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 1910
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PCANAL DLOC



Panama Canal record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097368/00003
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal record
Physical Description: 34 v. : ill., tables, diagrs. ; 24-30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States
Publisher: The Panama Canal etc.
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Canal Zone etc
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone etc
Publication Date: 1909/1910
Frequency: monthly[july 1933-1941]
weekly[ former 1907-june 1933]
monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-34, no. 9; Sept. 4, 1907-April 30, 1941.
Numbering Peculiarities: No more published.
Issuing Body: Published under the authority and supervision of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 1907-Mar. 1914; of the Panama Canal, Apr. 1914-1941.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01761828
lccn - 07035378
oclc - 1761828
Classification:
System ID: UF00097368:00003

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Index
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    1909
        Page A-1
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Full Text


























UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES


I


































Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from Lyrasis and the Sloan Foundation


http: www.archive.org details canalrecord3152isth









CANAL RECORD









PUBLISHED WEEKLY UNDER THE
AUTHORITY AND SUPERVISION OF
THE ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION







SEPTEMBER 1, 1909, TO AUGUST 24, 1910








VOLUME III.
WITH INDEX


ANCON, CANAL ZONE
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION
1910.























































MOUNT HOPE, CANAL ZONE
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION PRINTING OFFICE
1910.
























A
ACCIDN irS-
Bla.tmng. 203. 221.
Drowning. 100 115. 370 403.
Electrocution. 13. 69.
Gatun Spillway, 260
Lightning. 59.
Poisorung at Gaoun mess. 397
Railroad. 13. 59, 69. 260. 267. 306. 325. 403.
Steam shovel. 131.
Agriculture-
Alfalfa growing. 33?.
Chinqui. investigation of resources. 26.
Experts on. visit of. 90.
Garden and landscape work. 4. 9. 27. 55. 155. 179,
233. 306. 353. 390.
Agua Dulce pumping station. 129. 213. 313.
Air Compressors. 36. 110. 177.
Amazon River, health conditions on. 74.
Ancon-
Administration building. changes in. 230.
Balboa water service extension. 25.
Cold storage plant. 9. 257.
Corral building. 129. 209. 316.
Dramatic Club. benefit performance. 405.
Hospital. See Hospital.
Port of. See Balobo
Quarry-
Shlide at 65. 122
Crusher plant. See Rock Crushers.
Water supply. 25.
Anthropological research, 410.
Appropriations. See Finances of Canal.
Assessments for sanitary improvements, 195.
Atlanuc Athletic Association. 118.
Atlanuc Division-
Breakwaters. See Breakwater
Concrete work. See Concrete.
Division Engineer acting. 39. 247
Dredges. See Dredges.
Dredging. See Dredging.
Excavation. See Excavation.
Gatun Dam. See Dam.
Spillway. See Spillway
Locks. Se LoL:ks.
Marine Shop-. 1. 9. 163. 185. 186. 195. 257. 313
329. 353 38S. 410
Storehouses transferred to Quartermaster's Depart.
ment. 119.
Tug service. 30 127. ItO 135.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer. monthly
reports.
Atlantic entrance-
Excavation. 81. 130. 185. 346. 402
Navigation 393.

B
BAGGAGE on tugs 135.
Balboa-
Electric and compressed air plant. 106
Harbor plans. 153. 186. 217 273. 369.
Magazine for dynamite. 139.
Manne shops. work. 42. 188 307.
Mess hall reopened. 25.
Port of-
Vessels entering and clearing. quarterly re-
port. 285.
Weekly reports. See each issue
Quarantine stauon, razing of. 177. 193.
Water service extension. 25.
Band concerts. See each -suse.
Barges-
Assembling at Balboa shipways. 42.
Concrete construction. 187, 2i3. 337. 402.
Towing machines. 162.
See also Tugs.
Baseball Leagues. 67, 92.


INDEX.


Bas Obiapo-
Chapel 78.
Fire station, contract let. 34.
Bathing beach. Panrima. petition. 44. 54.
Bayano Lumber Compan-.' native lumber. 42 74 130.
Bicycle race at Ancon. 381
Births, registration or. 51
Blaciaburn. Hon. Jo. C. S. reception and resignation,
35. 54. 107.
Boiler inspection urcnrargei. 295.
Boilers and loc.:omotives unit for service. 307.
Bonding companies, exemption trom payment of license.
171.
Boquete limited accommodation at. 1.
Boundary monuments. Canal Zone 326.
Brazil. health cunditions on Amazon 74
Breakwater-
Limon Bay construction. 105. 201. 268 285. 330.
401
See also Toro Point
Naos Island. 17. 177.
Bridges-
French it Gamboa. removal. 209
Gamboa. 181.
Gatun Spillway. construction. 209.
Lumber for repairs. 322.
Buildings--
Changes in. 23. 33. 218. 266 321. 377
Construction and repairs, accounts. 400
Contract work at Ancon. 313
Cost statement. 387.
Destruction or removal. 11.
Improvements. 218.260,37?.
New. plans approved. 33. 49. 73
Quarantine station. Li Folie Dingier. 177. 193.
Recreaton. 9. 44. i189
Buoy for Porto Bello harbor. 42.
Burglarines at Empire and Culenra. 395.



CABLE MESNAGES. hill rate for employes 41i.
Cableway tower at Gatun. collapse 13. 105.
Camacho reservoir and spillwjv. 281
Camp Elliott-
Food supplies 15.
Quarters net. 49.
Canal Zone-
Bounda.' monuments. 326.
Survey 74. 345.
Canoes. construc.ron. 194. 281
Cargo handling. 1. 114. 21i.
Cars-
Dump. contract 154.169.178 186.217 409
Flat painting. 140.
Measurement, standard load. 285 326
Repairs. machined lumber. 35. 209.
Cement-
Bags returned to States. 100.
Checking and accounting of deliveries. 335.
Deliveries on Isthmus. 146. 201. 217 2 11. 249. 258,
305.331.
Unloading plants. 53. 186. 403.
See alsu Concrete.
Cemetery. Mount Hope. improvements. 357.
Central Division-
Chagres section. See Gatun Lake.
Culebra Cut See Culebra Cut.
Division Engineer. acting. 295, 326
Dumps. material handled 388.
Dynamite used. record. 240. 210
Empire shops. 25. 31. 259.
Excavation. See Excavation.
Gorgona office abolished. 49.
Lidgerwood unloaders. monthly records. See Un-
loaders.
Organization changes. 290, 317. 326.


Central Division-
Resident Engineer, acting, 416.
Steam shovels. See Steam shovels.
Spoil, dumping at Balboa and Miraflores, 388.
Track shifters work. See Track shifters.
Track construction, 387, 402.
Transportation service and records, 329, 337, 370.
338.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly
reports.
Chagres River-
Closing of at Gatun, 273, 329.
Discharge of, 141, 273, 277.
Freshets, 93, 97, 105, 114, 122, 137, 139, 145, 193.
Gauging stations, 210, 385.
Stages. See each issue.
Survey of basin, 12.
Work along. See Gatun Lake, and Excavation.
Chairman and Chief Engineer-
Acting, appointment, 7, 295.
Assistant to Chairman, acting, 232.
Reports, monthly, 28, 60, 108, 132, 172, 204, 236,
276, 308, 340, 372, 412.
Office-
Changes, 295.
Third Division, acting chief, 23.
Cham6. sand service, 18, 42, 58, 83, 100, 121, 146. 185,
229, 253, 290, 322, 355, 395.
Charcoal, manufacture. 194,281.
China and crockery, commissary sales, 46.
Chinese dead, removal, 316.
Chiriqui-
Agricultural resources, investigation, 26.
Steamship service, 163.
Churches in the Canal Zone, 381. 388, 405.
Church work. See various issues.
Circuit Court building at Ancon. alterations, 377.
Circulars, official-
Annual reports for employes, 55.
Applica3ions for increase in force or pay. 135.
Appointment and reappointment of employee, 95.
Assistant to Chairman, acting. 232.
Atlantic Division-
Division Engineer, acting, 39, 247.
Sand and stone service, 151,
Storehouses, transfer. 119
Baggage on tugs, 135.
Boiler inspection surcharges, 295.
Boilers and locomotives, unserviceable, 307.
Boundary monuments, 326.
Buildings-
Construction and repair accounts, 400.
Destruction or removal, 111.
Cars, measurement of contents, 285, 326.
Cement, checking and accounting, 335.
Central Division-
Division Engineer, acting, 295, 326.
Empire shops transfer. 31.
Re..ident Engineer. acting 416.
Superintendent of Construction, 317.
Chairman and Chief Engineer, acting, 7, 295.
Chief Engineer's office-
Changes in, 295.
Third Di' ,ion. cling chief. 23.
Circulars, copies to De sent to Chairm in. 191.
Civil Administration Department of-
Head of, appointment, 55, 301.
Timekeeper acting chief, 400.
Clearance neces sar for reemployment. 215.
Clubhouses, Superintendent of, 78. 103, 127.
Coal for Canal uork 215.
Coins. U. S fractional. exchange. 55
Collector of Revenues. acting, 407
Colon Hospital change of Superintendent. 232.








4

Circulars-
Commissary-
Manager, acting. .07.
Storekeepers. appointment, 416.
Compla3ntm employes. 199.
Contractors employee medical attention, 285.
Coupon book. rules governing use, 7, 143, 407.
Court attlnd.nr~e 23.
Customs duty, form for remission, 167.
Dentist, Gorgona, 307.
Disbursing Officer, acting, 15.
Dogs, muzzling, 232.
Electric current-
Charge for, 335.
For lights only, 224.
Empire shops transferred to Central Division, 31.
Employes--
Appointments and reappointments. 95.
Assignments, temporary, 95.
Complaints, method of handling. 199.
Court attendance, pay, 23.
European laborers, 255, 275,
Hourly, leave with pay, 127, 407.
Injured, pay and work, 15, 255.
Laborers, time vouchers, 224,
Overtime pay, 55, 175, 183, 400.
Ratings, and rates of pay. 55, 150, 199, 262,
275. 295, 301,367. 374, 383, 416.
Recruiting, requisition form, 47.
Requisitions, 103, 255.
Service slip, 262.
Sick certificates, rules governing, 103, 342.
Sick In quarters, 103.
Sick leave, transit time. 255.
Shop rules, 119, 374.
Special trains, use of equipment. 63.
Steamship transportation, 262, 374.
Vacation status when changed from monthly
to hourly basis, 407.
Engineers, traveling, jurisdiction and duties, 39.
Estimates for 1911-12, 307.
Examiner of Accounts, acting, 255.
Expenditures, classified, changes, 375, 383.
Fire alarms, 39.
Firemen on silver roll, 295.
Freight rate for employes, 175.
Freight shipments on passenger trains, 407.
Gardening, landscape, transfer, 55.
Gatun Lake property settlement, 167.
Hand cars, operation, 119.
Harbor Master, Canal Zone ports, 135.
Health Officer, Panama, 199.
Holidays, 7, 55, 78, 95, 127. 199. 238, 307. 350.
Horse and rig, corral charges, 199.
Hospital service, bills, 39.
Hotel books, rules governing use, 143, 407.
Hotel Tivoli rates, 87.
Hunting permit applications, 224.
Ice orders, 407, 416.
Infants in hospitals with sick mothers, 382.
Inspector of shops, appointment. 285, 374.
Invoices between divisions, 215.
Jamaica, vacations, 317.
King Edward, death, 310.
Labor train. Gatun.Culebra, 255.
Laborers--
European, employment, 255, 275.
Time vouchers, 224.
See also Employes.
Laundry rates, reduction, 183.
Leases in Gatun Lake area to be cancelled, 167.
Leave with pay for hourly men, 127, 407.
Liquor licenses in Canal Zone, 285.
Local Inspectors, board of. 95, 262.
Locomotive repairs, 159'.
Longevity increases, computation, 15.
Lubricanis-
Rules governing use, 87, 247, 301, 367.
Lumber, old car. 232.
Material-
Pricing of, 159.
Unserviceable, disposal of, 400.
Meal tickets, new form, 307.
Mechanical Division-
Acting officials, 183.
Superintendent, 285.
Medical service for contractors, 285.
Metal check requisite for pay, 119.
Obaldla, President, funeral, 224.


INDEX

Circulars-
Oil lubricating-
Standard containers, 367, 416.
Use of, 87, 247, 301.
Overtime pay, 55, 175, 183, 400.
Pacific Division, storehouses transferred, 1 2I.
Panama railroad. See Panama railroad.
Pay ratings, 55, 150, 199, 262, 275, 295, 301. 367.
374, 383, 416.
Pay roll table, error, 262.
Plant turned into storehouse, 301, 400.
Plants, ornamental, law protecting, 355.
Police, Chief of.143, 191.
Property-
Accountable officials. 151.
Deductions for lost or damaged, 199.
Gatun Lake area, settlement, 167.
Transfer, 47, 207.
Prosecuting Attorney, 271.
Public works, acting Superintendent, 78, 262.
Purchasing officer, acting, 47.
Quartermaster's Department-
Acting Chief Quartermaster, 15, 416.
District Quartermasters, changes and appoint-
ments, 23, 47, 127, 343.
Depot Quartermaster, acting, 43.
Gardening, landscape, 55.
Ratings and rates of pay, 55, 150, 199, 262, 275,
295, 301, 367, 374, 383, 416.
Recruiting employes, form. 47.
Repair work, approval, 15.
Reports, annual, for employes, 55.
Requisitions for employes, 103, 255.
Rifle, gun and pistol clubs, 159.
Sand in railroad cars, 285. 326.
Sanitation, Department of-
Chief, of; acting, 55, 307.
Hospital service bills, 39.
Shipments, entry free of duty, 167,
Shops-
Inspector of, 285, 374,
Rules for employes, 119, 374.
Sick certificates, rules governing, 103, 342.
Signal and interlocking work, 207.
Steamship rates for employes, 50, 295.
Steam shovels, care, 15.
Storehouses, transfer. 119, 127.
Subsistence Officer, acting, 7, 307.
Surcharge, reduction, 247.
Survey of instruments, 255.
Telegraph and telephones-
Superintendent of. 207, 342.
Telephone calls by number, 285.
Time vouchers for laborers, 224.
Train service, rates, 295.
Trainmen on monthly basis, 127.
Trains, special, 26, 63.
Transfer of plant, 47, 207.
Transportation-
Committee appointed, 407.
Families of employes, 262, 374.
Forms, 317.
Half rate requests, 93, 191.
Passes, inspection and signing, 301.
Payment, New York to Colon, 87.
Sixty-trip tickets, 307.
Steamship rates for employes, 50, 295.
Twenty-four trip tickets, 167.
Traveling engineers, jurisdiction, 39, 151, 374.
United Fruit Company's change in sailings, 247.
Vacancies by reduction of force, 183.
Veterinarian, 167.
Work requests, changes, 350, 416.
See also Executive Orders.
Citizenship, effect of residence in Canal Zone, 5, 348,
Civil Administration, Department of-
Chief Timekeeper, acting, 400.
Executive Secretary, position abolished, 322.
Head of, 55, 257, 275, 301. [reports.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly
Civil Service-
Appointment rules, amendment, 187.
Examination notices, 45, 54, 59, 102, 141,149, 157,
188, 194, 203, 379, 387, 410.
Retirement Association. 45, 107.
Clubhouses, Commission-
Recreation hall, Corozal, 9.
Regulations, 14, 106.
Report for 1908-09, 45.


Clubhouses-
Superintendent of. '8. 103. 127.
See abo eah isrue
Coal-
Barge for delivery to ships. 93.
Contract. 29;.
Delieries. 89. 298.
Pur':hasd from P. R R.. 215.
Quality, investigauon,. 143.
tTnloading plant at Miourn Hope. 4.
Cocolh Lake-
SLatershed,. 310, : 5.
Water supply. 10. 24 '. 265, 362.
Coins-
Counterfeit. iarnlng agalns 10. 203.
Frciiunal. exchange. 55.
Cold stor.ge. See Lonml.n.Iary.
Colombia. no demand for laiorcrs. 221.
Colon-
Breakixater., :on.tru.:tlon. 105. 201. 265. 285. 330,
401. .Ie a!;.5 Toro Point
Electrical storm. 370
Explosion or d:.nhrnite. 30.
Harbor 1h91.5 314. Ai3.
HoispIal. See Hospltal. [j 3R. 353. 410.
Improtme,,'ntS,. municipal. 5;. 94, 1:9. 218, 233.
LibrarN, public. 14Q.
Lighung. 33.
QuLaranune station damaged by storm. 355.
S, hool bulnmgL new. 242.
Writer 3r% ice. 131.
aetelezs station. 313.
Comacho resenoir. 73. 281.
Commissarv-
Buddmngs. addionrs. 9
Bulletin. Isutog. 398.
Camp Elliott food supplhem. 35.
China ani.i .rckery saile. 46.
Cold stur.age plants. 0, 2571. 394
Prices. 5,e each ssuen
C-orouA. 73. 14o.
Coupon books. rules governing. ;. 401.
Emplovyes, add.innA rtLirgs 55
Fruit and vegetable ;uppll.. I J. 299. 362.
Grocerine. coniumcrnior,, 38
Ice ordei.-. 07. 416
Improvements, 1.5
Manager. acting. 417.
Mllrfluire. J17.
Prices, :com rpans.:'r. 201.
t'ales. special. 11 5
Stortkeepers. di~iriLt. 416
Compressed air. ai.Jirotn, t.o plants. 36 110. 171.
Contrete-
barges cun;tra,._tu of. 187. 2:3. 337. 402.
F.stimnt Pedro I, ihgul jni Mir.flores Locks, 189.
Gatun lh:.idl.ng and Tisxjrn- pla t 1-3, 18, 370.
Locks an-I .Idimi n'ioll, reports. 196. 228. 252.
N'-2. 36I. ')b
,'e ikl. rc[.'.rrt. See ea.h s:,sue.
Reinflor.cemen :tecl rails for. 5;.
l: t .,'iter. eric:' on, 401.
Still ,. Ga Ln Dam Ser Sptilway.
ThermomTiler; to '-elermine temperature, 267.
Weight of a bl.:k. 261
1r;e dlii, Cern.:nrt.
Cnngre'pmnc '. t.tLng 'o, 58. 00. 2,. 90. 97. 100. 140.
Co.nisulr .otr,. j:2.
Contrat:lor: employ-.i mrietj'al .eri,':e 285.
Contricts,. tule ior a%.ardrg. o.p.rsn of Attorney.
General. 314.
Corozal-
Comml-ar ouilading, 73. 146
Fire. 10.
Re.:reation building. 9. 44
Corral building at Arcon 129. -'l0" 31t
Costa IRica-
E:rtlh.uake. 265 29v,, 2lo 123. 14..
Quaramn.lne ajdn'ilt. J54.
Counaril .,rnd Chid Ar'oirn.: appo,ntmen;n 234
Counter -it com.n 1i0 ,03.
Ct-upon L-.ok rulte: g= erninc une. 7. 143. 407.
Court. llrit tric.nr r-I )dCeArrl.c n 403
Cristobal-
Cement unl., ,d,ng plant. 53. 186. 403
Docks 56 114. 1S5. 369.
Lighting 33 [313 329. 353. 385. 410.
Marine .hops, %ork. 1. 9. 162, 185. 186, 195. 257.
RainfIIl, unusually heavy. 51.










Culebra Cut-
Drainage. 25. 43. 169. 253. 385.
Excavation-
Charts. profile and crois sec.ion. 68. 284.
See also Excavauon.
Fossils for Smithsonian Institute. 9, 50, 146. 266.
Night work, 315.
Obispo Diversion. 51. Io0 289. 305.
Rains. heavy. 43. 51. 59 73. Q0. 160
Slides. 18. 98. 105. 115. 122. 161. 250. 297. 305 306.
Spoil from. 229. 329. 337.
Tracks, construction. .387. 402.
Culebra [.land. water service. 139. 169. 242. 16.3
Culebra village, improvements. 106. 229. 331.
Customs-
Regulations U. S.. 275.
Remission of. form for. 167.

D
DAIRY, Ancon Hospital. 195, 265. 337.
Dam. Gatun-
Dry filling. 14. 147.
Fill placed, monthly records, 196 228, 252.
292. 324, 364. 396.
Freshets, 99.
Hydraulic fill. 185. 369. 411.
Slide on toes. 289.
Track layout. 360.
West Diversion closed. 7_3.
See also monWthl reports
Miraflores. fill placed See ,montld yi,,.rr
Hydraulic fill 120 233. 313.
Pedro Miguel. fill placed. See mansi.; rel ,,lr.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer. monthly
reports.
Deaths. See Obituaries.
Dentist at Gorgona, 307.
DepositorieB of Canal Zone funds. 140.
Dike. Gatun to Mindi. j77.
Diplomatic Corps. directory. 2'2.
Directory-
Canal officials. S. 88. 184. 203. 320.
Diplomatic and consular corps. 272.
Notaries Public. 01.
Panamanian officials. 272
Disbursing Officer. acting. 15.
Ditching machine, railroad. 377.
Diversion channel s-
Chagrea at Gatun. closing of. 223. 329.
Obispo. 51, 160. 289. 305.
Docks-
Channel. deepening at Cristobal. 369.
Completion of No. 13. Cristobal. 185.
Freight. handling. No 14. Cr.trobal. 1 14.
Sand. Balboa. 100, I; 229. :533
Unloading sand and rock. 281.
Work at No. 12. Crinstoal. 58.
Dogs. muzzling of. suspension of order. 232.
Drainage, Culebra Cut. 25. 43. 169. 253. 385.
Dredges-
Crew shiats. 393.
Dipper. ten-yard, requisition. 122.
French. renewed. I. 9. 186. 385
Ladder, bids and contract. 2:3. 394. 401
Repairs. 185. 188. 195. 251. 3*3;.
Sandpiper, transfer to. Il4.
Spud, construction. 410.
Suction. twenty-inci-
Loss of. on wsa, to Isthmue. 120.
New. for fill of Gatun Dam 313. 329. 353.
Dredging-
Monthly records. 17, 49. 81. I13. 153 193 225,.
249. 289. 321. 361, 393.
Monthly since American occupation. 20. 52 84.
116. 156. 157. 196. 223. 249, 252. 292 324. 364.
396.
See also Dam. Gatun,
Dynamite---
Central Diviaion records. 241, 270.
Contract for. 313.
Estimate for 1911. 293.
Explosion at Colon. 30
Magazine at Balboa. 139.
Prices paid. 330.
Shipments received, 25. 123.
E
EARTHQUAKE-
Costa Rica. record of. 265. 290. 299. 323, 342.
Isthmian, seismograph records, 5. 306.


INDEX

Electric Current-
Charge for. 335.
For ightng onl.'. 224.
Electric power plant-
Balboa. 10r.
Mirarlorre. 18. 40. 100. 212.
Porto Bello. ?5
Electrical iuppl :.e r'qu.m]ii n. 1 77
Empire--
Conmmarsnary ajdlitiln Q
i.hb.ps Sre Stiep..
Emrplc es-
Aliens on gold roll. I 9.
Appo)mtm. nt and repij.:,.nr.-ent. 95 115.
Cable me;.ages at hall rate. 415.
Freigti rat,.. 14;, 175
Houri.'-
Holjida work. pay. 2;. 1"5
Lea e. vacaLtorn. lu. 127. Lul7.
Injured-
Luablht% Act. 275.
Pay tor tim. lo0t. 255.
Relief, 211.
Work. 15
Leave-
Hourly men. 12,. 3 u.
Resignation. 27.
Liabilit$ Act. ariendment. 2.s5.
Lanugerii.' in..rr.-..s. computation. I5
MedalS .Sc, MedalQ
PrUmotio, in engineering p.:.ilt,ons 251.
Ratings and rte, of ray. 55. 15I. 199. 262. 275,
2J,5. Iul, 07. 374. 383. 41o.
Recruistng o', form. 47.
TransporLai.iuln-
FamriLs of empl,, e:.. 2-2.
Free to N,. ', ork. I J1.
Half ratr re,1ue.tsi, 1i. 93. 191
Paise.. railro-d. 3),l
Stemirnhip r-te. 50. '. 4 314
TickLet. t,;ents f.ur .n. -ivi trip. 16;. 307.
.'cjtlon stati .-. lien h ng,d I'rorm munthli to
hourly basil. 40-.
Employment-
Central Americin Rail.a$ emrplos 247.
On the lithmus. 115
Engineer Corp.. U. A. Lieutenair.n in'tructon. 89.
Equipment. misrklng, 201. 210
Estmates--
Canal ,-:.rk for 1011. 37
Fortiri,-:nonic, 300
Eucalyptus lumber .penrmentI ;4. I ;.
Examcmaer of Ak..ount; stiung. 235
Ex ,vst.on-
ALianiiL Di-.si.n See. Exa juann lablei. monthly.
AlantLc entran.:e. 8I, lI3, 41)2
Se, al.o month i trepot.
Central Divis on-
Chagre.3 peruns'ilas. 250
Completed portions or Canal. 385. .'93
Contracr,. 101, 154. 1M6 22r, 234. 401
CuLehra Cut-
Charts. profile and ,.ro= e'tlon. 65. 284.
Dr.' wvatther re:.or'l 169.
Etim3te. 3,O!.
Recor.J hi 33. 1 3. i1 ; 241. 2o 3ol
Ste al0 o E 1,4a SioSi.'.L m.'nthih and monthly
Ip-F..I:-
Dreigmng See E c it itis...n tal.e: mont.ii .
See ai.o, Drdr=emg
Estlirn.tcm-
Central Diviion. 361
French. 63
Revis.,I, ,'3.
Special report on work b:, French, 124
French records 83 124
FrenLh canal to (.atun Io2
Gatun Lake 21. lol 186. 281. 384
Halfway, mark pjs d. 49. 68. 157.
Fiydraulhc. 21U 254. i45.
See a/lo Dredging.
Mamei and Catmno 17t
Original Canal dug 240.
Rock. sub-a.lueous. I. 42. 139. 281.
Pacafic Divilion. ..,ee E.xcaiianon aNes. monthly
Steam shovels See Steam'shovelg and ntilhly
tables.


5

Excavation,-
Tables-
Monthly records, 17, 49.81,113,153,193,225,
249, 289, 321, 361, 393.
Monthly records since American occupation,
20, 52, 84, 116, 156, 157, 196, 228, 249, 252.
'92, 324 364. 396.
Six years' i,:urd. 284.
Two years' record, 90.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly
reports.
Executive Orders-
Bonding companies, exemption from payment of
license, 171.
Civil service appointments, 187.
Courts, limitation of jurisdiction, 403.
Criminal procedure, code, amendment to, 283.
Employes, executive, relation to Congress, 131.
Executive Secretary, position abolished, 322.
Hotel registers, keeping, 335.
Humane laws, 67.
Hunting laws,37, 131.
Law officers, duties, 283.
Liquor c.:n :. collection, 267.
Local In. c,-tori Board of, 67, 203.
Pro,tectI,.n 0 C inal works, regulations, 395.
Recruiting of laborers forbidden, 105, 115.
Sanitary improvements assessments, 195.
Steamboat inspectors may administer oaths, 203.
Thatcher, Maurice H., appointment as Commis-
sioner, 275.
Train dispatchers, hours, 115.
Expenditures, classified, 5, 265. 291, 331, 363, 175. 383
391.
F
FINANCE, S. S., claims resulting from sinking, 70.
Finances of Canal-
Allotments for 1909-10, 5.
Appropriations, 337, 345, 380.
Visit of House Committee, 26, 58, 66, 82, 90,
97, 100.
Depositaries for Canal Zone funds, 140,
Estimates for 1911, 37, 307.
Expenditures, classified, 5, 263, 291, 331, 363. 375.
383. 391.
Fire protection-
Alarms, 39.
Firemen on silver roll, 295.
Fires in Canal Zone, 10, 157, 258. 394.
Hose drying tower, 143.
Station at Bas Obispo, 34.
Volunteer company at Gatun, 188.
Fish for extermination of mosquito larvae, 50.
Fly,warning and crusade against, 31, 365.
Fortifications Board, visit and report, 100, 178, 238,
251, 300.
Fossils from Culebra Cut, 9, 50. 146, 266.
Fourth of July celebrations, 37, 274, 291, 325, 332, 338,
346, 348, 350, 358, 366, 381.
Fraternal organizations. See each issue.
Freight-
Canal, handled by P. R. R., 43.
Handling of at Pacific entrance, 217.
Quartermaster's Department to handle. 114.
Ratei for emplo%.-. 147, 175.
Shipmintn on passenger trains, 407.
See alsj Panamm railroad.
French-
Canal. deepening of, 162,346.
Excavation r.eords SI 1?4
MaN.hmnery used in Canal work. 92, 139, 187.
Frijoles--
Police station transferred, 395.
Village, new, 217.
Fruits, supply for Canal workers, 14, 299, 362.
Funds, Canal Zone depositaries, 140.

GAMBOA-
French bridge removed, 209.
River gaug-ing range ree.italihshed. 385.
Gardens-
Ancon Hoapital. 390.
Experimental, discontinued, 9.
School, 155,179,306.353.
Gardening, landscape, transferred to Quartemaster's
Department. 55
Gatun-
Cablewa% tower, colliyap. of. 33.
Dam. See Dam.











Gatun-
Dke. Gatun to mindi 3:7
Fre 301
).l. enlrarg- ment. 10,;
La.borer, p.tiioned l:;
Lake--
Excavation and clearing, 21, 49, 92, 154, 161,
186, 194, 281.
FlooIrlin 141, 273,377.
Property settlement, 167.
Locks. See Locks.
Power house, accident, 226.
Qumrteri addiuonal 42, 121.
Spillway. See Spillway.
Water supply, 4, 18, 100, 121, 217, 330.
Good Fr.d :. a holiday, 238.
Gorgona-
Commissary additions. 9.
Dramatic Club, benefit performance. 6.
Shops. See Shops.
Grass cutting contests, 4.
Groceries, consumption by employes, 38.
H
HAIL STORM, 323.
Hand cars, operation, 119.
Harbor Master, Canal Zone ports, 135.
Health Officer, Panama, appointment, 199.
Hermit of Empire, 316.
Herrera, M acquital of murder, 4.
Highways, Canal Zone. 26, 100, 142, 209, 257, 285, 409
Prison labor, 91
Slides, 73, 187.
Tax or toll, 305.
Holiday pay for hourly employes, 27.
Iloli.a, 7, 55, 78, 95, 127. 199, 238, 307, 350.
Horse and carriage, corral charges, 199.
Horses for Police Department, 397.
Hospital-
Ancon-
Dairy, 195. 265, 337.
Gardens, 390.
Poultry farm, 161. 195, 265.
Waid numbers, 36
Bills for services, 39.
Colon-
Improvements, 353, 402.
Superintendent, appointment, 232.
Hotel-
Coupon books, rules governing, 143, 407.
Registers, keeping of, 335.
Tivoli, rates at, 87.
Washington, at Colon, 4, 106, 315, 363.
Humane laws, 67.
Humane Societies, 107, 339, 382, 405, 414.
Hunting laws, 37, 131, 146.
Hydraulic work-
Excavation at Miraflores, 129, 233, 234, 345.
Fill of Gatun Dam, 185, 369, 411.

I I
Ica, rules for supplying, 407, 416.
Immigration of laborers, 58, 356.
Indemnity for American sailors, 18.
Infants in hospitals with mothers, 382.
Insane Asylum, new building, 140.
Inspector of Shops, appointment, 285, 374.
Instruments, survey of those for sale, 255.
Insurance, Life in the Canal Zone, 124, 131.
Interlocking system on Panama railroad, 36, 207, 395.
Invoices between divisions, 215.
J
JAIL AT GATUN, enlargement, 105.
Jamaica, vacation leave, 317.
Jury trial of Secundino Pinedo, 37, 59.

LABOR-
Force and quarters, monthly*reports, 30, 66, 106.
130, 162, 202, 242, 267, 299, 323, 356. 357, 380.
Prison, 91.
Shortage of, temporary, 100.
Labor day, a holiday, 7.
Labor recruiter, arrest and deportation. 122. 363.
Labor train, Gatun-Culebra, 255.
Laborer, Spanish, heroism, 221.
Laborers-
European, employment, 255.
Contract, preference. 275.
Excavation test of quality, 401.
Immigration, 58, 356.


INDEX

Laborers-
Pay, 255
Poisoning at Gatun, 397.
Recreation halls, 9, 189.
Recruiting on Zone forbidden, 105, 115.
Subilten.:r opcrtiun- [for isx months. 163.
Tim,- souihr.:. 224
West Indian, 4, 9, 146,
La Folie Dingier, razing, 177, 193.
Lake region. See Gatun Lake.
Landscape work, transfer and continuation, 9, 55.
Laundry-
Rates, 183, 248.
Unclaimed, list, 70.
Launch for Gatun Lake, 313.
Launch Mauretania, sinking, 195, 221.
Laws, Canal Zone-
Birth registrations, 51.
Hotel registers, 335.
Humane, 67.
Hunting, 37, 131, 146.
Local Inspectors, jurisdiction, 67, 203.
Plants, protection, 335.
Postal Savings Bank, 348.
Rifle, gun and pistol clubs, 159.
Tariff, 35.
See also Executive Orders.
Leave. See Employes.
Legation building, American, improvements, 321.
Letters, misdirected See each issue.
Liability Act, amendment, 275.
Lidgerwood cars, steel side stakes, 106.
Lidgerwood unloaders--
Central Division, monthly records, 9, 51, 90, 140,
164, 194, 243, 260, 291, 326.
Testing cables, 33.
Life saving medals awarded, 90.
Lighter, raising, 321.
Lightning-
Laborer killed, 59.
Precautions and rules for resuscitation, 75.
Lion Hill, town site abandoned, 329.
Liquor licenses-
Collection, 267.
Granting of, and list of holders, 285, 335, 338, 385.
Locks-
Caisson seats, 107.
Concrete See weekly and monthly statements.
See also Concrete.
Conduits, French pipe, 186.
Excavation See monthly statements.
Fender chains, anchors. 401.
Gates, materials for, 233, 347.
Gate valves, machinery, 394.
Model of locks, 89.
Pressure on gates, tidal and salt water, 377.
Reinforcement, steel rail, 57.
Rock for locks, concrete. See Rock crushers.
Sand for locks, concrete. See sand.
Valve seats, 130, 146.
GATUN LOCKS--
Auxiliary concrete plant, 113.
Back fill and foot bridge, 386.
Cable, stranding of, 369.
Cableways tower, collapse, 33, 105.
Castings set in concrete, 226.
Concrete records. See weekly and monthly
statements.
Concrete laying begun, 1.
Concrete cooling, thermometers to indicate,
267.
Excavation progress, 283.
Floor, plans, 33.
Plant for concrete, 1.
Progress of construction, 85, 165, 283. 291,
305. 329. 353, 397,409.
Rainy weather work, 389.
Rock, large, in concrete, 379.
MIRAFLORES LOCKS-
Concrete work begun, 378.
Drainage, 42, 51.
Estimate of concrete, 189.
Power plant, 212.
Progress of construction, 178, 225, 305, 378,
404.
PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS-
Concrete work begun, 3.
Cranes of lndlr.g plant 233 30,2
Drainage, 42, 51.


Locka-
Pedro Miguel-
Estimate of concrete 189.
Power plant. 212.
Progress of construction, 17; 241. 201. 305.
397. 404
Rainy weather work 380.
Ship basin. 265.
Locomotives-
Firemen. r-te; of pay. 383.
French ,n use. 187.
HotliMs and repair. Ill. 159
Unlit for s.rvLC. disposition. 307.
Louge hill% regulations. I I.
Longevity incra3iri. computat on. 15.
LubricantI, S Oh1
Lumber-
Bridge. 322
Car disposal ?12
Car repair 209
Euclvyptus exDeriments with. 74. 177.
Native 12. i4 130.
M
MA'- -t'LIGHTER t',olombiin continued. 59
M I ... -l Ca,a.3l for C'ngr.~.s 137.
MN3raithn rmce An.-on. 36'
H.arinr L'ori- eI'pediluinry brigade. 234. 267. 322.
3.i3
,.1 ine as hop; .N,. rnitobal. and Balboa.
Nlarket.. Canal Zone 14V. 331.
M. iterial-
Pr,:ing. 150
Scrap Se. Scrap
Lnier c-rabhle disposal of. 400.
Meal tickets nei- iorm. 307
-Med.cal ..3ocitation. annual meeting 230.
Medical aericwe. See Circulars.
MeIllanic3l Din-lon-
Change, 2V0
Dr mijng force transferred. 34
Urfficlls. cmnge 183.
Shopi tranmier 25 31 42.
Superintendent appointment. 285.
2e* a/l. Srop'.
MIedal .ind bar; Can-A Zon,---
.'. iaci.ih n, I I141. 1 1 2o 363.
Di it rlibut .n 9
List ol r-,m r'- 141. 1 i. 162 171. 213. 220, 227.
235. ?24. 26;
.rn Jlasrir d. li't 300
Mendo'.a Pres.&dnt oi Panama. 210 332
Me-.e:. Subilstence Department-
Balh..i reopened 25
Record on oi.rating. 163
R[lou3,i.otn lOump 1'i.
Mind, ottic.m 01 C anil reached., t,. 82. 259.
Sce .,j o Atlnti.: Entl.in,'-
Nilnini F ng-,neer: t it. 403
Kirafl,.rea-
CommrisMi.,r, 3;;
D.mrn .'*, Dam
L,j, k ;.-;e bock...
Fa-oer plinrt1 1 i 40 100. 212.
Mons crunteri. ,t. 10 203
lMone order h.iosne3 ,er Posit Customs. and Reve-
nues rcpoitl.
F.1-,Quito lara-e' \iermrnatlon o wilth fish. 50
MNlitor bo.it picked up by tihe Calebru. 90.
Mount lHop,--
Cmneletly imp.roernenLt. 357.
Coal unloading plant. 4
P.unariipl improvements Panama and Colon. 49. 57.
;8. 4 121. 178 179. 18. 233.31l.. 33;. 338. 353. 410.
Murder and attempts at. 4. 44 82 171. 195. 221. 226.
316. 323 3130. .163.
N

NAOS ISLAND 0REKuAIER. 1. 177
National Institute of Panama. 219
Nituralization law in Ca3nal Zone. S. 30t.
Numbre de Dio -
Fire and adiuItment of claims 2lb. 322
Rebuilding. plans 265 33 1
Sand .ervice. -sc Sand
Tug ser.ike. 10 I317
Work. 130.
See also Atlantic Division.
Notaries Public. list. 91.










OC
OBALDIA JOSE DOMINGO DE. President of Panama.
death and funeral. 210. 224
Obispo Diversion. 169. 289. 305.
Obituaries-
Ames. Lamont. 310.
Ball. H. C.. 37.
Barry. John H. 314
Bork, Fred A.. 163.
Brown. John E 163.
Callender. Lyall. 22.
Cheeseman. Henry. 267.
Clark. James F 306.
Cole. Willis R.. 226. 234
Coogan, Michael. 4.
Cook. Lester Allgood. 123.
Corr. Andrew J 1I1.
Cottrell. Richard, 260.
Edwards. Charles. 101.
Fake. Lynn E., 285.
Galsson. Ahelard. 22.
Geary. L. D.. 285.
Hart. Frankling W'. 260.
Hawley. G. I 93.
Hennigh, George A.. 115.
Hill, George. 114.
Howard. Robert E 325.
Hutin, Maurnce. 234.
Kennedy. Stephen. 51.
Kitchen \alter % 163
Lloyd. Mrs. H M 346.
Lythgrow A. G.. 44.
Malmroi. Oscar. 4
McGurn. Harold D. 234
McKenna. Laurence T 234
Murin. Mrs. W. H .414
Obaldia. lose Domingo de. 210 224.
Odebretti. Ernest 203.
Reimann. Karl Howe. 365.
Ridley. Annrthur G.. 39.'.
Smith. Jackson. 179.
Snyder. William 107.
Stewart. Mrs. A H 24
Tanner,. Harold. 51.
Tartnner. George 234.
Thorne Charles L 155
Tinaley. Ehas C.. 403
Turner. Robert. 203
Worrall. James C.. 58.
Officials. See Directory.
Oil-
Fuel-
Cargo. record, received. 114
Consumption. 41. 325.
Installation of boilers. 4 1.
Tests. 189. 28!. 325.
Lubricating-
Containers. standard. 367 416
Contract. 19. 337
Economy in use. 33. 153 265
Rules governing use. 87. 247. .101
Oranges. Navel. trees on Zone. 4. 2..
Overtime work-
Pay, 175. 183. 400
Records. 41. 55. 90.
P
PACIFIc DIVISION-
Balboa ahipissys. 42 18. 397.
Concrete work See Concrete
Ercavation. See Excavation tables, monthly
Hydraulic excavating plant. 129. 233. 313
Labor train service. 388.
Locks See Locks.
Sand. See Sand.
Storehouses. transfer. 127.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer monthly
reports.
Pacific entrance--
Breakwater. See Breakwater.
Channel. section completed. 36. 82. 281. 345.
Excavation. 1. 82. 345.
Harbor. plans prepared 153. 186. 217. 273 369
Paints. submarine, estimate of amount and cost 76
Palo Seco Leper Asylum-
Gardening. 233.
Water facilities. 169. 242. 363.
Panama. Republic of-
Bathing beach. petition for bath houses. 44. 54.
Boundary. 326.


