page 731
        Page 732
        Page 733
        Page 734
        Page 735
        Page 736
        Page 737
        Page 738
        Page 739
        Page 740
        Page 741
        Page 742
        Page 743
        Page 744
    Index
        Page Index-3
        Page Index-4
        Page Index-5
        Page Index-6
        Page Index-7
        Page Index-8
        Page Index-9
        Page Index-10
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text








Gift of the Panamu Canal Museum










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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD






PUBLISHED WEEKLY UNDER
*THE AUTHORITY AND SUPER-
VISION OF THE PANAMA CANAL


AUGUST 6, 1930, TO JULY 29, 1931


VOLUME XXIV
WITH INDEX







THE PANAMA CANAL
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
1931


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THE PANAMA CANAL PRESS
MOUNT HOPE, CANAL ZONE
1931








For additional copies of thi; publication address The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C., or Balboa
Heights, Canal Zone. Price of bound volumes, $1.00; for foreign postal delivery, $1.50. Price of
current subscription, $0.50 a year, foreign $1.00.




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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
,OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
too PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
SSubeeription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the PAt Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Cerificate.-By direction of the Governor of the Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 6, 1930. No. I.

Canal Traffic During July.
During the month of July, 1930, 488 commercial vessels and 10
small launches transited the Canal. Tolls on the commercial vessels
aggregated $2,180,511.82 and on the launches $64.95, or a total tolls.
collection of $2,180,576.77.
The daily average of commercial vessels was 15.74 and the average
tolls collection was $70,341.19, as compared with 15.93 and $70,033.15
for the previous month, and an average of 17.00 transit and $72,889.75
for July, 1929. The average amount of tolls paid by each of the
commercial transits was $4,468.23, as compared with $4,395.39 for
the month of June, 1930.
In the following tabulation the number of commercial transits and
the amount of tolls collected are shown for the first 7 months of the
current calendar year, with the daily averages of transits and tolls,
Together with the totals for the first 7 months of the calendar years
1929 and 1928:
Totals for month. Daily averages.
Transit. Tolls. Transits. Tolls.
January .............................................. 531 12,360,211.24 17.13 $76,135.84
February........................................... 491 2,131,386.12 17.54 76,120.93
March................. ............................. 515 2,260,002.36 16.61 72,903.30
April .............................................. 489 2,232,763.00 16.30 74,425.43
May................ ..... .......... ... ......... 479 2,162,898.60 15.45 69,770 92
SJune............................................. 478 2,100,994.53 15.93 70,033.15
July ............................................... 488 2,180,576.77 15.74 70,341.19
Total, first 7 months of calendar year 1930............ 3,471 15,428,832.62 16.37 72,777.51
Total, first 7 montli of calendar year 1929.......... 3,755 16,023,664.05 17.71 75,583.32
Total, first 7 months of calendar year 1928.......... 3,658 15,121,750.37 17.17 70,994.13

As compared with the first 7 months of the calendar year 1929;
ithe corresponding period this year has had 284 fewer transits and
'4: 94,831.43 less tolls.

Earthquake.
An earthquake in the afternoon of July 30, 1930, which was felt
,:n&erally in the Canal Zone was reported upon by the Chief of Surveys
I 4 memorandum for THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD as follows:
S"i'I A 'heavy local seismic disturbance began 1: 51:59 p. m. and ended 1:57:30 p. m.,
..ftt 1930. Two shocks were noticed, the first giving a low explosive-like sound.
D Estane and direction of epicenter was about 75 miles, probably to the southwest.
Itenity V or VI; was generally felt over the Isthmus, the more so on Pacific
Ssid6e. .No material damage.. Telephone department reports "doors" on switch-
d generally dropped. Some small plaster cracks on buildings. Quake in general
the one on March 7, 1930, and about same intensity. No special damage known
h titior,. authority of Panama Telegraph Company, though quake was generally
)lby inhabitants
..... ..: ..a s
-':.' i ,,';'. :: .. . ,.:.




rI -- --


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Augul 6, 198


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6 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD Aupg 6, 1980

Net Tonnage of Vessels Transiting the Panama Canal during the Fiscal
Year 1930.
During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1930, there were 6,185 transits
of the Panama Canal by commercial vessels, including 19 of foreign naval
vessels paying tolls on the basis of displacement tonnage, and 6,166
of merchant vessels, yachts, etc. Fifty-three and three-tenths per.
cent of the 6,166 commercial transits on which tolls were levied on net
tonnage were by vessels of from 4,000 to 6,000 net tons, Panama Canal
measurement, 5.8 per cent by vessels under 1,000 net tons, and 5.6 per
cent by vessels over 8,000 net tons; the latter included 102 transits by
vessels of over 10,000 net tons, as compared with 86 such transits
during the fiscal year 1929. The average tonnage of all transits was
4,862 net tons as compared with 4,666 net tons for the preceding fiscal
year, an increase of 196 tons, or 4.2 per cent.
SVessels of Italian registry averaged the highest net tonnage, 6,501,
'' with those of Danzig second, 6,150 net tons, and British ships third,
averaging 5,244 net tons. The lowest recorded average by nationality
was for Nicaragua, one transit of a vessel of 140 tons, the next lowest
176 net tons for 74 transits of Colombian vessels, the third, 331 for, 2
1 transits of a Costa Rican vessel.
The German liner Columbus of 20,079 net tons, Panama Canal
measurement, was the largest commercial vessel transiting during the
year.
The following tabulation shows the 6,166 commercial transits in
groups according to net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, segre-
gated by nationality, together with the average tonnages and the per
cent which the total of each group formed of the total number of tran-
sits for the fiscal years 1930 and 1929:
Number of transit in net tonnage groups. Average
S,:| ---- Panama
; a a a a a a a a a Panama Canalnet
Nationality. .S g '1 %; 0 3 0 0! 0! -c Canal net tonnage.

i > Argentine.....1 ... .. .. > ... .... .....> ..... ..... 3,81 3,816 ....
a 0 W 0 W ow 0, o'3 o0' o'G 0'9 o' 0i tonnage.
!ai 0-3 -2 --5 : 3 h Fiscal Fiscal
ro. sB oa o.- ... .- o o o year year
o S 6 c CC 0 a 0 E- 1930.1929.
Argentine ........................ ........ ....................... 1 3,816 3,816
Belgian ..... ........ 1 12 5 4 1 ................... 23 119.499 5,1965,276
British....... 13 52 69 13 171 518 215 207 99 78 54 381,527 8,006,962 5,2445,070
Chilean ... 2 1 1 2 10 27 ... .......... ........... ... 43 164,152 3,8174,353
Colombian .... ..... 74 .............. ..... .. ...... .. .. ...... 74 13,026 176 386
C osta R ican ....... 2 ..... ..... ..... .......... . . ....... ..... ..... 2 662 331 39
Danish........ 7 2 18 9 16 34 4 1 .......... .... 91 381,766 4,1954,129
Danzig..... .. ............. ... 17 17 2 .......... ..... 36 221,382 6,1506,247
Dutch. ...... ..... 37 .... 6 13 17 39 24 5 .......... 141 671,250 4,7614,635
Finnish........... ... 1 1 ... . ....... ... ..... . . .... 2 3,810 1,9052,331
French...... .. ......... ........ 4 62 43 4 11 ............... 124 627,760 5,0634,772 *
German ...... .... 73 60 7 26 64 70 60 14..... .... 2 376 1,433,074 3,8113,496
Gredk........ ... .......... 1 7 14 ... .. ... .... ..... ...... 22 19,221 4,0563,904 :
Italian .. ... ......... .... 3 4 9 1 26 8 15..... 66 429,091 6,5015,933
Japanese ........ 1 4 .. .. 9 .. .. 79 69 ... 6 ........... 159 80f3182 5,0515,000
SM exican ..... .... ... .... .............................. ........ 1 2,159 2,159.....
Nicaraguan.. I ...... ...... 1 .. .... .... ... . ..... ....... .. .. ... 1 140 140 .....
Norwegian... 10 13 18 8 57 120 102 30 9.......... 4 371 1,660,101 4,4753,765
* Panamanian 35 7 2 5 .... 4..... 6 1..... .... 60 87,826 1,4642,406
Peruvian .............. ... . .... 1 ..... I .......... ............... 2 8,959 4,4802,372
Spanish ...... .... ....... .......... I......... .................... 1 4,209 4,2093,791
"* Swedish........... 4 3.... 16 60 32 10 ..... .. ....... 125 571,535 4,5724,296
United States 10 20 108 377 88 896 768 400 72 55 33 582,88514,534,495 5,0384,935
I., Yugoslav......................... 10 18 5 ... .................... 33 142,537 4,319 4,198


Total....
Per cent of
total, fiscal
year 1930..
Fiscal year
1929.......
It


70 292 268 437 4221,906:1,378 804 2471 138 102 1026,16620,980,614 4,8684,666

1.1 4 7 4.4 7.1 6.8 31.0 22.3 13.0 4.0 2.2 1.7 1.7 100.0.....................


0.6 5.8 4.5 7.9 7.3 34.2 20.0 11.6 3.4 1.8 1.8 1.5 1.4100.0................


,a


-a







Avu AUd, 1980 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 7

Panama Canal Records.
A statement of various records made by traffic through the Panama
Canal at different times was published in THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
of March 26, 1930. Since that time new records have been established
with respect to several items, viz., vessel of greatest length; vessel of
greatest registered gross, registered net, and Panama Canal net
tonnage; largest cargo carried on any ship passing through the Canal;
greatest amount of cargo passing through the Canal in one day's
traffic; and, with respect to one day's commercial traffic in one direc-
tion, largest Panama Canal net tonnage, tolls and cargo. A revised
statement of the various records to date is presented below.
In the tabulation directly following, data are shown separately for
merchant or commercial vessels and for naval vessels because they
are different types of craft:
MERCHANT OR COMMERCIAL VESSELS.

Feature. Record. Vessel. Date of transit.
Length.............................. 778.0 feet ......... Columbus................ May 3, 1930.
Beam............................ ..... 83.2 feet .......... Malolo................... November 2, 1927.
Draft............................... 36 feet............ Chilore................. March 25, 1928.
Tonn ee goss................32,565 tons........Columbus..............May 3,1930age:
Registered groess.................. 32,565 tons ........ Columbus .............. May 3, 1930.
H:, Registered net ..................... 15,988 tons......... Columbus ............... May 3, 1930.
Panama Canal net ................ 20,079 tons ........ Columbus .............. May 3, 1930.
United States net................. 13,769 tons ........ Empress of Scotland ...... April 2, 1926.
Tolls.................................. 17,211.25 ...... Empress of Scotland ...... April 2, 1926.
Cargo............................... 23,000 tons crude oil. C. 0. Stillman.......... July 20, 1930.

NoTE.-The Empress of Scotland has made one transit since April 2, 1926.
NAVAL VESSELS.

Feature. Record. Vessel. Date of transit.
Ength.............................. 888 feet......... U. S. S. Saratogas....... February 5, 1928.
Beam ............................. 107.9 feet ......... U. S. S. Saratoga ....... February 5, 1928.
i Draft............................... 33 feet 1 inch ....... U. S. S. Colorado ....... March 19, 1926.
Tonnage.......................... 44,799 tons displace- H. M. S. Hood ......... July 23 and 24, 1924.
ment.
Tollsb.........*....................... 22,399.50.......... H. M. S. Hood........ July 23 and 24, 1924.
NoTr.-The U. S. S. Lexington, a sister ship of the U. S. S. Saratoga, transited on March 25, 1928; both of these
vessels transited also in 1930.
In the following data the term "commercial traffic" includes all
,Braft subject to payment of tolls except small vessels under 20 net tons,
14 Panama Canal measurement. It does not include vessels in the public
Ae vice of the Governments of the United States, Panama, and Colom-
Sia, and.ships which transit the Canal solely for the purpose of having
*f pairs made at the Balboa shops and dry-dock, as such vessels are
empt from payment of tolls.

Largest year's commercial traffic:
.Number of transits, 6,456, fiscal year 1928.
ama Canal n.et tonnage, 30,353,189, calendar year 1929.
l a, $27,592,715.84,. calendar year 1929.
`0 31,450,493, calendar year 1929.
''est month's commercial traffic:
N Puiiri'r of transits, 603, January, 1929.
; natia Canal net tonnage, 2,771,280, January, 1929.
^pls$2,502,815.12, January, 1929.
go 2,858,835 tAs. January, 1929.
K-I .... .....







8 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD Augus 6, s190 '

Largest day's commercial traffic:
I 'Number of transits, 33, October 1, 1927.
Panama Canal net tonnage, 152,610, November 15, 1927.
;I, Tolls, $137,053.98, April 10, 1928.
Cargo, 174,247 tons, April 22, 1930.
Largest day's commercial traffic in one direction:
Number of transits, 22, Atlantic to Pacific, December 8, 1928.
I ,Panama Canal net tonnage, 116,618, Pacific to Atlantic, April 22, 1930.
5,1 Tolls, $104,687.50, Pacific to Atlantic, April 22, 1930.
Cargo, 149,894 tons, Pacific to Atlantic, April 22, 1930.
U' Largest number of transits in any one day:
I Thirty-five Government and 22 commercial vessels, a total of 57 vessels, Janu-
;1 ary 17, 1924.

Smallest day's commercial traffic occurred on November 18, 1924,
on which the number of transits-was 2; Panama Canal net tonnage,.
; 2,870; tolls, $2,865; and cargo, 2,809 tons.
i' The lowest pro rata cost of tolls per ton of cargo carried through the
* \\! Canal on a commercial vessel is $0.2103 per ton, which occurred with
the transit of the Swedish motor ship Svealand, on January 2, 1930,
carrying a cargo of iron ore from Cruz Grande, Chile, to Sparrows
Point, Md. On this transit the Svealand carried 22,244 tons of cargo
and paid tolls of $4,678.75.
The fastest transit through the Canal, in 4 hours and 10 minutes,
was made by the United States destroyer Lawrence, Atlantic to Pacific,
on December 2, 1917.

Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
;" NBALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., July 26, 1930.
I No. 727.
AID TO NAVIGATION.
H!Ir' The Panama Canal, Atlantic entrance, beacon replaced.-Beacon No. 5, a fixed white light on the east
side of the channel, Atlantic entrance of the Panama Canal, which was temporarily discontinued
i l June 13, 1930, was reestablished July 25, 1930. (See Notice to Mariners No. 716, June 16, 1930).
Approximate position: Latitude 9* 20' 25" N., longitude 79* 55' 15" W.
: H. BURGESS,
Governor.

II Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
;; BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 6, 1930.
No. 730.
Colombia, Cartagena approach; information on Salmedina Bank light vessel.-The
following is quoted from "Daily Memorandum" for July 29, 1930, published by the
I 1 Hydrographic Office, U. S. Navy:
The master of the Canadian steamship Beacon Street. reports that from reliable compass bearing .
he found Salmedina Bank light vessel to be located one-half mile, 140", from its present charted position.
Approximate position: Latitude 100 23' 10" N., longitude 750 38' 42" W.
H. BURGESS,
Governor.

Ships' Chandlery Supplies. ...,
;1i Panama Canal Storehouses carry a complete line of ships' chandlery supplies,
available for sale to ships at C. I. F. cost plus 25 per bent surcharge which covers
local freight, handling, and other costs .







.W ua,1 0O THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 9

. Comparison of Canal Traffic in July, 1930, with July Traffic in Previous
Years.
The traffic through the Panama Canal during the month of July,
.1930, showed an increase as compared with the preceding month, and
a decrease as compared with July, 1929.
The 488 transits in July this year are fewer, by 39, or 7.4 per cent,
than the 527 transits in the corresponding month a year ago, while the
Snet tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, aggregating 2,438,895 tons,
is less by 29,385 tons, or 1.2 per cent, than the total of 2,468,280 tons
in July, 1929. The cargo tonnage of 2,402,047 tons for July, 1930,
shows a decline of 196,115 tons, or 7.5 per cent, from the total of
2,598,162 tons passing through the Canal in July, 1929.
In the tabulation below are shown the number of transits, net
tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, and the tons of cargo carried
..through the Canal during the month of July each year from 1915 to
.1930, inclusive, ahd for comparison, the monthly averages for the
Corresponding fiscal, year ending on June 30th following:
,:_" Month of July. Average psr month for fiscal year. -
Calendar Commer- Panamn Tons Fiscal Commer- Panama Tons a
year. cial Canal net of year. cial Canal net of
transit. tonnage. cargo. transit. tonnage. cirgo.
1914 .... .......... ..... ....... ............ 1915 -102 '361,197 '465,507
S1915 ......... 166 542,676 715,253 1916 63 199,687 257.843
1916: ......... 145 482,2092 624,061 1917 150 483,213 588,213
1917......... 181 557,411 664,924 1918 172 517,839 627,669
..198 ........ 169 497.489 584,995 1919 169 510,410 576,385
.1919... ..... 158 510,808 568,172 1927 206 712,170 781,203
190......... 225 856.798 896,814 1921 241 951,323 966,601
,1921......... 206 810;613 708,932 1922 228 951.455 917,075
1922........ .51 1,127,871. 1,211,100 1923 331 1,550,482 1,633,656
I: 1923........ 474 2,310,027 2,337,784 1924 430 2,179,073 2,249,559
194 ......... 422 2,036,097 2,097,154 1925 389 1,904,590 1,996,570
S1925 ........ 418 1,951,295 1,960,651 1926 433 2,064.549 2,169,787
i:1926 ......... 456 2.154,821 2,185,527 1927 456 2,185,651 2,312,351
: 927......... 509 2,406,955 2,450,468 1928 538 2,454,886 2,469,226
8........ 500 2,318,395 2,291,955 1929 534 2,49,453 2,555,259
129, ........ 527 2,465,250 2,598,162 1930 515 2,498,385 2,502,519
....... 488 2,438,895 2,402,047 .......... 496 32,453,086 '2,402,199
Caaal opened August 15, 1914.
lAverage for 10 months of fiscl year ended June 30, 1915.
Firs' t 7 months of calendar yar, 1930.

S Tanker Traffic Through the Panama Canal in July, 1930.
'Diuring the month of July, 1930, 120 tank ships transited the Canal
ih an aggregate net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, of 656,757,
Which tolls of $588,395.10 were paid.. Cargo amounted to 688,237
.which "included 681,937 tons of mineral oil and 6,300 tons of
.n.ut oil. In point of net tonnage, tanker traffic increased 12.1
,icent as compared with the same traffic for the corresponding
i a year ago, while cargo tonnage increased 42.7 per cent.
ker traffic comprised 24.6 per cent of the total commercial
'th through the' Canal during the month; made up 26.9 per cent
-:itotal Panama Canal net tonnage; were the source of 27.0 per
e: tolls collected; and carried 28.7 per cent of the total cargo
: through. the Canal.
hber, aggregate net tonnage, tolls, and cargo of tank ships
CAe -Cant during the month of July, 1930, segregated by
ti"nsit and nationality of vessels, are shown in the follow-
7.fwith comparativee totals for the two preceding months


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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


No. Panama Tons.
of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. cargo.
Atlantic lo Pacific.
British.. ....... ......... ......... .. ..... 9 45,888 33,101.52 ...........
Danish ........... ..... 3 14,15o 10,194.48 ...........
Danzig .... ....... .. .. 1 6,127 4,411.4 ...........
Dutch ... ......... .... . ... I 4,317 3,109.24 ..........
French....... .. ... ...... . 1 5.395 3,877.20 ........
German ............. ...... ..... :. 1 4,435 3,193 20 ...........
Italian .... .......... 1 4,320 3,110.40 ..........
Norwegian. ... ........ .. .... .. 5 26,334 18,969.48 .....
United States........... ........ 29 170,725 122,932.14
Total, July, 1930 .......... ... .. .. .... 51 231,690 202,949.10 ..
Total, June, 1930... .................. .. 65 345,896 256,991 09 27,972
Total, May, 1930... ................... ........ 48 272,155 202,856.35 33,928
Total, July, 1929. ............................. . 60 323,512 237,677 21 19,961
Pacifier o Atlantic.
Belgian..... .... .. .. .................. 1 5,410 6,196 25 9,517
British ........... ...... .. ......... 14 69,944 74,257.5J 133,002
Danzig ... .. .... ...... ... ...... ........ ... 2 11,990 13,003.75 23,408
French ..... ...... ................... ..... 3 14,31. 15,462.50 23,376
Norwegian ........ . . .. .. ...... .. .. ....... 5 24,895 26,615.00 47,479
Panamanian. ........ ..... .. ... .... 1 6,450 7,062 50 12,817
Swedish.... ....... .. .................. 1 6,235 6,436.25 12,1.32
United States ...... ....... .. ............... 42 235,855 236.372 25 424,506
Total, July, 1930..... .. ....................... 69 375,067 385,446.00 688,237
Total, June, 1930 ........ ............ ........... 44 245,517 251,649.15 432,961
Total, May, 1930.................. .......... .. 44 236,762 242,891.54 422,174.
Total, July, 1929 ............ ................... 51 262,465 267,964.88 .462,453

Includes 6,300 tons coconut oil.

The following tabulation shows the tanker traffic through the Canal
during July, 1930, classified according to trade routes:

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.

No. Panama Tons
Trade routes. of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. cargo. r
United States intercoastal ............. ................. 27 161,087 $115,982.64 ...........
United States to South America....... .... .. .......... 2 7,652 5,509.44 .........
Canada to United Stats . ........... . .. ............. 3,913 2,887.50 .........
Canada to South Am ric.i ........ .. ........... ... 2 12,989 9,352.08 ..........
South America to United States ...................... 1 2.081 1,498.32 ...........
Cristobal to United States .................. ......... ... 1 5,725 4,122.00 ..........
Europe to United States ............................... 16 82,116 59,185.68 ...........
Europe to South America ............. ........... ..... 1 6,127 4,411.44 ...........

PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.
No. Panama Tons
Trade routes. of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. cargo..
United States intercoastal. ............................... 39 217,227 $217,404 75 389.841 0
United States to Cristobal ............................ 1 5,725 6,346.25 18,000
United States to West Indies ............................. 4 22,138 23,007.50 40,630
United States to Europe ............................. 18 88,455 94,723.75 161,855
South America to United States........ ................. 3 17,537 19,132.50 37,004
South America to Canada ................... ......... 2 13,774 14,483.75 28,299
South America to Europe .. ...................... 1 5,927 6,508.75 11,308 .
Philippine Islands to United States........................ 1 4,284 3,838.75 =6,308.

C Coconut oil. *

Of the tanker traffic passing through the Canal in July, 1930, tlie
following is a summary of the vessels giving Los Angeles as their pott'l
of origin or destination, together with the totals for the two preceding
months and for July, 1929: -
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U: To Los Angee.
. July, 1930.............................................
June, 1930 ............. .......................
May, 1930.......... ........................
July, 192. .................... .......................
From Los A ngees.
July, 1930 ................... ..........................
June, 1930............ ........ ...................
M ay, 1930........... ............ ............
July, 1929 ................. ..... .... .. ........ ...


No. Panama Tons
, of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. a rgo.


45,
56
33
46

56
33
32
36


248,994
390.721
193.213
249,097

302,142
189.882
173,014
190,089


$17.9400.78
219.494 66
119,975 35
184,099.41

307,081 25
191,944 40
177,394 65
194.298.90


9,792
14,353
19,061

545.893
330.780
311.899
347,537


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Week Ending August 2, 1930.

Cargo-
Name oT veseL Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed.
SDisrhargedl Laded.


Cbateau Thierry.....
St. Mihiel. ..........
Kenowia ...........
Cambrai.............
SLaPerla............
LMurla ..............
S auica ..............
.. Abraham Linuoln .....
Veneuela ..........
Caldaa .............
El Salvador...........
i :Santa Elisa.........
::enderson..........


U. S. Government .............
U. S. Governmenot.......... .
U. S. Government..............
U. S. Government.. ...........
United Fruit Co. .............
Roland Line... ............
National Navigation Co.........
Fred Olsen & Co. .........
Panama Mail S. S. Co...........
National Navigation Co..........
Panama Mail S. S. Co .......
Grace Lino .................
U. S. Govrnment....... .....


July 19.......
July 22 ...
July 23......
July 24.......
July 23......
July 25.......
July 25.......
July 28 .......
July 29.....
July 29.......
July 30....
July 30.......
July 31 .......


July 22 ......
July 22.......
July 24.......
July 25.......
July 2 ......
July 26.......
July 26......
July 29.......
July 30,......
July 29......
July 31......
July 30.......
August 1... .


Tons.
569
210
1,125
13
714
58

1,194
21

254
70
2


Tons.
10
106
63
49
147
240
I
18
82
183
.B


Names$f Streets and Roads.

THE PAWAMA CANAL, ExtcuTIvE DEPARTMENT.
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., July 30, 1930.

Toall concerned:
'he following names are given to the streets
~and roads in the Canal Zone hereinafter de-
iScribed:

I:- :. The intersection of Gorgas Road, Heights Road,
iFlnd Lion Hill Road in *Ancon, is designated
~ashew Place.
: The new street south of' Plank Street inter-
iec ing Gavilan Road at right angles at the cable
office in Balbok, extending westward, is desig-
ted Akee Street.
iThe new street south of Akee Street, inter-
ecting Gavilan Road, extending westward and
lleling Akee Street, is designated Almond
.The new street'intersecting Akee and Almond
aets, stunning north and south paralleling
an Road, is designated Calabash Street.
Snew ireet intersecting Amador Road at
teortern boundary of Balbok Radion Station
nation and extending eastward, is designated
SStreet.
new street intersecting Amador Road just
f Banyan Street and extending eastward
d Bamboo Street.
mte: 'reet running borth and south, inter-
:.nyan .and Bamboo Streets, paralleling
l8ad, is designated Bougainvillea Street.
: CRISTOBAt.
..br extending eastward from Bolivar
aidithe north side of the Commissary
Plant, and intersecting Guava Road,
itlock Street, in hondr of Major
formerly Subsistence Ofcer,
iain est~aiird ..from Bolivar
:. c$outh' aide of the Commissary
nlj 1 t. a northiWard to Whitlock





..'4 .. ..... . .


Street, is designated Wilson Street. in honor of
Colonel E. T. VWlson, formerly Subsistence Officer
Isthmian Canal Commission.
H. BURGESS,
Governor.

Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
and Coal.
Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama
Canal, for $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons.
Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
private companies with tanks at the Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
on application. The prices at present are as
follows: Crude fuel oil, $1.20 per barrel, Diesel
oil $1.80 per barrel, at Balboa and Cristobal.
Coal is upplied to steamships, including
warships of all nations, delivered and trimmed
in bunkers, at $8 per ton of 2,240 pounds at
Cristobal, and $11 at Balboa. Extra charges
are made for delivery from lighters, special trim-
ming in bunkers, trimming on deck, furnishing
lump coal for galley use, and run of mine coal
in sacks.
Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
of the Governor, at prices quoted upon appli-
cation.
Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
made up to 1,500 tons per hour, as fast as it can
be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
can be made up to 5,500 barrels per hour, rate
depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
tanks, and ship's facilities for handling.
Binders for The Panama Canal Record.
Cardboard covers, punched and fitted with
brass fasteners forming binders for THE PANAMI
CANAL RECORD are offered for sale at 25 cents
a set, for the benefit of those who wish to keep
a file of the issues for ready reference. Orders
may be addressed to The Panama Canal, Balboa
Heights. Canal Zone, or The Panama Canal,
Washington, D. C.


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


, 1930










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12 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD Adtus 6, 193 .


Official Publications of Interest to Shipping.

Masters may obtain from the office of, the Captain of the Port,
at either Cristobal or Balboa, without charge, the "Rules and Regu- .
lations Governing Navigation of The Panama Canal and Adjacent
Waters," and the current Tariff of charges at the Canal for supplies
and services.
Requests for Canal publications sent by mail should be addressed to:
The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z.; or, when more convenient,
to The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal maintains at all times a com-
plete stock of navigational charts and books, including charts of all
parts of the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical tables,
light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs, etc.
At the office of the Port Captain in Balboa, a limited stock of navi-
gational charts, books, etc., is also carried, and this office is in a
position to fill practically anyorder in this connection that a ship might
place.
Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts. Notices to Mariners, and
Hydrographic Bulletins may be obtained in return for marine infor-
mation.
Observations of weather, ocean currents, and other marine data
collected, and blanks, instructions, barometer comparisons, etc.,
furnished.
Correct time is maintained and chronometers rated.



Prices of Miscellaneous Supplies at Panama Canpl Storehouses.

The following are prices to individuals and companies including the
25 per cent surcharge, effective August 7, 1930.

