<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 August 1928
 September 1928
 October 1928
 November 1928
 December 1928
 January 1929
 February 1929
 March 1929
 April 1929
 May 1929
 June 1929
 July 1929
 Index
 Back Cover


PCANAL DLOC



Panama Canal record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097368/00032
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal record
Physical Description: 34 v. : ill., tables, diagrs. ; 24-30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States
Publisher: The Panama Canal etc.
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Canal Zone etc
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone etc
Frequency: monthly[july 1933-1941]
weekly[ former 1907-june 1933]
monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-34, no. 9; Sept. 4, 1907-April 30, 1941.
Numbering Peculiarities: No more published.
Issuing Body: Published under the authority and supervision of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 1907-Mar. 1914; of the Panama Canal, Apr. 1914-1941.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01761828
lccn - 07035378
oclc - 1761828
sobekcm - UF00097368_00032
System ID: UF00097368:00032

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    August 1928
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    September 1928
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    October 1928
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
    November 1928
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
    December 1928
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
    January 1929
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
    February 1929
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
        Page 384
        Page 385
        Page 386
        Page 387
        Page 388
        Page 389
        Page 390
        Page 391
        Page 392
        Page 393
        Page 394
        Page 395
        Page 396
        Page 397
        Page 398
        Page 399
        Page 400
        Page 401
        Page 402
        Page 403
        Page 404
        Page 405
        Page 406
        Page 407
        Page 408
        Page 409
        Page 410
        Page 411
        Page 412
        Page 413
        Page 414
        Page 415
        Page 416
        Page 417
        Page 418
        Page 419
        Page 420
        Page 421
        Page 422
        Page 423
        Page 424
        Page 425
        Page 426
        Page 427
        Page 428
        Page 429
        Page 430
        Page 431
        Page 432
    March 1929
        Page 433
        Page 434
        Page 435
        Page 436
        Page 437
        Page 438
        Page 439
        Page 440
        Page 441
        Page 442
        Page 443
        Page 444
        Page 445
        Page 446
        Page 447
        Page 448
        Page 449
        Page 450
        Page 451
        Page 452
        Page 453
        Page 454
        Page 455
        Page 456
        Page 457
        Page 458
        Page 459
        Page 460
        Page 461
        Page 462
        Page 463
        Page 464
        Page 465
        Page 466
        Page 467
        Page 468
        Page 469
        Page 470
        Page 471
        Page 472
        Page 473
        Page 474
        Page 475
        Page 476
        Page 477
        Page 478
        Page 479
        Page 480
        Page 481
        Page 482
        Page 483
        Page 484
        Page 485
        Page 486
        Page 487
        Page 488
        Page 489
        Page 490
        Page 491
        Page 492
        Page 493
        Page 494
        Page 495
        Page 496
        Page 497
        Page 498
        Page 499
        Page 500
    April 1929
        Page 501
        Page 502
        Page 503
        Page 504
        Page 505
        Page 506
        Page 507
        Page 508
        Page 509
        Page 510
        Page 511
        Page 512
        Page 513
        Page 514
        Page 515
        Page 516
        Page 517
        Page 518
        Page 519
        Page 520
        Page 521
        Page 522
        Page 523
        Page 524
        Page 525
        Page 526
        Page 527
        Page 528
        Page 529
        Page 530
        Page 531
        Page 532
        Page 533
        Page 534
        Page 535
        Page 536
        Page 537
        Page 538
        Page 539
        Page 540
        Page 541
        Page 542
        Page 543
        Page 544
        Page 545
        Page 546
        Page 547
        Page 548
        Page 549
        Page 550
        Page 551
        Page 552
        Page 553
        Page 554
        Page 555
        Page 556
    May 1929
        Page 557
        Page 558
        Page 559
        Page 560
        Page 561
        Page 562
        Page 563
        Page 564
        Page 565
        Page 566
        Page 567
        Page 568
        Page 569
        Page 570
        Page 571
        Page 572
        Page 573
        Page 574
        Page 575
        Page 576
        Page 577
        Page 578
        Page 579
        Page 580
        Page 581
        Page 582
        Page 583
        Page 584
        Page 585
        Page 586
        Page 587
        Page 588
        Page 589
        Page 590
        Page 591
        Page 592
        Page 593
        Page 594
        Page 595
        Page 596
        Page 597
        Page 598
        Page 599
        Page 600
        Page 601
        Page 602
        Page 603
        Page 604
        Page 605
        Page 606
        Page 607
        Page 608
        Page 609
        Page 610
        Page 611
        Page 612
        Page 613
        Page 614
        Page 615
        Page 616
        Page 617
        Page 618
        Page 619
        Page 620
        Page 621
        Page 622
    June 1929
        Page 623
        Page 624
        Page 625
        Page 626
        Page 627
        Page 628
        Page 629
        Page 630
        Page 631
        Page 632
        Page 633
        Page 634
        Page 635
        Page 636
        Page 637
        Page 638
        Page 639
        Page 640
        Page 641
        Page 642
        Page 643
        Page 644
        Page 645
        Page 646
        Page 647
        Page 648
        Page 649
        Page 650
        Page 651
        Page 652
        Page 653
        Page 654
        Page 655
        Page 656
        Page 657
        Page 658
        Page 659
        Page 660
        Page 661
        Page 662
        Page 663
        Page 664
        Page 665
        Page 666
        Page 667
        Page 668
        Page 669
        Page 670
        Page 671
        Page 672
        Page 673
        Page 674
        Page 675
        Page 676
        Page 677
        Page 678
    July 1929
        Page 679
        Page 680
        Page 681
        Page 682
        Page 683
        Page 684
        Page 685
        Page 686
        Page 687
        Page 688
        Page 689
        Page 690
        Page 691
        Page 692
        Page 693
        Page 694
        Page 695
        Page 696
        Page 697
        Page 698
        Page 699
        Page 700
        Page 701
        Page 702
        Page 703
        Page 704
        Page 705
        Page 706
        Page 707
        Page 708
        Page 709
        Page 710
        Page 711
        Page 712
        Page 713
        Page 714
        Page 715
        Page 716
        Page 717
        Page 718
        Page 719
        Page 720
        Page 721
        Page 722
        Page 723
        Page 724
        Page 725
        Page 726
        Page 727
        Page 728
        Page 729
        Page 730
        Page 731
        Page 732
        Page 733
        Page 734
        Page 735
        Page 736
        Page 737
        Page 738
        Page 739
        Page 740
        Page 741
        Page 742
        Page 743
        Page 744
        Page 745
        Page 746
        Page 747
        Page 748
        Page 749
        Page 750
    Index
        Page Index-3
        Page Index-4
        Page Index-5
        Page Index-6
        Page Index-7
        Page Index-8
        Page Index-9
        Page Index-10
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text






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Gift of the Panama Canal Museum




olo6 a3- 9,9


UNIV. OF FL. LIB.
JUL 1 7 2007
DOCUMENTSS DEPT.



























Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2011 with funding from
Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation


http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalr22192829isth







THE PANAA C L RD





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD.


PUBLISHED .WEEKLY UNDER
THE AUTHORITY AND SUPER-
VISION OF THE PANAMA CANAL


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VOLUME XXII
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THE PANAMA CANAL
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
1929

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MOUNT HOPE, CANAL ZONE
1929


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For additional copies of this publication address The Panama Canal,Washington, D. C.,or Balboa *
Heights, Canal Zone. Price of bound volumes, $1.00; for foreign postal delivery, $1.50. Price of
current subscription, $0.50 a year, foreign $1.00.


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:kTHE-, PANAMA CANAL RECORD.
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF TUE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.. "
Subscription rates. domestic, 10.50 per year; foreign, 51.00; address
i The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
The Panama Canal, Washington. D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
S Certificate.-By direction or the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and Is required for the proper transaction of the public business.
Volume XXII. Balboa heights, C. Z., August 8, 1928. No. I.

I.- Canal Traffic During July.
S During the month of July, 1928, 509 commercial vesselsand 10 small
t: launches transited the Canal. Tolls on the commercial vessels aggre-
gated $2,109,083.19, and on the launches, $73.35, or a total tolls
Collection of $2,109,156.54.
The daily average number of transits of seagoing vessels for the
month was 16.41, and the'aaily average tolls collection, $68,034.94.
The average amount of tolls paid by each of the commercial transits
was $4,143.58, as compared with $4,191.67 for the month of June,
1928. Traffic in July exceeded that of June by 28 transits and by l
almost $93,000 in tolls. '
In the following tabulation the number of commercial transits and
: the amount of tolls collected are shown for the first 7 months of the
S current calendar year, with the daily averages of t;ansits and tolls:


Totals for month. Daily averages.
Transit. Tolls. Transits. Tolls.
January............. .......... .... 540 $2,212,752 50 17.42 $71,379.20
February........... ......... ............ 547 2,253,755.37 18.86 77,715.70
March ...................... ..... ... 542 2,223,370.57 17 48 71,271.63
April ......... ........... 531 2,187,607 82 17.70 72,914.55
May ......................... .. 508 2,118,969.83 16.38 68,353.86
June. ............. ........... .... 481 2,016,211.09 16 03 67,206 43
July.............................. ........... 509 2,109,083 19 16.41 68,034.94
Totals .................... . .............. 3,658 15,121,750.37 17.17 70,994.13
1 1 1


a


STanker Traffic Through the Panama Canal in July, 1928. 7
During the month of July, 1928, 96 tank ships transited the Canal
S-with an aggregate net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement. of
S506,542, on which tolls of $442,108.53 were collected. Cargo amounted
to 462,483 tons. This included 9,340 tons of molasses routed from
Honolulu to Mobile. In point of net tonnage, tanker traffic for the
Past month showed a decrease of 22.9 per cent under the same traffic .;
for tie corresponding month a year ago, while cargo tonnage decreased
22.7 per cent under the cargo tonnage of July, 1927. : .
Tank ships comprised 18.8 per cent of the total commercial transit
through" the Canal during the month; made up 21.8 per cent of tlihe
pitotial Panama Canal net tonnage; were the source of 20.9 per cen totf
thuee 'tolls collected; and carried 20.2 per cent of the total cargo in
'4,jransit through the Canal. .
': he.pumber, aggregate net tonnage, tolls, and cargo of tank ships N,
r.tnsifing the Canal during the month of July, 1928, segregated by ,
'ed.tjon of transit and nationality of vessels, are shown in the'follow-
ftabtlations, with comparative totals for the two preceding months
.iR. fuhly, 1927: .
T....i.. 1 (Continued on page 6.) .
14.I: H ..' : .. z '.









2 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


' *


Tanker Traffic Through the Panama Canal in July, 1928.
(Continued from page 1.)


Nationality.


Atlantic to Pacific.
B ritish ... . .. . .. . .... . . . .
Danish ..... ................... ..
Danzig ....... ...... ..... ...........
F rench .............. ...... ...........
N orw egian ................ ............ .
U united States .......... ...... .......... .
Totals, July, 1928...................... ....
Totals, June, 1928 .. ....... ... .... .. ...
Totals, May, 1928 .... ... ........
Totals, July, 1927 ... ....... .... .
Pacific to Atlanlic.
British ... .... ................. .
Norwegian .. ......... . . ...
United States ...... ............ .....
Totals, July, 1928 ... ......... ...
Totals, June, 1928 .... .
Totals, May, 1928 ... .
Totals. July, 1927 ... ..


No.
of
vessels.


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.


j________ Ii -


16
2
1
2
28
50
51
32
62

8
2
36
46
39
41
54


70.107
6,024
12.465
4,635
9.589
155,868
264,688
270.917
170,811
345.496

34,530
9.388
197.936
241.854
211,872
209.621
311.682


$56,235.99
4,337.28
8,974 80
3,337.20
* 6.904 08
115.994 83
195.784 18
207,154 95
125,686.91
252.532.90

36.355.30
10,108.75
199.860 30
246,324 35
21t,261 95
216,418.53
321.670.00


SIncludes 9,340 tons of molasses.

Of the total tanker traffic shown above, the following is a summary
of the vessels giving Los Angeles as their port of origin or destination,
together with the totals for the two preceding months, and for July,
1927:

No. Panama Tons
of Canal net Tolls. of
vessels. tonnage. cargo.
To Los A. angels.
July, 1928 ..... 33 176.648 $129.046 42 5.831
June, 1928 7 202.294 147,178 32 4,641
May, 1928 20 139.992 100.794.24 ........
July, 1927 .. 48 268,988 195.611.70 6,028
From Los Angeles.
July, 1928 ...... .. .. .. :39 209.472 212,735.30 384,358
June, 1928 .. 27 141,569 144.231.95 261,233
May, 1928 .. .. 26 138,180 144,904.45 255,893
July, 1927 ............ ....... . 45 23.810 271,442.50 492,975


Compagnie Generale Transatlantique Plans New Service.

The inauguration of a supplementary passenger and freight service
between Europe and the west coast of North America is being planned
by the Compagnie Generale Transatlantique. Three new vessels of
11,000 tons deadweight capacity, capable of making 14 knots, the
Oregon, Wyoming, and Wisconsin, are now under construction and are
to be placed in service next year. Each of the boats is to' have cabin
accommodations for 40 passengers and 500 tons of refrigerator cargo.
Two will be steamers and one a motorship.
The vessels will make Cristobal a port of call and stop at San Pedro,
San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver northbound and
southbound. This line has at present a fortnightly service to the west
coast, its boats sailing from Havre, Dunkirk, Bordeaux, and Antwerp.


Tolls.


Tons
argo.q
cargo.


5,835



12,686
18,521
53,676
12,995
14,846

59,482
18,740
'365,380
443,962
382,036
363,702
583,227








a V


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Traffic by Nationality for July, 1928.

She following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the
Canal during the month of July, 1928, classified accordingto nationality
of vessel by direction of transit, and the combined traffic in both
directions, together with corresponding totals for July, 1927 and 1926:

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


Nationality.


Belgian .......... .... ..
British .... ...............
Chilean .. ...........
Colombian ......... ...
Cuban ........ ............
Danish................
Danzig .. ... .......
Dutch ..... ....
French ............ .. .
German........ .... ..
Italian ............
Japanese ........ .
Norwegian
Panaman ... ....... .
Peruvian .. ... ......
Spanish ......... .....
Swedish........
United States .. . . .
Yugoslav .. ... .

Totals, July, 1928....
Totals, July, 1927 ...

Totals, July, 1926 .......


No.
of
ships.

I
i 75
2 2
5
I
4
2
6
5
15

6
12

3
5
125
2


Panama
Canal
net.
6,211
378,017
7,436
2,587
194
17,578
12.465
23,923
23,591
61,539
5,867
33,185
42,390
2. b06
6.885
3,844
22.687
'609 331
8.699


272 1.269.085


TONNAGE.


I'nited
States
equivalent.
4,522
282.341
5.980
2.225
194
14. 799
10,504
16.299
18,143
42.769
4,372
28.975
32,795
1. R4
3,978
3,017
14,895
,471,147
7.140

965.479


Registered
gross.

7,130
460,693
10,875
3,777
176
21,398
17,895
26,834
29.823
71,850
7,057
42.181
54,694
3,644
10,204
5,205
33.837
7t01.750
11,344

1,580,367


280 1,323.649 1.032.027 1,686,511

241 1,156,000 906,259 1,490,562


Registered
net.

4,013
281,942
6,236
2,278
136
13,264
10,048
16,498
17,839
43.519
4,455
27.303
32,827
2,594
5,356
3,226
19,013
470,626
7,111


Tolls.


$5,652 50
'324,536 55
7.475.00
2,762.45
242 50
14,131 89
8,974 80
20%373 75
20.985 95
53.461 .25
5,465 00
33 809 98
36,147 72
1,7.30 00
4,053 55
3,771 25
16,355 32
533,963 75
8.925.00


967,284 1,103,618.21


1,031,969

909,056


1.149,465.16

1,001,504.93


SIncludes Naval vessel of 5,150 displacement tons
Includes barge of 67 net tons and yacht of 20 net tons. Panama Canal and United States measurements; no
registered tonnage.
J Two hundred and sixty-two tons of cargo from Gatun Lake not included.


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.

TONNAGE. *


Nationality.


Belgian
British..
Chilean
Colombia
Danish:.
Dutch ..
Finnish
French..
German.
Italian..
Japanese.
Norwegia
Panaman
Peruvian
Spanish.
Swedish.
United St
Yugoslav

Tota
Tota

Total

: Inc
'B
'.. ... I n


n ..............
.............. ....


. . .... ... .. ..
.'.. ... .. .





.ales...........
.. 4 .
. te ... ...... ...
... I ...... . . .


No.
of
ships.


'53

5
4
6
1
4
19
3
2

2
1
3
S118
1


le, July, 1928 .... 237

Is, July, 1927.. ... 229

Is, July, 1926.... ... 215


Panama
Canal
net.

4,792
240.346
4,705
2,587
16,669
25,R27
1,675
19,376
71,806
21,120
10,105
43,098
'33
5,356
2,827
13,836
1561,740
3,412


United
States
equivalent.

4,142
184,805
3,466
2,225
11,283
18.444
1,648
14,940
51.031
13,962
8,749
2,209
'33
2,495
2,459
10,364
'441,353
2,800


Registered
gross.

6,511
304,432
7,310
3,777
18.417
31,142
1,817
24,002
84,171
25,791
12.828
53,010

8,049
4,349
38,636
713,999
4,296


Registered
net.

4,172
186,414
3,976
2,278
11,389
18,320
1,523
15,068
51,487
15,699
8,573
31,577
4,187
2,565
12,427
440,241
2,781


Tolls.


55,177.50
'231,231.70
4,332.50
2,348,02
14,103.75
23,055.00
2.010.00
18,675 00
63,336 90
17,452 50
10,756.30
40,260.28
24 75
3.118 75
3,073.75
12,955.00
550,053.28
3,500 00


1,049.310 806.408 1.342.537 812,677 1,005,464.98 l1.543.795


1,083.306

998,821


851,Ill

786,109


1,385.744

1,.285,166


853.689
794,331


1.066,050.83

979,214.74


Tons
of
cargo.

7,300
220,355
3,228
3,066
20
2,853

12,100
10,429
40,922
1,419
35,8!3
29.548
2,728
2.375
306
10,044
351,855
14,061

0748,160

739,656

686,354


Tons
of
cargo.

8,141
315,017
2,613
870
27,572
37,078
3,100
26,490
93,474
21,633
16,142
71,255

4,340
728
48,200
859,949
6,931


ludgis Naval vessels h ting a total displacement tonnage of 3,170 tons.
fe having no reglstered tonnage.
itle hbarge of 19o net tons, nMama Canal and United States measurements; no registered tonnage,
IfIe262 tons 6f cat6 frim Gattm Lake.


1.710.812

1,499,173








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


COMBINED TRAFFIC.


Nationality.


Belgian
British .. ..
Chilean ....
Colombian .
Cuban
Danish.. .. . .
Danzig .....
Dutch ... . .
Finnish.. .........
French .. ..
German . ....
Italian .
Japanese .. ...
Norwegian
Panaman ... .. .. .
Peruvian ... .... ..
Spanish .. .
Swedish ..
United States
Yugcslav ... .
Totals, July, 1928.
Totals,. July. 1927.

Totals, July, 1926.


No.
of
hi ps.

2
128
3
10
1
8
24
12
09
345
4
8
24
'2


2431
3
509

509
456


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.
11,003
618.363
12,141
5,174
194
34.247
12,465
49.750
1,675
42.9h7
133,345
26,987
43,290
85.488
'2.639
12.241
i, 671
.16.523
1,171 ,121
12,111
2.318.395
2.406,955
2,154.821


United
States
equivalent.
8,664
467,146
9,446
4,450
194
.26,082
'10.504
34,743
1,648
33,083
93.800
18,334
37,724
65.004
'1.417
6.473
5.476
25,259
'912,500
9,.940
1,771,887

1,883.138


Registered
gross.

13,641
765,125
18,185
7,554
176
39,815
17,895
57,976
1.,817
53.825
156.021
32,848
55,009
107,704
3.644
18,253
9,554
72,473
1.475.749
15,640
2.922.904
3,072,255


Registered
net.

8,185
468,356
10,212
4,556
136
24,653
10,048
34,818
1,523
32,907
95,006
20,154
.35,876
'4,404
2,594
9,543
S5,791
30,440
910,867
9,892
1,779,961

1,885,658


1.692,368 2.775,728 1,703,387


Tolls.


$10,830.00
=555,768.25
11,807.50
5,110.47-
242 50
28,235.64
8,974.80
43,428.75
2,010.00
39,660.95
116,798 15
22,917.50
44,566.28
76.408.00
1,754.75
8,072.30
6,845.00
29,310.32
1,083,917.03
12,425.00
2.109.083.19

2.215.515.99
J,980,719.67


Tons
of
cargo.

15,441 *
635,372
5,841
3,936
20
30,425
.......
49,178
3,100
369,019
134,396
23,052 *
51,055
100,803
2,728
6,715
1,084
58,244
1,211,804
20,992
2,291,955
2,450,468
2,185,527


Includes 3 Naval vessels having a total displacement tonnage of 8,320 tons.
J Includes barge of 33 net tons, Panama Canal and United States measurements; no registered tonnage.
Includes 2 barges having a total of 236 net tons and yacht of 20 net tons, Panama Canal and United Statee
measurements; no registered tonnage.

Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 3, 1928.
The following was received by the Hydrographic Office from the Port Captain, q
Balboa:
"The wrecking tug Killerig is jettis.oning the cargo on the IM'. S Cynthiana, ashore milesW. S. W.
of Cape M ala. As some of the large i mbers may go adrift, request has been made and the radio station
will broadcast every 12 hours a warning to shipping to lookout for timbers from this vessel.
S. A. TAFFINDER, R
Port Captain."


Message being sent is: a
"Ships approaching Cape Mala should look nut for large drifting timbers jettisoned from steamer
Cynthiana ashore four miles Wci;t Soutlhwet of Cape NMala."
M. L. WALKER, Governor.

Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 7, 1928.
The following was received at the Hydrographic Office through the Balboa Radio:
"S. S. Columbia. 6 p. m., Augunt 6. reports that the red buoy marking Lafayette Shoal in Puerto
Colombia is mi..sing (No signatiurc.)
*
M. L. WALKER, Governor.

Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessel Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Week Ending August 4, 1928.

Name of yessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed. C- ,o--
Discharged Laded.
Tos. Tons.
Orangeleaf ,. Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co. July 29.... July 31. .. 5,836 ..........
H. M. Storey.. Standard Oil Co. of Calif July 31. July 31....... 15,021 .........
Santa Cruz Grace Line .. July 31. July 31....... ........ 4
Durazze ... Hamburg-American Line July 31. July31............... 157
Tongking ... . East Asiatic Co. .... .. .. August 1 ..... August 2...... 351 .........
Frost. ........ .. .. Hans Erieson. .. August 1... August 1..... 300 ........
Salvador. . .... Paci6c Steam Navigation Co . Augtst 2 .... August 2..... ....... 28
City of Panama. .... Panama Mail S. S. Co. ...... August 2 .... August 2..... 74 ........
Venezuela........... Panama Mail S. S. Co ...... August 2 ... August 2..... 45 ........


4.


he-,


I







THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
43, PUBLISHED WEEKLY. 0
Subscription rates. domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, 11.00; address t. -
TheiPanama Ci al Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
a a Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristabal, Q. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Certificae.-By direction cf the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 15, 1928. No. 2.

New Shaw, Savill and Albion Vessel Transits Canal.
The motor ship Coptic of the Shaw, Savill & Albion Company
transited the Canal for the first time on August 7, 1928, en route from,
the United Kingdom to New Zealand. The Coptit is the third of a
fleet of four new motor shipsjeing placed in this trade by this com-
pany, having been preceded by the Zealandic and the Taranaki.
The fourth vessel of this new fleet, the Karamea, is under construction
and is to be placed in the service within a short time.
The Coptic is 482 feet long, 64 feet beam and of 11,190 deadweight
ton$. She carried 9,000 tons of general cargo on her maiden voyage.


Supplement No. 11 to Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation
of the Panama Canal and Adjacent Waters.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, .
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 11, 1928.
& Regulation 47.5 is changed to read as follows:
Regulation 47.5. Vessels Carrying Volatile Crude Oil Products: Vessels whose
cdrgoes consist of volatile crude oil products in bulk, with flash point below 85
Fahrenheit, may be brought into either terminal day or night at the discretion of
-the Port Captain concerned, except when overdraft. Notice of such move into the
tiner harbor shall be given in advance to the Fire Division by the Captain of the Port.
(a) When overdraft, vessels of this class will not be handled in Canal Zone waters
except during daylight.
h (b) Ini addition to compliance with Rule 73 as to display of signals, such vessels
shall exercise the utmost precautions to prevent explosion or fire.
(c) Vessels of this class shall not shift volatile crude oil products from ship to
ship while in Canal waters.
Regulation 47.7, contained in Supplement No. 2 of May 12, 1926, to the "Rules
and Regulations Governing Navigation of the Panama Canal and Adjacent waters,"
is hereby canceled.
M. L. WALKER,
Governor.
Published in THE PANAMA CANAL RzCORD of July 7, 1926, page 646.
*

Provisions Required by Ships.
,: The PaAama Canal Commissary Division, with facilities at Balboa and Cristobal
; for delivery of supplies to steamships, carries a complete line of provisions, such as
: meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter, canned goods, cigars, cigarettes, tobacco,
S: etc., which are sold to ships at the prices which are in effect for employees, no sur-
y:charge being added. Beef especially is available at low prices, hindquarters selling
i.at 12 cents per pound and forequarters at 91 cents per pound.
- 'Orders may be placed in advance by radio for delivery on arrival, or at either ter-
n'.iatJor prompt delivery or for delivery at the other terminal after transit. All
s.tess. boarded on arrival by a representative of the Commissary Division.

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14 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Commercial Traffic Through the Panama Canal in July, 1928, by'
Trade Routes.
The following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the
Canal during the month of July, 1928, classified according to trade
routes and nationality of vessels in each trade route, together with
corresponding totals for July, 1927, and 1926. The amount of cargo
shown is the amount carried by vessels operating over the respective
trade routes and in some cases includes cargo having other destinations.
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


Nationality.


United States intercoastal:
United States ... .. ..
Europe to west coast of United
States:
British ... .........
Danish....
Danzig ..........
French ... ....
German ... ....
Norwegian ........
United States
Tolals. .....
Europe to west coast of South
America:
Belgian.
British ......
Danish ...
Danzig ....
Dutch .
French .
German
Norwegian
Spanish.
Swedish
Yugoslav .

Totals
East coast of United States to
west coast of South
America:
British
Chilean . ..
Norwegian
Peruvian
Swedish . ...
United Stales.

Totals . .
East coast of United States
to Far East:
British . ..
Japanese.
Norwegian . ..
United States..
Totals. ...
Europe to west coast Canada:
British... . . ..
Danish ..... ......
Dutch ..... .......
French . .. ......
German ...............
Italian ...... ..
Swedish ...............

Totals....... .....
Cristobal, C. Z., to west coast
South America:
Colombian ............
Dutch. ........... ....
German ...... ... ..
Peruvian............. .
United States ..........
Totals..............


No.
of
ships.


82

19
I

3
4
2


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.

418.535

86,919
4,744
0U.127
4.,35
18.990
19.356
12.216


United
States
equivalent.

321,391

66,646
4.318
5.268
4.024
12,733
1i. 740
9.142


Registered
grose.


513,325

108,761
4.500
8.939
5, 477
21,734
27,888
14.867


Registered
net.


321.461

65.924
2.747
5.007
3,488
13,005
16.738
9.113


31 152.987 118871 193.166 116.112
. . .i-. . . tI


1
5
I
2
4


2
21





3
2
I1
1
1
10


6.211
30.880
6.024
6.338
9,761
Y, 18t
19,453
3.879
3.844
1.513
8,699
103. 88



9.694
7.436
3,160
1.529
4,421
44,970


4,522
24,255
5,036
5.236
5.445
7,511
14,019
2.962
3,017
1,307
7,140

80.450


7,553
5,980
2.189
1,483
3,743
36,825


7.130
40,ti03
8,278
8.056
9,235
12,205
22,925
4.854
5,205
1.600
11,344
132.335


13.431
10.875
3.664
2,155
15,331
64.344


4,013
25.060
5.064
5,041
5,616
7,577
14,123
2,950
3.226
1,054
7.111

80.835


8,020
6.236
2,178
1.169
4.377
36,920


Tolls.



$365,802 96

65,366 85
3,415 68
4.411.44
3,337 20
15,916.25
16,091.77
9,541.11

118,080 30


5,652.50
30,318 75
4,337.28
4.563.36
6,806.25
9.388.75
17,523.75
3,702 50
3.771 25
1.089.36
8,925 00

96,078 75


9.441 25
7.475.00
2,736 25
1,834 80
3.183.12
36,219.84


Tons
of
cargo.


220,004

18,095


16,607
1,006
6,600
4*208
7--

7,300
14,574

7,253
2,773
11,467
3,302
306
... 14,061
61,036



0,621
3,228
2,455
2,077
15,054


18 71.210 57,773 109,800 58.900 60.890.26 29,435


6
4
2
5

17

5
1
I'
2
2
I

14


4


31,817
21,127
9.482
27,858

90,284

30.159
5.341
12.678
9.770
12.633
5,867
5,122


21.451
18.b79
6.594
19,206
65.930

20,063
4,257
10,206
t6,608
7.944
4,372
3,129


81.570 56,639


1,081
1.484
3,359
5,356
9,436


1,026
588
2.432
2,495
8,649


34,568
26,895
10,895
31,059
103,417

32,777
6,650
16,039
11,141
13,422
7,057
5,.293

92,379


1,72-2
1,560
4,508
8.049
15,333


21,166
17.174
6,630
19.046
64,016

19.156
4,247
10.236
6.774
8.140
4,455
4,046
57,054


1,027
646
2,459
4,187
8,671


26,813 75
22,975 60
8,242.50
24,007.50

82,039.35

24,155.19
5,321.25
12,832.50
8,260.00
9,930.00
5,465 00
3.687.84

69.651.78


1,263.70
735.00
3,040.00
3,118.75
6,829.83


-I-I------- I I---------


43,803
33,495
16,573
42,580
136,451

6,925
2,853
4.723
7,656
6,614
1,419

30,190


791
124
896
298
. .... .... .


1f 1


14,987.28


2,199


20,716


15,190


31,172


16.990








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.-Continucd.


Nationality.


East coast of United States to
Australasia:
British.
United States.
Totals. ...
Europe to Australasia:
British . . . ...
Swedish............
Totals. . ..
East coast of United States to
west coast Canada:
British ...... .
United States .. ..
Totals. ....
East coast of Central America
to west coast United
States:
United States. . ..
Ardend the World:
Japanese... .. .
United States.


No.
of
ships.



6
I

7




7


2
4

6



6

4


Totals. ... . 5


Foreign vessels in ballast-
United States inter-
coastal:
British. ... ........
Japanese .........

Totals ....... .
West Indies to west coast of
United States:
British.. ... .. .
West Indies to west coast of
South America:
Cuban. .. .. .. ....
United States..... ..

Totals ...... ...
Cristobal. C. Z., to west coast
of Central America:
British .. .. ...
Norwegian .