INDEX

Panama Republic oi-
Improsements Panama and Colon 40 57, 77, 94,
121. 178 110 219 2331 il 137. 33 353. 410.
Independence Dal ; .
National Ins[iute 219
Official, director!,. 2.:
Roadways. work on 22o
Telegraph. transithniianr contia,:t for. 59.
Water -en',ce 331.
Panima-David Railroad-
Ph:,'i..iar.s as~ilr-'d to engine-ring force 307.
SJrves. 242 250.
Panama radroad-
Car load mea'ureme nit 265 326
Cement unload'ini plant .;3
Chief Engneer. appcintmrnt. 31 11i0
Coal..See Coal.
Commission eauirpmFrt on main line. 6fi
Crossing at Paraiso 3ris
Dispatchers. train. hourI I t;.
Doctk See Dock;
Esrnlngs. 190b.00. 188
Electncal Department. Acing Superintendent.
Ill.
Expenditures. clasificatlorn 45.
Finanr- SS acl.mii. :0
Freight-
Esilmate amount handl.-d cor Commission, 43,
Handling ot at P3.inc entrance. 217
Passenger bits e s, irnd ireiht l 14'
Quarterma.tcr De.part men, to ind.le, 114.
Rates for rmiplo.v; Ij.. 1:3
Ge-neral Nlariacr ..Aint 30
General Superinitenid.n appointmrent 1 I1.
Hand cars. operti.on I !9
Hoboken terminal. 100
Interlo,:klnEg .tem. 36 207,. 395
Leasing of lots. 2511
Lighter. rai..ng. 321.
Lightirng rf Colon ain Cristobal. 33
Local Agent. Panama aprpontment. 143.
Local Auditor acting 39]
Lo.:omoties. conversion and repair I 31 137, 159.
Mamei agency Llo;ed 151
Master of Tranipo.-rtatlon. appointment 247.
(ill economy in u'e 165
Paralso cro4,ring. hi5.
Passenger tralfic. .3i;
Pedro Miguel -tation. diAposal. 255
President. acting 7.
Quarters clerk in .:harge of. 1753
Relc..ation-n
Ditching machine 377.
F.rst tpa.enger train. 5F9
Pr'-,gre-s if uork ':. I. i. is.- 2 ,. 386.
Report nf commiitte 38W
Requisitiions for material. I 19.
-t.atifhns 4u9.
Steam rAis\cel records P4i8 293 402
Reorigrn.ation of personnel 114 119
Sale of unclaimed ;hipmentr. 191
Sand spur track at Panama removed. 234.
Special trains. u'e .6o ri
Steamshitis--
Imprroverr.Enit. 101) 362.
Sailinge Se ei h i: ine
Telegraph an. telephc.ne Superiniendent. 207,
342
Ticker. on trains 1.'5 ,;
Time tabli,. ;9. in3 311. 348.
Track Fles atin. 145
Train and engine, ser.'ice charge .'05s
Trains passernper .tarting 47.
Trainmaiter acting 101
Transport iion ire Tran'portation.
1Wharf Panama. leasing 25;
Para.so. railroad cros.ing. 305.
Pay car schedule. ?43.
Pa% roll tables. error. 262
Pedro Miguel-
Concrete handling and mixing plant 1. 57, 162.
Dams. See Dam
L Railroad station disposal 255
Ship basin. 265.
Slides. 22.
Pile driver, floating 282.
Piling. renusluons. 145


7

Pipes, for sewer, 106, 354.
Pistol championship matches, 404.
Plant, transfer, 207.
Plant turned into store, 301, 400.
Plants and flowers, law protecting, 335.
See also Gardens,
Poisoning at Gatun mess, 397.
Police and Prisons, Division of-
Chief of, appointment, 143, 191.
Frijoles station transferred, 395.
Horses, 397.
Organization, 195.
Outposts, 21.
Prison labor, utilization, 91.
Reports, monthly. 19, 66, 91, 141. 179, 197.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly
reports.
Porto Bello--
Buoy, whistling, for harbor, 42.
Cold storage plant, 9.
Improvements, 25, 26.
Road from Colon, 26.
Rock crusher. See Rock crusher.
Shipments, 383.
Tug service, 30, 103, 127, 317.
Wireless station, 161.
Postal Savings Law not applicable to Canal Zone, 348.
Posts, Customs and Revenues, Division of-
Collector, acting, 407.
Customs regulations, 275.
Registry fee increased, 50.
Reports, monthly, 19, 27. 66, 69, 91, 123, 171, 195.
230, 274, 311, 338, 404.
Revenue statement quarterly, 293.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly
reports.
Postage required on The Canal Record, 123.
Poultry farm at Ancon Hospital, 161, 195, 265.
Press Associations, visit of, 44, 59, 198, 206.
Prison labor, utilization of, 91.
Property-
Accountable officials. 151.
Deductions for lost or damaged, 199.
Pay for, in Gatun Lake area. 167.
Transfer, 47.
Prosecuting Attorney, appointment, 271.
Protection of Canal work, regulations. 395.
Public Works, Division of-
Superintendent, acting, 78, 262.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer monthly
reports.
Pump casing repairs, 210.
Purchasing Officer, acting, 47.

Q
QUARANTINE-
Yellow fever, 230, 354.
Station at C(-lon d imaged by storm. 355. 402.
Quarters-
Bachelor, retention of, while on leave, 10.
Family and bachelor, additional, 23, 33, 42, 49,
121,218, 266, 377.
Family, applications, 43, 162, 219, 243, 266, 311,
363, 389, 415.
Nonnhor, j.ke.:ping l miices 378.
Panrama rarniload .up,:riour 175.
Reports, labor force and quarters, 30. 66, 106, 130.
162. 202, 242, 267, 299, 357, 380.
Quartermaster's Department-
Chief of, acting, 15, 416.
Depot Quartermaster, acting, 43.
Di srit ,-Juirtrrn-atii.er; appointment.i' 2 47. 127.
342.
Fr-ig;iht hndlinc takn ouer by. 114.
Qla.rter5. Se, Q5,irier;
Reports, labor force and quarters. See Quarters.
Storehouses transferred, 119.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, nionthly
reports.

R
RAILS, steel, for lock reinforcement. 5.7
Rains-
Arainy day r.,cnTd 402.
Dry season, 218.
Gauginc station-. S1. 137.
Tables weekly. ,ee eanh iusa'i
LInuauilly heavy. 13 51 q7 7 1'i 94. 91. 10in
113. Ill. Il;. 122. 137 145, 19.4 ?51, 379. 388.









8

Rand. Charles-
Indemnity fo.r d-ath. 1
Slayer of a..- atledJ If-
Recveation b.,ild.gs. o 44 1\9.
Recruiting hh,h.,rrs Iorbii.J-n 105, 115.
Red Cr.,*.--
Bprifil. C,:rfornrman t.,
C(iSLi Ri. in i ,rl..4uk-: relief, 290, 299, 323, 342.
Dulei ate. ot 10u
Ofticnal' 10 il. 2[1
Report andi nra,..eo iurcellaneous, 118, 148, 174,
I l. 1"' 1,'1. :'3. 211, 230, 260. 269, 285, 311,
325. 1 405l
R eg tra t' fee pornt jl 1n,.r ,3 : 50.
Relu.camion. l'anjrr,.i rlrno.l. See Panama railroad
reloatlon
Rep.lr vork. ipprc,.i. Ia.
Report-. rnnraJ focr .rmplr...3t, 55.
Revenue; 5.- PoLis. Cu-tims and Revenues.
See ali Fiiancr.c- of Cnfa3l.
Rifle. gun and ,t.ic.ol c-lub: regulation. 159.
Rio Grinle. rire Ii7.
Ia.?erAir. 30. 24. 307.
Rio Graride ..hance .:o,ir:.: 130.
River g-auing ;ta.uonz 51. 137, 210, 385.
R...iJds 'Ser Hi Ih, a', ;.
Rock br.ker H-utl-. 4aTius. 1,42.
Rock crushers-
Ancon quarry, 41, 193, 402.
Weekly statements. See each issue after Feb-
ruary 23.
Porto Bello, 30, 34, 57, 85, 97, 106, 139, 161. 281,
402.
Weekly statements. See each issue after Feb-
ruary 9.
Rio Grande, 140, 221.
Rock-
Unloading at night, 281.
Tests by Geological Survey, 42.
Rourke, L. K., farewell banquet, 315.

S

SAILORB*. Ampri an indemmity, 18.
S and --
Dock at Balboa, 106, 229, 253.
Cham6, 18, 42, 58, 83, 100, 121, f46, 185, 229, 253,
290. 322. 355. 395.
Nombrede Dios, 30,85,130, 194, 229,258,281, 331
Test by Geological Survey, 42.
Sanitation, Department of-
Assistant Chief, acting, 55.
Chief, acting, 55, 307.
Health Officer, Panama, appointment. 199.
Iopitl n'ni-'r bills, 39.
Infants In hospitals with mother, 382.
Fly, warning against, 31.
Mosquito I ir, .. .'terrintrion of with fish, 50.
Sanitation .:f I .' nri,, .ibuTb., plans approved,
77, 178.
Superintendent, Colon Hospital, change, 232.
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer, monthly
reports.
Sanitary improvements, assessments. 195.
Santa Cruz, excavation, 121, 217, 385.
Schools-
Attendance, 50, 274.
Christian Brothers', 115.
Colored-
Building at Culebra, 9.
Industrial work for, 86.
Teachers' examinations, 9, 50, 251, 291.
Colon, new buildings at, 242.
Consolidation of, 379.
Course and equipment, change in, 27.
Gardening, 155, 179, 306, 353.
High I., 8o 106, 211, 333, 403.
Kindergarten 214,230,242.269,293,322.
Opening of. 9 50
Paper High S.'hool 197, 365.
Pnvite supervision 3143
Spanish at Cul,.bra. 44
Special coah ircr childrenn on trains, 190.
Teaching force 27.
Tuition r.ies in. reas.-d 332 338.
Vacation ia rn.it.:.hal 3.11.
Scrap material di.r.-Odal. 34. 13. 74, 129, 145, 169, 197.
306. 385. 40".
Secretary of \ War. sit postponed. 265.


INDEX

Shops. NMerhanrdcl-
F.c.anjiiI? r-sulting from reorgar.n.,iion. 299
Emnirre trn-te-r ,nd e.hanes 25 i1 42
Work, 34. 187, 159.
Gorgona-
I. ,,irm. for locks, 107, 146.
Transfer and L-,.,rn:.- i,. I 42.
Welding and.:t Ling plant 377.
Work at, 137, 187, 229.
Inspector, appointment, 285,374.
Meeting of representatives, 21.
Rules for employes. 119, 374.
See also Marine shops.
Six years of Canal work, 284.
Slides-
Ancon quarry, 65, 122.
Culebra Ct: IS. 100, 105 115, 122, 161, 250. 29:.
305. 306.
E- np.ic,-. P.ralso highway, 73.
Gatun Dam, 288.
Mindi, 18.
Naos Island breakwater, 17.
Pedro Miguel, 22.
Smithsonian Inriitiue foils fo.r 9, 50. 146 266
Social life. S. ea, h ,ie,.
Specifications, standard, committee ...int. imi- 5
Spiller, W. P., deportation, 122.
Spillway, Gatun-
Accident, fatal, 260.
Bridge across, 209.
Experiments in checking flow of water, 22 5.
Layout, sketch, 10.
Progress of work, 34, 58, 85, 177, 274, 411
See also Chairman and Chief Engineer. monthly
reports.
Spoil-
Dump records, 388.
Equipment for transporting. 147.
Transportation records. 329, 337.
Utilization of, 226.
Steamship rates for employes. See Employe..
Steamship sailings. See each issue.
See also Vessels.
Steam shovels-
Accidents, 131.
Care of, rules governing, 15.
Excavation records--
Monthly, 22, 69, 101, 125, 164, 19. ?'21. 260
298, 331, 363.
Special, 186, 202, 221, 241, 265, 387. 394. 402.
409, 411.
New type, 33.
Panama railroad relocation records, 258. 293. 402.
Repairs, 34, 162, 187, 259.
Steel and metal supplies, Lan.ld iro. ,:.)rtras. 326.
Storehouses-
Balboa, improvements, 130.
Transfer, 119, 127.
Sub-aqueous rock excavation, 1, 42, 139, 281
See also Dredging,
Subsistence Department-
Head of, acting, 7, 307.
Messes, record of operations, 163.
Supplihu for loaiUng -equipment 321
.See .atj Chairmrn and Chief Engineer. montlils
reports.
See also Commissary.
Suicides. 155, 226, 267.
Supplies for Canal work. See each issue.
Surcharge reductions, 247.
Survey-
Canal Zone, 74, 345.
Chagres River, 12, 194.

T-

TAIERNILLA, excavation and clearing at, 73.
Tariff Law, effect In Canal Zone, 35.
Task work, Gatun Lake area, 92, 186, 401.
Telegraph and telephone-
Administration Buillinc Ancon priateexchange.
18.
Calls by number, 285.
Improvements, 18, 163, 339.
'Superintendent, appointment 207, 341
Transisthmian, i'or Republic of Panama. 59
Temperature. See eitherer .:nmlitions
Thanksgiving Day, ',5, 102.


Thatcher. NMaunce H appointment. 257.275.301
Tide table See each sIiue
T;me tables. Panama railroad. 79. 303. 319, 348.
rime vouchers for laborers. 214
Tlroli Club officers. 6.
Tonnage dues on vessels. 10
Toro Point-
Hospital and dTspenranry. 353.
Shipments. 383.
Telephone. 369
Work. 330. 370. 402.
Toting machinea on barges. 162.
Track ahifteis. "ork of. 36. 140. 164. 194. 243, 291. 331.
362. 395
Trails See Highways.
Train dispatchers, hours or. 115
Train and engine service charges 295.
Trainmen on monthlhjy baais 127
Tran.;port i un-
Comnmitee. 407
Forms. 317
Half rate requests. 10. 93. 191
Pa3se; 301.
'itearn..hip rant. to New \'ork. 50. 87, 295.
F milies of ermplos.is. 262. 295. 374.
Frte. I Il.
Tr.k- I . ity and t.nent -four trip. 167, 307.
Tr.,ir. Ing ngEinrs. ,uridictiorn and duties. 39, 151.,
374.
Tnring.ula.in ;urs.- .:.f Canal Zone. 74. 345.
T'rinidlad Ridge pmploration.s. :4.
Tugs-
De Leijep. put into service. 130.
Names chani;ed. 43. 257.
New for !itlanuc and Pacifc Divisions. 89. 186.
Ar19.
Repairs. 139.
Service. .Alantic Diviaion. 30. 103. 127. 140. 355.
Tirr. Stephen. first Canal concms'ionalre, 13.

U

Il .lVER.Tirv CLUB ELECTIONS. 53. 59.
L;rnlojders, Ldgerwood. monthly records. 9. 51. 90.
14. 164. 194 243. 260. 211. 326

V
VACANCIES CAUSED BY REDUCTION OP FORCE, 183.
S,-a ions Sie Employe,. Leave.
Vegetables a year s supply. 14.
'iertak.'i. s I~i of Chief Sanil.ry Officer. 43.

Entering arid clearing at Balboa-
Quarterly report 285
Weet-y. See ieuh ,-ase
Lo.:.i. irnpe,:tors. Board of. 7,. 95. 179. 203, 213.
2;5. 2r,2
Tonnage dues 30.
Veterinarian. appointment. 167.



WALK ACROSS rTHE 15sTtEIt. 293.
%tatungton s Birthday. holiay. 199.
'.asringtor Hotel. 4. 106. 161. 315. 363.
\' aihingtnn Reading Room Club. 38. 77. 161.
Water-
Concrete tinks at Culebra Island and Palo Seco,
242. 363.
Panama and Colon service. 331.
Systems, municipal. 4 18, 25. 30. 73. 75, 100, 121,
139. 169 217 243 265 281.298. 330.362.
\L.eather conditions, monthly. 15. 47. 86. 117. 192, 223,
241. 25l. 291. 3 7., 359. 404.
Weekly. See each issue.
West Indian Protective League. 3187.
Wireless stations. 161. 313.
Woman's Clubs. See each miiae
Work teqiJesU changes. 350. 416
Saorld I Fair to commemorate opening of Canal, 355.
Wre.:ks. railroad. 260.

Y
YELLOW FEVER-
Case in city of Panama, 169.
Costa Rica. quarantine against, 354.
Mosquito theory. controlling and suppressing, 180.
Quaranune case. 230.
V. MT. C. A. See Clubhouses. Commission.














CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1909. No. 1.


The Canal Record
Fublished weekly under the authority and supenr'ision
of the Isthmian Canal Commission.

Canalec is issued.freeof charge. one copy
eAto ployes the Commiasion and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Er-ra copies and back numbers can be obtained .from
the me's stands of the Panama Rairoad Compan> for
Sfve cents each.

Address all Communications
V'E CANAL RECORD,
Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
Vo communication. either for pub.'aitapn or request-
as8 information. u izl rece-e atlenit~o unless agned
with thefull name and address at the briter.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Rock Breaker at Work.
In an article relating to the Lobnitz rock
breaker at work in the Pacific entrance to
the Canal, which was published in THE
CANAL RECORD of last week, a statement
was made that is likely to be misleading.
It was said:
"One complete operation occupies but 15 seconds
when themsachinery is working steadily. and 'the
area of rock broken while the barge is inone location
is a circular space about five leet in diameter The
ram crushes the rock to a depth of three feet "
As a matter of fact the raising and lower-
ing of the ram occupies about 15 seconds.
This, however, does not constitute a com-
plete operation as the records so far show
that the ram may have to be raised and
lowered from fifteen to eighty times to
penetrate the rock to a depth of three feet.
The depth of the penetration at each blow
depends on the character of the rock to be
shattered.* Complete detailed records are
being kept of the work performed and the
results achieved, which will be published
when completed.
Locks and Plants at Miraflore*.
Regular excavation operations continue
at Mitaflores Locks. On the west side a
small slide developed in the earth section
which has been checked by a concrete toe
wall and rip-rap, and this method will be
used wherever necessary. Several feet
were added during August to the west toe
of the dam, and only a small amount of
dumping is now required to bring it to the
60-foot level, which is the ultimate height.
The suction dredge Sandpiper worked all
of August adding to the hydraulic fill in the
dam core.
Concrete work at the cement shed is en-
tirely finished, and the traveling cranes are
in position and will be ready for service
within a few days. About 60,000 bags of
cement are now stored in the shed, which
has a capacity of 70,000 barrels, or 280,000
bags. Bags found in good condition when
emptied will be shipped back to the States.


The storehouse office has been equipped
with cement testing machines and other
apparatus to be used in connection with the
work.
At the Miraflores power house, the switch-
boards are all in position, and one of the
units is nearly ready for a trial. The boiler
work is well along and the smokestack has
been placed. On the west side fronting the
railroad track an arched facing has been
made of concrete on which will be lettered
the words "Miraflores Power House, 1909."
The unusually dry weather that has been
experienced in the territory of the Pacific
Division during the past ten days has
accelerated the Canal work in a marked
degree.
Limited Accommodation,6 nt Boquete.
DAVID, August 26, 1909.
C e. ito. Coc.ti-.,
Cu !'el.a C. Z.-
Accommodations for no more than twenty
men and no women and children in Boquete
at present.
(Signedi G. D. HUBBARD,
C. P. GIBSON,
DR. C. G. PHILLIPS,
FRANK FERNANDEZ.
Unloading Heavy Cargo.
One of the largest pieces of cargo ever
handled on the Isthmus was a Scotch marine
boiler, weighing 98,560 pounds, which was
taken from the hold of the C global on her
last \oyage and sent to Balboa where it
will be placed in the Panama railroad tug
BoliLz'r. As the ship's tackle was not
strong enough to take the boiler from the
hold an "A" frame was rigged up to lift it
on deck. Its flues were then plugged and
it was rolled overboard. It was lifted from
the water to a flat car by the crane boat,
.- L. .La ,/ei.
New Suetion Dredge.
Requisition has been made for the ma-
chinery for an 18-inch suction dredge to be
used in excavating in the prism of the Canal
between Mindi Hills and Gatun Locks, and
in making the fill at Colon, which is pro-
jected as part of the sanitary improvements
under the appropriation for sanitation of the
cities of Colon and Panama. Borings be-
tween Mindi Hills and the north end of
Gatun Locks show that the material can be
handled by suction dredge, and there are
about seven million cubic yards of it, in-
cluding excavation in the mooring basin im-
mediately north of the locks. The project
for filling at Colon has not yet been ap-
proved. The machinery of the dredge in-
cludes two boilers, a triple expansion en-
gine, and centrifugal pump. It will be
mounted on the hull of the old French lad-
der dredge, VNo. 4, one of the dredges found
on the banksof the Chagres River at Frijoles
and utilized in the Canal work.


LOCK BUILDING BEGUN.
Fir-t Concrete Laid at Gatun anti Pedro 11i-
guel.
GATtIN.
The building of Gatun Locks was begun
on August 24, when the handling and mix-
ing plants were set in motion and the first
concrete was laid. Only one of the three
power units is in operation, and the ca-
pacity of this unit will not be reached until
necessary adjustments are made in the
automatic electric railroad, which carries
materials from the storage to the concrete
mixers The concrete is being placed in
the foundation of the center wall which will
divide the two south, or upper locks.
Excavation wa- begun in October, 1906,
and on July 31. 19(09, there had been taken
out 3,640,011 cubic yards of material. There
remained to be removed about 1,500,000
cubic yards, most of it in the middle and
lower lock chambers. Work on the plant
for mixing and handling concretedates from
September, 1908, when excavation for the
power house was begun. The plant has a
maximum capacity of 1,920 cubic yards of
concrete in eight hours.
There will be six locks in three pairs at
Gatun, making the lift from sea level to S5
feet above sea level. Each lock will be 110
feet wide, have a usable length of 1,000feet,
and there will be 41 1 feet of water over the
sills when the surface of Gatun Lake is at
the normal height of 85 feet above mean sea
level. The concrete construction includes
the locks and approach walls, and it is esti-
mated that in all about 2,096,000 cubic yards
will be laid.
The method of handling the materials for
concrete and of cons eying the concrete itself
to the place where it is laid, involves three
distinct operations. The first of these is the
assembling of materials. It is estimated that
2,250,000 barrels of cement will be required
for the concrete in Gatun Locks. The cement
is shipped to New York from the manufac-
turer's plant in Northampton. Pa., after it
has been tested by an agent of the Govern-
ment, and is brought tothe Isthmus in ships
owned by the Government. From thedocks
in Colon or Cristobal it is carried in barges
up the old French canal to the cement stor-
age dock at Gatun. There it is unloaded
by electric cranes and stored. Rock is quar-
ried and crushed at Porto Bello, a village
on the north coast of the Isthmus about 17
miles east of Colon, and is towed in barges
to Cristobal, and thence up the French canal
to Gatun. Sand is dredged at Nombre de
Dios, also a north coast village about 35
miles east of Colon, and is towed in barges
to Gatun. Two duplex and one single un-
loading cableway-five strands of cable in
all-extend over the slip in which the barges
tie up, and the rock and sand are picked up
by clam-shell buckets and conveyed to a
storage pile. An electric railway runs un-








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III., No. 1.


derneath the cement storehouse, under the
rock and sand storage piles, and up to the
battery' of concrete mixers. Cars pass along
this railway and are charged in succession
with cement, sand and rock. in proportions
of 1, 3, and 6, thus completing the opera-
tion of assembling the materials.
In the second operation, that of mixing
the concrete, the loaded cars run up an in-
cline to a platform over the mixers where
the material is dumped. There are eig-ht
mixers, so mounted that the.-" dump by
gravity into tip buckets. The-e buckets
are carried on cars that run on a railway
track along the west bank of the lock site.
After the concrete is dumped onto a car,
an electric locomotive, fed- by the third rail
system, takes it to any point along the lock
site. The full buckets are lifted from the
cars by cablewa, s that stretch acro-ss the lock
site, and are lowered into the chamber at
the spot where it is de-iredl to lay the con-
crete. Each loctinmtive hauls out a train


the old French csinal,and is lll' feet wide Cement is
unloaded from birges by ten traveling cranes of the
Lhree-motor t ',D. One hundred thousand barrels of
ctiintint more thin 3 month's 'uppl.s can be stored
acre. CiOer the tracks oIL which the material cars
run ire Ati hoppers for cement. eich hopper with a
al .- l'" by 3) inche- The cement is dumped into the
h.Apper-- nd the '-al-es regulate the charging The
miteril ca.'r. run beneath the sand and rock storage
1jil-, in two tunnels. and the L.ars are charged with
sind and r,.ck in the same way as with cement
There Are :2 vahls each 15 inch-: square under the
strd r-Ile and 4r. vilvcs IS by i,0 inches under the
rnck pilel
a l-.,./ ';i St.fragr" P'es e.. .fLueit -Two rtil-
rTO -i.s ul 24-inch -'ouge lead from the cement dock
.And -rtA n' ijiles to the concrete mixer., the total
length of each road being about 4 70'. feet. The riil-
roids -ire entrelt separate from one another as the
(.bj,:,ct ct their being in diiDlicate is that one m:j.' be
in -er.ice while the other is under.omin repairs The
cars in which the materiAtls are carried are iudivid-
utill dnen b5 three phace motor. chain geared to
the ,ale' taking an alternating ?5-cscle current of
2'? -olts from two inverted collecting r il: I d be-
tweet the traction ratils Ech car i. started. stopped.
or reseracd by the operation of n master switch so
loc.itei- that it cail be controlled from either side
'A hen this s,,itch is thrown the car start= 'inl auto-


side, and four over a road on the west or the mixing
plant
Concrete caring radrviad.-A railroad of four
tracks runs along the west bank of the locks two
tracks on either side of the mixer plant. A train,
consisting of a locomotive.and two flat cars, each car
carrv ing one bucket. stopsalongside two of the mixers
and receives concrete from them. It then runs to the
point on the bank where the cnbleway is waiting.
and the cableway deposits two empty buckets and
picks up the loaded ones. The train then backs up
on the return track sand waits its turn to switch
alongside the mixers There are 12 locomotives and
24 flat car. in this service The locomotives are 12
feet long 61-. feet wide and 5 feet high above the
deck They have single trucks with rigid wheel
b-ise, and a required drawbar pull of 2.000 pounds.
They are propelled by two reversible, waterproof.
railway motors, one on each axle, taking current
from a third ruil. The care are built entirely of
steel are I. fretl long anid 7 feet wide. with the deck 2
feet 6 inches above the rails, and are mound on
double trucks of eight wheels with a tour-foo base.
Each car has a receptacle for two buckets, and will
c.,rr:. a load of 12 tons
Cab6.'euraji' .'r th, /oc* site -There are eight of
these cableways arranged in pairs, each pair stretch-
ing from a steel tower on the west bank of the locks
to s- similar tower on the east bank, a distance of s00


LAYOUT OF IIANDLING. AND MINING PLANT GATLIN LOCKS
A Cjilew.i.s for unloiding rock and sand. C Concrete mixers E Cablewa.ysover lock site for delivering concrete
B Automatic elcitnrc r:.laay from cement, sand. D Electric railro.ad on bank abose lock site for in lock'.
and rock stor:TeC to miser-s. haulincr concrete to lock cb'le-ways-


of two cars, each car carrying one loaded
bucket. An empty bucket is placed on each
car by each strand of the duplex cableway,
and the loaded buckets are then hoisted.
The empty buckets are then hauled back to
the mixers for another load. Twelhe- loco-
motives and 2'4 cars are in use when the
plant is running at full capacity. The buck-
ets are nicely balanced and can be tipped
with slight effort. Power for all the opera-
tions is supplied from an electric poA'er
plant Delivering the concrete and placing
it form the third operation.
DETAILS OF THFi PLANT.
Additional details about the plant follow:
i.,. ic" L.i'.',': -These cablewa s .ire of the
sime cu-lllri-,tlio1 is iho'e over the locks de teill 'f
which *irc ,-,ten below The, operate with self-dit.
ging .-.u-matim c grab buicletsof the two bl-ade t pe ''0
cubic feel ctpacit., and convey rock and sittil frtin
barge- 1o the lonrice piles There are fiveittands of
cable ii all two .,-iplex and one single The mani.
mnum carry is 675 feet
C. erti D'ct and Straser aL.'s.-The cement dock
has a frontage of 19,' Feet along n slip that leads from


miiticA-l'. comes up tcO. peed aindwhether" traveling
on the le'.el or un the heaviest gride on the niixer
DI.ilt inclin': the 'peed never varies more than ten
per cent When the errinly cars de4-:end the grade
[rom the mixers tI. the .'tortage piles their mn tior .iIr.-
reser-ed into g neralors ind pt.-wr is returned to the
line Automatic magnetic bra k s -wn) the car' in
ca.e of accident and thil r, licip.Lte collisiorln. The
cats 'itr) built of teel r. -diviJvded lit- tiw. conip'rt.
ments one for 4.ind and concrete and one for rock
rsid h:ive ar caeacltI of a S cubic feet. TIes ;re of the
hinted -ide door ti pe andl when oer the hopper_ or
the nmixers their door are orpete b. hai.d FortsI-
two of" th se car arerearrelds I cr sericc
.is iA 1 P,:ut -Eight imnproied Chic.ao cube
mixers of 64 cubic feet cr-acity each belt driven
front 'haifis ciplhe of m'iking !SO re'olittions a
miinite with 1 4 re,'olutionsn minute for the cube,.
coinnose the mixing plint The'e mixers are erected
a.hoe the level nof thec ir into which they discharge.
They are char cd by mrn it% tietL is the material
crT, run up in incline It a platform no'er the mixers
where thev dumr. into chnargnig hoppers of 90 cubic
feet c imacity so designed s to throw the materials
into the misers The miVers receive and discharge
their Inad without 'tonoina or slowing down aud
one operator controls the clhiargin i and discharging.
The mixers are mounted in one file eight deep and
four of them discharge over a railroad on the east


feet The lowers are x5 feet high abovethe tracks on
which ihe:. move Ic.ng the banks above the lock site.
Each of the tail towers on the east bank moves
synchronously with the tower opposite it on the west
bunk and the movement of each pair is controlled
from the control -tation in the head lower on the
west bank. The carrying cable is a locked steel
wire 21,t inches in diameter and on this cable a
tr.neler is pulled back and forth over the lock cham-
ber OnL the traveler is a pulley through which
runs a cable to lift material and drop it The maxi-
mum distance the traveler is required to run is 670
feet the greatLct lift 17i feet and the carrying capa-
city is not less than six tons with 20 trips an hour.
In all these pee e the ableas exceed the require-
menLs. The machinery for operating is mounted in
the head towers on the west bank of the lock site.
It consists of a motor of 15O-horsepower to turn the
hoistlha i and conveying cable drums, a motor of 23-
hor,-eDower to run the dumping device and a motor
of :5 horsepower in both head and tail towers to
propel the towers One nlan operates a cableway.
controlling a.ll the movementLs by switches located
on a platform on each head tower. In addition to
delivering concrete in the locks the cableways will
be used to lift material from the lock site and dump
it by an aerial dumping device, to handle forms foa








September 1, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


the concrete work, and to handle the parts of the
gates and the gate operating machinery.
APr wr lant.-Power is supplied by an electric
generating plant.a detailed description of which was
given in THE CANAL RECORD of April 28. 1909 Six
water tube boilers of the Keeler type. each with a
nominal rating of 4o0-horsepower and generating
Steam at 205 poundsabsolute pressure and 150 degrees
Fahrenheit of superheat, supply steam to three Cur-
tis, 1500-k. w vertical steam turbine base condenser
generators. The plant is modern in all respects.
After the Canal is completed this plant will be used
as an auxiliary to the hydraulic power plant for
operating the locks.
LAYING THE CONCRETE.
The concrete laying for months to come
will be confined to the upper locks. Ex-
cavation for the curtain walls is carried
on by rock channelers and orange peel
dredges, and is almost completed. Floor
anchors have been placed in about a half


the soft sandstone and the argillaceous sandstone
with tufa until the depth of minus I is reached
FORMS FOR THE CONCRETE.
The concrete in the walls and floors must
be laid with reference to the culverts which
will be embedded in it for the purpose of
carrying water in filling and emptying the
lock chambers. There will be three main
culverts extending the full length of the
locks, one in each of the side walls and one
in the middle wall. The side wall culverts
will be 22 feet in diameter from the intake at
the south end of the south, or upper locks,
toa point 320 feet north, where they will be
reduced to 18 feet, at which diameter they,
will continue to the end, a distance of about
3,500 feet. The bottoms of these culverts
will be 2> feet below the surface of the floor.


CROSS SECTION OF LOCK CHAMBER AND WALLS GATliN LOCKb


A Culvert in center wall.
B Connections between center and lateral culvert.
C Lateral culvert.
D Wells opening from lateral culverts into lock
chamber.


of the east lock and the excavation in the
chambers of the upper locks is practically
done. The plan to be followed in laying
the floor was discussed at length in the re-
port published in THE CANAL RECORD Of
July 14, 1909. The summary of the report
is as follows:
That the floor of all that part of the chamber lying
below the sill of the upper pair of upper lock gates
should be treated as belonging to the lock, and the
portion above that sill as belonging to the forebay
That the floor and walls of the forebay from the
sill of the movable dam to the sill othe sill of the upper dupli-
cate lock gates should be founded at reference plus 4.
and that the floor there should be made 20 feet thick.
That from the upper surface of the sill of the up-
per duplicate lock gates to and including the sill of
the intermediate gates, the excavation for the Boor
and walls should be carried to plus 0 67.
That this part of the floor should be made of uant-
form thickness of 13 feet. and should be anchored
down by rails spaced as nearly as practicable 6 feet
apart, longitudinally and transversely
That the rails should be anchored by concrete to
a leastdepth of 10 feet in the underlying material in
the outer parts ofeach lock pit.and in the middle part
the penetration should be from 15 to 20 feet. depend-
ing upon the material.
Thatbelow the intermediate gate walls the founda-
tions for the walls and floors should be trenched for
the culverts, the floor between the culvert trenches
being made three feet thick, and all floors anchored
to the underlying material with rails penetrating
not more than 10 feet.
That a curtain wall 6 feet thick should be con-
structed along the sill of the emergency dam and the
upper portion of the lock walls: the wall along the sill I
to be carried to reliable material, the least depth of
the foundation to be minus 8, the walls along the lock
walls to be founded at the depth of the foundation of
the corretaonding end of the cross curtain wall until
the soft sandstone stratum is met. and thence at a
Depth of one or two feet below thb surface dividing


E Culvert in side wall
F Drainage gallery
G Gallery for electric wires
H Passageway for operators.


The culvert in the middle wall will be 22
feet in diameter from its south end to a
point 120 feet north where it also will be
reduced to IS feet, at which diameter it
will continue to the end, a distance of about
3,600 feet. The bottom of this culvert will
be in general 10,$ feet above the surface of
the lock floors.
Lateral culverts, in the form of an ellipse
6,% feet high and 8 feet wide will run in the
floor from and at right angles to the main
culverts at intervals of 32 and 36 feet, lead-
ing alternately from the side and middle
culverts. The top of each lateral culvert
will be 3 feet below the surface of the floor.
Water will be delivered or collected by each
lateral culvert through five openings or wells
in the floor. Valves, which may be opened
or closed either individually or all at one
time, will he located at the intakes and
outlets of the main culverts, and at the
connections between the center culvertsand
the lateral culverts.
Forms for the culverts are made of open
hearth boiler steel, are collapsible, are
mounted on wheels to facilitate withdrawal,
and are constructed to stand five years of
continual use. For the main culverts in the
side walls there are 21 forms in 12-foot
lengths, each form weighing not less than
303.300 pounds. There are 12 forms for the
culvert in the middle wall, each 12 feet long,
and weighing not less than 177,000 pounds.
There are 100 forms for the lateral culverts,
each 10 feet long, and weighing not less than
217,000 pounds. All the culvert forms are


being constructed b% the Baltimore Bridge
Company, and deliver) will begin in a few
weeks.
Forms for the valve recesses and open-
ings in the floors were made at Gorgona
foundry. There are eight sets of valve
recess forms, made of boiler plate, and
weighing 21,400 pounds each. The forms
for the floor wells are made of cast iron and
boiler plate, and weigh 61,0l00 pounds each.
There are forty of these forms.
The floor and walls will be built up in
monoliths. Forms for the floor are made
of timber and are i5i feet long, .20 feet wide,
and their height will vary with the thick-
ness of the floor, which will be 20) feet in
the south foreba, and 13 feet in the south
locks. These forms are built in the lock
site and will be moved from place to place
by the cableways.
The side walls will be 5i) feet wide at the
surface of the floor, will be perpendicular
on the face and will narrow from a point
24'a feet aboae the floor until they are 8 feet
wide at the top. The narrowing will be
accomplished by a series of steps each 6 feet
high. The middle wall will be 60 feet
wide, approximately S1 feet high, and each
face will be perpendicular to the floor. At
a point 421' feet above the surface of the
floor and 15 feet above the top of the middle
culvert, this wall will dit ide into two parts,
leaving a space down the center much like
the letter "'L," which will be 19 feet wide
at the bottom From this point the two
parts of the center wall will be diminished
by a series of five steps, six feet high and 4,
3, 2, 2, and 1 ', feet wide, to a coping 8 feet
wide at the top. In this center space, which
will thus be 19 feet wide at the bottom and
44 feet wide at the top, will be a tunnel
diided into three stories or galleries. The
lowest gallery will be for drainage; the
middle, for the wires that will carry the
electric current to operate the gate and valve
machinery, which will be installed in the
center wall, and the top, a'passagewai for the
operators.
Face forms for the side and center walls
are of sheet steel carried on movable towers,
also bui!t of steel. Tracks %ill be laid as
near to the line of the walls as possible, and
on these tracks the towers will move up
and down the lock chambers parallel with
the walls. Jacks fixed to the towers and
bearing on the forms will be used to align
the forms and hold them in place. There
will be twelve of these towers with forms78
feet long from top to bottom, 36 feet wide,
and 71,2 inches thick. Tower and form will
weigh at least 4,392,220 pounds. For the
sides or ends of the wall monoliths, steel
girders six feet high will be built up in
succession to the full height of the wall
before the placing of concrete is begun. For
the backs of the walls steel girders with
triangular bracing will be used. The forms
and towers for the side and middle wallsare
being made by the United States Steel
Products Company, and the delivery will
begin in October.

PEDRO MIGUEL.
The laying of concrete at the Pedro Mi-
guel Locks will be begun to-day, September
1, in the center guide wall at the lower, or
south end. A portable cube mixer, operated
by steam power, and having a capacity of
12X cubic yards of material per hour is in


~_









THE CANAL RECORD j?~) lii, No. 1.


temporary service in the mixing operations,
and will be used until the stationary mixer
plant, under erection on the bank of the
west chamber, is completed This plant is
nearly finished and when read) for service
will have a capacity of 500 cubic yards per
working day. A similar plant will be con-
structed later on the bank of the east cham-
ber. Both of these installations are tempo-
rary and will be used onls until the handling
plant on order and now overdue is received.
Crushed rock for the concrete work is
at present supplied from Rio Grande, but
will come from Ancon quarry as soon as the
plant there is started. The sand is brought
from ChamP, 2,000 cubic yards having been
piled at the lock site during the past few
weeks.
Work on the handling plant in the fore-
bay of the locks is making progress. The
west trestle is entirely completed, but the
ties hate not yet been laid on the east tres-
tle, which will take a week or ten days
more. Nineteen small flat cars for use in
transporting material from the handling
plant to the locks had been assembled up to
August 28. Considerable track work has
been done along the floor of the forebay,
and a small storehouse has been built for the
storage of tools and miscellaneous supplies
required at this point. The new 50,000-gal-
lon tank, which will supply water to the
mixers, has been filled. It is fed by a pipe-
line from the Rio Grande, about a quarter
of a mile away, where a duplex boiler feed
pump, having a capacity of 310 gallons of
water per minute, has been installed.
A steam shovel is at work in the forebay,
and in the west chamber of the locks, the
excavation for the lateral culverts is being
vigorously prosecuted. Most of the cultert
excavation is in hard rock, which must be
drilled and blasted. The spoil is shoveled
by hand labor into large buckets, which are
emptied intodump cars and other wise manip-
ulated by two locomotive cranes moving
forward and backward on their tracks. A
certain amount of pumping is necessary to
handle the surface water and drainage
from the earth. Two steam shovels are
at work in the east chamber of the locks
making the final cut, and the excavation
there is near completion. A field office of
the regulation Commission type has been
constructed on the east bank for use of the
supervising force.
Schedule of Trains on Labor Day.
Panama railroad trains will run on the
Sunday and holiday schedule, as published
in THE CANAL RECORD of August 18, 1909,
on Labor Day, September 6. The first train
from Panama to Colon will leave at 6.45
o'clock in the morning, and the last train
at 9.40 o'clock at night. The first train
from Colon to Panama will leave at 6.45
o'clock in the morning, and the last train at
7 o'clock at night The special ,train for
the Red Cross benefit will run as stated
elsewhere in this issue.
Guarding Gato n Water Supply.
Distilled water is supplied to residents of
Gatun, but the presence of typhoid fever
among the negroes of the vicinity during
the past few months shows that all the peo-
ple do not use that water. On this account a
patrol of the watershed of the Gatun River
has been established and already extends to
the Canal Zone boundary line. Latrines are


being put in along both banks of the river at
the isolated farm houses, and also in the
hamlet called Monte Lirio and the Panama
railroad construction camp of that name.
Thee latrines are built some distance from
the banks of the river and are inspected and
disinfected twice a week. Between Gatun
and Monte Lirio about fifty people are liv-
ing, at Monte Lirio as many more, and at
the construction camp about two hundred
laborers are quartered. The precautions
against pollution will be continued until
water is available from the new reservoir,
east of Gatun, which will be within the next
year.
Navel Orange Tree at Bearing Stage.
The only navel orange tree known to
exist in the Canal Zone is at the Ancon
nursery. It is of the species familiar to
horticulturists as Ciltrs Aurantiium, and
was imported as a cutting from California
about three and a half years ago. Several
other cuttings were brought to the Isthmus
at the same time, but none of them arrived
at maturity. The cutting from which the
present tree has developed was grafted on
sour stock, and by judicious fertilization
both the tree and fruit exhibit a vigorous
and healthy growth, although the tree is
somewhat undersized. The fruit, however,
is unusually large, and it has been found
necessary to cut away some of it to remove
the danger of the branches breaking under
the weight. The first crop will number 15
or 20 oranges, and the largest one, now
nearly ripe, will easily weigh a pound. The
others are in various stages of development,
some green and others beginning to show
a golden color.
Grass Cutting Conte*t.
A grass cutting contest will be held at 10
a. m., Labor Da), at Ancon. Eleven teams
of two men each have been entered from
the various scythe gangs of the Quarter-
master's Department. Plots of ground ap-
proximately .'200 square yards have been
laid off for each team. In selecting the
winners, speed and quality of work will be
the determining factors. The following
prizes will be given: First, $10 gold, and sil-
ver medal; second, $5 gold; third, $2.50
gold.
This contest was proposed at the instance
of some of the Spanish sc3themen from the
Ancon District, who believed they were
superior to men from the other districts.
The contest has already excited considerable
interest among the Spaniards employed in
this class of work and it is believed the
contest will be a close one.
Herrera Acquitted.i
Marcelino Herrera, a Panamanian, was
acquitted of the charge of killing Charles Ml
Abbott in the riot at Colon on May 10, by a
jury of three judges in the circuit court at
Cristobal on August 27. He was tried under
the procedure prescribed in Section 171 of
the Code of Criminal Procedure for the Ca-
nal Zone, the judges sitting in the case
being Associate Justice Lorin C. Collins,
and District Judges M. C. Rerdell and
Thomas E. Brown, Jr.
LosT-On train No. 31. in Panama. on August 22. one
folder pocket book containing one hotel meal book.
ncue SIC commissary book partly used one refund
noLe on Las Cascadas commissary for $5 60. cards,
etc. Finder will oblige by returning same to R. V.
Mudgett. Las Cascadas. C. Z.