Commodities. Unit. Price.
Briss bar. average .............................. ..... ..................... Lb 30.24 .
Brass, sheer, average ..................... ............................... ....Lb. ..
Bronze, T'obin, average.......................................................... Lb. 28
Gas jlne. motor grade .................. ........................... ........... Gal. .135
Metal, yellow . ... ............... ..................................... Lb .29 .
Oakum, Navy, spun ................... ....................................... Lb. .15
O.akiim. Navy, uinspun ................... ................ ................ Lb. .16
Oil, Dieasl, at Cristohal onry, in bulk, no surcharge ............................. Bbl.o 42 gals. 1.80
Oil, fuel, at Balthna and Cristobal, in bulk, no surcharge.......................... Bbl. of 42 gals. 1.60
Oil. ammonia, cylinder ........................................................ Gal. .28
Oil, burning, Cuiza. .. .......... . .............................. Gal. 1.06'
Oil, engine, gas. in drums, Gulftriton Med. No. 2135. ............................ Gal. .36
Oil, ezncine, gas, extra heavy, in cases, Gulfiriton No. 2250 ...................... Gal. .49
Oil, engine, gas, e' tra heavy, in drums, Gulftriton, No. 2250....................... Gal .46' ,
Oil, kernsene, in drums ............................................. ....... .. Gal. .10 .
Oil, marine engine ......................................................... Gal. .850
Paint, le.d. white, dry ........................................................ Lb. .14
Paint, lead. white, in oil ....................................................... Lb. ,.18
Paint, zile oxide, dry .............. ..................................... Lb. .10
Paint, .ine oxide, in oil .. . .............................. .......... Lb. .1i
Grease, gear, chuin and wire rope, lubricating ..................................... Lb. .Oask a
Grease, yellow, cup, No. 3 ..................... ...... .......................... Lb. .05
Grease. yellow, cup, No. 5 ............................ ...... .. ... Lb. .09
Soda, ash ...................................................... ...... Lb..
Waste, cotton, colored ........................................................ Lb. Lb4
Waste, cation, white ..................... ............................ Lb. .1


Publication of Notices and Circulars of Interest to Shipping.
All of the Panama Canal notices to mariners, notices to steamship lines, and general circulas -t of':.
interest to shipping in its relation to the Canal are published in THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD.; ..For
this reason it is considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution away from the Isthmus
of such notices and circulars to those receiving THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD.. Shipping ineteri s l
are advised to look for them in this paper, which is supplied to them without charge.



F







V: THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
s -PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00: address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Certificoae.-By direction of the Governor of the Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 13, 1930. No. 2.

Sale of Diesel Oil at Cristobal by Union Oil Company of California.
The Union Oil Company of California, has rented tanks Nos. 151
and 152, each of 42,000 barrels capacity, at the Mount Hope oil
handling plant from The Panama Canal, and stocked them 'with
Diesel oil for sale to shipping and other interests. Oil was delivered
.. into the tanks from the company's tanker Santa Maria, which t-ansited
the Canal on July 28th, bound from Los Angeles to Cristobal. The
company now sells both fuel and Diesel oil at both terminals, and is
the first private company to handle Diesel oil at the Atlantic end of
the Canal, though The" Panama Canal has maintained a tank of
SDiesel oil there since 1923. The Panama Canal has sold its stock of
Diesel oil at Cristobal to the Union Oil Company and, for the present,
withdrawn from selling Diesel oil at either terminal. It continues to
maintain stocks of fuel oil at both terminals.
The Union Oil Company of California, is. the original supplier of
fuel oil on the Isthmus. In January, 1905, the company broached the
'matter of securing permission to build a pipeline across the Isthmus,
and stated that it was primarily for the purpose of transferring oil
from tankers in the Pacific to tankers on the Atlantic side for delivery
.to the eastern seaboard of the United States and Europe.. A re-
:.vocable license covering construction and operation of such pipeline
,and appurtenances was signed by the President of the United States
on January 10, 1906, and the laying of pipe began in March, 1906.
Pil was first supplied to the Isthmian Canal Commission in March, 1907,
idnd on November 14, 1907, the pipeline across the Isthmus was in
Complete operation. The transfer of oil between tankers, siinilar to
be transfer of cargo between ships by shipment over the Panama'Rail-
,never developed extensively, and supplying the Canal, organi-
tibri with. oil became the main feature of the company's business
..the Isthmus; so much so that in 1909 it threatened to rerhove its
nt and line if that business could not be had on more favorable
s. With several revisions of contracts the company continued to
Aly oil to the Canal and Railroad until the end of the ye r 1914.
SDpecember 31, 1914, the revocable license under which the cbrpany
6been operating its pipeline across the Isthmus was termiinated,
in' 1915 the line was removed. The Panama Canal laid a line from
; to Paraiso, reaching thus the dredging equipment in Gaillard
inft all of the more important distribution points along the Pacific
*aif of -the Canal.
?iB'. .,.: Postal Address of the Panama Canal.
.ad i .: The Pa riaia Canal,. Balboa Heights, Canal Zone" or "The Panama Canal,
r uain .tbhrouh 'the Canal or touching at either of the terminal ports should be

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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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Nationality.


United States intercoastal:
United States.
East coast of United States to
west coast of South
America:
British ....... ...
Chilean . .. ..
Norwegian ... .
Swedish ....... .......
United States ..... ..
Total. ........
Europe to west coast of United
States:
British ...........
Danish.... .. .........
D utch....... .......
French..... .. .... ..
German....... ...
Italian ........
Norwegian ....... ...
Total ........ .. .
East coast of United States to
Far East:
British....... ..... . .
D anish..... .. ........
Japanese ..... ...
United States... .......
Total..... .......
Europe to west coast of
Canada:
British ..... . ....
Danish ...... .......
French .......... ...
German......... ......
Italian ........ ......
Norwegian ............
Swedish .... .......
United States ....... .
Total..... ... .
Europe to west coast of
South America:
British ... .... ...
Danzig ......... ....
D utch ........ .........
French. ........ .
German ................
Norwegian..... ... ...


No.
of
ships.


80


6
1
3
1
13
24


6
18


5
1
6
4
16


6
1
1
2
1
2
1

15


Total......... .... 14
Oristobal to west coast of
South America:
Colombian .............. 3
Dutch.................. 1
German ............... 4


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.

447,874


21.909
4,672
7,308
4,496
57,223
95,608


25,217
12,078
4,317
5,385
11,178
4,320
29,823
92,348


27,381
2,510
31,569
17,434
78,894


35,590
5,660
7,146
13,500
6,041
11.626
5,337
4,614
89,514


27,378
6, 127
8,926
5,563
20,568
3,820
72,382


372
742
3,491


Total............ s 4,605


United
States
equivalent.

339,049


17,624
3,433
5,020
3,743
45,526
75,346


21,845
10,094
3,492
4.595
8,664
3,701
25,005
77,396


17,072
1,938
25,163
12,378
56.551


22.394
5,233
4,020
8,186
5,092
6,970
2,861
3,400
58,156


Registered
gross.


548,158


30,015
7,310
8,120
15,337
80,073
140.855


35,211
16,549
5,792
7,650
14,142
6,468
41,922
127,734


27,608
3,252
39,140
20,181
90.181


40,703
6,919
8,068
14,501
7,057
11,390
5,210
5,689
99,537


Registered
net.


339,858


18,212
3,976
4,824
4,385
45,533
76,930


21,660
10.121
3,379
4,435
8,460
3,640
24,847
76,542


16,965
1,985
24,626
12,321
55,897


23,906
5,223
4,497
8,543
4,455
7,092
3,747
3,400
60,863


Tolls.


5381,425.14


17,595.14
4,291.25
6,265.56
3,237.12
46,650.66
78,039.73


18,240 00
8,696.16
3,108.24
3,877.20
9,280.50
3,110.40
21,472.56
67,785 26


21,340 00
2,422.50
31,298 75
15,472 50
70,533.75


27,092 50
6,541.25
5,025.00
10,232.50
6,365.00
8,712.50
3,576.25
4,250.00
72,695 00


IIII


20,860
5,268
5,596
4,282
15,442
2,333
53,781


339
294
2,260

.2,893


34,683
8,939
8,998
, 6,863
24,475
3,886
87,844


621
780
4,347
5,748


21,510
5,007
5,278
4,287
15,195
2,335
53,612


327
323
2,334
2,9841


26,075.00
4,411.44
6,995 00
5,352.50
19,302.50
2,916.25
65,052.69


423.75
367.50
2,825.00
3,616.25


Tons
of
dargo.


194,.481


5,641
2.327 .
2,170
16,268
26,406






4,205

4,205



29,077
3.500
36,180
13,039
81,796


9,358
5, 11
2,781
11,840
2,468
5,220
4,408.
7,351
49,037


22,761
7,546
3014
16,2431
6, 100'
56,258



6


Commercial Traffic Through the Panama Canal in July, 1930, by Trade
Routes.

The following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the
Canal during the month of July, 1930, classified according to trade-
routes and nationality of vessels in each trade route, together with
corresponding totals for July, 1929 and 1928. The amount of cargo
shown is the amount carried by vessels operating over the respective
routes and in some cases includes cargo having other destinations:

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


''


August 1i 198




* *


:i, 1..
'v i aCsia


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.--Continued.


Nationality.


East coast of United States to
Philippine Islands:
British .................
Norwegian..............
United States..........
Total........ .. .
East coast of United States to
Australasia:
B ritish ............ ...
Europe to Australasia:
British ........ ... .
.i Cristobal to west coast of
United States:
United States ...
Cristobal to Balboa:
Panamanian.........
United States ..........


No.
of
ships.



4
I

6


5
5

5
1
3


Total.............. 4


East coast of United States to
west coast of Canada:
B ritish .................
United States..........


Total


1
2


. ...... ... .... 3


East coast of South America
to west coast of
United States:
D anish.................
United States...........
Total...............
;Cristobal to west coast of
Central America:
British ................
Colombian..............

Total .............
SAround the world: *
,: United States...........
K;:Europe. to west coast of
Central America:
r .................
i German. ..............
To l ..............

MT;est Indies to west coast of
Canada:
,, B itish.................
an intercoastal:
H h..............
onasnt of Canada to west
S oast of South Amer-
i.ea:
itish.................
m ast of Canada to
I ::'. Australasia:

..pat of Canada to weVt
3a. :" t United States:
.pited States...........
qat of COnada to west
'.' ab. of Central

.............

e .. .........


1
2

3


2
1
3

2


I
2


Ltbjted States te




lt

,4J w'. .. ,


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.


25,712
6,829
6,612
39,153


26,286
46,405

15,571
47
232
279


5,308
7,862
13,170



2,081
10,051
12,132


2,322
163
2,485

18,423

4,101
3,533
7,634


United
States
equivalent.


13,980
3,973
4,906
22,859


17,479
32,286

11,559
47
227


Registered
gros.


26,087
6,687
7,587
40,361


28,221

53,890

19,372
86
20


Registered
net.


14,243
4,085
4,808
23,136


17,672
33,303

1.1,424
47
16


Tolls.




$17,475.00
4.966 25
6,132.50
28,573.75


21,848.75
40,357.50

12,224.50
56 40
173.40


Tons
of
cargo.



9,390
3,918
7,049
20,357


18,707
26,168

3,318
30


274 106 63 229.80 30


3,028
5,866
8,894



1,747
7,354
9,101


1,930
164

2,094

12,651

3,247
2,542
5.789


4.971
9,474
14,445



3,056
11,525
14,581


3,661
233
3,894

21,017

5,280
4,201
9,481


3,033
5,852
8,885



1,857
7,285
9,442


2,061
166
2,227

12,651


3,228
2,554


3,785.00
7,332.50
11,117.50



1,498.32
9,192.50
10,690.82


2,412.50
195.60
2,608.10

15,813.75


4,058.75
3,177.50


5,782 7,236.25


9,494
9,494




10,639
10,639


1,663
380
2,043

5,977

1,854
1,763
3,617


I III_______ _____


4,271
9,181


12,989

9,618

* 3,913


1

I

1.


193

4,672

.1,740

4,859


3,718
6,918


11,069

7,682

3,l50


187

4,264

1,542

2,619


5,848
11,136


20,336

12,586

5,10i


263


5,823

2.647;

4,444


3,692
6,861


11,398

7,734

3,749


176

4,261

1,542

2,609


4,635.00
8.647.50


7,341
8,934.


9,352.08 1....


9,602.50


2,887.50 ..


233.75

5,330.00

1,927.50

3,273.75.


6,341


175

7,786

3,229

7.525


I


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,


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


A ugut 13, I : *180


ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.-Conlinued.


Nationality.


East coast of South America
to west coast of
Canada:
Norwegian ......... ....
West Indies to west coast of
Central America:
German ...
West Indies to Australasia:
B ritish .. .. ... .....
Europe to Far East:
British ........ .....
Supplemental bill. .. ......
Grand total, July, 1930..
Grand total, July, 1929...

Grand total, July, 1928...


No.
of
ships.









1



230
273
272


United States irtprecastal-
United States ....... 92
West coast of Canada to
Europe:
British .. .......... 16
D anish .............. 2
D utch ................. I
French... ...... ... I
German ............... 3
Italian .............. 1I
Norwegian .............. 2
Swedish .......... 1
United States .......... 2
Total ............. 29


West coast of South America
to east coast of
United States:
B ritish ...............
C hilean ................
Swedish ..... ..... .
United States....... ...
Total . .....

West coast of United States
to Europe:
B elgian..... ...........
B ritish .... ...........
French .................
G reek..................
Norwegian .............
Panamanian....... ....
United States ...........
Total ...... ...
West coast of South America
to Europe:
B ritish .................
D anzig .................
Dutch..... ...........
French .................
German.. ..........
Italian ...............
Norwegian..............
Yugoslav............. j.


9
I
2
15

27


2
13
3
1
4
I
1
25


Total .............. 19
Philippine Islands to east
coast United States:
Danish ................. 1
Japanese ............... 8
Panamanian............. 1
Swedish................ 1
United'. States ........... 3

Total .............. 14


TONN0&GE.


Panama
Canal
net.



5,132

1,469
3,946
5,161


1,129,916
1,291,828

1,269,085


United
States
equivalent.



2,912

1,155

2,663,
2,867
. . ....

837,604

991,474
965,479


Registered
gross.



4,885

1,930
4,251
4,702


1,389,381

1.618,784

1,580,367


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.


504,358

85,446
12. 767
6,066
7,466
19,737
6,010
10,223
5,485
10,992

164,192



43,204
4,705
8,917
66,446
123,272


11,005
57,796
14,318
4,099
18,201
6,450
8,619
120,488


32,962
5,927
3,195
4,932
29,270
18,702
3,965
4,570
103,523


4,483
39,295
6,955
1,513
16,720-


385,805

58,046
8,394
4.863
4,438
12,469
4,334
6,908
3,406
7,736
110,594



35,195
3,466
7,486
55,085
101,232


8,642
46,494
12,370
2,636
15,775
5,650
7,026
98,593


26,168
5,207
2,494
4,219
19,419
10,399
2,637
3,271
73,814


2,495
34,777
3,998
1,307-
12,380


68,966 54,957


621,114

94,661
14,642
7,655
7,759
21,466
7,061
11,379
5,558
12,583
182,764



60,429
7,310
30,676
96,422
194,837


14,253
76,651
19,712
4,386
26,344
8,947
11,247
161,540


43,060
8,744
3,981
6,669
31,805
23,387
4,436
5,291
127,373


4,194
49,510
7,044
1,600
18,468-
80,816


Registered
net.


3,005

1,128

2,635
2,865


842,686
990.494

976,284


386,359

58,186
8,942
4,799
4,677
12,953
4,460
7,037
4,246
7,717
113,017



36,689
3,976
8,762
57,037
106,464


8,214
46,912
11,420
2,639
15,633
5,651
6,953
97,422


26,363
5,026
2,423
4,224
19,246
13,529
2,664
3,299
76,774


2,532
34,273
3,988
1,054
11,505.
53,352


Tolls.





33,640 00

1,057.68
3,328 75

3,583.75
80.00

947,428 30

1,119,496.15
1,103,618.21


$482,135.59

72,557.50
10,492.50
6,078 75
5,547.50
15,586.25
5,417.50
8,635 00
4,257.50
9,681.25

138.253.75



42,886.81
4,332 50
9:357.50
68,419.85
124,996.66


10,802.50
58,117.50
15,462.50
3,295.00
19,718.75
7,062.50
8,782.50
123,241.25


32,710.00
6,508.75
3,117.50
5,273.75
24,273.75
12,998.75
3,296.25
4,088.75
92,267.50


3,118.75
43,471.25
4,997.50
1,633.75
15,475.00

68,696.25


Tons
of
cargo.




5,887



7,290
7,800


575.964
909,976
748,160


695,394

121,508
15,740
8,306
8,466
22,873
8,910
16,448
" 7,350
15,903
225,504



67,167
3,308
43,798 a,
145;739
260,010


17,488
103,280
25:376
7,093
35,165
12,817
16,355

216,684


35,818
11,308
4,81
3,777
40,010
2,22 .
3,839.
8,152
10M9777



50,887
2.4"s:


89,70 -
A t::..









"~ ~ fl.WO


THE. PANAMA CANAL RECORD


PACIFIC TO ATL;ANTIC.--Continued.


Nationality."


Australssia to Europe:
British.................
French.............
Total..............

West coast of South America
to Cristobal:
-Colombian..........
German...............
Swedish .......... ....

Total ..............
SWest coast of United States to
Cristobal:
United States ...... ...
SWest coast of United States to
West Indies:
British.................
Norwegian..............
Swedish ............. .

.. Total..............
Australasia to east coast of
United States:
.. Norwegian...:..........
'" United States..........

Total..............
: est coast of Canada to east
I. coast United States:
Norwegian ..........
': United States..........

Total ..............
p: 1waii to east coast of
United States:
||- United States...........
Ciaadian intercoastal:
Britis .................
S coast of South America
4:., to east coast of
Canada:
Britib ........ '.........
M ig.................
... OW ............

q6 astof Central America
to Cristojw,a
British..
"to Otistabul...:
uania ian............
coast of Cential America
: tq east coast tf.
Ujfited States: I
of United Stiates to
*, ea et coast of South
Mionerica.
tstStutus.........
iof 'tiasto east
of5 uAmet..-



& otast of

.....


............ .....


No.
of
ships.


9
10

10



6
I
9


4


2
I

3


1
2

3


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.

80,507
5,629

86,136


248
5,200
746
6,194


14,517

9,239
6,604
. 6,295
22,138


8,822
5,167
13,989


4,910
8,308

13,218


6,453

8,229


7,711
6,063


United
States
equivalent.

56,576
4,343

60,919


226
3,384
600
4,210


11,375

7,700
5,517
5,189
18,406


4,984
3,816

8,800


2,615
6,124

8,739


5,173
- 6,523


6,391
5,196


Registered Registered
gross. net.


93,056
7,007
100,063


414
6,490
1,036

7,940


18,911

12,877
9,153
8,945
30,975


8,449
6,094
14,543


4,402
9,884

14,286


8,681
11,151


11,404
8,932


57,888
4,402
62,290


218
3,472
582
4,272


11,234

7,545
5,527
6,59,2
19,664


4,948
. 3,816
8,764


2,624
6,158

8,782


5,923

6,884


5,691
5,002


Tolls.


$70,720 00
5,428.75
70,148 75


282.50
4,230.00
750.00
5,262 50


14,218.75

S 6_25.,00Q
6,896.25
6,486.25
23,007.50


6,230.00
4,770.00
11,000.00


3,268.75
7,655 00

10,923.75


6,466.25

8,153.75


7,988.75
6,495.00


Tons
of
cargo.


43,353
3.,707
47,060


354
4,650
113

5,117


14,995

16,184
12,314
12,132
40,630


13,721
6,600
20,321


7,400
12,032
19,432


12,078

12,071


16,199
12,100


2- 13,774 11,587 20,336 10,693 -14-483.75 .28,290


2 2,293 1,920 3,703 2,066 2,400.00 822

2 67 62 106 63 4,965.00 .........


1. 2,500 2,504 2,447 1,421 1,878.00 ..........


. 5,014 3,508 5,652 3,522 4,385.00 5,354


1 i ,131 2.006 XT 3, 004 3,632:50 5,276

1 4,071 3,116 ,-' 890 3,136 2,931.12 ..........

I 4, *4, 257 5,370 3,260 4,071.25 1,267

1 .;294 4,181 6,600 4,040 5,226.25 2,488
1. 6,226 4,938 '.,615 4,835 6,172.50 6,445


u A01 I


sff L


i.A..f r ....L..,_9 1 ....


S1l398.75 8,933


: : .. . .. ... . . .. .


. .. ..... :
[ !i ::...J.::.: =:::.;': : .; =: ==.:* :" .:'1; :.* .. ..


~~--~~~---1-~~- ~~--~~-~---~- ~~ ~-


2 '.A f. 1 520 1




'I*I



I' ll





I, i
1 ,
I I
I,

,'
















I I






,I




II I
!1 !"





Iii

I



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I, '!.
I ;
'1 ,'
,ll''I











i ,: s
L r', ,, ,


I I


S '.,'i'I










I ll '
,t ii,
'i

,.. I,',
E' '[* 'h















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I '


i I i




t i' '



* ,
!; i !

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Autwl 13, 190


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.-Continued.
TONNAGE.
No. Tons
Nationality. of Panama United Tolls. of
ships. Canal States Registered Registered eargo
net. equivalent. gross. net.
Far East to West Indies:
Norwegian .. .. ....... 1 4,534 2,465 4,114 2,453 $3,081.25 7; 00
Grand total, July, 1930.. 258 1.308,979 989,584 1,640,726 999,696 1.233,083.52 1,826,083
Grand total, July, 1929.. 254 1,176,452 915.824 1,499,297 919,094 1,140,086.22 1,688,1856
Grand total, July, 1928.. 237 1,049,310 806,408 1.342,537 814,540 1,005,464 98 1,548,71

Traffic by Nationality for July, 1930.
The following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the
Canal during the month of July, 1930, classified according to nation-
ality oil vessels by direction of transit, and the combined traffic in both
directions, together with corresponding totals for July, 1929 and 1928:
.ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


Nationality.


B ritish .... ................
Chilean... ............
Colombian........ .....
Danish .....................
Danzig................ .. .
D utch ....................
French .....................
German ......... ......
Italian ......... ..........
Japanese ..... . ........
Norwegian ...... . .....
Panamanian... ..... ....
Swedish . . ...........
United States ...............
Total, July, 1930.......


No.
of
ships.

55
1
4
5
4
4
4
14
2
7
15
1
2
115
230


TONNAGB.


Panama
Canal
net.
288.897
4,672
535
22,329
6,127
13,985
22,195
53,739
10,361
36,241
69,397
47
9,833
591,558
1,129,916


United
States
equivalent.
203,602
3,433
503
19,012
5,268
9.382
16,144
38,249
8,793
29,427
48,832
47
6,604
418,308


Registered
gross.

344,172
7,310
854
29,776
8,939
15,570
27.861
63,596
13.523
44.963
81,334
86
20.547
730,848


837,604 ,1.389,381


Total, ly, 1929 ....... 273 1,291,828 991,474 1,618.784


Total, July. 1928 ........


1,269,085


965,479


1,580,367


Registered
net.

207,926
3,976
493
19,186
5,007
8,980
16.417
38,214
8,095
28,887
48,857
47
8,132
448,439
842.696
990.494
967,284


Tolls.


,$236,584.72
4,291.25
619 35
19,158 23
4,411.44
10,470.74
18,313 45
45,875.88
9,475.40
36,62S 75
51.246.87
56.40
6,813.37
503,482.45
947,428.30
1,119,496.15
1,103,618.21


Tans
of
cargo.

160,646
2,327
807
9,111
7,549
S8,240
34,738-
2,468
43,966
30,820
30
4,408
270,845
575,954
909,976
748,1601t
i


Includes supplemental bill of $80.
PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.
.______________------------- :---------
TONNAGE.
No. Tom
Nationality. of Panama United Tolls. of
ships. Canal States Registered Registered g.
net. equivalent. gross. net.
Belgian......... ...... 2 11,005 8.642 14,253 8,2i4 $10,802.50 17,48*
British.... ,................ 62 335,860 251.386 I 417,258 254,61 9 312,161.68 417,610
Chilean .................... 1 4,705 3,466 I 7,310 3,9716 4,332.50 3,308
Colomhian................. 2 -248 -226 414 21,8 282.50 3854
Danish ................... 3 17,250 10,889 18,836' 11,474 13,511.25 M:.io
Danzig ................. 2 11,990 10,403 17,6765 10,048 13,003.75. 23,408
Dutch...................... 2 9,261 7,357 11,636 7,2P2 9,196.25 13,157
French..................... 6 32.345 25,370 41,147; 24,723 31,712.50 41326
German ................... 16 56,707 37,776 6, 208 37,092 45.968.00 .
Greek........... .. ...... 1 4,099 2,636 4,386 2,639 3,295.00 7
Italian ................... 3 24,712 14,733 30,448 17,99 18,416.25 11,132
Japanese .................. 9 44',589 38.958 56,119 38,313 48,697.50. 6.,325
Norwegian ,................. 13 62,390 43,807 73,161 43,890. 54,758.75 10143BM
PanTamanian........ ....... 4 13,472 9,710 16,097 9.702 J2,109,65 15,,811
S7 dish ................. 6 .22,956 17,988 47j815 21,236 22,485.00 5,791. :X
United states ............ 125 652,820 502,966 816,671 505.062 628,1.61.69 .950Q
hugolv........... ....... 1 4,570 3,271 5,291 3,2g( 4,088.75 i
Total, July, 1930........ 258 1,308,979 989,584 1,640,726 999,696 .1,383,088.62 i ,86,. 8
Total, July, 1929......... 254 1.176,452 915,824 1,499,297 '919,0U. l.,J.40,086.22I 4,:8B.
Total, July, 1928........ 237 1,049,310i. 806,408 1,342,5371 814,540 1,005,464.98 15. 'i a

S ,.1j.


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


COMBINED TRAFFIC.


Natimaoity


Belgian....................
British ....................
thilean .....................
Colombian.................
Danish.................. ...
,D ansig................ ..
SDutch......................
S French................
German....................
S Greek ......................
Japanese....................
Norwegian..................
S Panamania .................
: Swedis.....................
,United States ...............
Yugoslav ..................
Total, July, 1930........


No.
of
"ships.

2
117
2
6
8
q


Panama
Canal
net.
11,005
624,757
9,377
783
39,579
18,117
23,246
54.540
110.416
4,099
35,073
80,830
131,787
13,519
32,789
1,244,378
4,570


488 2,438,895


Total July, 129........ 527 2468280
Total, July. 1928. 509 2.318,395


Includes supplemental bill of 380.


United
States
equivalent.
8,642
454,988
6,899
729
29.901
15,671
16,739
41.514
76,025
2,636
23,526
68,385
92,639
9,757
24,592
951,274
3,271
1,827,188

1,909,834
1,771,887


14,253
761.430
14,620
1,268
48,612
26,615
27,206
69,008
125,81)4
4,386
43,973
101.032
154.495
16,183
69,362
1,547,519
5.291


net.

8,214
462,545
7.952
711
30,663
15,035
16.2)2
41,170
75,306
2,639
26,084
67,200
92,747
9,749
2q,369
953,501
3,299


$10,802 50
'548,746,40
8,623 75
931 85
32,769 48
17,415 19
19,666.99
50.025 95-
91,813.88
3,295.00
27,891.65
85,326.25
106,035.62
12,166.05
29,298.37
1.,13f 614,14
4,088.75


3,030.107 1,842,382 2,180,511.82 2,402,047


3,118,081
2,923.901


1,900,588 2,259,592.37
1.779,961 2.109.083.19


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending August 2, 1930.


Name .d veseL


Adolf voat Baer.....
Teutonia............
fHeredia............
Pastore ............
Erfurt...........
t.Takaka Mpru ......
Abraham Lincoln.....
p Iriona ... .........
SDay.onian..........
e i euelms..........
Bania..............


................
taddae..............
Mi ............
s-d .........1P..
3 HtElis.........
S ela ... ........
"""rte ......
ri t Maria..........
Bof an Franciano.
,5 i ne ..........
els ......" ........
.............


..r............
i.........






.........
. .. . .


Line or chatterer.


Hamburg-American Line.........
Hamburg-American Line.........
United Fruit Co................
United Fruit Co.................
Roland Line....................
Nippon Yueen Kaisha............
Fred Olsen & Co .......... ....
United Fruit Co ............
Leyland 8. E. Line... ............
Panama Mail S. S. Co...........
United Fruit Co.................
United Fruit Co ............
famburg-American Line.........
Quaker Line ............. ......
National Navigation Co..........
Leyland S. 8. Line...............
Hamburg-American Line.........
Grace Line ....... .............
Royal Netherlands S. 8. Co.......
Furnes, Withy & Co............
Union Oil Co...................
Panama Mail 8. 8. Co...........
R. Feuillebois...................
Hamburg-American Line....... U,
United Fruit Co.................
United Fruit Co................
North German Lloyd............
'Aluminium Line................
Paeiflc Steam Navigation Co......
Italian Line... ..... .........
Panama R. R. S. S. Line.........
Panama MailS. S. Ca...........
Colombian Line................
Chilean Line.... ...............
United Fruit Co................
.Nelson Line....................
Royal Netherlands S8. o .......
Roya] Netherlands S. S. Co......
Royal Netherlnmds 8. S. Co.......
Standard Fruit & S. S. Co........
,United Fruit Co...............
North German Lloyd...........
R. Feuillebes, .................
SBaabjrwALeria .inLms........
r.Frkh1Line...................
.n icue,...................
Co...................
.... ji:~~vAAVu


i .a.e* ,1 ; ca argo ]Wed.


Arrived.


July .7.......
July 27.......
July 27.......
July 27.......
July 27.......
July 27.......
July 28' .......
July 27.......
July 28.
July 28.......
July 28.......
July 289.......
July 29.......
July 29.......

July 29.......
July 29.......
July 29 .......
July 230.......
July 30.......
July 30.......
July 30.......
July 30.......
July 30.......
July 31.......
July31.......
July 31.......
July 3 .......
July 31.......
July 31.......
August 1.....
August 1.
August 1.....
t ug1:t:1
August 1.
August 1
August 1..
August .
August 2.
August 2.....
August 2.....
August 2.....
August 2.....
August2.

i One package.


Departed.


July 27.......
July 27 .......
July 27.......
July 27......
July 27 .......
July 27.......
July 28 ...
July 23 ..
July 23.......
July 29 ......
July 29.......
July 30.......
..Ju y.. ..........
July 29.......
July 29......
July 29 ......
July 29.......
July 30.......
July 31.- .....
July 30......
July 30.......
July 31......
July 31......
July 31. .....
August 2.....
July31.......
.......... ...
August 1....
...Augut...........
August 1.....
August 2.....
August 1.....
August 2....