3

4


3


2

3


* 2
I


Totals. .... .... 3


East coast of United States to
Philippine Islands:
British.. ........
United States ..


T tl I


East coast of Canada to west
coast South America:
British..... . .
East coast of Canada to
Australasia:
British.. ..........
East coast of Central America
to Australasia:
British.......... .....
East coast of South America
to west coast Canada:
Norwegian ..........
United States........
Totals. ............
Soutb American inate coastal:
Colombian..... ........
NQrwe k ..............
S 'otal..............

v.A


2

2

2

I
I 1
2


I


Panama
Canal
net.


31,888
5,450

37,338

48.407
6.098
51,505


11.520
22,692

34,212





7,354
29,4P3

36.817



11,136
4,704

18,840


13,163

194
136

330
==--



1,328
bobi
1,934


ti,089
I 6.030
12,125


16,219

10,598

0,188

4,722
4.989
9,711
-

1,506
504


2,010


TONNAGE.


United
States
equivalent.


22,503
3.465
25,968

36,171
3,286

39,457


9,488
17.750
27,238



14.595

5,958
22.152

28.110



8,512
* 4,338
12,850


II1,099

194
215

409


1.2.52
485
1.737


4.)70
4,828

9,798


13.454


Registered
gross.



35,972
5,87

41.659

58,243
I),059

64.302


13,102
28,235
41,337



23.130
9.455
3 3t. 634
46.089


13.786
5,831

19.617


18,175

176
394

570


2,308
855
3.163


7,786
7,597

15,383


22,814


8,612 13,416


5,932

2,728
3,517

6,245

1,199
433


9,497

4,624
5,550
10,174

2,055
732


Registered
net.



22,800
3,450
26.250

36,852
4.311
41.163


9,199
17,743
26.942



14,436
5,902
22.020

27,922


8,447
4,227

12,674


10,922

13:6
225

361


1,25b
482

1,738


4,934
4,754
9,688


13,409

8,372

5.929


2,765
3,517


Tolls.


328.128 75
4,331 25
32,460 00

45,213.75
4,107 50
49,321 25


11,860 00
22,187 50

34,047 50



10,574 93

7,447 50
27,690.00

35,137 50



9,936.37
3,386 88

13.323.25


10.677 28


242 50
146 40


Tons
of
cargo.



33,647
7,430
41.077

40,350
2,506

42,856


8,105
26,893

34,998



.J,852
2,318
13,779
16.097


3.000

20


388 90 20


1,543 Q0
606 25
2,150 15


6,212.50
6.035 00
12,247 50


11,677.68

10,765 00

7,415.00


3,410 00
4,396 25


2.008
945

2,953


5,742
8,123
13,865


9,721

13,016

4,855
4,902


6,282 7,8D6 25 9,757


1,251
391


1,498.75
541.25


1,632 I 2,787 1,642 1 2,040.00


2,275
150


2,425


-------I=


I
1








THE PANAMA CANAL 'RECORD


ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.-Continued.


Nationality.


Cristobal, C. Z.. to west coast
of United States:
Panaman
United States.

Totals. ....
West Indies to Balboa, C. Z.:
British
Europe to west coast of Cen-
tral America:
German
East coast of United States to
Balboa. C. Z.:
British
United States

Totals.
East coast of United States to
west coast of Cen-
tral America:
Danish ..
East coast of United States to
Hawaiian Islands:
United States. ..... ..
Europe to Hawaiian Islands:
Swedish
Europe to Far East:
British
Canadian intercoastal:
British ...
East coast of Canada to west
coast United States:
British .. .
East coast of Canada to Far
East:
British
West Indies to west coast of
Central America:
British
Gatun Lake, C. Z., to Balboa,
C. Z.:
United States .
Cristobal, C. Z., to Balboa,
C. Z.:
United States
East coast of United States to
Gatun Lake, C. Z.:
Norwegian

Grand totals, July, 1928
Grand totals, July, 1927
* Grand totals, July, 1926


No.
of
ship-.






2


=--I =


1
1





I


1
I
I

I

I
I I

I I









I 1



272

280


I I TONNAGE. I I


Panama
Canal
net.


2.606
5.199
7.805


2,865

7.101

1.326
4,264

7.590



1.469

1,740

5,533
5.521
4,182

5.867


4.129


152

67

20

681
1.269,085


United
States
equivalent.


1.384
4.315
5,699

2,721

5,641

2.872
3,468

6,340



1,188

1.542
3,430
4.641

3,318

3,468


3,258


Registered
grrf"q.


3,64
7.059

10.703


5.927

9,261

4.800
5.580

10,380



1,970

2.647

5.554
7,435
5.757

5,677

5.334

524

(*)

( )


664 1.182

965.479 1,580.367


1,323,649 1,032,027 1.686.511


241 j1,156,000(


906.259 11.490,562


Registered
net.


2,594
4,349

6,943

2,627

5.702

2,949
3,379

6.328



1,206

1,542
4,225

4,407
3,554

3,510

3,242

197

(')

(0)

693
967'h84

1,031.969


Tolls.


1,730 00
3,743 28

5,473.28

5,976.25

7,051 25

2.394.72
4.335.00
6,729.72



1,057.68

1.927.50

4,287.50
3,975.12
4,147.50

4,335 00

4,072.50

109.44


Tons
of
cargo.



2,728

2,708 7

5,835

5,348


255
255


r2,383

7,538


2,374

4,066

2,473


80.40 1......


15.00

817.20

1,103,618 21
1,149.465 16


909.056 1.001,504.93


748,160
739.656

686.354


' Includes naval vessel of 5.150 displacement tons.
, Barge having no registered tonnage.
I Yacht baring no registered tonnage.

PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.


United States intercoastal"
United States
West coast of South America
to Europe:
British.
Dutch..
French
German
Italian .
Norwegian
Spanish. . ...
Totals............ .


85

9
2
I
8
2

24


437,688

44,482
10.864
4,187
39,036
9,373
7.167
2,827
117,936


340.897

35.541
6.890
3.353
29,977
5,223
4,722
2,459
88,165


548.131

58,098
11,879
5,505
48.333
11,669
7,930
4,349
147,763


340,506

35,974
6,698
3,366
30,065
6,779
4,642
2.565

90,089


5425,211.55

44.426 25
8,612.50
4,191.25
37,471.25
6,528.75
5,902 50
3,073.75
110,206.25


643,926

57,300
17,479
6,182
61,926
3,845
12,424
728
159,884









ITE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.-Continued.


Nationality.


West coast of South Amerika
to east coast United
States:
Britih. .
Chilean.......... .
German ... ....... .
Swedish. . . . .
United States .... ......
Totals. . . . .
West coast Canada to Europe:
British . ..........
Danmh .. ........ ..
D utch. ............
French .... ..........
German.. ... . ....
Italian .. . .
,Norwegian ... .
Swedish . ......

Totals .

West coast of United States to
Europe:
British ......
Danish ........ ..
French ......... ....
German .. ..... ....
Japanese .. .. ..
Norwegian.. ....... .
United States .....

Totals ......


West coast of South America
to Cristobal:
Colombian ... ........ .
Dutch. ...... ...
German .. ... ..
Peruvian ....


Totals .... ...
West coast of Canada to east
cemt United States:
British ..... .....
Danish .... ....
Norwegian .... ......

Totals ...... .
Australasiato Europe:
British ............ .
Finnish .. .............
French ......... .....

Totals .... ...

West coast United States to
east coast of Central
America:
United States...........

'West coast of Central America
to Cristobal; C. Z.:
British... ........
Norwegian... ..........


No.
of
ships.




4

2
215

24

10
1
2
1
3
2
1
I

21


5
1
I
I

4
4

17


S4
2
4
2

12


5
2
1

8

5
I

7


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.



15,665
4,705
3,726
8,917
62,706

95,719
50,420
4,268
13,479
4,464
15,439
11.747
5,854
4,919
110,590


21,187
4,418
5,563
6,344
4,424
17,700
25.857

85,493


1,081
1,484
3,491
5,356

11.412


20,437
7.983
4,343
32,763

37,504
1.675
5,162

44.341


United
States
equivalent.



11,822
3,466
2.234
7.486
51.395

76,403

35.089
2,634
10,966
2,948
10.201
8,739
4.679
2,878

78,134


18,214
3,585
4.282
3.826
4,391
14,642
19.308

68,248


1,026
588
2,260
2,495

6,369


14.798
5.064
2,500

22,362

29,236
1,648
4,357

35,241


Registered
gross.



20.655
7,310
3,907
33,676
87.309

152,857
57,284
4,289
17,703
4,745
16,629
14,122
7,468
4.960

127,200


29.889
5.702
6,863
6,780
5,865
24.300
31,047

110,446


1,722
1,560
4,327
8,049

15.658


23,895
8.426
4,319

36.640

46,796
1,817
, 6,889

55.502


Registered
net.



12,527
3,976
2,207
8,762
51,340

78,812

35,143
2,675
10,976
2,969
10,245
8,920
4.724
3,665

79.317


18,028
3,583
4,287
4,057
1.293
14,666
19,145

68,059


1,027
646
2.334
4,187


Tolls.


314,777 50
4,332 50
2.792 50
9,357 50
64.038 20

95,298 20

43,861 25
3,292 50
13,707 50
3,685 00
12.751 25
10,923.75
5.848 75
3.597 50

97,667 50


22.767.50
4,481 25
5,352 50
4,782 50
5,308 80
18.302 50
24,135 00

85,130 05


1,263.70
735 00
2,825 00
3,118 75


Tons
of
cargo.




17 293
2,613
908
42,500
129.257

192,571

81.440
6,106
18,907
7,534
21,652
17.78S
8,885
5,700

168.012


37,143
8,455
9,511
7,321
7,919
32,218
41.568
144.135


870
692
1,667
4.340


8.194 7.942.45 7,569


14,828
5.131
2.441

22.400

29,732
1.523
4,446

35,70,1


18,497 50
6,330 00
3,125 00
27,952 50

36,545 00
2,010 00
5,446 25

44,001 25


32.162
13,011
7,000
52,173

22,422
3,100
3.263

28,785


5 14,169 12.627 20,211 12,557 15,730.70 10,904
I I I s


2,063
606


1.900
485


Totals.............. 4 2,669 2,385
Canadian intereoastal:
British. ............ 3 13,947 9,661
est coast of South America
to West Indies:
B ritish ................. 2 .......... ....... .
United States........... 1 115 75
Totals.............. 3 115 75

*Naval veasels aving a Wtial of 34170 displacement tons.


.. -:


3.436
855
4,291


15,920 t


1.906
482

2,388


9,788 I


419 201

419 201


2,353.90
606 25

2,960 15


12,076.25


1,159
565

1,724


18.636


S1,585.00 ........
82 80 ........
1,667 80........


I


T


.







18' THE PANAMA CANAL RECOKRf


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.-Continued.


Nationality.


Philippine Ilabda-to east east
of United States:
British .. .
Japanese
United Stateg
Totals

West coast of United States to
West Indies:
British
United StatLc
Tota:a

West coast of United States to
Cristobal, C. Z.:
United States
West coast of South America
to east coast Canada:
British
.lWet coast of Central Ameri-
ca to Europe:
Norwegian
South Ameriin intercoastal:
Colombian
West coat of South America
to Egypt:
Yugc.lav
West coast of South America
to Africa:
Belgian
Central American intercoastal:
German
West eoz.st of Central America
to West Indifs:
United Srates
Australasia to east cast Can-
ada:
British
Hasaiian Islands to east coat
of United States:
United States
Hawaiian Islands toCristobal,
C. Z.:
United States
Aalboa,C. Z., to Gatun Lake:
Panaman
Balboa, C. Z., to Cristobal,
C. Z.:
United Statef ...
Balboa, C. Z., to West Ifltier-
British
Far East to east coast United
States:
British
Far East to West Indies:
Norwegian
Gatun Lake to east coast of
United States:
Norwegian ...

Grand totals, July, 1928
Grand totals, July, 1927
Grand totals, July? 1926


No.
of
ships.



I
I
I
3


I

I


2

2


2













2

















237

237


229
215


TONNAGE.


Panama
Canal
net.


6.263
5,G81
6,612

18,556


3,430
1.443
4.,8M2


6,748

12,096

2,894
1.506

3,412

4,792
3.770

1,824

4,172

4,389

20

33

169
2.865

5.815
4,534

'681
1,049,310


1,083,306
998,i.82


United
States
equivalent.


4,602
4,358
4,973

13,933


3.188
1,270
4,458


5,482

9,826

2,716
1,199

2.800

4,142
2,533

1.342

3.286

3,795

20

33

169
2,721

4,921
2.465

-664


Registered
gross.


7,362
6.9t63
7,587
21.912Y


5,203
2,264

7,467


9.033

16,613

4,024
2,055

4,296

6,511
4,195

2,247

5.454

5,.731

20


(')


5,927

7,900
4.114

= 1,182


Registered
net.


4,599
4,280
4,808

13,687


3,199
1.300


4,499 5,572 50 9,839


806.408 1.342,537 812.677


851,11I 1,385,744

786,109 1,285.166


853,689

794.331


Barge having no registered tonnage. 'This vessel entered the Canal at Cristobal and proceeded as far as,
Gatun Lake, where after loading a cargo of bananas she returned to Cristebal. As vessels transiting the Canal as far
as Gatun Lake only, are entitled to return to Canal port of entry without payment of toUs for return voyage, the only
item taken up in connection with this transit i the Pacific-to-Atlantic traffic statinties is the amount of cargo tonmagp.


Publication of Notices and Circulars et Intera to Shipping.
All of the Panama Canal notices to mariners, notices to steamship lines, and general circulars ol
interest to shipping in its relation to the Canal are published in TaHE PANAMA CANAL RECORD. For
this reason it is considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution away from the Isthmus
6f such notices and circulars to those receiving THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD. Shipping interests
are advised to look for them in this paper, which is supplied to them withbot c.some.


Tolls.




$5,752 50
5,447.50
6,216.25
17,416.25


3,985.00
1,587.50


Tons
of
cargo.



9.263
8,223'
10,0001
27,86.


7,055.
2,784


5,510

9,843

2,169

1,251

2,781

4,172
2,579

1,348

3,340

3,512

14

(0)

( )
3*627

4,880
2,453

'693


6.852.50.

12,282 50

3,394 03
1,084.32

3,500 00

5,177 50
2,714 40

1,313 28

4,107.50

4,743.75

15.00
24 75

126 75
2,062.80

6.151.25
3,081 25

S817 20

1,005.464 98


1,066.050 83
979,214.74


12,170,

23.300'

3.009



6,93r

8,14r


2,4501

9,3401


5,494

7,163

2aW
1,543,795


1,7T0,812
1,499,173


I _







THE PANAMA CANAL -RECORD 19

Notices to Mariners.
No. 414. THE PANAMA*CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOKAHEIGHTS, C. Z., August 13, 1928.
The Pilot in Charge, Lighthouse Subdivision of The Panama Canal, has requested
the following preliminary notice to be issued:
PACIFIC C OCEAN-PANAMA BAY.
"On or about September 15, 1928, the characteristic of the South Fraille Combination Gas and Whistling Buoy will
be changed to the following:
"1 second light-3 seconds dark, a period of 4 seconds. (Signed) F. K&azoan, Pilof in Charge."
M. L. WALKER,
Governor.
No. 416. THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA. HEIGHTS, C. Z., Ahgust 14, 1928.
The following appeared in Notice to Mariners, Washington, D. C., July 8th:
"Colombia-Puerto Colombia-Shoal depth. The Master of the German steamer Orinoco reports that his vessel,:
drawing 221 feet, took the ground about midway between Lafayette Rook Light Buoy and the wreck-marking Light
Buoy, where the chart shous depths of 51 to 6 fathoms.
"Approximate position: 11 00' 00" N., 74 59' 30" W."
M. L. WALKER,
Governor.
No. 418. THE PANAMA CANAL. EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 14, 1928.
The following appeared in Hydrographic Office, Notice to Mariners No. 31, dated
August 4, 1928:
"West Indies-Virgin Islands-St. Thomas Island: Wreck gas buoy changed. On July 13, 1928, Grainton Wreck
Gas Bucy was changed to show flashing green every 6 seconds, flash I second, eclipse 5 seconds, of 40 candlepower,
13 feet above the water. The buoy is spar shaped. Approximate position: 18 16' 45" North, 65 00' 15" West."
Nicaragua-West Coast-Corinto Harbor-Nonexistenee of shoal-Decreased depths: The Commanding Officer
of the U. S. S. Galvesion reports that a survey has failed to locate the 16-foot shoal about 650 yards 105 from Cardon
Head Lighthouse, in the entrance to Corinto Harbor, the least depth found in this vicinity being 21 feet.
"Sawyer Bank is extending to the southward, the 30-foolwcurve being considerably southward of the present charted
position.
"Soundings between buoy No. 6 and buoy No. 8 indicate considerable shoaling in this vicinity, the least depth found
being 12 feet.
'Approximate position: 12* 28' North, 87 12' West."
Quoted from H. 0. Notice to Mariners No. 29:
"Panama-Gulf of Panama-Perlas Island-San Jose Island Light-Arc of visibility: The Commanding Officer
of the U. S. S. Niagara reports that San Jose Light is visible over an are of 226 from 274* to 150.
"Approximate position: 8 12' 50" N., 790 07' 55" W."
M. L. WALKER,
Governor.
No. 421. THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., Atgust 15, 1928.
* *
The following appeared in Hydrographic Bulletin, August 8:
"Guatemala, Honduras Bay, Cape Three Points Ligah, Position: The new flashing white light ,every
6 seconds, recently established by the United Fruit Company at Cape Three Points, is located practically
in the same position as the old light, in latitude 15 56' 44" N., longitude 88 35' 35" W., on H. 0.
Chart No. 1496."
M. L. WALKER, -
Governor.

Report of Cargo Discharged aAd Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Week Ending August ft, 1928.
Cargo-
Name of vesel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed.
Discharged Laded.
Tons. Tons.
Chateau Thierry...... U. S. Government ............. August 2..... August 3..... 52 31
A Maru........ Nippon Yusen Kaisha........... August 4..... August 5..... 00 .......
Ruma Marn ........ Nippon Yusen Kaisha............ August 6..... August 7..... 263 ..........
huencs Aires......... Spanish Line.................... August 7..... August 7..... 174 ..........
olite.......... Imperial Oi Co., Ltd............ August ... August 9..... .......... s
aibia............ Panam M 8. &. Co.......... Augut 8..... August 8..... 13 ..........
SC 1....... ... Colomhbian Government.:....... August?..... August 9 ..... .......... 17 ,
S ,.,...... Panama Mi B. S.Co............ Agua 9..... Augst ..... ..........



'"'C'ii:,:, ? :, . .









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
and Coal.
Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama
Canal. for $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons.
Diesel oil is sold by the Canal at $2.20 per
barrel.
Crude fuel oil and&Diesel oil are also sold by
private companies with tanks at the Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
on application. The prices at present are as
follows: Crude fuel oil. $1.25 per barrel at Balboa
and Cristobal. Diesel oil. Balboa only. $1.80 per
barrel
Coal is supplied to steamships, including war-
ships of all nations, delivered and trimmed in
bunkers at $8.00 per ton of 2.240 pounds at Cris-
tobal, and $11.00 atLBalboa. For ships in transit
through the Canal, 'which are directed to take
coal at Balboa, for the convenience of The
Panama Canal. $R 00 per ton at Balboa. When
coal is delivered from lighters in quantities of 50
tons or more, the price is S9.00 per ton at Cris-
tobal, $12.00 at Balboa. If less than 50 tons is
taken from lighters, prices are $11 00 per ton at
Cristobal and $14.00 per ton at Balboa with
minimum charge for 20 tons and maximum
charge not to exceed that for 50 tons at S9.00
Cristobal and $12 00 Balboa. For furnishing
lump coal for galley use, or run of mine coal, in
sacks. $6.00 additional per ton: but if vessels fur-
nishes sacks $3.00 additional per ton.
Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
of the Governor, at prices quoted upon applica-
tion.
For trimming on deck, between decks, or
special trimming in bunkers for convenience of
vessel, when requested, an additional charge of
90 cents per ton will be made for extra handling.
Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
made up to 1.500 tons per hour, as fast as it can
be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
can be made up to 5.500 barrels per hour, rate
depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
tanks, and ship's facilities for handling.

Tolls Charges for Transit of The Panama
Canal.
1. Merchant vessels carrying passengers or
cargo. per net vessel ton teachl 100
cubic feet of actual earning capacity $1. 20
2. Vessels in ballast, without passengersor
cargo, per net vessel ton teach 100
cubic feet I of actual earning capacity .72
3. Naval vessels, other than transports.
colliers, hospital ships. and supply
ships, per displacement ton.. .... .50
4. Army and navy transports. colliers,
hospital ships, and supply ships. the
vessels to be measured by the same
rules as are employed in determining
the net tonnage of merchant vessel,
per net ton ................. ..... 1.20
5. To ls may not exceed the equivalent of $1.25
per net registered ton as determined by
United States rules of measurement, nor be
less than the equivalent of $0.75 per net
registered ton.
6. Vessels returning from Gatun Lake to original
point of entry into the Canal, without
passing through the locks at the other end,
are charged tolls for one passage only.
7. Vessels transiting the Panama Canal from Cris-
tobal to Balboa and return for the sole pur-
pose of having repairs made at the Balboa
dry dock and shops will be exempt from
payment of tolls, but a charge will be made
for pilotage in such cases, as provided in
Paragraph 4, Item 3, of the tariff, and for
handling lines in accordance with Item 4
of the tariff.

Ships' Chandlery Supplies.
Panama Canal storehouses stock a complete
line of ships' chandlery supplies available for sale
to shipping. at cost prices plus 25 per cent sur-
charge. whfch surcharge includes freight, hand-
ling, and other costs.


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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY. r
Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 pe year; foreign, $1.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights. Canal Zone, or a
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Certificale.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.


Volume XXII: Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 22, 1928.


No. 3.


Canal Traffic During First Fifteen Days of Augpst.
During the first 15 days of August, 243 commercial vessels and 3
small launches transited the Canal. Tolls on the commercial vessels
aggregated $1,047,324.39, and on the launches, $30.30, or a total tolls
collection of $1,047,354.69.
The daily average of trahsits of commercial vessels was 16.20, and
the daily average tolls collection, $69,821.62. The average amount of
tolls paid by each of the commercial transits was$4,309.98, ascompared
with $4,168.39 for the first 15 days of July. Tolls for the first 15 days
of August were over $5,000 higher than those for the corresponding
period in July, although the number of transit was two less in
August than in July.
In the following tabulation the number of commercial transit and
the amount of tolls collected are shown for the first 7 A months of the
current calendar year, with the daily averages of transits and tolls:

Totals for month. Daily averages.*
Month.
Transits. Tolls. Transits. Tolls.
January ............................................ 540 $2,212,752.50 17.42 $71,379.20
February................... ........................ 547 2,253,755.37 18.86 77,715 70
March.............................................. 542 2,223,370.57 17 48 71,271.63
April................................................ 531 2,187,607.82 17.70 72,914.55
May............................................... 508 2,118,969.83 16.38 68,353.86
June................................................. 481 2.016,211.09 16.03 67,206.43
July....... ....................................... 509 2,109,083.19 16.41 68,034 94
August(frut 15 days).................. ..... ........... 243 1,047,324.39 16.20 69,821.62
Totals .......................................... 3,901 16,169,074.76 17.11 70,916.99


New Liner for Panama Pacific Line.
The International Mercantile Marine Company has announced that
a contract has been awarded for the construction of a third new turbo-
electric liner for the Panama Pacific Line, operating between New York
and Los Angeles and San Francisco, via Habana and the Panama Canal.
'This vessel which follows the California, now in service, and the'
Virginia, launched this month, is to be ready for service in December,
" 1929. The new ship will be a sister ship of the Virginia, and will be
612 feet long, by 82 feet beam, with a displacement of 35,000 tons.
These two vessels, which are slightly larger than the California, are
said to be the largest ships ever built in the United States.


Publication of Notices and Circulars of Interest to Shtpplng.
All of the Panama Canal notices to mariners, notices to steamship lines, and general circulars of
interest to shipping in its relation to the Canal are published in THE PANAMA CANAL RICORD. For ,
this reason it is considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution away from the Isthmus 9
of such notices and circulars to those receiving Tas PANAMA CANAL RECORD. Shipping interests
are advised .j look for them in this paper, which is supplied to them without charge.



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26 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

Cargo Through Canal During July, 1928.
On pages 28 and 29 of this issue .will be found tables showing the
origin and destination of cargo passing through the Canal during July,
1928. The aggregate of all cargo for the month was 2,291,955 long
tons, as compared with 2,450,468 tons passing through the Canal in
"July last year. The heavy decrease was in theAtlantic-bound cargo and
was brought about by small shipments of several commodities usually
shipped in bulk,'yiz., mineral oils, nitrates, and lumber, as compared
f* ith the shipments in July of 1927.
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
Oriein.-Over 66 per cent of the cargo from the Atlantic to the
Pacific originated on the eastern and Gulf seaboards of the United
States, and 23.6 per cent in Europe. Cargo originating in the United
States was 23,488 tons, or 4.9 per cent greater than the amount coming
from this area in July last year. Cargo from Europe showed a relative
as well as an actual decrease under the amount carried through the
Canal in July last year. The decrease from this area was 15,031 tons,
or 7.8 per cent.
Destination.-Forty-four per cent of the Pacific-bound cargo tonnage
was destined to the United States; 21.1 per cent to Asia (including the
Philippines); 15 per cqit to Australasia; and 13 per cent to South
America. Cargo tonnages to the United States and Asia increased both
relatively and actually over July last year, the increases amounting
to 35,707 tons, or 12.1 per cent, and 11,096 tons, or 7:6 per cent respec-
tively. Tonnages to Australasia and South America showed small
decreases.
PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
Origin.-Of the cargo tonnage moving in this direction, 56.1 per
cent originated on the west. coast of the United States; 25.8 per cent
in South America; 12.5 per cent in Canada; 2.6 per cent in Asia (includ-
ing the Philippines); and 2.1 per cent in Australasia. Cargo from all of
these areas, with the exception of Canada, showed decreases under July
of last year, although that coming from Asia and Australasia, were,
relatively, about the same as last year. The decrease from the United
States was 149,669 tons, that from South America, 59,998 tons, from
Asia, 4,891 tons; and from Australasia, 4,105 tons. The large decreases
from the United States and South America were occasionedbycompara-
tively light shipments of mineral oils and nitrates. Cargo from Canada
increased 44,658 tons on account of the heavy wheat shipments.
Destination.-Segregated according to direction, 60.3 per cent of the
cargo in this direction went to the United States and 31.9 per cent to
Europe. Tonnage to the United States showed an actual decrease of
96,748 tons, or 9.4 per cent, but a small relative increase in its propor-
tion of all cargo from the Pacific as compared with July last year, while
that to Europe increased 7,210 tons, or 1.4 per cent. Light shipments
of mineral oils and nitrates were responsible for the decreased tonnage
to the United States.
PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.
From the cargo declarations submitted it was possible to classify
over 89 per cent of the total cargo in transit through the Canal from i
the Atlantic to the Pacific. The remaining 11 per cent consisted, for
t.he most part, of manufactured articles in small lots reported as
"General cargo." -







THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Atlantic-to-Pacific-bound commodities which aggregated more than
10,000 tons for July, 1928, or July, 1927, are listed in the following
tabulation, showing differences:

Commodity. July928. 1927Ju Difference.

Long tons. Long tons. Long Ions.
Ammonia ................. .. ... . . . ... .... 12,645 7,429 + 5,216
Asphalt. ..... .... ................................ 15,162 7.104 +8 058
Automobiles.............. ... ...... 14,466 6,912 +7654
Cement ..... ........... .... .. ....... ........... 12,600m 25.111 -12,511
Coal and coke .......... ...... ..... 29,367 20,203 +9.161t
Cotton.. ....... ...... .. .. . .. 12,502 25,186 -12,684'
Manufactured goods:
Iron and steel.......... .. ... . .. .. 171,255 171,739 -484'
Machinery ...... . .. .. . . ... 13,457 22,086 -8.629
Railroad- material .... . .. . . . ....... 11,058 15,531 -4,473
Tin plate ...... ............... ..... ............ 21,644 13,909 +7,735
Textiles............ .......................... 11,739 10,751 +988
Metals, various............. .......... .. .. ...... ... 16,652 10,135 +6,517
Ols, mineral............ ................ ... . 61,992 50,273 +11,719
Paper ................. ............... ........... 23.397 14,184 +9,213
Phosphates...... ....... ..................... . . .. 23,598 12,874 +10,724
Sulphur ......... .. .. .... .. . . ... 32,510 14,881 + 17,629
The above 16 commodity groups comprise approximately 65 per
cent of the cargo moving from the Atlantic to the Pacific during July,
1928. It will benoted that 11 of the itemsshow increasesand 5 decreases.
The heaviest increases were in sulphur, 'mineral oils, and phosphates,
while cotton and cement showed the heaviest decreases.
PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.
It was possible to classify almost 99 per cent of all cargo moving
from the Pacific to the Atlantic during the month of July, 1928.
Commodities which aggregated more than 10,000 tons either during the
past month or the corresponding month a year ago are listed below,
showing differences:
Commodity. 19July. 1927July Dfference.

Long tons. Long tons. Long tons.
Barley ..... ... ......................... .... ...... ... ..... 14,815 23,957 9,142
Canned goods (fish, fruit, vegetables, etc.) ............... .. .. ..... 37,701 35,408 +2,19a
Cold storage (food products) ..... ... .......... .... .. ....... 22.788 11,515 +11,27
Cotton ................... ................. .............. .. . 1. 1,231 8,347 +2,884
Fruit, dried ....... ....... ......... ... .... ........ ......... ... 13,013 8,456 + 4,557
Lumber... ....................... .............. ........ 344,836 380,612 -35,776
Metals, various ............................. ... ......... 65.171 62,469 +2,702
Nitrates ................. ................................. 148,983 221,379 -72,396
Oils, mineral... .................. ............... ... ........ 434,369 594,741 160,373
Ores principally iron)...... ..... ...... ........... ............. 140,575 121,573 +19,002
Sugar................ .. .... ......... ....... ..... .... .......... 26,428 43.644 17,216
Wheat................................................ ......... 124,042 63.402 +60,640
W ool................. ............ .. ........... .. ... .... 11.373 9.899 + 1,474
Does not include fresh fruit.


The above 13 commodity
cargo moving from the Pacific
of the items show increases ar
in wheat, which showed a gai
oils and nitrates showed hea,
(Cont
Report of Cargo Discharged a
from-Port of Balboa, C.

Name of vessel: Line or charter


Santa Maria......... Grace Line........
Atmark............. Hamburg-Amerman Lin
an Arrow........ Standard Transportatloi
enow ............. U. S. Government .....
utal. ...... Panama Mall Co..
irin..... U...... U. 8. Government..
L Os nams...... PaamaMalB. Co..

:::.".. '. # ,ldll ".:l.: ::" r..: .


groups comprise over 90 per cent of tht
c to the Atlantic during July, 1928. Eight
id 5 decreases. The heaviest increaswas
n of 60,640 tons over July, 1927. Mineral
vy decreases.
inued on next page.)

nd Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
Z., for Week Ending August 18, 1928.


r.


e..........
i Co ......
..........