COAL UNLOADING.
Crane at Mount Hope to be Moved-Receipts
for Fiscal Year 1908.
The coal unloading crane at Mt. Hope
will be moved in the near future from the
slip at Cristobal Dry Dock to Dock 14, a
short distance from its present location. As
now located the crane runs alongside the
dry dock slip, and colliers must tie up in
the slip to discharge cargo. In the new
location it will run along the bank of the
French canal at right angleswith itspresent
course, and the boom will extend over Dock
14, at which the colliers will tie up. This
change will relieve the congestion in the
dry dock slip and add to the convenience of
working at the marine shops.
All the coal used on the Isthmus is un-
loaded at Mt. Hope. The average is about
7,000 tons a week, which means that about
two colliers are unloaded each week and
that the dock where they tie up is always
occupied. This coal is brought from Hamp-
ton Roads by the Panama Railroad Company
under a yearly contract calling for delivery
on the Isthmus at a flat rate regardless of
the prevailing prices for charters. In the
fiscal year 1908 the amount brought to the
Isthmus was 368,331 tons, and of this
amount 262,375 tons were used by the Com-
mission. The Panama railroad sells coal *
also to United States Government ships
calling at either side of the Isthmus, to
merchantmen, and to private customers.
On account of the uncertainty of the
output of coal during the holiday season a
reserve is accumulated in the piles at Mt.
Hope and Empire during the fall months,
and the deliveries during the ensuing two
months will therefore be considerably above
the average. By the end of October over
ten thousand tons will be in reserve on the
Isthmus.
Obituary.
Oscar Malmros, who was United States
consul at Colon at the time the independence
of the Republic of Panama was proclaimed,
died at Rouen, France, on August 18. He
had been in the consular service since 1865,
having been appointed from Minnesota, and
held the post at Colon for about two years.
Michael Coogan died at Colon Hospital
on August 25, alter an illness of about five
months. He was born in Ireland 39 years
ago and had resided on the Isthmus about
three years. At the time of his last illness
he was engaged on suction dredge No. 85
at Gatun. A brother, John Coogan, of
County Monaghan, Ireland, survives him.
Meals at the Washington Hotel.
In the month of July, 12,071 meals were
served at the Washington Hotel in Colon,
1,922 of which were a la carte meals. The
regular meals were served without a loss,
and there was a profit on the meals served
to order. All operating expenses including
fuel, light, water, repairs and renewals to
equipment, and stationery and printing were
charged against the meals.
Laborers for Canal Work.
The cement ship A-ncon, which sailed
from New York for Colon on August 19,
and called at Barbados, where 1,500 laborers
were taken aboard on August 27, will dock
at Colon on September 2. The laborers are
West Indian negroes and they will be used
in replenishing the force at various points
along the Canal.


THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. Ill., No. 1.








September 1, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


MONEY ALLOTMENTS FOR
1909-10.
Amounts Assigned for Carrying on Work in
the Various Departments.,
Money available for carrying on the Canal
work during the present fiscal year has been
allotted in accordance with the schedules
printed below. The total amount appropri-
ated by Congress for Canal work in the year
1909-10, is $33,638,000, and the unexpended
balance from 1908-9 is $4,877,000, making
the amount of money available $38,515,000.
The allotments represent money available
for all expenditures during the fiscal year;
that is, they cover all obligations such as
unpaid bills, undelivered material now on
order, and requisitions issued for which con-
tracts had not been awarded on Jul) 1, 1909.
According to classes of expenditure the
allotments are as follows:
Employes in the United States ............ $150.0 0
Incidentals in the United States .......... 75.Oifi
Officers and employes. Department of
Construction and Engineering.. .... .3.7(00.000
Skilled and unskilled labor, Department
of Construction and Engineering ....... 13 627.600i
Material, supplies and equipment. De-
partment of Construction and Engi.
neering................................ 13.005.400
Equipment. Panama railroad ... ........ 7'011t000
Miscellaneous expenses. Department of
Construction and Engineering ......... 1.592.000
Officers and employes. Department of
Civil Administration................... 60fi.ju
Skilled and unskilled labor. Department
of Civil Administration................. 20 000'
Material, supplies and equipment, De-
partment of Civil Administration .. 205a.iji)
Officers and employes. Department of
Sanitation........................... 740.000
Skilled and unskilled labor, Department
of Sanitation ............................ 430.000
Material, supplies and equipment, De-
partment of Sanitation. ................ 890.000
Relocation. Panama railroad............. .9%0.00O
Improvement. citiesof Panama and Colon. 8u0.u'0.)
Total............. .................. $35 515.00'0
The allotments to the Department of Con-
struction and Engineering are divided as
follows:
Central Division........................ 57.850.000
Pacific Division............ ........... 7.31,X0
Atlantic Division..................... . 8 96,00
Office of Chairman and Chief Engineer 486 000
Mechanical Division ..... .............. 3 41"0 1 K.
S Qnartermaster's Department ............ 2 355.000
I Department of Disbursements......... 78 000
Department of Examination of Accounts 240.0,10
Subsistence Department.................. 62,000
General expense......................... 1.163.3000
Total......................... ... $31.924.000
That part of theallotment to the Quarter-
master's Department which relates to new
building and repairs to buildings has been
divided as follows:
NEW CONSTRUCTION.
Subsistence Department..................... $37000
New corral at Ancon ...................... 17.rjOB
conversion of silver camps ...... ...... 20.000
Conversion of gold quarters ..... ..... . 39.r000
New construction of quarters............. 100 000
V Y. M.C. a., Gatun................... .... 5.000
Miscellaneous buildings.................... 1200)


Total...................... ....... ....
REPAIRS TO BUILDINGS.
Office buildings............................
H otels........................................
Quarters (gold)............................
Kitchens (silver).............. ...........
Quarters (silver)...........................
Commissaries .....................
Baths. closets, and washhouses.............
Shops........................................
Storehouses.............................
Clubhouses.................................
Lodge halls..................................
Old Prench buildings ....................
Misellaneouns buildings..................


$250.000

$12.500
20,000
190.000
6.000
18.000
3.000
6 iOfs
18.000
10.000
4.a00
2 000
60.000
25,500


Total.................................... 375,000
The notice of allotment, as sent to the


heads of the various Departments and Di-
visions, is accompanied by three detailed
statements, of which the above statements
are abstracts. Attention is called to features
of the statements as follows:
It will be noted that the allotments for the con-
struction divisions do not include fuds to take care
of charges against them for work performed b) ihe
Mechanical Division. as the Mechanical Di .-i-ton has
been granted a special allotment A5, expenditures
of the Mechanical Division, ont account of any disi-
sion. in excess of the items which go to make up the
total for the Mechanical Division. would. of course
have to be taken care of out of the allotment for the
division thus benefited.
It will also be noted th-i ou July 1 there was an
unobligated balance under the appre-Driation for ma-
terial, supplies and equipment, and for plant for the
Department of Constructioni and Engineerine ,I less
than two million dollars which shows that care
must be taken during the present fiscal :.ear so ,.s not
to incur greater liabilities, unless the work performed
is greater than that contemplated at the time the es-
timates were prepared in which case such work
must be specifically :sated in support of a deficiency.
should one be necessary Work should be solid out
and cared on as 1o keep within the allo.tments dur-
ing the fiscal year. for such work as was originally
estimated. Any deficiencies must he supported by
evidence to show that greater amount of work will
be done than was covered by estiinate submiitted.

Earthquake Shocks.
Seismic disturbances were recorded on the
instruments at Ancon Observatory on Au-
gust 28 and 30. On the 28th, four distinct
shocks were recorded, all of minor intensity,
the first occurring about 11 a. m and the
last, at a little past 5p. m., none of these be-
ing accompanied by any preliminary tremors.
On the morningof thej0th, about a. m.,
a shock of pronounced intensity occurred,
the tremors continuing for about twenty
minutes. The vibrations were sufficient to
throw the pens from the cylinders of the
high-tension instruments. This disturbance
was felt b} many persons at various points
in the Zone, and almost immediate inquiries
were made at the meteorological office from
Ancon, Alhajuela, and Gatun. At the lat-
ter place, the clock in the fluviograph
station was stopped, presumably b) the dis-
turbance.
Many slight records from supposed earth
disturbances have appeared on the seismo-
graphs, but the shock of August 30 is the
most severe that has been experienced since
American occupation.
No building in Panama, or Colon, or in
the Canal Zone villages was damaged by the
earthquake. The flat arch in the ruins of
the church of Santo Domingo in Panama,


which is the evidence most often cited in
proof of the statement that severe earth-
quake shocks have never occurred on the
Isthmus, was unshaken, and the ruins of
other churches, although in a weakened
condition, withstood the shock. Advices
from various parts of Panama indicate that
the earthquake was felt throughout the Re-
public, but so far as can be learned, no dam-
age was done.
Canal Zone RIesidlence and Citizenship.
THE: CANAL RECORD.
Will you please advise me if a British sub-
ject can take out naturalization papers here
on the Canal Zone? I have been three years
on the Canal Zone I am an Englishman,
but it is my intention to become a citizenof
the United States, if possible.
IRWIN V'URRNON STANFORD.

[Residence in the Canal Zone is not con-
sidered residence in the United States within
the meaning of the naturalization law.]
Misdirected Letters.
DrIisioN OF Posts. Coa-.roM ANJ REVENE.,S.
ANCON. C. Z.. September 1. 1909.
The following insufficiently addressed letters.
originating in the United States nd its possessions
hdave been recesncd in the office of the Director of
Posts. and may be secuied iipon request of the
addressee
Catlin. W R. Nitzer Jr. Wm. A.
Connell. F 0 Peter John G.
Conner. Luther L. Read Jno.
Drake. Creswell C. Selby, F. C
Freedman. Sam D Slicco. Ogusu.ani
FurLtasto V P Steele, W. D
Gnrswold, George Thomaz Dr J Oliver
Holman, C A Tucker. Mr and Mrs
Jordan. Mrs Ellenor Herman F.
Leonard Coupl Jos J W'ahlund, Charles I.I
MacSp3rr-n. blisGladys Wilkjin, Robert W4)
Marcolte. Mrs. H J A\ ainer. C'scar
McCall, IL. C.
Nilseu. CaprLiu S. l2d class.)

Supplies for 'anal Work.
The following steamers arnved at theports of Cris-
tohal Colon and Balboa di-rinug the week ending
August ? with surpliesfor the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission
Prr,: .4A II' Vli.',,r August 23 from New York,
with 41 cs-ses axes. 18 barrels creosole oil. 62 barrels
co3l tar; 9 barrels sulphate of copper, for stock.
.4dran'ce. August ?4 from New York. with I 000
barrels cement 125 cases bronze wire cloth. 4 Li00
short handle shovels. for stock: 2.5'0u feet B M, ma-
hogany lumber for car repairs. 13 cases electrical
appliances for relay dredging pumps at Balboa. and
a miscellaneous cargo aggregating 2.400 packages,
weighing 61t0 ions.
.4h/1'a,. August 26, from New Orleans. with 15
crates track drills: 30 push cars. ?l 000 pounds rosin
77 crates gate valves. for stock. ', illi feet lumber for
car repairs
Hoeu,.'r August. 25 from Seattle Wash., with
I 130.4o9 feet B M Douglis fir lumber for Atlantic
and Mechanical Divisions


STATEMENT OF CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES TO JUNE 30. 1909.
The following table shows expenditures for Canal work, classified monthly, since July
I, 1908. The figures give only expenditures which have been located. In addition, there
have been some disbursements, such as purchasing material, etc., which it will not be
possible to locate to a specified account until their use has been finally determined:


Period.


Prior to July 1. 1907 .......
Fiscal year 1908 ..........
Fiscal year 1909.
July. 1908 ...............
August, 190 ...............
September. 1908...........
October. 1908............ .
November. 1908...........
December. 190B............
January. 1909.... .........
February. 1909............
March. 1909.............
April. 1909.................
May. 1909.............. ...
June. 1909 .................


Department
of
Civil Admin-
istration.

$1.446.407.73
704.610 15
84.898 15
77.019 801)
69.867 03
59 612 51
59.374 12
65.526 32
51.41682
60.782.U4
60,130.85
66.846 14
63.161.61
63.297 79


Department
Department of
of I Construcction
Sanitation. and
Engineering

$4.636.630.37 $13.410.795.01


2.310,212.01
197.963.07
145,370.37
129,723.40
155,676.68
147.957.24
166.321.70
164.605.80
139,368.18
127.669 50
146.515.18
136.521.29
136,678.61


Total................ 2,932,951.06 8.741.71540


16,680.660.46
1.452.698 8
1.599,556.90
1.636,253.17
1.448.614 64
1.369,805 86
1.500.404.77
1.550.843.72
1.453 781 43
1.611.343.85
1.480.566 68
1.604,437.10
1.511.859 69
48.311.622 16


Municipal
Improve-
ments.


$4.296.732.98
1.494.956.41
91.901 17
60.793 76
52.809 20
67.696.17
77.406 64
70.936.43
65.20951
54.105 6.3
39 267.70
56.617 86
48,168 74
44 310 78
6.520,917.98


PLant Ac-
count


519345.69787
11.694.215 15
544.083 23
517,(.46.09
703 633 [19
727 544.14
480.139 10
893 337.24
1.416.18590
5% 564.67
776821 41
1 072221.29
667 335 95
Sal 026.65
40,.87,851.78


Total.


$43.136.263 96
32.874.654 18
2 371 544 50
2.400,291.92
2.592 287.89
2.459.144.14
2.134.682.96
2,696,526.46
3.250.261.75
2.304 601.95
2 615 233.31
2 822.767.15
2.519.624.69
2 617.173 52
106.795,058.38









THE CANAL RECORD


ol. III., No. 1.


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.
Activities of the Young M1en'l Christian As-
SOrin t inn.
The Hearou S buter- Concert Comnt-nnv of New
York will arrive ou the Isthrmu Strienmber 9 and
their inlr, i performniritce- will be 'is foilluwv Septlm-
ber 11.Cnstobal Serp.embrr 13 Culebr.i Septenrtbee
14 Gorgaoni Septeinber 1p Empire Aeptrmther I'
Galui Setenimb.:r I1 \aco', Sulbcequent darts will
be announced ,liter. rThe cerronnel of the company
is Aun.a H nrois viano Fr;irce. Herarmiis ''tolin
Charlotte Heir.uis clari-net Winifred He rous cor.
net auud reader Ther nrogr ims are iried but the
following i an sample of what w-il be gi-en
PART I
I Orciheitra i ,, r, a,. .tDa' etf .Irahmni
/ CGroup of Re',f glin .. ... Selectdc
3 String Quarter MNtrch ..... .... Frraad
4 Vloliu Contcerto ..... Bendot
5 Orche-tra 1FTantase- e../'- .-tI .. .A S S'
PAJLRT I1.
I Clissairhone Selctrin .. ......
2 Reading--7t" I a''es' r' t$ $ii
..... ........ .Katle LioUIl.A ,, 1iggl]O
3 S,ong --.Sparri z .s'i twiih tinged quartetl
4 Violin 1 "i .1 dlfa J . ......... .. imonet
4 I Se ecled. . .. .. . ..........
Sij.ip ne. ketch ... .. ...
A talls -register count of the clablouse attendance
was taken ftur a period of two weeks ending August
67. Notwithstanding that during the entire period
some p,irts of the Cristobal clubhouse were closed for
repairs the total aitendince for the four clubhouses
averaged 1.441 per day. The lowest natenldauce for
nuy one d-j was I 2ni. and the highest w- 1I 743
CULEBRA.
The bowling all.e:. h-ie received special prerara-
lion for the tournament rlwhch begins Saturday Sep-
tember 4.
The interest iand .iteida'nce iUn he g n.ini-itin
continues to incrtea4e The work consists chief\
of s .steltlic bijlding-up exercise and Tecre ltie
games. Men desirain to enter there classes may do
soon any Monday or Wedoesdai evening
Mr. S R D. Kramer. aFisiLal t secret.r) isaCLtrFI
na secreLir:. during the absence of Mr Goodman who
went 011 annual leave Augu-t 26
W EMPIRE.
The bowling leam Ihas elected a1 It: clphlain. C J
Iluuon The first game in the uen tournament will
be rolled at F'moirr on Saturda5 night. September 4
with the teamin from Critobil The (men who rolled
2iiior better betwE'en Aug- 1 dIsd I 2Srire-Bardelson.
2.': Brown. 21' Edward ?. 21, 1. Ino Hinckley.
? 1'.2i2 21., Husin 2(.i201 t 1t 213.217 Gool by.
2Ui2- Polter i02 2. ?l:s. Robbitt ujl J, ?C'2
In a bowliig niitch lit rrid.ai etenling a tearmn
from the office of the M.Tiler Mechanic wont two out
of three gaitn1s from the Post-office ite mi the 'core
being MaJ.ter MeAlchn;c Ciffice-S3u 70. 814. total
2.37AS Post.ofice--6'l -.," si. toLil 2 ?36.
Gymnasium acut,tiifs OccuIs ervry night of the
week but men wvantiusg astlematic exercise are in.
sited to join the reg ular cla-i in physical training
whih meeLts Tuesday and nriday eveniiogs from 7.31)
to 9 o'clock
The boys department will hive an outing on the
beach at Panamna onI S.turda.. September 4 Each
boy is requested to bring his own lunch
GORCONA.
Mr E. P Daupline is office assistntp eseniner. dur-
ing the absence of Mr. Swanson who is on his an.
nujil 'acaion leave
In a bowling contest bertecn GCorgona and Gatun
the following scores were rolled Giorgon3--?6. 224
74i Gatun SW.. ;32 o2.1 Messrs L-isker. W' J.
Wright Hall Sprechen and McConughey repre-
sented Gorgon-i against Mersr' Durond. Bailey
Wickhliamnn E A Wnght and Hertz of Gatun.
The monthly song service I.nt- Sunday evening wIas
ixll .iatenided Two peei i1 seleclions were a ten b%
the uinixted quarrt-t composed of Mrs Bcrgtlrom.I Mrs
Snyder. Mrt Cole and Mr Sweet Mrs Beethrni was
pianist. The address by Mr Minear of Culebrn was
received with interez A markedJ feature of the
e'.'lng was.i Ic %ihbging b'y ihe audience
Mir Grosse lends in the billi.,rd tournament with
Mr Prentiss second .Mr Joues leads in the pool
.oLirUr .iient
Members are in'-tted to suggest books that ihey de-
sir. d:,,J-d to the libr 'rs
CRISTOBAL.
The Cnsr.obal clubhouse h.is been in the bunds of
the painter' the past niouth and has undergone a
thorough renu alon .iil trilansformnitioti in its ap,
pearrince. The wiallt oi the lobby gaine room, pool
room enterlninmtrnt hIll arid reading room have been
painted light green Inrmmed with white The barber
shop. lavatories bath room. locker room and bowlin .


allet s have been painted entirely in while The floors
h'.e been -rtined and .a rnished. The veranda floors
also have been painted The entire building has been
decorated with pictures pnnrl.aund curtains. New
rnigs are expected -hortll to complete the furnishing.
Au alteraLion his been made in the office arrange-
mentl g-,ing more room rind permiltlng an addi-
tnonal section of bouk shelves The library has been
overlhjul.l and the books have been renumbered and
c.aaL'1oued b.. authors and by title. The new books
recutlyl received are in great demand
CipLaiti Racket" presented by the Gorgona Dra.
ianlic Club lisl Saturday eveuiig. drew a larger au-
dience than could be accommodated All the seals
were suld the verandas were filled with satndin_
spectators and a number were turned awash

PERSONAL.

Lieut.-Col. Geo. W. Goethals sailed for
the States on the Hamburg-American
steamship Pu-zr;: August Iril/elsm on Au-
gust c.]
Mr. W. G. Comber, Resident Engineer
at Balboa, returned from his leave of absence
in the States on August 29.
Mr. F. A. Gause, the new Superintendent
of Schools, arrived at Cristobal on the
A/ilarica on August 29.

Tivoli Club OGticer,.
The annual meeting of the Tivoli Club
was held on August 29, when the following
officers were elected for the ensuing year:
President, Thomas M. Cooke; First Vice-
President, Col. W. C. Gorgas; Second Vice-
President, Dr. J. C. Perry; Secretary and
Treasurer, Hugh S. Hunter; members to
act with officers as a board of governors, C.
M. Brown and D. \\. MacCormack.

Church Note-.
Weekly meetings for the club of Marines
at Camp Elliott have been instituted, in-
structive discussions being led by the Rev.
Carl H. Elliott. Acourse on Old Testament
characters is held at the Camp on Tuesday
evenings.
The Cristobal Union church hascontributed
the sum of $51 gold, toward the building
fund of the negro Wesleyan Methodist church
in Gatan.

Gntun Masonic Club.
Master Masons are cordially invited to
attend any and all business and social meet-
ings held by the Gatun Masonic Club. The
regular meetings are held every Monday
evening in the Gatun lodge hall.
GORGE H. FURBISH,
.45isiant Sectar;J aud T7ranuaeL.
Gatun. August 24, 1909.

Notice tou Kangaroos.
Hereafter it will be necessary for all Kan-
garoos to show a membership card at the door
in order to gain admission to the regular
monthly dances given on the first Saturday
evening of each month by Empire Court
No. 1, at Kangaroo Hall in Empire.
E. W. STOLBERG,
Culp!I,',' h" .
Empire, August 16, 1909.

Band Concert.
The I. C. C. Band will give its regular
concert at the Hotel Tivoli in Ancon on the
night of Sunday, September 5.

Married.
FREEMAN-HACKENBERG-At Gorgona. on Au-
gust 21 by Rev. Wm.Gray. Bernice Genevra Hacken-
berg. daughter of Mr and Mrs. A. L. Hackenberg of
Gorgona. formerly of Akron. 0., to Floyd C. Free-
man of Culebra. formerly of Chaflee, N. Y.


RED CROSS BENEFIT.
Gorgona Dramatic Club at National Theater
on Labor Day.
The Gorgona Dramatic Club, which has
presented "Capt. Racket," a three act farce
comedy, at Gorgona, Empire, Culebra, Bas
Obispo, Cristobal and Gatun, will present the
play at the National Theater in Panama, on
the evening of Labor Day, September 6,
under the auspices of the Gorgona branch
of the Canal Zone Red Cross.
A special train will leave Colon at 5.30
p. m. on the day of the performance and
returning will leave Panama at 11.30 p. m.
Stops will be made at all stations in both
directions. Tickets on the special train
may be procured at all Commission club-
houses, and from committees in the towns in.
which no clubhouses are located. The fare
from any station on the line will be $1.50
gold, and will include admission to the
theater, where the tickets will be exchanged
for numbered seat checks.
Residents of Panama, Ancon and Balboa
can obtain tickets of Mr. Harry Bovay, An-
con, or at the theater on the evening of the
performance. To residents of the above-
mentioned places, the price of admission
will be J1 gold.
All seats may be reserved upon applica-
tion, exceptingthose in the gallery, to which
the general admission is fifty cents gold.
Private boxes, seating eight persons, may
be procured at 512 gold each.
Tickets are for sale by the following peo-
ple: G. C. Mitchell, Secretary, Y. M. C. A.,
Cristobal; D. Sinclair, Chairman, Red Cross
Association, Gatun; J. H. Humphrey, Dis-
trict Quartermaster, Tabernilla; Thos. S.
Booz, Acting Secretary, V. hi. C. A., Gor-
gona; District Quartermaster, Bas Obispo;
W. K. Freeland, Chairman, Red Cross As-
sociation, Las Cascadas; E. R. Gobrecht,
Secretary, V. Ml. C. A., Empire; F. G. Good-
man, Secretary, V. M. C. A., Culebra; R. R.
Watson, Chairman, Red Cross Association,
Pedro Miguel; Harry Dundas, Chairman,
Red Cross Association, Paraiso; A. R. Ben-
nett, District Quartermaster. Corozal; Harry
Bovay, Chairman, Red Cross Association,
Ancon.
At each of the places mentioned tickets
will also be on sale by members of the Red
Cross Association.

Ball Game at Ancon Park.
A baseball game was played at Ancon park
Sunday forenoon, August 29, between a team
made up of employes of the Department of
Sanitation, and a team from the Department
of Civil Administration. The contest was
fairly close up to the seventh and last in-
ning when the Civil Administration team
took a strong lead and won the game. Score
by innings:
Total.
Sanitation- 0 0 1 0 0 2 0-- 3
Civil Admin 2 0 0 0 0 3 13-18
Batte-ies--Cil Administration. Russell and Rex;
Sanitation. Weling and Ramsey.
The winning team has been challenged to
play a picked nine from the Pacific Division.
Odd Fellows.
Ancon Club, I. 0. 0. F., holds regular
sessions each Thursday evening at the An-
con Lodge hall. During the first part of
the session non-members are admitted.
This is followed by a session of members
only, at which timethe regular club business
will be transacted.







September 1, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

Consignment of Peaches, Plums and Cher-
ries Received-Cold Storage Price Lisl.
The hours duringwhich commissariesare open are
as follows-
Cristobal and Culebra. 8 a m. to 12.30 p. m.' 2 p. m.
to 7 p. m.
All other commissaries. S a. m. to I p. m : 3 p. m.
to 7 p. m.

The Allianca brought peaches, plums, and cherries.
and celery, lettuce and other vegetables, ou her re-
cent trip from the States.
A shipment of grapes, peaches. plums,. cherries,
and apples is expected on the Cnrrst5i.'. which is
scheduled to leave New York on September ?
A consignment of watermelons is expected on the
TurrWlba, due to arrive from New Orleans on Sep-
tember 2.
Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning September 1.
FRESH MEATS.
P- e .
Mutton-Stewing ........................ ...... per Ib 7
Shoulder, neck trimmed off
14 pounds and over)..... .....per Ib 10
Entire forequarter loot trim-
med). 10 pounds and over ....per Ib 9
Leg (8 to 10 pounds).............. per Ib 19
Steak..... ......................... per lb 20
Short-cut chops.......................per lb 22
Lamb-Stewing .. ............... ............oer lb 7
Entire forequarter, neck trimmed
off ........... ..... .................... per Ib 10
Leg (6 to 8 pounds) ...................per Ib 27
Chops .................................p. per lb 2'9
Veal-Stewing .........................................er Ib 10
Shoulder for roasting toot under
4 Ibs)t.... ..... ......... .. ..... ....... o. r lb 15
Loin for roasting.......................per Ib 19
Chops... .............................. ... per lb 20
Cutlets ........ .................... er lb 23
Pork cuts ..... ............................. .per lb l2
Beef-Suet .................... ......... .... per b 4
Sou .......................... .. ...... per Ib 6
Stew....... ........ ................. per lb l2
Corned ...... ..... ................ .. per Ib 1 14 16
Chuck roast. ........ ........ ...... ..per lb 14
Pot roast ................. ............ per b 16
Rib-roast, second cut l not under
3K pounds) ................. er Ib 19
Rib-roast, first cut (not under 3
pounds)....... ..........................per lb 21
Sirloin roast....................... per lb 22
Rump roast . ................per lb 22
Porterhouse roast ..... .... ...per lb 32
Steak. Chuck .... ............. ...........per b 15
Round............... ..........per ib 16
Rib ................................ per lb 21
Sirloin .... .. ........... ............per Ib 22
Porterhouse....... ... ......per lb 22
Rump .......... .............. per lb 2
Tenderloin.......... ....... per lb 27
MISCELLANEOUS.
ivers- Beef ... .....................per lb li,
Calf .................. ................ each 65
Shad roes ....................................ai........... r 40
Sausage-Pork.......... ................ per Ib 17
Bologna .................. ............per lb 17
rPankfurter ....................... per lb lF
l Leberwurst ............................per b 17
Sweet bread-Veal..... ..................per lb 1.20
Sweet bread-Beef............................... per lb 30
Eggs fresh ............... .............. ........ dozen 32
POULTRY AND GAME.
Chickens-Fancy Roasting.large ....... each 1 50
medium..... each 1.30
Fowls ....... .......... ............. ......... ... each 90. 1.00
Ducks, fatted ......... ............................. each 1 30
medium weight .... ...................each 90
Broilers ............... .. ................. ....... each 75
Turkeys... ........... .............per Ilb 31)
Squab .................................. ... ...... each 35
Capon s.................... ............... .... each 2 50
Geese. fatted. about 10 pounds . ...each 3 uO
12 pounds ..... ...... each 2 30
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.
Bacon-Breakfast, whole piece........ per Ib 231
Breakfast. sliced .. .. ..........per lb V 6
amn-Sugar-cured. sliced........... ......... per Ib 25
One-half. for boiling................. per Ib 921
Hocks ................. .................. per lb 18
Sugar cured ...... ................. er Ib 20
Beef. salt. family .............................. per lb 10
Pork. salt ....................................per Ib 15
Ham boiled..... ......... ........ ............. per lb 28
Ox ton es ..... ........................................... ..each 1.00
Pigs" feet ................ .......................... per Ib 14
tongues..... ............................... per lb 16
DAIRY PRODUCTS.
Butter-Printas, prime quality................. per lb 38
Cheese-Roquefort ............................... per lb 45
Philadelphia Cream.................... each 20
Young America..................... .. per lb 22
Swiss....................................... per lb 31
am......................................... each 1.05
Camembert............................... per Ib 28
Neahfnatel............ ......... each 6
Gou ..................................... per lb 34


Parmesan. ... ........ .... ....... bottle 20
French cheese in tins-Camembert Brie.
Neuichatel ... .. .... ...... ...l.lb tin a It
Milk, Briarclif ... .. .... .............. bottle "-55
Butter .... . .. bottle *"Ir
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS
Celery .......... ... .. .. per hd 10
Cauliflower .. ............. ... .per lb 15
Lettuce.. ..... ... ... .. ....... per lb i
Potatoes, white old ... ... .... per lb 3',
sweet. ... .... . per Ib i
Onions............................... per lb 3
Squash Hubbard ............. .. per b 5
Yams...... .. .... ...... ... per lb 3V4
Turnips .... ......... ..... .... per Ib 3',
Carrots ........ .... .. .... per lb 5
BeeL ................ .. ...... .. per ]b 5
Polatoes new ...... .... .. pr Ib 3
Rhubarb .............. .. .. .. per 11,
Cucumbers. .... .... ...... per lb 7
Tom .toes ................... per lb 7'1
Lemons .. ......... ........ .... ....... ...... dozen 21
Lim es..... ............ ... .. .. per 100 Si,
Watermelons .......... .. ... .. ... each 4a
Canteloupes ............ . .. ..... each
Cabbage............ .... ..... ... per lb 4',
Pineapples . .. ..................... each IS
Oranges ...... ......................... .. dozen 12
Grapefruit ... ..... ......... ................. each 4

'Indicates reduction from last IIut
"lIndicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle.
tlndiciles advance on last list
ISold only from Commissaries. no orders taken for
delivery
6Sold only from Cold Stora.e and nol from Com.
m issaries
Tide Table.
The following table shows thetimeof high
and low tides at Panama for the week end-
ing September 8, 1909 (75th meridian time):

DAre. Low. High. Low High I.ow

A M A M.. I .r. P. -M. P M
Sept .. 4 I 11 5 2. it11

Sept 3... 542 Il ., ..4
P. I.
Sept 4 .. 12 ? 6 6 13 4: 6 ,)
Sept ... I l, 7 1 1 35 7 ....
Selt. 6 .. 1 5-, s 0l 2 7'i 5 3 1 .
Sept 7 54 356 3 27 3 ...
Sept 8 .. 4 S n I 1 3 4 3. 10 51
The variation of high and low tide at Cris-
tobal is so slight that a tide table for the
Atlantic side is not necessary.
Rainfall, August I to 28, 1909, Inclusive.
IMIDNI'CUT TO MIoNIGrT I

I

ST.rio.3s. .

a a iS
X --
Atanrin- Dvr~ac..-
Cristobal ..... ................... 4 75 14 50
Brazos Brook ...... ..... .. .... 2 24 I5 n 43
Catun. ....... ..... ...... 4 5 3 0. o
Bahio .... ............ ...... 2 1 3 9 9?
Central On, town-
Tabernila .. . ............... 1 6? 3 u 57
San Pablo .. .... .. ......... 1 52 8
Gormona .. ... ..... ........ 1 37 7 21
Gam boa ............ ..... . 1 o 674
Em pire. ...... .......... .... . I cS5 3 .09
Camacho .. ........ ........... 1 4 7 93
Culebra. .......... ... 2 19 3 7.79
'FiZ.: I &<;O is, on-
Rio Grande ........... .. ... 1 88 3 3 54
Pedro Miguel .. ......... .. 2.11 22 at64
Balbo . ... .......... .... 1.98 ] 5 96
Ancon . .. .... .. ............. I 5 3 i
At.'nIn Coasit-
Porto Bello ................. 2 19 9 I1 i
Nombre de Dios (August I to 211 243 .3 II.00
UtPer Chag gn-
El Viaa ... ..... . .. ... ... 1 43 4 10 51
Alhajuela ... .. ...... .. .. I 3 7 65

The following steamersarnrved at or departed from
Balboa during the week ending August 7. 190.W9
Arnved-August 23 .-jsen front South ports
u,'iuf,. from intermediate ports Augusl 24. Arica
from Guaraquil August 25. Hmorntw/'e. from Pugiet
Sound. V'. S .S. Victsitug. from Central America
August 26. k,-part. from San Francisco. Ba'-rcaouraz
front Central Antenca. Departures-August 24.
Loa. for South ports

Losr--On Sunday. August 22 between the Hotel
Tivoli and Hotel Central in Panama. a purse con.
training several money order receipts and two Cadiz
Bank deposit slips. Finder please mail purse atd
contents to J. G. Blane. Balboa. C. Z.


OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.

Acting Chairnian andl Chief -Engfineer.
COLEBRA C. Z liugust 3,1 1?u9
CiRCreLAR No. 271:
During mr absence from the llthmuu Licul Col
H F Hod eswill he in chargeof thb work. as Actlig
Chairman and Chief Enigiiner eflcl-etae Atgit '1
l ".J'3 GEO '. CUE TH.I t


CULLBRA. C Z A.ugust 311. l.r)?
CIFCUL \R
Litut Col H P Hodees. second Vice-Pre-ident
will be in chliare of the affairs of the Panama Rail-
road ComaL-an. and Pan.miri Railroad Stenmship
Line rn the Isthmus during Imy absence effective
AuUitus-il. 1'l'
GEO Wt GOE T LS Peiaaii'nl.
.44 ling miiubi.tncce Officer.
Cr.uLFk % C Z Augu't 25. Is(l.
CiRCiut NJ -26
During the absence Iron the Isthmus of Mij E.
T lWils0on S"lubsistence Officer. Isthtmian Cin.al Cotn-
mis iti. .,11 hi. dutlie iIn COUiile tion %lth the Sub-
sIilence Depirtment Isthminn C.inal Comimissio.n.
and the Commisariry Depirlment. Pan-imr Railrund
Company. will be performed bv Lieut F 1 'Vhit.
lock Asiit-not Subsistence Officer Isthlimian Canal
Comrn ision
GEO W.. COETBrALS.
L.'i 4 0i1-11 / 12iii Ctiiif COtn, m o, ,w
istiderit P.inamia Radraad Contoiij.

No Refund for L.ost Comunis.sary Book.
CIJLFBRA. C Z Augu't 24 1919
CIRCUL aR No .'56-.
The attention of ernplove, is called to the follow.
iin paragraDh *f instructions printel on the in-ide
cover of all cornmi.sir. book,.
If ths honk Io lost itnmediiate notice should be
gisen to 'he Subti-tenice Officer and Local Audi-
,or of the PinaIinJ Railroad Conp.in bilt it is
understl.od that neither the lthuil',n Cioal C. ,B-
mrlnion ncor the Paniroa Railroi',d Colnp, iny' will
tie reMuolnsitble or reimburse owner for the value
cf iucih tuaJi.-d r.,cponI if book I, not recovered
Her-after in the case of the loss of a coinmi-sary.
t6Nk from in% cause e hauLoever the lk-su mui.t be
borne by the emiplo)e and no refund for the value
of unused coupons will be authonzed
EO) W GFirTa. s.
Chairneam mag. Chalt ERig nter
Comnaui-.ary Books.
C-LRRis C Z. August 26. 1909.
CIRCCn.R No 256-t
When the prencit suplill of ill commissary books
shall hite been exhausted books of I value of $5 atnd
$13 only will be is-ued to gold employes and books
of a value of $2 50. $5 and $15 to silver emplo)es.
These books will contain sufficient coupons of small
denJominations to rneet the demands in this respect.
In accordance with Paragraph 5 of Circular No.
2.-6 not more than one book of the $5 denomination
will be issued in any one month ia a gold employee
whose snlar.. exceeds S100 per month
C.Ou %' GriETrALS. Cbllzr'atf.

Labor Day n Holiday.
CULE.nRA. C. Z lugusit 2.4, 1l09.
CracrLAR NO 271-
Labor Day. Monday. September ri, I 119 will be ob.
senred as a holiday throughout the Cinul Zone and
a-s far as po.-sible all work will tie suspended on that
day. GEO 1V. Goti II .Iit Chla urira a.

stage. of tlie Clingre'.
Maximum height of Chagres River abcve
mean sea level for the week ending midnight
Saturilay, August 2S, 1909:

SrA"noN ,


a I I -


Height of low water
ab h in in ea.ltvel ft 125 )92 41 0) 0
Matimum h':ight sb
mean sea level feet I
Sunday Aug 22. 11 96 41 51.8 8 2 3
Monday. Aig ?3 131 )' 96 2 51.2 10 2 44 3 7
Tuesday. Aug 24 129 9 95 6 51 2 96 44 3.
Wed'esdaS. Aug V I?1) 1t 95 6 50.7 8.4 36 2.
Thursday Aug Ru 127 9 94 6 49 b 1 I .33
Friday. Aug 7 1286 94 8 49.4 6 7 3ri '.
Saturday, Aug '.. 134 93.2 53 8 7 2 2 8 2.5
1








TH CANAL RECORD


Vol Ill.. No. 1.


CANAL DIRECTORY.

ISTEMIAN CANAL COMMISSION.

Lieut.-Col. Geo. W. Goethals, U. S. A.,
Chairman, Culebra.
Lieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges, U. S. A., Culebra.
Lieut.-Col. D. D. Gaillard, U. S. A., Empire.
Maj. Win. L. Sibert, U. S. A., Gatun.
Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, U. S. N.,
Culebra.
Mr. Jo C. S. Blackburn, Ancon.
Col. W. C. Gorgas, UL. S. A., Ancon.
Mr. Joseph Bucklin Bishop,
Secretary, Ancon.

DEPARTMbIENTS.

Construction and Engineering.
Headquirlers. Culehr.j
Lieut.-Col. Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman
and Chief Engineer.
William Howard May. Secretary to the
Chairman
M. B DePutrun. AssistLnt to the Chairman.
C. A MNcllhaine Chief Clerk
John K. Baxter Assi-sirnt Chief Clerk.
H S F.rish Surveying Officer
Caleb M Sa-ille. Assistant Engineer.

Lieut.-Col. H. F. Hodges, Assistant Chief
Engineer.
C 0 Carlkon Secreiwr.
Edward Schildhauer. Electrical and Mechanical
Engineer.
Henry Goldmark L D Cornish H F Tucker.
T. B Monniche. Edward C Sherman. De.
signing Eng-ineers.

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, Assistant
to the Chief Engineer.
J C. Parsous. SecrcLnr
A. B Nichols Office Engineer

Central Division.
Headquarters. Empire.
Lieut.-Col. D. D. Gaillard, Division Engi-
neer.
Louis K. Rourke. Assistant Di.-ision Engineer.
A. E Bronk Chief Clerk.
A. S Zinn. Resident Engiueer
Mark W Tenny Asitnnl Engineer.
R \k. Hebard. Assistant Ene-ineer
W I. Thompson Assistant Enineer.

Atlantic Division.
Headqu irters Gatun.
Maj. Wm. L. Sibert. Division Engineer.
MNi. Chester Harding. U S A Assistant Dis-i-
sion Engineer.
R M Sand? Chief Clerk
Maj Edgar Jadwin U S A. Resident Engineer
Maj J P Jervey LU S A. Resident Engineer
Carl G M. Hoffman. U. S. A Assistant En-
gineer
Capt Horlon W SLicklr U.1 c A Assistant Eu-
gineer
L G. Thomn Assistant Engineer
F C Stanton AisiLint Engineer.

Pacific Division.
Hendqu,irtrs. Corozal.
S. B. Williamson, Division Engineer.
John M G 'Watt Assi iant Diil'ion Ericintcr.
J C Keller Chiel Clerk.
C; Comher Resideni Engineer
A. I Cauiribell RKesidnt Erngineer
H I) Cole. As-sistLnt En.gineer
Frank Cotlon Assistant Engineer.