August 2....
August 2.....

August 2.....
August 2 .....
August 2.....

... .. ... .. '
.".s..........


Cargo-
Disoharged laded.

Tons. Tons.
.......... 3 19
. .. .. . 9 1
...... . 11
31 181q
73 103
74 (0)
341 (').
11 88
828 (9)
399 318
19 (,)
797 47
581 .. ...
3 (z)
......... 211
.......... 65
59 112
108 173
174 (')
(9) 461
13,000 (')
... ...... 1,365
(,) 17
63 (1)
695 179
373 258
861 185
272 (.)
276 ..........
85 472
3.511 ..........
560 149'
294 439
(') 194.
545 796
343 (*)
240 143
600 ..........
(s) 744
168 387
394 267
51 :.........
251'
26 ..:......
440 ..........
95 .........
141 ..........


2,598.162
2.291.955


Tons
of
cargo.

17,488
578.315
5.635
1,161
29,302
23,408
2J.706
49,575
102,271
7,093
13,690
196.291
132,183
15.341
70,199
1,221,327
8,152


*ut If4 1irIs*




'li *


24 THE PANAMA' CANAL RECORD Augua -tS, 1. M

:11 .Osaka Shosen Kaisha Inaugurates New Express Service between New York
'i and Far East through the Panama Canal.

The motor ship Kinai Maru7 of the Osaka Shosen Kaisha, transited
the Canal from the Pacific August 5, 1930, en route from Hongkong,
411 Yokohama, and other Far Eastern ports, via Los Angeles and the
Panamp Canal, to New York, in a new express service. This vessel
i is reported as the first of six motor ships built for this trade. The other
i five, which are to be added during the remainder of the year, are the
r! Tokai Alaru, Sanyo M1aru, Hokuroku Alaru, Kwanto Alaru, and Kwansai
I.:, aru. All are equipped with specially built silk rooms with a capacity
'l of 857 tons of raw silk, have 300 tons refrigerated space, and deep
tanks for carrying oil in bulk.
,,, ., The Kinai Maru is of 8,365 registered gross, and 5,046 net tons,
with length of 446 feet and beam of 60.6 feet.


I, Thatcher Highway.
I, THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 5, 1930.
To all concerned:
I. The road now being constructed from the Canal to the Zone boundary near
Arraijan is hereby designated Thatcher Highway.
',i"' 2. This action is taken on the suggestion of the Panama Federation of Highway
S*I Education and also in recognition of the distinguished services of the Honorable*
i Maurice H. Thatcher in the interest of The Panama Canal, both as a member of the
[ Isthmian Canal Commission and as a Member of Congress.
H. BURGESS,
I i Governor.

Notice to Mariners.
'I THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
No. 731. BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 8, 1930.
No. 731.
The following notice was received by the Hydrographic Office from the Assistant
Superintendent of the Lighthouse Subdivision:
'| Panama Canal. Atlantic entrance, West breakwater beacon temporarily discontinued.-Effective August
i 17, 1930. the West breakwater beacon was temporarily discontinued until further notice.
A temporary flashing light of same characteristics will be installed on "A" frame of wrecking bawge
".i' located slightly to we.t of beacon which at times will be obscured to the south by the "A" frame legs.
1 Other lights may show from barge.
HI H. BURGESS,
Governor.

h e Facilities for Shipping.
The Panama Canal is equipped with all the facilities for' the fueling, supply, and repair of ships
which are found in modern ports.
The coaling plants, with an aggregate storage capacity of 700,000 tons, can bunker ships up to
1,500 tons an hour, practically as fast as it can be handled in ships' bunkers. Oil can be delivered
as fast as the ships can take it. from 46 tanks aggregating approximately 2,361,040 barrels of storage
capacity. Crude fuel oil, Diesel oil, and gasoline are sold.
The ships' chandlery storehouses carry a wide variety of marine supplies and spare parts. The
commissary stores sell foodstuffs, fresh meats, fruits, and vegetables, as well as clothing and a general
line of goods for supplying about 30,000 people resident on the Isthmus. Ice plants, a large laundry, .
I l hotels, hospitals, and restaurants serve the passengers and crews of ships.
i. ;A 1.000-foot dry dock. capable of receiving the largest ships built, a smaller dry dock, floating crane :
foundry, and amply equipped shops, employing about 1,100 men. provide means of making prac-".
1:,( tically any kind of marine repairs.
Ample space exists at either terminal of the Canal for the berthing of vessels, as well as large covered:.
piers for the storage of cargo. These are modern structures, fireproof, ratproof, in splendid condition,
well lighted and maintained in a clean and orderly condition ,. *
In general, the services to shipping at the Canal are such as have been developed and found-at te
apd effective in the course of handling large traffic through the Canal in over 15 years ofopetation.l. ..:


.. .":i,:: .I
.LL. '! ,








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
Subscription rates, domestic, 50.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
R: The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
SCafifcte.-By direction of the Governor of the Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 20, 1930. No. 3-

Completion of Sixteen Years of Canal Operation.
The Panama Canal completed 16 years of operation at the close of
business on August 14, 1930, having been opened to commerce on
August 15, 1914. During the 16 years of operation, 60,133 commer-
cial vessels have transited the Canal, aggregating 267,490,045 net
tons, Panama Canal measurement, on which tolls amounting to
$250,660,068.98 were levied, and which carried 279,338,333 long tons
of cargo. Of these totals, the past 10 years have accounted for 82 per
cent of the transits, 87 per cent of the net tonnage, 86 per cent of
the tolls collected, and 86 per cent of the cargo carried.


Lines to the Panama Canal.
A new edition of the pamphlet, "Lines to the Panama Canal,"
revised as of June 1, 1930, has been issued by The Panama Canal and
is being distributed to steamship lines and agencies, travel bureaus
4and similar organizations. The pamphlet contains the following
Information:
Services through the Canal, classified by principal trade routes; air services; pas-
senger connections from the Canal, with fares; list of steamship lines, etc., having
agencies on the Isthmus, with the names of their representatives; list of the agents
on the Isthmus for steamship lines, air lines, oil companies, and other maritime
Sintereits, showing their locations and telephone numbers; consular and diplomatic
representatives in the cities of Panama and Colon and the Canal Zone, with their
. -telephone numbers; miscellaneous information concerning tolls charges, facilities for
- shipping, distances saved by the use of the Canak, etc.


Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 15, 1930.
Nop. 734.
Cartagena, Colombia, wharf destroyed. The following is quoted from the "Daily
iSMemorandum" of August 8, 1930, published by the Hydrographic Office of the U. S.

l the'American Consul at Cartagena, in a telegram dated August 5th, states that the only wharf
Cartagena was destroyed by fire on the night of August 4th.
J. H. BURGESS,
Governor.

: .Publication of Notices and Circulars of Interest to Shipping.
4 the ?anama Canal notices to mariners, notices to steamship lines, and general circulars of
s. ipping in its relation to the Canal are published in Tim PANAMA CANAL RECORD. For
it is considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution away from the Isthmus
na: and circulars to those receiving Tim PANAMA CANAL REcoRD. Shipping interests
... look for them iqithis paper, which is supplied to them without charge.













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Auus S0, 1980 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 31

S' Cargo Through the Canal During July, 1930.
On pages 34 and 35 of this issue will be found tables showing the
origin and destination of cargo passing through the Canal in July, 1930.
this cargo, segregated according to direction, as compared with July,
1929, and the differences, is shown in the following tabulation:
July, July,
1929. 1930. Difference.
Long tone. Long tons. Long tons.
Atlujtic to Pacific.................... ............... .. 909,976 575,964 -334,012
Pa ic toAtlantic........ ........................... .. 1,688,186 1,826,083 +137,897
Total ............................................... 2,598.162 2,402,047 -196,115

It will be noted from the above that the Atlantic to Pacific tonnage
decreasedd 334,012 tons, or 36.7 per cent, as compared with July, 1929,
'.: and that from the Pacific to Atlantic increased 137,897 tons, or 8.2
per cent, making a total decrease of cargo tonnage in both directions of
196,115 tons, or 7.5 per cent. The heavy decrease from the Atlantic
was accounted for by curtailment in shipments of several important
commodities as indicated under "Principal commodities," most
notably manufactured iron and steel, mineral oils, and cement. The
increase from the Pacific was due to large gains in mineral oils, iron
ore, wheat, and cold storage cargo, offset to a large extent by decreases
in lumber,' nitrates, and metals.
S ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
Origin.-Sixty-four and one-tenth per cent of the cargo tonnage
'.from the Atlantic to the Pacific originated on the eastern and Gulf
sseaboards of the United States, and 23.6 per cent in Europe. Tonnage
.from the United States decreased 237,032 tons, or 38.1 per cent, as
compared with July, 1929, and the proportion to the total' in July,
1930, was slightly lower. The amount originating in Europe decreased
102,348 tons, or 42.9 per cent, and the percentage of the whole was
lower in July of this year.
Destination.-Forty-four and four-tenths of the Pacific-bound
tonnage was destined to the United States; 14.4 per cent to South
America; 20.7 per cent to Asia; and 11.5 per cent to Australasia.
Cargo tonnage to all these areas declined as compared with July, 1929,
actual tonnage as follows: To the United States, 182,975, or 41.7
cent; to South America, 49,369, or 37.2 per cent; to Australasia,
7,799, 'or 46.7 per cent, and to Asia, 48,560 tons, or 29.0 per cent.
point of the relation of cargo destined to the aforementioned areas
the total tonnage in this direction, that to the United States, South
erica, and Australasia decreased, while that to Asia showed a gain.

PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
"Orin.--Of the cargo moving in this direction, 58.4 per cent came
the United .States; 22.1 per cent from South America; 8.9 per
.oi. .Canada; 5.9 per cent from Asia; and 3.8 per cent from
lasia. As compared with the corresponding month a year ago,
eig from the United States increased 121,794 tons, or 12.9 per
nd th.:..e percentage of the total was higher in July, 1930. Cargo
fro-m,South America decreased 28,122 tons, or 6.5 per cent,
w i a re iced percentage in its relation to the total cargo.

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Tonnage from Canada increased 22,298 tons, or 14.9 per cent, with an"
increase in the percentage of the total. Asia showed a cargo decrease
of 2,593 tons, or 2.4 per cent, while Australasia showed an increase of
24,130 tons, or 54.2 per cent. Asia showed a decrease in its percentage /
of the total cargo and Australasia an increase. The increase in cargo
tonnage from the United States was principally due to mineral oils.
The decrease from South America was caused by lessened nitrate
shipments. The gain from Canada was due to wheat shipments and
that from Australasia to shipments of iron ore from Australasia to the
east coast of the United States, and an increase in cold storage cargo
from New Zealand.
Destination.-Segregated according to destination, 59.8 per cent of
the cargo in this direction went to the United States, and 32.5 per
cent to Europe. Tonnage to the United States decreased in its pro-
portion to the total tonnage, but showed an increase in actual tonnage
of 48,630 tons, or 4.7 per cent. That to Europe increased 45,294 tons,
or 8.3 per cent, while its relation to the total cargo remained the same.

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.

From the cargo declarations submitted it was possible to classify
82.5 per cent of the total cargo in transit through the Canal from the
Atlantic to the Pacific. The remaining 17.5 per cent consists, for the
most part, of manufactured articles in small lots reported as "General
cargo.
Atlantic to Pacific-bound commodities, which aggregated more than
10,000 tons for July, 1929, or July, 1930, are listed in the following
tabulation, showing differences:

July, July,
Commodity. 1929. 1930. Difference.


Ammonia ..... .. ... ....
Automobiles. ..... .. ..
Cement ... ......
Coal and coke..... ..... ..
Cotton ... .. .
Manufactured goods:
Iron and steel ... ...
M machinery .. .. .......
Railroad material....... ....
Textiles .. .. ... . .
Tinplate............. .
Miscellaneous . .... .
Metal, scrap (principally iron) ....
Oils, mineral .. ...... . ....
Paper... .. . .. ...
Phosphates. ... ... .........
Sugar ....... . .
Sulphur............. .....


Long tons.
12,368
22,881
38,331
23,637
10,559
230,916
14,979
29,294
11,948
15,555
15,492
8,318
62,050
22,038
32,638
15,108
29,485


Long Ions.
3,165
11,296
16,773
12,331
4,629
108,973
10,720
8,082
6,099
15,257
7,320
20,029
37,323
17,483
23,771
14,895
15,662


Long tons.
-9,203
-11,585
-21,558'
-11,308
-5,930
-121,943
-4,250
-21,212
-5,849
-298
-8,172
+11,711
-24,727
-4,555
-8,887
-213
-13,823 -
4.


The above 17 commodity groups comprise 58.0 per cent of the cargo 0'
moving from the Atlantic to the Pacific during July, 1930. All of the
items except scrap metal show decreases as compared with July,
1929. The largest decline was in manufactured iron and steel.

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.

It was possible to classify 98.6 per cent of all cargo moving from the
Pacific to Atlantic during the month of July, 1930. Commodities.
which aggregated more than 10,000 tons either during the past month .
or the corresponding month in 1929 are listed below:


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


.... ... ... ... ........... .
...............................
..... .. ................. ..... .
............. ........ ... .. .. .
. .. . . ... . . . . . . . .
. . . . . .. . . .
. . . . . .. . .. . .. . .
............ ..............
.. .... ............ ..... ....... ..
.. ............... ......... .....









August S0, 1980


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Commodity.


B arley ....................... .......... ......................... .
COai ed goods (fish, fruit, vegetables, etc.) ... .. ...... .... ... .... ..
Cold storage (food products) ......................................
Lumi ber............... ... ....... .. .. . . ...... .
M etala, various................... ............... ..... .............
Nitrates ..... ....... .. ....................... ......
Oils, mineral..................... ........................ .........
Ores. (principally iron)................. ............ . .........
Pulp ....................... ..........................
Rioe ..... ... .................. .. ....... .. ... . .... ....
Sugal.................... ..... . ......... ... .. ......... .
Wheat ......... . .... ... .. . ............. . .. .....
Wool............. ............. ................ .. ......


July.
1929.
Long tons.
24,625
38,527
18,306
348,814
58,560
143,664
455,333
173,437
10,053
10,993
113.644
107,888
10,497


July,
1930.

Long tons.
13,958
44,254
34,331
279,522
41,040
64,204
689.753
220,492
8,047
12,248
111,628
134,285
15,919


Difference.

Long tons.
-10,667
+5,727
+16,025
-69,292
-17,520
-79,460
+234,420
+47,055
-2,006
+1,255
-2.016
+26,397
+5,422


resh fruit not included.

The above 13 commodity groups comprise 91.4 per cent of the cargo
moving from the Pacific to the Atlantic during July, 1930. Seven of
the items show increases and 6 decreases. Mineral oils, iron ores, and
wheat showed the greatest increases, while lumber, nitrates, and metals
:.xlecreased heavily.
(Continued on next page.)



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending August 9, 1930.


Cargo-
Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed.
.Discharged Laded.


Sa.ta Barbara.......
Cristobal ...........
Ludwigshafen......
.Zeaon... .........
Cartago.............
eigo...............
u............
d a a .. ...........
.alia n ...........
I ian............
iu'it d.... ......
Angeles...-.......

dn ...........
m.. n...............
s iares..........
~t Teresa........
Johnson.......
d ............

n ..... ......
,.. ..........
Felipe...........

.............

. ............
d .....t....





... .......
I.........
.. ........



I. .To. he.
.. a


G race Line .. .................
Panama R. R. S. S. Line.........
North German Lloyd ...........
French Line. . ............
United Fruit Co .................
Hamburg-American Line.........
United Fruit Co ....... ........
National Navigation Co.... .....
Hamburg-American Line.........
Danisb-EasttAsiatic Co.... .....
Leyland S. S. Line.. ........
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.......
Hamburg-American Line.........
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.......
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.......
United Fruit Co.................
Grace Line....... ............
Johnson S. S. Line...............
North German Lloyd............
Hamburg-American Line.........
Fred Olsen Line ............ .
United Fruit Co..................
Chilean Line....................
States S. S. Co............. ..
Grace Line.....................
United Fruit Co................
C. D. Mallory & Co.............
Hamburg-American Line.........
United Fruit Co................
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
N. O. & S. A. S. S. Co...........
Colombian Line.................
French Line ....................
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
Standard Fruit S. S. Co .........
North German Lloyd............
Pacific Steam Navigation Co.....
French Line............ .... ..
United Fruit Co................
Osaka Shosen Kaisha............
Huseteca Petroleum Co..........
United Fruit Co................


lieharg No cargo laded.


IA (: :: : .
I'; .. ::.. .. .:. ... .. .;
: ' .:S . ... .


August 3....
August 3.....
August 3.....
August 3.....
August 3......

August 4.....
August 4....
August 4....
August 5 ....
August 5....
August 5....
August 5 .....
August 5....
August 6....
August 6....
August 6.....
August 6....
August 6....
August 6.
August 6....

August 7.....
August 7.....
August 7.....
August 7.....

August 8 .....
August 8......
August 8 .....
August 9 .....
August 9.....
August 9.....
August 9.....
August 9.....
August 9 .....


August 3.....
August 3.....
August 3.....
August 3....
August 3..
August 3..
August 3.....

August 3....
August 4.
August 4.
August 4....
August 5.....
August 5..
August 6..
August 5.....
August 6.....
August 6.....
August 6.....
August 6.....
August 6.....
August 6.....
August 6 ...
August 6.....
August 7.....
August 7.....
August 7.....
August 9..
August 7.....
August 8..
August 8..
August 9.....
August 8....
August 9..



August 9.....

............. :


S40 pounds.


Tons.





35
78
566
245
665

130
223
594
112
(*)
240
65
(')
566
54
5
97
245
11,079
29
103
244
152
124
182
718
205
33
71
1,259
76


Tons.
233
978
192
62
72
205
71

307
(,)
54
667
72
66'
15]
(4)
257
51
(C)
72
221
(0)
(')
103
88
(a)
60
272

1541
295
438
1,026
388


...... .

. .... ..
.. .... ....


4 2 packages.


_ _ I










THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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August 19MO THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 35


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36 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD .4ugust O0, 1980


United States Intercoastal Traffic by Commodities for July, 1930.

The following table shows the cargo carried through the Canal in
the United States intercoastal trade, segregated by commodities and .
by direction, with the total for July, 1930, and the totals for July,
1929 and 1928. Cargo statistics are compiled from cargo declarations
submitted by masters of vessels, and in these declarations small
items are frequently grouped under the designation "General cargo." 4
These statistics are accordingly not precise, but they are indicative
of the kind and quantity of the cargo in transit through the Canal.
These figures represent tons of 2,240 pounds, and are for the United
States intercoastal trade only:

Atlantic Pacific
to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.
Agriicltiiral impIlemtri s ... 465 97 562
Alfalfa .. ... . .. 304 304
Alfalfa meal .. ...... . ... .. . 583 583
Ammunia . . .... 25 . 25
Automobiles . .. . .... .. ...... ... 3,787 120 3.907
Automobile accussaries .. .... . .. . .... .. 885 167 1,052
Bark:
Cascara .. ... 53 53
Other . . . .. ... 384 384
Barley . .. . .... . .. .. 22 22
Beans ... .... .. . .. .1,541 1,541
Bor ... ... .. .. 77 1,413 1,490
Bricks . 100 100
Burlap . . . .. . . 21 42 63
Calcium carbide ... . 60 .. 60
Camphor .. ... ... 23 23
Cann,-.d:
Fish ............ ..... 165 9,301 9,466
Fr it .. . .... 277 15,110 15,387
M eat ... . ... ........ 92 492 584
Milk ...... .. .... 25 15 46
Soup .. .. .. 969 16 985
Vegetables .. .. ..... 269 3,431 3,700
M sceellaneous .. .. .. 2,186 4,291 6,477
Carbon black . .. 12 103 115
Celite filterce ... . . 586 586
Cement. . .. .. .. 449 8 457
Chalk ... ... .. .... . .. .. ...... . 32 .. 32
Charcoal ..... . .. .. 76 . .. 76
Chemicals .. . .. .. 2,981 305 3,286
China and fire clay ...... ..... ......... 89 89
Coal ............... .. .. 1,800 .. 1,800
Cocoa .. .. .. . . .... . 60 10 70
Coconuts ... . . .. ......... . ....... . . . 40 552 592
Coffee .. ... ..... .. ..... ........ .... . ........ 405 140 545
Coke .. .... .. ............. ................. ......... .. 1,970 .......... 1,970
Cold storage:
Beef .. .. . . ............ .. .......... . . 17 .......... 17
Butter... ... .. ... ..... ... ........ ........ 50 .... ..... 50
Eggs . ... ...... .. .. .. . .... ...... .... . .. .. .... 110 110
Lard .... . ....... . . .. ... 50 .... ... 50
Other .... .. .. ... .. .. ... ... ......... .. .. 185 ... 185
Confectionery ... .......407 .... 407
Copra.... . ....... ........ ... ............... .......... 110 110
Cotton ... .. . . . ..... . .. . 421 1,043 1,464
Cottonseed meal . . . . . . ..... ... ... ... 742 742
Cyanide.. ..... . .. ... ... .... .. . ... ....... ..... .... .20 . .
Drugs .. ............. .... . .......... ............ 1,506 6 1,512
Dyes . .. ... .. . . ... . .. . 318 . ... 318
Earthenware . ... ...... . .. ..... 45 169 214
Eggs, dried ... .. .. .... .. .. .. . ......... 199 199
Fertilizer.. .. .... . ..... . . ..... .... . ........... 33 .......... 33
Flour ... .. ... .. .... ... ..... .. ................... 300 4,268 4,568
Fruit:
Dried ........ .. ...... ............................... 9 4,395 4,404
Fresh ... . .. .. ......... .. ... .. .............. ..... ... 796 796
Fullers earth...... . ... .......... ... ...... ..... ... .... 76 55 131
Furniture ..... . ................... . ............... ... 520 111 631
General.. ........ ............ ........................ 42,119 16,525 58,644
Glass and glassware ............... . ...... ............... .... 2,596 201 2,797
Glue .. . .. .. .. ..... ......... .... 63 13 76
Granite... . ....... ......... .. .......... .... .... ....... .. 25 .......... .25
G raphite .......... ... .... .. ....... ............. .... .. ........ 71 ........ 71
G um ... . .. ............................................... . .......... 71 71
H air ....... . .... .... ....... .... .. ......... .. .... .......... 167 167



*J ?i








Av 4 d SO, 1980


RI


Atlantic Pacific
to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.


Hardwoods .................... ... .......... .. . ............ ......
H ay ........ ................................. .. ... ...................
H em p......... ........ ........................ .......... ... .
H money ..... ....................................... . .....
Hops. .............. . .. ................... .. ... .... .....
Ink........................ .... .......... . . ........... .......
J ute .......... ....... .. ..... .. .. .. ....... .... .. ..............
Lard substitute ....................... ..................................
Leather .......................................... .. ....................
Lime........ .......... .. .................... .........
Linoleum.......... ......... ........... .........................
L iquors ........ ..... .. .......... ..... v .. ......... . . . .. .
Lum ber ............................. ..... .. .......... ..... ...........
Malt.............. .. .. .. .. ......... .. . ... .....
Manufactured goods:
Iron and steel......... .............. . .. ..... .......
Machinery ................................. .. ... ... .. . .....
Railroad material ............ ... ... .... . .
Tinplate........ .................. ... ... . .
Textiles ...... ........ .................... .. ..........
M miscellaneous .. ................ ......... .... .. .... . . .. ..
M atches ......... ... ............... ..... ... ........... ..... ........
Metals:
Copper ................................ ...................
Iron ........ ............................... . ....... ........
Lead .......... ................... ....... ..... . .. ....
Scrap ....................................... . ...... ...... ......
Tin ......................................... .. . ..... ........
Zinc ................ ............. ........ .. .. ........... .....
Other.............................. ..... ... ................
Milk, powdered.................................. ....... . .......
M olasses ............... .. ...................... ..... . .............
M musical instruments................................... ..................
Nitrates.............. ...... ...... .. ........... .. ....... .....
N uts.................. . .. ........... .. ... .. ....... ...... ......
Oats....................................... ..........
Oils:
Coconut ........... ... .... . ... .... .. ... . .. .....
Cottonseed ............................... ...... . .. ...
C rude..................................... .. .. .........
Gas oil, fuel oil.......................... ...... ...... ....
Gasoline, benzine, naphtha ........................ ........ .....
Kerosene............. ....................... ............
Lubricating and greases ..... .................................. . ...
Vegetable.............................. ....... ............ . ....
W ood......................................... ..... . .......
O ther................. ..................... .. ........... .......
Ores:
Copper...............................................................
M agnesite . . . . ............................................... . .
M anganese................................... .......................
Z inc .............. .. ...... ..................................... ....
Other....................................... ............ ........
Paint ..................... ............. ..................... ......
P aper. ...... ................... .. .. ............ ....
Paperpulp ................ ..... . .. .. .. ......... . . .
Paper roofing ...........................................................
Peanuta.................... ...... ... ................. ....
P eas........... .......... .... ..........................................
"Phosphates .................. ........................ ...................
Porcelain...................
R age ......... ..........................................................
R. ice........... ....................................................
Rope ................ ........ ...............................
R osin ...................................................................
Rubber:
Manufactured...........................................
Scrap ...............................................
S alt................................................ ......... ...........
S and ..................................... ... ............. .... .........

i k H em p ............... ........... .. ..... ............ ...... .......


shelsa ...... ........... .... .... .. ............. .......
S .. .......: .......................................................
S .ins and hig e ........................ ... ................. ............


le b........te...........................................................
o a........ .. .........................................................
.......... ........................................................


....... .... .......... .......................................
.......................................................................





-.", .. .......


693

18*
........ ._
22
148
1,795
69
29
209
106
6,609
295

68,719
2,228
85
8,259
3,826
3,471
204
32
1,477
25
279
18"
87
18
38
12
271

40

34
452
13
29
17
4,925
753
20
261

..........
75
14
30
860
5,270
32
52
666
27
1,114
289
10
69
150
647

1,486
. . . . .
324
2,200



..........i

1,791i
221
2,268
116
1,712
169
93

12,590


782
1,169
1,472
46
105

14

57
13
155,867

1,264
763
71
I1
78
1,115
12

4,703
400
..........
706"
5
244
204


15

12

56,652
332,958
1,202
2
..........
60o

300
109
55
950
308
14
8,715
7,352

246
192
1,365
328
22Q
90

77
59


30
82

1843
1,710

95




20,363
. .... ... ..


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


I


1,475
1,169
1,472
64
105
22
148
1,809
69
29
266
119
162,476
295

69,983
2,991
156
8.260
3,904
4,586
216

4,735
1,877
25
985
5
262
87
222
38
12
271
15
40

12
34
452
56,665
332,987
17
6,127
755
20
321
300
109
130
964
338
874
13,985
7,384
52
912
219
2,479
289
338
289
240
647
1,563
59
324
2,200

30
82
849
843
1,710
1,791
221
2,363
116
1,112
169
93
20,363
12,590








30 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD August o0, 190


Atlantic Pacific
to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.
Syrup.... ......... ... ..................... ...... ... ......... 33 ........ 33
Talc ................. ......... ............................ ......... 226 226
Tallow. . ............... ... ........................ ......... 170 170
Tar ............... ................... .......... ......... 136 ........ 136
Tobacco...... ............ ............ .............. 1,814 50 1,864
Toys ..... ........ ........ ................. ................ 55 .......... 55
Turpentine ... . . . . .......... .. .. .... ....... 93 .... ..... 93
Vegetables .. ... .......................................... 756 756
Waste ............ ..... .......................... .....45 33 18
Wax ...... ..... ...... .... ..... ................. 55 24 79
Wheat ................ ... ............. ....................... ... 68 68
Wine... ...... ............ ... ......... ......... .. ........ ..... . 22 22
W ool .. ............ ... .... ....................... ... ......... 7 10,733 10,740
Total, July, 1930 .. ....................... .. . ............ 207,096 683.667 890,763
Total, July, 1929............. .......... .......... ...... 336,019 642,384 978,403
Total, July, 1928 . ........... ...... . ...... .......... 245,433 633,488 878,921


Notice to Mariners.

THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 19, 1930.
No. 736.

The following was received in a letter addressed to the Governor of The Panama
Canal:
A new lighthouse has been established on La Plata Island in the same position as the old one but with
an increased visibility. Characteristics of light are as follows:
Period. 7 seconds; flash 0.7 second, eclipse 6.3 seconds. Range, 16.6 miles; in clear weather, 30 miles.
Position, latitude 1' 15' 50" S., longitude 81 06' 00" %V.
Light is situated on N. W'. end and summit of island.
(Signed.) C. E. ALFARO,
Ecuadorean Legation.
(NoTE.-Color of light was not given.)
H. BURGESS,
Governor. *

Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Two Weeks Ending August 16, 1930.


Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed. Cargo-
Discharged Laded.
Tons. Tons.
Santa Teresa. ....... Grace Line .. ........ August 4..... August 5 ..... 4 ..........
Rangitane... ....... New Zealand Shipping Co ....... August 5..... August 6.. 17 ..........
Barneveld .. Royal Netherlands S. S. Co....... August 5.... August 6 ..... 115 ..........
Vega. ..... ... U. S. Government ............... August 7..... August 7 ..... 47 ..........
Virginia ..... .... Panama-Pacific Line ......... August 8.... August 8 ..... .......... 168
Saramacca.. ... United Fruit Co... ............ August 8.... August 9. .. 523 9
Salvador ... ..... Pacific Steam Navigation Co. .... August 9 .... August 9 ..... 2 ..........
President Harrison. Dollar Line. .. ............ August 10 ... August 10.... 13 3
Charles E. Harwood. Huasteca Petroleum Co.......... August 10.... August 12.... 2,835 ..........
Montebello ... Union Oil Co... ...... ...... August 11... August 12 .... 11,850 19
Santa Inez ... ...... Grace Line. ................. August 12.... August 12.... 8 1
Guatemala. ......... Panama Mail S. S. Co........... August 12.... August 13... 62 3
Archer. ............ Roosevelt S. S. Co .... ......... August 12.... August 13.... 284 ........
Lagarto. .. ........ Pacific Steam Navigation Co...... August 12.... August 12.... .......... 5
Colombia ... ...... Panama Mail S. S. Co........... August 13 August 14 .... 76 .......
San Mateo.... .... United Fruit Co.............. August 14 August 15.... 141 61


Density of Water in Balboa and Cristobal Harbors.