Arrived.


Departed.


I- I I


August 12....
August 14.....
August 14.....
August 15.....
August 16.....
August 18..
August 18.


August 13.....
August 14.....
August 14.....
August 17.....
August 17.....
August 19.....
August 18.


Cargo-
Discharged Laded.
Tons. Ton.
6 ..........
1 ..........
830 ......... *
472 119
50 1
278 29
.......... 2


1 4.







THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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30 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

United States Intercoastal Shipments Transshipped at Canal Zone.

THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 14, 1928.
MEMORANDUM FOR STEAMSHIP AGENTS:
This office recently made inquiry of the Treasury Department as to the status.
of intercoastal shipments transshipped at Canal Zone ports. A reply has just been
received in which it is stated that the following regulations for handling the traffic
in question will be published in an early issue of the weekly Treasury Decisions:
"Shipments via Panama Canal Zone.
"Regulations governing the customs treatment of domestic merchandise trans-
shipped in the Panama Canal Zone while en route between any two ports of the
United States, including its island possessions.
"TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
"OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
"WASHINGTON, D. C.
"To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
"The following regulations are prescribed for the customs treatment of domestic
merchandise transshipped in the Panama Canal Zone while en route between ports
of the United States, including its island possessions:
"(1) Where domestic merchandise shipped between ports of the United States,
including its island possessions, via the Isthmus of Panama, is to be transshipped in
the Panama Canal Zone, a special manifest shall be prepared in triplicate and in
the form provided in Article 217 of the Customs Regulations of 1923, modified to meet
the circumstances and certified by the collector of customs at the port of departure.
One copy of the manifest shall be filed in the office of the collector at the said port,
one copy delivered to the master of the vessel and one mailed to the collector at the
port of destination of the merchandise.
"(2) It will not be necessary to seal the packages or the compartments in which they
are shipped, nor will any supervision of the transshipment in the Canal Zone be
required. However, upon arrival of the merchandise at the port of destination, the
packages will be examined by officers of the customs and compared with the marks
and numbers on the manifest and checked thereon before delivery to the consignee.
All goods so shipped not corresponding with the manifest will be held for duty.
Baggage pf passengers may be manifested in this manner.
"These regulations shall not apply to merchandise shipped in bond.
"(Signed) FRANK Dow,
"(110809) Acting Commissioner of Customs.
"Approved, July 26, 1928.
"(Signed) OGDEN L. MILLS,
"A citing Secretary of the Treasury.'
C. A. MCILVAINE,
Executive Secretary.

Price of Coal at the Canal.
Coal is obtainable from the plants operated by The Panama Canal at the prices
shown below, effective June 15, 1928:
Cristobal- Balboa.
Colon.
For steamships, including warships of all nations, delivered
from coaling plants, per ton of 2,240 pounds, except as pro-
vided in paragraph 5 ................................ $8.00 $11.00
For vessels transiting the Canal that are directed by The Pan-
ama Canal to take coal at Balboa on account of the con-
dition of the plants, the quantity available, or for the pur-
pose of expediting traffic ..................................... 8.00
For steamships, including warships of all nations when de-
livered from lighters in quantities of 50 tons or more, per
ton of 2,240 pounds.................................. 9.00 12.00'
For steamships, including warships of all nations, when deliver-
ed from lighters in quantities of less than 50 tons, with mini-
mum charge for 20 tons and with maximum charge not to
exceed that for 50 tons at prices specified in paragraph 6,
per ton of 2,240 pounds.................... ........ 11.00 14.00O








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


United States Intercoastal Traffic by Commodities for July, 1928..

The following table shows the cargo carried through the Canal in
the United States intercoastal trade, segregated by commodities and
by direction, with the totals for July, 1928, and the totals for July,
1927 and 1926. Cargo statistics are compiled from cargo declarations
submitted by masters of vessels, and in these declarations small items
are frequently grouped under, the designation of "General cargo."
These statistics are accordingly not precise but they are indicative
of the kind and quantity of the cargo in transit through the Canal.
The figures represent tons of 2,240 pounds, and are for the United
States intercoastal trade only:


Atlan'
Commodity. to
Pacific
A eroplanes .................... ..... ... .. .. .. . .... . . .
Agricultural im plements.... ...... .... .. ..... ...... .... .. ... 1,1
Alfalfa meal ................... ....... .. ... ..................
Ammonia........ ....... .......... .. .......... .. ... .. ....
A m m unition ......................... ...... ..... .... .. .
Asbestos ..................... ...... 1,2
Asphalt .. ............. ..... ............. .. .. ..... ... .. .
A utom obiles .. . .. ..... .., ......... .. .......1. ,
Automobile accessories. .... . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........
Bam boo......... .......... . ..... ....... . . . . .. . ...
Bananas ................ ... .... ...... . .... ...........
Bark, cascara. .. .. .... ..... ..... .............. ... .. ... ....
Barley.................. ...... .. . ... .. .... .. .. ... .. .. .
Beans .... ... .. ......... ... .... ............... ...... ...
Bones and bonemeal ...... ...... .. .. ... ..... ... ......... .
Borax .. .. .................. .. .. ... .. ... .. .... . ... . . .
Bricks ....... .. ..... .. ......... ... ..... .. ... ...
Burlap ...... ............ . .......... .... ... ... ..
Calcium carbide ..... .... .. ..... ... .. ... .. ... .....
Camphor ........ .. .. ... ..... . .. .... ....... .... .. ..
Canned goods:
Fish ......... .............. ........................
F ruit ........ ... .. ........... ... .. ..... . ..............
M eat....... .... .. ... ... ... ..... ........ ... ...... ..... . .
M ilk........... .. ... .. ... ..... .. .. .......... . ... ..
Soup . ..... ....... ..... .. ... . . ......... .. 1
Vegetables ........... ...... . ..................... ..
M miscellaneous ............... .. .. .. ..... .. ...... .. ..... .. 1,
Carbon black ................. ..... ............ ... ... ... ....
Celite filtercel.............. ... .. .. .. .. ..... ..... .... .. ... .. .
C em ent .. .............. ...... ...... .... . ............... ,1
Charcoal .......... ...... ... .. ..... ............ .. ... ......
Chemicals .. ......... ..... ...... 2,
China and fire clay . . ... .. .. . . . . .
C oal ........... ...... ... .. .. .... . ...... . ............ 4 ,i
Cocoa.. ............................................... ..
Coconuts........ .. .. .. .... ......... ... ........
Coffee ......... .... ... .. ........ ... .. ... . . .........
Cold storage:
S Cheese..... .. .......... . .. ... . ... .. ....... .....
Eggs ................ ..... ..... ... .......... .... ..... .. ..
Lard. ........... .......... .................. .. . .. .. .. i
M eat .. .. ..... . ...... ................ . . ..
Other ........ .................... ... ... .. ............ ....
C onfectionery .. . .. .. .. .. .. ................. .. .. ....
C ork .............. . .... .. .. .. .. .. ................ .. ... .. ....
Cotton........................................ ..... .....
Cyanide .................. ... .. .... .. .. ............ .... .........
Drugs............... .......... ........................... .. ..........
Earthenware............. ......... ..................... ..... .....
Eggs, dried ...................................... ..............
Fertilizer .... .. .......... . ................... ...............
F. lour ... .. ... ..... ... .. ....... ........ .....
Fruit:
D ried ........... ........ ....... ... ... ... .. .. . ............ .....
Fresh ......... ..... ...... .. ......... ... ....................
Fuller's earth... .................. .. ............................ .. .....
Furnitute........ ...................... ... ........ ......
G general. .... ...................... .. ................................ 42,
i (lsas and glassware ....................................................... 3,
I .G lue..... ....... ............... .......................................
........... .......................................................

ir.. ..................................................................
ooda...............................................................

..... . . . ............. ..................................


tic Pacific
to Totals.
c. Atlantic.


5
14

150
65
258
156
190
649
872

52
30
270
105
83

186
218
25
119
830
997
11
679,
76
287
132
510
544
50
240
5
083
14
120
182
256
60
142
503

51
132

44.
934
365
074
107
75
12
54
324


209
674


24
61
31
96
6
2,070
2,284
42
1,232
61

192

3,987
13,730
158
694
2,139
7,874
103
921
105
163
314
20

598
26

392


12
. 1,038

88
134
150
6,800
'6,928
2,661
.65*
10.197
134
27
79
50
525
346


5
1,323
674
150
65
1,258
380
1,251
680
96
872
6
2,070
2,336
72
1,232
270
166
83
192
4,473
13,948
183
694
1.119
2.969
9,871
114
921
1,784
239
2.601
152
4,510
544
648
266

5
392
1,083
14
120
194
256
1,098
142
503
88
134
2QI
6,932
6.928
2,705
934
430
52,271
3,241
102
12
133
374
525
561


I








32 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Atlantic Pacific
Commodity. to to Total.
Pacifie. Atlantic.
Honey ... ................................... ................ 331 331
Hops ...... . .... ..... .. .. .. .. ...... .. ....... 163 163
Jute .. ........ .... .... .. ... ".. 515 88 603
Linoleum ...... .... ......... 770 290 1,060
Liquors .. ........ ..... ......... ... ..... ...... 122 122
Lumber ..... ... ..... ..... 2,340 224.559 226,899
Malt . . . ... ... ..... .. ... 197 197
Manufactured goods:
Iron and steel ........... .. .... ...... ........... 87,440 338 87,778
Machinery. ........... .... ......................... 3.787 397 4,184
Railroad material...... ....................... .2,833 . 2,833
Tinplate ......... ......... .......................... 13,342 13,342
Textiles.. ......................................... 5.168 476 5,644
Miscellaneous ...... ... ................................. 3,850 3.009 6,859
M arble .. ....... .............. ....... .. . ... ..... .... .. 2,559 2,559
M catches .. ... ................. . .. .... .... ..... ........ 77 29 106
Metals:
Antimony ............................................. 45 45
C monpper...... ................................ 40 9.500 9,540
Iron ............ ...................... . . ......... ..... 156 .. 156
Scrap.. 291 1,359 1,650
Tin ... ......................... ................. ....... 6-3 63
Zinc.. .. .. ..... .. ..... ............ .......... 18 513 531
Other ............... ........ ........ ..................... ..... 550 550
Milk, powdered..... .... ............... ...................... 55 776 831
Molasses... ..... ...... . ..... ........ .... ........ .39 .. 39
Musical instruments ......... ...... ............ .. 57 57
Nitratee ...... ... ...... ... .......... .... ........ ...... .... ...... 45 45
Nuts ....... ......... ..... .. ............ .. .......... . .... ... 204 204
Ou: Cottonseed ... ................ ... ........ .......89 ... 89

Crude ed ... .. .... ........ .. 5,846 60016 65,862
Gas oil, fuel oil ................................. 19.474 19,474
Gasoline, benzine, and naphtha ... .. .. ........ .......... 216,650 216,650
Lubricating and greases ............................. ..... 3,464 91 3,555
Olive ............................................... 20 20
Vegetable .... .... .... ......... ... ..................... 300 56 356
W ood ........................ ..... ..... ...... ..... 60 60
Other. ................. ...... .. .. .... .... .......... . 512 120 632
Ores:
Copper ........................................................ 800 800
M agnesite ........ ............................. .... .. 54 2,083 2,137
Manganese ........... ... ......... ... ... .... 67 18 85
Zinc .... ...................... ... .... .. .. ... .. ... .. .... 32 U2
Paint ................ ........ ... ............. .. 712 88 800
Paper ....... ..... ............. ...... ... ................. ... 7,121 3.163 10,284
Paper, pulp .... ............................ .. .. .. ... ........ ... 12 1.109 1,121
Paper roofing ............................................... 280 280
Peanuts ....... ................... ::::::... :.'::.. 41 436 477
Peaa .. .. .......... ...... . ... ............ 16 16
Phosphates ................ ................ .. .... 1,151 1,151
Plaster .................................... .... . .......... .. 24 3 27
Porcelain ..... ...... ............. . .. .. ... .. ... ......... .. 95 804 899
Quicksilver........... ........ . ................... 4 4
Rags ...... .................... ... ... .. .. . .. . 807 807
Rice ...... .... ................................ .. ..... ..62 171 233
Rope ... ........... ....... .. . ... ........... .. 288 67 355
Rosin ............. .......... .. .................. :::::::::::: : : ...... 94 694
Rubber:
Manufactured............. ..... ........ ... .. ........ 1.602 73 1,675
Raw ........ ..... ............ ..... ... ..... .. .... .. ... . . 40 40
Scrap.... .......... . .. ...... .. .......... 3 37 393
Salt .. ..
Saltpetre .. ... .. ..... ..... 40 40
Seeds: 4r 46
Cotton ...........22 22
Grass 50 50
Hemp .. ..... .. ..
OHer 173 173
Other ..... .. ........ ..... . 1 7
Shells .. . .. ... . .. 1257 ,257
Silk. ... .. 20 95 115
Skins and hides 25 2,062 2.08700
Slag . .... .. . . . .... ... 44 441
Slale .. .. .......... .. ......... .. ... 4
Soap ......... ..... .. .... ... . .... ... 3.529 14 3.543
Soda .... ......... .............. . ............. 63 13 605
Soda, ash . ... .. ............... 1.395 350
Soda, bicarbonate .. ... .. 35
Soda, bicarbonate .. .. ....... 925
Soda, caustic ...... ........ ....... ..... 103 4.952 5,055
Sulphur. ................................. ........... 15,930 .. 15,930
Syruphur .. ... ........................................... 93
Talc ............... . ............................... 448 448202
Tallow ........ ... ....... .. ... .............. . ...... ... ..... ..... .... 15448
T ar...... ............. ... .... ......... .. ..... ... ..........1 15
I *1









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Atlantic Pacific
Commodity. to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.

Tea ...................................................... ...... ....... 135 51 186
Tobacco................................................................. 2,816 20 2,836
Toys................ ............................................. 201 10 211
T urpentine ......................... ..... .. ........ . ..... ... 82 .......... 82
Vegetables.............. .. ........ .. ............................ 60 210 270
Waste............................................... ............. 29 223 252
W ax ................ ..... ........................................... 56 ......... 56
Wine..................................................... ... .. ....... 21 341 362
W ool.. . ..................... .. ........... ................. .. .......... 8,278 8,278
Zinc oxide......... . ..... ... ............. ... ............ 76 ......... 76

Totals, July, 1928 .................. ... ... ......... .. ........... 245,433 633,488 878,921

Totals, July, 1927 ...... .......... ................................ 212,214 726,553 938,767

Totals, July, 1926.................................... ... ....... .... 216,831 617.515 834,366



Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Three Weeks Ending August 18, 1928.


Name of vessel. Line or cha


Urubamba.......... Peruvian Line ....
Portland............. Hamburg-American
Pastores...... ...... United Fruit Co...
Baralt.............. Royal Netherlands
Parismina ........ .. United Fruit Co ..
i Saint Joseph ........ French Line ......
Witram.............. North Germaji Lloy
Mayari ............ United Fruit Co...
Santa Cruz......... Grace Line .......
Poseidon............. Hamburg-American
Ballena............. Pacific Steam Navij
Ulua .............. United Fruit Co..
Astral............... Standard Transport
Alkmaar ............ Royal Netherland S
Rugia............... Hamburg-American
Durazzo............. Hamburg-American
Tongking........... Danish East Asiati
Abron............... Finkbine Guild Tra
Zacapa ............. United Fruit Co...
Coppename.......... United Fruit Co ..
Cristobal ........... Panama Railroad S
Uribe................ United Fruit Co...
Saramacca........... United Fruit Co .
Virginia ............ American Fruit & 8
Salvador............. Pacific Steam Navij
-City of Panama...... Panama Mail S. S.
San Mateo .......... United Fruit Co...
Westfalen............ Colombian Transpo
Almagro............. 'Pacific Steam Navii
Sesostris............. Hamburg-American
Venezuela .......... Panama Mail S. S.
Firpark ............ Munson Line......
Virginia ............ American Fruit & E
Maravi.............. United Fruit Co...
Padilla ............. Colombian 8. S. LL
William M .......... R. Fejillebois.....
Equatore ........... Italian Line.......
Minnesota .......... French Line.......
Cerigor ............... Hamburg-Americar
Garfield............. N. O. & S. A. S. S.
Heredia ............ United Fruit Co...
Cristobal ........... Panama Railroad 8
Garfield............. N. 0. & S. A. S. S.
SBuenos Aires ......... Johnson Line......
Baokoop ............. Royal Netherlands
Axel Johnson......... Johnson Line......
SGlmorganshire.... ... Royal Mail S. P. C
lUlua............... United Fruit Co...
"Bowden............. United Fruit Co...
S:-Auka Mar......... Nippon Yusen Kai
: Npierian............ Leyland Line......
leredia,............. United FruitCo...
Minu ineota .......... French Line.......
i o. ............... Chilean Line .....
I^e'..'............... Peruvian Line.....
No eargo discha

J .i';;i= .:: :: = "


rterer.



* Line..........

S. S. Co .......

.d ............
d ............

Line .......
nation Co......

ation Co......
. S. Co........
* Line..........
Line.........
c Co...........
ns. Co.........
..............

. S. Line.......
..............

. S. Corp......
nation Co......
Co............
irt Co .........
nation Co......
Line ..........
Line..........

............ .



....Line..........

ne.............
..............



..............
..............
.Line....... .
Line ..........
..............
. S. Line .......

..............
S. Co .......
..............

..............


Arrived. .. Departed.


.............. July 29........
.............. July 29........
July 29....... July 29......
.............. July 30.......
. ..... July 30........
July 29....... July 30 .....
July 29 ...... July 30.......
July 30...... July 30 .....
July 30....... July 31.......
July 30. ..... July 31.......
July 30....... August 1......
July 30....... August 1......
July 30....... August 2......
July 31 ...... August 1......
July 31 ...... August .....
July 31. ..... ..............
August 1...... August 1......
August ...... August 2......
August ...... August'2......
August 1...... August 2......
August 1...... ..............
August 1..... ...........
August 2...... August 2......
August 2...... August 2......
.............. August 2... .. .
August 2...... ..............
August 2...... August 3......
August 2..................
August 2...... August 3.....
August 2...... August 4......
August 3...... August 4......
August 3...... ............
August 4...... August 4......
August 4..... August 4.....
............. August 4......
August 4...... August 4......
August 4..... .............
August 4...... ..............
August 4...... ..............
August 4...... ..............
August 4...... ......... ....
.............. August 5...
.............. August 5...
August 5...... August 5...
August 5.... August 5...
August 5.... August 6...
August 5... August 5...
August 5 .... August 5......
August 5.... August 6......
August 5..... August 6..
August 5...... August 7..
.............. August 6......
.............. August 6......
August 6... August 6......
August 6... August 7......
*No cargo laded.


Cargo-
Discharged Laded.


Tons.



89
325

20
135
235
63
604
1,000
308
144
271
211
350
456
555
2,889
800
8
20(#

1,050
617
108
219
(,)
360
1,500
(,)
48

215
134
516
25
548


429
193
48
20
(,)
329
1,074
..........
5
3
**


Tons.
120
300
234
77
22
12
55
320
286
( )
230
4
(I)
86
79




.... .... .
229


415t
4
1,074
.........
420
..........
40

735
93
..........
327
695
550
30
..........
..........


3,566
112
140
70
(C)
17
469
343
(C)
12
273
365
(,)
50








34 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z.-Continued.


Name of vessel.
t -.

Tolna ...... ......
Linda S . ... ..
Finn . .....
Colombia ..........
Kuma Maru ... ...
Crijnssen . .....
Leon XI .... ...
Buenos Aires ....
Pellerin de Latouche.
Cormto.... ....
Oropesa ....... . .
Arizona ... .
Santa Marta ...
Suriname ..
Acajutla
Favorite .. ...
Pacific President ....
Moerdik .....
Coppename ... ..
Esparta....... ... .
Uribe . .......
Cerigo ... . .
Guayaquil
George Washington
Mississippi
Orita
Mercian
Adolf von Baeyer
Favorite
Crijnssen
Cauca .
Ulaearbon
Carlago .
Banan
Toloa . .
Sangro
Adolf von Baeyer
Cartago
Santa Marsia .
Ruga
Mercian
Arana
Linda S.
Canadian Constructor.
Macabi
Bogota
Calamares
J. M. Danziger
La Plata Myu
Sylvan Arro
Ancon
Saramacca
Metapan
Wido
Emil Kirdorf
Cali .
Durazzo ..
Suriname .
Canadian Prospector
August Leonbardt
Virginia
Atrato
La Pera .
Buenaventura
Waunta . .
Cauca. ...
Ebro ....
Baralt.
Westfaen .. .
Radnorshire
Guatemala
Illinois
Oklahoma ....
Virginia .
City of Panama .....
Spreewald ...
Canada ....
Santos
Texas..... .. .


Line or charterer.


United Fruit Co. .
R. Feuillebois. .. .. ..
Colombian Transport Co. ..
Panama Mail S. S. Co
Nippon Yuaen Kaisha ....
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co ....
Spanish Line ....... ..
Spanish Line . . .....
French Line
Panama Mail S. S. Co .
Pacific Steam Navigation Co.
French Line ...
United Fruit Coo ... .....
United Fruit Co
Pacific Steam Navigation Co
American Fruit & S. S. Corp
Furness, Withy & Co
Holland-American Line
United Fr.iit Co
United Fruit Co ... ....
United Fruit Co
Hamburg-Ameriean Line
Panama Railroad S. S. Line.
Fred Olson & Co
French Line
Pacific Steam Navigation Co
Leyland Line ..
Hamburg-American Line .
American Fruit & S. P Co
Royal Netherlands S S. Co
National Navigi'ion Co
Union Oil Co
United Fruit Co .
United Fruit Co
United Fruit Co
Anvlo-Saxon Petroleum Co
Hamburg-American Line .
United Fruit Co
Grace Line
Hamburg-American Line
Leyland Line
Pacific Steam Na v.gation Co
R. Feuilletlois
Canadian National Steamships
United Fruit Co
Pacific Steam Navigation Co.
United Fruit Co
Huasteca Petroleum Co. .
Osaka Shosen Kaisha.
Standard Transport Co
Panama Railroad S. S. Line
United Fruit Co
United Fruit Co .
North German Lloyd
Hamburg-American Line .
North German bLoyd ..
Hamburg-American Line ..
United Fruit Co
Canadian National Steamships
Colombian Transport Co.
American Fruit & S. S. Corp
Colombian Transport Co...
United Fruit Co
Panama Railroad S. S. Line.
American Fruit & S. S. Corp ..
National Navigation Co
Pacific Steam Navigation Co
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co
Colombian Transport Co .
Pacific Steam Navigation Co.
Panama Mail S. S Co . ..
French Line.. .. .......
French Line ........ .
American Fruit & S. S. Corp ....
Panama Mail S. S. Co .......
Hamburg-American Line .....
Johnson Line ............
Johnson Line .
French Line.. .. .......


Arrived.


August 6... ..
August 7 .....
August 7....
August 7.....
August 7....
August 7.....
August 7...
August 7.. ..
August 8...
August 8....
August 8..
August 8..
August 8..
August 9..
August 9. .
August 9..
August 9...
August 9..

August 10.. ..
August 10..
August 10..
August 10..
August 10I....
August I..
August II...
August 1 ..
August II..
August 11..
August II...
August 12
August 12

August 132

August 13..
AugLst 13

August 14..
August 14..
August 14..
August 14..
August 14..
August 14..
August 15...
August 15..
August 15...
August 15..
August 15..
August 15..
August 15..
August 15..
August 16...
August 16..
August 16..
August 16..
August 16..
August 16..
August 16..
August 16...
August 16..
August 16.....
August 17..
August 17...
August 18..
August 18....
August 18- ..

August 18...
August 18.....
August 18.....
August 16.....


Departed.


August 8....
August 7....
August 7....
August 8.....
August 8...
August 8.....
August 8..
August 8....
August 9....
August 9.....
August 9....
August 10...
August 10..
August 10..
August 9..
August 10....
August 9..
August 9....
August 10..
August 10..
August 10...
August 11....
August 11 ..
August II..
August II..

Auguqt II..
Aueust 11....


August 12 .
August 12 .
August 17 .
August 13
August 13
August 13..
August 14..
August 14..
August 14..
August 14...
August 14...
August 14..
August 14...
August 15...
August 15.....
August 15....
August 15..
August 16..
AugLst 16.. .
August 16. *
August 16.
August 16..
August 16..
August 16...
August 16..
August 16..
August 17.
August 17...
August 18. .
August 17...
August 17...
August 17.
August 17...
August 18....
August 18...

August 18....
August 18.....
August 18.. .
August 18....
August 18....


Cargo-
Discharged Laded.
Tons. Tons.
854 87
.. . .. 45
32 1
509 134
318 (')
3 8
227 68
199 408
345 967
1,990
105 254
40 154
1,094 475
745- 68
330 .....
343 4
( 287
(I, 144
II11 1,341
587 53
1,193
.. 357
829 293
(*) 300
198 (')
2 1
640 ..........
507 ...... ..
(1) 288
1I 492
271 ..........
5.715 .........
718
.. .. 527
13 187
7.116 (')
....... 417
24
( *) 108
7 288
137
77 86
40
22 (0)
112 417
471 37
1 079 5


9,285
109
450
3,101
091
469
195
3
209
117
4
1
19
189
118
535
351
726
19
408j
507
504
143
288


82
(795)
795


( ')
( ')
( )
88
157
( )
( '1
221
401
(')
5

121
( .)
44
295
33
126
1161

396

337
2,905
....... ii

152
18


o z No cargo discharged.


* No eargo laded.


I






r'w


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Merchandise Shipped to Canal Zone for Orders.


E:
::




'.!
:*
I
i-

i1
f
i.


;il


The Panama Railroad Company, a New York corporation, of which
the stock is now owned by the United States Government, will ware-
house"for orders" at its piers and warehouses at Balboa and Cristobal,
Canal Zone, nonperishable and nondangerous merchandise, excepting $
alcoholic liquors. An illustrated pamphlet explaining in detail the
arrangement may be had upon application to the Panama Railroad
Co., Balboa Heights, C. Z., or 24 State Street, New York City.
On general merchandise the rates are as follows:
(a) For handling cargo from ship's side to storage place, the customary inward
local charge of $1 per ton.
(b) For delivery or reforwarding, customary outward local charge of $1 per ton.
(Total of 20 cents per ton more than regular transfer charge.)
(c) For storage, 3 cents per ton per day, except that no charge will be made for
the first 35 days.
The Panama Railroad Company stores this cargo in four fireproof warehouses, 160
feet by 850 feet, at Cristobal, and in one of the same dimensions at Balboa.
Cargo stored for orders can be reforwarded from the Isthmus-each carrier to col-
lect its proportion of the through rate instead of the local. This means that should a
shipment move from New York to the Canal Zone, it will of course pay regular local
rate to Balboa or Colon, as the case may be-but should owner wish to reforward to,
say, "Guayaquil," he can do so by paying the oncarrier's proportion of the through
rate. Upon evidence that the shipment or any part of it moved beyond the Canal
Zone, the initial carrier will refund the difference between the through and local rate.
Cargo intended for warehousing at Cristobal or Balboa should be so indicated on
the bill of lading, thus "Cristobal for orders" or "Balboa for orders." When so con-
signed it is not necessary for shippers to secure consular papers at original point of
shipment, nor to have bills of lading consulate. Cargo consigned to Canal Zone for
orders may be delivered in the Republic of Panama in which case it is necessary to
prepare an invoice on which duties can be paid. When evidence of payment of duty
is presented to the Canal Zone customs officers they will issue the necessary release
and deliver)' can be taken in the usual way. For those on the Canal Zone who are
allowed to import goods duty free the Panama Canal customs release is all that is
necessary. For reshipment from storage to a foreign country the shipper takes out
bill of lading, consular invoice and sobordo if necessary and cargo is forwarded as
regular outward local.
There are no special forms for use in shipping except the warehouseman's order to
release the cargo for shipment ("Authority to Deliver Cargo from Storage on Piers)".
Shipper takes out his bill of lading and consular invoice and the cargo moves as regular
outward local. :"
Samples of the forms used, "Negotiable Warehouse Receipt." and "Authority to
Deliver Cargo from Storage on Piers," are shown in the pamphlet referred to above.
*_______________
Provisions Required by Ships.
The Panama Canal Commissary Division, with facilities at Balboa and Cristobal
for delivery of supplies to steamships, carries a complete line of provisions, such as
meats, fruits, vegetables, eggs, butter, canned goods, cigars, cigarettes, tobacco,
etc., which are sold to ships at the prices which are in effect for employees, no sur-
charge being added. Beef especially is available at low prices, hindquarters selling
at 12 cents per pound and forequarters at 91 cents per pound.
Orders may be placed in advance by radio for delivery on arrival, or at either ter-
minal for prompt delivery or for delivery at the other terminal after transit. All
vessels are boarded on arrival by a representative of the Commissary Division.

Information from American Consuls.
"he Consular officers of the United States at seaports all over the world are ex oficio represer tatives
S. The Panama Canal for the purpose of furnishing information to shipping and allied interests as to
.6 editions, charges, etc., at the Panama Canal affecting the operation of ships. The current publications
of The Panama Canal of interest to shipping are furnished to the Consular officers and filed for reference.
It is not desired that inquiries of a general nature be addressed to the Consular officers, or that they
% burdened with requests which should be made direct to The Panama Canal; but ships' operators who
zt' t 4be luffiientlyadvised as to charges, supplies, facilities, etc., at the Canal will often save time
R ii: y ixuLnt.the nearest American Consul.







THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Official Publications of Interest to Shipping.
Masters may obtain from the office of the Captain of the Port,
at either Cristobal or Balboa, without charge, the "Rules and Regu-
lations Governing Navigation of The Panama Canal and Adjacent
Q Waters," and the current Tariff of charges at the Canal for supplies
and services.
Requests for Canal publications sent by mail should be addressed to:
The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z.; or, when more convenient,
to The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal maintains at all times a com-
plete stock of navigational charts and books, includingcharts of all
parts of the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical tables,
light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs, etc.
At the office of the Port Captain in Balboa a limited stock of navi-
gational charts, books, etc., is also carried, and this office is in a
position to fill practically any order in this connection that ship might
place.
Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices to Mariners, and
Hydrographic Bulletins may be obtained in return for marine infor-
mation.
Observations of weather, ocean currents, and other marine data
collected, and blanks, instructions, barometer comparisons, etc.,
furnished.
Correct time is maintained and chronometers rated.


Location of Patients and Visiting Hours, at Gorgas Hospital.
The following table shows the distribution of patients in the Gorgas
hospital buildings and the visiting hours for the various wards and
sections:


Section and Ward.


Section "A:"
W ard 2, W hite male................. ............
Ward 3, American male, eye, ear, nose and throat....