Mechanical Division.
Headqun.rlers Culebra
Geo. D. Brooke, Superintendent of Motive
Power and Machinery
P. W iolt'. Chief Clerk
Earle J Bania Mechanical Engineer
A L Robinson Electrical Engineer, and Mas-
ter Mechanic Gorgona Shops
NW 0. Johnson Malter Mechanic Empire
Shors

Subsistence.
Headquarters. Crnsobal.
Maj. EugeneT. Wilson, U. S. A., Subsistence
Officer.
Lieut. Frank 0 Whitlock, LU S. A Assistant
Subsistence Officer.
W F Shipley. Chief Clerk.
lohn Burke. Manager of Commissaries.


Quartermaster's.
Headquarters. Culebra.
Maj. C. A. Devol, U. S. A., Chief Quarter-
master.
Lieut. R. E Wood. U S. A., Assistant Chief
Oi arlermasler
Liut Walter D Smith. U S A Constructing
quartermaster.
C. H Mann. Chief Clerk
Capt Courtlnd Nixon. U S. A., Depot Qunr.
terruasler Mount Hope.
Wm H. Macfariane. Inspector of Construction
and Repairs.
C. L. Prker C C. MeColley. Inspectors.

District Quartermasters.
WVm A Schwab lactingI Ancon and Balboa.
A. E Witly arcling). Bas Obispo.
A R Beiinett, Corozal.
Ira A. Giles. Cristobil.
John M King. Culebra
Walter C. Ross actingg. Empire.
1A B Dorsey. 1'ticngi. Calun
R C Shads. Gorgons.
U. A. Ei-an' isclinc1. ILas Cascadas
Ron R Watson Pedro Mtnicuel and Paraiso
M 0 Smith Porto Rello.
J H Humphre?. San Publo and Tabernilla.

Civil Administration.
Headquarters. Ancon.
Jo C. S. Blackburn, Head of the Department.
H D. Reed Execul\e Secretary.
G A Ninas Chief Clerk

Tom M Cooke Chief Diision of Posts Cus.
toms and Revenues Ancon
Herman A Gudcer, Drputv Collector. Ancon.
E l.ewis B.aker Deputy Collector. Cristohal.
Gcorge M Shoniz Pro.ecuting Attorney,Ancon
Grossenor A Porter Chief of Police. Ancon.
D E McDonald Chiel Clerk
C E %%eidmin Fire Chief. Crnstoh'il.
Geo H. Ruggles SUot of Public \ortk Ancon.
C R Screent. Chief Clerk
J J Reid' Asst Supt Public Works Cristobal
Frank A Gause Superintendent of Schools.
Ancon.
Edgar P Beck Treasurer of Canal Zone Empire

Canal Zone Judiciary.
Headquarters An-on
Supreme Court-H. A. Gudger,Chief Justice.
Walter Emery Clerk Anucon.
l.onn C Collins As-ociate Justice Cristobal
We'leN1 M Owen. Associate Justice. Empire.
Circuit Court Firct Circunt-H A. Gudger
Judge Ancon
Waller Emer, Clerk
Circuit Court. Scmonil Circuit-Wesle% M Owen
Judge EmDire
Elbert M. Goolsb?. Clerk
Circuit Court Third Cir--uil-Lornn C Collins,
Judge C nstobal
Nelson R Johnson Clerk
M C Rerdell. Senior Distnct Judge. Cnstobal
S E Blackburn. District Judge. Ancon.
Edgar S Garnson Distrinct judge. Empi-*
j b Mirch Diktricl Judge Gorgona.
ThoulLsE Brow-n Jr District Judge Cristobal.

Sanitation.
Headquarters Ancon
Col. XV. C. Gorgas, Chief Sanitary Officer.
Lient -Col John 1. Phillips '. S A Assistant
Chief SaniLnarv Officer
Cant Robert E Noble U S. A General In-
spector.
Harrm E Bovay Chief Clerk.

M..i. Charles F Mason. U S A Superin-
tendent Ancon Hospital Ancon
Surgeon J F. Leys i S N.. Superintendent
Colon Hospital. Cristcbal
Surgeon. I C Perry. P H. and M. H. S.. Chief
Quarantine Officer Ancon.
Sureon Claude C Pierce. P H and M H S
Quarantine Officer Colon
Dr Fleerwood CGruver P H and M. H S.. uar-
Mnline Officer. Panama.
Joseph A. LePrince Chief Sanitary Inspector.
Ancon.
Dr A H. Mayner. Acting Health Officer Pan-
a mn
Dr. M. F Connor. Health Officer. Colon

Disbursements.
Headquarters. Empire.
Edward J. Williams, Disbursing Officer.
Wm. M. Wood. Assistant Disbursing Officer.

Examination of Accounts.
Headquarters. Empire.
W. W. Warwick, Examiner of Accounts.
T I. Clear Assistant Examiner of Accounts.


Purchasing Department.
Headquarters. Washington. D. C.
Capt. F. C. Boggs, U. S. A., General Pur-
chasing Officer.
C. E. Dole. Chief Clerk.
Capt. Courtland Nixon, Purchasing Agent on
the Isthmus.
Maj Wendell L. Simpson. 0. S. A., Purchas-
ing Agent, 24 State Street. New York City.
F. C. Nordsiek. Assistant Purchasing Agent, 24
State street. New York City.
Lieut-Col Geo. B. Davis. U. S. A.. Assistant
Purchasing Agent, Custom House, New
Orleans La.

Panama Railroad Company.
Headquarters. Colon.
(General offices. 24 State Street. New York,)
H. J. Slifer, General Manager, Colon.
G E. Geer. Assistant to the General Manager,
R. Budd. Chief Engineer.
J. A. Smith. SuperintendeLt.

MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company. of the Hamburg-American
Line. and of the United Fruit Company's Line, the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change-
NEW YORK TO COLON.
Prinz Joachim......... H -A ...Saturday.......Aug. 28
Colon ................. P. R R.Saturday ...... Aug. 28
Cristobal............. P.R R Thursday ...... Sept 2
Panama................P. R R. Friday ........Sept. 3
Tagus ................ R.-M.. Saturday.......Sept. 4
Advance ..... ........ P R. R.Thrsday ...... Sept. 9
Prinz Aug. Wilhbelm...H -A ..Saturday ......Sept. 11
Allianca............. P.R. R Wednesday.....Sept. 15
Anon ......... .... P.R. R. thursday ....Sept 16
Oruba .............R.... M... Saturday...... Sept. 18
Colon...................P.R.R.Tuesday.......Sept. 21
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A... Saturday.......Sept. 25
Panama. ...............P. R. R.Monday.......Sept. 27
Cnstobal ..............P. R. R.Thursday......Sept 30
Magdalena ............ R -M...Saturday ......Oct. 2
Clyde .............. R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 16-
Thames .............. R.-Mt...Saturday......Oct. 30
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Cristobal
should apply in advarc? of arrival at the Customs
office. room 8, building No. 1, Cristobal for customs
line permits which are necessary to obtain admit-
tance beyond waiting room on pier 11
All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and
Ro)al Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO NEW YORK.
Ancon ..................P R. ................Sept. *
Allianca............... P R R .Friday ........Sept. 3
Oruba.................R -M.. Wednesday .Sept. 8
Colon........ .........P. R. R.Thursday......Sept. 9
Prinz Joachim......... H -A...Tuesday.......Sept. 14
Panama .......... P. R. R Wednesday ...Sept. 15
Cristobal ...... .. .P. R R Thursday......Sept. 16
Advance ............. P R. R Tuesday.......Sept. 21
Magdalena .............R .M Wednesday....Sept. 22
Alliance ........... ..P. R. R.Monday........ Sept. 27
PriAn Aug Wilhelm .. H A ..Tuesday.. Sept. 28
Ancon................P.R R Thursday......Sept. 30
Clyde.................. R.M Wednesday....Oct. 6
Thames.............. R -M .Wednesday. ..Oct. 20
'Date of sailing to be announced later.
NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Turrialba.............U. F.C.. Saturday......Aug. 28
Abangarez ........... U F.C..Saturday......Sept. 4
Atenas .... ........... tr F C. Saturday...... Sept. U1
Turnalba........... U.P.C .Saturday......Sept. 18
Abangarez ...........U..C. Saturday...... Sept. 25
COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.
Turrialba ..........U P C..Tuesday.......Sept. 7
Abangarez............ U.F C Tuesday....... Sept 14
Atenas.................U.F.C..Tuesday.......Sept 21
Turrialba .. .......... U.F.C..Tuesday ...... Sept. 28
Abangarez ............ U IC..Saturday ...... Oct 5
COLON TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD.
Tagus.................. R.-M...Tuesday.......Sepl. 14
Sailings of the French line (Cie. G&nfrale Trans-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows. Caltiorwian for New Orleans, via Kingston.
Ja.. on or about September 10.
The steamers David of the National Navigation
Company and the Taboga of the Pacific Steam Navi-
gatian Company, leave Panama. for David, province
of Chiriqui. and intermediate points, the first and
third weeks of each month.
The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p.m.
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York.














CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1909. No. 2.


The Canal Record
fuabishedat weekly under the authority and supervision
ao the Isthmiam Canal Commission.

Tle Canal Record is issued free a/ charge, one copy
rachk, toall employes of the Commission and Panama
Ratroad Company whose names are on the goad roli.
Etsa copies and back numbers can be obtained from
the news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for
fe i nts each.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Anron, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
Nocommunication, either for publraltwn or request-
ing information. wr7l receive attention unless signed
wit the/Iull name and address ao lile writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Canal Medals Here.
Two thousand two hundred and sixty-four
Canal Medals were received September 3, on
the Colon, and will be distributed this week
to the men who earned them between May
4, 1904, and January 1, 1909.

Canal Record Index.
The index to Vol. II of THE CANAL REC-
ORD, in form suitable for binding with the
year's issues of the paper, will be ready for
distribution shortly. It will be sent free, on
application, to such persons, institutions,
libraries, etc., as desire to preserve their
copies of THE CANAL RECORD in book form.

For Colored Employes.
A building in the labor camp at Upper
Caballo Viejo has been assigned to the Col-
ored Young Men's Christian League of Gor-
gona, for use until it may be needed again
for Canal purposes. This association has
forty members.
The contract for a school building and col-
ored institute at Culebra. near the colored
church at that place, has been let for $1,850,
this price being for work only, as the Com-
mission furnishes the materials. The school
building is to be completed by the time the
public schools are opened in October.
* Additions to Commissaries.
Plans have been prepared for a 15-foot
addition to the north.end of the Gorgona
commissary. The ice platform located at
the north end will be enclosed, and the
addition, which will be used for storage
purposes, will extend from it. A refrig-
rating room, 12 by 20 feet in size, will be
erected in the rear of the commissary ad-
joining the new ice unloading platform,
which till be built on the opposite side of
S "the delivery track after the plan of the one
.a.t i.atn, so that ice can be unloaded on
taidie,; aaneold storageand:miscela neoixs
-* .t:" -lies:on-'te other. The- commissary


office will be changed to the center of the
building and elevated one foot from the
floor. A ventilating skylight will also be
put in, and the windows on the sides of the
commissary permanently closed, which will
afford more shelf room.
An addition, 40 by 45 feet in size, will be
made to the north side of the Empire com-
missary to give more storage space. The
partition separating the present storeroom
from the front part will be moved back nine
feet, which will give more display space for
goods. The refrigerating room will be moved
to the southeast corner of the building, and
the portion of the old storeroom still left will
be connected with the new part by a door.
The improvements and changes at both
commissaries will be made by the Com-
mission forces.
Long Service of Atlantic Dredge.
Ladder dredge .Vo. 6 of the Atlantic
dredging fleet has been taken to the Cristo-
bal marine shops for extensive repairs after
18 months of continuous service in the At-
lantic entrance to the Canal. This is one of
the renewed French dredges, and its boilers
and machinery are French material. It
may be necessary to put in new boilers and
machinery, but if it is not the old will be
thoroughly overhauled. A cabin will be
built on the deck.
Experimental Gardens and Lnnd.-'npe Work.
As the produce from the experimental
gardens located at Ancon. Corozal. Pedro
Miguel and Empire does not pay for the ex-
pense of conducting them, and as the money
appropriated by Congress for the construc-
tion of the Canal cannot properly be drawn
upon for work of this character, the gar-
denswill be discontinued on October 1. No
more planting is being done and only such
work is now authorized as is necessary to
bring the present crops to maturity. Only
the experimental gardening will be discon-
tinued. The landscape work which has been
undertaken around the Canal Zone villages
will becontinued under theQuartermaster '
Department, and will be gradually extended.
Laborers for Galun.
Of the fifteen hundred laborers brought
from Barbados by the .-ncon on its recent
voyage, eight hundred were assigned to the
work at Gatun and the remainder were sent
to various pointsalong the line of the Canal.
Fossils Found in Culebra Cut.
Specimens of shells found in Culebra Cut,
about fifty feet below the original surfaceof
the ground at a point nearly half way be-
tween Empire and Culebra, have been sent
to the Smithsonian Institution at Washing-
ton, in accordance with a request made by
the secretary of the institution some weeks
ago. The shells occur in very soft, .coarse
sandstone, which disintegrates and, crum-


bles away rapidly on exposure to air and
moisture, leaving the shells exposed. This
is the only locality in Culebra Cut in which
shells have been found during the past two
or three years. The locality in question ex-
tends along theaxis of the Canal about four
hundred yards and the shellsare found there
in large numbers. Oyster shells predomi-
nate; in fact, a casual search disclosed only
two other specimens.
Cold Storage at Ancon and Porto Bello.
Authority has been granted for the con-
struction of small cold storage plants at An-
con and Porto Bello. Both of these places
are isolated, Porto Bello from the ice mak-
ing plant at Cristobal, and Ancon from the
commissary refrigerator at Balboa. The
Ancon project provides for a market to be
located near the Hotel Tivoli to contain a
cold storage box for meats, fruits, vegeta-
bles, and dairy products, and a similar box
for the Hotel Tivoli. Refrigeration will be
supplied by a small ammonia compressor.
The refrigeration plant authorized for Porto
Bello is similar to that for Ancon but smaller.
Opening of Public School-.
The Canal Zone schools will open on Mon-
day, October 4. Friday, October 1, will be
spent by the teachers in preparing for the
opening.
Recreation Hall at Corozal.
A site along the highway immediately
north of the hotel has been selected for the
recreation ball recently authorized for Cor-
ozal. The plans now under preparation
vary somewhat from those originally made,
the chief difference being that a veranda
will surround the pavilion, affording an out-
door lounging place.
Work of Central Dii ision tliulonder,.
A statement of the work of Lidgerwood
unloaders in the Central Division during
the month of August follows:
DNo of No of No. of
ou. nloader- trains cars
Balboa ....... 769 397
ira s ... .... 6 12691
Tabernilla ........ . 5 1 315 23.670
Total .... .......... It ? ?78 50.35

Examination for Colored Srlhol Teachers.
An examination of applicants for appoint-
ment to the position of school teacher, class
3 (colored), in the Canal Zone will be held
at Ancon school building on Friday, Sep-
tember 17, 1909. The morning session will
open at 8.30 sharp, and close at noon; the
afternoon session willopen at 1.30and close
at 5. The subjects are arithmetic, hygiene,
American history, geography, grammar.
McMurray's Method of Recitation, read-
ing, writing, and spelling. The grading of
the last two subjects will be determined by
the degree of efficiency and accuracy of the









THE CANAL RECORD Vol. lit, Na. 2.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
(Continued.)

writing and spelling of the manuscripts in
the other subjects. The reading examina-
tion will be oral. The examination is open
to all and no special application need be
made.
Any further information respecting the
examination may be secured from the office
of the Superintendent of Schools, Adminis-
tration Building. Ancon.

Acting President of the Red Crohs Society.
During the absence from the Isthmus of
Maj. C. A. Devol, Lieut.-Col. John L. Phil-
lips, treasurer of the Canal Zone Branch,
Red Cross, will act as president.
Bachelor Quarters.
THE CANAL RECORD
Will you please publish any circular or
other authority for not allowing a bachelor
employee to retain his quarters while on
vacation? The release of quarters when
going away is a matter of form which mar-
ried employes with their families have to go
through in the same manner, and their
quarters are retained fiftyv-six days. Surely
the bachelor is entitled to the same consid-
eration. He has his bedding, clothes, books
and other effects accumulated, which he
cannot take with him and has to leave
somewhere until his return. Under the
present practice he has to pack his things
away to get musty, whereas he could leave
them with his room-mate, with whom in
most cases he has become well acquainted
and who would see them taken care of.
Also, when he comes back now he has to
room with a stranger in most cases, and
according to District Quartermasters' notices
posted up in the Ancon and Balboa quar-
ters, no matter how distasteful, his room
will not be changed except for the good of
the service. To all appearances the quar-
ters are not so crowded as to call for strin-
gent regulations, and an employee being
satisfactorily accommodated must be to the
good of the service. BACHELOR.
Balboa, C. Z., August 26, 1909.

[At points where there are plenty of
quarters available and where the rooms can
be reserved without inconvenience, bachelors
are allowed to retain their quarters while
on vacation. There are some districts in
which the supply of bachelor quarters does
not permit this.]
Supplies for Canal Work.
The following steners arrived at the ports of Cris-
tobal Colon and Balboa during the week ending
September 4. with supplies for the Isthminn Canal
Commission:
.Saaln,. August 28. from Puger Sound. with I 107 832
feet B M lumber for buildings etc
.41,,'tanca August 29. from New Vork. with 1 1i0
barrels cement lor stock' 30400 electric frises for
stock' 132 bundle- lining bars for stock: 1.120 cross
arms for Pacific Division- 2.000 pieces pipe easing for
Pacific Division 61 tons bar iron for stock: 10i tons
wrought iron pipe for stock 21 tons bolts and nuts
for stock. 64 dredge castings for Pacific Division. and
a miscellaneous cargo aggregating 6.9R3 packages.
weighing 707 tons.
Viucaina. Augult IA from Baltimore with 2 pro-
pelleorwheels for Atlantic Division. 40 car wheels for
Mechanical Division: 11 car bodies for Catun hand
ling plant: 350 bags tie plugs for stock: 118 275 feet
B. M. while oak lumber for car repairs 20 340 boxes
dynamite for stock. 217 toiisstructural steel for Gatun
Locks. 245 tons galvanized pipe for stock. 372 tons
steel angles, plates etc. for stock.
Ancon. September 2. from New York. with 17,981


barrels cement for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions:
in 4(0 bags cement for Atlantic and Pacific Divisions:
18 tons unloading crane parts for Balboa.
C).'c&t. September 3. from New York, with 24 coils
drill rope for churn drills: 25 coils air drill hose for
churn drills: 15 200 electric fuses for stock; 7.750 gal-
lons engine oil for stock- 7000 gallons valve oil for
stock 20 000 quintuple caps for stock. 256 castings rot
Dredge No. 21. 1 '000 barrels cement for stock, and a
miscellaneous cargo aggregating 3,546 packages.
weighing 540 tons.
S',1-tra August 31. from New York. with 9 tons cop-
per tubes for stock
7rmra'hba. September 2. from New Orleans. with 62
creosoled poles for Gatun plant: 82 packages electri-
cal material and 45 coils wire for Gatun and Mira-
fores plants- 1.22'i cases kerosene for stock: 107 bar.
rels fire clay for stock 234 cases fire brick for stock-
I locomotive coaling crane for Mechanical Division
153 tons material for Balboa rock crushing plant.
Fire pt Corozal.
A small building, located in the rear of
the laborers' quarters at Corozal, and used
as an oil house by the District Quarter-
master, was partially destroyed by fire at
about 8.30 p. m., Thursday, September 2.
The alarm was sent in by the policeman on
duty, and the volunteer fire company re-
sponded promptly. The building contained
kerosene, gasoline, and other inflammable
materials. The damage, and loss on con-
tents are placed at $180.
The fire was caused by a lighted match in
the handsof the colored storekeeper, Arthur
Clare, who was severely burned about the
hands, face and thighs. Clare went into the
place, unthinkingly ignited match, and an
explosion of gas which had collected in-
stantly followed. He ran out of the build-
ing with his clothes ablaze, but bad pres-
ence of mind to divest himself of his coat
and to go to a hydrant under which he sat
until he was thoroughly water-soaked. He
was taken to Ancon Hospital for treatment.
Counterfeit Panamanian Coin,.
A counterfeit of the Panamanian peso,
which is equivalent to fifty cents in United
States currency, has been discovered in cir-
culation in the Canal Zone, and in the cities
of Panama and Colon. Up to the present
time, but few of these spurious coins have
been turned in. The Disbursing Office at
Empire received three from local banks,
while one was received by the Canal Zone
Police Department, which was given to the
police sergeant at Bas Obispo by a butcher
at that place, who said it had been paid to
him by an unknown negro woman. The
counterfeit is of very poor workmanship,
and was apparently made on the Isthmus
from a plaster of Paris mould. It is con-
siderably deficient in weight, has the appear-
ance of having been worn smooth, thus
obliterating all the finer marks, and bears
the date. 1901. On account of its short
weight and general faulty appearance it
should be easily detected.
Jacinto Eseudero Acquitted.
The trial of Jacinto Escudero. the Pana-
manian charged with killing Charles Rand,
acting chief boatswain mate on the U. S. S.
Buffalo, was held in the Superior Court of
Panama, on Thursday, September 2, before
a jury of three persons, as is customary un-
der the Panamanian law. Rand was stabbed
on the night of September 29, 1908, in
the city of Panama, the wounds inflicted
causing his death the following day. The
case was given to the jury Thursday after-
noon, and after a little over an hour's delib-
eration a verdict of "not guilty" was re-
turned.


GATUN SPILLWAY DAM.
Plans Approved for the Concrete Structure.
A concrete dam in ogee form with crest on
the arc of a circle in place has been decided
upon for the barrierin the spillwayof Gatun
Dam. The proportions are such that the
nappe will adhere to the masonry, and the
curve at the toe will be sufficiently long to
prevent any great disturbance being caused
in turning the water back to the horizontal
direction. By using the curved crest line the
energy of the fall maybe utilized to destroy
to some extent the velocity of the water.
Additional positive check will be provided
in the form of masonry baffles, for other-
wise it would be impossible to predetermine
the point below which regular flow will be
established.
In selecting a location for the spillway by
which the height of water in Gatun Lake
will be regulated, a hill about midway be-
tween the ends of the Dam was chosen
because in it the surface of the rock is about
at sea level, and a good foundation was thus
procured without excessive excavation. A
channel 1,200 feet long and 300 feet wide
has been excavated through the hill. This
channel will be closed at its south or up-
stream end by a concrete dam, with founda-
tion at sea level at the toe and at 10 feet above
sea level at the upstream end. The dam
will be 93.04 feet long from heel to toe, 630
feet long on the crest line across the chan-
nel, and the crest will be at 69 feet above sea
level. It will contain about 140,000 cubic
yardsof concrete. On topof the concretedam
will be built the regulating works, plans for
which have not yet been approved.
After study of the maximum flow to be
cared for and the probable rate of discharge
over a dam of the section shown and with
the heads that will obtain, it was deter-
mined that 14 gates, each 45 feet wide, with
sill elevation at 69 feet above sea level,
will give absolute control of the lake under
all possible conditions. The top of these
gates when closed will be at 87 feet above
sea level and the bottom when they are
open will be at 92 feet. Since little drift
will have to be taken over the spillway
dam, owing to the large size and irregular
outline of the lake and the prevailing direc-
tion of the winds, the crest gates have been
planned to open to elevation 92, which will
give sufficient opening to allow any drift
that may reach the dam to pass over. To
prevent any large drift that may go over
the dam from damaging them, it is pro-
posed to face the baffles with heavy ribbed
cast iron plates which will distribute the
shock over the concrete.
The cut through Spillway Hill has been
paved and the sides are being lined with
concrete, so as to give a smooth channel
through which the Chagres River may dis-
charge after the West Diversion is closed.
Before the West Diversion is closed prepara-
tions will be made to build coffer dams, un-
der shelter of which the concrete of the
main spillway dam may be placed later.
It is considered necessary to have positive
lake regulation during the construction of
the spillway dam and of the locks, and in
order to obtain this, and at the same time
to test some of the Stoney culvert gates
intended for the locks, three of the. piers
between the crest gates will be madL muith
larger than the others. Culverts will.be-left


Vol. III., No. 2.


THE CANAL RECORD







September 8, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


through them at a low level and some of the
gates already contracted for will be installed.
In order at the same time to test one of the
cylindrical valves for the lock, a fourth
hI large pier will be constructed in which to
install one of them. This valve will be set
at a somewhat higher elevation than the
i:7 Stoney gates and will, therefore, not assist
in the regulation of the lake at low levels.
Preparations for installing the coffer dams
have been made. The West Diversion will
be closed and the flow of the river will
then be through the channel and may
be continued there as long as desired.
During this time the ends of the spillway
dam, which will be founded upon the rock
at elevation 40 feet above sea level, may be
constructed, as they will be well above the
surface of the water flowing through the
channel.
The lake should drain down to about 13
or 14 feet above sea level during the dry
season, and construction of the dam should,
therefore, begin at that time of the year,
when it is desired to fill the lake. The coffer
dams may then be put in, shutting off the
water and allowing the concrete to be placed.
As soon as a few feet of concrete have been
put in, the culvert gates should be opened
and left wide open during the construction,
except as they may be occasionally closed
to permit the examination of the masonry
inside the culverts. If they are left open in
this way it will be possible to keep the con-
struction of the dam ahead of the rise of the
lake, so that there will be no danger of over-


Sit 2VSf


I
I
- so.a --I


Lien .o


5,



4.


-- --- -----"

GATLUN SPILLWAY DAM.
Section showing ogee curve on which concrete dam will be constructed. Regulating works will be
imposed on top of concrete dam.


topping the new masonry. The dam should
then be completed and the crest gates in-
stalled. It will be impossible to put in the
machinery for five of these gates at the time
they are installed, as the operating machin-
ery for the three Stoney culvert gates and the
one cylindrical gate will prevent it. There


GATUN SPILLWAY DAM.
pEet of concrete dam showing location of 14 Kates in regulating works. Number and location of baffle
Diess not yet determined. Space marked "'power house" is site of hydraulic plant that will utilize water
tla rd frs, laie. kand should not be confused with power house now in .use at Gatun Locks concrete plant.


will, however, be sufficient available lake
regulation with the nine crest gates, three
Stoney culvert gates, and one cylindrical
valve.
When it is desired to remove the Stoney
gates and the cylindrical valve to the locks,
the culverts will be closed by temporary
gates at their upstream ends, thus shutting
off the water and allowing the gates and
valve to be removed. The culverts will
then be filled with concrete. As soon as the
gates and the valve have been removed the
operating machinery for the remaining crest
gates can be installed, completing the spill-
way.
Obituary.
Andrew J. Corr, a private in Company C,
U. S. Marine Corps stationed at Camp
Elliott, was struck by a train at Matachin
on the morning of August 28, and died soon
afterwards. He was born in Shagtocoke,
N. V., in 1881, and had been on the Isth-
mus 14 months.
Misdirected Letters.
DrvisaiN op PosTs. CUSTosMS AND REVENUES,
ANrCON. C. Z September 8, 1909.
The following insufficiently addressed letters,
originating in the United States and its possessions.
have been received in the office of the Director or
Posts. and may be secured upon request of the
addressee.
Billings. Miss Floria M. Harrison, William T.
Bomberg. J. B. Herberger. L. C.
Boyer. Chas. S. Johnson. Nehemiah
Brennan. Chas. P. Koontz. 0 D.
Brown, Wm. Carter Lours. Jame
Burnell E. D. McConnell. Raymond
Callahan W. V. Oglebeem. Emily I.
Calvert. Fay Pason. J.
Cash. John H. Payne L. W.
Chalfant, Mack Plummer, Harry
Cherry. D. F. Sawyer. R. F.
Crooks. Z M. Schau. Wm.
Darling. W. W. Shuster E. S.
Decker. Rev. W. H. Skinner. Miss Irene
Devlin. John J. Straw. Clarence
Dickenson. Mrs. Charles Swallenberg. H. S
Dumlao. Mrs. Jusefa Westburg. Mrs. Mary
Flood. James Wilson. A S
During the week ending September 3. 1909, the fol-
lowing vessels arrived at or departed from Balboa;
Arrivals-August 26, Chiriqui. from intermediate
ports; August 29. Safltis. From North; September 2,
Chile. from South ports: September 3, Washmawzva,
from Port Harford. Departures-August 29, Plew,
for San Francisco, and Aysen. for South ports: An-
aust 30. Arina. for Guayaquil: September 1. Quito,.
for intermediate ports, and U B 5 Vtekshurg, for
Central America.








THE CANAL RECORD Vol. III., No. 2.


CHAGRES BASIN SURVEY.
Field Opernlions Finished-Soime Features of
the Work.
The survey of the Chagres Ri\er basin was
begun about the middle of November, 1908.
with only a small force, but by January 1,.
1909, there were four completely equipped
parties in the field and these continued until
the field work was ended about the middle
of July. Progress on the Chagres and its
branches above Alhajuela %\as hindered b%
the unusual and continuous rains that fell
this year during theory months, and as the
wet season advanced the work along the
rivers became hazardous. Narrow escapes
from drowning, and loss of supplies were
reported by three of the parties, the floods
of the latter part of January damaging in-
strumentsand washing away a large part of
the camp equipment. In the upper reaches
the streams flow through deep and narrow
gorges and rise rapidly without warning.
On several occasions members of the parties
were awakened at night by water rushing
through the camp, although the site had been
selected to avoid this danger.
Trouble was experienced in retaining labor-
ers, owing to the distance from the Zone
and to the hardships they were required to
endure. Wheuever possible, men living in the
vicinity of the work were employed, and on
account of the rough conditions encountered,
usually gave better satisfaction. The health
of the men was excellent until March 1.
After that date, malaria, tropical ulcers,
skin infections, and the poison of insect
bites kept the partie_- almost constantly
crippled. The laborers suffered much from
malaria, and from an affection of the feet
called mazamorra, due to continual wading
in mud and water.
The survey work was under the general
field charge of an assistant engineer, and
each party consisted of a chief of party, one
levelman, one rodman, and about 14 silver
men. Supplies were taken to the camps,
wherever possible, by boats, and when dis-
tant from navigable streams, they were
packed by laborers or by mules. The trans-
portation of supplies involved the employ-
ment of about 25 boatmen, in charge of a
general foreman, and the use of 12 cayucos.
When the survey was started Iatachin was
used as abase of supplies, but later the base
was moved to Alhajuela. For the Siri line,
supplies were sent b. boat from Gatun,
while the Trinidad party was supplied by
pack train from Empire.
In the survey operations the rivers were
utilized as far as possible and azimuth stadia
lines were run up the principal streams for
the location of points on the watershed from
three to five miles apart. From the head of
the Rio Santa Barbara, in general easterly
direction to the Esperanza, about 28 miles,
nine points were established. When a point
on the Rio Chagreswas reached about seven
days distant by boat Jrom the base of sup-
plies, illness of the white men and a strike
of the natives necessitated the temporary
abandonment of this line.
On the Pacific slope, a base was located at
Narinjal, less than a day from native settle-
ments. A drawback encountered here was
the absence of well-established points. The
country is uninhabited and untraveled, even
the natives being unfamiliar with the region.
To the highest and most prominent peaks,
which were locally unnamed, designations


were given to distinguish them in the sur-
vey work. The geodetic locations of Mount
Vista Linda and Mount Prominente were
determined by triangulation to points on the
islands of Chepillo and Taboga, and in the,
city of Panama.
From Mount Prominente, points on the
southwesterly ridge to the Rio Indio were
located, and a line was run to Mount
Brewster, closely following the ridge. From
here a tie line was run to the point formerly
established on the Chagres, and Mount San
Bias in the extreme northwest portion of
the divide was located. This survey devel-
oped the ridge line for a distance of about
22 miles. From Mount Vista Linda, a line
was run southwesterly along the trail to the
Zone boundary, near the Sabanas police sta-
tion. From stations on this line, sights were
taken to locate points on the ridge between
Mount Promninente and the head of the Rio
Indio, a distance of about 10 miles.
From the head of the Rio Indio to the
head of the Pedro Miguel River, six points
were established on the ridge line at inter-
vals of three miles by a survey made up the
Chilibre River, which is a branch of the
Chagres entering near Juan Mina. Total
ridge line covered was about 20 miles. From
the head of the Pedro Miguel River to that
of the Rio Grande, a distance of eight miles,
the divide has been determined by various
water supply investigation surveys. From
the head of the Rio Grande, the ridge has
been run to a point west of the town of
Chorrera, a distance of about 36 miles At
this point the ridge became too rough to
follow, and the line was run in the river
bottom, and spur lines run to the ridge at
various points, the length of ridge thus de-
termined being about 10 miles. For about
10 miles further, the ridge was located front
a line running along the native trails to the
head of the Rio Siri Grande. The survey
in this region has shown that the Rio Trin-
idad, and its main tributary, the Rio Siri,
have their sources much further south than
has hitherto been believed. The extreme
headwaters of these streams are approxi-
mately within 15 miles of Chame on the
Pacific coast, and the distance from the
mouth of the Chagres River is about 37 miles
in a straight line. This would indicate a
considerably larger area than previously has
been estimated.
From the head of the Rio SLri Graude, the
line follows the river trails to about the head
of the Rio Siricito, establishing by side lines,
the ridge for 22 miles. By running lines up
the Siricito and two of its branches, three
points about five miles apart were estab-
lished, a distance of about 20 miles. Two
of these points were connected up by the
survey run along the Trinidad ridge from
the high hills at the head of the Rio Siri-
cito to Gatun. A total of 230 miles of the
ridge was determined, and in locating it,
the actual amount of survey line was 419
miles, of which 381 miles wereon rivers and
trails and 38 miles on the divide itself.
Hard blue trap rock appears throughout
the Chagres divide, with the exception of
the district extending about 15 miles south
of Gatun. The rivers have cut cafons through
this rock, or tumble over it in falls having
in places sheer drops of 100, or more feet.
At Dos Bocas, 19 miles up river from Gam-
boa, the Chagres divides into two branches.
The main branch is to the east, retains the


name of Chagres, and has about double the
discharge of the other confluent. A short
distance below the mouth of the Piedras,
this branch passes through a series of cati-
ons, consisting of two distinct reaches, each
about a mile long, and separated by a stretch
of a quarterof a mile, where the banks assume
a gradual slope. For considerable distances,.
the river is less than 30 feet wide, and in
one place narrows in a rock gorge to only
20 feet. At the bottom of the gorge the
sides are in solid rock for a depth of 18 to
20 feet, and at ordinary stages the river has
a depth of from 10 to 15 feet. In thesecafions,
water rises of from 40 to 50 feet in four or
five hours are common during the dry sea-
son, and the drift and wash on the banks
show that during periods of heavy rainfall,
rises of from 70 to 80 feet are not unusual.
The smaller branch to the west at Dos
Bocas is known as the Pequeni. The fact
that the Chagres branch, and not the Pe-
queni. carries the larger volume of water
is contrary to general report and some
former records. This is established, how-
ever, by numerous gaugings on the main
streams and their tributaries. On the Pe-
queni River and its principal affluent, the
Boqueron, cafions and waterfalls are found,
but of less extent than on the Chagres. Sin-
gle falls, however, are much higher, and one
has a sheer drop of 125 feet.
The largest town in this district is San
Juan, with perhaps 55 houses and 350 inhab-
itants. During old Spanish days this was
an important settlement, having been a
stopping place on the paved royal road be-
tween Porto Bello and Panama. This trail
roughly) followed the continental divide from
Panama to a point near Dos Bocas, where it
crossed the Chagres, extended up to San
Juan, thence up the Pequeni and Boqueron
Rivers, crossing the mountains near the
Caribbean coast, and from there down the
Rio Casajal to Porto Bello. Portions of the
paving of this road are still in good condi-
tion, but for the most part the trail is im-
passable and frequently obliterated by veg-
etation.
The highest land in the Chagres basin is
found in the ridges of the continental divide,
where the rivers have their sources. The
main ridges are all above 2,000 feet, and the
peaks rise from 1,000 to 1,500 feet higher.
For a considerable distance above San Juan,
the Pequeni and Boqueron flow through a
very marked limestone region, the forma-
tion being massive and of large extent. The
Rio Indio flows for quite a distance through
blue trap rock cation, beginning about three
miles above its mouth, and this rock can be
followed on the continental divide where it
crosses the Zone. South of the Zone line,
although the hills are low, it appears almost
everywhere on the surface. As the head of
the Trinidad is reached the hills become
higher, attaining an elevation at Mount
Trinidad, of over 3,000 feet. The top of this
mountain is a bare mass of trap rock thrust
several hundred feet above the surrounding
hills. Peaks of the same nature occur on
the ridge from Mount Trinidad to Mount
Siri, and the trap rock can be traced to the
lower branches of the Siricito River. South
of the junction of this stream with the Siri
Grande, volcanic ash, conglomerate, and
argillaceous sandstone show in the outcrops
and gorges. With the exception of a short
length of the ridge south of Empire, the


Vol. I11., No. 2.


THE CANAL RECORD)







September 8, 1909.


TH' CANAL RECORD


hills in the trap rock region have very steep
slopes and avery lightcovering of soil, with
but little underbrush.
Several investigations of a more or less
extended nature were undertaken of alleged
mineral deposits, but nothing of considera-
ble commercial value was found. Deposits
of lignite are of frequent occurrence in the
Canal Zone and in other sections, but so far
as examined they are in thin layers of lim-
ited extent, and often occur at such an
angle as to be worthless commercially.
Many other mineralsand metals were found,
such as gold, silver, copper, iron, man-
ganese, limestone, and some natural puzzo-
lana. Excepting the lime rock, however,
none of these have as yet appeared in such
quantities as to be of great value.
The upper Chagres region is covered with
a heavy growth of trees, few being of com-
mercial value. Some rubber and small ma-
hogany trees were encountered. The low-
lands along some of the branches of the Pe-
queni are covered with ivory nut and other
palms. Many large sabanas are found along
theChilibre River. In the section traversed by
the upper Siri and Trinidad Rivers, the veg-
etation is heavy, except where cut for small
native farms. Although the largest trees
found in the drainage area are in this dis-
trict, no great amount of timber of commer-
cial size was observed. Rubber, coffee, and
cocoa are grown by the inhabitants who are
Cholo Indians of much better condition than
the native inhabitants found elsewhere.
Rice, yucca, corn, plantains, bananas, etc.,
are raised on the farms, and a few horses and
oxen are used, but most ol the products are
carried to market by the men. There are
no native inhabitants above the Rio Indio,
or the Rio Boqueron in the upper Chagres
country.
Game was found throughout the basin,
tapir and wild hog along the Chagres, deer
in the Trinidad region, while several varie-
ties of large pheasants, generally called tur-
keys, are abundant near the headwaters of
all the rivers. Some small cats, and a few
larger ones, standing perhaps 2$ feet high,
with a total length to tip of tail of about
seven feet, were seen, but are not plentiful.
Snakes were seldom met with, and are unu-
merous only in the Trinidad River basin.
Those to be found, however, are said to be
mostly very poisonous, but authenticated
cases of death from their bites are rare. Some
boas were observed having lengths of from
seven to ten feet.
Accidents at Gatan.
James Small, a Barbadian laborer, check
No. 35,162, was killed by electricity at Ga-
tun Saturday, September 4, on the automa-
tic railway near the south end of the cement
tunnel. He was riding on the cars that con-
vey cement to the mixing plant, when he
slipped and fell off, striking the power rail.
Death was instantaneous.
Percy O'Neil, a Jamaican, check No.
71,824, was fatally injured at Gatun on
Wednesday, September 1. He had climbed
S out on the frame of a cement mixer to oil
the cups, and although previously warned
to be careful, failed to notice the approach
of a cement train. The engine cab struck
him, knocked him under the wheels, cut-
Sting off his left leg and badly crushing his
right leg. He was taken to Colon Hospital,
where he died shortly afterwards.