Weight of sea water in ounces per cubic ft. Rainy season.
Place. '------ Averagetempera-
Average. Maximum. Minimum. ture. Degrees F. .
Cristobal (between docks 8 and 9) .................... 1018 1020 1013 840
Balboa (dock 18) ................................. 1011 1021 1005 83.0

(NoTz-The above is based on two months observations at Cristobal, and Balboa. Average taken at 12-foot depth.:
Minimum occurred after heavy rain at 3-foot depth at Cristobal and 12-foot depth at Balboa. The weight of a eubiA "
foot of fresh water at 85 F. is 995 ounces.







.: Aug l So,1930 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 39

Official Publications of Interest to Shipping.

Masters may obtain from the office of the Captain of the Port,
at either Cristobal or Balboa, without charge, the "Rules and Regu-
lations Governing Navigation of The Panama Canal and Adjacent
Waters," and the current Tariff of charges at the Canal for supplies
and services.
Requests for Canal publications sent by mail should be addressed to:
The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z.; or, when more convenient,
to The Panama Canal, \l'ashington, D. C.
The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal maintains at all times a com-
plete stock of navigational charts and books, including charts of all
parts of the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical tables,
light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs, etc.
At the office of the Port Captain in Balboa, a limited stock of navi-
gational charts, books, etc., is also carried, and this office is in a
position to fill practically any order in this connection that a ship might
place.
Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices to Mariners, and
'Hydrographic Bulletins may be obtained in return for marine infor-
.mation.
Observations of weather, ocean currents, and other marine data
collected, and blanks, instructions, barometer comparisons, etc.,
.urnished.
Correct time is maintained and chronometers rated.


Sailings of Panama Railroad Steamship Line.
;.,' Following are proposed dates of sailings for 1930 of passenger vessels in the New
ipYrk-Cristobal service of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, in which the steamers
ucon and Cristobal are engaged, sailing alternately:

Arrive Arrive
Leave Port au Prince Arrive Leave Port an Prince Arrive
Steamer. New York A. M. Cristobal Cristobal A. NI New York
4 P.M. Leave P. M. A.M. P.M Leave P. M. A.M.
ohsl....... August 19.... August 24.... August 27... August 31... September 3.. September 8.
........... September 3.. September8. September I. September 15. September 18. September23.
bal........ September 16. September 21. September 24. September 28. October 1.... October 6.
.......... September 30. October 5.... October 8..... Octoberg2.... October 15.... October 20.
bal........ October 15.... October 20.... October 23.... October 28.... October 31.... November 5.
S........... October28.... November 2.. November5. November 9.. November 12. November 17.
al........ November 11. November 16. November 19. November 23. November 26. December 1.
......... November 25. November 30. December 3... December 7... December 10.. December 15.
obal........ December 9... December 14.. December 17.. December 21.. December 24.. December 29.
......... December 23.. December 28.. December 31.. January 4.... January 7.... January 12.
.Jffeetive April 30, steamers sail daylight saving time.
V Du0e to discontinuance of the daylight saving time, departure after S. S. Criasobal, Sept. 16th, will be at 4. p. m.,
time,
sail at 4 p. m. from pier 65, North Rier, Foot of West 25th St., New York.

ii.:both southward and northward voyages the vessels call at Port-au-Prince,'Haiti,
U:is -approximately 5 days from New York and 60 hours from Cristobal. The
i. vessels at Port-au-Prince is of sufficient length of time to allow passengers to
Opints of interest.

I Depa ture of Passenger Trains. 12.15 p. m., 4.30 p. m.; Sunday only, 9.20 a. m.
4.00 p. m.
"'An re the hours of departure of the From Panama: Daily except Sunday, 7.05 a.m.,
Si traams of the Papama Railroad 12.20 p. m., 4.35 p. m.; Sunday oqly, 7.05 a. m.,
--the. Atlantic and tue Pacific: 6.15 p. m.
t.e Aanta Pacific:The time required for passage from one ter-
Dal:W except. Sunday, 7.00 a. m., minal to the other is I hour and 45 minutes.
Wh. .
A :4E ..
': Eh: =::.": V".....
... . .









4-U THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD Augustf O;1980


Prices of Miscellaneous Supplies at Panama Canal Storehouses.
i
The following are prices to individuals and companies including the
25 per cent surcharge, effective August 20, 1930.

Commodities. Unit. Price. .
Brass, bar. average ................................................... ........ Lb $0.24 ;
Brass, sheet, average .......................................................... Lb. .31. j
Bronze, Tobin, average ........................................................ Lb. 26 :
Gasoline, motor grade........................................................... Gal. .t3s ."
M etal, yellow . .......................................................... Lb .29 J
Oakum Navy. spun ................................................ ............ Lb. .15
Oakum, Navy, unspun ... ......................................... .......... Lb. .16
Oil, Diesel, at Cristobal only, in bulk, no surcharge................................ Bbl. of 42 gals. 1.80
Oil, fuel, at Balboa and Cristobal, in bulk, no surcharge........................... Bbl. of 42 gals. 1.50.
Oil, ammonia. cylinder ............................. ................... Gal. .28:
Oil, burning. Colza .... .... ........ ... ... ................................ Gal. 1.06
Oil, engine, gas. in drums, Gulftriton Med. No. 2135.. ............................. Gal. .36
Oil, engine, gas, extra heavy, in casrs, Gulftriton No. 2250 ........................ Gal. .49
Oil, engine, gas, extra heavy, in drums, Gulftriton, No. 2250....................... Gal. .41
Oil, kerosene, in drums ..................................................... Gal. .10
Oil, marine engine .......................................................... Gal. .50
Paint, lead, white, dry ......................................................... Lb. .14
Paint, lead, white, in oil .................................................... Lb. .13
Paint, zinc oxide, dry...................... ... ............................. Lb. .10
Paint. zinc oxide, in oil ..... .. .. ......................................... Lb. Jl3
Grease, gear, chain and wire rope, lubricating.................................... Lb. .05
Grease, yellow, cup, No. 3 ................................................... Lb. .08
Grease, yellow, cup, No. 5.......... .. .......................................... Lb. .09
Soda. ash ... ......................................................... Lb. .03
W aste, cotton, colored.......................................................... Lb. .14
W aste, cotton, white........................................................... Lb. .16


Location of Patients and Visiting Hours, at Gorgas Hospital.

The following table shows the distribution of patients in the Gorgas.
hospital buildings and the visiting hours for the various wards and


sections:

Section and Ward.


Section"A:"
Ward 2, Semi-private, white male ........... ......
Ward 3. American male, eye, ear, nose and throat
patients......................................

Ward 4, Private rooms...........................
Section "B:"
Ward 5, Male, private rooms. American boys .......
Ward 6, Foreign, male and female, private rooms,
American girls ..... .. ......... ......
Ward 7, White females, private rooms .............
Ward 8, Obstetrical department, white females.......
Nursery................. ................. ...
Section "C:"
Ward 9, Colored, male ...........................
Ward 10, White foreign, male.....................
Ward I Colored, male taurgical) .................
Ward 12. Colored, male (medical).................
Ward 13, Colored, male, G. U.....................
Ward 14, White, male, G. U......................
Section "D:"
Ward 15, American, male (surgical)...............
Ward 16, American, male (medical) ................
Ward 17, Colored children.........................
Ward 18, W hite children..........................
Ward 19, Colored, female (medical)................
Ward 20, Colored, female, surgical, obstetrical.......
Isolation section......................................


Visiting Hours. .

Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00 1
p. m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays, 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.
6.30 to 7.30 p. m. Sunday and holidays, 9.30 to 11.00
a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m,.
Daily, same as Ward 2 (above).



Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00
p.m.
No visitors permitted in nursery.



Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00
p. m.
Tuesday, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays,
2.30 to 4.30 p. m.
Tuesday, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.
2.30 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 7.30 p. m. Sunday and
holidays, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.
Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00
p. m.
Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m.
\ Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00
f p.m.
No visitors permitted except to visit tuberculosis patient
Thursday, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00 p. m.
I.


Permission to visit outside of visiting hours may be granted upon application to the Superintendent's Office. :
Immediate relatives of seriously ill patients will be admitted at any time by and in the discretion of the attendmn
physician, section nurse, and in her absence, the nurse in charge.



41 IN
72:


-~~- -"~'~-~ -~--'- ------








iHE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY. BE,
Subscription rates, domestic, 30.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-clas matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1870.
Curtifle.--By direction of the Governor of the Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
Information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

:Volume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 27, 1930. No. 4.

CANAL WORK IN JULY, 1930.
j The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of War,
of Canal work in the month of July, 1930.
.7 BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 21, 1930.
,.'The Honorable, the Secretary of War,
Washington, D. C.
SSIR: I have the honor to submit the following report covering operations of The
Pananft Canal during the month of July, 1930:
NUMBER OF TRANSITS.
i During the month, 488 commercial vessels and 10 small nonseagoing launches
.measuring under 20 tons transited the Canal. In addition to these there were 33
vessels belonging to the United States Government, and 2 transits of Panamanian
cGovernment vessels, on which no tolls were collected, making a total of 533 transit
Rfmor the month, or a daily average of 17.19.
, Tolls on the 488 commercial vessels amounted to $2,180,511.82, and on the launches
to $64.95, a total of $2,180,576.77, or a daily average on all traffic of $70,341.19.
Commercial traffic for the past month as compared with June, 1930, shows an
.m.rease of 10 transits and $79,517.29 in tolls, and in comparison with the traffic in
..J.ly, 1929, a decrease of 39 transits and $79,070.55 in tolls. Traffic in. the first 7
months of the current calendar year has fallen off to the extent of 284 transits and
..94,831.43 in tolls, in comparison with the corresponding period last year.
'The total numbers of craft of all kinds tradsiting the Canal during the month of
Jily, 1930, as compared with the same month in 1929 and 1928, are shown in the
following tabulation:

July, July, July,
1930. 1929. 1928.
a ial vessels....................................................... 488 527 509
hes (under 20 tons).................................................. 10 4 10
onsnerol vessels:
UI t. united States Government............................................. 33 44 28 ,
: anui anian Government. ......................................... 2 2 3
re.airs........................................................... 10 .
Total........................................................... 533 87 558

addition to the vessels listed above, Panama Canal equipment consisting of
,.es, tugs, barges, etc., was passed through the locks as follows:

W."North- South-
bound. bound. Total.
.. .............................................................. 8 16
..el ... .................................................... 23 27 50
.... ........................................................ 27 130 57
...,... ................................................... 58 65 123

COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC.'
iting tabulation .shows the number of vessels, Panama Canal net tonnage,
ftmsof cargo carged by vessels transiting the Canal each month from the
git.ealenddar year 1930 to the end of July, 1930, as compared with the
-ii the previous. year:

i 2 :A.. ]:i : :: ..
: :! !::~.4::; .' : N x'; v :::: ,.. ..:... ..
",; n :i. .":. . '' "" .o; ..i









42 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD Augw2a7, IMs


No. of Panama Canal net
Month. vessels tonnage. Ton of cargo. Tolls.
M month. _____ _____ _________
1929. 1930. 1929. 1930. 1929. 1930. 1929. 1930.
January... 603 531 2,771,280 2,601,628 2.858,835 2,611,632 $2,502,815.12 2,360,211.24
February.. 522 491 2,428,530 2,369.255 2,550.496 2,377,900 2,211,961.20 2,131,386.12
March.... 536 515 2,567,961 2,505,859 2,743,768 2,558,238 2,343,865.55 2,200,002.36
April..... 540 489 2,488,176 2,479,096 2,719,668 2,456,782 2,281,087.27 2,232,763.00
May..... 524 479 2,496,905 2,418,633 2,536,839 2,261,616 2,296,546 57 2,162,898.00
June...... 503 478 2,352,431 2,358,237 2,424,002 2,147,181 2,127,805.97 2,100,994.53
July...... 527 488 2.468,280 2,438,895 2,598,162 2,402,047 2,259,582.37 2,180,511.82
Total... 3,755 3,471 17,573,563 17,171,603 18,431,772 16,815,396 16,023,664.05 15,428,767.87

Commercial traffic includes all ocean-going vessels paying tolls. Vessels in direct service of the United States,
Panamanian, and Colombian Governments, including merchant vessels chartered by these Governments and vessel
transiting solely for repairs, do not pay tolls. Shipping Board vessels in commercial service pay tolls. Statistics on
vessels not paying tolls are shown under "Noncommercial traffic." T

The following is a summary of the commercial traffic for July, 1930, as compared
with the corresponding month in 1929 and 1928, and the monthly averages for the
fiscal year 1930:

Average per
July, July, July, moath for"
1930. 1929. 1928. fiscal year
1 1930.
Number of vessels ..................... 488 527 509 515
Panama Canal net tonnage ............. 2,438,895 2,468,280 2,318,395 2,498,385
United States net tonnage .............. 1,827,188 1,907,298 1,771,887 1,890,255
Registered gross tonnage ............... 3,030,107 3,118,081 2,922,904 3,119,221
Registered net tonnage....... ......... 1,842,382 1.909,588 1,781,824 1,899,802
Tolls................................ $2,180,511.82 $2,259,582.37 $2,109,083.19. $2,256,407.50
Tons of cargo carried ................ 2,402,047 2,598,162 2,291,955 2,502,619


The average daily number of transits, tonnage, tolls, and cargo, are shown in-the
following statement, in comparative form, commercial vessels only:

Average per day. Average per
day for fiscal
July, 1930. July, 1929. July, 1928. year 1930.
Numberoftransits ................. ... 15.74 17.00 16.41 10.95'
Panama Canal net tonnage ....... 78,674 79,622 74,787 82,139
Tolls ............................... $70,339.09 $72,889.75 $68,034.94 $74,183.26
Tonse of cargo carried .................. 77,485 83,812 73,934 82,275


"r.,
..2







3

























',i


AVERAGE TONNAGE, TOLLS, AND TONS OF CARGO PER VESSEL.

The average tonnage, tolls, and tons of cargo per vessel transiting the Canal during
the month of July, 1930, as compared with July, 1929 and 1928, are shown in the
following tabulation:

Average per vessel.
July, July, July,
1930. 1929. 1928.
Panama Canal net tonnage.................................. 4,998 4,684 4,554
United States net tonnage..................................... 3,744 3,619 3,8 1
Registered gross tonnage...................................... 6,209 5,917 5,742
Registered net tonnage ...................................... 3,775 3,624 3,497
Tolls ............................................... ........ $4,468.26 $4,287.63 34,143.58 'A
Tons of cargo (including vessels in ballast) ...................... 4,922 4,930 4,503 :
Tons of cargo (laden vessels only).............................. 5,802 5,878 5,431


NATIONALITY OF VESSELS.

Seventeen nationalities were represented in the commercial traffic passing through- *i
the Canal in July, 1930. Vessels of United States registry, with 240, led in the number *
of transits, while those of British registry, with 117, were second; vessels of these two
nationalities made 73.2 per cent of the total transits for the month. Germany',.
Norway, and Japan were next with 30, 28, and 16 transits, respectively.




: h !
".E '... a.




- -..' ". -




S7, 1980 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 43

CARGO AND PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES.

The total cargo carried through the Canal during the month of July, 1930,. was
1G02,047 tons. Cargo from the Atlantic to the Pacific aggregated 575,964 tons, as
b imptred with 699,652 tons in June, 1930, and 909,976 tons in July, 1929. From
fie Pocific to Atlantic there were 1,826,083 tons, as compared with 1,447,529 tons in
tne,'1930, and 1,688,186 tons in July, 1929.
From the Atlantic to Pacific, there was a decrease of 334,01? tons of cargo, or 36.7
l cent, as compared with July, 1929, caused by a decline in tonnages of practically
i commodities, principally manufactured iron and steel. Various manufactured
bqods, totaling 156,451 tons, constituted the heaviest item of traffic in this direction,
allowed by mineral oils with 37,323 tons, phosphates with 23,771 tons, scrap metal
ith 20,029 tons, and paper with 17,483 tons.
tFrom the Pacific to Atlantic, mineral oil shipments totaling 689,753 tons, were
ie heaviest item, followed by lumber with 279,522 tons, ores (principally iron) with
20,492 tons, wheat with 134,285 tons, and sugar with 111,628 tons.

|I. TOLLS.
SAt present tolls are collected at rates of $1.20 per net ton for laden vessels and $0.72
er ton for vessels in ballast, computed on the basis of the Panama Canal rules of
measurement, with the provision that tolls shall not exceed $1.25 per net ton nor be
than $0.75 per ton as determined in accordance with the United States rules for
measurement of net registered tonnage. In order to ascertain the proper tolls charges
ifls necessary, therefore, that the net tonnage of vessels transiting the Canal be deter-
fined in accordance with both the Panama Canal and the United States rules of
measurement.
Due to this limiting proviso, the tolls actually collected last month on laden vessels
ergged $0.923 per net ton, Panama Canal measurement, and tolls on vessels in
IHast averaged $0.719 per net ton, Panama Canal measurement.
i.Taking the traffic through the Canal for the month of July, 1930, the following
bulation shows a comparison of tolls actually collected under the present method
gl bessing tolls with the tolls that would have been collected on the basis of the
nhama Canal rules of measurement at the proposed rates of $1 laden and $0.60
st with no added charges for deck loads. The traffic for the month is segregated
lag:

Tolls that would
have been collected Difference.
at." i oTolls actually under proposed
.: 'Nationality,. collected under rates of $1 laden
present dual and 60o ballast on
,. system. basis of Panama Increase, Decrease.
Canal net tonnage.
............... ...... 10,802.50 11,005.00 202.50 ..................
................... 548,746.40 597,750.20 49,003.80 ..................
.................... 8,023.75 9,377.00 753.25 ..................
.................... 001.85 783.00 .................. 118.85
................... 32,769.48 33,915.40 1,145.92 ..................
........ ......... 17,415.19 15,666.20 .................. 1,748.99
.................. 19,666.99 21,519.20 1,852.21 ..................
................. 50,025.95 52,386.00 2,360.05 ..................
S................. 91,843.88 107,084.40 15,240.52 ..................
..................... 3,295.00 4,099.00 804.00 ..................
................. 27,891.65 33,345.00 5,453.35 ..................
i.'..9... ......... 85,326.25 80,830.00 .................. 4,496.25
..,............. 106,005.62 117,968.60 11,962.98 ..................
................ 12,166.05 13,492.20 1,326.15 ..................
....... ......... 29,298.37 .30,990.60 1,692.23 ..................
... ............ 1,131,644.14 1,166,424.00 34,779.86 ...............
p tE ...................... 4,088.75 4,5670,00 481.25 ..................
............. 2,180,511.82 2,301,205.80 127,058.07 6,364.09
Kalt a &fi ........................................ 120,693.98 ..................


yaqn.vessels of Tited States registry would have been distributed with
tisf trade in which the vessels were engaged as follows:

i T'r
*.i:..:i :: .*.i. : : .,. :/" ..









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


'14
.Aw l. "1
*. ..E "-
.* ".:".

* '*


United States intercoastal trade.... ..... .................................................... 824,227.4
United States foreign trade .. .................................. ................... ..... .. 9,197.
United States-Canal Zone trade............................................................ 1,354
N et increase...................................................................... ..... 34,779.


RATIO OF CARGO TONNAGE TO NET TONNAGE.

The ratio of cargo tonnage to net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement of vessel
transiting the Panama Canal in July, 1930, is shown in the following tabulations
segregated by nationality of vessels and direction of transit. Laden vessels only
included:

Atlantic Pacific
Nationality. to to Total.
Pacific. Atlantic.
Belgian............................................................ ............ 1.59 1.S
British ........................... ......................... .70 1.27 1.04
Chilean ...................... .............................. .50 .70 .6I
Colombian..................................................... 1.51 1.43 1,
Danish........... ..... .................................. 1.11 1.17 1.1
Danzig......................................................... .............. 1.95 1.
D utch ............................................................ .78 1.42 1.
French ............................................................ .49 1.28 1.0.
German .................... ..... .. ......................... .73 1.25 1.
G reek .......................................................... ... ............ 1.73 1.
Italian ............................................................ .41 .45 .4
Japanese .......................................................... 1.21 1.40 1.
Norwegian.......................... .............................. .88 1.62 1.3
Panamanian ...................................................... .64 1.14 1.1
Swedish .................... ................................. 83 2.87 2.
United States ..................................................... .68 1.46 1.1
Yugoslav.......................................................... ............ 1.78 1.7
Averages, July, 1930 .......................................... .72 1.40 1.
Averages, July, 1929............................................ .98 1.45 1.
Averages, July, 1928 ...... .................................... .82 1.49 1.1


CLASSIFICATION OF VESSELS.

A further classification of vessels passing through the Canal during the month oi
July is as follows: .

Atlantic to Pacific. Pacific to Atlantic.
Class. No. Panama No. Panama .
of Canal net Tolls. of Canal net Tolls.
ships. tonnage. ships. tonnage.
Tank ships:
Laden ................ .... .. .......... ............... 69 375,067 $385,446.05
Ballast ........................ 51 281,690 5202,949.10 ...... .......... ............
General cargo ships: so .
Laden ........................ 163 796,468 707,763.25 182 922,987 830,645.8
Ballast..... ................... 14 51,713 36,682.80 5 10,933 7.061.4.
Noncargo-earrying ships:
Yachts......................... 2 45 33.15 2 42 30.2.
Total... .................. 230 1,129,916 947,428.30 258 1,308,979 1,233,083.5.i
Method of propulsion:
Steam......................... 161 799,357 693,689.72 190 936,008. 899, 0. 25
Motor ....................... 65 330,129 253,327.08 66 372,607 333,0.9W.00-
Motor schooner ................. 2 218 252.50 2 364 272.3~
Nonpropelled.................... 2 212 159.00 ...... .......... .............
Total ..................... 230 1,129,916 947,428.30 258 1,308,979 1,233,083.


Of the 351 steam-driven vessels, 273 were oil burning, 77 coal burning, lind.t
burned either oil or coal.
NONCOMMERCIAL TRAFFIC.

The following statement shows the number of transits and tonnage of vessels tr
siting the Canal free of tolls during the month of July, 1930. If the tolls had be'
assessed against these vessels at commercial rates, the amounts would have be
approximately as indicated. -


F ..
5:":. i,,'
S'? ,,, '




*1
I'



57.1
it!


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Atlantic to Pacific. Pacific to Atlantic.
SClass and nationality. No. No.
of Tonnage. Tolls. of Tonnage. Tolls.
transit. transit.
8. Naval vessels:
Battleships ...................... 1 32,000 $16,000.00 .................. .........
Cruisers........................ 1 '3,200 1,600:00 1 '3,200 51,600.00
Cutters ........ ............... 1 10 500 ......... ... .... ..............
Gunboats....... ......... ... 2 3,150 1,575.00 ........ ........ .............
M: ewee pe ........ ......... 1 I 950 475.00 ........ .......... ..............
M otor s ilors.................... 1 10 5.00 ........ .... .... .............
Submarinesa...................... 9 '7,774 3,887.00 9 '7,774 3,887.00
Supply'ships..................... 1 i 1,613 2,016.25 ........ .......... ..............
S. Army vessels:
Transports...................... 2 7,816 9,770.00 4 114,770 18,462.50
Total, U.S. Government...... 19 .......... 35,333.25 14 ......... 23,949.50
namanian Government vessels:
Transports...... .... .......... 1 101 72.72 ........ .......... ..............
Yachts. .......................... ........ .......... .............. 1 20 10.00
Grand total.................. 20 .......... 35,405.97 15 ........... 23,959.50

Indicates displacement tonnage. Indicates Panama Canal net tonnage. Indicates United States net tonnage.

The foregoing noncommercial vessels transiting the Canal during the month of
;ly, 1930, carried cargo as follows: Atlantic to Pacific, 1,423 tons; Pacific to Atlantic,
17 tons; total 2,160 tons.

LAUNCHES UNDER 20 TONS MEASUREMENT.
The following statement shows the number of launches under 20 tons measurement
'anama- Canal net), transiting the Canal during the month of July, 1930. These
unches, although paying.tolls, are excepted Trom statements concerning commercial
affic:

Number Panama
Number Canal net Tolls.
of transit, tonnage.

anti to Pacific ................. .. .......................... ............ 8 56 $50.10
Wifiuto Atlantic ...................................................... 2 18 14.85
: Total ............................... ......................... 10 74 64.95


STATEMENT OF TERMINAL OPERATIONS.
.Details of the business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the
~nama Canal during the month of July, 1930, are shown in the following tabulation:


argo arriving ...........................................tons..
bargo shipped ........................................... tons.
t cargo arrving........................................ tons..
t eargo lgaiing........................................tons..
received for transshipment............................... tons..
tra lushipped.......... ................................ tons..
lone for Orders" cargo:
anberof receipt issued.......................................
isiber of withdrawals .........................................
1 eeived,............... ..................
touies received............................... ........... .. .
Swithd raw n.... .. ..... ....... . .... ... .....
- reed.

t led with bunker coal:
M* ,tial other than Panama Railroad Company................
S to above vessels:
their than Panama Railroad Company..........tons..
W gaeneoes:
Departments ................................ tons..
i udig ves ....... ....................... ton ..
a compa .............................. tons..
SCompan ..................... .......... tons..
toflv... . ... .................... tons..


4, 1......" ... .. ..t
-:1" e
4 ... ..:.,.: .. z. ,:
I ., :'.,....p : :


Cristobal.

62,928
6,210
2,357,017
2,344,258
27,244
26,531

99
669
2,273
2,427
5,070
8,824


Balboa.


36,698
744
2,351,400
2.375,088
1,816
1,506

29
252
254
286
2,664
2,061


Total.


99,626
6,954
4,708,417
4,719,346
29,060
28,037

128
921
2,527
2,713
7,734
10,885


32 2 34

9,629 3 9,632
72 4 76
19 2 21
252 ............ 252
7 ... 7
9 ............
* 9,088 9 9,97









46 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD August BT, 1



Cristobal. Balboa. Total.

Coal on hand, July 1, 1930 ......................... tons.. 114,521 550 115,07
Coal on hand. August 1, 1930 ..................................tons.. 104,533 541 105,07
Coal received from Navy........................................ tons............... 9
Fuel oil issued from Panama Canal tanks:
Panama Canal departments.................. ........... bbls... 6,154.80 13,511.23 19,666.0 !
Panama Railroad Company...... .................. bbls... 150.0.0 85.84 235.8
U. S. Army and Navy .......................... .. bbls.. ........... 108.10 108.1
Individuals and companies............................... bbls... ........... 138.76 138.7
Total sales and issues ............................... bblB... 6,304.80 13,843.93 20,148.
Fuel oil received during July, 1930........................ ... bbls.. ............ 79,438.64 79,438..
Fuel oil on hand, August 1, 1930.................... ... bbls... 73,639.90 105,618.07 '179,257..
Diesel oil sold during July, 1930...............................bbls.. 11,935.62 564.22 12,4990.1
Diesel oil on hand, August 1, 1930...... ...... bb.. 1,082.50 18,136.89 19,219.'
Miscellaneous transfers... .......................... bbls... 13,296.65 822.85 14,119.
Gasoline and kerosene pumped for The Panama Canal............bbls... 2,523.24 4,843.64 7,366.8
Gasoline pumped for individuals and companies............... ..bbla... 940.40 7,121.20 8,061.6
Oil pumped for individuals and companies....................... bbls... 516,474.78 301,066.50 817,541..
Oil pumped for U. S. Navy................................. bbls... 29,601.00 3,297.00 32,898.0
Total fuel oil, gasoline, and kerosene handled .............. bbls. 581.076.49 331,559.34 912,635.8
Admeasurement of vessels:
U. S. equivalent certificates issued.......................... ..... 19 3
Measured for Panama Canal net tonnage.... ...................... 5 1
Remeasured for Panama Canal net tonnage ........................ 16 2
Panama Canal net tonnage corrected .............................. 2 3 '
U. S. equivalent tonnage corrected ......................... ...... 8 11
Services of harbor equipment: 4
Tugs, total operating hours....................... .............. 3311 2391 570
Launches, total operating hours ................................ 1,309 1,567'1 2,87
Revenue from tug service, pilotage, etc.: :
Tug revenue .................. ...................... ........ $11,375.00 58,823.75 $20,198.7
Pilotage....................................................... 17,618.00 8,140.00 25,758.
Seamen............... ................................ 10,536.00 12,272.00 22,808.0
Launch service....................... .. ............... 2,137.50 2,852.00 4,989.50
Wharfage............. ..................................... 16,178.19 5,679.71 21,857.90'
Ships measured.............................................. .. 185.00 15.00 200.00
M iscellaneous............. ........... ................. 399.33 357.50 756.8
Ships repaired at Panama Canal shops:
Commercial.... ...................... ................. 41 12
U. S. Army and Navy............................................ 3 2
Panama Canal equipment ...................................... 3 12
Total................................................... 47 26 _
Vessels dry docked:
Comm ercial.. .............................................. 7 1
U. S. Army and Navy........................................... 1 1
Panama Canal equipment ...................................... 1 8 .
Total ............................................... .. 9 10 I
Clearances issued............... .................... ............ 316 237 556 &
Bills of health issued................................................. 347 240 587

Shortage of 409.40 barrels on account of shrinkage and seepage. Shortage of 111.35 barrels on account
of inventory.
ALL VESSELS ENTERING AND CLEARING PORT.
Port of Cristobal. Port of Balboa.
No. Registered Registered No. Registered Begistered
of gross net of gross net g
ships. tonnage. tonnage. ships. tonnage, tonnage. ,,.
Ships entering.
All vessels, including those transiting Canal.. 549 3,431,761 2,100,833 506 3,127,353 1,928,7
Vessels entering port but not transiting Canal. 74 349,517 208,712 10 63,883 40, .
Vessels transiting Canal and handling passen-
gers and cargo at terminal ports........ 118 718,287 431,519 96 559,436 883,
Ships clearing.
All vessels, including those transiting Canal... 556 3,402,591 2,084,459 516 3,164,128 1,957,
Vesselsclearing port but not transiting Canal. 74 355,640 211,240 11 64,919 40,
Vessels transiting Canal and handling passen-
gem and cargo at terminal ports........ 117 709,129 426,634 96 570,933 S3


A ",. ,k








ASlul .7,1930


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


MOVEMENT OF PASSENGERS.