Section "B:"
Ward 5, Male, private rooms, American boys.......
Ward 6, Foreign, male and female, private rooms,
American girls........ .....................
Ward 7, White female, private rooms... .......
Ward 8, Obstetrical department, white females
(Nursery)..........................
Section "C:"
Ward 9, White foreign, male .....................
Ward 11, Colored, male, surgical..................
Ward 12, Colored, male, medical, eye and ear.......
Ward 13, Colored, male, G. U....................
Ward 14, American, male, G. U..................
Section "D:"
Ward 15, American, male, surgical.................
Ward 16, American, male, medical, eye and ear......
Ward 17, Colored children..... .................
Ward 18, White children..........................
Ward 19, Colored, female, medical .............
Ward 20, Colored, female, surgical, obstetrical......


Visiting Hours.


Daily, 9.30 to 11.00 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.; 6.30 to 8.00
p. m.
Tuesday. Thursday, and Saturdays, 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.;
6.30 to 7.30 p.n.; Sundays and holidays, 9.30 to 11.00
a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p. m.
Daily, 9.30 to 11 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.30 p. m.;
6.30 to 8.00 p. m.
(No visitors permitted in nursery.)


Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30to 3p.m.



Tuesday, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 2.30 to 4.30 p. m.;
6.30 to 7.30 p. m
Sunday and holidays. 9.30 to 11 a. m.; 2.00 to 4.00 p.m.
Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30 to3 p.m.
Daily. 9.30 to 11 a. m.; 2 to 4 p. m.
} Wednesday, Fridays, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30 to3 p.m.


Isolation............................................ No visitors permitted except to visit tuberculosis patients.
Thursday, Sundays, and holidays, 1.30 to 3 p. m.

Permission to visit outside of visiting hours will be granted upon application to the Superintendent's Ofice.
Immediate relatives of seriously ill patients will be admitted at any time by and in the discretion of the attending
physician, section nurse, and in her absence, the nurse in charge.


* .


I




Fr -* I.


,ITHE PANAMA CANAL: RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY. S&M
Subscription rates., domestic, 50.50 per year; foreign, 51.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights,fanal Zone, or z
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
CTertflcats.--By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 29, 1928. No. 4.

Proportion of Traffic by Frequency, Fiscal Year 1928.
The following tabulation shows for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1928, the number of vessels making the indicated number of transits
thr irh -the Pananma Canal the npr rent which each class fnrrmnd nf the


total number of individual vessels (1,811), their aggregate number of
transits, and their per cent of the, total commercial transits (6,456):


Number
Number of transits. of
Vessels.

: ........... ..... ... ... .............. .......... 493
2 .................. . . ... ... .... .. 493
3 .......... . ....... ....... ... .. .. ..... 175
........ ......... ... .. ............ .. ... ...... 202
S....... .... ......... . ... . .... . ... 198
6........... .... .................... .. ..... . 986
.............. .. ..... ..... ..... . . a 64
9 ..... ...... ........... ... ... ......... .. .. .. .49
0.................. ...... ....... . .... .. ... 29
11.... ......... .. ...... ...... . ....... ... .. . 238
S 12........... ....... .... .. ....... ... . 16
3 .......... . ...... . .. .. .
S4 ........ ... .... .. . . ... . ... ....... 4
15 ... ..... .... ... . .... ... ... . . . .. ... .. 6
16.............. ....... .. .. ... . .. .......... 3
17........................ . ....... ... ...... 3.
. 18 ....... .... .. ...... .... . .. ... .... ... .... 3
19............... ... . . ....... .... 3
20............. ........ . .. .. . .. . . 1
22................................................... 2
,23.................. .. ................. ........... I
24 ...................... ............. ...... ........ 1
25................................................... I
26 ....................................................
20...................................................1
31................................................. .. 1
65 .....................................................I
Totals.................... ................... ... 1,811
*"


Per cent of
individual Total Per cent of
vessels, number of total Canal
(1.811) transit. transits.
27.2 498 7.6
27.2 986 15.3
9 7 525 8.1
11.2 808 12.5
6 1 555 8.6
5.4 588 9.1
3 5 448 6.9
2 7 392 6 1
1.6 261 4.0
1 3 230 3.6
4 88 1.4
.9 192 3 0
.9 221 3.4
.2- 56 .9
3 90 1.4
.1 48 .7
.1 34 .5
.1 54 .8
1 57 .9
.1 20 .3
1 42 .6
.1 44 .7
.1 23 .4
.1 24 .4
.1 25 .4
.1 26 4
.1 30 .5
.1 31 .5
.1 65 1.0
100.0 6,456 100.0


FREQUENCY OF TRANSITS OF VESSELS THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL.
During the fiscal year 1928, 1,811 individual commercial vessels
:representing 23 nationalities, passed through the Panama Canal. The
'number of transits per individual ship varied from 1 to 65, the 1,811
vessels making a total of 6,456 transits, or an average of 3.57 transits
per vessel.
| The highest number of transits made by any vessel during the fiscal
ear was 65, made by the motor ship Chiman, operated by the Isth-
mOian Land and Fruit Company. This vessel is bf Panaman registry,
pd operates between Cristobal and the west coast of the Republics
ZPanama and Colombia. It is a vessel of 124 net tons, Panama Canal
Iasurement, 116 feet long by 12 feet beam.
vessels of the Unitd States registry led in aggregate number of
though not in number of individual ships. While representing
19 per-cent of the individual vessels passing through the Canal,




::2:.::: .Ni :i2 :' .:. ; " " . .


I

*4J~


w







THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


they made up approximately 43 per cent of the total transits. Ships
of the British registry ranked second in total transits with 1,842, and
Germany third with 316.
The following table shows the number of individual ships, the fre-
quency of transit per vesse!, and total transits for the year, segregated
by nationality:
NATIONALITY, NUMBER, AND TRANSIT OF VESSELS THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL, FISCAL YEAR 1928.


Nationality
of vessels.



Belgian
British
Chdiean
Colombian
Costa Rican.
Danish
Danzig
Dutch
Ecuadorean
Finnish
French.
German
Greek
Honduraineau
Italian .
Japanese.
Norwegian.
Panaman
Peruvian
Spanish
Swedish
United States
Yug slav 1iL3
Totals


Vessels making indicated number of transit per vessel during
fiscal year 1928.


I 2 3 5 6 7 8 9:1 112 13 14 15 16 17,18 19 2021 22232

2 2 1 I 1 I '
253243 70 77 34.29 3 7 I 1 1 i I 1
4, 1 2 ; vi
4' I I ,

31 7 4 6 2 I
31 3 1 I I I
10! 512 '1 9 4 1
3,
10 9 12 12 3
19 9, 0 8 2 I I 2 2

10 2 b 5: I I
22' 21 8 18. 3 1 I
47 371 10, 10 7 7 2 1 1 I 1 '
:3' 4' 2 2 I I 1
2 1 1 i i ,
2; 9 21 1
10 41 1, 3 31 2- 2 1
79 91 47, 54 3:6 48:51 36 27 19, b12 11 3 2, 2 '
4: 1I 41 3, I I
193i493175 202 111 W90 4 4929 2.' 8 I 71 41 6 3 2. 3 3 1" 2 2 I


4 2526 30 31 65


!
1 1

I




i

I


I i


Il I: I I I I


I




61 13
727'1,842
7: 32
61 9g
23 69
10 29
33i 137
I 13
3; 32
46 127
81 316
8 12
I I
46 118
741 188
1231 313
16i 138
8, 53
15I 46
27; Ill
5322,753
17 54
1,811 6,456


B-
1..





2.17
2.53
4.57
16 50
2 00
3.00
2 90
4.28
1.00
1 00
2.76
3.90
1.50
1.00
2.57
2 54
2 54
8.62
6.62
3.07
4.11
5.17
3 1a
3 57


From the above it will be noted that 493, or approximately 27 per
cent of the individual vessels using the Canal during the year, made
but one transit; that 46 per cent made 3 or more transits; and that
less than 6 per cent made 10 or more transits.

4 CANAL WORK IN JULY, 1928.

The following is the report of the Governor to the Secretary of War,
of Canal work in July, 1928.
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 24, 1928.
The Honorable, the Secretory of ll'ar,
I1'ashington, D. C.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report covering operations of The
Panama Canal during the month of July, 1928:
NUMBER OF TRANSITS.
During the month 509 commercial vessels passed through the Canal. In addition
to these, 10 nonseagoing launches, measuring under 20 tons, and 28 vessels belonging
to or chartered by the United States Government transited the Canal. There were
also 3 transits of a Panama Government vessel and 8 transits of vessels solely for
repairs, on which no tolls were collected, making a total of 558 transits for the month,
or a daily average of 18.
Tolls on the 509 commercial vessels a mounted to $2,109,083.19, and on the launches
to $73.35, a total of $2,109,156.54, or a daily average on all traffic of $68,037.31.
Total traffic for July exceeded that of the preceding month by 23 transits and almost
$93,000 in tolls.
The total number of craft of all kinds transiting the Canal during the month of
July, 1928, as compared with the same month in 1927 and 1926, are shown in the
following tabulation:


I:








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


July, July, July,
1928. 1927. 1926.
Commercial vessels.. ... ..................... .... ...... ........ .... 509 509 456
Noncommercial vessels (Army and Navy)........ ...... . ...... 28 29 19
Launches (under 20 tons measurement)... ................... ..... 10 16 7
Panaman Government vessels................. .. ........... .. 3 2 1
Vessels for repairs............................. .. .. 8 2 2
Total vessels transiting Canal.................... ........ ... 558 558 485


In addition to the vessels listed above, Panama Canal equipment consisting of
dredges, tugs, barges, etc., was passed through the locks as follows:

North- Sout ?-
bound. bound. Total.
Gatun .... ............ .................. .. .... .. . .. .. .. 14 9 23
Pedro Miguel ....... .............. .. .. 35 27 62
M iraflores ...... ....... .... ........... . .. 37 23 60
Totals.......... ... ............. ... 8 59 145


COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC.'
The following tabulation shows the number of vessels, Panama Canal net tonnage,
tolls, and tons of cargo carried by vessels transiting the Canal each month from the
beginning of the calendar year 1928, to the end of July, 1928, as compared with the
same months in the preceding year:
No. of Panama Canal
Month. vessels, net tonnage. Tons of cargo. rolUs.
1927. 1928. 1927. 1928. 1927. 1928. 1 1927. 1928.
January .. 443 540 2,121,631 2,422,770 2.241,765 2,372.061 $1,984,760 71 $2.212,752 50
February 449 547 2,201,328 2,460,111 2,230,107 2,660.425 1.994,860 82 2,253,755.37
arch.. .. 496 542 2,413,999 2,441.077 2,533,525 2,428,662 2,217,913 20 2,223,370.57
April...... 464 531 2,224,500 2,384,491 2,429,807 2.473.884 2,065,2n6 92 2.187,607.82
May...... 471 508 2,248,892 2,271.612 2,379,713 2,497,588 2.066,070 73 2,118,969.83
June...... 455 481 2,152,926 2,227,865 2,229,097 2,139.565 1,970.377 97 2,016,211 09
July .. 509 509 2,406,955 2,318.395 2,450,468 2,291.955 2,215,515 99 2,109,083.19
Totals. 3,287 3,658 15,770,231 16,529,321 16,494,482 16.864.140 14,514.706r 34 15,121,750 37

S Commercial traffic includes all ocean-going vessels paying tolls. Vessels in direct service of the United States
Government, including merchant vessels chartered by the Government, do not pay tolls. Shipping Board vessels in
commercial service pay tolls. Statistics on vessels not paying tolls are shown under "Noncommercial traffic."

The following is a summary of the commercial traffic for July, 1928, as compared
with the corresponding month in 1927 and 1926, and the monthly averages for tle
fiscal year 1928:


July,
1927.


July,
1926.


Average per
month for fiscal
year 1928.


Number of vessels ..... ........ ... 509 509 456 538
Panama Canal net tonnage........ .... 2,318,395 2.406,955 2,154,821 2,454,886
United States net tonnage . 1,771,887 1,883.138 1.692,368 1,905,316
Registered gross tonnage ... ..... 2,922,904 3,072.255 2,775.728 3,100,239
Registered net tonnage ..... ..... ... 1,779,961 1,885,6518 1.703,387 1,903,974
Tolls................... ... ..... 52,109.083.19 12.215,515 99 $1,980,719.67 $2.245,374.98
Tons of cargo carried .. .... ....... 2,291,955 2,450,468 2,185,527 2,469,225


The average daily number of transits, tonnage, tolls, and cargo, are shown in the
following statement, in comparative form, commercial vessels only:
: ____


Average per day.


July,
1928.


July,
1927.


July,
1926.


Average
per day for
fiscal year.


: Number of transit .................. 16.41 16 42 14 71 17.63
..Panama Canal net tonnage .............. 74,787 77,644 69,510 80,488
T ................................. $68.034.94 '$71,358.56 $63,894 18 $73,618.85
,.Tom of cargo carried ................... 73,934 79,047 70,501 80,958

Does not include 13,400.54 collected on supplemental bill.








40 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


AVERAGE TONNAGE, TOLLS, AND TONS OF CARGO PER VESSEL.

The average tonnage, tolls, and tons of cargo per vessel transiting the Canal during
the month of July, 1928. as compared with July, 1927, and 1926, are shown in the
following tabulation:

Average per vessel.
July. July, July,
1928. 1927. 1926.


Panama Canal not tonnage
United States nCt tonnage
Registered gross tonnage
Registered net Sounage
Tols ..
Tons of cargo (including vessels in ballast ,
Tons of cargo Iladen vessels only) .


...... 4.554
.... .1 3,481
... . 5.742
3.497
$4.143 58
S.. 4,503
5,431


4,729
3,700
6,036
3,705
' 4,346 08
4,814
6,126


Does not include $3,400.54 collected on supplemental bill


4,725
3,711
6,087
3.735
$4,343 68
4,792
5,843


TOLLS.

At present tolls are collected at rates of $1.20 per net ton for laden vessels and 72
cents per ton for vessels in ballast, computed on the basis of the Panama Canal rules
of measurement, with the provision that tolls shall not exceed $1.25 per ton nor be
less than 75 cents per ton as determined in accordance with the United States rules
for measurement of net registered tonnage. In order to ascertain the proper tolls
charges it is necessary, therefore, that the net tonnage of vessels transiting the Canal
be determined both in accordance with the Panama Canal and the United States rules
of measurement. 9
Due to this limiting proviso the tolls actually collected on laden vessels averaged
$0.943 per net ton, Panama Canal measurement, and tolls on vessels in ballast aver-
aged S$0.72 per net ton, Panama Canal measurement.
Taking the traffic through the Canal for the month of July, 1928, the following
tabulation shows a comparison of rolls actually collected under the present method'of
assessing tolls with the tolls that would have been collected on the basis of the Panama
Canal rules olf measurement at the proposed rates of 81.00 laden and $0.60 ballast.
The traffic for the month is segregated by tflig:


I Toll, that would
I ,have b'ieen collected
Tolls actu ally under proposed
Nalionality. (nllected under rates of $1 laden
prrseni dual and 601. ballast on
system. b.ii, of Panama
('anal net tonnage.
Bol,,,n $10.830 00 311.003 00


Brit
Chil


Colo
Cub
Dan
Dan
Dut'
Finn
Fren
Ger
Itali
Japa
Nor
Pan!
Peru
Spi
Swe4
Unit
Yug


sh 555.718 25 '57,1,818 bO
en 11,807 50 12,141 00
imbian 5.110 47 4,571 60
an .2 .50 194 00
ish 28,235 t4l 29,352 20
zig 8,974 80 7,479 00
ch 43,428 75 49.750 00
nsh 2,010 00 1,675 00
ich .39,660 95 41,113 00
man 116.798 15 131,837 00
an . 22,917 50 26,987 00
nese 1 44.566 28 41,408 40
wegian 76,408 00 80,182.00
aman . 1,754 75 2.625 80
vian 8,072 30 12,241 00
nish 6,845 00 I ,671 00
Jish 29,310 32 34,149 40
ed States I 1,083,917 03 1,098.727 80
oslav .. 12,425.00 12,111 00
Totals.... .... ...... 2.109,083 19 2.176.037.80
Net increase for all traffic. ....


Difference.


Increase.

$173.00
10,050 35
333 50

1,116.56
6,321.25

1,452.05
15,038 85
4,069 50
3,774.00
871 05
4,168 70
4,839 08
14,810.77'


Decrease.


$538.87
48 50
1,495.80
335.00


3,157.88


174.00

314.00.... ....


73.018 66 6,064.05
66,954.61 ...............


Includes $4,160 collected for naval vessels at 50 cents per displacement ton.

The increase on vessels of United States registry would have been distributed with
respect to channels of trade in which the vessels were engaged as follows:




4


-------








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


United States intercoastal trade ............ . . .. ....... 513,910 49
United States foreign trade............. .... ...... ............... .... . 1,713 06
United States-Canal Zone trade.. ....... ........ .. I ...... .......... .. 812.78
Net increase .... ....... .... .................................... .. 14,810 77

= Denotes decrease.

RATIO OF CARGO TONNAGE TO NET TONNAGE.

The ratio of cargo tonnage to net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, of
vessels transiting the Panama Canal in July, 1928, is shown in the following tabula-
tion, segregated by nationality of vessels and direction of transit. Laden vessels only
are included:

Atlantic Pacific
Nationality. to to Totals.
Pacific. Atlantic.
Belgian........................... ...... .. . .. ......... 1.17 1.70 1 40
British .................... .............. ... .. . ..... ... .87 1 33 1.09
Chilean...... ............. .................. .. ........ ... . .43 .55 .48
Colom bian....................... ............. ...... ........ 1 18 95 1.12
C uban....... .................... .. .. . . .... .......10 .. .. 10
D anish ........................................... .. .. ...... 53 1.65 1 38
D utch................................... ........... . 51 I 44 .99
Finnish .. ............................... ... . . . . 85 1.85
French ........... ........................... .. ... 55 1.36 96
G erm an .................................. ... .. . ... .. .. 67 1.37 1.03
Italian............. ........... .... .. .... . ... . . 24 1.02 .85
Japanese........... ....... ...... ... . .. .. 1.26 1.59 1.35
Norwegian.......................... .. . .. ............ 1.01 1 66 1.40
Panam an..... .................... . .. ...... .. ......... 1.05 .... ...... 1.05
Peruvian ......... ................ . ...... ...... . .35 81 .55
Spanish .................................... ...... ....... 08 .25 .15
Swedish......................... ......... .. .................... 60 3 49 1.90
United States.................................. . .. . ....... .82 1.53 1.22
Yugoslavian......................... ...... ... 1.62 2 03 1 73
Avernges, July, 1928 ... ... ........................ . ... 82 1.49 1.18
Averages, July, 1927 ..................... .... .. .. ....... .90 1 58 1.29
Averages, July, 1926......... ........ ... ... .. ....... .90 1.51 1 25



CLASSIFICATION OF VESSELS.

A further classification of vessels passing through the Canal during the month of
July, is as follows:


Class.


Tank ships:
Laden.. ...... ...............
Ballast... ....... ... . .....
General cargo ships:
L aden .............................
Ballast............ ..........
Noncargo-carrying ships:
Naval vessels................ .....
T ugs...... ......... . ....... .
Yachts....................
Totals ........ ..... .......

i, Method of propulsion:
S Steam ..............................
otor.............................
. Sail.................... .........
Nonpropelled .....................


Atlantic to Pacific.


No.
of
ships

4
46
192
25
1
3
1
272

216
53
2


Totals........................ 272


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.

16,544
248. 144
896,498
107,591

288
20


S


8


Pacific to Atlantic.


No. Panama
Tolls. I of Canal net
ships, tonnage.

17,020.00 45 238.989
78,764 18 1 2,865
27,752.34 181 799,970
77,235.85 5 7,302


2,575.00
255 84
15.00


1,269,085 1,103,618 21

1,017,206 901,696 26
250,256 200,577 55
1,362 1,021 50
261 322 90
1,269,085 1,103,618.21


2 .... .
2 164
1 20
237 1.049,310

195 869,471
38 176,297
I 1,675
3 1,867
237 1 1,049,310


Tolls.


$244,261.55
2,062.80
752.159 05
5,263.50
1,585.00
118 08
15.00
1,005,464.98

841,516.78
159,788.70
2,010.00
2,149.50
1,005,464.98


:JOf the4.11 steam-driven vessels, 285 were oil-burning, 124 coal-burning, and 2 burned
oter oil coal.


.k, *








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


NONCOMMERCIAL TRAFFIC.
The following statement shows the number of transits and tonnage of vessels trans-
iting the Canal free of tolls during the month of July, 1928. If tolls had been assessed'
against these vessels at commercial rates, the amounts would have been approximately
as indicated:


Atlantic to Pacific.


Class.


No
of
transits.


U. S. Naval vessels:
Ammunition ships ..
Cruisers ..
M inesweepers .. ........
Submarines .. ..
Survey ships ......... ... .. .
Tankers ........
Tugs ..... ....
U. S. Army vessels:
Launches
Mineplanters .. I
Transports


Totals, U. S. Gove
Panama Government vesse
Transports
Vessels for repairs:
Tankers

Grand totals


2 I


Tonnage.



9.725
'1,900 '
3,602
S703

1,000
20 1


54,862.50
950 00
1,801.00
327.25

500.00
15.00


'11.724 14,655 00


rnment. 16 23.310.75
Is:
1 '101 I 72.72
4 '5.240 3,930 00

.... 21 .. 27,313.47


Pacific to Atlantic.


I ____ ______


No.
of
transit.


3


Tonnage.


34.405
22,500
'1,900


$5,506.25
11,250.00
950.00


1 '703 527.25
2 .11.118 13,341 60
... .... ... ............


1
2
12

2
4

18


"1,208
7,816



-202

15,233


........66......
604.00
9,770.00

41,949.10

145.44

3,924.75
46,016 29


Indicates displacement tonnage. Indicates Panama Canal net tonnage. j Indicates United Slates net tonnage.
The foregoing noncommercial vessels transiting the Canal during the month of .
July, 1928, carried cargo as follows: Atlantic to Pacific, 2,127 tons; Pacific to At-
lantic, 16,757 tons; total, 18.884 tons.
The following statement shows the number of launches transiting the Canal during
the month of July, 1928. These launches, although paying tolls, are excepted from
statements concerning commercial traffic:


Atlantic to Pacific
Pacific to Atlantic
Totals


No. of
Iransits.
6
4

10


Panama
Canal net Tolls.
tonnage.
41 $50.40
27 22 95

68 73 35


STATEMENT OF TERMINAL OPERATIONS.
Details of the business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals of the
Panama Canal during the month of July, 1928, are shown in the following tabulation:


I Cristobal.

Local cargo arriving tons 69,143
Local cargo shipped .. tons.. 8,210
Transit cargo arriving . ...tons 2,322,567
Transit cargo clearing . tons.. 2,304,278
Cargo received for transshipment . tons 31,589
Cargo transshipped ... tons 25,348


"Canal Zone for Orders" cargo:
Number of receipts issued
Number of withdrawals
Tons received ...
Tons withdrawn . ...
Packages received ..
Packages withdrawn .. .
Vessels supplied with bunker coal:
Commercial, other than Panama Railroad Co
Coal supplied to above vessels-
I Commercial, other than Panama Railroad Co
Coal isaned, miscellaneous:
Panama Canal departments .
U. S. Army, excepting vessels ....
Individuals and companies ........
Panama Railroad Company .... ...........
Transferred to Navy .


.tons .
tons
.tons.
..tons..
. tons..
.tons..


72
375
1.952
1,458
12,658
6,467

61
17,827
79
55
165
18
' 105


Balboa.

62,132
1,081
2.297,991
2.296,793
728
719
27
133
215
229
2,130
1,567

8
85
7
1

...... .....


Total.

131,275
9,291
4,620,558
4,601,071
32,317
26,067
99
508
2,167
1,687
14,788
8.034

69
17.912
86
56
165
30
105


Total sales and issues ........ .. .........


Tons
of
cargo.
15

15


.. tons 18,240 105 18,354









THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 43



Cristobal. i Balhoa. Total.

Coal on hand, July I, 1928 . ..... tons 36.928 36.928
Coal on hand, August 1, 1928 ons. 47,311 ............ 47,311
Coal received during month .. .. .................. tons 28,632 ..... ..... 28,632
Coal received from Navy..... .................... ......... tons.. ............ 105 105
Fuel oil issued from Panama Canal tanks:
Panama Canal departments.. ..... ................bbls.. 6,576 03 14.624.68 21,200 71
Panama Railroad Company ....................... bbls 540.83 ............ 540. 83
U. S. Army and Navy .. ... ......... .. ..bbls .......... 921.09 921 09
Individuals and companies ....................... bbls.. ...... .... 354 86 354.86
Total sales and issues ...... . .... ... .. .. ..bbls 7,116 86 15,900 63 23,017 49
Fuel oil on hand, August 1, 1928 ................. .. bbls.. 92,349 78 44,756.74 137,106.52
Diesel oil received from Union Oil Co... ......bbs ........ 26 19 26.19
Diesel oil sold during July, 1928....... ............bbls 103.97 26 19 130 16
Diesel oil on hand, August 1, 1928 .. .................. ... bbls 23,964 63 493.25 24,457.90
Miscellaneous transfers.......... .......... ...... ...... bbls 301.84 629 II 930.95
Gasoline and kerosene pumped for The Panama Canal ........... bbls 1,819.81 2,943.19 4,763 00
Gasoline pumped for individuals and companies ...... ..........bbls ..... .... 27,532.65 27,532.65
Oil pumped for individuals and companies ................. bbls 530,430 68 673,485.18 1,203,915.86
Oil pumped for U. S. Navy.............. ............... bbls. 5,353 00 42,500 46 47,853.46
Total fuel oil, gasoline, and kerosene handled..... ....bbls.. 545.126 16 763.017.41 1,308,143.57
Admeasurement of vessels:
U. S. equivalent certificates issued ......... .. ... .. 29 1 30
Measured for Panama Canal net tonnage ... ........ .. .. .. 9 1 10
Remeasured for Panama Canal net tonnage ........... .... 23 .. ...... 23
Panama Canal net tonnage corrected ............. .. ... ... 7 5 12
U. S. equivalent tonnage corrected .......... ....... 13 9 22
Service of harbor equipment:
Tugs, total operating hours .... .... .... . .. 475 3892 8641
Launches, total operating hours ... ......... ... 1.3544 1,734 3.0881
Revenue from tug service, pilotage, etc.:
Tug revenue........... .... .......... .. $14,022 50 112,377.50 $26,400.00
Pilotage..... .. ................. ... 18,285.00 8,867 00 27,152.00
Seamen.... .. .......... ... .... .. .................. 12,560.00 10,780.00 23,340.00
Launch service... ...................................... 1,753.50 3,440.50 5,194.00
Wharfage ........................ ............................. 16,383 82 6,406 71 22,790.53
Ships measured ....... ................................. ...... 110.00 50.00 160 00
Miscellaneous......... ......................... ........ 1,022 35 .586 50 1,608.85
Ships repaired at Panama Canal shops:
Commercial ... ............................................... 68 24 92 4
U. S. Army and Navy .. ................. ...... ... ..... .... 7 6 13
Panama Canal equipment ... ...... ..... ....... ........ .. 4 7 11
Totals ................................. ... .... 79 37 116
Vessels dry docked:
Comm ercial ......................... ........... ... .. ... 8 8 16
U. S. Army and Navy. ....... .... ..................... ... ..... ..... .. 2 2
Panama Canal equipment ........... ................. .. .. .. ..... .... 2 2
T otals ............................. ........... .. .. 8 12 20

Clearances issued ......................................... .. ... 271 282 553
Bills of health issued................................................ 276 288 564


ALL VESSELS ENTERING AND CLEARING PORT.

Port of Cristobal. Port of Balboa.

No. Registered Registered No. Registered Registered
of gross net of. gross net
ships. tonnage. tonnage. ships. tonnage. tonnage
Ships entering.
All vessels, including those transiting Canal.. 579 3,326,720 2,041,615 544 3,105,373 1,927,498
Vessels entering port but not transiting Canal. 65 281,130 168,804 17 74,238 51,041
Vessels transiting Canal and handling passen-
gers and cargo at terminal ports........ 119 682,661 414,689 98 579,821 357,891
Ships clearing.
Alvessels, including those transiting Canal.. 576 3,298,683 2,024,183 539 3,098,548 1,912,759
'essels clearing port but not transiting Canal. 65 271,968 163,368 17 85,074 48,622
ees i transiting Canal and handling passen-
g.teandeargo at terminal ports........ 114 663,585 402,427 97 564,379 348,583

... 0i
r -*...








44 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

04h
MOVEMENT OF PASSENGERS.

At Cristobal. At Balboa. s'
First- First-
class. Others. Total. elass Others. Total.
Disembarking:
From Atlantic ports.. ...................... 1608 889 2,497 174 211 385
From Pacific ports ............... .. ....... 240 73 313 255 192 447
Total disembarking ......... ...... ... .. 1,848 962 2,810 429 403 832
Embarking:
For Atlantic ports.... ... ................ 1,492 667 2,159 156 236 392
For Pacific ports. ............ ............ 228 378 606 234 133 367
Total embarking ...... ..... ...... 1,720 1,045 2.765 390 369 759
Remaining on board:
From Atlantic to Pacific ports .. ........ .. ... .. 1,833 2,229 4,062 1,783 2,210 3,993
From Pacific to Atlantic ports .... ........... 1.569 2,074 3,643 1,623 1,787 3,410
From Atlantic to Atlantic ports. ... ............ 685 149 834 ...... ........ ........
From Pacific to Pacific ports .... ...... .. .. ... ... ........ 14 477 491
Total remaining on board ..... ....... 4,087 4.452 8,539 3,420 4.474 7,894
Totalarriving.... .... .. ... ..... 5,935 5,414 11,349 3,849 4,877 8,726
Total departing ............ .......... ..... 5.807 5,487 11,304 3,810 4,843 8,653


PASSENGER-CARRYING VESSELS THROUGH CANAL.

I Total cornm- Passenger- Per cent
mercial carrying of total
vessels, vessels. transit.
Atlantic to Pacific ....... ... ... . 272 52 19.1
Pacific to Atlantic.. ... ........ ....... .... ... . . 237 50 21.1
Totals .. ... ..... ........... ...... 509 I 102 20.1


In addition to the aforesaid, 65 passenger-carrying vessels called at the port of
Cristobal and 4 at Balboa without transiting the Canal, making a total of 171
passenger-carrying vessels calling at Canal ports during the month.

COMMISSARY SALES TO VESSELS.

The following is a statement of commissary sales to vessels during the month of
July, 1928:

Cold Miscel-
Ice. Groceries. Storage. Laundry. laneous. Totals.