FIRST CANAL CONCESSIONAIRE

General Tuerr's Connection with the Early
Contracts.
THE CANAL RECORD'
THE CANAL RECORD in No. 43 of the 23d
of June speaks of Mr. Lucien Bonaparte
Wyse, marine officer, as the first concession-
aire of the Panama Canal. It is not my object
to discuss or to belittle the great and effect-
ive services which Mr. L. B. Wyse rendered
the Panama Canal, but I deem it necessary
to state that the first concession was given
to General Stephen Turr, a Hungarian gen-
tleman, who died at Budapest on the 3d of
May, 1908. The facts follow:
The Hungarian born Stephen Tiirr, Royal
Italian major general, made the acquaint-
ance of Mr. Ferdinand de Lesseps in the
year 1856 in Constantinople, who already at
that time was planning for the construction
of the Suez Canal. This acquaintance de-
veloped into an intimate friendship after
General Tiirr's marriage to Adeline Bona-
parte Wyse, when they moved their place of
residence to Paris. Mr. de Lesseps' brilliant
success with the Suez Canal incited Gen-
eral Tiirr to similar large enterprises, and
thus he began with the idea of piercing
the isthmus connecting North and South
America, which scheme was discussed also
at the International Geographical Con-
gresses in 1871 at Antwerp, and in 1875 at
Paris. General Tiirr collected all the exist-
ing plans and, according to the resolutions
of the before mentioned congresses, whereby
the two oceans were to be connected with a
(sea) level canal, General Tiirr, based upon
the law sanctioned on the 26th of May, IS6,
received a concession on the 28th of May
for the term of 99 years, for the construction
of an interoceanic canal at Darien without
locks or tunnels. Outside of the territory
required for railways and telegraphs an area
of 250,000 hectares was given by the Colom-
bian Government, and the contemplated
harbors at both ends of the canal, even in
case of war with Colombia, were declared
free and placed under international protec-
tion.
Having this concession in hand General
Tiirr constituted, under his chairmanship,
the Societd Civile International du Canal
Interoceanique du Darien, in Paris, a com-
pany for making the plans and doing the
preparatory work. This company, in the
month of November, 1876, delegated an ex-
pedition of engineers to Panama, under the
command of General Tiirr's brother-in-law,
Marine Officer Lucien Bonaparte Wyse, aged
23 years. In this expedition a Hungarian
engineer, Mr. Bela Gerstev, also took an
active part. This expedition could not solve
entirely the very difficult problem laid before
it, and three of the engineers became the
victims of the murderous climate. The
company sent out a second expedition in the
spring of 1878, under the command of Wyse
and Reclus, and they completed the work,
prepared the general plan, and made a
valuable and lengthy report of their work.
The International Geographical Congress
had, previous to this, constituted a com-
mittee for the purpose of studying the ques-
tion, and outside of French engineers,
American, English, Italian, and Russian ex-
perts had gone into the matter.
About thirty different projects were laid
before the committee, and of those the one
submitted by General Tiirr was found the
most practical, and virtually was declared


the onlyone capable of being carried out; it
being also considered that he was the only
one holding the concession" from the Colom-
bian Government.
On the ground of this plan the construc-
tion of the Panama Canal was carried out
under the presidency of Mr. de Lesseps,
while General Tiirr, in his capacity as con-
cessionaire, took part in the undertaking as
vice-president. The work began with great
hopes, but extraordinary difficulties cropped
up. so that the company was thrown into a
financial crisis, which finally ended in a tre-
mendous scandal.
A new French company tried afterwards
to conserve the work previously done, but
without any practical result, until the United
States Government took the matter into its
hands, and is so brilliantly proving that,
with American spirit, workmanship and
money, this world-renowned project, which
was originated by the Hungarian General
Tiirr, can be carried out to completion. It
is remarkable that General Tiirr's original
idea was for a lock canal as now contem-
plated, anPd had the company at the time
accepted the general's proposition, the canal
would have been carried out without any
greater difficulties.
Consequently it is clear that the initiation
of the building of the great Panama Canal
is due to the inspiriting and tireless activity
of the Hungarian General Ttirr. I think it
will not be thought immodest of me, who
had occasion to observe General Tiirr's
work connected with his different canal
projects for the last 35 years, if I propose to
the Isthmian Canal Commission, in con-
sideration of the preliminary work carried
on by General Tiirr, that his name be asso-
ciated with one of the technical objects on
the Canal by naming it after him.
In asking you kindly to publish this letter
in THE CANAL RECORD, I beg to inform
you at the same time that I contemplate
delivering a lecture about the Panama Canal
and its different stages, for the purpose of
bringing the progress of this miraculous
work to the knowledge of the Hungarian
technical world.
BELA DE GONDA,
Engineer. .Vtnrten.' t7ounscillor.
Budapest, Hungary, August 11, 1909.

[The contract of May 28, 1876, states in its
opening paragraph:
The undersigned. to wit: Manuel Ancizar. secre-
tary of state for the department of interior and for-
eign relations of the Colombian Government, duly
authorized by the President of the union, and
Anthoine de Gogorza. for himself and General
Stephen Tiirr. according to sufficient authority ex-
hibited, have agreed to the following. *
The concession of March 20, and May 18,
1878, states in its opening paragraph:
Eustorgio Snigar. secretary of the intenor and of
foreign relations of the United States of Colombia.
duly authorized, of the one part. and of the other
part Lucien N. B. Wyse, chief of the Isthmus Scien-
tific Surveying Expedition in 1876 1877. and 1878.
member and delegate of the council of administration
of the international Interoceanic Canal Association.
presided over by General Etienne Turr inconformity
with powers bestowed at Paris, jrom the 27lth to the
29th of October, 1877. which he his exhibited in legal
form. have celebrated the following contract: * "
Article 26 of the contract of 1878 is as
follows:
This contract which will serve as a substitute for
the provisions of law 33 of May 26. 1876. and the
clauses of the contract celebrated on the 28th day of
May of the same year shall be submitted for the ap-
proval of the President of the union and the definite
acceptance of the Congress of the nation.]








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. II., No. 2.


FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.
Supplies for Canal Worker--Improsed Ser-
vice Promiseul.
Fruits and vegetables for Canal workers
are supplied by the Subsistence Department
in two forms-fresh and tinned, and from
four sources-the United States, Panama,
the West Indies, and England. All the fruits
and vegetables that can be purchased to ad-
vantage in the United States, about 90per cent
of the total, are bought there and brought to
the Isthmus in cold storage. An improvement
in the cold storageservice within the next few
months is promised, owing to the increase
in cold storage space afforded by the new
cement ships, .-Ancon and Crislobal, and the
cold storage space recently added in the Pan-
amia and Colon. On its present voyage the
Cristobal will bring 150 tons of vegetables,
and fruits, including cauliflower, peaches,
grapes and apples. There will be 50barrels
of apples in the cargo, an experimental ship-
ment of early fruit. Large orders for grapes
and peaches have been placed, and the sup-
pl) of vegetables will also be increased as
the season advances. The season in the
States is said to be late this year and prime
fruits and vegetables are not expected until
the middle of September.
On their arrival on the Isthmus the fruits
and vegetables brought here in cold storage
are placed in dry refrigeration at Cristobal,
whence they) are sent to customers along
thelineofthe Canal. Dry refrigeration isac-
complished by passing cold air over cal-
cium chloride brine to dry it. About 40 per
cent of the vegetables and fruits is used
by the hotels and hospitals, and the remain-
der is sold at the commissaries.
Of the fresh fruits imported, oranges, grape
fruit, and tangerines come from Jamaica, and
the others are purchased in the United
States. Fruits from the northern part of
the United States are coming now and will
continue until November, when imports
from California will take their place to con-
tinue into February. Apples are imported
as late as June, but in general the fresh
fruit importations do not extend beyond May.
Fresh fruits were imported during the fiscal
year, 1909, in the following amounts:
Apples .. ............ .... 422.473 pounds
Oranges...... ....... 86 315 dozen
Lemon s ........... ... ..... 20 '6 dozen
Canntaloupes ...... ? 145
Watermelons......... . 10.844
Peaches ....... ...... . 35 921 pounds.
Pears ........ ... 26 2'9 pounds.
Plums ... .. .. .... 4 025 pounds
Grapes ............. ... .. 57 838 pounds
Grapefruit ....... .... ... 9 16 dozen
Limes ............... .. 5.10. dozen.
Other fruits .... .. .. 18.2u pounds
In addition to the fresh fruits imported,
two carloads of bananas are purchased on
the Isthmus each week. and a small quan-
tity of papaya is also purchased. Although
the Panamanian oranges and limes are of a
superior flavor none are purchased here be-
cause none are offered on the local market.
Native oranges sell at the Gatun market at
30 cents gold a dozen, and the supply is
less than the demand, although the fruit is
rotting on the trees not over five miles from
the market place.
Fruits canned in syrup were imported to
the amount of 439,003 pounds, and jams, jel-
lies, and preserves in glass and tin to the
amount of 193,586 pounds in the past fiscal
year.
About $1,600 worth of onions, lettuce, cu-
cumbers, and other fresh vegetables are


purchased in Panama each month, about
80,000 pounds of sweet potatoes are imported
from Barbados, and 40,000 pounds of yams
from Jamaica. With these exceptions all
the vegetables both fresh and in tins come
from the United States. The imports of
fresh vegetables in the fiscal year were as
follows:
Funds.
White potatoes................... 4.822.062
Onions ... .... .. ............... 612.316
Turnips.. ... .................. 105.977
Beets .. .. .... .................... 36.738
Carrots ........................... 70.571
Cabbage .......... ................... 672.433
Yams...... ...................... 427.973
Sweet potatnes.. ......... .... 1,306825
Other vegetables including celery.
tomatoes. squash and other north-
ern seasonable vegetables... ... 326.554
The tinned vegetables imported were:
Pounds.
Pork and beans .................... 53.88
Tomaloes............................. 506.080
Peas and beans.............. ... .. 340.234
Other vegetables ... .............. 474.192

PERSONAL.

Maj. C. A. Devol, Mrs. Devol, and their
daughter sailed for the States on the Allii-
anca on September 3.

Laying of Church Corner Stone at Gatun.
The corner stone of the Baptist church at
Gatun will be laid Sunday. September 19,
at 3 p. m., by Mr. H. L. Stuntz and Mrs.
J. L. Wise. Revs. C H. Elliott, E. G.
Cook, J. L Wise, and others will make ad-
dresses.
Knights of Columbus.
Panama Council, No. 1371, of the Knights
of Columbus will hold its regular meeting
on Sunday, September 12, at 10 a. m., in
the I. C. C. lodge hall at Empire. Visiting
brothers are invited. Important business will
be transacted. JosN A. DALEV,
Fnan cial Secretas-.

K angaroos.
A complete directory of all Kangaroos in
good standing has been prepared, and a
copy may be obtained free of charge by any
memberon application to the comptroller of
the court to which he belongs.
C. A. LESTER, Compiler.
Cristobal, August 31, 1909.

Pythian Si.ters.
Canal Zone Temple, No. 1, Pythian Sis-
ters, of Empire, gave a farewell reception
to Mrs. J. W. Forsythe, retiring chief of the
temple, on the night of August 16, and pre-
sented her with a pearl and silver belt. Mr.
and Mrs. Forsythe left for the States on
August 19.
Red Men.
A contest for the Red Men's inter-tribal
banner will be held in the hall at Gatun
on September 18, between Inca Tribe of
Gatun and Code Tribe of Empire. After
the contest there will be a haymakers meet-
ing. Corn and venison will be served.
Accommodations for the night will be pro-
vided for all visiting brothers.

Regulations Goserning Use of Clubroomns.
The control of the Commission clubrooms
has been vested by the Chairman in the
Quartermaster's Department, and the follow-
ing regulations govern their use:
The rooms are available for use by all
gold employes of the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission, or Panama Railroad Company,


living in the respective districts in which
the rooms are located.
The rooms will be under the supervision
of the District Quartermasters, who will be
responsible for all Commission property
therein, and provide janitor service, attend-
ance and equipment.
All expense for janitor service, attend-
ance, and care and maintenance of equip-
ment, will be borne by the Commission.
The rooms will be opened from 10 a. m.
to 2 p. m., and from 4 p. m. to 10 p. m., ex-
cept on Saturdays, when they will be open
until 11 p. m., and on Sundays, when
they will be open from 8 a. m. to 12 m.
An attendant, under the direction of the
District Quartermaster, will be present
when the rooms are open, to render asnh
service as may be necessary.
At points where there are no lodge halls,
the clubrooms may be assigned to organiza-
tions which desire to use them at night.
No gambling of any character will be
permitted in the clubrooms.
Any employee, who by his conduct, may
make himself undesirable, may be debarred
therefrom.

Gorgona Athletic Park Association,
At the recent meeting of the stockholders
of the Gorgona Athletic Park Association,
in Gorgona, the resignation of Mr. Harvey
C. Dew was accepted and Mr. William
Taylor was elected President of the Associa-
tion. Mr. D. E. Hayes was elected Secre-
tary and Treasurer.

Missing Man.
Arthur Moore, a British subject, left Ca-
racas and his wife in that city, in the sum-
mer of 1908. He arrived in Colon on July
7, 1908, on the steamship Huasco, and since
that time his family has not heard from him.
Information concerning his whereabouts
should be sent to the British Legation in
Panama.
Baseball at Ancon.
An exhibition gameof baseball was played
at Ancon park on Sunday, September 5, be-
tween employes of the Department of Civil
Administration and employes of the Panama
Railroad Company at Balboa. The score by
innings was:
Panama Railroad ...... 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0-0
Civil Administration.. 3 1 0 1 2 2 0 I x-10
Batteries- Panama Railroad, Major and Ransom:
Civil Administration. Russell and Rex. Umpire,
Mon roe
Another exhibition game was played at
Ancon on Labor Day, between the same
teams, resulting as follows:
Panama Railroad ... .... 2 0 0 1 1 1 2 3-10
Civil Administration...... 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1- 2
Batteries- Panama Railroad. Dixon and Ransom;
Civil Administraton. Russell and Rex. Umpire,
Vingling.
Concert by I. C. C. Band.
AT PORTO BELLO.
Sunday. September 12, L909, at 2 p. m.
PROGrAM.
I March-Festal Day .... ...................Roux
2 Selection-A 4'airr Dream................Strans
3 waltz-Goa ................. .........Waldteufel
J a-Southern Characteristique-
4 1 Mooanlthnl i Dirie ...........l.. element
b---S R Henry's Barn Dane .............. Henry
5 Medley Selection-Hitsaf 1909 ............Remick
6 Tone Poem-i/n Lover'j Lane................ Pryor
7 Idyl- The Mill in the Fore t........... Eilenberg
8 Overture-Pbet and Peasant................... Suppe
9 Patrol -.4meriana....................... Mescham
10 Mareb-A-iator............................Pulton
CHAS. E. N GS J s. MUsical DWctor.
The next concert will be given at Empire, Sun-
day, September 19.









September 8, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.

Computation of Longevity Increases.
D FA c rENT OF EXAMINATION OF ACCODUTS.
EMPIRE. C Z.. August 30. 1909.
CIRCULAR No. 18:
The attached tables showing the calculation of the
longevity increases of pay of employes on an hourly
basis, and of employes receiving pay at monthly
rates. are published in order that computation of
longevity increases may be uniform.
On and after September 1. 1909. the amounts staled
in these tables for each longevity penod. at each of
the basic rates, will be shown upon all pay rolls
W. W. WARWICK. EramierOr ceouants.
Approved:
GEO. W.GOErTrnLS.
Chairman and Chief Ensin-er.
TABLE SHOWITrNG LONGEVITY INCREASES OF HOUR-
LV MEN.


BASIC
RATES.




Cents.
32..........
38..........
44 ..........
50..........
56..........
65 .........
70..........
72 ........ .
75..........


a




.4

Cents.
Cmii

34
40
46
53
59
68
74
76
79


ra




Cent.
35
41
46
54
60
70
76
76
81


..c




Cents
36
42
49
56
62
72
78
80
83


Centsr.
36
43
50
57
64
74
80
82
86


,-



aSa



37
44
51
59
66

62
14
88


TABLESBOWING LONGEVITY INCREASES 01'MONTIi-
LV EMPLOVES.



BASC IC u *- 1. -
RATES. o 0 t
Ca o- o- C


$75.00 ....... $78.75 $81.00 $83 25 $15 50 $67 75
80.00 ....... 84 00 86,40 88 8 91.20 93.60
83 33....... 87.50 90.00 92 50 9500 97 50
100.00....... 10500 10800 11 114. 14.00 1701
105.00....... 11025 11340 116 55 119.70 122;85
110.00....... 115.50 118.80 122.10 125 40 128 70
112.50...... 118.13 121 50 124 88 128 25 131 63
115.00....... 120.75 124.20 127 65 131 10 134 55
120. ..... 126.00 129 &1 133.20 13.01 14n.40
125.00 ....... 131.25 135.00 138.75 142.50 146.25
130 00....... 136 5 140.40 144 30 148.20 152 10t)
135.00....... 141.75 145 801 149 65 153.90 15? 95
140.00....... 14700 151.20 15540 159.60 16380
14500....... 152.25 156 60 160 95 165.30 16965
15000....... 157.50 162 10 166 50 171.00 175 50
155.00....... 162.75 16740 17 17670 161 35
160.00....... 168 00 17280 17760 I2 40 18i 20
162.50....... 170.63 175.50 180.38 1,5 25 190.13
165.00....... 173.75 178.20 183.15 188.10 193.05
170.00....... 178.50 13 60 188.70 193.80 198 90
175 00... .. 183.75 189.00 193.25 199.50 204.75
180.00....... 18900 194 40) 19980 20,.20 211) 6)
18500....... 194.25 199.80 205.35 210.90 216.45
190.00....... 199.50 205.20 210 90 21660 222 30
200.00....... 21000 216.00 222.00 228 i00 234 00
210.00....... 220.50 226.90 233.10 2;9.40 245.70
215.00....... 225.75 23220 23865 745.1') 251 55
225.00...... 236.25 243.00 249.75 256 50 263 25

Care of Steam Shovels.
CULEBRA, C. Z., August 30, 1909.
C CULAR NO. 272!
Effective September 1. 1909, the following rules will
govern steam shovel engineers in the care of their
shovels, except in cases where on account of effi-
ciency, it is deemed advisable by the Division Enri.
nees or their assistants to have the work done by the
steam shovel repair crews:
1. Keep all bearings properly adjusted
2. To see that all bolls are kept tight.


3. Replace broken U bolls
4 Keep saddle block properly adjusted.
5 Put in all gaskets under 3% inches in diameter
except steam chest cover gaskets.
6 Pack all pislon rods and valve stems.
.. Replace grate hars.
8. Replace links in propelling chain.
9. Replace jack screws
10 Put cold shuts in hoisting chain
11. Replace Panama tips.
12. Replace .steam chest covers
13 Replace whistles.
14 Replace lubrientors
15 Replace cylinder heads
16 Replace all holts possible.
17 Replace padlocks.
16. Replace Dilch braces
19. Replace boom braces
20. Replace hoisting chains.
21 Set valves
22. Replace friction and brake hands
23 Keep cluders out of the smoke box.
24. Replace dipper sticks
25 Keep boiler flues clean.
26 In general to do all work around steam shovels
which can he done by the crew more econom-
ically and more quickly than by the repair
crew. and do all in their power to keep their
machines in proper condition to load dirt
eight hours per day.
GE.n W. GOETHALS. ChaZ-irIn.

Approval of Repair Work.
CULEBlt l. C 7 September 1. lfat
HEADSOr DEPARTMENTi ,NF, DIVelMON.-
Your attention i, invited to Paragraph 3 of Circular
No 197--" in which it is directed that in cases where
work requested on Foinr No 159 is notl estimated to
cost over $50 (which limit was raised in Crrculir No.
197-p to $S00 for steam shovel repairs and t20') for re.
pairs to unloaded sprererierl etc 1 same need n,,I he
forwarded frr approval of Ihe Chr.irronn and Chief
Engineer, but that two copies if -uch forms should
be forwarded to the Chief Eneineer's office one for
his files and the other for the Examiner of Accounts
Please see that this procedure is followed
H F. HOprGE .
Artng Cha nwan and Chr.r En sieer.

Work fur Disabled Employes.
CULEBRA C Z September 1 1909
CIRCtUL.R No. 235-.:
In case an emplose entitled to the benefits of the
Government Employes Compensation Act, approved
May 30 1906 is disabled in such manner thai after
recovery he is unable to resume his regular duties he
shall be entitled to the benefits of said Act for a
period of one yenr from date of injury
If. however, such employee elects to work at de-
creased remuneration in someother position iii order
to gain seniority or acquire experience to fit him-
self for promotion. he may do so with the under-
standing that theamount of his pay will be deducted
from the amount to be paid him as ir jury compensa.
Lion. H PF. HODGES. A, ting Chatnin.

Disbursing Officer.
CTILEBRA. C. Z.. September 2. 1909.
CIaRCULAR No. 274:
The duties of Disbursing Officer on the Islhmius
were assumed by Mr William M. Woond on Serlem-
ber 1. 1909. andhe will continue to serve in that capac-
ity during the absence of Mr Edward J. Williams.
on leave.
H. F HODGES. .Alctng Chairman

Acting Chief Quartermaster.
COLEBRA. C Z.. September I, 1909.
CrICOu.AR No. 273.
effective September 3. 1909 Lient R Pt. Wood will
act as Chief Ournrteimisler during the absence of
Maj C. A Devol on leave.
H. F HODGES. AI Nfg Chairman.


WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE. AUGUST, 1909.


Stations






K- enon.............


etc





862


Temperature






2 9 a i A

78 7 88 25 71 8
78.4 90 30 A8 15
78.7 91 31 70 15


precipitation.





a z

15.4? 15.22 27
8.32 1073 24
6.84 7.34 24


4.093
3 417
*4 204


i'ind.


t




S F. 26 'N.W. 25
N.W 25 I S. 17
V u' 23 N W. 3
I -


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.

Actillities of the Young Itlen's Chriistinn As-
Iociation.
CULEBRA.
The following were the results of the opening
games between Culebra and Gorgonan i the Isthmian
bowling tournament
C, rbe ra Fi!st Sejond. Ti?,-d. 7,'i'.
Lamsleriaclg capl.i 162 169 19i5 2n
Vogel .. ....... 12. 101 19 506
De Moll ....... ..... lo4 168 171 51.3
W inters ....... 146 1i4 Is5 457
Edwards. .. .. .. 174 193 179 516

773 a75 892 2.540
Gorgon a.
Buchanan . .. 155 150 151 456
McConaguhey .. ... I5 153 147 465
Hall . ... . I1" I Il 186 467
Humphrey .. ..... 202 170 133 5'r7
Oils icaptaini .... 17i 161 151 490

A49 766 -70 2 385
The fir;t inter -ssocintion handball games were
plo ed at Culebra Monday evening between the
home tehm and Cnilobal.
The members of the Cnstobal team were Thomas
Walter and R H Luce- of the Culebra team C T.
Lindsay. and H K Allen The results were as fol
lows
First grme-Cristobal 21: Culebra. 17 Second
game-Cnistubal 21. Culebra. 17 Thind game-Cris-
tob.il 10 Culebra. ?
Owing to the liniited time. Mr Lu, e. representing
the CrislobAs team. and Mr Lmndsai. the Culebra
team played a short games of singles which resulted
in favor of Cnstobal II poinLs to S.
Seat reservation for the Hearons Concert on ton-
day. Seonember 13 will begin Thursda. September 9.
EMPIRE.
Following are Ihe results of the opening games be-
Iween Empire and Crinsobal in the Isthmian bowling


tournament
Fmfiiie.
Brown.. .. ......
Potter .... ....
Bardelson .
Hinckle.. ..
Husoll Icuptaini

C-i.t/ba'.
Bullard Icaptaini
Louch ........... .
Barlow .. ... ..
Collins ............ .
B. rte.. ........


Frs t S\\rl1
16.7 1 i-
L61 1?2
166 17t,
197 156
.20 175

021 761

166 168
178 150
147 l11-
145 131
],I Ia4
SO 634


Thr.d.
158
169
14(0
1 A.

8$7


Tuta!.
457
452
$62
535
593

2.519


The third game being .1 lie a fourth game was
rolled deciding the tie in favor of Empire. The num.
ber of spectators was nlae and theinltetet very keen
Another open meeting of the camera club will be
held on WednesdaN night of this week. Interest is
increasing.
Seat reservation for the Hearons concert on Thurs-
day. September 16 will begin Saturday. September I 1.
GORGONA.
New playing equipment has been reteised for use
in the bowling tournament.
An order has lust been pl-ced for additional library
books consisting chiefly of late fiction
A popular feature of the clubhouse is the phonn-
graph A consemnent case for preserving the records
has recently been provided.
The reservation of seats for the Hearons concert on
Thursday September 14. will begin on Saturday
evening Sepember 11
CRISTOBA I.
Owing to a conflict in dales with the Hearons Sis-
ters entertainment at Cristobal on September I1. a
change has been made in the bowline schedule so
that the Cristobal lesm will bowl at Culebra on Sep-
tember II. and Culebra at Cristobal on October 9
This is just the reverse of these dates as scheduled
original y.
Seat reservation for the Hearonsconcert on Septem-
br 11. will begin Thursday morning September 9
The chess and checker equipment has been trans.
ferred to the reading room where the players will
find it more quiel.

Losr-A pair of spectacles lone lens. gold mount
ed. in case- itiside of case cover typewritten 'Wm
V. O'Reilly. Chief Engineer s office. Culebra. C. Z."
Reward offered for return to owner. Carun. C Z.

I.osT-During the month of July between Mount
Hope and Gatun a sharpshooter s medal inscribed
"John I. Conley. G Troop. 15th U S Cavalry The
finder will be rewarded for the returnmot the medal.


'


'


' ''' "









THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III.. No. 2.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

Regulation Concerning Return of Goods-
Cold Storage Price L.ist.
The hours dunng which commissariesare open are
as follows:
Cnstobal and Culebra 6 a m. to 12 30 p. m.: 2 p. m.
to 7 p. inm.
All other commnissarics. a. m. to 1 p. m.: 3 p. m
to 7 p. m
Goods Not Returnable.
CRIsrTOnaL. C. Z September 1, 1M9.
CiRLCUL'R No 43
Hereafter comnmissarn storekeepers will not take
back an goods after they once have been sold except
for defects which were not apparent at time of sale.
No goods will be exchanged after forty eight hours
from time of sale without the approval of the mana-
ger Goods will not he exchanged unless accompa-
nied by sales slip JOHN BURKE .itanager.
Approved: P 0. WRITLOCK
A-clhg Sub urence tOicer

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning September S
FRESH MEATS.
Pr*e.
Mutton-Stewing.. ..... .... .... .............per Ib 7
Shoulder. neck trimmed oil.
14 pound- and over I.. ... ... per lb 10
Entire forequarter Inot trim-
med), 10 pounds and over ...... per Ib 9
Leg (S to 10 pound- ....... per lb 19
Steak.. ............. ... .. .......... per lb 20
Short-cut chops................ ....per lb 22
Lamb-Stenw ng .. .............................per lb 7
Entire lorequarter. neck trimmed
off . .... ..... ... ...........per ib 10
Leg (6 1to pounds).. ............ .... per lb 27
Chops ................. ......... per lb 29
Veal-Stewing ... ................ .......... ..per lb 10
Shoulder for roasting Inol under
4 Ibs ........ ...... ... ..............per lb 15
Loin for roasting.. .. .... .- .... per Ib 19
ChoDs .... ... ............... .......... per lb 20
Cutlets......... . .... .... .......... per Ih 23
Pork cuts ... ....... .. ............... ... per lb 22
Beef- Suet ...... ...... ...... ..... ...............per lb 4
Soup.... .. .... ........ ......... per lb 6
Stew ........ ... ....... ... ...........Der lb 10
Corned .... .. ....... ......... per Ib 12 14 16
Chuck ro st ... .. ... .... .. ... per lb 1t
Pot roast .... ... .............. per Ib 16
Rib-roast. second cut lnot under
3 pounds) .... ........... per lb 19
Rib-roast first cut tnot under 3
pounds') .. ........ -............per Ib 21
Sirloin roast ................................. per lb 22
Rump roast ....... .... per lb 2
Porterhouse roast ..................... per Ib 22
Steak. Chuck... ............ ... .........per b 15
Round ... ..... ........ ...... ..per Ih 16
Rib .......... ...................... per lb 21
Sirloin ........ ................. per b 22
Porterhouse ...................... per lb 22
Rum p ............. ......... ....... per Ilb 22
Tenderloin......................... per Ib 27
MISCELLANEOUS.
Lives-Beef.. ...... per lb 11V
Calf ................... ............... .each 65
Shad roes. ... ...... ... ........ ... . .pair 4U
Sausage- Pork .... .. .. ........................per ib 17
Bologna .............. .. .. . .. per Ib 17
Franukfu ei ..... ..... ............. per lb 17
Leberwurst ...... .... ............ per Ib 17
Sweet bread-Veal ............................. .per lb 1.20
Sweet bread-Beef ................. .. .... per Ib 30)
Eggs. fresh ..... ........ .................... dozen 32
POULTRY AND GAME.
Chickens--Fancy Roasting.large ..... each I 5f
medium..... each 1.30
Fowls.. ........ .... .................. ........ ... each 90 1 0
Ducks, fatted ... ............ .. ... ............ each I 30
medium weight ...... ..... ... each 90
Broilers .... ... ...................... each 75
Turkeys .. ..... ......... .. .. ...... per lb 31)
Squabs ......... ........ ...... ................. each 35
CaponsR........ ............. .... ... .... .....each 2 50
Geese. fatted. hbout 1 pound........... each 2.00
12 ounds.. ......each 2 30
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS
Bacon-Breakfisl. whole piece .... per lb 236
Breakfast sliced. ... ................per Ih 926
Ham-Sugar-cured, sliced ........... ....... per Ib 025
One-half. for boiling .................... per Ib 321
Hocks ................................. ..per lb 18
Sugar cured .... .............. per lb 20
Beef salt. fam ily ......................... .. ..... per ib I)
Pork. salt .. ........... ......... ........ .. per I b 15
Ham. boiled . ...... .. .. ...... ............... per lb 28
Ox tongues.......... .. .. ..... ........... each 1 C0
Pigs' leet ............. ... .... ...................... per Ib 14
tongues .... ... ... .. .. ........ per lb 16
DAIRY PRODUCTS.
Butter-Prints. prime quality ... ...... ....per lb 38
Cheese-Roquefort............. .................. per lb 45
Philadelphia Cream ................. each 20
Young Amenca ........... ........ perib 22
5wiss .................... ................per tb 311


Price.
Edam ........................................ each 1.05
Camembert ........... ............ per lb 28
Neufchatel............... .... ............each 6
Gouda........... ...... ................ per lb 34
Parmesan............................ .....bottle 20
French cheese in tins-Camembert. Brie.
Neu chapel ........................................ I-lb tin 20
Milk, Bnarcliff ................................... bottle -25
Butter ................................. .....bottle S15
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.
Celery .................................. per hd 10
Cauliflower ..................... ........per Ib 15
Lettuce...... .. .... ............................ per Ib 8
Potatoes while, old ............................ per Ib 3~
sweet .. .......... ...................per lb 2X
Onions ............. ......... .... .......... per b 3
Squash. Hubbard...... ......................... pe. lb 5
Yam s ................. ................... ...- pei Ib 39
TuMrni s......................... ...................per lb 3%
Carrots ................ . ........................per Ib 5
Beets .... .. ...... ..... ...................... per lb 5
Potatoes new .. ............ ... ..........per lb 37
Rhuh. .rh ................ ................ per Ib 5
Cucum hers .... .. ............... ............... ..per b 7
Tomatoes ... ........ .. ... .. .............. per Ib 7%
Lem ons. ................................... ... dozen 24
Limes................. ................. per 100 80
W atermelons...... ... .. ...................... each 40
Canteloupes ....... .......... . ....... each 5
Cabbage ...................... ...... .................per Ib 4%
Pineapples...... ...................................each 15
Oranges............................................... dozen 12
Grapefruit.............................................. each 4

'Indicates reduction from last list
"'Indicates 5 cenis allowed for return of bottle
tindicates advance on last list
Isold onlh from Commissaries: no orders taken for
,Jelisery.
.Sold onlv from Cold Storage and not from Com-
miss.ries

Rainfall, August I to 31, 1909, Incluilve.
IMIDNIGHTr TO MIDNIGHT.)


STA TIONS.



.4/tant/i Drn sion-
Crislobal ..... ........ .........
Brazos Brook.............. ......
Galun .........................
Bohio ...... ....................
Cer'ra.' fDr ion-
Tabe riilla. ... ..................
San Pablo.. ...................
G orgona ...........................
Ga.mboa.......................
E m pire............................
Camacho .......................
Culeahr .......................
Pacrc D/uiton-
Rio Crande........................
Pedro Miguel.....................
Balboa.................... ........
Ancon ......... .... ..............
.4.'anic Cvoasij-
Porto Bello ....................
Nombre de Dios ... ...........
l['f61, Chagres-
El V i Ria .................. . ...
A lha uela .. ............... .......


August Rainfall for Three Years.


STATION.



.tit'anti Dliisroin-
Nombre de Dios
Porto Bello.....
Cn tobal ........
Brazos Brook ...
r.atun .........
Gatun River .
Trinidad .....
Bohin .
Cenrna' Diiisiun-
T'ibernilla ......
Sin Pablo .......
Gamboa. ...
Gorgonr .......
Empire .. .....
C.macho .....
Culebra .... .
Rio Grande .....
factic Dh aision-
Pedro Miguel....
Balboa ........
Ancon ... ..
L'per Chagres-
ElHI Viai .........
Alhajuela .......


1907. 1908 1 1909.


*. Not including 1909.


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of tbe Pan-
ama Railroad Steamship Company. of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American
Line. and of the United Fruit Company's Line, the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:
NEW YORK TO COLON.
Crislobal............. P. R R.Thursday ......Sept. 2
Panama ............ R.R riday....... Sept. 3
Tagus ................ R.-M.. Saturday ...... Sept. 4
Advance.............. P. R. R.Thursday......Sept. 9
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A...Saturday ......Sept.11
Allianca...............P. R. R.Wednesday....Sept. 15
Ancon .................P. R. R.Thursday......Sept 16
Oruba..................R.-M...Saturday......Sept. 18
Colon...... ............P. R.R.Tuesday.......Sept. 21
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A...Saturday.......Sept 25
Panama...... ........P. R. R.Monday.......Sept. 27
Cristobal...............P. R. R.Thursday...... Sept. 30
Magdalena ............R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 2
Clyde................. R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 16
Thames............... R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 30
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Criatobal
should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
office, room 8. building No. 1,. Crisltobal. for customs
line permits, which are necessary to obtain admit-
lance beyond waiting room on pier 11.
All the steamers of the Ramburg-American and
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroure to Colon.
COLON TO NEW YORK.
Ancon..................P R. R.Wednesday....Sept. 8*
Oruba.................. R.-M...Wednesday....Sept. 8
Colon ................P.R R Thursday ...... Sept. 9
Prinz Joachim........ H.-A.. Tuesday.......Sept. 14
Panama............P. R. R.Wednesday....Sept. 15
Cristobal ............P. R. R.Thursday......Sept. 16
Advance...............P. R. R.Tuesday .......Sept 21
Magdalena ........... R.-M... Wednesday....Sept. 22
Allianca..............P. R. R.Monday........Sept. 27
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm... H.-A...Tuesday.......Sept. 28
Ancon................ P. R. R Thursday......Sept. 30
Clyde............... R.-M... Wednesday.....Oct. 6
Thames........ .....R .-M.. .Wednesday....Oct. 20
*Sails at II a. m.
NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Ahangarez ...... ......U.F C. Saturday......Sept. 4
Atenas .............. U C. Saturday ......Sept. 11
Turrialba............. U.F C..Saturday......Sept 18
Abangarez ........ ... U.F.C..Saturday......Sept. 25
COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.
Abaugarez........... U.F.C..Tuesday ......Sept. 14
Atenas................. U.F.C..Tuesday.......Sept. 21
Turrialba.............U F.C Tuesday....... Sept. 28
Abangarez ..........U.P C..Saturday ......Oct 5
COLON TO BAB&ADOS. CALLING AT TRNIDAD.
Tagus..................R -M.. .Tuesday.......Sept. 14
Oruba..................R.-M...Tuesday.......Sept. 28
Sailings of the French line (Cie. Gn6rale Traus-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 2nth of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be ias
follows Ca/Efornian for New Orleans, via Kingston.
Ja.. on or about September 10.
The steamers David of the National Navigatiao
Company, and the Taboga onf the Pacific Steam Navi-
gatian Company, leave Panama, for David. province
of Chiriqui. and intermediate points, the first and
third weeks of each monlh
The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m.
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York.
A ship of the United Fruit Company's line sails
from the dock at Colon, at 3 p. m Tuesday of each
week.

Tide Table.
The following table shows the time of high
and low tides at Panama for the week end-'
ing September 15, 1909 (75th meridian time):

DATE. High. Low. High. Low.

A.M. A.M a.M. p.M.
September 9............... 5.13 11.22 5.50
P. M.
September 10 ...... 12.16 630 12.47 7.0U
September 11 ....... 129 7.38 1.51 8.00
September 12 ....... 2.25 8.32 2.45 8.50
September 13. 109 9 16 3.28 9.31
September 14....... 3 48 9.56 4.03 10.10
September 15 ...... 4.21 10.31 4.38 10.46

The variation of high and low tide at Cris-
tobal is so slight that a tide table f&. tihe
Atlantic side is not ccessary,















CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1909. No. 3.


The Canal Record
lited weekly under ke authority and suenrdsion
af the istlmian Canal Commission,

The Canal Record is issued/ree acharsr. one copy
each, to all employes q/ the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra coies and back numbers can be obtained from
the news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for
sccents each.

Address all Communications
THE CANdAL RECORD,
Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
Nocommunscation. either/or publication or reqnesl-
ing information, will receive attention unless signed
with thefull name and address at the niter.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Canal Work toin August.
The grand total of Canal excavation dur-
ing the month of August was 2.755,178 cu-
bic yards, which is 88,082 cubic yards less
than the total for July, and 1,125,159 less
than the highest record, that of March,
1909. Of the 2,755,178 cubic yards, 2,702,-
835 were charged to "Work" excavation,
and 52,343 to "Plant." The amount re-
moved from the Canal prism was 2,650,980
cubic yards. There were taken out by steam
shovels 1,604,871, and by dredges 1,046,109
cubic yards. There were 26 working days
duringthe month, the same as in July. The
mean rainfall for the month in the territory
in which excavation was in progress was 9.28
inches, as compared with 10.66 inches the
previous month.
In the Atlantic Division the total excava-
tion was 530,559 cubic yards, 60,672 more
than were removed in July. Of this total
107,713 cubic yards were removed by steam
shovels, and 422,846 by dredges. In addi-
tion to the latter amount the dredges in this
division worked in deepening the channel
and approaches to the docks of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company at Cristobal,
which is not counted as Canal excavation.
There were 1,298 cubic yards of concrete
placed in the Gatun Locks, 5,498 cubic
yards of concrete in the Spillway, and 379,-
533 cubic yards of fill were added to the Ga-
tun Dam during the month.
The total excavation in the Central Divi-
sion was 1,404,913 cubic yards, 38,181 less
than were removed in July. Of this total
1,169,342 cubic yards were taken from
Culebra Cut, 231,543 from the Canal prism
elsewhere than in the Cut, and 4,028 cubic
yards from the Obispo Diversion, which is
outside the Canal prism.
In the Pacific Division the total excavation
was 819,706 cubic yards, 110,573 less than
were removediu July. Of this total 144,696
Scbic yards were removed by steam shovels,
d.. 675,010 by dredges. A total of 75,144


i .. : ...


cubic yards of fill was added to the dams in
this division during the month.
The detailed statement of excavation in
the three divisions follows:
ATLANTIC DIVISION.


LOCALITy.

Dry excavation -
Locks. Dam and Spill-
way ............. ...
M indi.................
Total...............
Wet erxcaat ion-
Atlantic entrance.....
Locks, Dam and Spill-
way.................


Total............... 422 46


'Work." "Plant. Total
Excava Excava- excava-
tion. Lion. Lion

ca. ids. I c jds. ca. .dj.


40346
66.249
106 595
422.846


1.118
l.tt8


4U 346
67.367
IU7.713


.......... 422 846

......... ... ...22 6
.,,... .... 422 S46


Total wet and dry
excavation ........ 529.441 I 1.118 I 530559
CENTRAL DIVISION.
A4N dry ezcaat ion--
Culebra Cut......... 1.169,312 .... ... 1 169..42
Chagres section ....... 231.54 ........... 231 543
Obispo Diversion...... 4.028 .... ..... 4.028
Total .. ... ...... 1,404.913 .... ..... 1.4)4 91'
PACIFIC DIVISION.


Dry excavation-
Locks.Da ms and Spill
ways ........... ...
Diversions .............
Total ..... .......
Wet eacavaonsa-
Pacitfic entrance .......
Miraflores Locks.....
Diversions............


93.363
108
93.471
623 ?63
51.747


Toal................ 675010


51 2-5

51.225


144.548

144.096
623.26t
51.747

675.010


Total wet and dry
excavation........ I7t.481 I 51.225 819 IE6
TOTAL CANAL EXCAVATION.
Dry excavation........ 1.601.979 53.343 1.657 3?2
Wet excavation ....... 1,097.6 .... ... I 097O 56
Total .............. 2.702.835 I 52.343 2755. 1-
Mean rainfall along Canal (twelve stations) 9.28
inches. Twenty-six working days.
By "Work" Excavation is meant excavation actu
ally made foroneof the constituent partsof ithe Canl,
such as Prism, Diversions, or Locks, etc.: that is. it
represents material taken from the area to be occu-
pied by the Canal and constitutes excavation useful
for the complete Led Canal.
By "Plant" Excavation is meant exca-ation outside
of any of the constituent parts of the Canal. such as
Prism. Diversions or Locks etc. I includes mate-
rial necessary to be excavated for conEtruction pur-
poses only and is chargeable against the particular
plant item for which it is performed.such as Prism.
Diversions. Locks. etc.
Decreasing Excavation.
The highest point in Canal excavation was
reached in March, 1909. Since that time
there has been a gradual decrease in the
monthly total, as will be seen from the fol-
lowing statement:

Central. Atlantic Pacific. Total.

March...... 2.054.088 759.380 1.067.869 3.80 337
April...... 1.782.766 672.701 999.182 3.454649
May........ 1.513.133 522.622 860.340 2896.095
June...... 520.975 345.112 1.9.706 2,895793
July ........ 1,443.094 469.887 930.279 2.843.260
August ..... 1,404.913 530,559 819.706 2.755 178
The period of easy digging is almost past.
Dredges and steam shovels are encountering


less earth and more rock each day. Then,
too, several comparatively small pieces of
work have been completed, and the general
field of work has been narrowed. In Cu-
lebra Cut, where the work is continued on
the same scale as heretofore, there is no
dimunition in the output, as the following
table shows:

1907 1908. 1909.