At Cristobal. At Balboa.
First- First-
cla. Others. Total. class. Others. Total.

Pm Auantie ports.............................. 1,462 681 2,143 106 353 459
From Pacific ports................................ 180 135 315 269 248 517
Total disembarking............. ............ 1,642 816 2,458 375 601 976
Embarking:
For Atlantic ports............................... 1,354 708 2,062 127 296 423
For Pacific ports................................ 209 76 285 359 283 642
Total embarking............................ 1,563 784 2,347 486 579 1,065
Remaining on board:
FromAtlantictoPacificports..................... 1,858 2,088 3,946 2,089 1,930 4,019
From Pacific to Atlantic ports .................. 1,668 1,646 3,314 1,621 1,932 3,553
From Atlantic to Atlantic ports.................... 769 165 934 ........................
From Pacific to Pacific ports....................... ....... ........ ........ 33 471 504
Total remaining on board................. 4,295 3,899 8,194 3,743 4,333 8,076
Totalarriving..................................... 5,937 ,4,715 10,652 4,118 4,934 9,052
Total departing ..................................... 5,858 4,683 10,541 4,229 4,912 9,141


PASSENGER-CARRYING VESSELS THROUGH CANAL.

Total Passenger- Per cent
commercial carrying of total
vessels, vessels, transit.
Atlantic to Pacific ................................................. 230 44 19.13
Pacific to Atlantic................................................. 258 50 19.38
Total ......................................................... 488 94 19.26


In addition to the aforesaid, 65 passenger-carrying vessels called at the port of
Cristobal and 4 at Balboa without transiting the Canal, making a total of 163
passenger-carrying vessels calling at Canal ports during the month.

AIRCRAFT ENTERING AND CLEARING.

During the month of July, 1930, 43 commercial airplanes entered and 42 cleared
,'at the port of Cristobal, and none at Balboa.

COMMISSARY SALES TO VESSELS.

The following is a. statement of commissary sales to vessels during the month of
.July, 1930:


ail at Grietobal to:
: commercial veMel.............
G' government vessel .............
ZR. .IL essels................
: Total ales, July, 1930.......
Totsl ales, July, 1920......
Totalaes., July, 1928......
Balboa to:
vessels.............

7 e.TJuly. 1930......
aisiJuly, 1929......

ELl e-ll2J*L .....


Groceries.


Cold
storage.


Laundry.


MiBsel-
laneous.


. I I I I .1 .1


81,911.43
151.00
3.60


$11,116.20
808.59
209.88


$23,979.46
7,567.06
966.98


$84.55
448.50
813.24


57,108.28
705.68
17.42


Total.


144,199.92
9,680.83
2,011.12


2,066.03 12,134.67 32,513.50 2,346.29 7,831.38 55,8092.87
3,681.18 17,267.26 59,880.22 932.76 11,356.04 93,117.46
3,242.14 14,054.59 46,338.19 933.54 9,124,77 73,693.23


677.31
356.55

1,033.86


1,637.57
895.67

2,533.24


12,439.45
11,118.96

23,558.41


404.93
81.05
38.90
524.88


11,163.58
420.80

11,584.38


I --I- I--- I --I -


1,617.35 118,061.10 35,631.97 1,640.86 8,149.92


SI I I I I


1,913.94


16,109.71


36,909.88


1,548.79 5,976.38


26,322.84
12,873.0W3
38.90
39,234.77


66,001.20


62,458.70


Y


.:, : .... *7








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


The aggregate sales to Government vessels during the month was $22,553.86; to
Panama Railroad vessels, $2,050.02; and to other commercial vessels, $70,522.76,"::
making the total sales to all vessels $95,126.64. The figures shown are subject to
minor changes on final audit.
LOCK OPERATIONS.

The following tabulation shows the number of lockages, and the number of vessels
passing through the locks during the month of July, 1930, as compared with the.....
corresponding month in 1929 and 1928:

Number of lockages. Comparative

Locks. Commercial. Noncommercial.' grand totals.

North. South. Total. North. South. Total. 1930 1929. 1928.
Gatun..................................... 249 216 465 6 9 15 480 511 501
Pedro Miguel.............................. 252 217 469 13 21 34 503 542 520
Miraflores................................ 251 216 467 13 21 34 501 .534 518
Number of vessels put through locks.
Gatun..................................... 257 230 487 36 36 72 559 595 578
PedroMiguel ............................. 256 225 481 44 51 95 576 629 623
Miraflores.................................... 256 225 481 48 54 102 583 636 622

Includes tolls-paying launches under 20 tons. .
CLASSIFICATION OF NONCOMMERCIAL VESSELS.

Pedro
Gatun. Miguel. Miraflorea.

Army and Navy vessels............................................. ... 38 33 33
Panama Canal equipment...................................................... ........ 16 50 57
Launches (under 20 tons)........................ ................ .... ... 17 9 9
Panamanian Government vessels.. ....................................... 1 3 3


The total consumption of water for lockages, maintenance, an d loss in leakage was
as follows in July, 1930, as compared with the preceding month and the corresponding
month in 1929:

Pedro
Gatun. Miguel. Miraflores.

Cubic feet. Cubic feet. Cubic feet.
Lookages....................................... 1,904,970,000 1,531,600,000 1,486,700,000 :
Leakage. ............................. .............. 40,000,000 12,500,000 20,000,000 j
M maintenance. .... ................................... 3,380,000 ................ ..................
Total, July 1930 ........... ....................... 1,948,350,000 1,544,100,000 1,506,700,000
Total, June, 1930................................... 1,982,360,000 1,5671860,000 1,552,580.,000
Total, July, 1929 ................................. 2,086,630,000 1,608,210,000 1,604,570,000

HYDROGRAPHY.
The hydrographic conditions in the Canal Zone and vicinity during the month of
July, 1930, are shown in comparative form, in the following tabulations:

July. July-Years of record. "
1929. 1930. Maximum. Minimum. Mean.
C.f. C, f.. C.f.s. C.f.a. C. fs. A
Discharge of Chagres River at Alhajuela .............. 1,926 2,285 6,197 1,248 2,785
Maximum momentary discharge for the month......... 10,778 17,790 '33,700 .......... ..........
Gatun Lake watershed, total yield................... 4,882 5,107 14,663 2,677 6,045, ,
Gatun Lake watershed, net yield... ................ 4,396 4,482 14,156 1,898 6,395::.
Draft on Gatun Lake for lockages and power.......... 2,955 a 2,810 2,955 1,244 2,288
___________________ ------- ----- -_- --


July 22, 1927. a July, 1914, not included. No water saving.
The discharge of the Chagres River at Alhajuela was 18 per cent below the 29-year.:
average, or 2,285 c. f. s., compared with an average of 2,786 c. f. s. The maximumn4
momentary discharge for the month was 17,790 c. f. s. at elevation 100.04.feet on th...


. 4.. ..i*..


A gust 7, I
August S,19S...:







r 7, 190 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 49

tlk. The minimum discharge was 1,025 c. f. s. at elevation 92.25 feet on the 3d.
rh maximum mean monthly discharge on record for the month of July is 6,197 c. f. s.
Sl127, and the minimum 1,248 c. f. s. in 1905. The maximum momentary discharge
W record for July is 33,700 c. f. s. at elevation 103.99 feet on July 22, 1927.
The total yield of the Gatun Lake watershed for July was 5,107 c. f. s., or 26 per
tent below the 17-year average for July of 6,945 c. f. s. Maximum and minimum
btal yields of record for July are 14,663 c. f. s. in 1927, and 2,677 c. f. s. in 1914. The
ikie varied in elevation from 83.16 feet on the 7th to a maximum of 84.47 feet on the.
17th, and ended at elevation 84.29 feet, showing a net rise during the month of 0.92
oot.
Miraflores Lake varied between elevations 53.40 feet on the 25th and 54.76 feet
in the 10th, averaged 53.81 feet, and ended at elevation 54.06 feet.
SEISMOLOGY.
Six'seismic disturbances were recorded during the month, on the 7th, 14th, 15th,
l7th, 29th, and 30th. The disturbance on the 30th was of intensity V-VI on the
tossi-Forel scale. No damage was done to Canal structures.
ELECTRICAL DIVISION.
The gross generator output of the Gatun hydroelectric station for the month was
262,900 kilowatt hours, and the computed water consumption was 4.087,153,990
ubic feet. Continuous service was maintained throughout the month. The Mira-
lures Diesel-electric station had a gross generator output of 5,300 kilowatt hours,
kid the .fuel oil consumption was 25.7 barrels. The station was operated only for
iak-load service during the month.
In addition to the usual operating and maintenance work performed, electrical
additions or repairs were made on 47 vessels during the month. There were 421 work
.iders issued during the month, as compared with 474 issued during the previous
ionth.
'. MECHANICAL DIVISION.
VDuring the month of July, 1930, miscellaneous repairs were made on 47 vessels at
ristobal and 26 at Balboa. Nine vessels were dry docked at Cristobal and 10 at
laboa. Work was completed and carried forward on several pieces of equipment
liThe Panama Canal, the United States Army and Navy, and commercial steamship

; .. MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING DIVISION.
h)ne hundred and twenty-three square yards of concrete pavement was laid at the
~ ubrillo river, on the Madden r6ad. The bridges over the Chilibre and Chili-
o rivers were completed except for the road slab'. The Azote Caballo road was
leted.
'- the Thatcher Highway the erection of Camp No. 1 was 90 per cent completed.
and one-quarter miles of temporary road was built and a temporary ferry put
tion.
otk on several improvement projects in the cities of Colon and Panama, and in
^Canal Zone, was carried on.
usual maintenance work was performed on roads, streets, walks, and the
itand water systems. The amount of water pumped during the month totaled
94A00 gallons.
DREDGING DIVISION.
Sist Las Cascadas slide showed a slight movement along the waterfront and
west La Pita slide a slight surface movement during the month. A break
t' nt the 26th between stations 1735-00 and 1738-00 W. on the West Lirio slide,
eback 200 feet from the new west prism line and about 60 feet above the
There was a depth of 20 feet on the west prism line and a depth of 39
eetLeast at station 1738-00. A settlement of this slide at the water's edge
& betweenn stations 1772-00 and 1724-50 W. The general movement of
.Cebra slide along the waterfront continued throughout the month with
movement of 1.1 feet toward the Canal between stations 1772-00 and
llth a maximum of 2.0 feet at station 1792-00. A movement of the East
Sliide took place on the 10th, when 20 feet of the Lirio run-off culvert
rn: broke down. and 25,000 cubic yards of material entered-the Canal.
ukhed oat overthe east prism line for 65 feet, leaving a depth of water
1748.-00s 85 feet east of the center line. A few bank breaks

.'.. .. '.... .. .
p . : .:...:: ..:. . .., . . . . .. .
.. j :: : : ,, ,.,r N., ". " " . ".
... ". ,,,,''. ir I,:: .., .. . . . '







50 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD Augnwt T, 1980 |

occurred during the month. There was no interference with shipping on account of
slides.
The total excavation during July, 1930, was 655,315 cubic yards, as follows:

Wet excavation.
Earth. Rock. Total.
Cubic yds. Cubic yds. Cubic pde.
Work excavation:
Gaillard Out-
East Barge repair shde ............. ....... ........... ... ... 12,150 14,800 26,950
Project No. 3 . ... .......................................... 7,450 19,750 27,200
W est Lirio slide........................ .. ........................ 12,700 38,150 50,850
Maintenance........ .............................. 2,750 4,150 6,900
Pacific Entrance-
Project No. 1 .......... .... ................................ 59,000 196,600 255,600
M aintenance..................................................... 163,000 20,000 183,000
Auxiliary.. . .......... ....... ..................... 600 1,200 1,800.
Plant excavation:
Dredging sand at Chame.......... .... .. ............... ..... ... 3,515 .......... 3,515 i
France Field................ ........... . ... ....... ............... 99,500 .......... 99,500 :
Total ........... . ..... .... .. . .... ........ ... 360.665 294,650 655,8165

The ferry crossing at the north end of Pedro Miguel lock operated 31 days during
the month. One thousand three hundred and sixty-four trips were made, and 144
Panama Canal, 26 U. S. Army, and 4,470 other vehicles, a total of 4,640, were ferried
across the Canal.
MADDEN DAM PROJECT.
Preliminary layouts of hydroelectric works were drawn showing the power house
on the right bank of the riverand the spillway over the main dam, with intakes up
stream from spillway and also in spillway section. The installation of low-head
units to utilize storage at the lower elevations of reservoir level was studied. Comr
parative studies were made of long-span and short-span transmission lines, and design
of towers for long-span line started. Layout of general wiring diagram for the pow
development was drawn. Natural storage between Alhajuela and Gamboa for the
1,000-year flood was calculated.
The precise level circuit, from the precise bench mark datum along the Canal,,
has been carried up the Madden road to the Azote Caballo Ridge road, and will be:
extended to the damsite and along the Madronal and Azote Caballo ridges.
Sufficient mapping has been done to form a basis for an estimate of the amount of,
earth dam material available on the Azote Caballo side of the reservoir. At typicl|i
and centrally-located points four test pits and one sampling trench were staked out,
and at two of these points work is in progress.
Requisition was issued to cover simple and three dimensional tests of additional
specimens of rock from strata "b" and "c" at the damsite, and 21 specimens from the:
left bank were shipped to the United States on the 27th. At the end of the month-:
24 specimens from the right bank were nearly ready for shipment. Tests for moisture:,
content, and simple compression tests of cores from the same drill holes are being:
made at Miraflores Laboratory.
No sink-hole excavation was done during the month. Cleaning out and timbering:
was done at No. 1 for a length of 300 feet, at No. 5 for 9 feet, and at No. 13 for'
5 feet. At No. 20 the shaft was timbered, drain for surface water constructed,!
and concrete base for hoist was built. Blowers and pipe lines have been installed
and are now operating at sink holes Nos. 1 and 5.
One thousand two hundred and forty-three feet of drilling of all types was performed.
during the month. |
OCCUPANTS OF QUARTERS.
The number of persons, including men, women, and children occupying Panamtr
Canal quarters on July 31, 1930, was 22,640, composed of 7,818 Americans, 2,829 od
whom were men, 2,319 women, and 2,670 children; 245 Europeans, 92 of whom were
men, 38 women, and 115 children; 14,577 West Indians, 4,219 of whom, were meni.
2,686 women, and 7,672 children. The total number of persons in quarters on Jatiuy
31, 1929, was 21,906.
WORKING FORCE. .!
The following tabulation shows the number of gold and silver employees as A
July 16, 1930, with a comparison of the working force for the preceding month'a&-
for July 1929:








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


As of July 16, 1930. Total employees.
June. July,
Gold. Silver. Total. 1930. 1929.
Operation and Maintenance:
Officd ......................................... 58 71 129 140 105
Electrical.................................... 158 173 331 335 327
Municipal Engineering.......................... 99 972 1,071 762 1,599
Lock Operation............................... 239 713 952 941 956
Dredging ....... ........... ................ 202 1,009 1,211 1,179 1,251
Madden Project............................... 30 266 296 669 .........
Mechanical ............ ..................... 503 877 1,380 1,388 1,401
Marine...................................... 201 587 788 799 856
Fortifications....... .......... ....... ....... 26 151 177 165 317
Total.................................... 1,516 4,819 6,335 6,378 6,812
Supply Department:
Quartermaster ................................ 223 1,988 2,211 2,203 2,131
Commissary.............................. 234 1,326 1,560 1,552 1,503
Cattle Industry-Plantations .................... 2 94 96 100 188
Hotel Tivoli ................................... 8 107 115 116 109
Hotel Washington.............................. 9 95 104 104 109
Transportation ............................... 76 252 328 325 287
Total..................................... 552 3,862 4,414 4,400 4,327
Accounting Department ........................... 203 6 209 210 216
Health Department................... 292 860 1,152 1,155 1,147
Executive Department ............................. 528 330 858 865 844
Total........................................ 1,023 1,196 2,219 2,230 2,207
Panama Railroad Company:
Superintendent ............................... 52 250 302 302 326
Transportation ................................. 63 123 186 188 190
Receiving and Forwarding Agency................ 90 1,017 1,107 1,377 1,494
Coaling Stations........... ................... 43 183 226 249 278
Total ................................... 248 1,573 1,821 2,116 2,288
Grand total, July, 1930................. 3,339 11,450 14,789 .................
Grand total, June, 1930.............. .......... ......... .......... 15,124 ..........
Grand total, July, 1929.............. .......... .......... .......... .......... 15,634


Additions to the gold force on the Isthmus in July were as follows: Employed in
the United States, 9; reemployed in the United States, 1; employed on the Isthmus,
.17; reemployed on the Isthmus, 15; total, 42. Separations from the gold force
totaled 30, as follows: Resigned, 18; discharged, 8; retired, 3; died, 1. At the end of
"the month there were on file 520 applications from residents of the Isthmus for em-
:ployment.
VITAL STATISTICS.

A total of 201 deaths occurred during the month of July, 1930, among the popu-
"lation of the Canal Zone, and the cities of Panama and Colon, which is equivalent
to an annual death rate of 16.79 per 1,000 population. The leading causes of death
-rere: Pneumonia (broncho and lobar), 28; tuberculosis (various organs), 22; nephritis
acute and chronic), 17; and diarrhea and enteritis, 13. There were 10 deaths from
cancer, 10 from organic diseases of the heart, 9 from syphilis, and 1 each from leprosy,
meningococcus meningitis, and chicken pox. There were 21 deaths among nonresi-
tents. These are not included in the above statistics.
SThere were 320 live births and 12 stillbirths reported during the month. Including
illbirths, this is equivalent to an annual birth rate of 27.74. Deaths among children
der 1 year of age numbered 44, giving an infant mortality rate based on the number
live births reported, of 137.50.
:The total number of malaria cases reported from the Zone and the cities of Panama
d...Colon during July was 464, of whom 82 were employees (13 white and 69 colored),
were members of employees' families (6 white and 66 colored), 19 were Canal Zone
purists, 152 were other civilian nonemployees, and 139 were Army and Navy
Tie. Of the 154 employees and members of employees' families, 54 were prob-
a 0ected outside our sanitated areas, as they gave a history of working, living, or
been in6 such areas at night previous to their becoming sick. There were three
frei- malaria among residents, 1 a Canal Zone agriculturist, 1 colored adult.
.j -*iaainiia City, andi a 27-day-old baby who evidently contracted the disease
i t's birth in Panama City.



L".. ...
Mi
S:.. . .. .


:As. t 7,190








52 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD Augul T7, 191

RECEIPTS AND SALES OF MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES.
The value of material ordered on United States requisitions for which invoices were
received on the Isthmus during the month totaled $430,542.13, of which $411,988.15 .
was for the Department of Operation and Maintenace, and $18,553.98 for other Pan-
ama Canal departments.
Cash sales on the Isthmus from stock, fuel oil, scrap, and obsolete and second-hand
material amounted to $56,111.16. .
FINANCIAL STATEMENT.
The following statement shows in a condensed form the aggregate revenue and
expenditures for the month of June, 1930, as compared with June, 1929, with the
figures for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1930, as compared with the fiscal year 1929.
It is impossible to submit figures for the month of July at the time of writing this
report, since all charges, etc., involved in the accounting have not been completed.
June, June, Fiscal year.
June, June,
1930. 1929. 1930. 1929.
Tolls............ ....... ... .. .... $2,101,108.17 $2,127,851.84 52 7 7077,117.36 27,123,534.33
Other receipts... .............. .. 360,104.72 389,293.72 4,500,655.50 4,055,424.47
Total transit revenues........... 2,461,212.92 2,517,145.56 31,577,772.86 31,178,958.80
STotal transitexpenses... .......... 1,196,164.21 1,235,305.43 1,3,495,321.08 13,449,183.79
Net transit revenues ....... 1,265,048.71 1,281,840.13 18,082.451.78 17,729,775.01
Three per cent capital charge... 621,273.45 619,006.34 7,456,319.89 7,392,091.89
Transitsurplus............ 643,775.26 662,833.79 10,626,131.89 10,337,683.12
Business revenues..................... 1,635,358.99 1,395,771.67 19,865,895.45 17,236.785.0
Business expenses ................... 1,573,010.67 1,637,249.01 19,104,923.79 16,498,934.76
Net revenues ..................... 62,348.32 (241,477.34) 760,971.66 737,850.26
Three per cent capital charge. ... 64,447.23 62,674.50 808,861.93 788,424.05
Business deficit.... ... ....... (2,098.91) (304,151.84) (47,890.27) (50,573.79)
Combined revenues .................. 4,096,571.91 3,912,917.23 51,443,668.31 48,415;743.82
Combined expenses ....... ........... 2,769,174.88 2,872,554.44 32,600,244.87 29,948,118.55
Net revenues .... ................ 1,327,397.03 1,040,362.79 18,843,423.44 18.467,625.27
Three per cent capital charge ....... 685,720.68 681,680.84 8,265,181.82 8,180,515.9.4
Combined surplus............. 641,676.35 358,681.95 10,578,241.62 10,287,109.33

Respectfully,
H. BURGESS,
Governor.

Embarking or Disembarking Passengers.
THE PANAMA CANAL, DEPARTMENT OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS C. Z., August 22, 1930.
Notice to steamship agents:
Among vessels transiting the Panama Canal, there are some which stop at only -e
one terminal to discharge and receive passengers, and a few that stop at neither;
terminal. In consequence, on numerous occasions in the past this office has received
requests from the agents of vessels concerned (or direct requests from the prospective.
passengers or friends of actual passengers) for permission to embark or disembark
passengers while the vessel, in transit, is at one of the locks.
This procedure is strictly prohibited by Executive Order (See Rule 40, "Rules and
Regulations Governing Navigation of the Panama Canal"). Agents of vesselsW, '-
therefore, will please see that, in the future, all passengers or prospective passengers i
are notified accordingly, and make such arrangements as may be necessary and safe
for embarking or disembarking such passengers in the terminal basins, either prior..
or subsequent (as the case may be) to the vessel's transiting the locks.
C. H. WOODWARD,
Marine Superintendent.
Approved:
H. BURGESS,
Governor. .- .::..

.. .. t''








Avpda S7, 1980 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 53

Notices to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 22, 1930.
No. 737.
AID TO NAVIGATION.
Panama Canal, Atlantic entrance, west breakwater entrance. The following infor-
mation is furnished by the Lighthouse Subdivision:
The west breakwater beacon, on the west side of the entrance through the breakwater of Limon Bay,
temporarily discontinued August 7, 1930, due to rebuilding operations (see Notice to Mariners, B. H.
No. 731, August 8, 1930) was reestablished August 21, 1930.
Description, The new beacon is located on the same position occupied by the old one and consists
6f a 375 m.m. acetylene gas lantern mounted on a 24-foot steel tower; tower set on a 10-foot concrete
pedestal. The tower and pedestal are painted white.
Characteristic, Red group flashing, period 2 seconds: 0.3 light, 0.4 eclipse, 0.3 light, 1.0 eclipse;
height, 37.5 feet above mean high water; visibility. 10 nautical miles; position, lat. 9 23' 23" N., long.
S79 55'31" W.
S. H. BURGESS,
Governor.

THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
S738. BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 23, 1930.
No. 738.
The following is quoted from Notice to Mariners No. 33 of August 16, 1930, pub-
lished by the Hydrographic Office, Navy Department, Washington, D. C.:
1. Curacao Island, Canon Point light, characteristic changed. Canon Point light has been changed
from group flashing white to.flashing white. Period 4 seconds; flash 0.3 second, eclipse 3.7 seconds. The
light is visible 8 miles. Approximate position, 12* 03' N., 68* 45' W.
2." Peri, Islay Point, light established. The second officer of the American steamer Nosa Chief (Ex
Garfield), reports under date of June 17, 1930, that a flashing white light has been established on Flat
*"Rock Point, Islay Point, Peru. Approximate position, 17 00' 04" S., 72* 07' 30" W.
J. L. SCHLEY,
A cling Governor.

THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 25, 1930.
K.No. 739.
Panama, Canal Zone, Balboa harbor. lights on oil berth changed. The two green lights formerly
narking Dock 2-C (Oil Crib) in Balboa harbor, have*been removed and one red light has been installed in
center of outshore edge of the structure.
i: J. L. SCHLEY,
Acting Governor.

Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
i- .from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Week Ending August 23, 1930.

Cargo-
Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed.
Discharged Laded.
Tons. Tons.
iteo ......... United Fruit Co................. August 16 .... August 16 .... .......... 68
to............. Panama Mail S. S. Co........... August 16.... August 16.... .......... 1
Perkins........ Jas. Griffiths & Sons............. August 17.... August 22 ... 4,069 ..........
Maersk ...... Standard Oil Co ................ August 17.... August 18.... 11,830 .........
o Maru........ Nippon Yusen Kaisha............ August 17.... August 17.... 151 5........
i, u Thierry....U. S. Government............... August 18 August 19.... 29 10
i oMaru....... Nipppon Yuen Kaisha .......... August 18.... August 19.... 219 ........
tf Panama...... Panama Mail S. S. Co........... August 18.... August 19.... 67 ..........
i '............. U. S. Governme nt............... August 19.... August 19.... 2 3
arbfta........ Grace Line .................... August 20.... August 20 .... 3 .........
vania........ Panama-Pacific Line..... ...... August 22.... August 22 ............. 184
e..i......... Uted Fruit Co.............. August 22... August 23.... 554 36
Leie.......... Hamburg-American Line......... August 23.... August 23.... 208 .........


Ships' Chandlery Supplies.
a Canal Storehouses carry a Complete line of ships' chandlery supplies,
f6r sale to ships at C. I. F. cost plus 25 per cent surcharge which covers
e .ht handling, and other costs.
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Augul st7,19


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing from
Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Two Weeks Ending August 23, 1930.


Name of vessel.


Buenaventura Pan,
Magdalena .. Han
Washington Fren
Parismina .... Unil
Durazzo..... .. Han
Calamares ULnil
Guayaquil.... Pan
Colombo .. Itali
Waunta .... Star
Lochgoil ... Roy
Alvarado ...... Paci
Nebraska... Roy
Tela.... .... Unit
Emil Kirdorf Han
Santa Inez...... Gra
Guatemala ...... Pan
Santa Tecla.... N.
Toloa ......... . Uni
San Marcous... Stat
Manizales..... Nor
Nitokris Hn
Pearl Marie. . R. F
Lagarto ..... .. Paci
Dramatist T. &
Van Rensselaer .. Roy
Kmnderdijk. ... Hull
Alda. ... ... Nor
Archer . . Roo
Pacific Pioneer ... Fur
Bellasco .. Amlu
Iriona .. Unil
Santa Marta .. Unit
Swiftlight C. I
H. H. Rogers. Stan
Ancon ... Pan:
C. C. Acme.. Max
Cauca ..... . Nat
Marie Bakke .... Scar
Colombia .. Pan
Bogota ... .. Col
Daytonian .. Leyl
Tacoma.. ... Han
Manuel Arnus ..... Spai
TeJa ... ....... Unit
Van Rensselaer .... Roy
Atlantida. .. . Stan
San Mateo... .. Unit
Heredia .... .. Unit
Santa Clara..... .... Grac
Dora K........ .... R. F
Ebro . .... ... Paci
Lautaro .... ..... Paci
Corinto .. ... . Pan
Ancon ...... Pan
Manuel Arnus.. .. Spar
Heredia .... .... Unit
Ebro. . ......... Paci
Toloa .... Unit
Caldas ...... Nati
Delftdijk .. Holl
Leme .. .... Nay
Sparreholm.. .. Alun
Pastures . ....... Unit
Perou .. .. ... Fren
Cali . ..... .. Nort
Tatsuno Maru .... Nipp
Santa Rita . ... Grac
Bodegraven.... .. Royi
Santa Barbara.... .. Grac
San Julian.. .. Stati
Castilla .... ...... Unit
Camden...... .... Unit
Metapan........... Unit
Iriona... ....... ... Unit
Golden Gate ........ Knul
Seattle. .. .. ... Ham
Orbita .. ........ Pacil
Knute Nelson....... Fred
Drechedijk.......... Holl
No cargo discharged.