Sales at Cristobal to:
Commercial vessels . . ... 52,996 84 $11,352 82 $30,899 15 5134 (09 57,454.66 552,837 56
Government vessels .... 235 85 2,683 89 13,230 96 .......... 1,327.14 17,477.84
Panama Railroad vessels 9.45 17 88 2.208.08 799 45 342.97 3,377.83
Total sales, July, 1928 .... 3.242 14 14,054 59 46.338 19 933.54 9,124.77 73,693.23
Total sales. July, 1927 2,691 41 13,939 85 35,004.87 989 21 8,785.42 61,410.76
Total sales, July, 1926. 3,225 31 10,810 19 37,245 48 797 23 4,718.05 56,7906.26
Sales at Balboa to:
Commercial vessels ..... 1,569 48 13.073.08 22,038.95 503 33 5,061 07 42,245.91
Government vessels .. .. 344 46 3,036 63 14,870.93 1,017 00 915.31 20,194.33
Panama Railroad vessels .. . ..... ... 28 46 .. .. .. 28.46
Total sales, July, 1928. ... 1,913 94 16,109.71 36,909.88 1,548.79 5,976 38 62,468.70
Total-sales, July, 1927. 1,609 13 14,796 78 44,371 58 340.14 5,616.69 66,734.27
Total sales, July, 1926 1,454 85 10,349.87 27,692 13 569.41 3,164.74 43,231.00


.The aggregate sales to Government vessels during the month was $37,672.17,
to Panama Railroad vessels, $3,406.29; and to other commercial vessels, $95,083.47;
making the total sales to all vessels $136,161.93.



6 J




I


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


N LOCK OPERATIONS.

Th~e following tabulation shows the number of lockages, and the number of vessels
passing through the locksduring the month of July, 1928, ascompared with the corre-
sponding month in 1927 and 1926:

Number of blockages. Comparative
Comparative
Locks. Commerei#l. Noncomn ercial. grand totals.
July, July, July
North. South. Total. North. South. Total. 1928. 1927. 1926.,

Gatun ......... .................. ....... 222 256 478 12 II 23 501 503 440
Pedro Miguel........ ........ .. ......... 225 261 486 17 17 34 520 531 463
Miraflores............................... ... 226 258 484 17 17 34 518 527 455
Number of vessels put through locks.
Gatun .......................... ... 238 271 509 39 30 69 578 508 514
Pedro Miguel.......... .................... 241 273 514 56 53 109 623 628 533
Miralores ................................ ...24 273 514 58 50 108 622 634 530


CLASSIFICATION OF NONCOMMERCIAL VESSELS.

Pedro
Gatun. Migue. Miraflores.

Army and Navy vessels .................. ......... .... ........ ...... 28 28 29
PanamaCanal equipment........ .. ...... ............... ... ......... 23 62 60
Launches (under 20 tons)........... ..................................... 7 8 8
Panaman Government vessels.. .................... ......... .... .. ... 3 3 3
Vessels for repairs........ ...... .............. ............ . ........ 8 8 8


The total consumption of water for lockages and loss in leakage was as follows
in July, 1928, as compared with the preceding month and the corresponding month
in 1927:

Pedro
Gatun. Miguel. Miraflores.

Cubic feet. Cubic feet. Cubic feed.
Lockages........................................... 2,054,850,000 1,714,930,000 1,547,360,000
Leakage............................................ 20,000,000 30,000,000 20,000,000
Totals, July, 1928.................................. 2,074,850.000 1.744,930,000 1,567,360,000
Totals, June, 1928............... ............. 1,962,830,000 1,669,670,000 1,507,340,000
Totals, July, 1927.................................. 2,049,880,000 1,696,540,000 1,623,920,000


HYDROGRAPHY.

In the following tabulation the hydrographic conditions in the Canal Zone and
vicinity during the month of July, 1928, are shown in comparative form:

July. July-Years of record.
1928. 1927. Maximum. Minimum. Mean.
C. s. C. I. C. s. C.f. C.J.s.
Chagres River at Alhajuela:
Monthly mean discharge................... 2,127 6,197 6,197 1.248 2,837
Maximum momentary discharge................ 11.379 37,700 '37,700 ................
:.Gstua Lake watershed:
Total yield.................. ............... 5,262 14,663 14,663 2,677 7,205
Net yield... ............... .............. 4,665 14,156 14,156 1,898 6,656
Draft on Gatun Lake for loekages and power ......... 2,812 2,760 2,812 '1,244 '2,203


z July 22, 1927.


SNot including July, 1914.


. The total yield of the Gatun Lake watershed for the month of July was 27 percent
hqlow the 15-year July average, or 5,262 c. f. s., compared with an average of 7,205
j.s.,. Maximum and minimum July total yields of record are 14.663 c. f. s. in 1927,
tnd 2~47 -. f. s. in 1914, respectively. The Lake varied in elevation from 85.23
4 ;::!::!
34E,:i:: i








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


feet on the 3d to 85.70 feet on the 11th, averaged 85.48 feet and ended at elevation
85.44 feet. There wasan increase in storage during the month of 228 million cubic feet.
The net yield for the month was 12.5 billion cubic feet.
Miraflores Lake varied from elevation 54.66 feet on the 4th to 53.13 feet on'the
5th, averaged 53.87 feet and ended at elevation 53.84 feet. Two hundred and forty-
one c. f. s. was wasted over the M iraflores spillway.
SEISMOLOGY.
Three seismic disturbances were recorded during the month, all of which had the
epicenter over 1,000 miles distant.
ELECTRICAL DIVISION.
The gross generator output of the Gatun hydroelectric station for the month was
4,767,000 kilowatt hours and the computed water consumption was 3,761,119,368
cubic feet. Continuous service was maintained throughout the month. The Mira-
flores Diesel-electric station had a gross generator out put of 5,300 kilowatt hours, with
a fuel oil consumption of 23.39 barrels.
In addition to the usual operating and maintenance work performed, 45 work orders
comprising 56 items of additions or repairs were completed on 30 vessels during the
month. There were 350 work orders issued during the month, as compared with 368
for the previous month.
MECHANICAL DIVISION.
During the month miscellaneous repairs were made on 79 vessels at Cristobal and
37 at Balboa. Eight vessels were drydocked at Cristobal and 12 at Balboa. The
annual overhaul of submarines 0-7, and 0-10 was started during the month. The
annual overhaul of the mineplanter Gen. ll'm. M. Graham was completed during the
month.
MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING DIVISION.
Work was performed on several improvments in the cities of Colon and Panama,
and in the Canal Zone. The usual maintenance work was performed on roads, streets,
and walks, and the sewer and water systems. The amount of water pumped during
the month totaled 726,642,250 gallons.
DREDGING DIVISION.
East Culebra, West Culebra, Cucaracha, and Lirio slides showed practically no
movements during J uly. There were no other slides and no delays to shipping during
the month.
The total excavation during July was 218,895'cubic yards, as follows:
tesWet excavation.
Items Wet ------------ Character, of work.
Earth. Rock. | Total.
Work excavation:
Canal prism, Gaillard Cut-
Project No. 2 7.950 24,150 32,100 Maintenance.
Project No. 9 4.500 40,650 45,150 Maintenance.
Maintenance .....1,700 I 9,700 11,400 Maintenance
Canal prism, Pacific entrance--
Project No. I 54.700 54,700 Maintenance.
Maintenance . i 19,150 1.550 20,700 Maintenance.
Balboa inner harbor-
Project No. I ,3,800 3,800 Maintenance.
Maintenance . 2.550 .. 2.500 Maintenance.
Plant excavation:
Naval Air Station, Coco Solo fill 47.000 47,000 Auxiliary.
Dredging sand at Chame ..... 1.495 . 1,495 Auxiliary.
Totals ...... .. .. 84,345 134,550 218,895

The ferry crossing at the north end of Pedro Miguel locks operated 31 days during
the month. Five hundred and twenty-two trips were made, and 137 Panama Canal,
6 U. S. Army, and 2,381 other vehicles, a total of 2,524 ,were ferried across the Canal.
OCCUPANTS OF QUARTERS.
The number of persons, including men, women, and children, occupying Panama
Canal and Panama Railroad quarters on July 31, 1928, totaled 21,331, composed of
7,330 Americans, 2,640 of whom were men, 2,174 women, and 2,516 children; 197
Europeans, 86 of whom were men, 32 women, and 79 children; and 13,804 West
Indians, 4,124 of whom were men, 2,579 women, and 7,101 children. .The total
number of persons in quarters on July 31, 1927, was 20,791.








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 47

WORKING FORCE.

The following tabulation shows the number of gold and silver employees as of July
18 1928, with a comparison of the working force for the preceding month and for
July, 1927:

As of July 18, 1928. Total employees.
Gold. silver. Total. June, 1928. July, 1927.
Operation and Maintenance:
Office ...... ........... .. .... ........... 42 59 101 80 78
Electrical .... .. . ............... .. 155 173 328 336 326
Municipal Engineering. ...................... 81 669 750 777 700
Lock Operation ................................ 226 704 930 933 817
Dredging........................ ......... 183 924 1,107 1,061 1,111
M mechanical ............ . ............... 441 840 1,281 1,250 1,277
M arine ....................................... 215 707 922 912 823
Fortifications ....... ..................... 23 376 399 301 166
Totals.. ... ... ... ... ......... 1.366 4.452 5,818 5,650 5.298
Supply Department:
Quartermaster.............. ... ...... .. .. .... 197 1,700 1,897 1,941 1,897
subsistence ............. .................. 7 103 110 113 106
Commiesary .................. ......... .... 220 1,154 1,374 1,349 1,272
Cattle Industry .................. ....... 5 134 139 136 156
Washington Hotel............... .... ...... 8 92 100 102 101
Transportation.......... .. .... ............ 55 211 266 .262 252
Totals ..... .... ... ... ... ..... 492 3,394 3,886 3,903 3,787
Accounting Department .......... ... .. ......... 195 8 203 201 209
Health Department .......... .. ....... 284 849 1,133 1,145 1,031
Executive Department. . .... ......... 482 299 781 794 777
Totals .............. ... .......... 961 1,156 2,117 2,140 2,017
Panama Railroad Company:
Superintendent ...... ..... .......... . 49 268 317 344 284
Transportation ...... .. ..... ....... 65 118 183 186 176
Receiving and Forwarding Agency...... ......... 86 1,076 1,162 1,411 1,642
Coaling Stations .. .. .... ........... ..... 49 257 306 288 290
Totals ... ........ ...... .... ........... 249 1,719 1,968 2,229 2.392
Grand totals, July, 1928........... ..... 3,068 10,721 13,789 .... ..... ....
Grand totals, June, 1928......... ...... 3,038 10,884 .. .. 13,922 ........
Grand totals, July. 1927................. 2,946 10,548 .......... ........... 13,494


Additions to the gold force on the Isthmus in July were as follows: Employed in the
United States, 14; reemployed in the United States, 6; employed on the Isthmus, 30;
reemployed on the Isthmus, 16; total, 66. Separations from the gold force totaled 33,
as follows: Resigned, 21; discharged, 8; retired, 3; died, 1. At the end of the month
there were on file 102 applications from residents of the Isthmus for employment.

VITAL STATISTICS.

A total of 161 deaths occurred during the month of July, 1928, among the popula-
tion of the Canal Zone, and the cities of Panama and Colon, which is equivalent to an
annual death rate of 14.92 per 1,000 population. The leading causes of death were:
Tuberculosis (various organs), 24; diarrhea and enteritis, 19; organic diseases of the
heart, 11; nephritis (acute and chronic), 11; and penumonia (broncho and lobar), 9.
There were 6 deaths from cancer, 5 from apoplexy, 1 from diphtheria, and I from
.influenza. There were 17 deaths among nonresidents of the Isthmus. These are not
included in thd above statistics.
There were 266 live births, and 12 stillbirths, reported during the month. Including
stillbirths, this is equivalent to an annual birth rate of 25.76 per 1,000 population.
Deaths among children under 1 year of age numbered 40, giving an infant mortality
rate of 150.38.
The total number of malaria cases reported from the Zone and the cities of Panama
and Colon during July was 193, of whom 21 were employees (6 white and 15 colored),
20 were members of employees' families (2 white and 18 colored), 23 were Canal Zone
agriculturists, 41 were other civilian nonemployees, and 88 were Army and Navy
[ ti.jmVersOnzfehl: Of the 41 employees and members of employees' families, 18 were probably



:" ': .








48 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

infected outside our sanitated areas, as they gave a history of working, living, dr having '
been in such areas at night previous to their becoming sick.
There were 2 deaths from malaria, both of colored nonemployees living in the ty
of Panama.
RECEIPTS AND SALES OF MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES.
The value of material ordered on United States requisitions and received on the
Isthmus during the month totaled $294,136.88, of which $272,906.80 was for the
Department of Operation and Maintenance and $21,230.08 for other Panama Canal
departments.
Cash sales on the Isthmus from stock, fuel oil, scrap, and obsolete and second-hand
material amounted to $42,387.76.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT.
The following statement shows in p condensed form the aggregate revenue and
expenditures for the month of June, 1928, as compared with June, 1927, together with
the figures for the fiscal year as compared with the fiscal year 1927.
It is impossible to submit figures for the month of July at the time of writing this
report, since all charges, etc., involved in the accounting have not been completed:


' Month.


i Fiscal year ending June 30.


June, I June,
1928. 1927. 1928. 1927.
Tolls. .. ............. 62,016,277 34 $1,959,542 72 $26,943.513 11 $24,217,185.32
Other receipts . 337.208 27 289,642 37 3,600.907 34 3,574,643.27
Total transit revenues .. .353,485 61 2,249.185.09 30,544.420 45 27,791,828.59
Total transit expenses ...... .... .1.104,678 05 1,094,894.78 12.319.575.59 12,180,734.79
Net transit revenues ........ 1,248,807.56 1,154,290.31 18,224,844 86 15,611,093.80
Three per cent capital charge. 614,221 58 6090,589.16 7.343,774 39 7,309,248.28
Transit surplus........... 634.585 98 544.701 .15 10,881,070.47 8,301,845.52
Business revenues..... ....... ... 1.466,862 57 1,781,710 12 16,929,247.24 15,878,654.57
Business expenses............... 1,526,222.69 1,902,423 72 16,192,527 81 15,002,117.77
Net business revenues ............. 59.360 12 120,713.60 736,719 43 876,536.80
Three per cent capital charge ... .. 60.543.93 59,313.34 781.864 15 744,496.74
Business surplus........... .. 119.904 05 ,180,026.94 '45,144 72 132,040.06
Combined revenues ............. i 3,820,348 18 4,030,895 21 47.473,667.69 43,670.483.16
Combined expenses.. .............. 2,630,900.74 2.997,318 50 28,512,103 40 27,182,852.56
Net revenue ............. 1,189,447 44 1,033.576 71 i 18.961,564 29 16,487,630.60
Three per cent capital charge. ... 674,765 51 668,902 50 8,125,638 54 8,053,745.02
Combined surplus ..... .... 514.681 93 364,674 21 10.835,925.75 8,433,885.58

Indicates credit.


Respectfully,


M. L. WALKER,
Governor.


Notice to Mariners.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., A.4ugust 27, 1928.
No. 426.
The Hydrographic Office received the following information from the Pilot in
Charge, Lighthouse Subdivision, The Panama Canal:
"CRISTOBAL HARBOR.
"Effective August 24. 1928, the flashing white beacon located 550 yard-. 156 degreesfrom Margarita
Point, was permanently discontinued. (Signed) F. KARIGER."
BALBOAA HARBOR.
"Temporary Gas Buoy No. 20 was permanently discontinued, effective August 24. 1928, and on the
same date Electric Beacon No. 18' was established.
"The beacon has been placed on the southeastern extremity of dock No. 4. and exhibits a fixed red,
light, electric, 200 candle power. Focal plane 45 feet above mean low water springs. (Signed) F.
KARIGER."
M. L. WALKER,
Governor.


.' 4








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending August 25, 1928.
I A.


Line or charterer.


Name of vessel.


Jamaica............
Magellan......... ..
Calamares ... .. ....
Ancon.............. .
M inois..... .... .
Spreewald............
Bowden......... ...
Napierian .. ......
Theodore Roosevelt...
Parismina...........
Manizalee... .....
Targis... ...
Breda.. .........
Alvarado..... .....
Emequibo...... ....
Loreto......... ....
Perou ......... ....
Pastores .. .. .
William M. ....... .
Stuyvesant ... ...
Virgilio.............
Ucayali .....
Nictheroy .....
Orbits ........
San Francisco ....
Albingia .. . ..
Elmshorn ........
Coppename ...
Sixaola ..... ....
Saramacca.........
Favorite ..........
Australien .. ....
Pacific Enterprise
Cid .. ..... ......
Santa Cecelia... .....
San Jose..... ..
Leme ... ...........
Atrato .....
Notre Dame de Four-
viere ......... ..
Salvador........ ....
Cisy ................
Dramatist...........
Durazzo. ... .... ..
Heredia .............
Phoenix............
Stella...............
Acajutla..... ... ...
Favorita.......... ...
Eemdijk ............
Stuyvesant........ ..
M anaqui............
Linda S .............
Banan...............


' No cargo discharged.


Arrived.


Pacific Steam Navigation Co......
Pacific Steam Navigation Co.....
United Fruit Co .. .....
Panama Railroad S. S. Line.......
French Line... .. . ........ .
Hamburg-American Line ..... .
United Fruit Co..... ...
Leyland Line ... ... ....
Fred Olsen & Co... ...... ..
United Fruit Co...........
North German Lloyd ....... ...
North German Lloyd .......
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co
Pacific Steam Navigation Co .. ..
Pacific Steam Navigation Co .
Pacific Steam Navigation Co...
French Line ... ... .... ....
United Fruit Co ... . ...
R. Feuillebois . .
Royal Netherlands S. S. Co.. .
Italian Line ........ ..
Peruvian Line
Pacific Steam Navigation Co
Pacific Steam Navigation Co
Hamburg-American Line
Hamburg-American Line..... .
Hamburg-American Line .. .
United Fruit Co ... ...
United Fruit Co ....
United Fruit Co .. .....
American Fruit & S. S. Corp. ...
Danish East Asiatic Co .. ...
Furness, Withy & Co ..
Pacific Steam Navigation Co
Grace Line .... .......
United Fruit Co .... .... .
Italian Line . . .
Colombian Transport Co ...... .
French Line . .........
Pacific Steam Navigajion Co....
Mexican Petroleum Co... .......
T. & J. Harrison Line ......
Hamburg-American Line..... .
United Fruit Co... .........
American Tankers Corp........ .
Panama Mail S. S. Co .... ....
Pacific Steam Navigation Co ..... .
American Fruit & S. S. Corp .....
Holland-American Line ......
Royal Netherlands S. S. Line......
United Fruit Co. ......... .
R. Feuillebois .. ... .. .....
United Fruit Co ...............


a No cargp laded.


S Car
Departed. I
IDischarged


August 19....
August 19..
August 19..



August 19..
August 19...
August 19...
August 19...
August 20.....
August 20..
August 20..
August 20..
August 20..
August 20..
August 20. .
August 21..
August 21..
August 21....
August 21..
August 22..
August 22.
August 22..
August 22..
August 22..
August 22..
August 22..
August 23..
August 23...
August 23..
August 23..
August 23..
August 23...
August 23..
August 23...

August 23....
August 24..
August 24.....
August 24....

August 25...
August 25 ..
August 25....
Augus t 25..
August 25....
August 25....
August 25....
August 25.....
August 25....


I~


Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
from Port of Balboa, G. Z., for Week Ending August 25, 1928.


Cargo-
Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed. Ca
Discharged Laded.
Tons. Tons.
S. Grant......... U. 8. Government.............. August 20.... August 20.... 12 1
William A. McKenney Mystic S. S. Co........ ... August 20... August 29.. 700 700
'Amketian Star........ Charles Nelson & Co............. August 18.... August 23.... 802 802
Thedore Roosevelt... FredOlsen &Co ............. August 21... August23..... 1,421 .........
'3iurndae......... .. Fearnley & Eager................ August 22.... August 22..... 4 ..........
Anitlie........... East Asiatic Co ................ August 23.... August 24..... 110 .........
".----------"-----------"----,,,----


l


Tons.
........ 377
August 19..... 4
August 19..... 4
August 19..... . . .
August 19 ........
August 19..... . ..
August 19....... .
August 20.. .. (1)
August 20.... 255
August 20..... 832
August 25.. 326
August 20..... (')
August 21..... 235
August 21.. 277
August 21..... 4
August 21... 31
August 22.. 38
August 22.. 1,109
August 21.. (. )
August 22.. 43
August 23.. 387
August 23.. 2.143
August 23.... 59
August 23.... 78
August 23.. 1
August 23..... 156
August 24.. 37
August 22.. 932
Augus 23..... 946
August 23.. 2
August 23.... 256
August 23... 83
August 24.. ( ')
August 24.. I 112
August 24... 67
August 24.. 726
August 24.. (. I
August 24....

AugIst 25... 10
. . 440
August 24..... 19
August 25..... 600
August 25......... .
.............. 284
...... ..... 9,260
684
August 25...........
August 25.. (')
August 25..... )
August 25.... (')
August 25.. .. 24
August 25.... ( )
August 25..... (')

S215 pounds.


go-
Laded.
Toem.

()
238,
726
681
101
479
166i
( )*
115
116
205
272-
143
67
105
742
58
28

(I. )
59
297
94
( )
.394
26
474
176
1
(2)
335
10
45
45
11
160
647
...

(')



1 i,169"
308
149
790
141
45
338)








THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 55

SOfficial Publications of Interest to Shipping.
Masters may obtain from the office of the Captain of the Port,
:at either Cristobal or Balboa, without charge, the "Rules and Regu-
ations Governing Navigation of The Panama Canal and Adjacent
,Waters," and the current Tariff of charges at the Canal for supplies
and services.
Requests for Canal publications sent by mail should be addressed to:
The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z.; or, when more convenient,
'to The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. *
The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal maintains at all times a com-
plete stock of navigational charts and books, includingcharts of all
parts of the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical tables,
light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs, etc.
At the office of the Port Captain in Balboa a limited stock of navi-
gational charts, books, etc., is also carried, and this office is in a
position to fill practically any order in this connection that ship might
place.
Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices to Mariners, and
Hydrographic Bulletins may be obtained in return for marine infor-
mation.
Observations of weather, ocean currents, and other marine data
collected, and blanks, instructions, barometer comparisons, etc.,
furnished.
Correct time is maintained and chronometers rated.


Sailings of Panama Railroad Steamship Line.
Following are proposed dates of sailings for 1928, of passenger vessels in the New
York-Cristobal service of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, in which the passenger
steamers A neon and Cristobal are engaged, sailing alternately:
Leave Leave Arrive Leave Leave Arrive
Steamer. New York Port-au-Prince Cristobal Cristobal Port-au-Prince New York '
3 p. m. p. m. a. m. 3 p. m. p. m. a. m.
, Critobal....... August 21..... August 26..... August 29-... September 2.. September 5.. September 10.
Ancon........... September 5... September 10.. September 13.. September 17. September 20. September 25.
Cristbbal........ September 18.. September 23.. September 26.. September 30.. October 3..... October 8.
Anoon,.......... October 2.... October 7. ... October 10.... October 14... October 17.... October 22.
Cristobal ........ October 16.... October 21.... October 24.... October 28.... October 31.... November 5.
Aneon........... October 30.... November 4... November 7... November 11.. November 14.. November 19.
Cristobal........ November 13. November 18. November 21. November 25. November 28. December 3.
Anoon........... November 27. December 2... December 5... December 9... December 12.. December 17.
Cristobal........ December 11.. December 16.. December 19.. December 23.. December 26.. December 31.
Ancon.......... December 24.. December 29.. January 1 .... January 6..... January 9.... January 14.
NoTn.-Effective May 1. steamers sail daylight saving time. Due to discontinuance of the daylight saving time,
departures after steamship Cristobal, September 18. will beat 3 p. m. standard time.
1.7Steers sail at 3 p. m. from Pier 65, Narth River, foot of West 25th St., New York.
Both steamers call at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, which is approximately 5 days from
i:New York and 6Ohbours from Cristobal. The stay of steamers at Port-au-Prince is of
sufficient length of time to allow passengers to visit points of interest.
P. West coast freight service.-In addition, a regular freight service is maintained from
,New York, with occasional calls at Haiti and to Cristobal, Buenaventura and Ecuador-
'ian ports. Particulars upon application to the Panama Railroad Co., 24 State Street,
I ew York, or Balboa Heights, Canal Zone.

Publication of Notices and Cirnular of Interest to Shipping.
i-All of the Panama Canal noties to mariners, notices. to steamship lines, and general circulars of
rest to shipping in its relation to the Canal are published in THE PANAMA CANAL RaCORD. For
peaant it considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution away from the Isthmus n
thl notties and circular to those receiving Tit PANAMA CANAL RECORD. Shipping inteO
it.d.wBis. d p ok for them in this paper, which is supplied to them without charge. W








56 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Price of Coal at the Canal.

Coal is obtainable from the plants operated by The Panama Canal at the prices
shown below, effective June 15, 1928:


Cristobal-
Colon.
For steamships, including warships of all nations, delivered
from coaling plants, per ton of 2,240 pounds, except as pro-
vided in paragraph 5 ................................ $8.00
For vessels transiting the Canal that are directed by The Pan-
ama Canal to take coal at Balboa on account of the con-
dition of the plants, the quantity available, or for the pur-
pose of expediting traffic....................................


For steamships, including warships of all nations when de-
livered from lighters in quantities of 50 tons or more, per
ton of 2,240 pounds..................................
For steamships, including warships of all nations, when deliver-
ed from lighters in quantities of less than 50 tons, with mini-
mum charge for 20 tons and with maximum charge not to
exceed that for 50 tons at prices specified in paragraph 6,
per ton of 2,240 pounds..............................


Balbs.


$11.00


I

9.00 12.00





11.00 14.00


Postal and Cable Addresses of The Panama Canal.
The postal address is. "The Panama Canal, Balboa Heights. Canal Zone." or "The Panama Canal,
Washington, D. C."
Mail for ships passing through the Canal or touching at either of the terminal ports should be
addressed to "Cristobal. Canal Zone."
The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus. is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the United
States, "Pancanal. Washington."


Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
and Coal.
Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
Cristobal or Balboa. from tanks of The Panama
Canal. for $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons.
Diesel oil is sold by the Canal at $2.20 per
barrel.
Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
private companies with tanks at the Canal
terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
on application. The prices at present are as
follows: Crude fuel oil. $1.25 per barrel at Balboa
and Cristobal. Diesel oil, Balboa only; $1.80 per
barrel
Coal is supplied to steamships, including war-
ships of all nations, delivered and trimmed in
bunkers at $8.00perton of 2.240 pounds at Cris-
tobal, and 611.00 at Balboa. For ships in transit
through the Canal. which are directed to take
coal at Balboa. for the convenience of The
Panama Canal, $8.00 per ton at Balboa. When
coal is delivered from lighters in quantities of 50
tons or more. the price is $9.00 per ton at Cris-
tobal, $12.00 at Balboa. If less than 50 tons is
taken from lighters, prices are $11.00 per ton at
Cristobal and $14.00 per ton at Balboa with
minimum charge for 20 tons and maximum
charge not to exceed that for 50 tons at $9.00
Cristobal and $12.00 Balboa. For furnishing
lump coal for galley use, or run of mine coal. in
sacks, $6.00 additional per ton; but if vessels fur-
nishes sacks $3.00 additional per ton.
Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
of the Governor, at prices quoted upon applica-
tion.
For trimming on deck. between decks, or
special trimming in bunkers for convenience of
vessel, when requested, an additional charge of
90 cents per ton will be made for extra handling.
Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
made up to 1.500 tons per hour, as fast as it can
be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
can be made up to 5,500 barrels per hour, rate
detneding on gravity of oil, location of shore
talW9s. and ship's facilities for handling.


Official Circulars.

Acting Governor.
THE PANAMA CANAL.
EXECUTIVE OFFICE.
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 31. 1928.
To all roncerned.-Effectire September 3, 1928.
and until further notice. Colonel Harry Burgess,
U. S. A., Engineer of Maintenance, will be Act-
ing Governor.
NI. L. WALKER.,
Governor,

Duties of President of Panama Railroad
Company.
PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY.
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z.. August 31, 1928.
To all cnnrerned.-Effective September 3, 1928,
and until further notice, Colonel Harry Burgess,
U. S. A.. Second Vice President, wilL perform
such duties of the President as relate to the
operations of the Company on the Isthmus.
M,. L. WALKER,
President.

Trips Through the Canal.
The following lines operating passenger vessels
through the Canal carry local passengers from
one terminal to the other: Panama Mail Steam-
ship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Com-
pany, Grace Line, Chilean Line. Navigazione
General Italiana, Hamburg-American Line. The
Panama Mail and Hamburg-American Line charge
$6 for the trip. the others$10 for first-class pass-
age. The Chilean Line has also a rate of $4 for
intermediate class, and the Panama-Pacific Line
a rate of $6 for tourist class, The several services
together afford about 4 transits of the Canal each
way every week.


*.








J THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
S PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
Subscription rates, domestic, 50.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or z
The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Certificjte.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

Volume XXII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 5, r-98. No. 5.

Canal Traffic During August.
During the month of August, 1928, 526 commercial vessels and 6
small launches transited the Canal. Tolls on the commercial vessels
aggregated $2,199,069.31, and on the launches, $42.39, or a total tolls
collection of $2,199,111.70.
The daily average number of transits of seagoing vessels for the
month was 16.97, and the daily average tolls collection, $70,937.72.
The average amount of tolls paid by each of the commercial transits
was $4,180.74, as compared with $4,143.58 for the month of July.
Traffic for August showed a slight increase over July, both with respect
to the number of transits and the amount of tolls collected.
In the following tabulation the number of commercial transits and
the amount of tolls collected are shown for the first 8 months of the
current calendar year, with the daily averages of transits and tolls:
Totals for month. Daily average.
Month.
Transits. Tolls. Transits. Tolls.
January ................................. ........... 540 $2,212,752.50 17.42 $71,379.20
February................................... ....... 547 2,253,755.37 18.86 77,715.70
M arch ........... ........ ..... .. .. .... .. .. ... 542 2,223,370.57 17.48 71,271 63
.April ......................... .... ... ........ 531 2.187,607.82 17.70 72,914.55
M ay.... .. ... ......... . .. .. .. ........ 508 2,118,969.83 16.38 68,353.86
June................... .. ......................... 481 2,016,211 09 16 03 67,206.43
July ................. ........................ 509 2,109,083 19 16 41 68,034.94
August............ ................ ... .. ... .. ...... 526 2,199,069 31 16.97 70,937.72
'totals .............................. ...... 4,184 17,320,819 68 17.14 70,986 .96

Notice to Mariners.
'THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., August 28, 1928.
No. 427.
The following are quoted from Notice to Mariners, Washington, August 18, 1928:
"Colombia, Cartagena Harbor. Boca Chica. Light buoy missing.-The Second Officer of the American
steamer J. A. Bostuwick reports that on July 28, 1928, the gas buoy utarking the southern side of Boca
Chica entrance to Cartagena Harbor was missing.
"Approx4mate position: 10 19' N.. 75 35' W."
"West Igdies, Martinique. Information concerning lights-The master of the Doris Hamlin reports
hat the light.on Caravelle Peninsula is very unreliable.
"The master also reports that a newl4ight is to be established on Cabrit Islet, southern end of Marti-
ique Island.
"Further notice will be given.
"Approximate position: 14 23' 30" N.. 60 52' 30" W."
M. L. WALKER,
Governor.
: Notice to Mariners.-Aids to Navigation.
THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 5, 1928.
.. 433.
1. The following cablegram was received by the Captain of the Port of Cristobal:
Buenaventura, Colombia. September 5th.-The white light, first buoy entering port side of harbor
actidently put out. (Signed) T. LOPEz, Captain of the Port."
$: 9
:.. H. BURGESS,
Acting Governor.






tS THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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THE PANAMA CANA



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    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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    .
    .