March.... ............ 815. 711 129u.85 1.511.397
A ril .......... 87...... 9.527 1.742.574 1.291 844
May ................. 690 365 960840 1.126.963
June ...... ... b24. 1.134.0332 1.242,134
July......... ..... .. 7705; 1.121 325 1.2X0.828
August................. 786,866 1.171.927 1.173.370
Compared with August, 1908, the excava-
tion in August, 1909, shows better work
than even the number of cubic yards indi-
cates. In August, 1908. there were 52,j
shovels at work and in August, 1909, only
48 shovels. The chief difference, however, is
in the falling off in car service, due to the
long haul now made by spoil trains to Gatun,
14% miles beyond Tabernilla, whereas in
1908, the longest haul was to Tabernilla.
Naos Island Breakwater.
The slide on the breakwater from Balboa
along the Pacific entrance to the Canai to
Naos Island, a distance of three miles, con-
tinues. The point at which the greatest dif-
ficulty is experienced in getting the embank-
ment to stand is across thechannel through
which vessels formerly sailed up to the Bal-
boa wharf. This channel was kept open by
dredging for several years, and was filled
only six months ago when the new channel
was opened to navigation. Rock and earth
have been dumped into it, and the embank-
ment has been brought to grade several
times, but each time has sunk, carr. ing with
it the trestle on which the dump trains run.
A new trestle has been driven after every
sinking and more material has been dumped
in, and this process will be continued until
the embankment stands at the grade desired.
The bottom of the French channel is much
like the land on which the construction of
the old Sosa dam was begun, and like the
latter, gives way when a weight heavier than
itself is imposed upon it. It will continue to
give way until the material being dumped
there either rests on solid bottom or spreads
outoverasufficient area, and then the sliding
will cease and the breakwater will become
as stable as the toe of the old Sosa dam, over
which heavy trains have been running daily
for two years without any settlement occur-
ring. Although the embankment to Naos
Island is serving the useful purpose of keep-
ing cross currents out of the new channel,
and will be of other utility when the island
is connected with the mainland, its primary
purpose was that of a dump for spoil from
Culebra Cut, and it is serving this well.
If it were desired to complete the break-









THE CANAL RECORD Vol. III., No. 3.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
(Continued I

water in the next few month%, theslide might
be regarded as serious, but there is ample
time and material. The breakwater will
reach Naos Island long before the excava-
tion in the south end of Culebra Cut is fin-
ished. The Central Division will probably
continue touse itasadump, however, merely
broadening out the present narrow embank-
ment.
Chame Sand for Gamiun.
An order for 20.000 cubic sards of Chame
sand for use in the concrete operations at
the Gatun Locks has been placed with the
Pacific Division, and the first train load for
there was sent out Thursday, September 11.
It is being conveyed in steel dump cars,
each containing about 22 cubic yards, and
will be shipped at the rate of one train load
per day until the order is filled.
The ladder dredge .Vooi was taken to
Point Cham6 a fewdassago, where it dredged
3,000 cubic yardsof sand, and then returned
to its work in the Canal channel at Balboa.
The demand for sand so far has been com-
paratively light, and the dredge can quickly
fill all the barges available. The ladder
dredge Gopher has been undergoing exten-
sive repairs at the shipways, and when
these are completed, which will he within a
week or ten days. it will probably be as-
signed to the sand dredging work. Until
the demand for sand is continuous. however,
it is not purposed to keep a dredge steadily
at Point Chame.
The sand is transferred from the barges
to the cars at Balboa, a0 required, by a crane
working a clam-shell bucket. This method
of unloading is somewhat slow, but it is the
only available means at present, as the three
unloading cranes intended for this work have
not yet been erected. Parts of one crane
are on the ground, and the work of assem-
bling will begin within a few dals.

litles Cut Off Rio G;rinle.
The slides along the west bank of Cule-
bra Cut at Culebra have carried so much of
the earth in the bank toward the Cut that
theold lineof the Panama railroad, on which
Central Division trains have been running
to the Rio Gran'le compressor and machine
shop, will not be safe much longer. Plans
have been approved for opening a way from
the main line of the Panama railroad through
Rio Grande quarry past the crusher plant
to thecompressor and machine shop. Trains
will run on the main line to a point near
the quarry, where they will turn north
through a cut in the rock to the compressor
plant. About 900 cubic yards of rock exca-
vation must be done to open this road.
Long distance signals will be installed to
guard the switch, and telephone communi-
cation will he established between the switch
station and the block tower at Culebra in
order to guard the main line against possi-
bleaccident. This is one of the stretches of
line where the Panama railroad has not
been double tracked.
ilirnflores Power ollie.
One unit of the equipment at the Mira-
flores power house will probably be ready for
testing out within a week or ten days. An
exciter, which forms part of the machinery,
is being used for testing purposes in con-
nection with the switchboard installation,


and is operated by power furnished by a
hoisting engine. The work on the switch-
boards is well advanced, but the wiring has
been retarded to some extent by dampness
accumulating in the insulation, which it is
necessary to dry out. The boiler work is
practically completed.
High School Pupils.
The Division of Schools would liketo have
the names of all parents whose children will
attend the high schools of the Canal Zone
during the present year, together with the
number of children to be enrolled. Parents
arc requested to write at once to the Super-
intendent of Schools, Ancon.
Hes.ervoir for Gatun Water Supply.
In the work of providing a water supply
for Gatun, b. impounding the water of the
creek known as Quebrada los Guacas, a
trestle has been driven along theasis of the
proposed Agua Clara dam, and rock from
Mindi, and clay from pit near the reservoir
are being dumped there. The mixture of
rock and clay will form a tight dam Before
the filling was begun, a waste culvert was
set and a water main laid through the dam
site, and the water was thus diverted.
Additional Teleplione Facilities.
A private branch telephone switchboard
has been installed in the Administration
Building at Ancon for the use of the various
divisions of the Department of Civil Admin-
istration. The apparatus consists of a West-
ern Electric cordless switchboard with a
capacity for 33 subscriber lines, and is con-
nected tuith the main exchange by three
trunk lines The switchboard serves eleven
stations. four on private lines in the offices
of the head of the Department of Civil Ad-
ministration, three on a party line in the
offices of the Chief of Police and Prisons,
two on a party line in the offices of the Su-
perintenilent of Schools and two on a party
line in the offices of the Director of Posts.
The installation of this equipment improves
the service, and.loes awa, with three of the
six trunk lines to the main exchange, which
were previously in use. An operator -ill be
on duty at the siitchboardl during business
hours.
Indemntty for American Sailors.
Washington, Aug. 31.-Through the State
Department. Acting Secretary Winthrop has
received $14,000 from the Panamanian Gov-
ernment, paid by it as money reparation in
the cases involving the maltreatment of
American naval officers and seamen at the
hauds of the police of that Republic.
Of this amount $5,(000 is indemnity in
%what is known as the cruiser Colh.abia in-
cident, when several officers in uniform were
arrested, locked up and roughly handled in
Colon on June 1, 1906. The assault, it is
declared, was entirely unprovoked.
An indemnit) of $3,000 will be paid to the
relatives of Charles Rand. a boatswain's
mate on the cruiser u'ffado. who was killed
iu Panama in September. 1908, and $1,000
will be given to Joseph Cieslik, a sailor of
the same vessel, who was stabbed at the
time Rand was killed. Panama also has
agreed to make other amends to the Uni-
ted States Government for the indignities
suffered by these men.
The Cr-islabal. on thbe voyage that ended
at Cristobal on September 9, brought 18,000
barrels and 23,959 bags of cement for the
lock work at Gatun and Pedro Miguel.


GATUN LOCKS.
Some Changes Made in the Automatic Elec-
tric Cars-Concrete Work.
The work of laying concrete in the locks
at Gatun has been handicapped by the re-
adjustment necessary in the automatic elec-
tric cars that carry materials from storage
to the mixers. Two of these cars have been
taken apart at Gorgona shops and some
alterations have been made in them, suchas
changing the gear from chain to sprocket.
It is probable that all of the 42 cars will be
changed materially. Meanwhile the concrete
plant has not ceased running, and between
August 24, when the work was begun, and
September 11, inclusive, 4,282 cubic yardsof
concrete were laid, an average of about 252
cubic yards a day. The maximum capacity of
the plant is 1,920 cubic yards in eight hours.
At present the concrete gangs are working
in two 6-hour shifts, and as soon as elec-
tric lights are installed the concrete laying
will be carried on in two 8-hour shifts, 16
hour. a day. Only the concrete work is
done in two shifts, all the other work being
carried on in the 8-hour day.
The concrete is being laid on the floor
of the upstream locks and in the wall which
will separate them. The lateral culverts
are being placed. For the concrete around
the culverts a finer grade of sand than is
being sent from Nombre de Dios is desirable,
and on this account 20,000 cubic yards of
sand from Chamd have been ordered by the
Atlantic Division. As soon as the 12-inch
suction dredge now on order is installed at
Nombre de Dios, making it possible to wash
clay out of the sand while loading it into
the barges, the sand from that place will be
satisfactory for all purposes, as it is now for
all except the culvert work.
Concrete work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam has reached a point where it is not
possible to utilize the full output of the
spillway concrete plant. In order to make
use of the surplus concrete from this plant
by placing it in the locks, and later to utilize
the locks' mixer plant in case it is desired
to rush work on the spillway dam, a narrow
gauge railroad has been built irom the spill-
way mixing plant to the west bank of the
lock site. Concrete from the spillway mixers
will be delivered to the railway running
along the lock site, and will be handled by
the cableways in the same manner as the
concrete from the locks' mixing plant. The
ruling grade of the railroad is four percent,
the length about one mile, and the concrete
will be hauled up to the lock site by the 18-
ton locomotives used in the spillway plant.
About 400 cubic yards of concrete a day can
be delivered in the locks in this manner
without interfering with the concrete work
in the spillway.
Two of the 45-ton steam shovels hitherto
in use in the Central Division have been
sent to Gatun where they will be put olex-
cavation in the lock site. This addition to
the equipment in the lock site is made in
order that the excavation may be kept well
in advance of the concrete laying.
Slide at Mimli.
Work in the hills at Mindi has been re-
tarded by a slide which occurred on August
23, enveloping the 90-ton steam shovel at
work there. The three 70-ton shovels con-
tinued at their work, but the monthly exca-
vation fell below that of previous months on
account of the damage to the largest shovel
and other inconvenience caused by the slide.


Vol. III., No. 3.


THE CANAL RECORD







September 15, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


ANCON HOSPITAL ADDITION.
New BaUdings Containing Surgical Wants
Practically Completed.
The two new buildings at Ancon Hospital,
which will contain four surgical wards,
Nos. 7, 8, 9 and 10 in section "B," are
nearing completion, and constitute the lar-
gest ward buildings in the reservation. Each
structure is of two stories, the largest
one extending nearly east and west, while
the other extends north and south, form-
ing a wingat S right angle. The buildings
are intercommunicable, and are separated
by a hallway only. The new additions
are located well up on the slope of Ancon
Hill, and from the upper stories a splen-
did view of Ancon, Panama, and the bay
can be obtained. An old French ward
building formerly occupied the site, and
was demolished when the present work was
commenced. The stone piers upon which it
rested, however, were found in a good state
of preservation and were utilized for the
new buildings as far as possible. The wards
will be used for the treatment of negro pa-
tients, and will give an additional capacity
to the hospital of 150 persons.
The larger building is 180 feet 5 inches in
length, and 37 feet 8 inches in width over
all, while the smaller structure is 125 feet
long and 37 feet 8 inches wide over all. The
second story of the larger building will be
known as ward No. 10, the lower floor as
ward No. 8. The second story of the other
building will contain ward No. 9, and the
first floor ward No. 7. The buildings have
a wide screened-in veranda all around, both
upstairs and down.
The first floor of the larger building con-
Stains adiet kitchen, 20 feet 8 inches by 12
feet in size, having two copper sinks, stove,
and suitable shelves for utensilsand dishes;
a surgeon's dressing room, equipped with
the necessary appliances and fixtures, in-
cluding a surgeon's sink, and an ordinary
sink; an office for the head nurse, a linen
room, one isolation rooin, a clothes room
fitted with 150 compartments for the storing
of patients' clothes upon entering, dormi-
tory space for 32 beds, a dining room; three
toilets for the use of patients, with four lav-
atories, two sinks and two showers, and a
private toilet. The arrangement is some-
what similar on the second floor. There is
the same dormitory and dining room space,
with the same number of toilets, including
a private toilet for the nurses. In addition,
there are three isolation rooms, and a strong
room for the uncontrollable patients.
The arrangements on both floors of the
smaller building are practically identical.
Ttere will be dormitory space for 38 beds
in each story, and four toilets, with two
sinks, four lavatories, one shower and one
bathtub. The patients use the dining rooms
located in the large building.
The main entrance is located about mid-
way of the front or north side of the princi-
pal building, from which a walk will lead
to a flight of massive stone steps, built dur-
ing the French regime, which descends to
the road. A hallway divides the main
building, from which stairs ascend to the
second floor. A second 'flight of stairs
ascends from the hallway between the two
* buildings. An emergency flight of stairs
extends from the ground to the second floor


on the outside at the west end of the larger
building, while another emergency stair-
way is located in the rear of the smaller
structure.
Caution to iEmployes.
An ex-employe of the Commission was
arrested at Empire recently for attempting
to use an employee's half-rate request. He
was tried on a charge of fraud and sen-
tenced to 'ive days' imprisonment. A few
days ago a man who presented a request and
the employee who gave it to him were ar-
rested and fined ,17 gold. The agents of
the Panama Railroad Company have been
notified of the decisions in these cases, and
the same action may be expected in any
similar cases which arise in future.
Lubricating Oil.
A contract has been made with the New
York Lubricating Oil Company to supply
the following quantities of oil for the Canal
work:
Engine oil, 25,000 gallons, at 22 cents a
gallon; valve oil, 20,0.00 gallons, at 31 cents
a gallon; car oil, 20.000 gallons, at 18 cents
a gallon; oil for marine machinery, 20,000
gallons, at 30.5 cents gallon. Theamounts
given are merely estimates of what will be
required during the first three months of
the contract and may be increased or dimin-
ished by .0 per cent as the Commission de-
sires. If the three months' trial shows
that the oils are what the Commission re-
quires the contract may be extended over a
period of a year, and in that event the
amounts given above would represent about
one-fourth of the oil to be purchased. One
of the terms of the contract is that an expert
in the use of oils shall be kept on the
Isthmus by the contractor.
Police Report for August.
The August report of the Chief of the Di-
vision of Police and Prisons shows that 535
arrests, representing 51 nationalities, were
made in the Canal Zone during the month,
as compared with 529 in July, an increase of
six. Of the August arrests 498 were men
and 37 were women, the offenses with which
they were charged aggregating 54. The ar-
rests were distributed as follows: Ancon,
33; Las Sabanas, 4; Balboa, 27; Corozal, 6:
Miraflores, 8; Pedjo Miguel, 16; Paraiso, 28;
Culebra, 38; Empire, 84; Las Cascadas, 21;
Bas Obispo, 19; Gorgona, 44; San Pablo, 6;
Tabernilla, 13; Bohio. 15: Gatun, 84; Cristo-
bal, 80, and Porto Bello, 9. The police force
numbered 251 men on August 31, including
69 men on special duty, a net increase of two
for the month. The pay roll amounted to
$19,292.81.
There were 52 criminal cases tried in the
Circuit Courts, 17 of which were dismissed,
4 continued, 1 resulting in acquittal, and 28
in which convictions were secured. Of the
28 persons convicted, 6 were sentenced to
the penitentiary and fined; 8 received peni-
tentiary sentences only; 2 were sentenced to *
the common jail and fined, and 12 received
fines only. Sentence was suspended in one
case. Forty-five civil cases were tried during
the month, and the sum of $2,549.41 was col-
lected in executions.
The Zone convicts numbered 119 on July
31; received during August, 14; discharged,
10; total on August 31, 123. The number
of district prisoners on the same date was
111. The prison pay-rolls for the month


amounted to $1,527.83; cost of prisoners'
subsistence, $892.75, a total expense of
$2,420.58. The value of work performed by
prisoners on Zone roads was $2,024.22.
There were 14 deaths by violence during
August requiring action by the Coroner, 6 of
these being due to accidental drowning; 5
to railroad accidents; one to accidental
shooting, and two to accidental traumatisms.
Jules Masse, a district prisoner in jail at
Bohio for assault with intent to commit
murder, attempted suicide in his cell on
August IS by hanging himself to a rafter
with a rope made of his shirt-sleeves. He
was discovered in time and cut down.
There were nine deportations during the
month, five to Barbados, one to Jamaica, one
to Cuba, one to St. Kitts, and one to the
United States.
lMorey Order Bu-ines in August.
During the month of August, 1909, the
sixteen post-offices of the Canal Zone in
which a money order business is done, sold
15,466 orders, aggregating in value $409,-
481.22. This is an increase of 32 over the
number issued in July, but a decrease of
ki,896.88 in value. Of the August busi-
ness, 31.1i9,540.07 represented orders drawn
payable in the United States. $99,913.15 in
orders drawn payable in the Canal Zone, and
$28 in orders drawn payable in Martinique.
The fees collected amounted to $1,764.15.
as compared with $1,790.08 for the month
of July. The orders paid and repaid amount-
ed to $115.308.47, which includes $1.743 90
representing invalidated money orders paid
by warrants on the Treasurer. The postal
sales were $5,944, of which amount $3,566.40
accrued to the Canal Zone postal system.
and $2,37 .60 to the Republic of Panama.
The revenue from newspaper postage was
$14.51.
In the number of orders drawn, Cristobal
was first with 2,988; Empire second with
1,929, and Ancon third with 1,554. In the
total value of orders drawn, Cristobal was
first with $79,089.04; Empire second with
$42,091.97, and Gorgona third with $40,-
434.66. Of the amount payable in the United
States, Cristobal was first with $68.969.49;
Empire second with $33,651.19, and Gatun
third with $29,382.97. In orders payable in
the Canal Zone, Gorgona was first with
$12,421.23; Pedro Miguel second with $10,-
286.15, and Cristobal third with $10(,119.55.
Of the amount paid and repaid, Cristobal
was first with $24,740.24; Gorgona second
with $11,925.78, and Pedro Miguel third
with $10,419.49.
The average of all the orders issued was
$26.47. The highest average was at. San
Pablo where 379 orders, amounting to
$13,656.41 were issued, an average of $36.03;
the lowest was at Matachin where 201 orders
amounting $3,544.63 were issued, an aver-
age of $17.63.
Atlantic Dredgers on Dock Work.
The dredging record of the Atlantic Divi-
sion, which is published elsewhere in this
issue of THE CANAL. RECORD, was much
lower in August than in months past on ac-
count of several of the dredges being out of
the Canal service. The sea-going suction
dredge Caribbean was out of service 100
hours on account of a strike among the oil-
ers. Part of the month the Caribbean and
the dipper dredge lindi were dredging on
Panama railroad dock work at Cristobal.







THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. IL., No. 3.


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September 15, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


GATUN LAKE EXCAVATION.
Progress of the Work in the Canal Channel.
In that part of the Central Division which
extends from Gatun Dam to the beginning
of Culebra Cut at Bas Obispo, a distance of
22 miles on the center line of the Canal,
excavation is confined to a number of small
hills in the prism that rise above the pro
posed bottom of the Canal, which is at 40 feet
above sea level. When the work was begun
by the Americans, the amount to be exca-
vated in this territory was 11,752,198 cubic
yards, about 4,000,000 cubic yards of which
it is proposed to remove by suction dredges
after the water in Gatun Lake has reached
a sufficiently high level. Excavation thus
far has been by steam shovel and by hand,
and on September 1, 6,981,465 cubic yards
had been taken out. ,
BOHIO AND BUENA VISTA.
A steam shovel was set at work on a bill
at Bohio in the prism of the Canal about two
weeks ago, and it will excavate 28,559 cubic
yards of earth and soft sandstone. The
equipment includes five well drills to make
holes for the dynamite charges, and two
trains of 10-yard dump cars which haul the
material to Gatun Dam, a distance of about
eight miles. The hill that is being taken
down is near the Panama railroad, and is
the only excavation at Bohio on the right
bank of the Chagres River that will be done
by steam shovel. A large quantity of old
French iron and steel that is included in the
scrap advertised for sale is located around
this hill, and it was necessary to lay a track
in order to bring it out onto the Panama
railroad. This track is utilized in the steam
shovel work. The remainder of the work
at Bohio on the right bank of the river is
being done by hand, and the spoil dumped
into the old French canal and diversion
channels by Decauville cars. On the left
bank of the river, however, 179,000 cubic
yards of material are to be taken out by
steam shovel. Plans are being made to build
a bridge across the river and to have this ex-
cavation done during the dry season, when
there will be little difficulty in maintaining
the bridge.
Only 203,151 cubic yards remained on Sep-
tember 1 to be excavated at Buena Vista, a
mile southeast of Bohio, 30,791 cubic yards
havingbeen taken out by the steam shovel at
work on the two hills at this point in August.
The spoil from Buena Vista is also hauled
to Gatun Dam.
c.RSO RIVER AND TABERNTLLA.
What is known as the Caflo River work of
the Central Division is nearing completion.
One shovel is at work on the toe of the
hill, a part of which has been excavated to
40 feet above sea level. This is situated along
the right bank of the Chagres River oppo-
site Tabernilla, between 24 and 25 miles
from the beginning of the Canal in the bay
of Limon. When it is completed, 698,382
cubic yards of earth and rock will have been
taken out and dumped in the Chagres and at
two other nearby dumps. The short hauls to
these dumps assisted greatly in the rapid com-
pletion of the work. The first steam shovel
was "cut in" at this point on Deeemiber 15,
1908, and most of the excavation was done
by.two shovels. Some delays were experi-
i c.. edbecauseof freshets in the Chagres, and

L mi:.....


several times the tracks leading to the river
dump were washed out.
At Cafio River the Canal crosses the Chag-
res to Tabernilla, and the prism for some
distance includes the present line of the
Panama railroad. Between miles 21 and 23,
near Tabernilla, 364,472 cubic yards of ma-
terial must be excavated to bring the chan-
nel down to 40 feet above sea level. The
material is almost wholly earth. It lies in
a long low ridge, the maximum cut on which
is only eight feet. To prepare this ridge for
economical dredging it would be necessary
to strip it and therefore it will be taken out
by steam shovels. The land is covered by
jungle growth and clearing will begin next
month.
FINISHING THE WORK AT CAIMITO.
The steam shovel excavation at Caimito
will be finished about December 1, 1909.
The steam shovels at work there will then
be moved to the prism near Mamei, after
which the Caimito work will be finished by
scraper and hand excavation. The work can
be seen from the Panama railroad near San
Pablo on the right bank of the Chagres River.
It issituated between miles 26 and 27 on the
line of the Canal, and includes the angle
which the Canal makes at this point. It
was begun on October 1, 1907, and most of
the time since five steam shovels have been
excavating there. Excavation was facili-
tated by a short haul for the spoil and by the
fact that the floods of the river have seldom
interfered with the shovels, and on but one
occasion seriously delayed the work. Low
water at this point is at 25 feet above sea
level, making a rise of fifteen feet necessary
before the excavation on the 40-foot level
can be reached. The total amount of ma-
terial excavated when the work is finished
will be 2,207,509 cubic yards, and only 149,-
000 yards remained to be removed on Sep-
tember 1, 1909.
BEGINNING OF EXCAVATION AT MAMEI,.
Clearing gangs are at work in the prism
of the Canal near Mamei, between 27 and
28 miles from the beginning of the Canal in
the bay of Limon. As soon as the two steam
shovels now finishing their work at Caimito,
are taken from that part of the Canal they
will be moved to Mamei. The excavation to
be done consists of a stretch of earth along
the left bank of the Chagres River in which
there are 323,586 cubic yards of material
with a maximum height of 25 feetabove the
level of the Canal bottom; an island in the
river in which there are 359 cubic yards with
a maximum cut of 3 feet, and a stretch
along the right bank of the river contain-
ing 183,000 cubic yards with a maximum cut
of 20 feet. For the next few months work
will be confined to the stretch on the left
bank of the Chagres. Dumping grounds
have been located near the work and the
haul will be short. Low water in the river
is at 27 feet above sea level at this point, and
no trouble is anticipated from freshets, as a
rise of 13 feet will be necessary to reach the
lowest point of excavation. A flood of this
magnitude in the Chagres seldom occurs and
is always of short duration.
WORK IN THE PRJSM AT GORGONA.
Excavation at "Point 3," as the penin-
sula in the Chagres River back of Gorgona
is called, has been in progress since July,
and on September 1 there had been exca-
vated 103,880 cubic yards, while 750,670 cu-
bic yards remained. Two steam shovels are


doing this work. Low water in the riser at
this point is 37 feet above sea level and, a,
the bottom of the Canal is to be excavated
to 40 feet above sea level, excavation on the
lower levels would constantly be subjected
to overflow from rises in the river, which
during the rain) season are usually above the
40-foot level. On this account the steam
shovels are working only on that part of the
peninsula which is above the 50-foot level.
Meetings of Methanical Representalives.
Representatives from the various mechan-
ical shops on the Isthmus are holding bi-
weekly meetings for the purpose of corre-
lating their work. and thus effecting econ-
omies in time and money. The first meet-
ing was held at Culebra, August 1, at which
time the Chief Engineer addressed the men
and introduced the Superintendent of Mo-
tive Power and Machinery as chairman of
the committee. Various matters pertaining
to records and office work were considered.
The second meeting was held at Gorgona on
August 17, when a thorough inspection of
the shop and foundry was made. At Gor-
gona all the foundry work for the Canal
and Panama railroad equipment that can be
handled more economically on the Isthmus
than by placing orders in the States is done.
There has been a lack of uniformity in
methods of placing orders by the various di-
visions, and there has even been some du-
plication of pattern work, due to the fact
that no uniform method of ordering has been
pursued. This difficulty was the chief theme
of discussion at the meeting. The third
meeting was held at Mount Hope and Cris-
tobal on August 31. At Mount Hope the
marine shop and dry dock were inspected,
and the dredges undergoing repairs were
visited and the machinery discussed. A trip
was made on the sea-going suction dredge
Caribbean, and the machinery was inspected
while the dredge was at work. Later, the
committee visited the Panama railroad shops
at Cristobal. A meeting was held at Balboa
on September 14, when the marine shops,
floating equipment, and power plant were
inspected. The meetings are attended by
representatives of the various divisions of
the Canal and Panama railroad work, who
are in immediate charge of the mechanical
work in connection with the maintenance of
shop and field repairs.
Police Department Outposts.
Effective September 1, the police station
at Las Sabanas was made an outpost of the
station at Ancon. This change reduces the
force at that point from five to three men,
a corporal and two privates. A new out-
post has been established near the Las Cas-
cadas plantation, called Camp Plantation,
with a private in charge. There are now
eight outposts in the territory covered by
the Zone police department, as follows:
Mount Hope, tributary to the Cristobal sta-
tion; Frijoles, tributary to Tabernilla; Mat-
achin, to Gorgona; Buena Vista, to Las Cas-
cadas; Camp Plantation and Cerro, to Em-
pire; Cucaracha, to Paraiso, and Las Saba-
nas, to Ancon.
A mounted patrol was established on Sep-
tember 2 in connection with the Aucon sta-
tion, consisting of two men, one on duty
between 3 p. m. and 10 p. m., and the
other between 10 p. m. and daylight.
This patrol covers the territory along the
new Ancon road and over the Balboa road
to the commissary.








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III., No. 3.


STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS.

Work Accomipli'hed in the Central Division
During Augiut, 1309.
During the month of August the total
amount of material excavated in the Central
Division was 1,404,913 cubic yards, of which
361.558 cubic yards were classified as earth,
and 1,043,355 cubic .ard' as rock. Of this
quantity, l,376,3S6cubic ards were removed
by steam shovels, 24.499 cubic yards by
hand, and 4,02S cubic yards by sluicing fill
in the Obispo Diversion. The quantity of
material removed from the Canal prism was
1,40u,SS5 cubic yards, while 4,028 cubic
yards were removed from the Obispo Di-
version.
The high record for the month was made
by shovel No. 223, working in the Culebra
District, which excavated 45,694 cubic yards
of earth in 26 working days. Shovel No. 204,
working eight days in the Culebra District
and IS days in the Empire District, excavated
16,755 and 26,518 cubic yards respectively, a
total of 43,273 cubic yards, the second best
record for the month.
Shovel No. 217 in the Culebra District
made the high record for one day by exca-
vating 2,549 cubic yards of rock and earth
on August 31.
The best record for a shovel in the 7u-ton
class was made by shovel No. 108 working
in the Bas Obispo District which excavated
31,299 cubic yards of earth in 26 working
days. Shovel No. 127, working in the Tab-
ernilla District, excavated 1,750 cubic yards
on August 14, being the high record for one
day for a 70-ton shovel during the month.
Monthly records are computed by place
measurement, while the daily records are
based on car measurement. The best rec-
ords for the month and for one daN in each
district are shown below:
Belti Record,. four the Month.
TABERNILLA DISTRICT

Shovet CUBIC VARDS No. of
..el days at
No E.arth Rock. I Total. work

131 .. 351 '-?? I 29)073 26
254 .... '6 695 170 i 2 399 17
ikS OaiSPO DiiTRICT.
2'32 .... 8.6- .i l -.4-6 226
229 .... h ,7 24 .1o 32 34 26
EMPIRE Dli.TRIT
..3 41 . 41.535 ?6
2u2 .... .. 31 63K W.1:2 A


COLEBR I rsirRICT
133 .... ......... 45 69i3
21 . . . . 4i 774
nis a coR r. 1- Fui ONE

Z Charn
lo.3cation. Date mat
iel

254 Tabernilla ... .. Aug 12 r, rt
254 Tabernilld.. .... Aug II. Earth
232 Bnas Obispo..... Aug 23 R.xk
229 Bas Obispo.... Aug 'i Rock
265 Empire ....... Aug. 2 Rock
215 Empire ... ..... Aug 24. Rock
217 Culebra ........ Aug 31 Rock
21? Culebra ......... Aug 2A Rock
2Os Culebra ... ...... Aug. 30 Rock


45i.'4 26
40 774 '26
[DAV.

cier of
eri.al eI
.aled.


h .... 2 2,
;and eirth 1 ?.'r,
.and earth 2r,."

bad earth : 256
and earth 2 549
and earth 2.46b
and earth 2.3ol


Obituary.
Lyall Callender, a resident of the city of
Panama, native of Trinidad, and engaged
as a car repairer on the gold roll of the
Mechanical Division, was killed while at his
work at Balboa on the afternoon of Sep-


tember 8. He was engaged in repairing the
drawhead of an unloader on the dumps
when a car, shunted onto the track on which
the unloader was standing, knocked him
off and ran over him. He had resided on
the Isthmus about twenty months.
Abelard Giasson of Waterbury, Conn.,
an enlisted man in the Marine Corps sta-
tioned at Camp Elliott, was drowned in the
Chagres River at Cruces on September 6.
Hlie was born in Canada in 1878 and had
been on the Isthmus about 21 months.

slide at Pedro Miguel.
A slide occurred at the Pedro Miguel Locks
ou Wednesday, September 1, which involved
a section of the east bank, about mid-
way between the sites of the lock gates.
Previous to the slide a wall of rock ex-
tended upwards at this point for several
feet from the bottom of the cut, which is at
elevation plus 10. Above this the bank con-
sisted of a boulder formation for a depth of
a few feet, which in turn was overtopped
by a mixture of comparatively loose rock
and earth, forming part of an old French
dump. There had been previous indications
that the whole mass had become loosened
during the earlier operations at that point
by blasting. The effect of this blasting, and
the removal of support as the cut grew in
depth caused it to move.
In the slide the wall of shattered rock
was simply pushed out into the lock cham-
ber about 15 feet, and for a length of
about 125 feet. It extended back from
the former edge of the bank about 150
feet, and the crack in the ground appears
irregularly along the surface for a dis-
tance of about 250 feet, stopping just
short of a point where the bank rises still
higher. The entire mass did not fall in,
but sank instead, pressing the face of the
bank outward. In some places the surface
of the ground sank from three to four feet;
in other places to a greater depth.
The slide came near carrying with it
house No. 35, a remodeled French cottage,
the ground breaking not four feet from the
rear of the building. The chicken house
and other appurtenances to the place, to-
gether with some fair-sized trees were in-
cluded in the slide. The house has since
been moved to a place of safety. A steam
shovel working in the lock chamber close to
the spot was partially buried, and badly dam-
aged. The amount of material involved in
the slide is estimated at 35,000 cubic yards,
and will be removed.

Steam lShovel and Dredgemnen.
Local No. 19, International Brotherhood
of Steam Shovel and Dredgemen, will hold
its monthly meeting on Sunday, September
19, at 2.30 p.m., in the Commission lodge
hall at Empire. Important business will be
considered. S. I. LYONS,
Sevplar3 apnd 7leasurrr.
Empire, C. Z., September 9, 1909.
Mi-singi Mfen.
Information is desired with regard to the
whereabouts of William Crow, white, age
about 35 years; occupation, carpenter; last
heard of in Panama, about two years ago.
Any one having information is requested to
send it to Guido B. Pompeji, Porto Bello,
care Cristobal, C. Z.
Any intelligence with regard to the
whereabouts of W. J. Ronrkeof Boston will


be gladly received by Frank A. Doyle of
Balboa, who holds fiiof6rmation of value
to him.
Mrs. L. L. Aulgur, No. 6436 Dauphin
Avenue, Kansas City, Mo., desires informa-
tion in regard to the whereabouts of her
brother, William McNeff, who left the
United States for the Isthmus about two
years ago, and of whom nothing has since
been heard.

Kangaroos.
Empire Court, No. 1, I. 0. P. K., an-
nounces its second annual masquerade ball,
which will be held at Kangaroo hall, Emn-
pire, C. Z., on Saturday evening, October 2,
19u9. All Kangaroos and their lady friends
are cordially invited to attend. Due cards
must be presented at the door.
E. W. STOLBERG, Complroller.
Empire, C. Z., September 8, 1909.

Knights of Pythias.
All Knights of Pythias who are interested
in the organization of a Temple of the Dra-
matic Order, Knights of Khorassan, are re-
quested to be present at a meeting to be
held at Ancon hall, Ancon, on Sunday, Sep-
tember 19, at 3 p. m. C. C. JACKSON.

Tide Table.
The following table shows the time of high
and low tides at Panama for the week end-
ing September 22, 1909 (75th meridian time):


DATE. Low.

& M.
Sept 16 ..... .....
Sept 17 ... .... ..
Sept Is... .
Sept. 19.... 12 18
Sept 20 .... 1251
Sept. 21 .... 1.34
Sept. 22..... 206


High.

A. MI
4 50
S18\
5.46
6.15
647
7.22
,s.u5


Low. High.

A. M. P. M.
11.04 5.08
11.35 5.36
P. M.
12.08 6.03
12.38 6.33
1.14 7.08
1.56 7.48
2.43 8.38


Low.

P. U.
11.16
11.48


The variation of high and low tide at Cris-
tobal is so slight that a tide table for the
Atlantic side is-not necessary.

Supplies for Canal Work.
The following steamers arrived at the ports of Cris-
tohaland Colon during the week ended September Il.
with supplies for the Isthminn Canal Commission:
Pn-a: Joachim. September 6. from New York, with
11 tons galvanized pipe and 15,000 pounds sal soda,
for stock.
Rosa Lea. September 6. from Mobile. with 30 bar-
rels sea coal facing, for foundry; 400.000 pounds pig
iron. for foundry. i6U creosoted poles for Porto Bello.
90 000 feet white oak lumber, for stock. 250 untreated
piling, for Atlantic Division: 1.047 untreated piling.
for Pacific Division.
Abangare. September 9. from New Orleans, with
68 creosoted piling, for Gatun, 12.250 feet yellow pine
lumber, for car repairs. Gorgona- 49,653 feet yellow
pine lumber, for Central Division: 80 tons machinery,
for rock crushing plant, Balboa: 10 tons castings, for
car repairs. Empire. I locomotive coaling crane, for
Mechanical Division: 125 refrigerators, 45 tons cast
iron pipe. rnd 588 cases kerosene, for stock.
iiostbal, September 9. from New York, with 18,000
barrels cement. for Atlantic Division: 24.000 bags ce-
ment. for Pacific Division.
Panama, September 9. from New York, with 30.000
electric fuses. 48.00 feet triple tape fuse, 100 cases
toilet paper. 20,000 detonators, 8,000 pounds boat
spikes, 4,030 bundlesangle bars. 180 kegs track bolts.
300 cases lard oil. 150 cases yellow lubricating grease.
4.250 gallons valve oil. 50 coils drill cable and sand
line. 55 tons steel shafting and 35.000 feet air hose, for
stock; 292 packages pipe covering, for Gatun and
Miraflores boiler plants: 24 packages pumping ma-
chinery, 5 packages electrical machinery. 529 pieces
spruce lumber and I Thew steam shovel. for Pacific
Division. 46 tons steel forms. 34 reels and 344 coils
insulated copper wire and 21 cases cableway repair
parts, for Atlantic Division; 200 brake beams, for Me-
chanicnl Division, and a miscellaneous cargo agre-
gating 8.519 packages, weighing 746 tons.







September 15, 1909.


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.
Activities of the Young Men's Christian As-
sociation.
The Hearons Sisters Concert Company will remain
am the Isthmus until September 27. The following
engagements are yet lo be filled Thursday. Septem-
her 16, Empire. Friday September 17 Galun, Satur-
day. September 18. Ancon. Monday, September 20.
Porto Bello; Tuesday. September 21. Cristobal: Wed-
nesday. September 22. Gorgona. Thursday. Septem-
ber 23, Empire- Friday, September 24, Culebra.
The number of library books withdrawn for circu-
lation is averaging 45 per day.
Interest in amateur photography has steadily in-
creased. More than 100 members have united in
clubs for promoting this activity.
CULEBRA.
The bowling tournament games at Culebra last
Saturday night resulted as follows-
Culetbra. First. Second. Third. Total.
Lamster ........... 137 194 197 51's
Vogel............... 147 154 139 440
Winters ............ 195 157 135 487
Edwards ............ 146 148 18.? 476
Dougherty leapt ) .. 157 202 149 568

782 855 802 2 439
Cristobal.
Bullard (captain)... 175 198 163 536
Barlow ............. 194 168 151 513
Strong............ 173 158 167 498
tLouch............... 154 121 197 472
Harte................ I4M 160 194 518

860 805 872 2.537
CORGONA.
The bowling tournament games at Gorgoni last
Saturday night resulted as follows-
Gorgona. First. .Se'ond. Third. Ttia/
Sexton .............. 135 145 189 469)
Lasker............... 151 161 115 427
MeConaughey ....... 120 1 166 -450
Otis (captain). ..... 166 159 15 s ,4
Humphrey .......... 141 202 159 502
713 831 788 2.332
Empire.
Brown............... 204 204 171 579
Gorham ............. 148 185 131 463
Bardelsou .......... 139 134 157 43.
SHinckley ............ 163 215 195 353
Huson (captain). ... 194 194 175 5ti
F48 932 s82 2 6il
On Friday night a game of indoor basebalL wna.
played between two local learns known as Wnght s
Whirlwinds" and 'Weiser s Wonders." The former
team was composed of W. J. Wright. Clements Bar.
ney. Emery. Ridge, Kenney. Charoley,the latter, of
Weiser, Ward, King Keenan. H Wright. Buchanan.
Harrison The score was 26 to 15 in favor of the
"Whirlwinds." James McGee was umpire.
CRISTOBAL.
The Hearous Sisters Concert Company entertained
a large audience last Saturday night. Practically
every seat in the hall was taken. The program was
of a popular character.
Mr. Frank Gardner Smith. who for two years has
been secretary of the railroad V. M. C A. in Elmira,
N. V., has been appomled as successor to Mr Sltckel
at Cristobal. and will arrive on the Adi anc on Sep-
tember 16.
Concert by 1. C. C. Band.
AT EMPIRE, C. Z.
Sunday. September 19, 1909. at 6 p. m.
PBDCBLAIt.
1 March-Fekstal Day ...................... Roux
2 Selection-The Grand ,Magiu.......... ... Luders
3 Tone Poem -fa Lover's Lane............. Prior
4 Warltz--Fo/e Elase ........................ Milok
5 Medley Selection-Don't Take Me Hame ...
Von Tiler
Sa Bolero-I-srna ....................... Labor
6 I b-S. R. Henry's Barn Dance........... .Henry
7 Idyl-Forge ra the Forest.............. Michaelies
8 Overture-Lus/teil ....................KeleT BelI
9 lutermesao-Eldoray ............ Vn der Miehdeu
10 March-Show, Potk .......................en rich
CaS. E JENNIrS. Musical Director.
The next concert will be given at Gorgona. Sun-
day, September 26.

Proposals for Building.
Contract building. Sealed proposals, for labor on yv.
will be received at the office of the Constructing Quar-
ternaster. Culebra. until 3 p. m., September 24. 1909.
and then opened, for the erection by contract of a
recreation building at Corozal. Plans and specifica-
lions can be obtained from the Constructing Quar.
termaster by making a deposit of 55. Fifty dollars
must be deposited with the proposal and S200 when
the contract is signed. R. E. WOOD,
Actmig Chief Quartermaster.


THE CANAL RECORD


PERSONAL.

Mr. H. H. Rousseau, accompanied by
his wife and child, arrived at Cristobal from
New York on the O-risloal on September 9.
Mr. Henry Goldmark, designing engineer,
sailed for the States on his annual leave on
September 8.
Mr. I4. D. Cornish, designing engineer,
arrived at Cristobal on the Paniama on Sep-
tember 9, returning from his annual leave
in the States.
Mr. C. M. Saville sailed for the States on
the A,'con on September 8.

Additional Married Quarters.
Two buildings at Balboa, one at East Bal-
boa, twoat Ancon, one at Gatun. and one at
Cristobal. which were formerly either occu-
pied by bachelor employes, or used as offices,
have been vacated and are being converted
into familyquarters. Twenty-twoadditional
families will thus be provided for at Balboa,
four at East Balboa. six at Aucon, one at
Gatun, and one at Cristobal. a total of 3-1.
The alterations to the three-story building.
No. 26, at Balboa. have been completed, and
the District Quartermaster has begun mak-
ing assignments. Twelve families can be
accommodated in this building. The work
of Converting building No. 28, located back
of the post-office, has been begun, and when
finished will takecareof ten families. Build-
ing No. 106, at East Balboa. which was
originally erected as an office for the Resi-
dent Engineer, will also be converted, and
will supply room for four families.
The alterations to building No. 74 at
Ancon, formerly the District Quartermas-
ter's office, will convert it into quarters for
unmarried women employes of the Commis-
sion, including school teachers, stationed at
that point. The entire upper floor of the
building will be set apart for their use, and
they will be permitted to do light house-
keeping. The lower floor will be made into
quarters for one family. The type 5 build-
ing, No. 71, at Ancon, situated on the road
between the police and fire stations, u ill also
be converted into family quarters, housing
four families, two on each floor. This build-
ing was formerly used as bachelor quarters.
Buililing No. 121 at Gatun, formerly used
as an office by the Assistant Engineer in
charge of municipal engineering work, has
been vacated and is being converted into
quarters for one family. The office of the
Assistant Engineer was moved into the
building occupied by the general offices of
the Atlantic Division.
Building No. 12, at Cristobal, formerly used
as an office by the District Quartermaster,
is being converted into one-family quarters.
Aneon Baseball.
Another exhibition game of baseball was
played at the Ancon park on Sunday, Sep-
tember 12, between the team of the Depart-
ment of Civil Administration, and that of
the Panama railroad at Balboa. The score
was as follows:
Panama Railroad ....... 0 0 J I 0 l1 0 I 0- 3
Civil Administration .... I 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 x-10
Batteries--Panama Railroad Dixon and Ransom:
Civil Adminislration. Russell and Rex Umpire,
Monroe.
The Civil Administration team has so far
won two, and the Panama railroad team one
of the series.
Losr--Ieft on train No. 4. on September 4.between
Panama and Culebra a lady's Panama hat. Reward
for return to H. Rowe. Culebra.