Line or charterer.


ama R. R. S. S. Line.. ..
aburg-American Line. ....
ich Line .. .
ted Fruit Co
nburg-American Line....
ted Fruit Co
ama R. R. S. S. Line.
an Line
idard Fruit & S. S. Co
al Mail Steam Packet Co
fic Steam Navigation Co ....
al Mail Steam Packet Co .
ed Fruit Co
aburg-American Line ..
ce Line ..
ama Mail S. S. Co.. ..
)-. & S. A. S. S. Co
ted Fruit Co
es S. S. Co
th German Lloyd
ahurg-Am'rican Line .....
Feuillebois .. .. .
fie Steam Navigation Co.....
J. Harrison ....
al Netherlands S. S. Co... ..
aud-American Line ...
th German Lloyd ... .. .
sevelt Line .... ..
ness. Wit bhy & Co.
minium Line .....
ted Fruit Co ..
ed Fruit Co .... ......
). Mallory ...
dard Shipping Co ... ...
ama R. R. S. S. Line .....
well Newball ....
ional Navigation Co .. ....
idinavian-South Pacific Co ....
ama Mail S. S. Co ... .... .
imbian S. S. Line. ..........
and S. S. Line .. ...
nburg-American Line ........
nish Line ... ... ..
ed Fruit Co ... ..... .
al Netherlands S. S. Co.......
dard Fruit & S. S. Co.. .....
ed Fruit Co. .... .... .....
ed Fruit Co....... ..... .
:e L ine ............. ......
euillebois . ... ..... .
fie Steam Navigation Co......
fie Steam Navigation Co......
ama Mail S. S. Co ... ......
ama R. R. S. S. Line..... ..
iish Line.... .. ..... ...
ed Fruit Co............... .
fie Steam Navigation Co. ..
ed Fruit Co................
onal Navigation Co ........
and-American Line..........
. Libera-Triestina. ...... .
ninium Line..............
ed Fruit Co ... ...........
ch Line ... ...... ... .
,h German Lloyd ............
ton Yusen Kaieha...... .....
*e Line.. ............
al Netherlands S. S. Co......
e Line .......... ....
es S. S. Co. .. . ..... ..
ed Fruit Co... ... ......
ed Fruit Co... ..........
ed Fruit Co.... ......
ed Fruit Co. ........... .
te Nelson Line ..............
burg-American Line. .....
ic Steam Navigation Co.....
Olsen Line .. ...........
and-American Line..........


Arrived.


--I - -_


August 7


..August 10 .. .
August 10 ..
August 10 ...
August 10 ..
August 10 ....
August 10 ..
August 10 ...
August 10...

August 11 ..
August 11....
August 11 ....
August 12...
August 11 ....
August 12

August 12
August 12.
August 12..
August 12.
August 12....
August 123..
August 12...
August 13...
August 13...
August 13 ..
August 13...
August 13..
August 13.
August 13...
August 13...
August 13...
August 14 ..
August 14...
August 14...
August 14 ..
August 14...
August 14...
August 15...
August 156 ...
August 15....
August 16....
August 16 ....
August 16....
August 16....
August 17S....
August 16....




August 18....
August ...........
August .............

August 18...
August18.....
August 18....
August 19....
August 17....
August 19...
August 20 ...
August 20....
August 20....
August 20....
August 20....
August 20....
August 21....
August 21....
August 21....
August 201....
August 21....
August 20....
August 20....
August 21....


August 21 ....


Departed.


August 9.....
August 10. ..
August 10....
August 10. ...
August 10....
August 10 .
August 10....
August 11.. .
August 11 ...
August II.
August I1...
August 11 ..
August II....
August 11 ...
August 12...
August 12....
August 12...
August 13 ...
August 12..
August 12...
August 12.
August 12....
August 12....
August 13....
August 13.
August 13. .
August 13....
August 13. .
August 14 ....
August 14 .
August 14...
August 14
August 14.
August 15..
August 15 ...
August 14....
August 14....
August 15. ..
August 15....
August 15....
August 16...
August 15.....
August 16
August 16 ..
August 16....
August 16....
August 15....

August 15....
August 17....
August 17.....
August 17....
August 17....
August 17....
August 18....
August 18....
August 18....
August 19....
August 20....
August 20.:..
August 21 ....
August 19....
August 19...
August 20....
August 20....
August 20....
August 21 ...
August 21 ....
August 21 ....
August 23....
August 21..
August 21...
August 21 ...
August 22....
August 22 ....
August 22 ....


Cargo-
DischargedI Laded.


Tons.
1,469



19-
238
292
353
38
35
(,)
229
33
309
32
565
11
71
()J
59
228
141
366
21
101
(C)
251
1,004
429
12,269
14.799
4,542
10
29
378
I
(9')
104
160
3
(,)
872
744
154
113
(,)
19
73




3
80

169
465
57
9561
456
97
172
150
16S
1,022
7,508
711
52
20
56
116
(9
9


SNo cargo laded.


I a


Tons.
37-
631
212
5*
133
309
2
(i)
496
40
78.
110
2
180
174
()
61)
(.)
133
25
144
89
()
19
2
114
(*)
221
(3)
43
170

(a)

296 .
(a)
171
77
143
484
........ .
128
192
295
136

7A
...........
987
527
550
30
210
31f
69
2
140
(9



20
298 9
') 37
(9so
-72"
(a,,




I.. .

qat s7, 19S0 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 59

a: Cargo-
'. Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed.
Discharged Laded.
Tons. Tons.
Birlt.............. Royal Netherlands S. S. Co ...... August 21.... ........ ..... 507 ...... .
Bridgetown.......... Colombian S. 8. Line.......... August 21.... August 22.... 79 474
Noa Chief ........ N, O. & S. A. S. S. Co .......... August 21.... August 22.... 138 233
Balboa.......... ... Johnson Line... ... ........... August 21.... August 22.... 51 88
Biatto..... ....... Nav. Libera-Trlestina........... August 21.... August 22.... 107 (0)
San Clemente........ States S. S. Co .......... ..... August 22 .... August 22... 2 (.)
lelquibo........... Pacific Steam Navigation Co...... August 22.... August 22.... 1 (1 )
arlLegien.......... Hamburg-American Line......... August 22.... August 23.. 10 167
Amapala............ Standard Fruit & S. S..Co....... August22.... August23.... Ill 388
Prt Fremantle....... Commonwealth & Dominion Line.. August 23.... August 23.... 58 (')
a rtago............. United Fruit Co ............... August 23 .... ................ 3 ........
Champerico.......... Pacific Steam Navigation Co...... ..... : ....... August 23.... .......... 432
Alaska...... ..... French Line................... August 23.................. 412 ... ......
No cargo discharged. No cargo laded.


Official Publications of Interest to Shipping.
Masters may obtain from the office of the Captain of the Port,
at either Cristobal or Balboa, without charge, the "Rules and Regu-
[Ations Governing Navigation of The Panama Canal and Adjacent
Waters," and the current Tariff of charges at the Canal for supplies
and services.
. Requests.for Canal publications sent by mail should be addressed to:
'he Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z.; or, when more convenient,
bc:The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
'".The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal rhaintains at all times a com-
flete stock of navigational charts And books, including charts of all
xrts of the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical tables,
fght lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs, etc.
IrAt the office of the Port Captain in Balboa, a limited stock of navi-
Wtional charts, books, etc., is also carried, and this office is in a
position to fill practically any order in this connection that a ship might
e.
'Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices to Mariners, and
idrographic Bulletins may be obtained in return" for marine infor-
lion.
iObservations of weather, ocean currents, and other marine data
.Iected, and blanks, instructions, barometer comparisons, etc.,
wished.
Correct time is maintained and chronometers rated.


oProvislons Required by Ships.
e Panama Canal Commissary Division, with facilities at Balboa
itistobal for delivery of supplies to steamships, carries a complete
.f. provisions, such as meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter,
lgoodspcigars, cigarettes, tobacco, etc., which are sold to ships
unable prices. Beef especially is available at low prices,
ters selling at 14j cents per pound, and forequarters at 11
Pound.
imay: be placed in advance by radio for delivery on arrival,
C; Vrterminal for prompt delivery, or for delivery at the other
B4ter transit. All vessels are boarded on arrival by a repre-
l.ltte Commissary Division.
i: # i .: !.:.: .,.. '.

1' [: "PH 'Ei! : .: .". "













Official Circulars.

Acting Governor.
THE PANAMA CANAL. EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 22, 1930.

To all concecrped.j-Effective August 23, 1930,
and during my.' absence from the Isthmus, Lieut.
Col. J. L. Schley, LU. S. A., Engineer of Mainte-
nance, will act as Governor.
H. BURGESS,
Governor.

Duties of President of Panama Railroad
Company.
PANA.MA RAILROAD COMPANY,
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS. C. Z., August 22. 1930.

To all concerned.-Effective August 23, 1930,
and during my absence from the Isthmus, Lieut.
Col. J. L. Schley, LU. S. A., 2d Vice President.
will perform such duties of the President as relate
to the operation of the Company on the Isthmus.
H. BURGESS,
Piesidenlt.

Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
and Coal.
Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama
Canal, for $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons.
Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
private companies with tanks at the Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
on application. The prices at present are as *
follows: Crude fuel oil, $1.20 per barrel, Diesel
oil S1.80 per barrel, at Balboa and Cristobal.
Coal is supplied to steamships, including
warships of all nations, delivered and trimmed
in bunkers, at 8 per ton of 2,240 pounds at
Cristobal, and S11 at Balboa. Extra charges
are made for delivery from lighters, special trim-
ming in bunkers, trimming on deck, furnishing
lump coal for galley use, and run of mine coal
in sacks.
Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
of the Governor. at prices quoted upon applica-
tion.
Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
made up to 1.500 tons per hour, as fast as it can
be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
can be made up to 5,500 barrels per hour, rate
depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
tanks, and ship's facilities for handling.


Trips Through the Canal.
The following lines operating passenger vessels
through the Canal carry local passengers from
one terminal to the other: Panama Mail Steam-
ship Company. Pacific Steam Navigation Com-
pany, Grace Line, Chilean Line. Navigazione
General Italiana, Hamburg-American Line. The
Panama Mail and Hamburg-AmericanLinecharge
$6 for the trip. the others$10 for first-class pass-
age. The Chilean Line has also a rate of $4 for
intermediate class, and the Panama-Pacific Line
a rate of$6 for tourist class. The several services
together afford about 4 transits of the Canal each
way every week.

Binders for The Panama Canal Record.
Cardboard covers, punched and fitted with
brass fasteners forming binders for THE PANAMA
CANAL RECORD are offered for sale at 25 cents
a set, for the benefit of those who wish to keep
a file of the issues for ready reference. Orders
may be addressed to The Panama Canal. Balboa
Heights, Canal Zone. or The Panama Canal.
Washington, D. C.


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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


AugusLt37,19. 0







iHE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
C PPUBLISHED WEEKLY.
Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
i.fliicuts.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 3, 1930. No. 5-.

"Canal Traffic During August.
During the month of August, 1930, 465 commercial vessels and 19
mall launches transited the Canal. Tolls on the commercial vessels
aggregated $2,080,230.42, and on the launches $111.00, or a total tolls
collection of $2,080,341.42.
The daily average of commercial vessels was 15.00 and the average
oils collection was $67,104.21, as compared with 15.74 and $70,341.19
or the previous month, and an average of 17.45 transits and $75,078.64
Or August, 1929. The average amount of tolls paid by each of the
commercial transits was $4,473.61, as compared with $4,468.23 for
he month of July, 1930.
In the following tabulation the number of commerical transits and
he amount of tolls collected are shown for the first 8 months of the
Mrrent calendar year, with the daily averages of- transits and tolls,
pgether with the totals for the first 8 months of the calendar years
g929 and 1928:

: *Total for month. Daily averages.
Transits. Tolls. Transits. Tolls.
na .............................................. 531 $2,360,211.24 17.13 $76,135.84
1ay............................................. 491 2,131,386.12 17.54 76,120.93
............................................... 515 2,260,002.36 16.61 72,903.30
............................................... 489 2,232,763.00 16.30 74,425.43
.......................... 479 2,162,898.60 15.45 69,770.92
...... 478 2,100,994.53 15.93 70,033.15
............................................... 488 2,180,576.77 15.74 70,341.19
............................................... 465 2,080,230.42 15.00 67,104.21
Total, first 8 months of calendar year 1930........... 3,936 17,509,063.04 16.20 72,053.76
total, first 8 months of calendar year 1929........... 4,296 18,351,101.91 17.68 75,518.94
total, first 8 months of calendar year 1928......... 4,184 17,320,819.68 17.14 704986.96

A compared with the first 8 months of the-calendar year 1929, the
pisponding period of this year has had 360 fewer transits and -
A:038.87 less tolls.

Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, i
:..72. BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 30, 1930.

:Canat, approaches to Pacific entrance, buoy established marking wreck. On August 28, 1930,
*&blwk, horizontal striped nun buoy was placed in 7 feet of water at low tide, 400 yards and
1 degrees (true) from channel buoy No. 9. This buoy is 80 yards outside of and westward
1 pian and marks the stern of a sunken sand barge.
J. L. SCHLEY,
SActing Governior.









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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66 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 8eptember S. 19S

Merchandise Shipped to Canal Zone for Orders.
The Panama Railroad Company, a New York corporation, of which
the stock is now owned by the United States Government, will wat"e-.
house "for orders" at its piers and warehouses at Balboa and Cristobal,
Canal Zone, nonperishable and nondangerous merchandise, excepting
alcoholic liquors.
The rates are as follows:
(a) For handling cargo from ship's side to storage place, $1 per ton of 2,000 pounds
or 40 cubic feet on general merchandise, and one-half of the transfer rates provided
by Item 34, Panama Canal Tariff No. 10, on other commodities.
(b) For handling cargo from storage place to ship's side, i. e., for delivering or
reforwarding it, the same rates as for receiving and storing, as per (a), above.. The'
minimum charge for handling any shipment taken out of storage is $1.
(c) For storage: First 35 days free; thereafter, 3 cents per day or fraction thereof
per ton of 2,000 pounds or I I cents per day or fraction thereof per ton of 40 cubic feet.
Special rates on special commodities in large quantities may be obtained on request.
Various lines operating out of Cristobal and Balboa to the west coast of Central and
South America will accept their proportion of the through rate for the haul beyond the
Isthmus, as explained in the following paragraph:
By virtue of the Canal Zone for Orders arrangement shippers are enabled to consign
*cargo to the Isthmus and subsequently to reconsign it to any port beyond the Isthmus
to which there is a through rate from port of origin without sacrificing their right to
the through freight rate. This means that when a shipment moves from, say, New
York to the Canal Zone, usual local rates will be charged to Cristobal or Balboa,
as the case may be; but should the owner wish to reforward to any other port to
which there is a through rate from port of origin, he may do so upon payment of
the receiving carrier's proportion of the through rate from port of origin to port of
ultimate destination, and upon evidence that the shipment, or any part of it, has
moved beyond the Isthmus, the initial carrier will refund the difference between its
proportion of the through rate applicable and the local rate.
In addition to reconsigning beyond the Isthmus, cargo billed Cristobal for Orders
may be reconsigned to Panama City or line points on the Panama Railroad on the
basis of through rates from port of origin to Panama City. In this case the Panama
Railroad Company's charges will be the difference between the rate charged to Ci.-
tobal by the ocean carrier and the through rate from port of origin to Panama Citiyir
and the necessary adjustments with the ocean carrier will be made by the Panama
Railroad Company without inconvenience to shippers or consignees. The handling
charge from storage place to cars is the same as from storage place to ship's side.
Cargo deposited in Hold for Orders Warehouse, Cristobal, which consignees desire.
transferred to Hold for Orders Warehouse, Balboa, will be assessed a charge of $1
per ton on general cargo and one-half the transfer rates on other commodities for han-,|
dling from the warehouse into cars at Cristobal, and a second charge of the same kind-:
for handling from cars into warehouse at Balboa. The same charge will again1
apply when the cargo is reforwarded from, or delivered locally at Balboa. The same.
handling charges will apply, vice versa, on Hold for Orders cargo discharged from;
vessels at Balboa. :
Cargo consigned to Hold for Orders, Balboa, arriving at Cristobal piers, and/orl
cargo consigned to Hold for Orders, Cristobal, on which by previous arrangement thei
destination has been changed to Hold for Orders, Balboa, prior to arrival of the vesselW,
will be assessed one handling charge of $1 per ton on general cargo or one-half oftthei
transfer rates on other commodities for handling from shipside across piers and into
cars at Cristobal and from cars into the Hold for Orders Warehouse, Balboa. The
same charge will apply when the cargo is reforwarded from or delivered locally at
Balboa. The same handling charges will apply, vice versa, on cargo moving in th<
opposite direction.
There are no special forms for use in shipping except the warehouseman's order t
release the cargo for shipment ("Authority to Deliver Cargo from Storage on Pietrs')
Shipper takes out his bill of lading and consular invoice and the cargo moves as r.eg
lar outward local.
Samples of the forms used, "Negotiable Warehouse Receipt," and "Authority..
Deliver Cargo from Storage on Piers," will be supplied on request to the P -
Railroad Co., Balboa Heights, C. Z., or 24 State Street, New York City.








e,1980 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 67


I, Prices of Miscellaneous Supplies at Panama Canal Storehouses.

jThe following are prices to individuals and companies including the
!:per cent surcharge, effective August 20, 1930.

Commodities. Unit. Price.
iibar.average.......................................................... Lb $0.24
p,aheet, average........................................................... Lb. .31
ie1Tobin, average.............................................. .......... Lb .26
Oline, motor grade.........................................................Gal. .135
Sl yellow ................................................................ Lb. .29
ImD, Navy, spun .......................................................... Lb. .15
in, Navy, unspun........................................................ Lb. .16
DiieRl, at Cristobal only, in bulk, no surcharge............................... Bbl. of 42 gals. 1.80
fuel, at Balboa and Cristobal, in bulk, no surcharge........................... Bbl. of 42 gals. 1.50
ammonia, cylinder........................................................ Gal. .28
burning, Colea ......... ................................................... Gal. 1.06
egime gas, in drums, Gulftriton Med. No. 2135................................ Gal. .36
engine, gas, extra heavy, in cases, Gulftriton No. 2250.......................... Gal. .49
engine, gas, extra heavy, in drums, Gulftriton, No. 2250....................... Gal. .41
kerasene, in drum.......................................................... Gal. .10
marine engine............................................................ Gal. .50
t, lead, white, dry ........................................................ Lb. .14
it, lead, white, in oil....................................................... Lb. .13
it,u ine oxide, dry.............................. ............................ Lb. .10
it, sins oxide, in oil......................................... ................ Lb. .13
me, gear, ohain and wire rope, lubricating.................................... Lb. .05
ue, yellow, cup, No. 3..................................................... Lb. .08
e, yellow, cup, No. 5..................................................... Lb. .09
aash .................................. .................................. Lb. .03
eseotton, colored ........................................................ Lb. .14
4t,.aotton, white.......................................................... Lb. .16

':Location of Patients and Visiting Hours, at Gorgas Hospital.

The following table shows the distribution of patients in the Gorgas
i0ptal buildings and the visiting hours for the various wards and
tonsn:
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Section and Ward.


ard Semi-private, white male..................
Fad 3, American male, eye, ear, nose and throat
latients.....................................

ha4 4, Private room.............................

5j Male, private rooms, American boys........
F foreign .male and female, private rooms,
AM erlea rl ...............................
7 White female, private ooms...............
8P Obtetrical department white females.
.s erye, male.............................

W te oloareign, male.....................
W. ite Fored, male ..)..................
SColored, male )ric .................
SCOdaored, male G. U ......................
hie male, G.U.......................

W^Id^te male )
rian male (me ................


.i.b... ren ........................

.~i ..... a obstetria .......
.......... .......................
... ,


Visiting Hours.


Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. nm.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00
p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays, 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.
6.30 to 7.30 p.m. Sunday and holidays, 9.30 to 11.00
a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m.
Daily, same as Ward 2 (above).



Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00
p.m..
1o visitors permitted in nursery.



Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00
p.m.
Tueedays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays,
S2.30 to 4.30 p. m.
Tuesday, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays,
2.30 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 7.30 p. m. 'Sundays and
holidays, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.
Wednesday Fridays, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00
p. i.
Daily 9 30 to O11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m.
Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays and holidays, 1.30 to 3.00
J p. m.
No visitors permitted except to visit tuberculosis patients
Thursday, Sundays and holidays, 1UO30 to 3.00 p. m.


e may be granted upon application to the Superintendent's 0,. e.
ptl. ent wpll be admitted at any time by and in the discretion pf the attending
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I










THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


September S, 1980


Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
and Coal.
Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama
Canal, for S1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons.
Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
.private companies with tanks at the Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
on application. The prices at present are as
follows: Crude fuel oil. $1.20 per barrel, Diesel
oil $1.80 per barrel, at Balboa and Cristobal.
Coal is supplied to steanships, including
warships of all nations, delivered and trimmed
in bunkers, at $8 per ton of 2,240 pounds at
Cristobal. and $11 at Balboa. Extra charges
are made for delivery from lighters, special trim-
ming in bunkers, trimming on deck, furnishing
lump coal for galley use, and run of mine coal
in sacks.
Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
of the Governor, at prices quoted upon applica-
tion.
Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
made up to 1,500 tons per hour, as fact as it can
be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
can be made up to 5,500 barrels per hour. rate
depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
tanks, and ship's facilities for handling.


Facilities for Shipping.
The Panama Canal is equipped with all the
facilities for the fueling, supply. and repair of
ships which are found in modern ports.
The coaling plants, with an aggregate storage
capacity of 700.000 tons. bunker ships up to 1.500
tons an hour. practically as fast as it can be
handled in ships' bunkers. Oil can be delivered
as fast as the ships can take it, from 46 tanks
aggregating approximately 2.361,040 barrels of
storage capacity. Crude fuel oil, Diesel oil, and
gasoline are sold.
The ships' chandlery storehouses carry a wide
variety of marine supplies and spare parts. The
commissary stores sell foodstuffs, fresh meats.
fruits, and vegetables, as well as clothing and a
general line of goods for supplying about 30.000
people resident on the Isthmus. Ice plants, a
large laundry, hotels, hospitals, and restaurants
serve the passengers and crews of ships.
A 1.000-foot dry dock, capable of receiving the
largest ships built, a smaller dry dock, floating
cranes, foundry, and amply equipped shops,
employing about 1.100 men, provide the means
of making practically any kind of marine repairs.
Ample space exists at either terminal of the
Canal for the berthing of vessels, as well as large
covered piers for the storage of cargo. These are
modern structures, fireproof, rat proof, in splendid
condition. well lighted and maintained in a clean
and orderly condition.
In general, the services to shipping at the Canal
are such as have been developed and found ample
and effective, in the course of handling large
traffic through the Canal in over 15 years of oper-
ation.


Information from American Consuls.
The Consular officers of the United States at
seaports all over the world are ex officio repre-
sentatives of The Panama Canal for the purpose
of furnishing information to shipping and allied
interests as to conditions, charges, etc., at the
Panama Canal affecting the operation of ships.
The current publications of The Panama Canal
of interest to shipping are furnished to the Con-
sular officers and filed for reference.
It is not desired that inquiries of a general
nature be addressed to the Consular officers, or
that they be burdened with requests which should
be made direct to The Panama Canal: but
ships' operators who may not be sufficiently
advised as to charges, supplies, facilities, etc.,
at the Canal will always save time by applying to
the nearest American Consul.


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rHE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEK LY.
Subscription rates, domestic, 50.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
0. i The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or -
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
cate.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

ilume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September io, 1930. No. 6.

Comparison of Canal Traffic in August, 1930, with August Traffic in
Previous Years.
The traffic through the Panama Canal during the month of August,
30, showed a decrease as compared with the preceding month, and
Urge decrease as compared with August, 1929.
The 465 transits in August this year are fewer by 76, or 14.0 per cent,
in the 541 transits in the corresponding month a year ago, while the
t tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, aggregating 2,345,573 tons,
less by 213,166 tons, or 8.3 per cent, than the total of 2,558,739 tons
.August, 1929. The cargo tonnage of 2,148,469 tons for August,
A0, shows a decline of 532,261 tons, or 19.9 per cent, from the total
:2,680,730 tons passing through the Canal in August, 1929.
In the tabulation below are shown the number of transits, net
stage Panama Canal measurement, and the tons of cargo carried
ldugh the Canal during the month of August each year from 1914 to
80, inclusive, and for comparison, the monthly averages for the
responding fiscal year ending on June 30th following:
Month of August. Average per month for fiscal year.
r year. Commer- Panama Tons Fiscal year. Commer- Panama Tons
cial Canal net of cial Canal net of
transits. tonnage. cargo. transits. tonnage. cargo.
........... 24 89,894 110,884 1915 ............. 102 361,197 -465,567
S .......... 155 492,752 571,475 1916............. 63 199,687 257,843
........... 137 443,415 505,673 1917............. 150 483,213 588,213
........... 170 511,648 579,340 1918............. 172 547,839 627,669
.......... 158 452,005 533,703 1919....... ..... 169 510,416 576,385
.......... 188 586,111 715,724 J920............. 206 712,170 781,208
........... 266 951,345 1,040,740 1921............. 241 951,323 966,601
.......... 236 965,276 839,273 1922 ............. 228 951,455 907,075
.......... 257 1,084,133 1,165.950 1923............. 331 1,550,482 1,630,656
T......... 454 2,232,590 2,168,750 1924............. 436 2,179,073 2,249,559
B ......... 372 1,901,895 1,958,479 1925.............. 389 1,904,596 1,996,570
i :........... 372 1,779,627 1,912,217 1926............. 433 2,064,549 2.169,787
.......... 464 2,230,905 2,321,697 1927 ............. 456 2,185,651 2,312,351
K,......... 543 2,513,614 2,429,947 1928............. 538 2,454,886 2,469,226
.......... 526 2,437,246 2,425,336 1929............. 534 2,468,483 2,555,250
......... 541 2,558,739 2,680,730 1930............. 515 2,498,385 2,502,519
........ 465 2,845,573 2,148,469 ................. 1 492 32,439,647 '2,370,483

onal opened August 15,19T4.
ikvrage for 10j months of fiscal year ended June 30, 1915.
I-l 8 months of calendar year 1930.


.Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 6, 1930.

: _PljEdt Island light, reported extinguished. The master of the S. S. Rhodopis reports that
.1930, La Plata Island light was extinguished.
ptitlon, Lat. 1" 15 50" S., Long. 81" 06' 00" W.
lee to Mariners No, Z36, August 19, 1930.)
J. L. SCHLEY,
Acting Governor.
.7.









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


September 10, 1930"


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rO, 1930 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 73


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74 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD September 10, 1930 .,:.


Commercial Traffic Through the Panama Canal in August, 1930, by Trade ,
Routes.

The following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the -
Canal during the month of August, 1930, classified according to trade
routes and nationality of vessels in each trade route, together with
corresponding totals for August, 1929 and 1928. The amount of
cargo shown is the amount carried by vessels operating over the
respective routes and in some cases includes cargo having other
destinations: .
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.

TONNAGE.
No. Tons
Nationality. of Panama United .Tolls. of


United States intercoastal:
United States ... ...
East coast of United States to
west coast of South
America:
B ritish .......... .. .
C hilean ...............
Danish ... .. .
Swedish ..... .....
United States .......
T otal ...... ......
Europe to west coast of United
States:
B ritish ... .......
Danish..... . .
French .. .. ..
German .....
Norwegian......... .
Panamanian... .......
Swedish
United States .... ...
Total .. ....... ..
Europe to west coast of
Canada:
Belgian ......... . .
British ... .......
Danish...... ... ..
Dutch......
French. ... ....
German .. ...
Italian. .
Norwegian........ .
Swedish .............

Total ..............
Europe to west coast of South
America:
aritish... ... ... .
Danzig...... .........
Dutch ................
French..... .... ...
German............
Italian ....... ...... .
Norwegian .............
Total ..... ......
East coast of United States to
Far East:
British. .... .......
Japanese...... .. ....
Norwegian ... ....... .
United States .. ......
Total ........ .....
East coast of United States to
Australasia:
British .......... ......
Norwegian..............
United States ...........
Total ........ ..


ships.


77


3
2
1
2
12

20


4
1
2
5







2
2




2
18







2
I
1
2
2






2
16
I


6








3
2
2
1



16



3
2

15


7
3
2
12


Canal
net.

426,673


12,375
9.377
4,558
8,917
56.059
91,286


24,703
4.097
6.907
12.0.39
26,056
6,650
* 10,655
16,532
107,638


4,976
29,102
10,655
13.679
14,538
13,648
6,025
6,140
4,860
103,623


19,151
6,310
9,640
4,854
24,612
16,845
8,442
89,854


36,209
14,513
11,315
23,988
86,025


States
equivalent.

325.907


9,776
6,899
2,734
7,486
43,041
69,936


20,466
3,355
C.693
9,412
20,441
5.650
6,559
13,093
85,669


4,569
18,177
8,442
10.642
8,464
8.619
5,056
5,261
2,781
72,010


14,144
5,346
5,431
3,234
19,221
10,690
5,785
63,841


21,245
13,097
6,455
17,321
58,118


negiBLtreu
gross.


526,209


16,799
14,620
4,553
30,676
76,520
143,168


32,696
5,752
9,117
15,396
33,802
8,947
10,847
21,083

137,640


7.138
29,808
13,297
16,989
15,989
15.048
7,098
8,518
4,960
118,845


24,124
8,940
9,243
5,399
30,781
23,721
10,009
112,217


35,481
18,683
11,048
27,808
93,020


RvegIstereu
net.