    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    Tanker Traffic Through The Panama Canal in August, 1928.
    During the month of August, 1928, 95 tank ships transited the Canal
    with an aggregate net tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, of
    520,764, on which tolls of $459,139.45 were collected. Cargo amounted
    to 495,713 tons. In point of net tonnage, tanker traffic for the past
    month showed a decrease of 22.2 per cent under the same traffic for
    the corresponding month a year ago, while cargo tonnage decreased
    16.9 per cent under the cargo tonnage of August, 1927.
    Tank ships comprised 18 per cent of the total commercial tryniits
    through the Canal during the month; made up 21.3 per cent of the
    total Panama Canal net tonnage; were the source of 20.8 per cent of
    the tolls collected; and carried 20.4 per cent of the total cargo in
    transit through the Canal.
    The number, aggregate net tonnage, tolls, and cargo of tank ships
    transiting the Canal during the month of August, 1928, segregated
    by direction of transit and nationality of vessels, are shown ia the
    following tabulation, with comparative totals for the two preceding
    months and for August, 1927: :


    Nationality.


    Belgian..
    British
    Danish .
    Danzig ... ...
    German .....
    Norwegian
    Swedish .
    United States ...


    Atlantic to Pacific.


    Totals, August, 1928
    Totals, July, 1928
    Totals, June, 1928 .. . .
    Totals, August. 1927
    Pacific Io Atlantic.
    B ritish ... ....... . . .
    Danzig ...... ... .
    French .... . . . . .
    Norwegian ....... .......
    United States ......... .. .
    Totals, August, 1928 ...
    Totals, July. 1928 . .... ..
    Totals, June, 1928 . ..
    Totals, August, 1927 .... .... ...


    No. Panama
    of Canal net
    vessels tonnage.


    1
    9
    I
    2
    I
    30
    46
    49
    51
    62

    19
    2
    1
    2
    25
    49


    4,976
    47,001
    5,623
    6,310
    4,574
    9,501
    4,497
    169,607
    252,089
    264,688
    270,917
    353.368

    102.084
    12.465
    4,635
    7,948
    141.543
    268,675


    Tolls.


    $3,582.72
    35,196.56
    4,048.56
    4,543 20
    3,293.28
    6,840 72
    3,237 84
    124.470.27
    185,213 15
    195,784 18
    207,154 95.
    256,276 41

    105.926.30
    13.130.00
    5,030.00
    8,737.50
    141,102.50
    273,926.30


    46 241,854 246,324 35
    39 211,872 215,261.95
    54 315,850 314,781.25


    Of the tanker traffic shown above, the following is a summaryof the
    vessels giving Los Angeles as their port of origin ordestination, together
    with the totals for the two preceding months and for August, 1927:
    No. Panama Tons
    of Canal net Tolls. of
    vessels,. tonnage. cargo.


    To Los Angeles.
    August, 1928 ..... .... .......... . .
    July, 1928.. .... ...................
    June, 1928 . . ................ . ....
    August, 1927 .............. ...... ... ... .. ..
    From Los A ngeles.
    August, 1928 ...................... .
    July, 1928.......... ..... .... ...... ... .. ...
    June, 1928. .......... ..... ........... .....
    August, 1927. .............. ................


    34
    33
    37
    52

    32
    39
    27
    43


    187.964
    176.648
    202,294
    297,.107

    170.030
    209,472
    141,560
    254,004


    $135,334.
    129,046.
    147,178
    214,209

    173,221.
    212.735.
    144,231.
    251,755.


    08 ..... .... .
    42 5,831
    32 4,641
    09 7,638

    25 801,968
    30 384,358
    95 261,2388
    00 469,8900


    --------- *--- -- 4i


    Tons
    of
    cargo.


    7,289




    14,413
    21,702
    18,521
    53,676
    7,638

    175,992
    23,090
    7,860
    16,179
    250,890
    474,.011
    443,62
    * 382,036
    589,231


    --








    THE PAJAMA CANAL RECORD


    Executive Order.
    The area of land hereinafter described, to be known as Bruja Point Military Reser-
    vation, situated in the Canal Zone, is hereby set apart and assigned to the uses and
    purposes of a military reservation under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of War;
    but said area shall be subject to the civil control and jurisdiction of the Governor of
    The Panama Canal, in conformity with the Panama Canal Act.
    The boundaries of said reservation are described as follows:
    Beginning at a point where the meridian 790 36' intersects the mean low water
    line at .Venado Beach and following along a course of due north along the meridian
    .790 36' for a distance of 8,400 feet more or less to a concrete monument marked A,
    whqse geodetic coordinates are 8 55' north and 790 36' west; thence along a course
    of'd*3teast for a distance of 8,708 feet to a concrete monument marked B; thence
    along a course of S. 45 00' E. for a distance of 2,710 feet to a concrete monument
    marked C, which is a point on the western boundary of tract No. I of the Palo Seco
    Leper Colony Reservation; thence along the western boundary of tract No. 1 on a
    course of S. 130 30' W. for a distance of 1,412 feet to a concrete monument marked D,
    which is the southwest corner of tract No. 1 of the Palo Seco Leper Colony Reservation;
    thence along the southern boundary of tract No. 1 following a course of S. 760 30' E.
    for a distance of 1,500 feet more or less to its intersection with the mean low water
    line near Batele Point; thence along the mean low water line in a southerly and west-
    erly direction to the point of beginning. The area of the reservation, as described,
    is 1,804 acres, plus or minus. All bearings refer to the true north and coordinates
    to the Panama Colon datum.
    The above area is shown on Map of Bruja Point Military Reservation, U. S.
    Engineer Office, Balboa Heights, C. Z., dated February 18, 1928, revised March 12
    and May 24, 1928. File No. 2778. .j


    CALVIN. COOLIDGE


    THE WHITE HOUSE,
    A ugtst 11, 1928.


    [No. 4947]

    Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
    from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending September 1, 1928.

    Cargo-
    Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed.
    Discharged Laded.


    Danzig ........... ..
    Ammon ..... .....
    Hessen .. ... .....
    Pastores .. ... ....
    Ucayali..............
    Santa Luisa .......
    Benjamin Franklin....
    Havana Maru ....
    Ulua.... . . .... .
    Venezuela ...
    T akaokerMaru .... .
    T5O ... .. ....
    Jamaica........
    Resolute...,......
    Rialto. .. ..
    Cristobal... ..
    Zacapa ....... .
    Suriname..........
    Cauca... ... ... ..
    Coppename. .. .
    Muria... . ........
    Rapot . .. . ..
    Teutonia.. . . .
    Virginia... ......
    Santa Tecla.. ....
    Limon ... .......
    Bennekom ........
    SUrilbe.. .
    Orduna ....... ....
    Liochgoil.. . .. . . .
    Loegoiadl......... ...
    .i . ...........
    Led.............


    Hamburg-American Line .
    Hamburg-American Line
    Hamburg-American Line
    United Fruit Co ..........
    Peruvian Line
    Grace Line
    Fred Olsen & Co..........
    Osaka Shosen Kaisha ......
    United Fruit Co
    Panama Mail S. S. Co
    Nippon Yusen Kaisha ..
    Chilean Line .
    Pacific Steam Navigation Co
    R. Feuillebois
    Nay. Libera-Triestina Line .
    Panama Railroad S. S. Line..
    United Fruit Co .
    United Fruit Co
    National Navigation Co
    United Fruit Co
    North German Lloyd .... ..
    Roland Line .
    Hamburg-American Line ....
    American Fruit & S. S. Corp .
    N. O. & S. A. S. S. Co...... .
    United Fruit Co
    Royal Netherlands S. S. Co
    United Fruit Co .... ... .
    Pacific Steam Navigation Co.
    Pacific Steam Navigation Co
    Pacific Steam Navigation Co . .
    American Fruit & S. S. Corp....
    Royal Netherlands 8. S. Co .......
    French Line.... .. ......
    United Fruit Co...............
    United Fruit Co...............


    :Nocarg

    i: .. .
    A ,i: :,, ".. ... A


    o discharged.


    August 26..
    August 26..
    August 26...
    August 26. .
    August 2.....
    August 27.....
    August 27...
    August 27...
    August 27..
    August 27....
    August 28...
    August 28..
    August 2. ..
    August 29..
    August 29..
    August 29..
    August 29..
    August 29...
    August 30....
    August 30....
    August 30..
    August 30...
    August 30..
    August 30..
    August 30...
    August 31.. ..
    August 31...
    August 31.....
    August 31....
    August 31.....
    September I...
    September 1...
    September I...
    September 1...
    . . . .


    August 26...
    August 26...
    August 26...
    August 26...
    August 27.....
    August 27...
    August 28....
    August 28.....
    August 29.....
    August 29.....
    August 28...
    August 29....
    August 29.....
    August 29.. .
    August 30....
    August 30....
    August 30...
    August 30..
    August 30...
    August 30.. .
    August 31.... .
    August 31.....
    August 31....
    August 31....
    August 31.....
    September 1..
    August 31.. .
    September I...
    September 1...
    September I...
    September 1...
    September 1...
    ...Augu........
    August 27.....


    SNo cargo laded.


    'S


    Tons.
    78
    48
    138
    8
    (,*)
    C()
    (C)
    656
    758
    431
    204
    (*)
    208
    5.624
    517
    719
    143
    82
    197
    34
    320
    378
    77
    724
    350
    613
    2
    155
    (')
    (C)


    Tons.
    ( ')
    48
    (I)
    84
    116
    280
    97
    (C )
    20
    68
    (')
    113
    841
    32
    49
    580
    84
    336
    37
    ( )
    200
    196
    3
    60
    58
    302
    16
    39
    144
    314
    45
    17
    . ... .. ..
    42..











    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
    and Coal.
    Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
    Cristobal or Balboa, from tanks of The Panama
    Canal, for $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons.
    Diesel oil is sold by the Canal at $2.20 per
    barrel.
    Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
    private companies with tanks at the Canal
    terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
    on application. The prices at present are as
    follows: Crude fuel oil. $1.25 per barrel at Balboa
    and Cristobal. Diesel oil, Balboa only, $1.80 per
    barrel.
    Coal is supplied to steamships, including war-
    ships of all nations, delivered and trimmed in
    bunkers at $8.00 per ton of 2,240 pounds at Cris-
    tobal. and $11.00 at Balboa. For ships in transit
    through the Canal, which are directed to take
    coal at Balboa, for the convenience of The
    Panama Canal, $8.00 per ton at Balboa. When
    coal is delivered from lighters in quantities of 50
    tons or more, the price is $9 00 per ton at Cris-
    tobal, $12.00 at Balboa. If less than 50 tons is
    taken from lighters, prices are $11 00 per ton at
    Cristobal and $14.00 per ton at Balboa with
    minimum charge for 20 tons and maximum
    charge not to exceed that for 50 tons at $9.00
    Cristobal and $12.00 Balboa. For furnishing
    lump coal for galley use. or run of mine coal. in
    sacks. $6.00 additional per ton; but if vessels fur-
    nishes sacks $3.00 additional per ton.
    Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
    of the Governor, at prices quoted upon applica-
    tion.
    For trimming qn deck, between decks, or
    special trimming in bunkers for convenience of
    vessel, when requested, an additional charge of
    90 cents per ton will be made for extra handling.
    Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
    made up to 1.500 tons per hour, as fast as it can
    be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
    can be made up to 5,500 barrels per hour, rate
    depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
    tanks, and ship's facilities for handling.

    Facilities for Shipping.
    The Panama Canal is equipped with all the
    facilities for the fueling. supply, and repair of
    ships which are found in modern ports.
    The coaling plants, with an aggregate storage
    capacity of 700,000 tons. bunker ships up to 1,500
    tons an hour. practically as fast as it can be
    handled in ships' bunkers. Oil can be delivered
    as fast as the ships can take it, from 46 tanks
    aggregating approximately 2,361.040 barrels of
    storage capacity. Crude fuel oil, Diesel oil. and
    gasoline are sold.
    The ships' chandlery storehouses carry a wide
    variety of marine supplies and spare parts. The
    commissary stores sell foodstuffs, fresh meats,
    fruits, and vegetables. as well as clothing and a
    general line of goods for supplying about 30,000
    people resident on the Isthmus. Ice plants. a
    large laundry, hotels. hospitals. and restaurants
    serve the passengers and crews of ships.
    A 1,000-foot dry dock, capable of receiving the
    largest ships built. a smaller dry dock. floating
    cranes, foundry, and amply equipped shops.
    employing about 1.100 men, provide the means
    of making practically any kind of marine repairs.
    Ample space exists at either terminal of the
    Canal for the berthing of vessels, as well as large
    covered piers for the storage of cargo. These are
    modern structures, fireproof. ratproof. in splendid
    condition. well lighted and maintained in a clean
    and orderly condition.
    In general, the services to shipping at the Canal
    are such as have been developed and found ample
    and effective, in the course of handling large
    traffic through the Canal in over 13 years of oper-
    ation.
    Ships' Chandlery Supplies.
    Panama Canal storehouses stock a complete
    line of ships' chandlery supplies available for sale
    tb shipping at cost prices plus 25 per cent sur-
    charge, which surcharge includes freight, hand-
    ling, and other costs.


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    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
    OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
    SE,, PUBLISHED WEEKLY. I
    f p Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
    The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. or
    Iy The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
    r 5 Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
    at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3. 1879.
    Caerfifiate.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
    information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

    LVolume XXII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 12, 1928. No. 6.

    I Danish Scientific Ship "Dana" Transits Canal.
    I The steam yacht Dana, owned by the Ministry of Agriculture of the
    :Danish Government, arrived at Cristobal on August 25, 1928, from
    [Copenhagen, Denmark, on the first leg of a scientific expedition that
    will take about 2 years to complete. The vessel transited the Canal
    on August 27, and, after taking on fuel and commissary supplies,
    'sailed on September 10 for Tahiti.
    The Dana left Denmark last June, and has been making studies of
    ;deep sea life en route to the Isthmus. These studies will be continued
    ,through the South Pacific, North Pacific, and the Indian Oceans, the
    return trip to Denmark to be made via the Suez Canal. The vessel
    fis equipped with modern instruments for such research and with
    facilities for preserving the live specimens.
    The Danaeis 134 feet long, 23 feet beam, and of 354 registered
    :gross tons. She carries a crew of 25 men.

    Notices to Mariners.
    THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 5, 1928.
    INo. 435.
    The following is quoted from Hydrographic Office Notice to Mariners No. 34,
    dated August 25, 1928:
    1. "Nicaragua, East Coast, Puerto Cabezas (Bragman Bluff).Light Discontinued.-In consequence of the
    establishment of the new group flashing white light, the old fixed white light at Puerto Cabezas has been
    *discontinued.
    "Approximate position-14 01' 32" N., 83" 22' 52" W.
    2. "Colombia. West Coast, Buenaventura River Approach, Palmas Island Light-Information.-The
    master of the Italian steamer Carso reported that on June 4, 1928, Palmas Island Light was showing a
    group of 2 flashes every 10 seconds, and not as stated in the Light List.
    "The master also reported that the light showed red from 670 to 113.
    "This report was confirmed by the master of the American steamer Santa Tecla on June 30, 1928.
    "Approximate position-3 53' 28" N., 77 22' 12" W.
    3. "West Indies, Virgin Islands, St. Thomas Harbor, Rupert Rock Light, New Structure.-About Sep-
    tember 10, 1928, Rupert Rock Light will be reexhibited, 16feet above the water, from a gray post without
    other change.
    "Approximate position-18 19' 45" N., 64' 55' 35" W.
    4. "Porto Rico, South Coast, Port Arroyo, Shoal Located.-A recent survey shows a depth of 17 feet
    at mean low water 0.85 mile 204* from Port Arroyo Range Front Light, in latitute 170 57' 05" N.,
    longitude 660 04' 12" W."
    H. BURGESS,
    Acting Governor.
    THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 8, 1928.
    fo. 438.
    The following was received from the Lighthouse Subdivision, The Panama Canal:
    PANAMA BAY-PACIFIC OCEAN.
    "Commission Rock gas buoy established on September 4, 1928, in 36 feet of water, M. L. W. S.,
    a the following bearings:
    Taboga Light, 12" 00' (N. 9/16 E. mag.).
    Flamenco Light, 2120 00' (SSW. 3/8 W. mag.).
    Urava Island R. T., 337* 00' (NNW. 1/2 W. mag.).
    Color of aid-Red and black, horizontal stripes.
    Color of light-Red. ;
    Chavcter stic--Fashing thus: I second light, II seconds dark, period of 2 seconds.
    Focai.F lane-16 feet; visibility, 5 miles. F. KARIGER, Pilot in Charge."
    ..: H. BURGESS,
    .Ac.ing Governor.








    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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    70 THE PANAMA CANAL RECOkD


    Commercial Traffic Through the Panama Canal in August, 1928, by
    Trade Routes.

    The following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the
    Canal during the month of August, 1928, classified according to trade
    routes and nationality of vessels in each trade route, together with
    corresponding totals for August, 1927, and 1926. The amount of cargo
    shown is the amount carried by vessels operating over the respective
    trade routes, and in some cases includes cargo having other desti-
    nations:
    ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


    Nationality.


    United States intercoastal:
    United States. . .
    East coast of United States to
    west coast So. Amer.
    B ritish ......... ......
    Chilean ............
    German. . ... .. ...
    Norwegian .. .....
    Swedish ...... .. ....
    United States
    Totals ......
    Europe to west coast of South
    America:
    British .. .
    Colombian ... .....
    Danish .... .........
    Dutch ... .... ...
    French .... ..... ....
    German .' ... .
    Italian .. .........
    Spanish ...........
    Yugoslavian ..... ...
    Totals ....... ...
    Europe to west coast of United
    States:
    British ... ....... .
    Danish ..........
    Danzig ... . .
    German ......... ..
    Norwegian .. ....
    Swedish .. .......
    S United States.... .
    Totals .. .. .. ...
    Europe to west coast Canada:
    British ..... ....
    Danish .. .... .
    French .. . ..
    German .. .. ..
    Italian ..
    Totals .. ......

    East coast of United States to
    Far East:
    British .. ..... ....
    Danish ....... ......
    Japanese
    Norwegian
    Swedish ...... .
    United States .........

    Totals .......... ...
    Cristobal, C. Z., to west coast
    of South America:
    Colombian. ....... ..
    Dutch............... .
    German.............
    Totals..... .........


    No.
    of
    ships.


    84

    7
    2
    I
    1
    2
    14

    27


    6
    1
    2
    2
    2
    3
    2
    1
    I

    20


    4
    1
    I
    6
    4

    18

    1
    2
    2
    2
    I1

    18
    .._7 _.


    TONNAGE.


    Panama
    Canal
    net.

    442,373

    23,954
    9,377
    2,817
    4.730
    8,917
    57,279

    107,074


    40,630
    29
    4,787
    11,413
    8,742
    14,433
    12,744
    3,729
    3.288
    99,795


    It;,990
    5,625
    6.310
    4.574
    29.840
    20.22t;


    United
    States
    equivalent.

    344,038

    18.927
    6,899
    1,545
    4,105
    7,486
    47,714

    86.676


    31.995
    23
    3,150
    8,307
    6,947
    10.203
    7,911
    2,960
    2.355

    73,851


    14.473
    4,670
    5.346
    3,832
    23,29.1
    13 476


    7,895 0,052
    91.464 71,142

    57.819 I 42.174
    10,655 8.412
    10,13d 8.34t


    12.312
    6.025

    97.150


    9.989
    5,722
    31.987
    4,222
    5,213
    17,795


    9,342
    5.056


    Registered
    gross.


    552.975

    32.152
    14.620
    2,593
    t.58.1
    30.676
    81,143
    167.767


    53,407
    117
    5,104
    13,850
    11 .175
    1 285
    I .'683
    5,087
    3,724
    125.432


    22.489
    7,691
    8,940
    6.358
    :18.093
    22,.5629
    9,838


    Registered
    net.


    343,360

    19.395
    7,952
    1,526
    4.119
    8.762
    48,508


    Tolls.


    1382,916 82

    21,069.87
    8,b23 75
    1,931.25
    3,405 60
    6.420 24
    46,074 61


    Tons
    of
    cargo.


    219,421

    19,0990
    4,706
    224

    18.130


    90,262 87.525.32 43,050


    32,938
    39
    3, 169
    10.157
    6,820
    9 973
    9.878
    3,000
    2.324
    78,298


    13,442
    4.710
    5.050
    3,637
    22.945
    16,884
    6,019


    115,971 72,687

    67,887 42,069


    13,297
    13,o3b
    12.957
    7,098


    73.360 114,875


    5.723
    4,115
    24.710
    2,487
    4,170
    11,803


    9.387
    6,878
    38.432
    4,302
    6,865
    19,168


    8.490
    8,381
    7.854
    4.498

    71.292


    5,692
    4,142
    24.201
    2,450
    4,972
    11,701


    38,104 48
    20 88
    3,857 00
    10,383 75
    8,683.75
    12,753.75
    9,888.75
    3,700 00
    2,943.75

    90,336 11


    12,915 88
    4,048 56
    4,543 20
    3,293 28
    23,754.47
    14,848.07
    5,684 40


    16,781
    5,939
    7,901
    2,794
    13.764
    2,579
    388
    4,864
    55,010


    6.475


    16,045
    9,244


    69,087.86 31.764


    47,386 19
    10,552.50
    10,432.50
    11.677 50
    6,320.00
    86,368.69


    7,153.75
    5,143 75
    30,887.50
    3.108.75
    5,212.50
    14,753.75


    13,181
    7,410
    7,841
    9,430
    3,423,

    41,285


    14,5010
    9,655
    41,980
    7,100
    5,487
    27,777


    15 74,928 53,008 85,032 53,158 66,26000 106,409


    1.081
    742
    8,963


    1,026
    294
    6.310


    1,722
    780
    11,038


    1,027
    323
    6,259


    1.263.70
    367.50
    7,854.85


    -I d I I I-


    10,786


    7.630


    13.540


    7,609


    9.486.05 I


    1,990
    129
    3,959
    6,078








    T THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 71


    eATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.---Continued.


    Nationality.


    East coast of United States to
    Australasia:
    British.. ........
    Norwegian ..........
    United States...... ..
    Totals .... .. .. .
    Europe to Australasia:
    British.............. ..
    French ........ ...
    Totals .. .. ...


    i


    No.
    of
    ships.


    TONNAGE.


    Panama United
    Canal States Registered
    net. equivalent. gross.


    7 41.370
    I 4,343
    I 5,823

    9 51,536


    8


    2
    4



    3

    3

    6




    * 5

    6


    2
    1
    1

    4






    3


    PAround the world:
    British........ ...
    Norwegian ..........
    United States.........

    Totals.......... ...
    East coast of United StateA to
    west coast of Canada:
    British ...
    United States.......

    Totals ....... .. .
    East coast of Central America
    to west coast of
    United States:
    Norwegian..........
    United States. .. ....

    Totals. .. ........

    East coast of United States to
    Philippine Islands:
    British................
    Norwegian..... ..
    S United States .........
    Totals ..............

    Foreign ships in ballast, U. S.
    intereoastal:
    L Belgian...........
    British........ ....
    Norwegian.......... .

    Totals......... ....

    t coast of United States to
    west coast of Central
    America:
    S British...... ..


    Totals ... .
    t coast of Canada to west
    |W... coast of South Amer-
    British.............
    coast of Canada to Aus-
    tralasia:
    British........... ...
    American intercoastal:
    German....... ......
    Norwegian............
    | Piruvian.... ...........

    Totals........... .
    al, C. Z., to west coast
    of Central America:
    tit.sh..................
    l.itetof United States to
    B awai1an Islands:
    :W M efl..........


    29,614
    2.500
    5,395

    37,509

    38.788
    4,287
    43.075

    3.129
    5,671
    20,275

    29,075


    9,370
    9.678
    19.048



    1,305
    12.680

    13.985


    6,728
    2,415
    4.838

    13' 981


    55,439
    5,364
    60.803

    5.861
    7.603
    27,063

    40,527


    13.453
    13,185
    26,638



    2,080
    14,331

    16,411


    12,182
    4,358
    6.063
    22,603


    4,976
    5,095
    3,876
    13,947



    1.379
    1,469
    244

    3.092



    20,339

    12.858
    698
    504
    .2,405

    3,607


    2,063

    7,194


    1,209
    1.155
    227


    47,081
    4.319
    6.870

    58,270

    63.055
    7.133
    70.188

    5,299
    9,461
    33.089

    47.849


    15.066
    15,320

    30,386



    2,166
    20,596
    22,762


    12,028
    4.111
    7,597

    23,736


    7,138
    7.045
    5,923

    20.106


    1,955
    1,930
    545


    2,591 4.430


    17.557

    9,935

    618
    423
    989
    2.030


    1,900

    5,007


    29,877

    16.405
    1,023
    732
    3,305

    5,060


    3,436

    8,366


    Registered
    net.


    29,638
    2,441
    5.259

    37,338

    39,105
    4,335
    43,440

    3,091
    5,773
    19,853
    28,717


    9,282
    9,500

    18,782



    1,298
    12,601

    13,899


    6,744
    2,356
    4.754

    13,854


    3,988
    4,371
    3,381
    11,740



    1,191
    1,128
    236
    2,555



    18,104

    10,039
    616
    391
    1,514

    2.521


    Tolls.


    $37,017 50
    3,125 00
    6,743.75

    46,886.25

    48,485 00
    5,358.75
    53,843 75

    3,911.25
    7,.088 75
    25,343 75

    36,343 75


    9,686 16
    12,097.50

    21,783 66



    1.631 25
    14,138.68
    15,769.93


    8,410.00
    3,018.75
    6,047.50

    17.476 25


    3,582.72
    3,668.40
    2,790.72
    10.041.84



    1,511.25
    1,057.68
    175.68

    2,744 61


    14,644 08 .......


    12,418.75
    772.50
    528.75
    1,236.25
    2.537.50


    1,906 2,353.90 3,085

    5.014 6,258.75 10,421


    Tons
    of
    cargo.



    35,030
    6,600
    4,195
    45,825

    42,654
    2,677

    45,331

    4,998
    8,698
    19,937

    33,633



    16.380

    16.380



    1,992
    2,898

    4,890


    11,298
    7,303
    8,315
    26,916


    9,563
    206
    150
    275

    631


    4,568
    4,242
    3,438

    12,248


    I3





    3
    ]

    3







    I
    1


    3




    3
    2


    ..........




    11


    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.-Continued.


    Nationality.


    Eastcoast of Central Ameries
    towest coast of South
    America:
    United States.
    Cristobal, C. Z., to west coast
    of United States:
    Panaman .
    United States.. . .

    Totals
    East coast of South America to
    west coast of United
    States:
    Norwegian
    United States

    Totals ..
    Canadian intercoastal:
    British
    Eist ce.st of Canada to Far
    East:
    British
    Europe to west coast of Ceu-
    tral America:
    German
    Europe to Hawaiian Islands:
    British .
    Europe to Far East:
    Norwegian .
    West Indips to west coast of
    United States:
    United States... . .
    East coast of Central America
    to Australasia:
    British .. .. ......
    East coast of Central America
    to Far East:
    Danish . .
    East coast of South America to
    Far East:
    Japanese
    Africa to west coast of Canada:
    British. .
    Africa to Australasia:
    British
    Gatuu Lake, C. Z., Io Balboa,
    C. Z.:
    United States .
    Grand totals. August, 1929.
    Grand totals. August, 1927.

    Grand totals, August, 1926.


    No.
    of Panam a
    ships. Canal
    net.



    2 432


    I


    2
    I

    21



    I
    I


    2,603
    1.549
    4.152



    4.375
    5.014

    9.389

    4.180 I

    5.115

    3,751
    3.754
    4,114

    1,443

    1.042

    4.467


    TONNAGE.


    United
    States
    equivalent.



    533

    1,383
    1,167

    2,550



    2.431
    3,508
    5.939


    Registered
    gross.



    743

    2,461
    1,974

    4,435



    4.000
    5,550
    9,550


    Registered
    net.



    538

    1,384
    1,161

    2,545



    2,485
    3.533

    6,018


    Tolls.


    $364 50 .


    1,728.75
    1,458.75

    3.187 50



    3.038.75
    4,385 00
    7.423 75


    Ti
    cal


    - I_,___,L I -- I-,_


    3,322

    3, 23

    2,480
    2,954

    3,228

    1,270

    2.603

    2,690


    1 5.821 4.170

    1 4.810 4,134
    I 4.U9S 3.199

    1 i 7 67

    271 il.264.850 960,408

    298 11,387.511 1.079,237

    239 1.157.109 902,488


    5,430

    5.714

    4,381

    4.863
    5,247

    2,264

    4,221

    4,473

    7.267
    6,695
    5,225


    3,336

    3,629

    2,515
    2,951

    3,67

    1,301

    2,633

    2,737

    4,387
    4,122

    3,168


    (') ( C)
    1,586.980 967,722
    1.751,014 1,073.081

    1.484.333 909,143


    4,152 50

    4,528.75

    3,100.00
    3,692.50
    2,962.08


    4,817
    5,491


    1,038.96 .........


    3,253.75

    3,362.50

    5,212.50
    3,463.20

    3,998.75

    80 40

    1,084.905.51
    1,167,476 40

    999,201 3(t


    5,658

    7,503

    2,906
    ....... ..

    6,920



    752,508-

    669,187
    689,547


    ' Barge having no registered tonnage.


    PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.


    United States intercoastal:
    -United States.. .......
    West coast of United Statesto
    Europe:
    British .. ........
    Danish ... ..... ....
    Danzig..... ..... .....
    French .. . .... ...
    German . ....
    Norwegian .... .......
    Swedish ......... ...


    441,417

    91.113
    5,341
    6,127
    4,635
    6,732
    13.393
    5,661


    Totals .............. 28 133,052


    337,086

    67,485
    4,257
    5,268
    4,024
    4,909
    10,021
    3,406
    99,370


    543,327 340,339 $421,357 50

    111,427 67,527 84,356.25
    6,650 4,247 5,321.25
    8,930 5,007 6,585.00
    6,477 3,488 5,030.00
    8,109 4.883 6,136.25
    16,954 10,003 12,526.25
    5,642 4,320 4,257.50
    164,198 99,475 124,212.50


    603,099

    156,224
    8,841
    11,545
    7,860
    8,978
    24,009
    7,665
    225,122


    'na
    of
    rgo.







    2,928
    2,109

    5,037



    3,049
    2,154
    5,203

    2,511

    6,680


    i









    THit PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.-Conlinued.


    Nationality.


    .West coast of South America
    to Europe:
    British.................
    Danzig................
    i. Dutch. ..............
    French.................
    German ...............
    Italian. ...............
    Norwegian.............
    Spanish ..............
    Yugoslavian ...........

    Tottal........... ..
    test coast of South America
    to east coast United
    States:
    British............. ..
    Chilean............ ...
    Finnish .......... ...
    German......
    Norwegian...... .
    Panaman.... .... ..
    : Peruvian.... ... ...
    Swedish ... ...... .
    United States..... ..
    I Totals. .........a

    West coast ofCanada toEurope:
    British..............
    Dutch...............
    German...............
    Italian....... .........
    Norwegian..........
    Swedish............
    United States .. .....