23


OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.

In Charge of Third Division.
CcLEBRA. C Z September 7. 1919.
CIRCULAR NO 275.
Effective September a 19*W' Mr Charles T Waring.
Assistant Engineer. will be in charge of the work of
the Third Division of the office of Ihe Chief Engineer
during the absence of Mr. C. M Saville Assistant
Engineer. on lea f H. F. HonL FS.
Acting Cirairmaai and ChwiJ Engineer.
Employes Attending Court.
CUL.EBRA. C Z Se-)tember 9. \190
CIRC LLAR No. 27o (Aenrdig C-iru/ap ,o "',dl
The Ifollowing rules concerning the time of nit-
ploses while attending court will be effective Seu-
tember 15. lai:i9
I Whn an employee of the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission or of the Panamn Railroad Company attends
upon a court of the Canal Zone as a juror. he shall be
allowed hi= uiual compensation for the time lost from
work on hi regular pa3- roll in the same manner as
if present and performing hii ordinary duties. He
shall be furnished transporl.tio.n to and from the
place of holding court His actual and necessary ex-
penses -iLcouri will he providedI for h% the court. The
.amerule i- to compensation and transportation will
apply loan emnploie attending .a i winue-ss iu a crim.
in.tl ta~i when summoned b5 the court
2. The foregoing rule as tocomrenosation and tInns.
portallion will -also apply when siich emplove atlends
upon n court of the Canal Zone -a. weness in a civil
case in which the United States. the Government of
the Canal Zone or the Panama Railroad Company is
a partv., or is interested. if the attendance be on be-
half of an,.' nut of them It will not apply when an
emploae itelnds court i.as witrnes, in % civil case in
which the tnled Stales. the Government of the Ca-
nil Zone or the Pan.rm.i Railroad Company is not a
p-.rty or intere'led
3 Time ltI from work nnd allowed on a pay roll
to an emplose attending as iuror or witness shall
include the time necessanly occupied in going to and
returning from court taking into consideration the
acltul time of arrival and departure of trains An
emolo-.e will rece-.'e no pay for any time consumed
in traveling which is not a portion of his regular
working hours
4. Judge .of di-trict courts rnd clerks of circuit
courts will i.sue a certific-,te of attendance in accord-
ance with the factL in e-,ch case showing the time the
employee is aiclually in ittendance and Iimekeepers
will file such certificates with the time rolls.
5 In all cares in which, as hereinbefore provided
an emplose ik a wiltnes, and is allowed time. it shall
shall be the duty of the distinct judge or the clerk of
the circuit court to tas and so far as possible collect
from the part other thin the United States. the
Government or the Canal Zone or the Panama Rail-
road Cnmranyi liable therefore the lawful witness
fees and allowances due such employes and p-i tihe
same to the Disbursing Officer of the Commission as
to Commnis-ico employes. or to the Panama Railroad
Company as to ils employes. a monthly) report of such
collections to be rendered the Examiner of Accounu.
6 No charge will hereafter be made against the lie-
partminent of Civil Administration the Government of
the Canal Zone or the Panama Railro-ia Compan, for
the compensalin or cxpencesof emrplo>es uhen they
serve as jurors or attend as witnesses
7. Employs when entitled to their time will not be
paid fees as jurors, and itf paid a witntss fee bh any
person the amount will be at once deposited with tile
district judge or circuit court clerk.
H. F HoDGES.
,.tilng Chaarian /ihleman Canal. Comr,,a tis.
S'irord I "i-. cp -',,nt Panama Rai.' ,,ad Compan;)
Changes in Qunnrterna ter'a Department.
CULEBRA. C Z September 8. 1909.
TO ALL CONCIRN[:r,
Effective Septenmber in the following changes and
appointments are announced
Mr John M King Distr:ct C(uarternmaster at Cule-
bra is tr isferred to Lns Cascadas for station
Mr. Harr'.' F Sedwick A.sisLant District Quarter-
masterat Culebrn is appointed Districi Quartermas.
ler
Mr. Charles D Morgan isapoointed Assistant Dis-
trict Quartermaster Culebra
R E. WooD. AL-e1 Clr- Ca"i'u-earnirmaster

Arrivals and departuresof vessels at Balboa during
the week ended Seplember 10 were as follows
Arrivnis-Seplember 5 Sun / f.ce. from San Fran-
cisco September 6. Caaemala from South ports.
Departures-September .A\Nfport for San Fran-
ciseo September 6. Hflvne/tn for South porLs. and
Chwrteur for intermediate ports: September 7 ChAle.
for South ports. September 10. Barracoiua. for Cen-
tral Amenca. and Ecuador for Guayaquil.









THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. II., No. 3.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

The hours during which commini'- arie ire open are
as follows
Cnsto3bal and Culebra. in t to 1.' 30 p. m.: ? p. m.
to 7 p. m.
All other commissaries. ., it. to I ,. Im.: 3 p. m.
to p. m.
Retail price of cold storagee provisions for the week
beginning September 11
FRESH MEATS.
hire.
Mutllon-Stewing. .......................perb lb
Shoulder neck trimmed off.
1 pounds a, .1 oicr) ..... .. -per lb 10
Entire forequarter inot trim.
rued 1. 10 pound and over. .. per lb 9
I.eg 0i to 11, pound............per lb 19
Stek ....... ............... per lb 20
Short-cut chops ........ .........per lb 23
Lamb-Slew.ing .. ..................... per Ib 7
Entire foreqiuarter, neck trimmed
ofi .... ............ ...... per lb 10
Leg (6 to A pounds)... ............per lb 27
Chops .. .. ... .. ...... . ...... per lb '9
veal-- tewiing.............. ...................ner lb 10
shoulder for roasting i.not under
4 1 . .......... ............. per lb 13
Loin for roasting ............. ....per lb 19
Chops ..................... ............ .per lb 20
Cullets. ......... ......... ... ... ... per lb 23
Pork cuts..... . ........ ... ...... per lb 22
Beef- Suet ............... ... ......... .. .. per lb 4
Soup..... . .. ..... ... ..... ............ per lb 6
Stew ...... ....... ............ per lb 10
Corned... .. ............ ... ..... per lb 12 14. 16
Chuck roast ............... er lb 14
Pot roast.. . . .... .. .... ..per lb 16
Rib-roast second cut Inot under
3P, pounds' ....... .............per lb 19
Rib-roast first cut Inot under 3
pounds .... .. ............... ........per lb 21
Sirloin rot ............. ............per lb 22
Rump roat. ... ... ...- ..... ... per lb 22
Porterlhoue roa.)3st............... per Ib 22
Steak. Chuck .............. .per lb IS
Round. ... ..... ....... per lb 16
Rib .............. ..... per lb ?71
Sirloin ..... ... ... .. ..........per lb 23
Porterhouse .... .......... per lb 22
Rump ...................... .......perlb 22
Tenderloin ... ...........P...er lb 27
MISCELLANEOUS.
Livers-Beef ...... .............. ... per lb 11
Calf.. ................... .... ....each 65
Shad roes .. ..... ..... .... .... ...... par 41'7
Sausage--Pork ................. ........per lb 17
Bologna .................. per lb 17
Frankfurte .. .. ... ...... ..... per Ib '
Leberwurst ... ....... .. .....per lb 17
Sweet bread-Veal ................. .... ....per lb 1 211
Sweet brea-.l-Beef...... . ....... ......... per lb 30
Eggs. fresh.. . .. ............. ..... .... dozen 33
Blueish ... ........ .. .. ... .per lb 15
POULTRY AND GAME.
Chickens-Fancy Roasting large ......... eich I 50
medium.... each I 3n
Fowls.. .. ..... ... ........ ............ .each 90., I 0
Duck' fatted ............. .. .... .... ..each I 30
medium I. ]ight ................. .each 9U
Broilers .. ........... ........ ... ..... .ach 75
rurke.s. .... .. .. .. ............... .... per Ib 30
Squab; ......... .........................each 35
Capon. ........ each 2.511
Gc eie. littd about 10' pounds . .... ech 2 i,
12 r.ottudsi......... each 2 31
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.
Bacon- Brteikfi.a. whole piece ......... per Ib 23i
Breakfisi sliced ...... .. ...... per lb 26
Ham-Sugar-cured. sliced ... ............per lb 25
Oneihalf for boiling ......... ......per lb 21
W e-tphalia...... .. .... .....per lb 45
llncks .. .... .... . ... per lb IS
Sugar cured .... .. ......... per lb 20
Beef. salt. family ......... ...... .. ..... ..per lb 10
Pork t ilt..... ... ......... .... ....... per lb 15
Ham.boild. . per lb 23S
On tongues ...... ... ... ... ... ....... . eich I 011
Pigs' feet .. ........ .. .. .... ...per lb 14
tongues ................... per lb 1o
DAIRY PRuDL'CTS.
Butter-Prints. prme quality ......... per lb 38
Cheese--Roquefort .. ..................... .....per Ib 45
Philadelphia Creim .. .. ..... each 20
Young America .............. . per Ih 22
Swiss .......... .................... ......per lb 31
Fdam .................. ... ..... .... ... each 1 051
Camembert.......... .............. er lb 28
Neuichatel.......... .... .......... each 6
Gouda........... ....................... per lb 34
Parmesan.................... ..... bottle 20
French cheese in lins-Camembert Brie.
Neufchatel ............ ............ l.b tin ?)
M ilk. Briarcilf ............... ............ ...... bottle -15
Butter ............... ..... ... .... bottle 15
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.
Celery .......................... ..... per hd 10
Lettuce ............. ........... .. ... .per lb 8
Potatoes, white, old.............................per lb 39
sweet .............. ..........per lb 2J
Onions.................................................. per lb 3
Squash. Hubbard................................... per lb 5


Pri e.
Yams. .... .................................. per lb 3%
Turnips..... ............ .................. per lb 31
Carrots .......................... ..... ......... ....per lb '4
Beets ........................ ...... .. ... ... per lb 5
Potatoes new ............... .....ner lb 3V3
Cucumher. .... ... . . .......... .per lb *4
Tomatoe. . .... ..... ........... ..... per lb '5
Lemons ................ .......... ......dozen 24
Grapes ............ ............. .. per lb 10'
Limes. ............. ................ .. ..... per l00 SO
Wale rmelons...... . . ............... . each 40
Peaches. ........ ... .............. .....per lb 12
Canielounes .............. . ............ ........each 5
Blueberries ........ ................ box 15
Cabbage ...................... ............per lb 4!f
Apples .. .............. ........... perlb 6
Oranges . ... ..........................dozen 12
Grapefruit ............................. .............. each 4

Indicates reduction from last list.
**Tndicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle.
f Indicates advance on last lisl.
tSold only from Commiasariei: no orders taken for
delivery
Sold only from Cold Storage and not from Com-
missaries.
Stages of the Chagres.
Maximum height of Chagres River above
mean sea level for the week ending midnight
Saturday, September 4, 1909:
STATIONS.



J- a 0- E!
------ -~ -

Height of low water
abose e.a.-level ft 125 92 4, 1 0 0
lMaximun height ab
me.-n se-alecl. feet
Sunday Aug 29 131.0 96 I 53 11.4 4 6 4 0
Monday. Aug 30 128 i 95 4 51 I 5 3 1 2.0
Tuesday Aug 31 10 95. 77 39 65 2 7 23
Wed'esdav Sep I 1 18 i 9.0 50 4 7 7 3 u 2.6
Thursday Sept 2 130 96.n 50.4 6.8 3.) 2 3
Friday Sept. 3.... 129- 96 51 i 94 3 6 3
Saturday:,. Sept 4 128 9a.t 5'0 Ii 9 3 0 2 5


Maximum height of Chagres River above
mean sea level for the week ending midnight
Saturday, September 11. 1909:
STaTIONS

I -: a
5 g .- '- ,


Height of low water
above sea lesel ft 1:5 ''2 36 1 0
Maximum hb.ight ab
mean sea level feet:
Sunday. Sept 5 129 4 95.4 5C0 8 7.5 2.9 2 3
Monday. enlt.6 .132 4 97 0 %'1 Q 5 3 2 6
Tuesday Sept 7 1.)9 2 96 3 1 16 1 I 5
Wed 'e-'day Sept 1?8 0 9 4 4Q 8 1 3.6 3.?
Thursday. Sept 9 I-'v 7 51.4 7.5 2 ''2.
Fnda,. Sent 10. 131 ? 96 6 51 4 9 3 3 .3
Saturday Sept II. 135 7 99.1 55 2 122 610 4


Rainfall, September I to 11, 1909, Inclusive.
(MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIPC-RT )


STATIONS.



.&t,'anIL" Dlli, tr vr-.
Cristobil .. ........ .. ......
Brazos Brook.... ...............
Gatun ........... .. ...
Boh to ...... ........... .....
Cents9.' D, ,. i'on-
Tabermilla .... ...............
San Pablo.... . ... ..........
Gorgonn . ........... .........
Gam boa......... ..... ....... ...
Empire ................ ........
Csa mac ho ... ....................
Culebra ........... ............
P i tic Ln ision-
Rio Grande ........... ...... ....
Pedro M ituel ............. .... ...
Balboa .................... ...
Ancon ..........................
AIat"'xe Coat-
Porto ell ........... .......
Nombrede Dios. ISept I to 4.'....
Upper Chagresr-
El V igia..... .... .................
Alhaiuela.........................


0
0


4.21




8 89
5 1.902





2.1
3
2.19
S75
2 05
94
.74

4.83
.55

4.41
3 26


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
ama Railroad SteamshipCompany. of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company. of the Hamburg-American
Line. and of the United Fruit Company's Line, the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:
NEW YORK TO COLON.
Advance............... P. R. R.Thursday......Sept. 9
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A.. Saturday ......Sept. 11
Allianca...............P. R. R Wednesday....Sept. 15
Ancon ................P R R.Thursday......Sept. 16
Oruba.................R.-M...Saturday......Sept. 18
Colon ....... R.R.Tueday....... Sept. 21
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A.. Saturday.......Sept. 25
Panama.............. P. R. R.Monday.......Sept. 27
Cristabl............... P. R. R.Thursday......Sept. 30
Miagdalena ...........R.-M .s aturday......Oct. 2
Advance............... P. R. R.Saturday ......Oct. 2
Alliance ..............P. R. R.Friday. .......Oct. 8
Colon................ P. R. R.Thursday......Oct. 14
Ancon..............P.R R.Friday.........Oct. 15
Clyde................R.-M .Saturday......Oct. 16
Panama.... ...........P. R.R.Wednesday....Oct. 20
Advance............... P. R. R.Tuesday........Oct. 26
Thames ............... R.-M...Saturday..... Oct. 30
Alrato..................R.-RM Saturday .......Nov. 13
Tagus..... ............R.-M...Saturday.......Nov. 27
Oruba ............R.-M .Saturday.......Dec. II
lagdalena ............R.-M...Saturday....... Dec. 25
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Cristobal
should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
office, room 8, building No. 1, Cristobal, for customs
line permits, which are necessary to obtain admit-
lance beyond waiting room on pier II.
All the steamers of the Hamburg.-American and
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO NEW VORK.
Panama................P. R. R.Wednesday....Sept. 15
Cristobal ..............P R. R.Thursday......Sept. 16
Advance ..............P. R. R.Tuesday.......Sept.. 21
Magdalena ........... R.-M...Wednesday.. ..Sept. 22
Allianca............ ...P. R. R.Monday........Sept. 27
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm .. H -A ..Tuesday.......Sept. 28
Ancon ..............P. R R.Thursday......Sept. 30
Colon.................. P. R R.Saturday.......Oct. 2
Clyde.................. R.-M.. Wednesday....Oct. 6
Panama................ P. R. R.Friday. .......Oct. 8
Advance............... P.R R.Thursday......Oct. 14
Cristobal .. ....... ..P R R Friday.........Oct. 15
Alliance .............P.R R.Wednesday.....Oct. 20
Thames ...............R.-M. .Wednesday....Oct. 20
Colon.................. P. R. R.Tuesday....... Oct. 26
Ancon............. ..P R. R.Thursday......Oct. 28
Panama................P. R.R.Monday....... Nov. 1
Advance............... P. R.R.Saturday......Nov. 6
NEV ORLEANS TO COLON.
Atenas ................ U.F.C .Saturday...... Sept. 11
Turrialba.............U PC .Saturday ......Sept. 18
Abangarez. ........ ...F.C. Saturday......Sept. 25
COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.
Atenas ... .........U.F.C .Tuesday.......Sept. 21
Turrialba..............U.F.C..Tuesday....... Sept. 28
Abangarez .. ........ U P.C. Saturday ......Oct. 5
:COLON TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD.
Oruba .................R.-M...Tuesday..... .Sept.28
Sailings of the French line (Cie. GaEnrale Trans.
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows: Tampicav for New Orleans, via Kingston.
Ja. on or about October 2.
The steamers David of the National Navigation
Company. and the Tabaoa of the Pacific Steam Navi-
galion Company. leave Panama. for David, province
of Chiriqui, and intermediate points the first and
third weeks of each month.-
Misdirected Letters.
DIVISION OF POSTS, CUSTOMS AND REVENUES.
ANCON C. Z.. September 15, 1909.
The following insufficiently addressed letters.
originating in the United States and its possessions,
have been received in the office of the Director of
Posts. and may be secured upon request of the
addressee.
Anderson Edward D. Nugent, Dennis.
Aubery. Melville C Patheier. John A.
Baumgart. J. P. Porter. Edward
Begley. D. Purcell. P
Cody Mrs. James Roche. P. E.
Cutler, Ralph Sherman Mrs Edward C.
Durnine. Will Smith. H. G.
FParren, Thomas (2J Snyder William
Ferguson. Miss Fannie Swankert. William.
Gasparini, Charles Toberer. Master Carl
Griscom. J. T. Van der Leith. T. R.
James MNI T. Walter. Leo F.
King. A B. Weitz.Cap.Wm. H.
Leslie, Mrs. T. Whiaker. S. W.
Nixen, Mrs. Julia Williams, J. W.













CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1909. No. 4-.


The Canal Record
Published weekly under the authority and suterwuuon
of the Isthmmian Canal Commission.

SCanal Record is issuedfire of charge, one copy
each, tooal/ employes of the Commussvon and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roil.
Extra coi es and back numbers can be obtained from
the news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for
five cents each.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panamna.
No commwuncatlion. esther for pueb,'ia/lon or request-
ing information, will receive attention unless signed
wiYA thefuil name and address a/ the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Chairman's Mnuthly Report.
The report of the Chairman of the Isth-
mian Canal Commission for the month of
August is published in full in other columns
of this issue of TnE CANAL RECORD. It
gives a detailed account of the progress of
Canal work in all departments and divisions.
Ancon-Balboa Water Extension.
The laying of pipe on the new Ancon-Bal-
boa water service extension was completed
on September 15, and the entire work will be
finished within another week. This system,
which was begun on July 15, 1909. will not
only furnish additional water facilities, but
through connection with the high pressure
reservoir on Ancon Hill, will give adequate
fire protection to Commission property at
Ancon, Balboa and East Balboa.
Transfer of Empire Shops to Central Division.
The transfer of Empire shops from the
Mechanical Division to the Central Division,
as provided for in the official circular pub-
lished elsewhere in this issue, contemplates
placing all the steam-shovel repair work un-
der one organization. Out of the 101 steam
shovels otftCanal excavation, 61 are in use
in the Central Division. Field repair shops
are maintained by the Central Division at
Cucaracha or Rio Grande, Cunette near Em-
pire, and Bas Obispo. The Cunette shops
will be combined with the Empire shops,
but no change will be made in the shops at
Bas Obispo and Cucaracha. The repairing
of steel cars, hostling of locomotives, and
. the operation of the air compressors and
electric light plants in the Empire district
will be placed under the master mechanic
of Gorgona shops. A portion of the drafting
force in the Culebra office of the Saperin-
tendent of Motive Power and Machinery will
be transferred to Gorgona.
The average number of employes at Em-
pire shops in the fiscal year 1909 was 996
S. ... and the average monthly pay roll was $67,-
L,.- 17$.16. The principal items of work accom-


polished were: Steam shovels repaired, 52;
locomotives-extensive repairs, 28; run-
ning repairs, 18,210; engines hostled, 44.-
664; cars repaired, 81,156; work equip-
ment repaired, 432. The steam shovel re-
pairs referred to were extensive repairs and
were made at a cost of $197,612.42. The
cost per unit per annum was 51,976.12, and
the cost per unit per repair was $3,800.24.
The cost of shop repairs to steam shovels
per cubic yards of excavation was 50.0875
for the year, the basis of this cost being the
amount of steam shovel excavation, 22,583,-
099 cubic yards in the fiscal year.
Mess Hall at Balboa.
A mess hall will be opened this week in
house No. 25. Balboa, nearly opposite the
shipways. This was formerly a French
building, but was converted intoamess hall
by the Commission, and operated as such un-
til the completion of the new hotel at East
Balboa, when it was abandoned and has not
been used since. Owing to the distance
some of the employes at the shipways and
machine shop have to go to get their meals
at the East Balboa hotel, which has proved
especially inconvenient at the noon hour,
it was decided to reopen the mess hall.

Keeping Culebra Cut Dry.
After a month's test the pumping plant
recently installed in Culebra Cut at Bas
Obispo has demonstrated its effectiveness in
handling the water that accumulates in the
Cut during the heavy showers of the rainy
season. The water that flows toward the
Cut from the north and south sides of the
oldObispoand Camacho watersheds is caught
in diversion canals, but that which falls into
the Cut itself and flows down its sides is
handled by pumping. The rainfall at Em-
pire in August was 7.20 inches and at Bas
Obispo 7.03 inches. During August, dams
were built across the old channel of the
Obispo, where it crossed the Cut at Haut
Obispo and at the end of the tunnel at
Bas Obispo, with red clay brought from
Gorgona, because of its superior quality
for dams. These dams keep the water
in the Camacho diversion canal from back-
ing up into the Cut, but they also shut off
two outlets for surplus water from the
Cut. In short, the pumping plant at Bas
Obispo is now handling all the water that
accumulates in Culebra Cut between the dike
at the Chagres River and the summit near
Empire, a distance of 4,14 miles. The ca-
pacity of the pumping plant is 15,000 gal-
lons a minute, and up to the present time
not over 3,000 gallons a minute have been
pumped. One pump did this work satis-
factorily.
As the work advances the summit of the
Cut will be placed at Whitehouse, a point
between Empire and LasCascadas, about two
miles south of the Chagres River. The


drainage ditch being constructed through
the centerof the Cut will carry the water to a
sump near the pumping plant, where it will
be forced over the dike into the river. The
plant consists of three horizontal duplex
pumps, steam cylinder 16 inches in diame-
ter, water cylinder 22 inches, and stroke 18
inches. An auxiliary boiler plant located
near the pumping plant furnishes steam at
present, but the purpose is to run the pumps
by compressed air as soon as the air com-
pressors on order are installed.
Dynamite.
The first shipment of dynamite under the
new contract was received at Cristobal on
the I'i:camna from Baltimore on September
3, the amount being 1,017,000 pounds. The
explosive was unloaded in 17 hours, and was
delivered at the storage magazines within a
day after the unloading. The next shipment
consists of 766,000 pounds and is due about
September 28.
Improvements at Porto Hello.
The installation of the electric light and
telephone equipment at Porto Bello is prac-
tically completed, and the service is about
equal to that maintained in the settlements
of the Canal Zone. The power plant occu-
pies a part of the engine house containing
the main driving machinery for the rock
crushers, and consists of two 75 k. w. 125-
volt direct current General Electric genera-
tors, direct connected to two Ames tan-
dem compound engines, with the necessary
switchboards, etc. Each generator will carry
a load equivalent to 1,200 incandescent
lights of 32 c. p., but only one machine is
operated steadily, the other, which was re-
cently installed, being held in reserve. Day
and night service is furnished, and current
is also supplied to operate two 15 h. p. dy-
namos which drive the machinery in the
machine shop.
There were 435 incandescent and twenty
5-ampere arc lights in use on September 15.
Thirty 32 c. p. incandescent lights are used
in outside lighting, and of the arcs, nine
are used outside, and 11 distributed among
the buildings of the rock crushing plant.
The incandescents are attached by goose-
neck fixtures to voles and buildings along
the sidewalks, while the arc lamps are used
in the more open spaces.
A transmission line to the wireless station
was completed in August, and an electric
line, with five stations, for firing blasts has
been installed in the quarry.
Telephone service is supplied from a cen-
tral exchange located in the Superintend-
ent's office. The apparatus consists of a Sun-
ter, S. C., magneto switchboard, equipped.
for fifty drops. Instruments of tbeSumtltr,
and National Electric Suppl) Company makes
are used, and twenty stations so, Var have
been installed, all on private lines. The
telephone circuits extend from the dynamite







26 THE CANAL RECORD


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
(Continued.)


magazine at one end of Porto Bello to the
wireless station on the hill at the other,
every part of the settlement being reached.
The system was installed by the Atlantic Di-
vision forces, and has no connection with
the Panama railroad telephone lines.
Work on the new wireless station is at a
standstill, due to delay in receiving material.
The station house is finished, but no further
progress can be made until the remainder of
the apparatus has been received.
A new dock, which will afford better fa-
cilities for the unloading of supplies from
tugs, is under construction. It extends east
of the coal bin to a point not far from the
present steamer landing, and will be 610
feet long by 18 feet wide. The dock is built
on piling on the seaward side, while on the
landward side the pier supports rest on con-
crete bases Waste material from the quarry
site is being hauled to fill in between the shore
and the dock. Along the face of the dock op-
posite the machine shop will be located an air
line for operating air tools, in making repairs
to floating equipment. A storehouse for ma-
terials, 40 by 75 feet in size, will be erected
at one end of the dock, directly east of the
coal bin, and will take the place of the small
building now used for a storehouse by the
Atlantic Division. The new location will save
transportation and be convenient of access.
Landscape gardening was begun last week
under the direction of the District Quarter-
master, when a consignment of plants were
received from the Commission garden and
set out in front of the bachelor quarters in
house No. 11. A quantity of grass seed has
been requested for the slopes of the hill
upon which the married quarters are lo-
cated.
There were eight applications for married
quarters at Porto Bello on September 15
that could not be acted upon, but in the
bachelor quarters there are some unoccupied
rooms. The jurisdiction of the District
Quartermaster extends to Nombre de Dios.
and the August statement of the Chief Quar-
termaster shows that there were at these two
places a total of 696 employes, 15 married and
106 single employeson the gold roll. 412 West
Indians, and 163 Europeans. There are no
married quarters at Nombre de Dios, and
two or three of the employes at that point,
with families on the Isthmus, were pro-
vided with quarters at Porto Bello There
were ten white children at Porto Bello in
August
Gatun Loekh.
Between August 24, when the work of
laying concrete in Gatun Locks with the
permanent plant was begun, and the close
of work on September 18, 7.066 cubic yards
of concrete had been laid The amount
placed is increasing with the increase in the
efficiency of the handling and mixing plants.
The best record up to September 18 was
made on that day. when 638 cubic yards were
laid. Concrete is being laid at present in the
20-foot floor of the forebay, in the center
of the upper lock chamber, and in the floor
of the east chamber of the upper lock.
QOne hfni;red and sityv feet of the lateral cul-
veftp, .wth the floor'wells, have been built,
and tele,Jorms have been pulled without diffi-
celty.
All three fmitp in the power house are in
working condition. The changes in the an-
(t r' I I


tomatic electric cars, which carry materials
to the mixers, are continuing. Although
the chief change made is merely to rein force
the I-beam on which the motors are mounted:
in order to do away with the wobbling of the
motors, it involves taking the car apart
and the work therefore will probably take
two weeks or more. The dozen cars that
bave already been changed are giving sat-
isfactory service. In the cableway plant
the electrically controlled air brake by which
the speed of hoisting and lowering the buck-
ets is regulated is being changed to hand
control.
Wooden forms for the connections between
the lateral culverts and the main culverts
are being made at the wood shop at Gatun.
These forms will be in the shapeof an elbow,
elliptical at the end which connects with the
lateral culverts and circularat the top where
the connection with the balance valves of
the main tunnels is made. Thediameters of
the ellipse will be eight feet and sis and
one-half feet, respectively; the form will
be 25 feet long, and will weigh between
7,000 and 8,000 pounds. In each pair of
locks there will be 25 of these connections
between the lateral culverts and the tunnel
in the center wall, and 25 between the lat-
eral culverts and the tunnels in the side walls,
and 150 forms will therefore be required.

visitingg Congressmen.
Reservations have been made on the Pan-
ama Railroad Company's steamship, sched-
uled to leave New York the first week in No-
vember, for the members oft he Committee on
Appropriations of the House of Representa-
tives. It is probable that the members will
be accompanied by a number of friends.
The committee will hold several sessions on
the Isthmus, during which the Canal esti-
mates for 1911 will be considered. The re-
turn will be made in time for the opening
of Congress on December 6.

Special Trains for I. C. C. Employes.
CoLON, September 20. 1909.
LIUT.-COI. H F. HODGES.
.4aing Chairnan and Chief Engineer, Cleba.
Dear Sir-It is the desire of the manage-
ment of the Panama railroad to afford the
employes of the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion ant and every opportunity to run spe-
cial trains, which may have the endorse-
ment of their superior officer.
There seems to be somewhat of a misun-
derstanding as to the proper method to pur-
sue to obtain permission for I. C. C. em-
ploues to run special trains, with I. C. C.
equipment, over the Panama railroad main
line.
Rules and regulations, approved by the
Chairman and Chief Engineer, have been
in effect for about a year covering this ques-
tion, and are as follows"
Permission will not be eranled to run trains on
Pnnama railroad inmiin line. unless requested through
and hby the Chief Engineer's or the Division Engi-
nter s office-emploses desiring such service must
make their requests on their superior officers andnot
on the management if the Panami Railroad Corn-
p,,ny
Trains whose limit- fall within the district of any
Division Engineer will be authorized on the request
of that Divimion Engineer's office
Trains whose limits exceed the district of any one
Division Engineer will be authorized on the request
of the Chairman's office
In all cases, qualified crews must be used and trains
equipped with flags. markers, torpedoes fusees. etc.
Yours truly
H. I SLIFERa. General Manager.


PORTO BELLO WAGON ROAD.

Const ruteon or a Hlghway from Colon Begun
by the Panamanian Government.
The construction of a wagon road from
Colon to Porto Bello by way of Mount Hope
has been undertaken by the Panamanian Gov-
ernment, and work at the Porto Bello end was
begun a few days ago. Following the sur-
vey, the road, when completed will be about
30 miles in length, and in no part of it must
the grade exceed seven percent. Work for
the present will be confined to clearing out
the jungle growth and bringing the road to
grade, so that carts can pass over it. Later,
the road will probably be given a dressing
of coarse stone to prevent washouts during
the period of heavy rains. Convict labor is
employed, and the prisoners are now housed
in a temporary stockade at old Porto Bello..
It is proposed to erect a prison building at
that point as soon as arrangements can be
made.
The road is divided into seven sections, as
follows: Colon to Mount Hope; Mount Hope
to Majagual; Majagnal to Cativa; Cativa to
Santa Rita; Santa Rita to Llano Sucio; Llano
Sucio to Maria Chiquita; Maria Chiquita to
Punta Gorda and Porto Bello.
From Colon to Mount Hope the present
road, built by municipal engineering forces
of the Commission, will be utilized. Prom
Mount Hope the road will extend due east
to Majagual, and nearly all of this section
will be within the limits of the Canal Zone.
From Majagual the road will traverse low
ground to Cativa, and from Cativa to Ilano
Sucio it will skirt a coast indentation called
Bahia Muerto. There is a level stretch be-
tween Llano Sucio and Maria Chiquita, from
where an old road formerly extended to
Porto Bello, following the playa, or beach.
As this old route crosses several rivers at their
widest extent, it was determined to build
the new road in a more easterly direction',
about two miles from the coast. It will
skirt the hill known as El Giro, cross
the Rio Piedra at a point where the stream
is very narrow, and then turn a little to the
south until a valley formed by the Guanche
and Sierra Llorena is entered. From there
the road will run nearly level along the
side of a hill until the Rio Guanche is
reached It will then skirt a hill called Pan
de Azucar to the Rio Buenaventura, and
thence will encircle the base of a hill known
as Las Trincheras for four miles when it
will meet the old royal road to Cruces, about
a mile and a half from old Porto Bello. The
royal road will be followed for the remainder
of the distance.
In the construction of this road three
rivers will be bridged, and a great many
culverts put in. The longest bridge span
will be approximately 300 feet, and will be
over the Rio Guanche.

Woodmen.
All Modern Woodmen of America on the
Isthmus are requested to communicate with
me. JOHN E. WEST'BURG.
Empire, C. Z., September 10, 1909.

Mr. H. L. Schultz, the horticulturist of
the Commission, has been directed by- the
Acting Chairman to report to the Chief En-
gineer of the Republic of Panama for serv-
ice on an investigation of the resources of'
the province of Chiriqui.


VoL. Ill., No. 4.







September 22, 1909.


THE"CANAL RECORD


CANAL ZONE SCHOOLS.
Change in Course and Equlpment-Teaching
Force.
Work in the Canal Zone public schools will
be resumed on October 1, when a meeting of
the teachers will be held at the Superin-
tendent's office, Ancon. Teachers in the
schools for white children will meet in the
morning at 8.30 o'clock, and the teachers in
the schools for colored children will meetat
10.30 o'clock. On October 4 at 8 o'clock in
the morning the regular sessions will begin.
Schools for white children will be con-
ducted at the 12 stations along the line of
the Canal where they were conducted last
year. A high school course will be added at
Gatun, although the work will not be so ex-
tensive as in the other villages, where high
school courses are offered, namely Culebra
and Cristobal. One of the four rooms in the
new building at Gatun will be used for this
purpose.
Two rooms have been added to the Cris-
tobal school building, and two to the school
building at Gorgona. High school pupils
living in Empire will go to Culebra, and
brake service will be provided to convey them
hack and forth. Childrenrr living in Balboa
will be brought to the Ancon school by brake.
In the schools for white children there
will be 36 teachers, including two itinerant
teachersof Spanish and two substitute teach-
ers. It will be the duty of the substitute
teachers to take vacant places in schools
throughout the Zone, and when not so en-
gaged to assist backward pupils by giving
individual instruction. In the work of im-
proving the methods of instruction as carried
on last year card catalogue was made in the
office of theSuperintendent of Schools in An-
con in which the progress of each pupil is reg-
istered from month to month. By consulting
the catalogue the office can send the substi-
tute teachers where their services are most
needed. The substitute teachers will also
take the places of teachers on the regular
force who are sent to other schools to ob-
serve methods of instruction. A supervisor
of grammar and high school work has been
added to the directing force.
Subject to change throughout the year the
following assignments of teachers have been
made for the schools for white children:
Ancon-MissGeorgia E. Munro lowergrades: Miss
Jessie S. Wilson. intennediale grades. MissCalhanue
Bailey. upper grades, principal.
Corn-a-Miss Elizabeth E Shimer Miss Margaret
B. Kyte.
ro W Migauel-Mrs. W. E. Maxon
FParaisa-Miss Gertrude Hanson.
Cil/ebrar-Miss Annie S. Irvin, lower grades: Miss
Ida Keys, next higher grades: Miss Lena Tozier;
Mrs. Mamie Miracle, principal.
i.EmM r--Miss Jessie J. Heller, lower grades. prin-
cipal: Miss Grace Yarborough. next higher grades:
Miss Gertrude L. Bliss, next higher grade-. Miss
Dorothy Doyle. upper grades.
Las Cascada-B-Miss Mary M. Shea. upper grades.
principal: Miss Grace E. McCray, lower grades
Goargowa-Miss M. Edith Anderson. upper girndes-
Miss Florence O'Connor. next lower grades, princi-
pal; Miss Elise Cage. next lower grades: Miss Stella
S Morrow. primary grades.
I Thhradia-Mrs. Pay c Berry.
Gatsm-UMr. Alice P. Schreiber, upper grades: Miss
A. Elise Stone. intermediate grades: Miss Lola M.
Taylor, primary grades.
i Critabal--Mr. Charles Carl Carr. principal, high
school: Miss Bessie Annis. upper grades, high school:
Miss Alicel.eae Coombs, upper grades: Miss Regina
.. Kinman, next lower grades: Miss Natalie Hine.
S lower grades.
Calon Beach-Miss Edith L. Slifer, higher grades.
1.. Irin al: Miss Edna Hart, primary grades.
alsirk ,DackerTs-MinaOdina J. I. Frost. Cristolbal
LI


and Catun; Mrs. Cornelia H. Ellsworth Ancon and
Cnutebra.
Substltue Teacher.-Miss Jessie E. Daniels Miss
Evelyn Eld redge.
There will be 17 schools and at least 21
teachers for colored children at various settle-
ments along the line of the Canal. A new
four-room building at New Culebra, in pro-
cess of construction, will be ready for occu-
pancy. At New Gatun a four-room building
has been erected. There is plenty of room
around this building in which to carry on
experiments in school gardening, and much
work of this character can be done without
extra cost. At Pleya de Flor, near Colon,
a boatman will be provided as heretofore to
transport the pupils who live along the
Sweetwater River. The assignment of
teachers in the schools for colored children
will not be made until after the examination
of teachers held on September 17 has been
completed.
Pay for Holiday Work.
THE CANAL RECORD.
Would you kindly answer this in THE
CANAL RECORD? Will an hourly man get
twenty hours or twelve hours for working
on a holiday ? This information is for the
benefit of a few who do not understand the
circular that was in THE CANAL RECORD
some time ago. JOHN H. PRICE.
Gatun, C. Z.. September 4, 1909.

[All hourly employes on the gold roll, and
all citizens of the United States on the silver
roll. who work both the day preceding and
the day following a holiday, will be paid
eight hours' regular pay, and in addition
thereto, time and a half for all time worked
on a holiday. For instance, if such a man
works eight hours on a holiday, he will re-
ceive pay for twenty hours' time; if he works
four hours on a holiday he will receive pay
for fourteen hours' time. All aliens on the
hourly silver roll will receive only time and
a half for all time worked on a holiday.]

Resignation While on Leave.
THE CANAL RECORD:
Is the resignation of an employee on leave
in the States allowed the extra fifteen days
to reach the Isthmus before leave pay is for-
feited, same as an employee returning to
work? EMPLOVE.
Cristobal, C. Z., September 3, 1909.

[If an employee desires to resign in the
United States, upon expiration of his leave
of absence, his resignation must be received
on the Isthmus by the head of his depart-
ment, within fifteen days after the expira-
tion of his leave of absence. It is desired,
however, whenever possible, that an em-
ploye notify the head of his department of
his intention to resign before entering upon
his leave of absence.]

Navel Orange Tree.
THB CANAL RECORD:
In THE CANAL RECORD of September 1
I notice an article referring to a navel orange
tree at the A ncon nursery as being the only
one known to exist in the Canal Zone.
I hopeyou will pardon me for calling your
attention to the fact that I brought a dozen
of these trees to the Isthmus about three and
a half years ago, and presented two of them
tothe President of Panama, two to the Chair-
manof the Canal Commission, and two to the
Ancon Hospital. Three of them were planted


at the pumping station of the Union Oil
Company at Mount Hope and are flourish-
ing; the remaining three were planted at
the pumping station at Petrolia. One of
these latter died, but the other two aregrow-
ing nicely, one having borne a half dozen
oranges. R. W. FENN.
Balboa, C. Z., September 2, 1909.
Revenue Operations in Angust,
The total revenue receipts in the Canal
Zone during the month of August amounted
to $8,925.41, derived from the following
sources: Distillation licenses, $349.25; es-
cheated estates, 54;8.98; taxes, licenses,
etc., turned in by tax collectors, 58,097.18.
Distillation licenses are usually granted
for a period of 15 days, although they may
be taken out for any period from 15 days up
to a year. The distilleries in the Canal Zone
do not operate continuously. The proprie-
tors usually make all their arrangements for
the distilling process, such as preparing the
mash, and then take out a license for the
time it is estimated to require. Occasionally
it happens that the period covered by the
15-day license is too short, in which case, a
license is generally granted to the applicant
for the additional time needed to use up his
mash. The license is based on the litre of
manufactured product. In the month of
July, the greater part of the revenue from
this source came from a simple still in oper-
ation at Ancon.
The sum credited to escheated estates is
derived from the Commission employes and
other Canal Zone residents, who have died
intestate, or whose heirs cannot be located.
Under the Zone law, proved heirs may ap-
pear at any time within a period of 10 years
and ;ollect the amount derived from an es-
cheated estate. The August collections under
taxes, licenses, etc.. consist of back taxes,
with penalties and miscellaneous licenses.
Married Men Won at Baseball.
A team composed of married men of Gor-
gona defeated a team of unmarried men in
that village Sunday, September 19. The
score was:
Single Men.......... ... 1 0 0 3 0 2 1 1 0-8
Married Men.. . ..... 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 3-9
Batteries Single Men-Sprecken. Laskerand Ken-
ney Married Men--Sexlon, Case and Barney t'mI
pire-Cramer
Baptist Church of Empire.
First Baptist Church of Empire, C. Z., will
hold services in the I. C. C. Chapel next
Sunday, 26th instant, 3 p. in., as is custom-
ary every fourth Sunday at same hour. The
ordinance of baptism will be administered
at this service.
Concert by 1. C. C. Band.
AT GORGONA, C. Z
Sunday. September 26. 19U9. at 6 p m.
PROGRAM.
I March-U S. Cadel ........................ Hale
2 Selectii -- ao i-,' Lamb ............... ....Carle
I a-S R Henr's Bar, Dance............. Henry
3 I Two Step-Dii ze T71 eight ... .. .... Johnson
4 Waltz-Gate ..........................Waldteufel
5 Medley Selection- The Glitrering Gl/ow
Worm .... ........ .. .. ...........La Farge
6 a Bolero--Isol/ Ia.............. ...... .Lahory
I in g-liu of-e-A'ack. ...................Alien
7 ldyl- The Forge n rthe Forest ........ Eiltnber
8 Overture-Poel and Peasant..... .........Suppe
9 Ballet-Rightof the Birds ................... Rice
10 March- The Avator .............. ....... Pullon
cnH.S. E. JENNiUGS. jifustical Dirc lr.
The next concert will be given at Hotel Tivoli.
Sunday. October 3
Ships to Boquete.
The steamer Tabaoa of the Pacific Steam Naviga-
tion Company is scheduled to sail fromrn Panama for
Pedregal (David) on September 29, October 13 and
October 27.