325,991 $361,612.16


10,342
7.952
2,785
8,762
42,959
72,800


20,029
3,406
6.732
9,295
20,047
5,651
8,271
12,961
86,392


3,988
18,138
8,490
10.604
9,073
9,070
4,498
5,341
3,665
72,867


14,919
5,050
5,630
3.225
18,988
12,808
5,781
66,401


21,119
12,800
6,556
17,297
57,772


10,700.97
8,623.75
3,417.50
6,420.24
44,092.33

73.254.79


21,597.78
2,949.84
5.019.75
10,157.30
18,612.27
4,788.00
7,975.34
11,903.04
83,003.32


5,710.00
22,718.35
10,552.50
13,302.50
10,580.00
10,773.75
6,320.00
6,576.25
3,476.25
90,009.60


17,680.00
4,543.20
6,788.75
4,030.00
24,026.25
13,362.50
5,945.07
76,375.77


26,556.25
16,119.10
8,068.75
21,651.25
72,395.35


cargo.


191,501


5,023
3,206
2,268
16,059
26,556


15,519

2,925
8,284

337,094

33,822


5,20(
12,751
8,941
4,951
3,411
8.731
2,91(
2.57(
2,311
51,811


12,211
7,931
3,671
19,601
3,034
7,321
53,78(


25,58W
18,844
10,274
32,331
87,03E


1 .








4


_______________ .1 1 (:.......................JI-


42,200
14,173
8,061

64,434


29,762
7,876
5,943


47,377
13,430
9,603


43,581 70.410


30,033
7,845
5,937
43,815


37,202.50 21,866
9,845.00 21,865
7,428.75 12,645
54,476.25 SS ,7
:: : ::.'.^ ?;
: A *


_____ ... . .. .;..~ ^.^ r r








epember: 10, 1980
i.' :
.."


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.--Continued.


4 TONNAGE.
No. Tons
Nationality. f Panama United Tolls. of
ships. Canal States Registered Registered cargo.
net. equivalent. gross. net.


Europe to Australasia:
B ritish.................
French .................
Norwegian.............
Swedish................
Total...............

Cristobal to west coast of
South America:
Colombian ............
Dutch...... ...........
German ...............
Total ..............
East coast of United States to
Philippine Islands:
British.................
Norwegian..........
United States...........
Total.............
Foreign vessels in ballast-
United States inter-
coastal:
British ........ ........
Norwegian.............
Total..............
Cristobal to west coast of
United States:
United States...........
East coast of South America
to west coast of
United States:
Norwegian..............
United States..........
Total: .............


7
I
1
2,

II


2
2





3
1















2

3
3


58,757
5,364
20,285
6,190
90.596


326
1,484
5,941
7,751


18,952
3,735
6,183

28,870



13,750
4,722

18,472


8,310


5,246
10,039
15,285


42,286
4,287
16.007
3.278
65,858


328
588
4,003
4,919


12,263
2,075
5,780
20,118



12,039
2,728
14,767


7,437


2,949
7,594
10,543


69,747
7,139
27,317
5,841
110,044


466
1,560
7,544

9,567


21,390
3,549
7,717
32,656



21,754
4,624
26,378


11,290


4,883
11,994
. 16,877


43,141
4,335
16,465
4,083

68,024


332
646
4,112

5,090


12,283
2,098
5,791
20,172



12,926
2,765

15,691


7,332


2,999
7,540
10,539


$52,857 50
5,358.75
16,317 97
4,097.50
78,631.72


391.20
735 00
5,003.75
6,129 95


15,328 75
2,593.75
7,225 00
25,147.50



9,909.09
3,399.84
13,308.93


8,189.75


3,686.25
7,998.98
11,685.23


- I*


SCristobal to west coast of
Central America:
British ................ 3 3,028
East coast of United States to
west coast of Canada:
United States .......... 2 II,261
East coast of United States to
Hawaii:
United States..........- 2 3,470
Around the world:
United States ........... 2 20,565
Canadian intercoastal:
British................. 2 8,290
East Goust of Canada to west
|castof South Amer- *
aseta:
British................. 2 12,766
oEast oast of Canada to Aus-
tralacia:
British ............ 2 8,605
gat coast of Central Ameriea
to west coat of South
America:
British............... 1 3,892
Colombian.............. 1 124
S Total .............. 2 4,016

W lIndies to west coast of
SCanada
British................. 2 8,909
:hirope to. west coast of Cen-
tral America:
an ................ 1 2,967
.a m in m ....'...:.... 1 101


Te .at..... ....... 3,068


Fc .1 ...
NO, ~


* 2,568

9,230

3,070.
15,731

6,563


10,909

6,571


3,363
113


4,831

13,277

5,294
26,048

11,156


19,144

10,950


5,582
207


3,47,6 5,789


6,708

1,832
103

1,935


10,539

3,034
203

3,237 I


2,715

9,214

3,084
15,731

6,887


10,994

6,694


3,370
109
3.479


6,751

1,786
101

1,887


3,210.00

11,304.45

3,837.50
19,663.75
8,203.75


9,191.52

8,213.75


4,203.75
141.25
4,345.00


8,385.00 11,014


2,290.00
121.20
2,411.20


38,377
1,484
. ... .. .. ..
4,479
44,340


451
204
1,424
2,079


13,972
5,400
8,698
28,070


1,755


5,319
5,476
10,795


2,107

12,159

6,307
7,302
3,200


6,182


7,619
245
7,864


1,697
150
1,847


[1


It,


- .
*: -








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.-Continued.


Nationality.


East coast of South America
to Far East:
Japanese . ......
East coast of Canada to west
coast of United
States:
British .. .
East coast of Central America
to Australasia.
Norwegian..... ..
South American intercoastal:
Norwegian.... ....
Cristobal to Balboa:
Panamanian ... .
West Indies to Balboa:
United States . ..
West Indies to west coast of
South America:
British .. ...... .
Africa to Far East:
B ritish..... ... .. .

Grand total, August, 1930

Grand total, August, 1929


No.
of
ships.



2





1










244
267


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.


13,452


5,185

4,534

1,189
59

2,235

3,326
5,406

1.255,181

1,307,072


United
States
equivalent.


9,617


3,007

2.465

1.061
54

1.906

2,872

2,901

933,348

971,968


Registered Registered


Registered
gross.



16,893


4,867

4.114

1,657
94

2,991

4,800

4,745

1,558,747

1.607.157


Grand total, August, 1928 271 1.264,859 960,408 1.586.980


Registered
net.



10,241


2,991

2,453

944

54

1,739

2,949

2,877
944,570

975,948

967,722


Septem


Tolls.




$12,021 25


3,758.75

3,081.25

856 08

67.50

2,382.50

3,590.00

3,626.25

1.062,369.82

1,119,659.40

1.084,905 51


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.


United States intercoastal;
United States .
West coast of South America
east coast of United
States:
British
Chilean . . .. .
Danzig . .
Swedish .......
United States...... ..
Total ... .....

West coast of Canada to
Europe:
Belgian.. ... ..... .
Britishi ........
Danish ... . . ..
Dutch............
French ...... ... ..
German .. ..
Italian ... ... ...
Norwegian ....
Swedish ...... .
United States .........

Total.. . ... .
West coast of United States
to Europe:
British ...........
Dutch .
French ..
German ..... ....
Japanese ..... ...
Norwegian .. .......
Swedish ..........

Total ... ......
West coast of South America
to Europe:
British ........ .
Danzig . ...... ...
D utch..... ..... ........
French..... ....
German ..... ..
Norwegian....... .. . .
Total .. ....... ..


16


393,739


29,310
4,672
8,167
4,421
77,671


26 124,241


I1
I
2
2
2

22


10
I
i
3
3
2
1

21


5

3
1
6
2
18


8,133
44,829
10.966
8.266
7,146
7,252
6,497
11,491
10,256
10,900

125,736


46,918
4,317
5,385
14,736
13,514
11,827
3,532
100,229


30,147
6,127
15,926
4,834
27,731
7,640

92,405


300,519


22,836
3.433
5.485
3,743
60,954

96.451


6,957
31.858
9,411
6,197
4,020
4,792
4,905
9,186
5,751
6,930

90,007


37,831
3,492
4,595
10,199
12,203
9,099
2,411

*80,730


23,426
5,268
8,510
3,223
20,201
5,349

65,977


486,887


38,390
7,310
8,952
15,339
106,408

176,399


10,095
51,588
13,550
10,220
8,068
8,269
8,124
14,584
10,170
11,374

146,042


60,591
5.792
7,650
17,717
17,510
16,732
4,066

130.058


38,866
8,939
14,710
5,390
32,513
8,868

109,286


300,600


23,463
3,976
5,096
4,377
60,903

97,815


6,776
32,107
9,441
6,385
4.497
5.018
5,128
9,217
7,412
6,900

92,881


37,544
3,379
4,435
10,292
12,542
9,943
3,144

81,279


24,115
5,007
8,890
3,219
19,782
5,300

66,313


$375,648.75


28,545.00
4,291.25
6,856.25
4,678.75
75,980.70

120,351.95


8,696 25
39.822.50
11,763 75
7,746.25
5,025.00
5,990 00
6,131 25
11,482.50
7,188 75
8,662.50

112,508 75


47,185.15
4,365 00
5,743.75
12,748 75
15,087.50
12,498 75
3,013.75

100,642.65


29,282.50
6,585.00
10,637.50
4,028.75
24,030.54
6,686.25
81,250.54


ber 10, 2980





Tons ..i
of
cargo.



7,313


4,000

7,001


48

2,927

4,506
7,700

679,407
858,661

752.508




520,184 -


42,869
1,839
13,000
21,654
141,380

220,742


13,759
65,525
17,572
10,296
7,877
7,914
8,902
18,280
11,464
15,334

176,923


82,621
7,416
9,210
21,957
22,749
21,967 ".
6,000

171,920


34,501 ...
11.330 .
16,989
7,708
35,489
1,855

116,872,..

'A'.:::.:


_ .. I









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Nationality.


West coast of South America
to Cristobal:
Colombian.............
Dutch..... .. ........
German ...............
Total.......... .
Australasia to Europe:
British ...... .......
Philippine Islands to east coast
t of United States:
British.................
Japanese...............
Norwegian .......... ...
United States ..........
Total..............
Hawaii to east coast of United
States:
United States ........
West coast of United States
to Cristobal:
United States.........
West coast of Canada to east
coast of United
States:
Norwegian..........
United States..........
:T Total ..............

S West coast of South America
to east coast of
Canada:
British .............
Canadian intercoastal:
British ................
West coast of Central America
to Cristobal:
B ritish ................
West coast of Central America
to Europe:
French................
German...............
Total ....... ......

Australasia to east coast of
United States:
United States........
Australasia to east coast of
Canada:
British............
Far East to east coast of
United States:
Japanese...............
Far East to West Indies:
Norwegian ............
West coast of United States to
east coast of Central
America:
Norwegian..............
West coast of United States
to east coast of South
VC. America:
Danish .................
West ooast of United States
i to West Indies:,
Norwegian..............
West coast of Canada to east
... coast of South Amer-
Norwegian .........
West coast of Canada to West
Indies:
S British ........ ........
:Wastcoast of Central Amerima
to- east coast of
i ,: lUnited States:
............


. i .


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.-Conlinued.

I TONNAGE. I I


No.
of
ships.



3
2
5
10

8


3


6


3

3


2

3



3
2

2




2


2

2

2
2


1


Panama
Canal
net.


450
1,484
4,232
'6,166

68,810

6,726
15,600
7,063
6,100
35,489


14,440

6,761


8,462
4,297
12,759



18,044
5,015

1,441

4,101
1,469
5,570


10,151

9,6066

11,044

8,676


2,080


United
States
equivalent.


441
588
2,879
3,908

48,178

5,580
13,108
4,017
4,872
27,577


10,377

6,270


5,015
2,986
8,001



15,587
4,042

1,286

3,247
1,297
4,544


7,352

7,689

8,705
4,645


1,305


6054 5,058


5,035


5,308

2,207


3,533


4,395


2,894

1,239


1,542


Registered
gross.


673
1,5601)
5,398
7,631

81,515

9,031
19,908
6,744
7,610
43,293


16,751

10,216


8,478
.1 7A7


Registered
net.


441
646
2.974


Tolls.


$534.85
735.00
3,598.75


Tons
of
cargo.


361
1,115
3,341


4.061 4,868 60 4,817


49,778

5.376
12,910
4,109
4,872
27,267


10,410

6,171


5,088
9 O9a5


13,225 8,043


28,085

6,873

2,298

5,280
1,930
7,210


11,526

9,632

14,007
7.974


2,166


8,271

7,078


4,873

2,338


4,201


16,138
4,124

1,304

3,228
1.128

4,356


7,127

7,753

8,498
4,678


1,298


5,057

4,411


2,984

1,249


2,554


*


60,222.50

6,975 00
16,218.75
5,021 25
6,090.00

34,305.00


12,971.25

7,784.45


6,268.75
3,732.50
10,001.25



19,483.75
5,052.50

1,607.50

4,058 75
1,621.25
5,680.00


9,190.00

9,611.25

10,881.25
5,806.25


1,631.25


6,322.50


43,193

12,652
20,212
5,979
5,835
44,678


23,141

1,526


13,143
4,542

17,685



37,730

7,014

568

4,827
2,750

7,577


13,065

4,716

5,616
13,862


2,568


12,100


3,625.20 .........


3,617.50

1,548.75


5,339

3,294


2,543.76 1.........


* '


I'




*1
a,

I
Ii


eptember 10, s19S








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.-Contioned.


Nationality.


Balboa to east coast of United
States:
United States ........
Balboa to Cristobal:
Panamanian. .......
Balboa to West Indies:
United States .........
Hawaii to Europe:
Swedish ............
Far East to Europe:
British ........ .......
Grand total, August, 1930
Grand total, August, 1929
Grand total. August. 1928


No.
of
ships.


I
I


I

221
274
255


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.


55
59
2.335
5,661
4,683
1,087.392
1,251,667
1,172,387


United
States
equivalent.


67
54
1,906
3,406
3,705


Registered IRegistered


gross.


98
94
2,991
5,642
5,971


net.


67
54
1,728
4,320
3,757


818,416 11,32.631 826,075


971,908
896,159


1,588,746
1,470,265


976,531
902,489


Tolls.


$66.00
67.50
1,631.20
4.257.50
4,631.25
1,017,860.60
1,207,778.46
1,114,163.80


Notice to Mariners.

THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 8, 1930.
No. 753.

Colombia, Tumaco Road, lights extinguished. The following information was re-
ported to the Cristobal Hydrographic office by the Panama Railroad S. S. Buena-
ventura:
On September 1. 1930, El Morro Island light and buoy No. 3, Tumaco Road, Colombia, were not
burning.
Approximate positions: El Mlorro Island, Lat. 010 50' 50" N., Long. 78* 43' 50" W.; buoy No. 3,
Lat. 01 51' 45" N.. Long. 78' 43' 54" W.
J. L. SCHLEY,
Acting Governor.


Traffic by Nationality for August, 1930.

The following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the
Canal during the month of August, 1930, classified according to nation-,
ality of vessels by direction of transit, and the combined traffic in both
directions, together with corresponding totals for August, 1929 and
1928:
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


Nationality.


Belgian ....................
B ritish ........ .............
C hilean ....................
Colombian .................
Danish...................
Danzig...................
Dutch.....................
French .....................
German ...................
Italian .. ..................
Japanese...................
Norwegian..................
Panamanian................
Swedish....................
United States...............
Total, August, 1930......
Total, August, 1929......
Total, August, 1928......


No.
of
ships.


57
2
3
4
I1
6
5
17
3
5
20
3
6
111
244
267
271


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.
4,976
314,606
9,377
450
19,310
6,310
24,803
31,663
59,206
22,870
27,965
105,837
6,810
30,622
593,376
1.258,181
1,307,072
1,264,859


United
States
equivalent.
4,568
225.620
6,899
441
14,538 L
5,346
16,661
22,668
43,087
15,746
22,714
73,103
5,807
20,104
456,053
933,348
971,968
960,408


Registered Registered
gross. net.


7,138
375,790
14,620
673
23,602
8,940
27,792
37,644
71,800
30,819
35,576
122,951
9,244
52,324
739,834
1,558,747
1,607,157
1,586,980


3,988
229,158
7,952
441
14,681
5,050
16,880
23,365
43,251
17,306
23,041
73,294
5,806
24,781
455,576
944,570
975,948
967,722


Tons
of
cargo.


September 10, 1980


7,762
6,17Q
1,469,062
1,822,069
1,672,828


Tolls.


$5,710 .00
266,933.96
8,623.75
532.45
16,919.84
4,543.20
20,826.25
24,988.50
52,251.05
19,682.50
28,140.35
78,982.48
4,976.70
21,969.33
507,284.46

1,062,369.82
1,119,659.40
1,084,005.51


Tons
of
cargo.

5,200
191,634
3,206
696
11,213
13,092
8,577
34,386
5,944
26,157
68,046
198
13,891
297,167

679,407
858,661
752,508


,ii


" ":' .::


* '' ~I


:i








"I








&pember 10, 1980





Nationality.


Belgian....................
British.....................
Chilean ....................
Colombian..................
Danish...................
Danzig..... ..........
Dutch...............
French .....................
German...................
Italian..................
Japanese ..................
Norwegian.. .............
Pananianian................
Swedish ....................
United States..........'.......
Total, August, 1930......
Total, August, 1929......
Total, August, 1928......


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.


No.
of
ships.

2
50
1
3
3
2
7
4
17
1
8
14
1
5
103
221
274
255


TONNAUo.


Panama
Canal
net.
8,133
267,796
4,672
450
17,020
14,294
20,993
21,466
58,953
6,497
40,158
67,582
59
23,870
526,449
1,087,392
1,251,667
1,172,387


United
States
equivalent.
6,957
203,257
3,433
441
14,469
10,753
18,787
15,085
41,910
4,905
34,016
46,805
54
15.311
402,233
818,416
971,908
896,159


Registered Registered


gross.

10,095
335,178
7,310
673
21,821
17,891
32,282
26,388
70,028
8,124
51,425
77,497
94
35,217
658,608
1,352,631
1,588,746
1,470,265


net.

6,776
206,708
3,976
441
14,498
10,103
19,300
15,379
41,748
5,128
33,950
47,028
54
19.253
401,733
826,075
976,531
902,489


COMBINED TRAFFIC.
TONNAGE.
No. Tons
Nationality. of Panama United Tolls. of
ships. Canal States Registered Registered cargo.
net. equivalent. grose. net.
Belgian ................... 3 13,109 11,525 17,233 10.764 $14,406.25 18,959
British.................... 107 582,402 428,877 710,968 435,866 520,901.61 532,487
Chilean.................... 3 14,049 10,332 21,930 11.928 12,915.00 5,045
Colombian.................. 6 900 882 1,346 882 1,067.30 1,057
Danish ..................... 7 36,330 29,000 45,423 29,179 35,006.09 40,885
Danzig...................... 3 20,604 16,099 26,831 15,153 17,984.45 24,330
Dutch...................... 13 54,796 35,448 60,074 36,180 44,310.00 48,908
French ..................... 9 53,129 37,753 64,032 38,744 43,844.75 38,199
German..................... 34 118,159 84,997 141,828 84,999 102,784.10 105,837
Italian..................... 4 29,367 20,651 38,943 22,434 25,813.75 14,846
Japanese.................. 13 68,123 56,730 87,001 56,991 70,327.85 74,734
Norwegian.................. 34 173,419 119,908 200,448 120,322 135,620.18 160,039
Panamanian ................ 4 6,869 5,861 9,338 5.860 5,044.20 198
Swedish .................. 11 54,492 35,415 87,541 44,034 41,108 08 60,771
United States............... 214 1,119,825 858,286 1,398,442 857,309 1,009,096.81 1,022,174
Total, August, 1930...... 465 2,345,573 1,751,764 2,911,378 1,770,645 2,080,230.42 2,148,469
Total, August, 1929...... 541 2,558,739 1,943,876 3,195,903 1,952,479 2,327,437.86 2,680,730
Total, August, 1928...... 526 2,437,246 1,856,567 3,057,243 1,870,211 2,199,069.31 2,425,336


Tanker Traffic Through the Panama Canal in August, 1930.
During the month of August, 1930, 95 tank ships transited the Canal
with an aggregate net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, of
526,104, on which tolls of $461,949.41 were paid. Cargo amounted to
:.490,437 tons, which included 456,110 tons of mineral oil and 14,613 ,
A: tons of creosote, and 19,714 tons of molasses. In point of net tonnage,
..+:tanker traffic decreased 9.7 per cent as compared with the same traffic
" for the corresponding month-a year ago, while cargo tonnage decreased
18.4 per cent.
I" Tank vessels comprised 20.4 per cent of the total commercial transits .
i..i'through the Canal during the month; made up 22.4 per cent of the
"total Panama Canal net tonnage; were the source of 22.2 per cent of
;ghe tolls collected; and carried 22.8 per cent df the total cargo in
asit through the Canal.
'he number, aggregate net tonnage, tolls, and cargo of tank ships
.gthe Capal during the month of August, 1930, segregated by



: ":': 'H@ ":;' : 2!i i : r.. ,: : o ""' " "" :
Ld!, *1: :.. :


Tolls.


38,696.25
253,967.65
4,291.25
534.85
18,086.25
13,441.25
23,483.75
18,856.25
50,533.05
6,131.25
42,187.50
56,637.70
67.50
19,138.65
501,807.35
1,017,860.60
1.207,778.46
1,114,163.80


Tons
of
cargo.

13,759
340,853
1,839
361
29,672
24,330
35.816
29,622
71,451
8,902
48,577
91,993
46,880
725,007
1,469,062
1,822,069
1,672,828








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


direction of transit and nationality of vessels, are shown in. the follow-
ing tabulation, with comparative totals for the two preceding months
and for August, 1929:

No. Panama Tons
of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. cargo.
Atlantic to Pacific.
Belgian ... ........................... .... .... 4,976 $5,710.00 5,200
British .. .. .. .. .. . 9 44,944 36,968 16 '21,538
Danzig ... .... .... ......... .. 1 6,310 4,543.20 ... .....
French. ................. ......... 1 6,907 5,019 75 . .....
German . 4,340 3,124.80
Norwegian.... 5 23,847 17,079 84 . .....
Panamanin ...... . 1 6,650 4,788 00
United States.. ....... .. .. .. 30 176,016 128,725 36 14,677
Total, August, 1930 ........... .. .. . ....... 49 273,990 205,959.11 41.415
Total. July, 1930 ... .... ... .... 51 281,690 202,949.10 . .....
Total, June, 1930 ..... ... . ..... ...... 6.5 345,896 256,991 09 27,972
Total, August, 1929 ... .. .... ..... 50 259,668 194,731.47 34,356
Pacific to Atlantic.
British ............. 13 66,038 70,902.65 a 125.162
Danish ............ ... 1 6,054 6,322.50 12,100
Danzig. . .................... .. .... 2 14,294 13,441 25 24,330
Dutch . ..... . .... . .. . 4,317 4,365.00 7,416
French ...... ... . I 5,385 5,743.75 9,210
German . ..... . .. ... 4,435 4,742.50 8,447
Norwegian ... ... .... 3 16,862 16,123 95 21,967
United States .. 24 134,729 134,348.70 240,390
Total, August. 1930 .......... ... ..... 46 252,114 255,990 30 449,022
Total, July, 1930 ..... . ... 69' 375,067 385,446 00 688,237
Total, June. 1930 .... ............ 44 245,517 251,b49.15 432,961
Total, August. 1929..... ...... ....... 59 322,779 329,195 '06 566,907

Creoso:t-. 3 Includes 9,413 tons creosote. Includes 12,652 tons of molasses.
4 Includes 7,0o2 tons of molasses.
The following tabulation shows the tanker traffic through the Canal
during August, 1930, classified according to trade routes:
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.
No. Panama Tons
Trade routes. of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. cargo.
United States intercoastal .................... 27 153,398 $110,512.71
United States to South America.... ...... ..... 1 4,326 3,114.72 .. .. ....
United States to Far East............... ... .. .......... 1 7,388 6,473.75 11,750
Canada to South America ... .. ...... ... ....... ....... 2 12,766 9,191.52 ...........
Central America to South America. ....................... I 3,892 4,203.75 7,619
West Indies to South America ........ ................. 1 3,326 3,590.00 4,506
West Indies to Balboa .... . ....... ................... 1 2,235 2,382.50 2,927
Europe to United States .... ............. .. ....... 12 71,517 53,460.64 9,413
Europe to Canada .............. ..................... 1 4,976 5,710.00 5,200
Europe to South America ... ....... .. .. .. ....... 2 10,166 7,319.52 ... .......

Creosote.
PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.
No. Panama Tons
Trade routes, of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. cargo.
United States intercoastal.......... ..... . ... ..... 22 128,108 $128,826.25 233,328
United States to South America .......... .... ......... 1 6,054 6,322.50 12,100
United States to Hawaii... ....... .................... 1 5,035 3,625 20 ........ ..
United States to Australasia............................ 11 55,254 58,936.40 99,863
South America to United States .......................... 4 20,145 19,713.75 34,957
South America to Canada. ............................... 3 18,044 19,483.75 37,730
South America to Europe.... ............................. 1 6,127 6,585.00 11.330
Balboa to West Indies ....... ................ ......... 1 2,335 1,681.20 ...... ...
Hawaii to United States... .... .................... 1 4,286 3,841.25 '7,062
Philippine Islands to United States........................ 1 6,726 6,975.00 12,652
'


2 Molasses.


.. :.".

7'.


3.' i^



"tll
" A" ;i
M J:::


=. t,,, mmt~ =n


1 I


September 10, 1980





: -- ept br .


: .... tember I
r :


1, 1980


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Of the tanker traffic passing through the Canal in August, 1930, the
following is a summary of the vessels giving Los Angeles as their port
of origin or destination, together with the totals for the two preceding
months and for August, 1929:
No. Panama Tons
of Canal net Tolls. of
ships. tonnage. cargo.
To Los Angeles.
August, 1930........................................... 33 193,904 $139,567.59 .........
July, 1930...... ............. ............. ........... 45 248,984 179,400.78 ........
June, 1930....... .............................. 56 300,724 219,484.66 9,782
August, 1929 ........................... ............. 36 185,410 134,683.91 7,400
From Los Angeles.
August, 1930...................... ............ ..... 33 183,370 185,721 60 325,811
July, 1930 ......................... ..... ...... ... 56 302,142 307,081.25 545,893
June, 1930.. ......... ............................ 33 89,882 191944.40 330,780
August, 1929 .... ................... .. .. .. .. 43 236,932 237,282.96 401,565


United States Intercoastal Traffic by Commodities for August, 1930.

The following table shows the cargo carried through the Canal in
the United States intercoastal trade, segregated by commodities and
by direction, with the total for August, 1930, and the totals for August,
1929 and 1928. Cargo statistics are compiled from cargo declarations
submitted by masters of vessels, and in these declarations small
items are frequently grouped under the designation "General cargo.'.'
These statistics are accordingly not precise, but they are indicative
of the kind and quantity of the cargo in transit through the Canal.
These figures represent tons of 2,240 pounds, and are for the United
States intercoastal trade only:
* Atlantic. Pacific
to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.


Aeroplanes ......... ..... ........................... .. ...........
Agricultural implements........ ...............................
Alfalfa ..................................... .... .... .......... .......
Alfalfa m eal..................... . .......................... ... .. .
A m m onia.............................. . . ........................
A asbestos ............. .......................................... .......
Asphalt ...... ............... ....... ................... ... ...
Autom obiles ............................... .................. ...
Automobile accessories .......................................... .......
Bamboo.......................................... ........ . ....
Bark:
Cascara.................................................... .....
O ther...............................................................
B i m e... ................................... ................... ........
Borax ............ ............. ............... .................... .. ..
Bri eks ............... .......................................... ... ..
B urlap. ... ........ .. .................. ... ............... ..
Calcium carbide.............................. ............ .. . ..
: : C am phor ............................................. . ..... ... ..... .

F ish .... ...... ......... ................................... .. .....
Fruit ...................................................... ....
M eat ...............................................................
M ilk .............................................................
Boup ... ............................................... .........
S Vegetables................................................. ......
M iscellaneous.................. ................. ................
Carbon black............... ......... ...
C elite iltercel ................ ...........................................
S m e ....... .. ........................ ...........................
Char o al...................... ..........................................
:hnA and. ir clay.......................................................






.*.. .. ......... ............
.. ..... .. ... ... .... ........ ...............


.. ..: ...


209,

43
27
139
3,410
774


28.
189
95
140
40

271
34

2,359
446
2,519
32
. 3771
161
783
118
1,500
198
19
424
820
17

602 1


37
149
1,345
661

46
183
140
23
19
5D7
1,555
269
93
11.