    Totals.............
    Wet coast of South America
    .. to Cristobal, C. Z.:
    Colombian.......
    Dutch......
    German. .......
    Norwegian. ...........
    Peruvian............ ..

    Totals ...........

    etoast of United Sta tea to
    east coast of Central
    America:
    [. United States ........
    eat coast of Canada to east
    coast ofUnited States:
    British . .. .... ...
    United States ..........
    Totals .............

    pine Islands to east coast
    ofimUnited States:
    Japanese ...........
    SUnited States..........

    Totals........... .
    et coast of South America
    S' o east coast of Canada:
    British .... ......
    a r to Europe:
    British........ ... ....
    Siia to east coast of
    'Canada:

    tuieat coast of United
    States:
    S................


    .............


    No.
    of
    ships.


    8
    1
    2
    2
    7
    I1
    4
    I1
    2

    28



    6

    I2
    I



    2
    II

    1

    26

    13
    3
    ' 2
    1
    2
    I
    1

    23


    5
    1
    4
    1

    12



    7

    4
    2

    6


    4
    1

    5


    4

    4

    4

    1
    2

    3


    I TONNAGE. I I


    Panama
    Canal
    net.


    44,761
    6,338
    12,750
    9,461
    35,108
    4.344
    12,472
    3,844
    8.341

    137,419



    28.588
    4,672
    1,687
    2,817
    7,673
    4,897
    1.529
    5.934
    51,698

    109,195

    69,156
    20,673
    12,143
    6.497
    11,767
    4.033
    4,964

    129,233


    1,744
    742
    * 3,296
    606
    2,405

    8,793



    21.519

    18.415
    7.062

    25,477


    20,970
    5,956

    26,926


    25,827

    28,482

    18,318

    4,769
    II,156

    15,925


    United
    States
    equivalent.


    34,872
    5,236
    7,380
    7,105
    25.803
    3,7b8
    9,248
    3,017
    7,303

    103,732



    23,459
    3.433
    1,673
    1,545
    5.719
    4.014
    1,483
    5.050
    42.763

    89,139

    46.886
    15,186
    7,578
    4.963
    9,784
    2,316
    3.663

    90,376


    1.643
    294
    2,151
    485
    989

    5,562



    18,922

    12,877
    5,068

    17,945


    17,684
    5,510

    23.194


    22,039
    22,430

    14,239


    3,511
    8,.320


    Registered Registered
    gross. net.


    56,633'
    S.956
    124 137
    11,373
    42.149
    6,275
    15,139
    5.205
    11,548

    169,715



    40,275
    7,310
    1.816
    2,593
    9,323
    6,386
    2,155
    16,939
    73,765

    160,562

    77,379
    24,364
    12,806
    8,124
    15,606
    3,877
    5,856

    148,012


    2,826
    780
    3,922
    855
    3,305

    11,688



    30,515

    20,675
    8,025

    28,700


    26,933
    7,700

    34,633


    37,181

    32,908

    23,479

    5,652
    12,004


    35,176
    5,041
    7.737
    7,087
    25.802
    3,953
    9,181
    3,226
    7,303

    101.508



    24,157
    3,976
    1.565
    1.526
    5,711
    4,067
    1 .169
    5,431
    43,754

    91.356

    47.731
    15.108
    7.821
    5,128
    9.818
    2.912
    3,663

    92.181


    1,654
    323
    2,034
    482
    1,514

    6,007



    18,795

    12,947
    4,991

    17,938


    17,108
    5.599

    22,707


    22,352

    20,554

    14,383


    3,451
    7.389


    11,831 17,656 10,840


    Tolls.


    $43,590 00
    6,545 00
    9.225 00
    8,881 25
    32.253 75
    4,710.00
    11.560 00
    3,771 25
    9,128 75

    129,b665 00



    29,323 75
    4,291 25
    2,024 40
    1.931 25
    7,148 75
    5,017 50
    1,834 80
    6,312 50
    53,334 05

    111,218 25

    58,607.50
    18,982 50
    9,472.50
    6,203.75
    12.230 00
    2,895.00
    4,578 75

    112,970 00


    2,044 35
    367 50
    2,656 10
    60G 25
    1,236 25

    6,910 45



    23,599 45

    16,096 25
    6,335.00

    22,431.25


    22.105 00
    6,887 50

    28.992.50


    27,548.75

    28,037.50

    17,798.75

    4,388.75
    10,400.00

    14,788.75


    li


    Tons
    of
    cargo.


    54,890
    11,545
    18,355
    16,084
    56,591
    8,450
    20,559
    1,818
    16,878
    205,170



    38.384
    2,250
    2,950
    294
    14,600
    5,475
    2,112
    21,152
    110,139

    197.356

    105,259
    28,624
    14,506
    9,233
    17,798
    5,538
    8,400

    189.378


    1,930
    410
    1,035
    683
    2,143

    6,201



    16,203-

    29,692
    9,'718
    39,410


    27,925
    9,846

    37,771


    52.205

    26,268

    12,932

    4,357
    12,302

    16,659









    74 THE PANAMA CANAL REbRD


    PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.-Continued.
    TONNAGE.
    No. Tons
    Nationality. of Panama United Tolls. of
    ships. Canal States Registered Registered cargo.
    net. equivalent. gross net.


    West coast of Cent ral America
    to Cristobal, C. Z.:
    B ritish ......... ... ....
    Canadian intercoastal:
    British. .. ...
    West coast of Central America
    toeast coast of United
    States:
    D anish ...............
    German...............


    3
    2


    Totals. ........... 2


    South American intercoastal:
    German ............
    Norwegian ............
    Totals ............
    Balboa, C. Z. to Cristobal,
    C. Z.:
    United States .... ...
    West coastof United Statesto
    West Indies:
    British
    West coast of United States to
    Cristobal, C. Z.:
    Panaman
    West coast of Canada to West
    Indies:
    Danish ... ..
    West coast of Canada to Africa:
    British .. . . ..
    CentrNl American intercostal:
    German .
    West coast of Central America
    to Europe:
    German .
    West coast of South America
    to West Indies:
    British .. .
    Hawaiian Islands to east coast
    of United States:
    United States......
    Balboa, C. Z. to east coast of
    Central America:
    United States .. .. ...
    Balboa, C. Z. to West Indies:
    British. . ..... .....
    Far East to Europe:
    Japanese........ ......
    Grand totals, August, 1928...


    1

    2







    I

    I
    1


















    255


    Grand totals, August, 1927.... 245


    Grand totals, August, 1926....


    2.063
    7,168


    1,469
    1,167
    2.636

    698
    504
    1,202


    895

    4,062

    2,603

    3,643
    4,335
    3,832

    3,272

    8,665

    1,740

    111
    152
    4,125
    1,172.387

    1,126,103


    1,900
    5.897


    1,188
    816
    2,004

    618
    423


    3,436
    9,104


    1,970
    1,432
    3,402

    1,023
    732


    1,041 1,755


    851

    3,579

    1,383

    1,919
    3,144
    3,124

    2,801

    7,497

    1,542

    191
    102
    3,319
    896.159
    878,468


    1,839

    5,880

    3,644

    3,300
    5,224
    5,096

    4,165

    11,877

    2,647

    401
    525
    5,396
    1,470.265
    1,437.303


    1,906
    5,750


    1,206
    811
    2,017

    616
    391
    1,007


    894

    3,531

    2,594

    1,998
    3,136
    3,155

    2,547

    7,353

    1,542

    196
    197
    3,231
    902,489
    879,491


    $2,353 90
    7,371 25


    1,485.00
    1,020 00
    2,505 00

    772 50
    362 88
    1,135 38


    1,053.75

    4,473.75

    1,728.75

    2,398.75
    3,930.00
    2,759.04


    1.122
    10,490


    2,484
    2,103
    4,587

    S3It

    330





    8,206

    1,056

    5,109
    6,428


    2,355.84 1.........


    6.238.80 1


    1,927.50

    143 25
    109 44
    4,148 75
    1,114,163.80
    1,106,564 15


    225 1,073,496 849;614 1,381,787 851,379 1,055,840.61


    .......... .

    1,845

    ..........


    5,881
    1,672,828
    1.760,760
    1,632,150


    Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
    from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Two Weeks Ending September 8, 1928.


    Name of vessel. Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed. Cargo-
    Discharged Laded.
    Tons. Tons.
    Takoka Maru....... Nippon Yusen Kaisha........... August 27..... August 27..... 285 ..........
    Venezuela ........... Panama Mail S. S. Co............ August 29..... August 29..... 46 1
    California .......... Panama-Pacific Line ........... August 31..... August 31..... .......... 170
    Santa Tecla ......... Grace Line. .. ................ August 31..... August 31..... 60 4
    Ginyo Maru......... Nippon Yusen Kaisha............ August 31.. August 31..... 159 ..........
    Ecuador ............ Panama Mail S. S. Co............ September 1... September 9... 680 ..........
    Losada ............. Pacific Steam Navigation Co...... September I... September 1... ......... 50
    Rakuyo Maru........ Nippon Yusen Kaisha............ September 2... September 2... .......... 45
    Annam.............. East Asiatic Co.................. September 3... September 3... 660 ..........
    Cathwood............ Union Oil Co ................... September 6... September 6... 10,336 ..........
    City of San Francisco. Panama Mail S. S. Co ........... September 6... September 7... 28 229
    President Polk ...... Dollar Line .................. September 7... September 7... .......... 9
    San Luis............. United Fruit Co ................ September 8... September 8... .......... 87


    i
    I









    TOe PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    Traffic by Nationality for August, 1928.

    SThe following tabulation shows the commercial traffic through the
    Canal during the month of August, 1928, classified according to
    nationality of vessel by direction of transit, and the combined traffic
    in both directions, with corresponding totals for August, 1927, and
    1926:
    ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


    Nationality.


    B elgian ............. ....
    British . ...............
    )Chilean ...............
    `Colombian ..............
    D anish. .. .................
    D anzig .................
    Dutch. ............ ...
    F rench ...... ............
    G erman ................. .
    Italian ............. ...
    Japanese ....... .......
    Norwegian ........... ..
    Panaman .. .... ...... .
    Peruvian .. ... .....
    Spanish .... .
    Swedish .........
    United States. .... .......
    Yugoslavian. ....... ...
    Totals, August, 1928 ...

    Totals, August, 1927 ..
    Totals, August, 1926...


    No.
    of
    ships.


    67
    2
    5
    8
    1
    3
    5
    17
    3

    16
    I

    7
    '125

    271

    298
    239


    TONNAGB.


    Panama
    Canal
    net.
    4,976
    345,462
    9,377
    1,110
    31,254
    6,310
    12,155
    21,445
    49,715
    18,769
    37,808
    69,347
    2,603
    2,405
    3,729
    34,356
    x607.750
    3,288

    1,264,859

    1,387,511

    1,157,409


    United
    States
    equivalent.
    4,568
    255,599
    6,899
    1,049
    23.067
    5,346
    8.601
    19,580
    36,103
    12,967
    28,880
    50,678
    1,383
    989
    2,960
    25.132
    ,474,252
    2,355


    Registered
    gross.

    7,138
    418,726
    14,620
    1,839
    37,443
    8,940
    14,630
    31,944
    57,588
    23,781
    45.699
    83,914
    2,461
    3,305
    5.087
    60,103
    766.038
    3,724


    960,408 1,586.980


    1,079,237
    902,488


    1,751,014
    1,484,333


    Registered
    net.

    3,988
    256,846
    7,952
    1,066
    23,248
    5,050
    10.480
    19,536
    34,124
    14,376
    28,588
    50,290
    1.384
    1,514
    3,000
    30,618
    473,338
    2,324

    967,722

    1,073.081
    909,143


    Tolls.


    $3,582 72
    291,825.91
    8,623.75
    1,284 58
    26,964 31
    4,543.20
    10,751.25
    24,475 00
    43.213 31
    16,208 75
    36,100 00
    53,680 37
    1,728 75
    1,236 25
    3,700.00
    26.480 81
    527,562 80
    2,943 75

    1,084,905.51
    1.167,476 40
    999,201.30


    Tons
    of
    cargo.


    204,815
    4,706
    1,990
    30,507
    8,030
    13,312
    32,730
    6.002
    44,886
    50,607
    2,928
    275
    388
    14,731
    331,737
    4,864
    752,508

    669,187

    689,547


    Includes barge of 67 net tons, Panama Canal and United States measurements; no registered tonnage.

    PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.


    Nationality.


    B ritish ......... ... .......
    C hilean.... ...............
    Colom bian.. ...... ........
    ".'Danish ................. ..
    ,:D anzig.....................
    Duteh ..... .. ....... .....
    SFinnish. ..............
    'Irench.... ............
    Italian ...................
    :'Japanese.................
    Norwegian ...... ..........
    S'anaman...................
    Peruvian....................
    nis ....... ..............
    Swedish. .... ..............
    United States ...............
    .Yugoslavian................
    Totals, August, 1928.....
    Totals, August, 1927. ....
    Totals, August, 1926.....


    No.
    of
    ships.

    72
    5
    3
    2
    6
    1
    3
    18
    2
    6
    14
    2
    2
    1
    4
    111
    2
    255
    245


    Panama
    Canal
    net.
    351,155
    4.672
    1,744
    10,453
    12,465
    34,165
    1,687
    14,096
    68,367
    10,841
    29,864
    47,113
    7,500
    3,934
    3,844
    15,628
    546,518
    8,341
    1,172,387

    1,126,103


    225 1,073,496
    a


    TONNAGE.


    United
    States
    equivalent.
    266,406
    3,433
    1,643
    7,364
    10,504
    22,860
    1,673
    11,129
    48,727
    8,731
    24,514
    36,298
    5,397
    2,472
    3,017
    10,772
    423,916
    7,303

    896,159
    878,468

    849,614


    Registered
    gross.

    436,003
    7,310
    2,826
    11,920
    17,895
    37,581
    1.816
    17,850
    80,272
    14,399
    37,981
    59,632
    10,030
    5.460
    5,205
    26,458
    686,079
    11,548
    1,470,265
    1,437,303

    1,381,787


    Registered
    net.

    266,700
    3,976
    1,654
    7,451
    10,048
    23,168
    1,565
    10,575
    48,579
    9,083
    23,790
    36,202
    6,661
    2,683
    3,226
    12,663
    427,162
    7,303
    902,489

    879,491

    851,379


    Tolls.


    $329.,835 89
    4,291.25
    2,044 35
    9,205 00
    13,130 QO
    28,575 00
    2,024.40
    13,911.25
    58,584.73
    10,913.75
    30,642.50
    45,206.63
    6,746.25
    .3,071.05
    3,771 25
    13,465.00
    529,616.75
    9,128.75
    1,114,163.80

    1,106,564.15
    1,055,840.61


    Tons
    of
    cargo.

    502,100
    2,250
    1.930
    16,434
    23,090
    47,389
    2,950
    23,944
    83,507
    17,683
    38,163
    77.979
    6,531
    4,255
    1,818
    34,375
    771,552
    16,878
    1,672,828
    1,760,760

    1,632,150


    (Continued on next page.)


    Ships' Chandlery Supplies.
    S'-anama Canal Storehouses carry a complete line of ships' chandlery supplies,
    M"ale fr sale tb ships at C. I. F. cost, plus 25 per -cent surcharge which covers
    aijt, handling, and other costs.





    *1



    76 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    Traffic by Nationality.--Continued.

    COMBINED TRAF.FI.
    ____ ___ ___ _ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ __ _ *I


    Nationality.


    Belgian .... . ...
    British ....... . ..
    Chilean ......... .... ..
    Colombian .............
    Danish ..... ........ .
    D anzig ...... ....... ....
    D utch ............. ...
    Finnish.......... ...... ...
    French ............ ... .
    German ............ .. .
    Italian ....... .... ...
    Japanese ... ......... ..
    Norwegian ........... .
    Panaman .... .......
    Peruvian .. ..... . .
    Spanish ....
    Swedish
    United States .........
    Yugoslavian ...............
    Totals. August. 1928 ...
    Totals. August, 1927 ...

    Totals. August, 1926 .


    No.
    of
    ships.


    139
    3
    10
    1
    3
    9
    I1
    8
    35
    5
    13
    30


    TONNAGE.


    Panama
    Canal
    net.
    4.976
    696.617
    14,049
    2.854
    41,707
    18.775
    46,320
    1.687
    38.541
    118,082
    29.610
    67,G72
    116,460
    10,103
    6.339
    7.573
    49,984
    1,154.268'
    11.629


    United
    States
    equivalent.
    4,568
    522.005
    10,332
    2,692
    30.431
    15.850
    31 461
    1.6,'3
    30.709
    84.830
    21,698
    53,394
    86.976
    6,781
    3,461
    5,977
    35,904
    '898,168
    9.658


    Registered
    gross.

    7.138
    854,729
    21.930
    4.665
    49,363
    26.835
    52.211
    1,811)
    49,794
    137,860
    38,180
    83,680
    143.546
    12,491
    8.765
    10.292
    86,561
    1,452,117
    15.272


    Registered
    net.

    3,988
    523.546
    11,928
    2,720
    30. 699
    15,098
    33,648
    1,.565
    30. 111
    82.703
    23,459
    52.378
    86.492
    8,045
    4,197
    6,226
    43.281
    900.500
    9.627


    Tolls.


    $3,582 72
    621.661 80
    12.915 00
    3,328 93
    36.169 31
    17,673 20
    39,326 25
    2,024 40
    38,386 25
    101.798 04
    27.122 50
    66.742 50
    98.887 00
    8.475 00
    4.307 30
    7,471 25
    39,945 81
    1,057,179 55
    12.072 50


    526 2.437,246 1.856,567 3,057,245 1.870.211 2.199,069 31


    543 2.513.614

    464 2.230.905


    1.957.705
    1,752,102


    3.188.317 1.952.572

    2,860,120 F,760,522


    2.274.040 55

    2.055.041 91


    Tons
    of
    cargo.


    706,915
    6,956
    3.920
    46,941
    23,090
    55,419
    2,950
    37.256
    116,237,
    23,685'
    83.049
    128.585
    9,459
    4.530
    2,206
    49.106
    1. 103,289
    21,742

    2.425,336
    2.429.947
    2,321.,97


    - Includes barge of 67 net tons, Panama Canal and United States measurements, no registered tonnage.


    Notices to Mariners.

    THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 10, 1928.
    No. 439.

    The following is quoted from Hydrographic Office Notice to Mariners No. 35,
    dated September 1:

    "Caribbean Sea. Swan Island. Meteorological and weather information by radio.-The following
    notice has been received from the United States Weather Bureau. Department of Agriculture:
    "The United States Weather Bureau has made arrangements for the reopening of the meteorological
    station at Swan Island in the western Caribbean Sea (approximately latitude 17 25' N.. longitude
    83 56' WV.), in cooperation with the Tropical Radio Telegraph Company, for the months of August,
    September. and October, 1928.
    "Meteorological observations from Swan Island are of great value during the hurricane season, not
    only to shipping in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean but to the U. S. Weather Bureau in the
    issuingof its warnings and advice of stormsand hurricanes The observations are takenat 7a.m.and
    7p.m. daily, 75th meridian time. They are transmitted by radioto the Weather Bureau at Washington
    on wave lengths of 600 and 630 meters at 7.15 a. m. and 7.15 p. m., 75th meridian time. There is no
    objection to ships copying these reports for their individual use and information."
    H. BURGESS,
    AciingGovernor.


    THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 10, 1928.
    No. 440.

    The following was received by the Hydrographic Office through the Captain of the
    Port, Cristobal:

    "M. S. IVestfalen. September 1. 7 p. m.-Passed Buenaventura River Buoy No. 1. latitude 3" 47'
    north. longitude 77" 19' west, and found that this buoy was not burning. (Signed) P. G. HOrZEL,
    Master."
    H. BURGESS,
    Acting Governor.







    HE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
    OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
    PUBLISHED WEEKLY. 8"A
    Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign, $1.00; address
    The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
    The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C.
    Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
    at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
    ce.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
    information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

    volume XXII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 19, 1928. No. 7.

    Canal Traffic During First Fifteen Days of September.
    During the first 15 days of September, 232 commercial vessels and
    * small launches transited the Canal. Tolls on the commercial vessels
    ggregated $1,016,395.25, and on the launches, $41.34, or a total tolls
    collection of $1,016,436.59.
    The daily average of transits of commercial vessels was 15.46,
    nd the daily average tolls collection, $67,759.68. The average amount
    iftolls paid by each of the commercial transits was $4,381.01, as com-
    ared with $4,309.98 for the first 15 days of August. Traffic for the
    first 15 days of September was lower by 11 transits and $30,929.14
    an the traffic for the first 15 days of August, 1928, and lower by 31
    ransits and $95,298.57 than the traffic for the first 15 days of Sep-
    ember, 1927.
    * In the following tabulation the number of commercial transits and
    bhe amount of tolls collected are shown for the first 81 months of the
    current calendar year, with the daily averages of transits and tolls:

    Month. Transits. Tolls. Transit. Tolls.

    Imary....................... ...... ... 540 $2,212,752 50 17 42 $71,379.20
    ,ruary....................................... ... 547 2,253,755.37 18.86 77,715.70
    ...sh ...................... ........................ 542 2,223,370.57 17.48 71,271.63
    .il...................................... 531 2,187,607.82 17.70 72,914.55
    ...ay .................... ...................... 508 2,118,969.83 16.38 68,353.86
    ........................... .................. 481 2,016,211.09 16.03 67,206.43
    ............................................... 509 2,109,083.19 16.41 68,034.94
    526 2,199,069.31 16 97 70,937.72
    member (first 15 days)............ ................. 232 1,016,395 25 15.46 67,759.68
    Total........... ................................ 4,416 18,337,214.3 17.05 70,800.06

    "City of New York" Transits Canal.
    The first unit of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, the City of New
    ork, arrived at Cristobal on September 15, 1928, on the first leg of its
    yage from New York to Dunedin, New Zealand, where it will be
    et by Commander Byrd and other units of the expedition. The
    ssel transited the Canal on the 17th and set sail the following day for
    Hew Zealand. Engine trouble developed, however, in the vicinity of
    HQna Island and the vessel returned to Balboa for repairs. After
    cessary repairs are made it will resume its voyage.
    ,The City of New York, which is the flag ship of Commander Byrd's
    eition, is a 3-masted bark with an auxiliary coal-burning engine.
    is built entirely of wood and so constructed that the vessel will lift
    .n in an ice pack. The vessel is about 4 years old and prior to
    Xase by the Byrd expedition was engaged in the whaling trade
    .Norwegian registry. It is 147.9 feet long by 31 feet beam, and
    tons.

    L ~i" ""ii'':':'"" ""0









    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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    80 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

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    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    Cargo Through Canal IDuring August, 1928.
    On pages 84 and 85 of this issue will be found tables showing the
    origin and destination of cargo passing through the Canal during
    August, 1928. The aggregate of all cargo for the month was 2,425,336
    tons, as compared with 2,429,947 tons passing through the Canal in
    August of last year. Pacific-to-Atlantic cargo movement decreased
    87,932 tons under August, 1927, while the Atlantic-to-Pacific tonnage
    increased 83,321 tons. The present depression in the California mineral
    oil movement through the Canal as compared with last year is the chief
    reason for the decreased Atlantic-bound movement, together with
    rather heavy decreases in shipments of lumber, nitrates, and ores.
    While the total decreases in these four commodities aggregate 257,039
    tons under August of last year, increases in wheat, canned goods, and
    barley offset partly this heavy loss.
    ATLANTIC-TO-PACIFIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
    Origin.--Over 69 per cent of the cargo from the Atlantic to the
    Pacific originated on theeastern and Gulf seaboardsof the United States,
    and 23 per cent in Europe. Cargo originating in the United States
    was 76,237 tons, or 17.1 per cent greater than the amount coming
    from that area in August last year. Cargo from Europe showed a smma
    actual increase, although the percentage of the total cargo passing
    through the Canal in August, 1928, was somewhat smaller than that
    coming from Europe in August last year. The actual increase was less
    than 3,000 tons. ,
    Desfination.-Over 40 per cent of the Pacific-bound cargo tonnage
    was destined to the United States; 2-1.4 per cent to Asia (irtluding the
    Philippines); 15.6 per cent to Australasia; and 13.6 per cent to South
    America. Cargo tonnage to the United States, Asia, and Australasia
    showed increases of 17,251 tons, or 6 per cent, 69,932 tons, or 60.9
    per cent, and 9,411 tons, or 8.7 per cent, respectively, over August
    last year. While the tonnage to the United States and Australasia
    showed actual increases, the percentage of the total cargo was smaller
    in August this year. Cargo to South America showed an actual as well
    as a relative decrease under that of August, 1927. This decrease
    amounted to 8,931 tons, or 8.7 per cent.
    PACIFIC-TO-ATLANTIC CARGO MOVEMENT.
    Origin.-Of the cargo tonnage moving in this direction, 56 per cent
    originated on the west coast of the United States; 27.4 per cent in
    South America; 9.9 per cent in Canada; 3.3 per cent in Asia (includ-
    ing the Philippines); and 2.7 per cent in Australasia. Cargo from,
    the United States and South America showed decreases under August
    1927, in the amounts of 141,927 tons, or 13.2 per cent, and 25,198
    tons, or 5.4 per cent, respectively. The percentage of the total cargo
    from the United States in August last year was 61.2 per cent as com-
    pared with 56 per cent of the total in August this year, while that from
    South America was, relatively, approximately the same in 1928 as iq
    1927. Cargo from Canada showed a relative as well as an actual increase.
    The actual increase amounted to 71,477 tons, or 75.7 per cent, over
    August, 1927, which heavy increase was accounted for by the increased
    grain shipments from that area. Cargo tonnage from Asia and
    Australasia also increased 3,720 tons and 1,537 tons, respectively.
    Destination.-Segregated according to. destination, 53.1 per cent
    of the cargo in this direction went to the United'States, and 39.2 per
    cent to Europe. Tonnage to the United States showed an actual de-
    crease of 276,822 tons, or 23.7 per cent, as well as a relative decrease in
    its proportion of all cargo from the Pacific as compared with August







    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 83

    last year, while that to Europegincreased 218,012 tons, or 49.7 per
    .cent,*together with a heavy relative increase in proportion of all cargo.
    I Over 200,000 tons of the decreased tonnage to the east coast of the
    united States was caused by lessened shipments of mineral oils.
    IMineral oil shipments to Europe increased approximately 80,000 tons
    over August, 1927. This item, together with heavy shipments of wheat,
    Made up the larger portion of the gain in cargo tonnage to Europe.
    PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.
    From the cargo declarations submitted it was possible to classify over
    585 per cent of the total cargo in transit through the Canal from the
    Atlantic to the Pacific. The remaining 15 per cent consisted, for the most
    part, of manufactured articles in small lots reported as "General cargo."
    Atlantic-to-Pacific-bound commodities which aggregated more than
    t10,000 tons for August, 1928, or August, 1927, are listed in the follow-
    ing tabulation, showing differences:
    August, August,
    Commodity. 1928. 1927. Difference.
    i Long tons. Long tons. Long tons.
    :Amm onia .. .... ...... i ....................... ....... .. 10,249 10,327 78
    'Automobiles...................... ...... ......... ... ... 18,779 8,361 + 10,418
    tC meant. .................... ....... .. ..... ...... . 26,631 36,363 -9,732
    ClWl and coke . .......... ... ... .. ... ... .. ..... . 17,879 22,795 4.916
    iotton........ .................. ..... ........ 15,962 12,873 +3,089
    Manufactured goods:
    Iron and steel .. ............ .. . .. 186.714 155,634 +31,080
    Machinery .... ................. ..... ........ ... 17,840 25,071 -7,231
    Railroad material ...... . .......................... . 10,424 10,043 +381
    Tinplate .............. ..... .......... ........ ........ ... 13,789 14.204 415
    Miscellaneous .j.. ........... ................ .. 15,171 7,887 +7,284
    MIetals, various............. .. ... .... ...... ....... ....... 22,716 11,850 + 10,866
    Oils. mineral............ ... ......................... .... 69.494 52,882 + 16,612
    rPaper ........... .. ..................... ................ 18,454 14,386 + 4,003
    PFhoa phates .................................................... 37,168 19,581 +17,587
    Sulphur. .. ............ ... .. ......... ................. 6.699 12,417 5,718
    The above 15 commodity groups comprise approximately 65 per
    cent of the cargo moving from the Atlantic to the Pacific during
    !Aygust, 1928. It will be noted that 9 of the items show increases and
    :6 decreases. The heaviest increases were in iron and steel, phosphates,
    mineral oils, and metals, while cement, machinery, sulphur, and coal
    and coke showed the heaviest decreases.
    I PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.
    It was possible to classify almost 99 per cent of all cargo moving
    |from the Pacific to the Atlantic during the month of August, 1928.
    1Commodities which aggregated more than 10,000 tons either during
    the past month or the corresponding month a year ago are listed
    .below, showing differences:
    August, August,
    Commodity. 1928. 1927. Difference.
    Long tons. Long tons. Long tons.
    ................................ ... ...... ...... ........ .. 66,414 48,226 + 18,188
    goods (fish, fruit, vegetables, etc.) ............................ 78,188 43,544 +34.644
    rage (food products) '........................................ 9,497 24,026 -14,529
    S ................................ ........ ... ............... 10,707 3.917 + 6,790
    .dried ............................................... 11.111 12,432 -1,321
    ... ............................... ............. .. ..... 350, 02 390,154 39,352
    t varione................... ................................. 51,810 44,493 + 7,317
    i trate......... ............. ... ... ................... 152,549 221,516 -68,967
    ; mineral . .................................................. 475,301 589,341 -114,040
    (principally iron) ............................................. 123,733 158,413 -34,680
    S.r ............................................................. 61,393 52,129 + 9,264
    ............................................................. 121.899 44,697 + 77,202
    f Does not include fresh fruit.
    The above. 12 commodity groups comprise over 90 per cent of the
    argo moving from Ae Pacific to the Atlantic during August, 1928.
    of the items show increases and 6 decreases. The heaviest increase
    inMwheat, which showed a gain of 77,202 tons over August, 1927.
    oils, nitrates, lumber, and ores decreased heavily.










    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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    60 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

    Lumber Shipments Through Canal in Fiscal Year, 1928.
    Lumber shipments routed through the Panama Canal during the
    fiscal year ending June 30, 1928, totaled 3,707,234 tons, comprised
    12.5 per cent of the total cargo in transit through the Canal during the
    year, and ranked second in importance of the commodities passing
    through the Canal during the year. Mineral oils (6,336,156 tons)
    formed the commodity of greatest quantity.
    Of the total lumber routed through the Canal during the year,
    33,402 tons passed from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and 3,673,832
    tons from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Of the cargo.from the Pacific,
    Origin of Lumber Passing Through Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During Fisca
    Years 1922 to 1928, inclusive.





    LEGEND:
    From United States.
    From Canada.
    From miscellaneous areas.
    Total shipped.


