9,373
21,281
800
55
3,410
5,789
954
27
120
112
206
.r.........
66'
311
51

9
250
161
402


37
358
1,345
661
43
27
185
3,593
914
23
19
535
1,744
269
95
233
40
11
9,644 ,
21,315
800
55
2,359
3,856 I
8,308
32
954
404
281
895
324
1,500
264
330
475
820 :'
20
250
261 .
1,004
O N ,-,J
'm:= ae = ;L rerll mmmmm J[









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Confectionery .................................. ....................
Cork. . ... .. ........ ..... ...... ....... ...... ...... ........
C o tto n ... ................. ..... ...... . ...... . .......... ...
Cottonseed meal ...... ...... .. ... ............. .. .......... .....
Cyanide .......... . ............. ....... .. ... ............
Drugs........... ..... ..... ....... ........ ... ......... ...
Dyes .. .. .......... ... ....... ...... .... . ....... .....
Dyewoeds .. .... ........... ......... ....... ........ . ..
Earthenware. ...... ..... ... . .................. .........
Eggs, dried ....... .... . .......... .. ....... ..... ...
Explosives .......... .. . .. . .... ... ... ...... .......
Fertilizer .. .. ... ........... .. ...... .. ........ .
F lou r .. ...... ... . ... .. ..... .. .. .. .. .. ..
Fruit:
Dried ....... .. ... ....... .. ....... ........ ....
Fresh ....... .... ... ... .. . ..... . ...... ..
Fuller's earth ... ...... . .. .... ........... ...... ...........
Furniture ........ ..... . . .... ........... ... . .. . ...... ....
General .. .. ........ .. ... .. .. . ....................... ...
Glass and glassware...... ........ .. ..... ....... .............
G lue ............ ..... ....... . . .. .......... .... . .. . .
Granite ... ... ..... .. ... ................... ..............
Gum .. .. ......... ...... .. .. ... .... ...... ...... ..... ....
H air .......... ... . .. ....... . .... .. ... ....... ....
Hardwoods .......... .. .... .... ..... .. .... ........ .....
H ay .. ...... ... ... .. .... . .. . .. .. ..
H em p... .. .. .. .......... ... .... . . ... . ... . . . .
Honey .. .. ... .... .. ........ .. .... ............
Hops. .. .. ................... .. ... . . .............
Irnfusorial earth ........ .. . ... ..... .... .. ... ... ...... ...
K apok .. ... ... .. .. .... . .. .. .. .. .. ..... . .
L ard substitute .......... ... . ... . ...... ..... .... . .
L eather.. .. ... ... .. .... ........ ...... ..... .....
Lim e .. ... . ............. .. . .......... .. ........
L inoleum .... . .. .. . .. .......... . . .. .. ..
Liquors ....... ... ... ... ... .... .. ... .... ..... . .. ....
L um ber ... ........ .. .... .. .. ... ..... .. .... ..
M a ize ... . . .. ... ... ... ... . . .. .. .. ..... ....
M alt .. . .. . ..... ... .. .. ... .........
Manufactured goods:
Iron and steel ..... ........ . ................... ..... ...... .....
M achiner ..................... .......... ..............
Radroad material ........................ ...... .. ... ...... .....
Tinplate .. ... ......................... ...... .................
Textiles ... ... .. .................. .... ................
M miscellaneous ....... ........... .. ... ..... .. .. ...........
Marble ........... ................... .. . ...... ...... .
M atches.... .. . . .................. .. .. ...... ..
Metals:
Antimony ..................................... ......
Copper . . ........................ .. ..................
Iro n ........ ............ ............................
Lead ............. ....... .. ..... ............. ..... .. ...
Scrap . . ............ ..... .. .. ...........................
Zinc .. .......... .................................. .
O t her ............. ... .... .. .. ................................
Milk, powdered ............ . .................. .. .... ...
M olasses.. .. ... ......... .... ............ .. ................
M musical instrum ents. .......... . ................. .. ...
N u ts ... ..... . .... ............. .............................
O ats ... ... ... ................... ... ........ ...... ........
Oils:
Coconut. . ......... ................................ .............
Cottonseed ....... .................. ..................... ........
Crude. .. ..... ... ... ..................... ..........
Gas oil, fuel oil ......................... .................
Gasoline, benzine, naphtha ..................................
K erosene ................... .............. ..................
Lubricating and greases ......... ...................................
Olive ..................... ...................................
Vegetable ............. .................................. .
Other ......................... ....... .................
Ores:
Antimony ............... .................... ............... .
Copper ............................... ............... .. .. ..........
M al nesite .................. ... ............... ...................
Manganese .... ............................... ............
Other ............................................. ... .......
Paint ... .................................................
Paper.............................................. .........
Paper pulp ................ ......................... .......
Paper roofing ........ ....................... ........... ......... ......
Peanuts ......................................... . .... ........... .....
Peas ................. ............... ......... .. ...........
P hosphates .................................... ... .......................


September 10, 1980


Atlantic. Pacific
to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.


447
518
749
50
983
II
15
106
45
200
324
34
7
500
190
44,654
1,228
62
170
63
521





2,038
8
229
443
225
2,460
13
104
76.724
2,527
42
9,569
2,663
4,141
88
143


2,225
27
575
..........

116
12

61


54
30

3,582
93
270




30
334
6,898
52


2,338


762
479

43

121
126
9
5,132
3,540
1,190
54
56
16,500
289
15
16
128
100
1,717
1,633
131
46
30
111
13

50

120,754


1,284
238

284
341


50
2,397
654
829
835
946
27
753


800

22,681
232,178
9,071
74
27


60
407
72
100
48
6,891
8,612
32
342
43


Iii


447
518
1,511
479
50
1,026
11
15
227
126
54
200
5,456

3,574
1,197
554
246
61.154
1,517
77
170
16
191
621
1,717
1,633
131
46
30
111
2,051
8
229
493
225
123,214
13
104
78,008
2,765
42
9,569
2,947
4,482
88
143
50
2,397
2,879
856
1,410
946
27
753
116
12
58
61
800
111
54
22,711
232,178
9,071
3,650'
93
27 .
270

60 '
407 :
72
100
30 ::
382
13,789
8,664 ..
32 ..
557 In
43 .
p "<



.


` ,, ..-T~~.i1IY~





:.:" * .: .*

: :


ji:... ,
r8

F, -'


L


Atlantic. Pacific
to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.


Porcelain............................. ........... ............
Q uicksilver ...................... ...................... ... ....... ..
Page......................................... ....... .....
R ice...................... ........................ .... ........ ...
Rope........................................ . ............ ... .....
Rosin ................ ............. ... ..... .............
Rubber, manufactured..................................... .. ...... ...
Salt .......................................... ... ..... . ...
Seeds:
Hemp.............................. . ....... ..... ..... ..
Other.......................... ... ........................ ....
Sh ells .............. ....................................... ....... ....
S eilk .................... .. ................ ................. ... .
Skins and hides.......................... ... .........
Blag ............. ............ .. . ....... ......... ........... ....
Slate ......................... .............. ............ ..........
Soap .......... ............ ...... .........................
Soda ....................................................................
S oda ash ........................ ......................................
Soda, bicarbonate.......................... . .....................
Soda, caustic............... ... ... .. .... .. ...... .. .......... ..
Sugar............... ...................................................
Sulphur.............. ..... ... ............ ......... .. ......... . .. ..
Syrup ................................ ....... .............. ...........
Talc .................. ............... ............. ......... ......
Tallow ............. ................. .................... ........... ..
Tar ............................ .......... ..............
T obacco................................................................ ..
Toys.................... ........................................... ....
Turpentine........ ........... ............ .. ......... ... ...... ..
Vegetables.................................... ....... ...............
W aste.......................... ..... .. ........ .... .... ............... ..
W ax............. .................................. .. ..................
Wheat...... ..... ........ ...... .... .........................
'S W ine................. ... .... .... ... ................ ...
Wool............................... ... ................ .. ......


Total, August, 1930 ................... ............................... 214,322


Total, August, 1929..................................................

T otal, August, 1928................. ....... .. ....... ............


291,381

243,405


180
38
83
30
1,802
586
171


1,003

1.201
955
2,095
533
1,259
128
110
30
17,616
233

16
986
32
95
14
S. . . . . .
15

10


Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 8, 1930.
No. 755.
Panama, Panama Bay, Knocker Rock gas buoy, characteristic of light changed. The
following is quoted from "Notice to Mariners," Washington, D. C., August 31, 1930:
a The light on Knocker Rock gas buoy has been changed from flashing white to flashing red every 6
seconds, flash I second, eclipse 5 seconds. Approximate position, Lat. 8 57' 00" N., Long. 79* 31' 20"
W.
J. L. SCHLEY,
A cling Governor.

Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing from
Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Two Weeks Ending September 6, 1930.

I Cargo-
Name of vesspl. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed.
] Discharged Laded.


City of Panama.....
Champerico.....,..
Toyama Marm.......
Frast........ ......
Benjamin Franklin....
Santa Teresa.........
Ecuador.............
lA Sedadur..........
1. Arwyao.............
Somme.............

Tesg King...........
E f ............
.... ...........


.... ..

B =Qai^ ;^ .


Panama Mail S. S. Co...........
Pacific Stewam Navigation Co......
Nippon Yusen Kaisha............
West rndia Oil Co...............
Fred Olsen & Co.................
Grace Line ....... .............
Panama Mail S. S. Co..........
Panama Mail 8. S. Co...........
General Navigation Co...........
U. S. Government...............
U. S. Government...............
East Asiatic Co.................
Hamburg-American Line .........
Westfal, Larsen & Co............
S. A. Nanset....................
United Fruit Co.................
Gr .e Jne...................
oy eotherlaads S. S. Co......
.Pa.. ma-Paifie B. S. Line ........


August 23....
August 23....
August 24...
August 24....
August 24....
August 26....
August 26....
August 26....
August 27 ....
August 27....
August 27....
August 27....
August 27....
August 27....
August 28....
August 28....
September 3..
September 3..
September 5..


August 31 ....
August 23....
August 25....
August 28.
August 25...
August 26....
August 27....
August 27....
August 28....
August 28....
August 29..
August 28..
August 27....
Agust 30....
August 31....
August 29....
September 3.
September 3.
September 5. .


Tons.
345

300
824
17
221
67
"........ .
I
62
200
9,202
6,889
116
95
87
..........


Tone.
..........
1
..........
..........
179
342
2
75
10
35
..........
..........

70
8
..........
.179"


1: A5' 4
7.


B


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


eptember 10, 1980


--


1,481
4
727
70
76
. .. . . .
60

166
178
704
1,256

446




11,528
65
78
207
25
47
119
412
65
129
143
113
2,412

512,105

690,983

595,539


-.- .. ,. l"


*I


1,661
4
765
153
106
1,802
646
171
166
178
1,003
704
1,256
1,201
955
2,541
533
1,259
128
110
11,558
17,616
298
78
207
41
943
151
95
426
65
144
143
113
2,422

726,427

982,364

838,944








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


New Light Ship Transits Canal.

The lightship Fire Island arrived at Balboa from Portland, Oreg.,
6n September 2, and after taking on fuel oil and supplies, transited the
Canal on September 4. She is bound for New York via Charleston,
S. C., and is due to arrive at her destination about September 18.
The Fire Island, which was built by the Albina Marine Iron Works
at Portland, Oreg., and launched in December, 1929, is one of three
new lightships in the Lighthouse Service of the Department of Com-
merce and is to replace the present ship at Fire Island, off long Island,
N. V. The new lightship is equipped with a number of improvements
and new features not seen on old lightships. The Fire Island is
powered with Diesel-electric engines and is to be equipped with a
radio beacon before being put into service. The service of the old light-
ship, equipped with only a fixed light, was diminished during periods
of poor visibility. The new ship, equipped with the radio beacon, will
enable vessels to ascertain their position regardless of the visibility.
The Fire Island has a length of 123 feet, beam of 30 feet, and draft of
114 feet.


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing from
Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending August 30, 1930.


Name of vessel.


Cartago .......... .
Alaska.......... .
Pastores ..........
Benjamin Franklin...
G alicia........ .....
Castilla....... .....
Wisconsin .... .... .
Donau .............
Tayama Maru ......
Tai Yin . . ....
Axel Johnson ........
W ido ......... .....
Haarlem............
Santa Teresa.........
El Salvador..... .
Cauca...............
Virgilio..............
Ulua ....... ....
Kyphissia.... ......
Wyoming.... .....
Vermar............
Gruenwald .........
Parthenia........ .
Marstenen ... .....
Pacific Enterprise. .
Cristobal.. .........
Pearl Marie.........
Ecuador......... .
Sixaola..............
Tela..... .. .... .
Margaret Johnson....
M ercian..... ......
Cerigo.......... .
Mary V.......... .
T eno ...... ........
Bolivar..............
Manizales...... .....
Orduna...... .....
La Perla...........
Castilla ..... .......
Atlantida............
Acajutla......... .
Santa Maria.........
Parismina..........
Peter Kerr..........
Dora K.............


Line or charterer.


United Fruit Co....... ..... .
French Line ............... ...
United Fruit Co .......... .
Fred Olsen & Co ..... .......
Hamburg-American Line ......
United Fruit Co. ............ .
French Line..... .... ......
North German Lloyd ... ........
Nippon Yusen Kaisha Line.....
Barber Line ...................
Johnson Line..... .............
North German Lloyd .... ....
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co ......
Grace Line .. ...............
Panama Mail S. S. Co...........
United Fruit Co ...... .......
Italian S. S. Line..............
United Fruit Co...... .... ....
Hamburg-American Line... ....
French S. S. Line... .. ......
Calmar S. S. Corp ..............
Hamburg-American Line.........
Donaldson S. S. Line ............
Aluminium S. S. Line ... .......
Furness Line ... ...............
Panama R. R. S. S. Line.......
R. Feuillebois. ... ... .. ......
Panama Mail S. S. Co ...........
United Fruit Co..... ..........
United Fruit Co ...............
Johnson Line ...................
Leyland S. S. Line...............
North German Lloyd.. .........
Lin Ming .. .............
Chilean S. S. Line ..............
United Fruit Co.... ............
North German Lloyd.. .........
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
United Fruit Co................
United Fruit Co...............
Standard Fruit & S. S. Co........
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
Grace Line.....................
United Fruit Co......... ..... ..
States S. S. Line ................
R. Feuillebois..................


Arrived.


I I-- -- -


August 24..
August 24. .
August 24 ....
August 24 .
August 24 ..
August 24....
August 25....
August 25....
August 25 ....
August 25....
August 25 ..
August 25....
August 25....
August 25 ....
August 25. ..
August 25...
August 26 ...
August 26 ...
August 26 ..
August 26 ..
August 26....
August 26....
August 26....
August 27 ...
August 27 ...
August 27....
August 27....
August 27....
August 27 ..
August 27 ...
August 27 ....
August 28....
August 28..
August 28...
August 28....
August 29....
August 29....
August 29....
August 29 ....
August 29 ....
August 30 ....
August 30 ....
August 30 ....
August 30 ....
August 30 ....


Departed.


August 24.. .
August 24....
August 24....
August 24....
August 24....
August 25..
August 25....
August 25..
August 25...
August 25 ....
August 25.. .
August 26....
August 26....
August 26....
August 26....
August 27 ...
August 27....
August 27....
August 26....
August 26....
August 27....
August 27....
August 27....
August 27....
August 29..
August 27....
August 28....
August 28....
August 28....
August 28....
August 28 ....
August 28....
August 29....
August 29 ...
August 30....
August 29...
August 30....
'August 30....
August 30....



August 30....


Cargo-


Discharged


23
264
()
1
263
181
133
79
123
180
156
36
240
248
164
324
220
38
774
96
(t)
470
(0)
3,257
(I)
609
.340
646
(I)
460
381

(0)
120
767
6
634
38
147
363
117
56
74


Laded.
4
2
307
(,)
239
134
104
187
(')
133
( )
97
107
529
519
242
(a)
4
221
8
(a)
3
370
I A1


469 .
7
202
87
207
117


235
672
301
( ) .::..
54 "
359 i.:'

....& ..


&~~ Nocrodshre. 'ocroldd


I


September 10, 1950


& No cargo discharged.


a No cargo laded.








1 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
9 Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
S Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. *
Certifcate.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.


Volume XXIV. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 17, 1930.


No. 7.


Cargo Through the Canal During August, 1930.
On pages 92 and 93 of this issue will be found tables showing the
origin and destination of cargo passing through the Canal in August,
1930. This cargo, segregated according to direction, as compared with
'August, 1929, and the differences are shown in the following tabulation:
August, August, Dierence.
1929. 1930. Difference.
Long tons. Long tons. Long tons.
Atlantic to Pacific....... ................................. 858,661 679,407 -179,254
Pacific to Atlantic............................... ......... 1,822,069 1,469,062 -353,007
Total ........... .. ........................ ...... 2,680,730 2,148,469 -532,261

It will be noted from the above that the Atlantic to Pacific tonnage
.decreased 179,254 tons, or 20.9 per cent, as compared with August,
1929, and that from the Pacific to Atlantic decreased 353,007 tons, or
19.4 per cent, making a total decrease of cargo tonnage in both direc-
tions of 532,261 tons, or 19.9 per cent. The heavy decrease from the
Atlantic was accounted for by a general curtailment in shipments and
a large decrease in cargo tonnage of several important commodities
as indicated under "Principal commodities." Shipments of manu-
.factured iron and steel declined 84,226 tons; automobiles and acces-
sories, 21,183 tons; mineral oils, 10,617 tons; and cement, 23,031 tons.
There was an increase of 32,553 tons of suphur from the Atlantic.
The decrease from the Pacific was due to losses in tonnage of mineral
:.oils, 93,958 tons; lumber, 177,648 tons; nitrates, 97,366 tons; and
barley, 17,000 tons. Wheat, molasses, rice, and cold storage cargo show
increases of 47,212 tons, 13,860 tons, 13,282 tons, and 11,171 tons,
respectively.
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
.Origin.-Sixty and five-tenths per cent of the cargo tonnage from the
Atlantic to the Pacific originated on the eastern and Gulf seaboards of
.the United States, and 26.7 per cent in Europe. Tonnage from the
United States decreased 125,561 tons, or 23.4 per cent, as compared
;:ith'August, 1929, and the proportion to the total in August, 1930, was
lower. The amount originating in Europe decreased 68,870 tons, or
S27.5 per cent, and the percentage of the whole was lower in August of
i:. this year.
!.. Destination.-Forty-two and four-tenths per cent of the Pacific-
iiip"bound tonnage was destined to the United States; 13.9 per cent to
South America; 18.6 per. cent to Asia; and 15.9 per cent to Australasia.
.4.argo tonnage to all these areas declined as compared with August,
S -1929. .in actual tonnage as follows: To the United States, 90,507 tons,
t .9 per cent; .t South America, 26,374 tons,. or 21.9 per cent; to
~t:iail 24,104kons, or .18.3 per cent; and to Asia, 45,484 tons, or
tY.n. In point of relation of cargo destined[to the aforemen-







86 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD September 17, 1980 "

tioned areas to the total tonnage in this direction, that to the United
States, South America, and Asia decreased, while that to Australasia
showed a gain.
PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
*Origin.-Of the cargo moving in this direction, 52.6 per cent came
from the United States; 25.9 per cent from South America; 10.3 per
cent from Canada; 4.5 per cent from Asia; and 4.4 percent from Austral-
asia. As compared with the corresponding month a year ago, tonnage
from the United States decreased 297,471 tons, or 27.8 per cent, and
the percentage of the total was lower in August, 1930. Cargo tonnage
from South America decreased 127,713 tons, or 25.1 per cent, and also
showed a reduced percentage in its relation to the total cargo. Ton-'
nage from Canada increased 18,272 tons, or 13.8 per cent, with an
increase in the percentage of the total. Asia showed a cargo increase
of 30,427 tons, or 85.1 per cent, while Australasia showed an increase
of 11,576 tons, or 21.6 per cent. Each of these areas showed an in-
crease in the percentage to the total cargo. The decrease in cargo ton-
nage from the United States was principally due to lumber and mineral
oils. The greater part of the decrease from South America was caused
by lessened nitrate shipments. The gain from Canada was due to
wheat shipments and that from Australasia to larger shipments of
meat in cold storage and wool. The increase from Asia was due to
large shipments of molasses and rice.
Destination.-Segregated according to destination, 57.3 per cent of
the cargo in this direction went to the United States, and 35.6 per cent"
to Europe. Tonnage to the United States decreased in its proportion
to the total tonnage and showed a decrease in actual tonnage of
243,644 tons, or 22.4 per cent. That to Europe decreased 83,219 tons,
or 13.7 per cent, while its relation to the total cargo was greater.
PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.
From the cargo declarations submitted it was possible to classify A
85.0 per cent of the total cargo in transit through the Canal from the
Atlantic to the Pacific. The remaining 15.0 per cent consists, for the
most part, of manufactured articles in small lots reported as "General"
cargo."
Atlantic to Pacific-bound commodities which aggregated more than
10,000 tons for August, 1929, or August, 1930, are listed in the follow-
ing tabulation, showing differences:
August, August,
Commodity. 1929. 1930. Difference.
Long tons. Long tons. Long tons.
Ammonia....................... .............................. 10,830 4,254 -6,576
Asphalt ............... ... .......................................... 18,184 18,634 + 450
Autom obiles ......................................................... 23,387 8,953 14,434
Automobile accessories.. ... ..... ....... ....................... 10,150 3,401 -6,749
Cement........ ....... ........ ... .. ....................... 48,220 25,189 23,031
Coal and coke......................... ... ..................... 14,205 12,131 -2,074
Cotton........................ ...................... .............. 8,176 10,991 -2,815
Creosote ............................................................ 3,047 14,624 + 11,577
Manufactured goods:
Iron and steel.................................................... 213,031 128,805 84,226
Machinery...... ................................. .... 15,949 12,742 -3,207
Railroad material.......... .. ............................. 20,425 5,441 -14,984
Textiles.................. ..................................... 13,356 9,170 -4,186 ;.
Tinplate .................................. .................. 20,156 20,025 -131
Miscellaneous .. ........... .............. ............ 13,699 6,580 -7,119 jjA
Metal, scrap (principally iron) ......... ............. ... ........ 12,785 10,732 -2,053 ;
Oils, mineral..... ..................... .............. ........ 72,398 61,781 -10,617 9
Paper.......... ....... .......... ..... ............... ........ 29,571 22,693 6,878 .
Phosphates............... ........ .......................... 31,344 36,437 +5,093
Sugar .... ....... .. ......................... ............. 6,591 11,367 +4,776
Sulphur ........................... .......................... 1,567 34,120 +32, i588
* : ,: ~







I. eptemb 17, 190S
I~:!:: ~ f ,m


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


The above 20 commodity groups comprise 67.4 per cent of the cargo
moving fiom the Atlantic to the Pacific during August, 1930. Fifteen
of the items show decreases and 5 increases as compared with August,
'1929. The largest decline was in manufactured iron and steel.
PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.
It was possible to classify 98.4 per cent of all cargo moving
from the Pacific to Atlantic during the month of August, 1930. Com-
modities which aggregated more than 10,000 tons either during the
past month or the corresponding month in 1929 are listed below:


August, August, '
Commodity. Au929t. 1930. Different.
Long tons. Long tons. Long tons.
Asphalt ............................................................. 11,104 1,520 9,584
Barley......................... .... .................................. 40,690 23,690 17,000
Canned goods (fish, fruit, vegetables, eta.) .............................. 55,836 53,803 -2,033
Cold storage (food products) '......................................... 18,396 29,567 + 11,171
Copra .............. ..... ............................................ 20,947 4,000 -16,947
PFrit, dried............ ............ ......................... ... ...... .. 13,631 10,152 -3,479-
Fruit, fresh..................................... ................. 11,538 6,981 -4,557
Lumber............................................................. 371,798 194,150 -177,648
Metals, various..................................................... 67.250 52,656 -4,594
Molasses........................................... ................. 7,000 20,860 +13,860
Nitrates....................... ..................................... 164,283 66,917 -97,366
Oils, mineral....................... .... ............................. 554,837 460,879 -93,958
Ores (principally iron).............................................. 175,769 173,096 -2,673
Pulp ................ ........................................... 15,725 9,201 -6,524
Rice.............................................. .................. 3,265 16,547 +13.282
Sugar............................................... ............... 63,588 63,513 -75
Wheat............... ..... ........ .................................... 94,832 142,044 +47,212
x Fresh fruit not included.
The above 17 commodity groups comprise 90.5 per cent of the cargo
moving from the Pacific to the Atlantic during August, 1930. Thir-
,teen of the items show decreases and 4 increases. Food products in
cold storage, molasses, rice, and wheat show increases. Lumber,
nitrates, and mineral oils were the commodities which decreased most
heavily.
(Continued on page 92.)
New Vessels for United Fruit Company.
According to an announcement of the United States Shipping Board,
loans to the United Mail Steamship Company aggregating $15,412,500
; are to be used in aid of building 6 passenger cargo steamships for the
Central-American services of the United Fruit Company.
The vessels, to be built under these loans will be 447 feet long, 60
feet beam, and 24 feet draft, with a deadweight tonnage of 4,000 tons
S ei: each. They will be equipped with turbo-electric drive and an average
* speed of 161 knots is expected. Three of the vessels will be operated'
between San Francisco and Cristobal, stopping at Puerto Armuelles,
Pq Following the development of new plantations on the Pacific side
of::Panama, in the region near Puerto Armuelles, the United Fruit
:::Company discontinued its service from Port Limon to San Francisco
,."a the Canal, displacing it by the service from Cristobal to California,
via Balboa, Puerto Armuelles, and San Jose de Guatemala. Three of
te new vessels will be used in this service, which now employs the
stema.ships La Perla, San Jose, San Mateo, Esparta, Saramacca, and

i:'e stated that the 6 new ships are to be completed and in operation


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5

I 41.


I
2 !









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing from
Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending September 6, 1930.

Cargo-
Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed. Cargo -
Discharged Laded.


Cerigo.......... .
Cristobal...........
Acajutla.............
Santa Maria.........
Parismina...........
Peter Kerr..........
Ulua ...............
Amasis.............
Caldas ..............
Santa Elisa.........
Darian.............
Calamares..........
Cauca...............
Simon Bolivar.......
C. C. Acme..........
Schwaben...........
Bookoop.............
Durazzo.............
Aconcagua..... .....
Orinoco ............
George Washington ..
Swiftwind. .........
Zacapa..............
M acoris .. .........
Santa Clara.........
Iriona...............
Tela...............
Amerika............
Pearl Marie.........
Baracoa .............
Bennekom..........
Oroya...............
Arana..............
Iowa.............
Simon Bolivar........
Moerdyk...........
Dintledyk...........
Amapala............
Guayaquil...........
Heredia............
Santa Tecla..........
Marques de Comillas.
San Francisco........
Ruhr ...............
Liberator............


North German Lloyd............
Panama R. R. S. S. Line.........
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
G race Line.....................
United Fruit Co... ........
States S. S. Line.................
United Fruit Co .. .........
Hamburg-American Line.........
United Fruit Co.............. .
Grace Line.....................
Leyland Line ...................
United Fruit Co...... .........
United Fruit Co .. .. .... ....
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.......
M Newball .....................
North German Lloyd .. .......
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.......
Hamburg-American Line .. ....
Chilean Line .................
Hamburg-American Line.........
Fred Olsen & Co ...............
C. D. Mallory & Co .. .......
United Fruit Co........... .
French Line ....................
Grace Line ....................
United Fruit Co................
United Fruit Co.......... .....
United Fruit Co...............
R. Feuillebois ..................
United Fruit Co........ .......
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.......
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
French Line..... ..............
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.......
Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
Pacific Steam Navigation Co ......
Standard Fruit Co ... ..........
Panama R. R. S. S. Line.........
United Fruit Co. . ... .......
N. O. & S. A. S. S. Co............
Spanish Line ... ..............
Hamburg-American Line.........
Hamburg-American Line........
Tampa Interocean Co............


a No cargo discharged.


August31............
September 1..
September ...
September 1
September ..
September ..
September 1.
September 1..
September 2..
September 2..
September 3
September 3..
September 3..
September 3..
September 3.
September 3. .
September 3..
September 3
September 3..
September 3..
September 4..
September 4.
September 4..
September 4..
September 4..
September 3..
September 5..
September 5..
September 5..
September 54..
September 4..
September 6..
September 6..
September 6.
September 6..
September 6..
September 6..
September 6..

September 6. .


Sailings of Panama Railroad Steamship Line.
Following are proposed dates of sailings for 1930 of passenger vessels in-the New
York-Cristobal service of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, in which the steamers
Ancon and Cristobal are engaged, sailing alternately:


Steamer.


Cristobal........
Ancon =..........
Cristobal........
Ancon..........
Cristobal........
Aneon...........
Cristobal........
Ancon ..........


Leave
New York
4 P.M.

September 16.
September 30.
October 15....
October 28...
November 11.
November 25.
December 9...
December 23..


Arrive
Port au Prince
A. M.
Leave P. M.
September 21.
October 5....
October 20....
November 2..
November 16.
November 30.
December 14..
December 28..


Arrive
Cristobal
A. M.

September 24.
October 8.....
October 23...
November 5
November 19
December 3...
December 17..
December 31..


Leave
Cristobal
P. M.

September 28.
October 12..
October 28.
November 9..
November 23
December 7..
December 21..
January 4....


Arrive
Port au Prince
A. M
Leave P. M.
October I. .
October 15...
October 31..
November 12.
November 26
December 10..
December 24.
January 7...


Arrive
New York
A. M.

October 6.
October 20.
November 5.
November 17.
December I'
December 15.
December 29.
January 12.


Effective April 30, steamers sail daylight saving time.
Due to discontinuance of the daylight saving time, departure after S. S. Cristobal, Sept. 16th, will be at 4. p. m.,
standard time.
Steamers sail at 4 p. m. from pier 65, North River, Foot of West 25th St., New York.
On both southward and northward voyages the vessels call at Port-au-Prince, Haiti,
which is approximately 5 days from New York and 60 hours from Cristobal. The-
stay of vessels at Port-au-Prince is of sufficient length of time to allow passengers to
visit points of interest.


99
809
739
191
3
( )
102
64


( ')



( )


(')
(,)


August 31....
August 31....
September 6..
August 31....
Augus' 31.. .
August 31
August 31....
August 31...
September 1.
September 2..
September 3..
September 3.
September 3.
September 3.
September 2.
September 3 .
September 3.
September 3.
September 3 .
September 3
September 3
September 4
September 4.
September 4.
September 6..
September 4..
September 4..
September 5..
September 5..
September 5..
September 5.
September 5..
September 6
September 6..
September 6.
September 6..





..............


Tons.





17
29
(,)
286
340
399
( *)
12
15
13
271
634
17
125
(a)
11,910
548
108
128
588
6
6
(,)
891
95
27
619
6
239
67
44
1,367
344
103
126
29
316
179


102
(a)
57
598
90
104
140
( )
40
168
202
89
66
(,)
529
283
(*)
365




. .. .. ..


2 No cargo laded.


J' X:


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September 17, 1980'


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