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    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    2,935j267 tons originated in the United States, 719,172 tons in Canada,
    and the balance of 19,393 tons consisted of small shipments from Cen-
    traj America, Australasia, Far East, and the Philippines.
    Segregated according to destination, 3,057,622 tons of the Atlantic-
    bound lumber were shipped to the eastern seaboard of the United
    States, 401,257 tons to Europe, and the balance of 214,953 tons to the
    West Indies, South America, Central America, Africa, and Cristobal.
    The graphs shown on pages 86 and 87 show by fiscal years since
    1922, the total amount of this commodity routed through the Canal
    from the Pacific to the Atlantic and the important areas of origin and
    destination.
    Destination of Lumber Passing Through Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During
    Fiscal Years 1922 to 1928, Inclusive.


    LEGEND:
    To United States.
    To Europe.
    To miscellaneous areas.
    Total shipped.


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    i.







    88 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD

    Jacob's Ladders To Be in Proper Condition.
    THE PANAMA CANAL, DEPARTMENT OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE,
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. A, September 12. 1921.
    To STEAMSHIP OWNERS AND AGENTS:
    It has been brought to the attention of this office that on one occasion recently,.
    on a vessel prepared to transit the Canal, due to the rotten condition of the rope in
    the Jacob's ladder, the ladder broke as the Custom Inspector was boarding the vessel,
    and only the fact that the boarding launch was close by prevented him from falling
    into the sea.
    It is requested that all steamship companies take immediate steps to inspect'their
    Jacob's ladders and see'that they are in proper condition in order that safety of Canal
    pilots and other employees may be properly assured.
    This circular is supplementary to Marine Superintendent's memorandum of
    November 7, 1927, regarding the proper rigging of Jacob's ladders.
    C. H. WOODWARD,
    Approved: Marine Superintendent.
    H. BURGESS,
    A cling Governor.


    Supplement No. 8.-Tariff No. 9
    THE PANAMA CANAL, PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 11, 1928.
    ITEM 22.-FUEL AND DIESEL OILS.
    (Effective September 8, 1928. |
    2. Diesel oil, per barrel of 42 gallons, delivered to vessira at Cristobal........ $1.80
    H. BURGESS,
    A cling Governor, The Panama Canal,
    2d Vice President, Panama Railroad Company.


    Nctices to Mariners.
    THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
    SBALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 17, 1928.
    No. 452.
    PACIFIC OCEAN-PANAMA BAY.
    "September 15, 1928. the characteristic of the South Fraile Combination Gas and Whistling Buoy
    was changed, and the light is now flashing I second light, 3 seconds dark. a period of 4 seconds. No
    other change. (Signed) F. KARIGER, Pilot in Charge, Lighthouse Subdivision."
    H. BURGESS,
    A cling Governor.

    THE P.ANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 19, 1928.
    No. 457.
    The following was received by the Hydrographic Office from the Lighthouse
    Subdivision, The Panama Canal:
    CRISTOBAL HARBOR.
    "Effective September 17, 1928, Spar Buoys "A" and "B," marking the western limits of the merchant
    ship anchorage in Cristobal Harbor, were permanently discontinued. (Signed' F. KARIGER, Pilot
    in Charge."
    H. BURGESS,
    A cling Governor.

    Publication of Notices and Circulars of Interest to Shipping.
    All of the Panama Canal notices to mariners, notices to steamship lines, and general circulars of
    interest to shipping in its relation to the Canal are published in THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD. For
    this reason it is considered unnecessary to make a separate general distribution away from the Isthmus
    of such notices and circulars to those receiving THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD. Shipping interests
    are advised to look for them in this paper, which is supplied to them without charge.


    A








    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
    from Port of Cristobal, C. Z., for Week Ending September 8, 1928.


    Name of vessel.


    Cristobil............
    Salvador.............
    Kiptalia .............
    Ulna................
    Mayari ...........
    Annam....... ....
    M anabi...............
    War Nizam ........
    Baralt. ...........
    Aconcagua .......
    Cartago .. ..... ...
    Alaska ...............
    Toloa...............
    Linda S. ...........
    Westfalen .......
    L.e Angeles
    Iowa. ... ...
    Kinderdijk ..
    Saramacca. ......
    Venezuela.. ..
    William M.... ..
    Volumnia .
    London Importer .
    Oroya ...
    Santa Marta .
    Favorite
    Suriname.
    Cali ..
    Cerigo
    Macoris ... ....
    B San Mateo
    Itauri
    City of San Francisco
    Venezuela .. .....
    La Paz
    Knute Nelson ...
    Maravi ......
    Favorite. .. ..
    Parismina .... .


    Line or charterer.


    Panama R. R. S. S. Line ......
    Pacific Steam Navigation Co ...
    Donaldson S. S. Line .......
    United Fruit Co ...... ...... .
    United Fruit Co . ... . ...
    Danish East Asiatic Co .. .....
    United Fruit Co ..... .......
    British Admiralty ..........
    Royal Netherlands S. S. Co
    Chilean Line .............
    United Fruit Co ... .....
    French Line ........... ...
    United Fruit Co .. .. .
    R. Feuillebois .. .. .
    Colombian Transport Co .......
    Hamburg-American Line ......
    French Line
    Holla nd-American Line
    United Fruit Co
    Royal Netherlands S. S. Co .
    R. Feuillebois .. ...
    DuPont & Co ....
    Furness. Withy & Co
    Pacific Steam Navigation Co
    United Fruit Co
    American Fruit & S. S. Corp.
    United Fruit Co .
    North German Lloyd
    Hamburg-American Line .
    French Line ... . .
    United Fruit Co ..... ....
    Hamburg-American Line ... .
    Panama Mail S. S. Co ...
    Royal Netherlands S. S. Co
    Pacific Steam Navigation Co
    Peter Olsen S. S. Line ....
    United Fruit Co .....
    American Fruit & S. S. Corp. .
    United Fruit Co .... .... ...


    x No cargo discharged.


    Arrived.


    September 2..
    September 2 ..
    September 2..
    September 2..
    September 2..
    September 2...
    September 2..
    September 3..
    September 3...
    September 3..
    September 4..
    September 4...
    September 4..
    September 4...
    September 4..
    September 5..
    September 5..
    September 5..
    September 5..
    September 5...
    September 5..
    September 5..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 7..
    September 7..
    September 7..
    September 7.
    September 8..
    September 8..
    September 8..
    September 8..
    September 8..
    September S...


    Departed.


    September 2...
    September 2...
    September 2...
    September 2...
    September 2...
    September 3..
    September 5...
    September 7...
    September 8...
    September 3...
    September 3...
    September 4...
    September 5...
    September 4..
    September 5...
    September 5..
    September 7...
    September 5..
    September 5..
    September 5..
    September 5..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 6..
    September 7..
    September 8...
    September 8..
    September 8..
    September 8..
    September 8..

    September 8..


    Cargo-
    Discharged Laded.
    Tons. Tons.
    ....... .. 3.175
    ....... .. 1,193
    (*) 396
    14 1931
    (*) 427
    96 (')
    1 757
    7,529 (.)
    367 188
    10 4
    . ........ 23
    33 (2)
    1,136 10
    (C) 43
    171 .. .... .
    (*) 217,
    381 16
    690 232
    890 40
    (') 6
    (0) 28
    165 (0)
    (,) 105
    53 365
    811 422
    285 1
    122 22


    233
    730
    390
    690
    321
    1,022
    14
    290
    365
    (4)
    403


    2 No cargo laded. ,


    ( )
    850
    394
    72
    2021
    101

    407


    Report of Cargo Discharged and Laded by Vessels Entering and Clearing
    from Port of Balboa, C. Z., for Week Ending September 16, 1928.


    Name of vessel Line or charterer. Arrived. Departed. Cargo--
    Discharged Laded.
    Tons. Tons. &
    Knute Nelson ........ Norway-Pacific Line ............ September 9... September 10.. 610 ..........
    Leon XIII.......... Spanish Line .... ........ September 9... September 10.. 218 .......
    Craftsman ......... MeArdle Contracting Co ........ September 10.. September 10. .......... 2
    Guatemala .......... Grace Line ... ............. September 11.. September 12.. 19 ........
    Kako Maru...... ... Nippon Yusen Kaisha.. ........ September 12.. September 12.. 349 .........
    Nitokris..a......... ambrg-Aerican Line........ September 12.. September 13.. 428 4'
    Uribe. ............ Colombian Transportation Co .... September 12.. September 12. ......... 50
    U. S. Grant......... U. S. Army Transport Service.... September 12.. September 13.. 65 18
    Dilworth ....... United States Shipping Board..... September 13.. September 14.. 10,000 ........
    Mojave .. ......... Standard Transportation Co...... September 14.. September 15.. 10,369 ........
    Manchuria ........ Panama-Pacific Line ........... September 15.. September 15. .......... 1
    Kellerwald ......... Hamburg-American Line ....... September 16.. September 16.. 75 ........
    City of San Francisco Panama Mail S. S. Co .......... September 16.. September 16.. .......... 108
    uca ............... National Navigation Co......... September 14.. September 15.. 4 ........


    Information from American Consuls.
    The Consular officers of the United States at seaports all over the world are ex officio representatives
    of The Panama Canal for the purpose of furnishing information to shipping and allied interests as to
    i.nditions. charges, etc., at the Panama Canal affecting the operation of ships. The current publications
    I'The Panama Canal of interest to shipping are furnished to the Consular officers and filed for reference.
    it is not desired that inquiries of a general nature be addressed to the Consular officers, or that they
    I ardened with requests which should be made direct to The Panama Canal; but ships' operators who
    Snot be alifciently. advised as to charges, supplies, facilities, etc., at the Canal will often save time
    aflligtW the nearest American Consul.







    90 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    United States Intercoastal Traffic by Commodities for August, 1928.

    The following table shows the cargo carried through the Canal in
    the United States intercoastal trade, segregated by commodities and
    by direction, with the totals for August, 1928, and the totals for Au-
    gust, 1927, and 1926. Cargo statistics are compiled from cargo
    declarations submitted by masters of vessels, and in these deolara-
    tions small items are frequently grouped under the designation of
    "General cargo." These statistics are accordingly not precise btit
    they are indicative of the kind and quantity of the cargo in transit
    through the Canal. The figures represent tons of 2,240 pounds, and
    are for the United States intercoastal trade only:

    Atlantic Pacific
    Commodity. to to Totals.
    Pacific. Atlantic.
    Aeroplanes .... 100 . 100
    Agricultural implements ..... 507 20 527
    Alfalfa meal ..... .. 42 942
    Ammonia .. 117 117
    Ammunition . 17 17
    Asbestos 459 140 599
    Asphalt 403 500 903
    Automobiles ..... .. 58 111 669
    Automobile accessories .... 384 86 470
    Beans ... 3,724 3,724
    Bones and bonemeal 72 72
    Borax .. . . 109 1,547 1,656
    Bricks .. 883 883
    Burlap . 227 361 588
    Calcium carbide 26 26
    Camphor . 166 166
    Canned goods:
    Fish 393 13,997 14,390
    Fruit .. 357 28.198 28,555
    Meat .. ... 84 357 441
    M ilk ... 45 1.147 1,192
    Soup 256 .... 256
    Vegetables .. 1,414 3,756 5,170
    Miscellaneous . ... 2,427 4.525 6,952
    Carbon black . 15 15
    Celite filtercel 817 817
    Cement 1,009 29 1,029
    Charcoal .. 51 40 91
    Chemicals .. 1,405 1,045 2,450
    China and fire clay .. ..397 70 467
    Coal .. 4,201 4,201
    Cocoa 324 10 334
    Coconuts . 668 668
    Coffee . 257 100 357
    Cold storage.
    Cheese .. 10 30 40
    Eggs .. 85 85
    Lard 520 .. 520
    Meat ... 24 24
    I Other .. 792 .. .. 792
    Confectionery . 650 . ... 650
    Cork 231 . .. 231
    Corn 30 30
    Cotton b2 1.512 1,574
    Drugs 1,829 249 2,078
    Earthenware 6.. 6 40 106
    Eggs, dried ... 68 68
    Explosives ..... 10 5 15
    Fertilizer .... .... 91 ...... 91
    Fish meal ...... ....... .15 15
    Flour ... ....... 181 5.383 5,564
    Fruit:
    Dried ... ... 56 7,802 7,858
    Fresh . .. 87 87
    Furniture .. . . .... .. . . . . .. 320 . . 320
    General .. ...... .... .. 56,093 11,556 67,649
    Glass and glassware ...................................... 1.945 240 2.185
    G lue .. .. .. .. .. . .. ..... .. . 41 ... 41
    Guano .. ... .. .... . 350 350
    H air .. . .. .. .. . .... . .. . .... 23 58 81
    Hardwoods ...... ..... .......... ... . ...... ... .. . 65 194 259
    Hats ....... ...... ................... . . ........ .. .. .. .. 30 30
    Hay ..................................................... .. ... 1,092 1,092
    Hemp ........... ..... ........................................ 86 1,454 1,540
    Honey ........... .. ... .............. ....... ......... 72 72
    Infusorial earth..... ...... ............. .............................. . .... 200 200








    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 91


    Atlantic Pacific
    Commodity. to to Totals.
    Pacific. Atlantic.
    Ink ............. ....... ....................... . ... .. ... 48 ..... ... 48
    Jute ........ ......... ....... ............. .. .. ...... 197 310 507
    Linoleum ... ..... ... .. ...... .... ... ..... .... .. .......... 1,150 170 1,320
    Liquor ..... ... ..... .................. . . .............. 162 ... ..... 162
    Lumber............. ...... ....... ....... . ....... .. 3,642 232,134 235,776
    Malt. 120 . 120
    Manufactured goods:
    Iron and steel ........... ... .......... ...... ......... 100,418 1,581 101,999
    Machinery. .. .. ....... ........... ........ .. .. 4,315 702 5.017
    aRailroad material .. .............. . . 766 .......... 766
    Tinplate . .. .. .. ...... .. ...... 7.621 ... 7,621
    Textiles ........... .... ..... .... . 2,149 184 2,333
    Miscellaneous ........ ....... .. . ... ........ .. 8.580 2,053 10,633
    Marble .... . .... . .. ... .. ... .. ... 294 ........ 294
    M atches.. ...... ..... . .. . . .. ..... . .. 121 ........ 121
    Metals:
    Copper ............ ... ...... . .... .. 35 9,951 9,986
    Lead .... ... ...... .. .. ....... .. 120 35 155
    Scrap ........... ... .... ... ... ..... 516 480 996
    T in ... ... .. .... . ...... .... ..... .. .. .... .. 26 ..... .. 26
    Zinc .... ....... ........ ... .. ... .. 68 32 100
    Other.. . .. .. .. 18 . 18
    Milk, powdered . .... . .. .. 451 451
    M olasses.... . .. ... . . 92 .... 92
    Nitrates. .... .. . 200 200
    N uts.................. . . . 137 137
    Oils:
    Coconut ..... .. . . 53 53
    Cottonseed ... .. .. .. 188 .... 188
    Crude .... .... ... ... ... ......... .. .. 33205 33,205
    Gas oil, fuel oil ... .. 64 8,527 8,591
    Gasoline, benzine, naphtha .. ... 184,500 184,500
    Linseed. ... . .. 33 .... 33
    Lubricating and greases .. .... 6.438 903 7,341
    Olive .......... . ... ....... ... 45 45
    Vegetable . .. ... . . 71 135 206
    Wood .... .. . 17 182 199
    Other .. ...... ... .... 155 155
    Ores:
    i Copper ... . ... 1,460 1,460
    Magnesite ......... . .. 2,079 2,079
    Manganese ..... .... .. . 20 20
    Zinc ........ .. ... ......... ..... 17 17
    Other ........... .. ... .. .. ..... 75. 75
    Paint... ... .. .. . .......... 807 97 904
    Paper .... ..... .... ...... .. .. .......... .. .... 5,941 4,279 10,220
    Paper, pulp .... ......... . ....................... 54 1,001 1,055
    Paper, roofing .................... . ..... 95 . . . .. 95
    Peanut ... ........ ...... .. .. 191 191
    Peas ... ... . ... . .. .. ... ... 201 201
    Phosphates. .................................... 2,169 .... .. 2,169
    Plaster ...... ....... ....... ............. 30 30
    Porcelain .. ..... .. .. .... ...... ... .......... . .. .. 240 983 1,223
    Quicksilver. .. .. ..... .. . ... ... ... .. ... ......... . 5 5
    Rag......... .. ...... ........ .. .. . 61 1,200 1,261
    Rice... .......... .. . ................ .. . . . . 67 555 622
    Rope.... .... .. ... . .. .. ...... 107 80 187
    Rosin..... ... ........ .... . ... .. . . 1,049 1,049
    Rubber:
    Manufactured ............ .......... 587 93 ho
    Raw...... .. .... . . .. ... ..... 328 .. . 328
    SScrap.. .... .. ... .. . 166 166
    al ........... . . . . 366 132 498
    S nd... ...... . .. ... 1,350 1,350
    G ra s.. .. ........... . ....... ... .... .. .. ... . ... . 177 177
    Other........ .. .. .... .... ..... . .. . 121 121
    Shells ....... .................. . ........ .. .... .... 2,278 .... .. 2,278
    Silk .......... .... ....... . ........................ ........ ... . ... ...... 343 343
    Ikins and hides . ..... .................... .... . .1,108 1,108
    Slate .................... ........ ......... ... ... .. ... .. 254 . ..... 254
    E ........... ............. ..... ...... .. .. ..... 3.305 185 3,490
    ..... ......... .......... ... ..... .. .. .. ....... 339 ... .... 339
    : o h ..... ........ .......... ...... . ... . .. ... .. . 1,233 . 1,233
    Boda, biarbonate ..... ............ .. ...... ..... .. ............ 23 .. .. 23
    S Bod, eausti... ............. ............ .... .... ...... 962 962
    a ch .................................. .. .. . .... .............. 82 ... ..... 82
    gar .. ................. .. ....... ..................... ... 328 9 ,003 9,331
    S.ph r... ........ .......... .................. ............... 16 .... .. 16
    yrup ........................................ ............... .. .. .. 188 118 306
    S... ....... 143 143
    Tallow ... ........................................... ................... 165 165
    .................... ............................................ 47 .......... 47
    I k ............................. ........................................ 20 .......... 20
    ..l t............ ................................................... ...... 2,969 59 3,028








    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    Atlantic Pacific
    Commodity. to to Totals.
    Pacific. Atlantic.
    Toys ... ...................... ................................ 433 58 491
    Turpentine .... ....................... ..... ................... 356 .......... 356
    Vegetables ................ ......... .. ... . .. .... .... ..... 15 ...... ... 15
    W aste............... ......... .... .... ... ... . . ....... 36 801 837
    Wax .............................. ..... ......... ....... ...... 180 30 210
    W heat .............. .............. ...... . . . .. ...... .... ... 70 70
    W ine ............ . ..... .......... ..... .... .... . . 263 203
    Wool.. .............. .. ... .. .. ..... 1,398 1,398
    Zinc oxide........... ... ..... .... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 68 .. ....... 68
    Totals, August, 1928 .......... ... .. ............. . ... 243,405 595,539 838.944
    Totals, August, 1927 .... .... ... ........ 227,472 821.643 1,049,115
    Totals, August, 1926 .................... . .. ... 202,875 755.927 958,802


    Facilities for Shipping.
    The Panama Canal is equipped with all the facilities for the fueling, supply, and repair of ships
    which are found in modern ports.
    The coaling plants. with an aggregate storage capacity of 700,000 tons. can bunker ships up to
    1,500 tons an hour, practically as fast as it can be handled in ships' bunkers. Oil can be delivered
    as fast as the ships can take it, from 46 tanks aggregating approximately 2.361,040 barrels of storage
    capacity. Crude fuel oil. Diesel oil, and gasoline are sold.
    The ships' chandlery storehouses carry a wide variety of marine supplies and spare parts. The
    commissary stores sell foodstuffs, fresh meats, fruits, and vegetables, as well as clothing and a general
    line of goods for supplying about 30,000 people resident on the Isthmus. Ice plants, a large laundry.
    hotels, hospitals, and restaurants serve the passengers and crews of ships.
    A 1,000-foot dry dock. capable of receiving the largest ships built, a smaller dry dock. floating cranes,
    foundry, and amply equipped shops. employing about 1.100 men. provide the means of making prac.
    tically any kind of marine repairs.
    Ample space exists at either terminal of the Canal for the berthing of vessels, as well as large
    covered piers for the storage of cargo. These are modern structures, fireproof, ratproof. in splendid
    condition, well lighted and maintained in a clean and orderly condition.
    In general, the services to shipping at the Canal are such as have been developed and found ample
    and effective in the course of handling large traffic through the Canal in over 13 years of operation.


    Current Net Prices on Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil,
    and Coal.
    Crude fuel oil is delivered to vessels at either
    Cristobal or Balboa. from tanks of The Panama
    Canal, for $1.50 per barrel of 42 gallons.
    Diesel oil is sold by The Panama Canal at
    Cristobal at $1.80 per barrel.
    Crude fuel oil and Diesel oil are also sold by
    private companies with tanks at the Canal
    terminals, at prices which will be quoted by them
    on application. The prices at present are as
    follows: Crude fuel oil. $1.25 per barrel at Balboa
    and Cristobal. Diesel oil. Balboa only. $1.80 per
    barrel
    Coal is supplied to steamships, including war-
    ships of all nations, delivered and trimmed in
    bunkers at $8.00 per ton of 2,240 pounds at Cris-
    tobal, and $11.00 at Balboa. For ships in transit
    though the Canal, which are directed to take
    coal at Balboa. for the convenience of The
    Panama Canal, $8.00 per ton at Balboa. When
    coal is delivered from lighters in quantities of 50
    tons or more. the price is $900 per ton at Cris-
    tobal, $12.00 at Balboa. If less than 50 tons is
    taken from lighters, prices are SI 1 00 per ton at
    Cristobal and S14.00 per ton at Balboa with
    minimum charge for 20 tons and maximum
    charge not to exceed that for 50 tons at $9.00
    Cristobal and $12.00 Balboa. For furnishing
    lump coal for galley use, or run of mine coal, in
    sacks, $6.00 additional per ton; but if vessels fur-
    nishes sacks $3.00 additional per ton.
    Coal for cargo is sold only by special authority
    of the Governor, at prices quoted upon applica-
    tion.
    For trimming on deck, between decks, or
    special trimming in bunkers for convenience of
    vessel, when requested, an additional charge of
    90 cents per ton will be made for extra handling.
    Deliveries of coal to individual ships can be
    made up to 1,500 tons per hour, as fast as it can
    be handled in the ship's bunkers. Oil deliveries
    can be made up to 5.500 barrels per hour, rate
    depending on gravity of oil, location of shore
    tanks, and ship's facilities for handling.


    Official Circular.

    Appointment.
    THE PANAMA CANAL, EXECUTIVE OFFICE.
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z..September 14,1928.
    To all concerned-Effective September 18,
    1928. Mr. Roy R. Watson is appointed Chief
    Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, rice Mr.
    Robert K. Morris, resigned, and Mr. James H. K.
    Humphrey is appointed Superintendent, Supply
    Department, vice Mr. Roy R. Watson. promoted.
    By direction of Governor MI. L. WALKER.
    H. BURGESS,
    Act R GCorernor.


    Official Publications of Interest to Shipping.
    Masters may obtain from the office of the
    Captain of the Port, at either Cristobal or Balboa.
    without charge, the "Transit and Harbor Regu-
    lations of The Panama Canal." and the current
    Tariff of charges at the Canal for supplies and
    services.
    Requests for Canal publications sent by mail
    should be addressed to: The Panama Canal.
    Balboa Heights. C. Z.
    The Hydrographic Office at Cristobal main.
    tain at all times a complete stock of navigational
    charts and books, including charts of all parts of
    the world, sailing directions of the world, nautical
    tables, light lists, tide tables, nautical almanacs.
    etc.
    Copies of current issues of Pilot Charts, Notices
    to Mariners, and Hydrographic Bulletins may
    be obtained in return for marine information.
    Observations of weather, ocean currents, and
    other marine data collected, and blanks, instruc-
    Lions, barometric comparisons, etc., furnished.
    Correct time is maintained and chronometers
    rated.


    1..








    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD
    @ OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL.
    aI PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
    Subscription rates, domestic, $0.50 per year; foreign. $1.00; address
    The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or
    The Panama Canal, Washington. D. C.
    4. Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office
    at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879.
    Certiflate.-By direction of the Governor of The Panama Canal the matter contained herein is published as statistical
    information and is required for the proper transaction of the public business.

    Volume XXII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 26, 1928. No. 8.

    CANAL WORK IN AUGUST, 1928.

    The following is the report of the Acting Governor to the Secretary
    of War, of Canal work in August, 1928.
    BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., September 15, 1928.
    The Honorable, the Secretary of War,
    Washington, D. C.
    SiR: I have the honor to submit the following report covering operations of The
    Panama Canal during the month of August, 1928:

    NUMBER OF TRANSITS.
    During the month 526 commercial vessels passed through the Canal. In addition
    'to these, 6 nonseagoing launches, measuring under 20 tons, and 24 vessels belonging
    rto or chartered by the United States Government transited the Canal. There was
    (also one transit of a Colombian Government vessel and 6 transits of vessels solely
    Br repairs on which no tolls were collected, making a total of 563 transits for the
    month or a daily average of 18.16.
    h*Tolls on the 526 commercial vessels amounted to $2,199,069.31, and on the launches
    p $42.39, a total of $2,199,111.70, or a daily average on all traffic of $70,939.09.
    SThe total numbers of craft of all kinds transiting the Canal during the month
    |f August, 1928, as compared with the same month in 1927 and 1926, are shown in
    he following tabulation:

    August, August., August,
    1928. 1927. 1926.
    ercial vessels ...... ................... ................... ......... 526 543 464
    commercial vessels (Army and Navy) ........ ... ........ ........... 24 34 26
    vnchea (under 20 tons measurement)............ ... .. ... ............ 6 17 7
    an Governm ent vessels ...................... ...... ... ...... ... .. ... ......... ... I
    ian G overnm ent vessels....... ............ ....... ............ I ....... ... ...
    el for repairs .. ... ................................. ............ 6 2 ........
    Total vessels transiting Canal..... ................................. 563 596 498'


    In addition to the vessels listed above, Panama Canal equipment consisting of
    es, tugs, barges, etc., was passed through the locks as follows:

    North- South-
    bound. bound. Total.
    S...................................................... .. .......... 6 10 16
    M iguel.. ........... ............... .... .......... . .. .... 23 27 50
    aree............................................ 24 26 50
    O. ls. ............. ............................... ..................... 53 63 11650


    COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC.'
    he following tabulation shows the number of vessels, Panama Canal net tonnage,
    taad tons of cargo carried by vessels transiting the Canal each month from the
    gop the calendar year 1928 to the end of August, 1928, as compared with the
    kit 'in the preceding year:








    THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


    No. of Panama Canal net
    vessels. tonnage
    1927. 1928. 1927. 1928.
    4-13 540 2.121.631 2.422,770
    449 547 2,2n1,328 2.460,111
    496 512 2.413,999 2,441,077
    4h4 531 2,224,500 2.384,491
    471 508 3 2.248,892 2,274.612
    455 481 1 2,152,926 2,227.865
    509 509 2.406,955 23,.318.395
    543 526 2,513,614 2,437,246
    3,830 4.184 18.283.845 18.966.567


    Tons of cargo.

    1927. 1928.
    2,241,765 2.372,061
    2.230,107 2,660,425
    2,533.525 2,428,662
    2,.429.807 2.473,884
    2,379.713 2.497,588
    2,229,097 2,139.565
    2,450,468 2,291,955
    2,429,947 2,425,.336
    18,924,429 19,289,476


    Tolls.


    1927.
    $1,984,760 71
    1,994.860 82
    2.217,913 20
    2,065,206 92
    2,066,070 73
    1,970.377 97
    2,215,515 99
    2,274,040 55


    1928.
    $2,212.752.50
    2.253,755.37
    2,223,370.57
    2,187,607 82
    2,118,969.83
    2,016,211.09
    2,109.083 19
    2,199,069.31


    Month.


    January
    February.
    March.
    April .
    May ...
    June ....
    July ....
    August .
    Totals.


    Commercial traffic includes all ocean-going vessels paying tolls. Vessels in direct service of the United States
    Government, including merchant vessels chartered by the Government, do not pay tolls. Shipping Board vessels in
    commercial service pay tolls. Statistics on vessels not paying tolls are shown under "Noncommercial traffic."

    The following is a summary of the commercial traffic for August, 1928, as compared
    with the corresponding month in 1927 and 1926, and the monthly averages forth
    fiscal year 1928:

    Average per
    August, August, August, month for fiscal
    1928. 1927. 1926. year 1928.

    Number of vessels .. . 526 543 464 538
    Panama Canal r.et tonnage . 2,437.246 2,513,614 2.230,905 2.454,886
    United States net tonnage. . 1.856,567 1,957,705 1,752,102 1,905,316
    Registered grc.ss tonnage ... 3,057,245 3,188,317 2,866,120 3,100,239
    Registered net tonnage .1,870.211 1.952.572 1,760,522 1,903,974
    Tolls ... .. ... 2,199,069 31 $2,274.040 55 $2,055.041 91 $2.245,374.98
    Tons of cargo carried 2,425.336 2,429,947 2.321,697 2,469,225


    The average daily number of transits, tonnage, tolls, and cargo, are shown in the
    following statement, in comparative form, commercial vessels only:

    Average per day. Average
    Average
    August, August, August, per day for
    1928. 1927. 1926. fiscal year.
    Number of transit 16 97 17.52 14 96 17.63
    Panama Canal net tonnage 78,621 81,084 71,294 80.488
    Tolls ... .. $70,937 72 $73,356 15 $66,291 57 $73,618.85
    Tons of cargo carried ....... 78,23b 78,385 74,893 80,958


    AVERAGE TONNAGE, TOLLS, AND TONS OF CARGO PER VESSEL.
    The average tonnage, tolls, and tons of cargo per vessel transiting the Canal
    during the month of August, 1928, as compared with August, 1927 and 1926, are
    shown in the following tabulation:

    Average per vessel.
    August, August, August,
    1928. 1927. 1926.
    Panama Canal net tonnage . ... .. 4,633 4,629 4,808.
    United States net tonnage. 3.530 3,605 1,776
    Registered gross tonnage .... . 5.812 5,872 6,177
    Registered net tonnage ......... ... . .......... 3.555 3,596 3,794
    Tolls ... .... . $4,180 74 $4.187 92 $4,428.96
    Tons of cargo (including vessels in ballast) ... ..... ... 4,611 4.475' 5,006
    Tons of cargo (laden vessels only); ... .. ..... 5,525 6,000 6,174


    TOLLS.
    At present, tolls are collected at rates of $1.20 per net ton for laden vessels and 72
    cents per ton for vessels in ballast, computed on the basis of the Panama Canal rules
    of measurement, with the provision that tolls shall not exceed $1.25 per ton nor be
    less than 75 cents per ton as determined in accordance with the United States rules
    for measurement of net registered tonnage. In order to ascertain the proper tolls
    charges it is necessary, therefore, that the net tonnage of vessels transiting the Canal
    be determined both in accordance with the Panama Canal and the United States
    rules of measurement.





    a.'f :


    16,788,746.89 17,320,819.68


    I