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III., No. 4.


CANAL WORK IN AUGUST.

Monthly Report of the Acting Chairman to the
Secretary of War.
CULEBRA, C. Z., September 15, 1909.
The Howoratle the Secretar; ar It'ar.
IVashington D C.
Sir-I have the honor to submit the fol-
lowing report of the operations on the Isth-
mus for the month of August. 1909
The following table summarizes the prin-
cipal items of construction work accom-
plished by the Atlantic, Central, and Pacific
Divisions during the month:


Item.


Uniit.


Work e.c.av,tion dry ........ ....... Cubic yards.....
Work excavaLion wet ...... Cubic ,ard .....
Tot.'i work excavation .... ..... ....... Cubic yards.....
Plant excavation dry........................ Cubic yards.....
Plant excavation wet. . .. .. ....... .. Cubic irds...
Total plant excavation. ................ Cubic 5ards ..


Total Canal excavation ....... .......
Explosives used .... ............ ...........
Rock drilling . . . ......... ...
Track removed. .... ............. .....
New track laid ......................... ....
Material placed in dams .. ................
Rock crushed ............... ...............
Cement used .......... .... ... ...
Concrete placed............. ... ... .........
New toads built ........... ........... ..
W ater m ains laid........... ...............
Sewers laid ................................
New drains and ditches dug ................
Average dJily force. .. .. ................
Rainfall. average... . ... ...........


Cubic oards .
Tons 2ltsolbs)
Peet... ...... ...
Miles ........
M iles .............
Cubic yards.....
Cubic sards.....
Barrels ............
Cubic yards.....
M iles ...... .....
Feet ... ........
Feet ............
Feet ...............
Inches............


Atlantic Division.
GATLUN LOCKS.
E.'cavalion-Excavation was continued
during the month. 39,160 cubic yards of
material being removed by two steam shov-
els and 1,186 cubic yards of material by
crane.
Recetiing a'd /ss-uing .Jlaherial-The fol-
lowing table shows the amounts of materials
received and issued during the month:

RECEIVED I SSUED.
MATERIAL --- -
Barrels Cu Vds Barrels Cu VYd

Cement. 444a .... 2 .
Sand ....... ..... .. 2 304 1.304
Stone 7.... .. .. 6 . 2.728

1/as nr II oprh Concreting was com-
menced on August 24, and at the end of the
month 1,298 cubic yards had been laid; 124,-
000 feet. board measure, of forms were
erected; 4 tons of steel culvert forms were
put in placeand 44 sections assembled, read.
to place; 350 feet of 4-inch tile drains were
laid in telltale system in the lock-floor plan.
.Vez' PIower PIzlat-During the month
power was supplied to all apparatus from
the new power plant. The steam connec-
tions to two generators were completed and
a temporary connection made for the third
generator.
-ilutonaltic kai/road--Theoperation of the
automatic railroad during the month was
unsatisfactory, due to the poor design and
poor workmanship of the cars.
Cement Shed-All the cranes in the cement
shed became disabled during the month,
due to the poor workmanship, poor design,
and poor material.
.lliscellaneous I 'ork-The east storage tun-
nel was reinforced during the month, and
75 per cent of the west tunnel reinforced.
Two transformer houses were built. Pile
driving for strengthening the tracks for the


head towers of the unloading cableways was
40 per cent completed.
G.ATLIN DAM.
Construction during the month increased
the total fill by 379,538 cubic yards, making
the total at the end of the month 3,S65,283
cubic ,ards.
S/rir.ing-The stripping of the east val-
ley was extended during the month up both
hillsides, the work being performed b) load-
ing Decauville cars by hand and dumping
the material just outside of the limits of the
stripped area. The work extended the


Atlantic.

106 595
122.646
529 441
I 11S

1.118
530.559
41.40
7: 229 60
3.29
396.398
11.410
S619
7.195

4?.7
S150,
, 11. 3


Central.

1.404 913

1.404.913




1 404.913
297 90
35" 568
8 Si1
13 50
545

2 (i.
669
2,%6
9.ia8
7.7)


Pacific. Total.
9341 .499


93.471
675 010
768 481

51.225

51 225
819.706
24 61
61.282
3 dl
75.144
3 275
1 001
S47
9.133
52-
220
4.207


1.604 919
I U97.856
2.702.835
52 343

52.343
2 .755.1 8

36391
516.0-9 60
8.8,)
20.60
471 532
23 2IQ
9.620
8.042
2.t.0
23.250
1 629
2 950
19 282


stripped and grubbed area by 1.7 acres.
The total area stripped and grubbed at the
end of the month was 197.4 acres.
-Hydraulic Fill-The hydraulic fill in the
dam was increased by 213,578 cubic yards,
making the total at the end of the month
1,244,590 cubic yards.
Etrockmenfs-The material recei% ed from
Bas Obispo, Buena Vista, the Locks, lIindi,
and the spillha%. amounting to 165,960 cu-
bic \ards, was placed on the north and south
toes of the dam. The total dry fill at the
close of the month was 2,611,694 cubic yards.
Treslles-The trestle to the site of the cut-
off dam to the foot of the West Di% version
was extended 372 linear feet, the total
length at the end of the month being 515
feet. In connection with the construction
of the new incline into the head of the
spillway, a trestle 140 feet long was con-
structed. A new trestle was started across
the head of the spillway at dam contour
+30 and was continued for 35 linear feet.
Work was continued on the trestle at the
site of the new water works, the same be-
ing extended for a length of 23S feet.
GATUN SPILLWAY.
Excavation was limited to clearing ahead
of the floor and side walls by hand and with
crane No. 44 During the month the ma-
terial removed amounted to 736 cubic yards,
making the total spillway excavation at the
close of the month 1,301,016 cubic yards.
Core!e-Work swas continued on theeast
and west wallsof the spillway dam, the east
and west face walls south of the dam, and
the floor south of the dam, and into the cur-
tain trench. The total amount of concrete
placed during the month was 5,496 cubic
yards, i,,aking the total at the end of the
month 42,290 cubic yards.
HARBOR AND CHANNEL SECTION.
Dry E.rcavat;on Below Sea Level at llin-
dli-During the month 28,906 cubic yards of


earth and 38,461 cubic yards of rock were
removed from the prism, and 1,118 cubic
yards of earth were excavated outside the
prism.
Dredging from the Ocean to Mindi--Four
dredges removed from the prism 388,282
cubic yards of earth and 34,564 cubic yards
of rock during the month. In addition, the
dredge Caribbean removed 87,130 cubic
yards of earth from the approach channel
to Cristobal Harbor, and 9,284 cubic yards.of
earth from in front of Pier No. 11. Two
thousand cubic yards of earth and 43,512
cubic 3ards of coral and rock were also re-
moved from in front of Pier No. 11 by the
dredge .1;indi. On August 31st, 40 feet of
water could be carried from 0 to Mile 2 plus
4,050-feet, 30 feet to Mile 3 plus 1,375 feet,
20 feet to Mile 4 plus 4,975 feet, and 10 feet
to Mile 4 plus 5,000 feet, the end of the cut.
PORTO BELLO.
General miscellaneous mechanical and re-
pair work was continued during the mouth.
Eighteen thousand five hundred and seven-
ty-eight cubic yards of rock were loaded
into cars for crushers and fills, and 15,200
cubic yards of earth were removed hydraulic-
ally from the quarry. Including material
cast over and removed by hand, to strip
rock and in track work, the total yardage
for the month was about 42,888 cubic yards.


NOMBRE DE DIOS.
The work of opening the channel to the
sand zone was continued.
MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING AND BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION.
The usual work was performed during this
month, including work on the Mount Hope-
Gatun road, and the new water supply for
Catun.
Central Division.
During the month of August, the total
amount of material excavated in the Central
Division was 1,404,913 cubic yards, of which
361,558 cubic yards were classified as earth,
and 1,043,355 cubic yards as rock.
Of this quantity, 1,376,386 cubic yards
were removed by steam shovels, 24,499 cu-
bic yards by hand, and 4,028 by sluicing fill
in the Obispo Diversion.
The quantity of material removed from the
Canal prism was 1,400,885 cubic yards, while
4,028 cubic yards were sluiced at the Obispo
Diversion.
The daily average number of steam shov-
els at work during the month was 46.73, as
compared with 45.08 for the mouth of July.
For comparison with the work done by
steam shovels during the corresponding
month of the previous year, the following'
table has been prepared:


Ptriod.


1908.
August
190.?.
August


Excavated
bi shovels.


cu. ids
I 534 199
1.376 386


Classification of
material.

Rock Earth.

cu 3ds cua. 'ds.
1 00.1345 530.153
1.035 515 340.671


Rainfall at Empire. 1908. .11 ins.- 1909.7 20 ins.
The above table shows that the average
output per shovel day was almost nine per
cent greater in August, 1909, than in the
corresponding month of the previous year.
During the month 191,566 cubic yards of
material excavated from the prism were
transported to the relocation of the Panama







September 22, 1909..


THE CANAL RECORD)


railroad at Caimito. Santa Cruz and Corozal,
and dumped as filling in the embankment
for the new roadbed, the total at the close
of the month for this purpose being 1,687,-
353 cubic yards.
During the month 13,540 cubic yards of
earth from Buena Vista, and 41,495 cubic
yards of rock from Bas Obispo were trans-
ported to Gatun for use in the construction
of the dam. At the close of the month 55,-
700 cubic yards of earth and 486,013 cubic
yards of rock had been transported for this
purpose.
The daily average number of laborers at
work was 8,460, while the average number
of gold men working was 928.
Pacific Division.
DISTRICT NO. I-LOCKS AND DAMS.
The total excavation during the month
amounted to 196,443 cubic yards.
During August 2,885 cubic yards of mate-
rial were added to the prism of the west dam
at Pedro Miguel, making the total at the
end of the month 169,946 cubic yards. At
Miraflores 23,466 cubic yards of dry filling
were added to the toe of the west dam, in-
creasing the total to 417,530 cubic yards.
Forty-eight thousand seven hundred and
ninety-three cubic yards of hydraulic filling
were added to the core of the west dam, in-
creasing the total to 81,140 cubic yards, and
6,000 cubic yards of material were placed in
back fill, increasing the total to 12,250 cu-
bic yards.
At Pedro Miguel the regular operations
were continued. The storage trestles were
practically completed, the west trestle being
put in service. The auxiliary mixer in the
west chamber was placed in position, to be
ready for operation early in September. A
portion of the foundation for the lower guide
wall was prepared for the beginning of the
placing of concrete on September 1.
At Miraflores the installation of one unit
at thepower house was practically completed.
During the month the four No.6 crushers
were placed in position at Ancon quarry, and
all work in connection with the crusher plant
was satisfactorily continued.
DISTRICT NO. 2-DREDGING.
Five dredges were in operation during the
month, the amount of material excavated
by each being shown in the following table:
Dan. f Tv e. CUBIC v'ARDS
I Work. Plant.
Culebra....... ... Suction...... ts151.87n ......
M ole ................ Ladder ..... 106.52 ...
E Badger......... ..... Ladder .... 142.241 ..... .
Carde s.... .. ........Dipper ... 71 62 3.600
adrmot .... ....... Ladder ....... )50.767 .... ..
Total .. .. .. ......... ..... 623.263 3.60:'
The necessary work in connection with
maintenance of equipment was satisfactorily
performed.
DISTRrCT NO. 3-MUNICIPAL AND BUILDING
WORK.


Building and municipal work was contin-
ted during the month, and the filtration
plant, Ancon steam plant, and the Rio Grande
rock crasher were successfully operated.
Mechanical Division.
The usual work of this division was satis-
factorily performed during the month.
Relocation Panama Railroad.
-During the month 200,474 cubic yards of
material were excavated, making the total


excavation at the close of the month 1,770,-
073 cubic yard.-. and 669,370 cubic yardss of
material were placed in embankment, mak-
ing the total for this purpose at the end of
the month 5,600,601 cubic yards.
During the month 1,881 linear feet of tem-
porary trestle were driven, and numerous
small culverts were completed.
During the month 6,569 linear feet of per-
manent track were laid, making the total
at the close of the month 120.140 linear feet.
The force of laborers durinR the month
averaged 2,246 men.
Quartermasler'- Departmneni.
During the month there were 213 addi-
tions to the gold force and 214 separations.
In the report for May, 1909, attention was
called to the fact that the combined force
actually at work for the Commission and
Panama Railroad Company on April 28, 1909,
was the largest up to that date in the his-
tory of Canal construction, under either
American or French administration, the
number of men actually at work being 33,-
369, the force of the Commission alone be-
ing 26,835. These figures were exceeded on
July 28, when the force of the Commission
was 26,938, and of the Panama railroad and
commissary 6.963, making a total of 33,901,
while the combined force at work on August
25, about one month later, was less by only
159 men.
Conditions relating to building repair work
are such at the present time that it is not eco-
nomical to maintain at each station a force
sufficiently large to handle all work that
may have to be performed, as such a maxi-
mum force could not be advantageously em-
ployed continuously. This condition has been
met by maintaining at each station a force
capable of performing all ordinary routine
work, and by the organization of two "tray-
eling gangs"-one each of carpenters and
painters. The carpentry gang is composed
of one gold foreman and twenty silver men,
and the painting gang of one gold foreman
and nineteen silver men. These gangs are
shifted from station to station as may be
necessary to perform an accumulation of
work, or any extraordinary work, that can-
not be cared for by the regular force.
The form of contract for building con-
struction was changed, and a more rigid in-
spection of contract buildings is being en-
forced.
Subsistence Depnrtment,
The operations of the Hotel Tivoli, during
the month, showed a lossof $2,396.83. There
was a loss of $2,988 45 on the operation of
the line hotels, and a profit was made on the
operation of the kitchens and mess halls.
The operations of this department for the
month showed a net loss of $2.176.77.
Department of Civil Administration.
COURTS.
The Supreme Court held one session in
August. No cases were disposed of. In
the Circuit Courts 23 civil and 43 criminal
cases were disposed of, and in the District
Courts 85 civil and 526 criminal cases were
disposed of.
DIVISION OF POSTS, CUSTOMS AND REVENUES.
The revenues in August aggregated $17,-
437.85. The general revenues amounted to
512,092.43. Postal revenues were $5,944,
on account of stamp sales; $14.51, on account
of newspaper postage; and $1,764.51, on ac-


count of money order fees Money oruler
sales during the month amounted to $409.-
481.22. of which $309,568.07 were payable in
the United States and foreign countries, and
599,913.15 in the Canal Zoie.
Eighteen vessels entered at and 15 cleared
from the port of Aucon, and 17 vessels en-
tered at and 19 cleared from the port of
Cristobal.
DIVISION OF POLICE AND PRISONS.
The number of arrests luring the month
was 535, as compared with 529 in July.
The total effective strength of the police
force on August 31, was 164 Lfficersand men,
and the total force of the division on that
date aggregated 251 officers and men.
There were Ill prisoners confined in the
district jails at the close of the month. Four-
teen convicts began penitentiary sentences
during the month, 10 were discharged at the
expiration of their sentences, and on Au-
gust 31-t, 123 convicts were confined in the
penitentiary. The cost of guarding and sub-
sisting the convicts was $2,420.58, and the
value of the work performed by them was
$2,024.22.
DIVISION OF PUBLIC WORKS.
The regular inspection and maintenance
work of this division was performed during
the month. In the citvof Panama28.770,000
gallons of water were consumed, and in the
city of Colon 20,233,075 gallons were con-
sumed.
DIVISION OF FIRE PROTECTION.
Four alarms of fire were responded to by
the Canal Zone Fire Department. although
seven fires actually occurred, two of which
were of minor importance. The total esti-
mated value of Commi.sion and Panama
railroad property' involved was $180,000;
the damage was $110. The estimated value
of private property involved was 58,000, no
damage resulting.
DIVISION OF SCHOOLS.
The schools were closed during August.
Department of Sanitarion.
The number of laborers on the rolls on
August 1 was larger than at any previous
time. The following table shows the num-
ber of employes carried on the rolls during
the month of August for each year since
American occupation:
, f, e e .*'0 .IHH,, .v'.
9 4 ......... .. 190 .......... .L 43
1905 .......... .... 19.226 19 ... .... 44.225
1906.. ... .... 9 555 1900 ... .. . ... 49 020
Attention is called to the low death rate
of the total population, 16.20 per thousand.
The rate for August during previous years
was as follows:
Aug ust. Rat'. .4August Rare.
1905 ...- ... ... ,1 01 19. ..... ... ... 2665
1906 .... .. .. ..... 61 1 109. ...... ...... 16 20
1907 ....... .. .. 33 '5
The death rate for the State of Pennsyl-
vania for 1907 was 16.40. for New Jersey
17.10i, and for California 18.60.
The death rate among employes was lower
than was recorded during any previous Au-
gust, as evidenced by the following table:
August Role August. Rate
1904...... . .. 1393 19r07 . ... ........ 27.59
1905. .............. 19.97 1908.. ............. 11.39
1906. ............. 62.12 1 909. ..... .. .. .. 10.38
For special diseases the showing is equally
satisfactory. In 1904, for malaria, the ad-
mission rate was 138 per thousand; 1905,
489 per thou-and; 1906. 1,081 per thousand;
1907. 641 per thousand; 1908. 413 per thou-
sand, and 1909, 222 per thousand.
The typhoid fever rate among employes


[ii;
" i:p" :. .: ..


i;







THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III., No. 4.


during the month was 25 per 100,000. For
Pennsylvania, for the year 1906, the rate
was 56 per 100,000, and for 1907, 50 per
100,000. For the registration area of the
United States at large, the average rate for
1906 was 31 per 100,u00. and for 190,", 29 per
100,000. It will, therefore, be seen that
among employes in the Canal Zone the ty-
phoid fever rate is less than one-half of that
which prevailed in Pennsylvania, and con-
siderably less than the average for the reg-
istration area of the United States.
The best measure of the efficiency of a
force is its sick rate. This rate for August,
1909, and for previous years was as follows:
Aus'st Si. n. 'r li .lins.t 'et 5 .i t ) taj
1 ... . 1 ... . . .
19 ? ........ .. .... ?
The above table shows that as far as the
sick rate is concerned, the force i'as more
efficient during August, 1909, than in any
previous August.
No cases of yellow fever or bubonic plague
occurred on the Isthmus during the month.
Respectfully,
H. F. HoLGE S,

mailinigs of the Ceatneni helps .
The Crslo/al, which arrived at Cristobal
on September 9and departed for New Vork
on September 16, sailed on scheduled time.
The Atvcon, due to leave Cristobal for New
York on September 30, was late in leaving
New York on its present voyage and there-
fore will probably he a da3 or two late in
leaving the Isthmus on the return. It is
believed, however, that the cement ships
will both arrive and depart on time after the
next sailing of the .4-tcon. These ships are
now unloading at the extension of Dock 11
at Cristobal Point, and although the work is
still done by hand and tackle no difficulty
is experienced in unloading the cargo within
the six days scheduled for that purpose. Bet-
ter time will be made as soon as the me-
chanical unloaders are installed.
S ind and thu k for (.alul Lock nind %ipillwaiy.
Stone was quarried and crushed at Porto
Bello and delivered at Gatun and Mindi for
Atlantic Division construction up to Septem-
ber I in the following amounts:
C,..: i: l'Jd.
At Galun S[illw.a ... . :;
At '.di.un Lick'... ..... . .' l
At Mindi Ii "i;-
Total ........ .......... .... n 21"
The rock delivered at Mindi was used in
surfacing the highway between Gatun and
Mount Hope.
Up to September 1] and uas dredgedi at
Nombre de Dios and delivered in the follow-
ing amounts:
Cu.'. l. ',
Alt atun .ir Tlw.... ..... .... Ir. 356
At GCatuln l.ocks .... .......... .
At Iortl Bello .. . ... .
Total....... .... .. .. 9. .
More dirt has been fuutid in the Nr'mbre
de Dios sand than was expected and it will
probably be necessary to swash it. By ban
dling it with a hydraulic dredge while exca-
vating and loading it the washing will be
accomplished. A 12-inch dredge is on order
for this purpose.
An examination of the watershed of Cocoli
Lake is in progress by a committee appointed
for that purpose. The report will Ie con-
sidered in connection with the project to


provide an auxiliary water supply for the
territory now served by Rio Grande reser-
voir.
Dynamite Explosion at Colon.
An explosion of dynamite occurred at
about 3 a. m., Sunday, September 19, in a
three-story frame building at No. 234 Cash
Street, near Fourteenth Street, Colon, in-
juring six of the colored occupants, five men
and one woman, more or less seriously, and
doing considerable damage to the house.
The Cristobal police in conjunction with the
Colon authorities made an investigation of
the premises immediately afterwards, and
found eight sticks of dynamite of the kind
commonly used on the Canal works, which
had failed to explode. From the examina-
tion it appeared that five charges bad been
placed at short intervals in a section of the
second floor, four of which exploded. The
Colon police took charge of the unexploded
dynamite and are investigating the occur-
rence.

Atlantic Disilon Tug .Serlce.
During the month of August, the tug boat
.I/. E. Su/lly, which was employed nearly
the whole time in the Atlantic Division
sand and stone service, steamed 1,300 miles,
carried 1.100 passengers, and handled 42 tows
at sea, beside 19 tows between pier No. 1
and pier No. 13. The Lug boat Porto Bello
steamed 1,030 miles during the month, car-
ried 123 passengers, and handled 20 tows at
sea, besides 18 tows between pier No. I and
pier No. 13. The tug boat .Mariner was sta-
tioned at Nombre de Dios from August 1 to
21, and from the 22d to the 30th was in dry


dock undergoing repairs. She steamed a
total of 310 miles during August, and han-
dled two tows between pier No. 13, and
Nombre de Dios. The tows at sea represent
either hauls of sand from Nombre de Dios,
or crushed rock from Porto Bello, with the
return of barges to those points. The iA.
E. Scully, the most powerful tug boat of the
fleet frequently handles as many as three
full barges of rock or sand at one time.
With a tow of this size it usually takes about
four hours to accomplish the distance from
Porto Bello. The tug boats running to Porto
Bello and Nombre de Dios now leave from
Dock 13 only. No stop is made going or
returning at Dock 11, as formerly.
Tonnage Dues on Vessels From Panama.
The Presidential proclamations, exempting
from the payment of tonnage dues vessels
from certain ports in foreign countries,
among which are Colon, Panama and Bocas
del Toro, have been revoked by President
Taft in a proclamation, effective October 5,
1909. After that date tonnage dues will be
collected in accordance with Section 36 of
the new tariff law, which reads in part as
follows:
That a tonnage duty of two cents per ton, not to
exceed in the aggregate ten cents per ton in any one
year. is hereby imposed at each entry on all vessels
which shall be entered in any port of the Unitld
States from any foreign port or place in North Amer-
ica. Central America, the West India Islands. the
Bahama Islands. the Bermuda Islands, or the oastof
South America bordering on the Caribbean Sea, or
Newfoundland and a duty of six cents per ton, not
to exceed thirty cents per Ion per annum, is hereby
imposed at each entry on all vessels which shall be
entered in an, port of the United States from any
other foreign port not, however, to include vessels in
distress or not engaged in trade


LARGEST LABOR FORCE SINCE BEGINNING OF WORK.
Neatly 34,000 Employes on the Cnnal WVork on July 28, 1909-Statement of Force and
Quarters for August.
In the report of the Chief Quartermaster for Mlay, 1909, attention was called to the fact
that the combined force actually at work for the Commission and the Panama Railroad
Company on April 28, 1909, was the largest up to that date in the history of Canal con-
struction, under either American or French administration. The number of men actually
at work on that day was 33.369, the force of the Commission alone having been 26,835.
These figures were exceeded on July 28, when the force of the Commission was 26,938, and
of the Panama railroad and commissary 6,963, making a -total of 33,901. The combined
force at work oil August 25, about one month later, was less by only 159.
The report of the Chief Quartermaster for the month of August shows that the number of
Isthmian Canal Commission employes actually at work on August 25, was 26,519, of whom
4,070 were "gold" employes, and the remainder were on the "silver" or labor roll. The
Panama railroad force was 6,413. and the Panama railroad commissary force numbered
810. Thus the total number of persons at work on the Canal and railroad on the 25th
day of August was 33,742. During August 213 people were added to the "gold" roll and
there were 214 separations, the net decrease in the force being 1.
The number of family quarters occupied by "gold" employes was 1,454, and the oc-
cupants numbered 4,335; bachelor quarters b% "gold" employes, 2,039, and the occupants
numbered 3,236, of whom 104 were women. The family quarters occupied by West Indiana
numbered 965, and the occupants 3.299; bachelor quarters, 244; number of occupants, 4,506.
The family quarters occupied by European laborers numbered 279, and the occupants 857;
bachelor quarters, 126; number of occupants 4,047.
A statement of the force actually at work on August 25, 1909, follows:

Artisans. I European West Indian
Laborer s. Laborers.
-6
.PARTPI, NT "' .5 E. Total 9 Grand
-_ =M NT eSrilr. Total.
n= 4.p,,p4,N s 4. 4. 1 = 4 a t,

C r M 0
7 7- u -
Consti ct'n aivd Ei]'r ng 2 :2.' 2. 4Q 339 835 1 990 3.131 499 868 2.676 4,713 14 18.228 3.034 21.262
Civil Adinitistr tion I5. 2 1 12 ...... .. ...... ...... 172 282 454
San . . 9( .1 ... .... 6 ...... 2A6 in 9 l 377 1.278
Ouarlerni lEr's ..... 1 4 7 44 164 165 315 31 7 4 792 20 2584 216 2.800
Subh-istence..... .. 54' 1 2 ..... ................ ..... .. 551 57 608
Disbnrsenie.ts . .. . .... .. ..... .... ...... .. ........ 8 25 33
Exaniminar n of Accoiw,' 5. ..................................... 5 79 84
To ils. ............ .179261'S6 39 1.005 2 12 3.44 53n 88 2.681 5.793 344 22449 4.070 26,519
Panama railroad force. 6.413 Pan ima r ilrond commissary force, Si0







September 22, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


BEWARE OF THE FLY.
Public Warned of This Menace to Health-
How to Guard Against It.
The Department of Sanitation has issued in
pamphlet form, in English and Spanish, the
following warning against the house fly:
This pamphlet has been prepared with the
object of callingattention to the filthy habits
of house flies, and also to the great danger
to the public health when they are per-
mitted to swarm in and about dwellings.
Heretofore we have looked upon the fly
as a harmless insect, but after investigating
its habits and breeding places we have been
obliged to change our ideas. A single fly
lays from 120 to 140 eggs at a time, and it
is only a matter of from seven to ten days
from the eggto the adult fly. The favorite
breeding places are in and about stables,
manure piles, decaying vegetable and ani-
mal matter, and filth of all kinds.
Under the microscope the legs of the fly
are seen to be covered with thin bristles,
the foot being like a pair of pincers. Should
you stick astiff-bristled brush or broom into
a dirt heap you would do just what the fly
does when it alights on the refuse pile.
When you lift the broom someof the refuse
comes with it. When a fly leaves a refuse
pile the filth sticks to its feet and legs, and
wherever it walks a trail of germs is left
behind.
A campaign of extermination against the
house fly is being carried on in all civilized
countries, for where the fly was once thought
to be a scavenger it is now known to be a
carrier of disease, and dangerous to the
public welfare. Bred in garbage and filth,
it drinks from cesspools and eats in pit-
closets The fly has been proved time and
again to be a germ carrier. It brings typhoid
fever, dysentery, tuberculosis, and other
diseases into our homes Coming direct
from the filth pile, it alights on the lips of
an infant, settles on its nursing bottle, or
on exposed food.
The work of controlling malaria and ex-
terminating yellow fever was accomplished
by doing away with the breeding places of
the mosquito. The same can and should be
done with the fly, even though the work is
more difficult.
Ithas been truly stated that the house fly
is the greatest menace to the public health
that exists in the insect world, not except.
ing mosquitoes, for mosquitoes do harm only
when infected and must derivetheir specific
infection from the human being himself;
but the fly is a direct carrier of disease, as it
gpntaminates food and drink by contact.
The remedy lies in cleanliness first, and
screening next. Screen your doors and
windows, especially those in the kitchen
and dining room. with wire netting, which
is the more serviceable and less expensive
in the long run. Keep the flies out of your
house; keep your garbage cans effectively
covered; scrub the floors and walls, es-
pecially those of the kitchen and dining
room, at least twice every week, using hot
water or some disinfectant, such as chloride
of lime or coaloil. Cold water, unless com-n
bined with a disinfectant, will not be effec-
tive, as without hard labor and scrubbing it
does not remove grease and other mailer
upon which flies feed.
Keep flies away from your children and
Eff your food and drink. Do not buy cooked
Mfod or sweets exposed for sale unscreened.
The. Sanitary Department will make re-


movable screens to fit any window or door
for any house for a nominal sum upon
application to the Health Officer. If there
is a nuisance in your neighborhood notify
any sanitary inspector, and demand that it
be abated

OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.

Empire Shops Transferred to Central DitI-
-ion.
CULEBRA. C. Z September 17. 1909.
CrncULAR No 183-M:
in order to promote economy. effective October I
1909 the repair of steam shovels and manufacture
and repair of steam shovel partsat Empireshops will
be transferred from the Mechanical Division to the
Central Division. This includes transfer of shops
necessary for this work and of the organization
which has been performing it.
Repairs of steam shovels for the Atlantic and Pa
cific Divisions and Panama railroad at present made
by the Mechanical Division at the Empire shops,
will hereafter be performed at the Empire shops by
the Central Division. H. F. HOOGES.
Acting Chairman and Chi/t EngMineer.

Chief Engineer Panama Railroad.
PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY.
COLON. R. P.. September 21. 1909
CiRCrULAR 186-
Effective this date. the resignation of Mr. Ralph
Budd. as Chief Engineer has been accepted. Mr
Frederick Mears is placed in temporary charge of the
engineering department
HrAM J. SLIFER. Genera' ltanIagee.

Supplies for Canal Work.
The following steamers arrived at the ports of Cris-
tobal. Colon and Balboa during the week ended
September 18, with supplies for the Isthmian Canal
Commission:
Sarnma, September 14. from New York. with 196
barrels insulators for Pedro Miguel and Miraflores
Locks: 15 hand cars and 3.000 gallons air cylinder oil.
for stock.
.teras. September 16. from New Orleans. with
1,000 feet V. P. lumber for car repairs- 14.000 feet
V. P. lumber for sand whairf Balboa. 12.830 feet V. P
lumber for sway braces, Culebra
Advance, September 17. from New York. with 450
castings For car repairs. 16 tons of machinery for Ga.
tun cahleways: 4 churn drills, 21) tons crane parts for
Pacific Division. 2.500 bundles Lie plates for stock.
1 gasoline motor car for Atlantic Division: I horizon-
tal boring and drilling machine for Cristobal shops.
59.600 cspresa cove lumber for Gatun Locks: and a
miscellaneous cargo aggregating 3.80') packages
weighing 550 Ions
Tnricvor. September 18. at Balboa. with 35 ).0K.)
feet Douglas fir lumber for stock, all divisions.

The following vessels arrived at or departed from
the port of Balboa during the week ended September
17-
Arrivals-September I 1. Manai'. from intermediate
ports. September 14. Aria, from Guayaquil, and
Pennsylvania from San Francisco: September 16.
Laiian from South ports, and Chrriqui. from inter-
mediate ports. Departures-September 12, Guste-
mna.a. for South ports. September 14. San .lose. for
San Francisco. September 15. Manabw, for inter-
mediate ports.

Proposals for 10,000 Pounds Charcoal,
Sealed bids will be received at the office of the
Depot Quartermaster. Mount Hope. C. Z up lo 2
p. m.. September 29. 1909. when they will be publicly
opened, for 10 000pounds of charcoal to be made from
mangle wood or equal and to be first class in every
respect. Delivery must be made in one lot within
thirty days after award is made. Delivery will beac-
cepted freeon board cars at any point on the Panama
railroad. and charcoal will be weighed upon receipt
at Mount Hope Depot Material must be delivered in
bags. of which an equal number will be returned to
the contractor. The right is reserved to reject an.t
and all bids. C. NiXON
Purchasing gecnlon the Isthmu s.

Proposals for Building.
Contract building. Sealed proposals, for labor only,
will be received at the office ofthe Constructin QOuar.
termaster. Culebra. until 3 p. m., September 24., 19).
and then opened, for the erection by contract of a
recreation building at Corozal. Plans and specifica-
tions can be obtained from the Constructing Quar.
termaster by making a deposit of $5. Fifty dollars
must be deposited with the proposal and $200 when
the contract is signed. R. E. WOOD.
,ctiMg Ciu4f Quartermastrr.


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.
Activities of the Young Men's Christiann A.-
socil ion.
CULEBRA.
Fifteen new books of fiction were received last week
and placed in the circulating library. Within a few
minutes after they had been catalogued and put on the
shelves all the books were in the hands of readers.
New supplies have been received for the gymna-
slum. including solley-balls handballs and handball
gloves.
The Empire bowling team will play a game in the
tournament series at Culebra.on Wednesday evening
September 23.
In spite of a steady rain during the time of the
concert a fair sized audience heard the Hearons Sis-
ters on the night of September 13. Another concert
will be given on Friday night. September 24 when
an entirely new program will be presented.
EMPIRE.
A match was played between the first and second
bowline tea-mt on Fnd'y night the second team
winning three straight.
A camera club dark room has been authorized and
construction will begin at once and be pushed to rapid
completion. Any member of the Empire Young
Men Christian Association is eligible to member
ship in thecamera club upon the payment of one dol-
lar initiation fee and twenty-five cents monthly dues.
These funds will be used to promote the interests of
amateur photography
A large and enthusIasuc audience greeted the
Hearons Sister' last Thurqda,. They will fill a
return engagement on Thursday of this week.
A smoker has been planned for Monday evening
September 2' All members of the association are
invited.
GORGONA.
A large audience gathered for the Hearons Sisters
concert on Tuesday. September 14 and all were well
pleased A return engagemeul by this company will
be given on Wednesday evening of this week.
On Sunday evening. September 26 in place of the
regular monthly song serviceand address a concert
of sacred music will be given by the Hearons Sisters
The public is cordially invited. No admission fee
will be charged The program will begin at 9 15
o'clock.
CRISTOBAL.
On Tuesday. September 28 the P R. R orchestra
will give an open house concert to which the public
is cordially invited.
Mr. T. E W. Oliphant hab been appointed librarian
and will be on duty each evening. Mr. Dibrell will
thus be relieved of the library work and will give his
evenings to btheduties of office secretary.
The bowling tournament gimes list Saturday night
resulted as follows
Cruito'al. Ftr:t. Second Thied Total.
Bullard Icaptain). lib 161) 154 500
Louch ............... 156 158 166 480
Strong ............. t,9 19f1 191 550
Collin .......... 166 17 ...
Barlow ............... ... ... 57 4"3
arle ............... 201 198 139 5.M
Total .......... 8SO S33 807 2 5?0


C"-*fona.


tis. ......... .... 157
King ....... ...... 175
H aes .............. 151
McConaughey.......
Buchanan 194
Humphrey (capLain) 157
Total..... ........ 834


Misdi reeled Letters.
DivisioN OF Posrs. CUSTOMS AND REVENUES.
ANCON C. Z September 2?. 1909.
The following insufficiently addressed letters.
origin:ring in the United States and its possessions.
have been received in the office of the Director of
Posts. and may be secured upon request of the
addressee
Ames. L Hebmeyer, E. H.
Amlaw Bert liing Miss Eugenie
Behia Herman McClean F R
Duncan. alter E. Piffer. Mrs Ed.
Fana. Sergeant Prachl Charles
Farrell Ma'ter Arthur Richardsohu Bob
Fonseca Ruben Stokoe,. Mr
Grosvenor Mrs F S. Swain Llewellyn
Han.on. Fred H. Tubert. Mrs. L.
Henderson. Mrs Sarah Withrow R E.
Hnrdin Zamadar. Ahemad Ally
LOST-On September 8 or 9 in Galun a gold cuff
button, set with small diamond Finder return to
G. C Hertz. Galun and receive reward.

LOST-Canal Medal No 2152 Finder will please
leave it at the V M C. A. in Cristobal.


I


O








32 THE CANAL RECORD


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

Regulations Regarding Limit on U e of Com-
mi- vary Bi.okA.
The hours dunni which comtmis-iri!es;ire open are
as follows
Cristobal and Culebra 8a min to 12 31 p. m 2 p.m.
to 7 p. min
All other commisanrs., 8 .. m. nto p. m : 3 p. m.
to7p m _
Limit on Ise of Commi-sary Books.
CRalITORBL C Z September II. 1909
CIRCt:LAR No. 5.
The time during which commissary books maa. be
u-ed after the expiration of the sity da limit will be
extended Ior another sixtI day- if request is mude
and hooks forwarded to this office. Any commissary
coupon books not used within the one hundred and
twenty dajs thus rroided will not be honored b, the
Commiss ry Department nor will it be extended a
second time It will be necessary for owners of such
books to apply to the local auditor of the Panmina
Railroad Company Colon for refund
Request for the extension of commissar) coupon
books in accordance with the above should be ad-
dressed. together with books to Maj Eugene T. Wil-
son Subsistence Officer Cnstobal. under registered
co3er JOsN BURKE: Mlanage'r.
Approved" F 0 Wa rtOCK.
A. 'tlin S.tsil.'efrnce Ojr':

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning September lh
FRESH MEATS.
Price.
M ution-Stewing ... ................... per Ib 7
Shoulder neck trimmed off.
k4 pounds and oserl .... ..... per lb 10
Entire forequairter i not trim-
medi I l pounds and over ....per Ilb 9
Leg 18 to 10 pounds ......... oer Ib 19
Ste-k ...... ..... ..... ... . per Ib 20
Short-cut chops ... .. .......Der lb 22
Lambh-Stewin.. .. . .............per Ib 7
Fntire forcqu.irter neck trimmed
off . ......oer Ib 10
Leg 16 to 3 pounds .. .... er 1b 27
Cnops ..... ... .... ... oer lb '9
Veal-Str ving ..................... oer lb 10
Shoulder for roslt I- n to under
4 Ibsi ...... ... .... ner Ib 15
Loin for roa'ling.. . ..... er Ib 19
Chops ......... per lb 20
Cutlet ..... per lb ;I
Pork cuts ................ per Ib 22
Beef-Suet .. .. .. ...... .... per lb 4
Soup . ... .. .... ....per lb 6
Stew . ... .... .... ... ......... per lb 10
Corned .. ... ... ...... per lb.. 12 14 16
Chuck rost ..................... per Ib 14
Pot rmoni ... ............per Ib 16
Rih-ro.ist secondd c'llt not under
3; pounds .. ... ... .. Der lb 19
Rib-roast first cut tnot under 3
pound's I ... . ........per lb 21
Sirloin roast...... ........... .. .........per lb 22
Rump roast .. . ...... ... ...per lb 22
Porterhouse roa l ......... ........ per th 22
Ste-ak Chuck . ... ...... .... per lb 15
Round .... .... .. ... .. per hl 16
Rib .... . .... per lb 21
Sirloin ........ ............. per Ib 22
Porterhouse ................per Lb 23
Rum p .................... .....per lb 22
Tenderloin ................ per lb 27
MISCELLANEOUS.
L..er.- Beef. .. .... .. .. ..... ...... ... per lb I ..1
Calf ... ..... .. ......... each 65
Shad roes .. ....... .. ... .. ....... cpair 411
Sausage-Pork ........ .............per lb 17
Bologna ..... . ............... ..per lb 17
Frankfurtel . . ...... .... ...per lb 17
Leberwurst ............. .. per lb I?
Sweet bread--Veal ...... .................. per lb 1 20
Sweet hread-Beef ...... .................. .per lb 30
Eggs fresh .... ..... ............ . dozen .
Bluefish ...... ... . .. .......... ... per lb 15
POULTRY AND GAME.
Chickens-Fancy Roasting.large . each I SOi
medium.. .... each 1 30
Fowls. .... ................... ....... each 90. 1.00
Ducks, fatted ... ........... . ......... .. each I 3n
medium weight ... ............. ..each 90
Broilers ...... ...... ..... ... .. .. .... each 75
turkeys ... ........... ............. .......... per lb 30
Squabs ........................... ................... each 3.S
Canons . ........... ..... ...............each 2 Srf
Geese, fatted, about 10 pounds......... ....each 2.00
12 pounds .... ......... each 2 3,0
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.
Bacon-Breakfast. whole piece.............. per Ib 927
Breakfast. sliced. ...... ...... .per lh f
Ham-Sugar-cured. sliced ..............per lb 425
One-half. for boiling ... ..... ...per lb 21
Westphalia .. . . .............per lb 45
Hocks ....................... ..... ....per Ib 18
Sugar cured .....................per Ib 20
Beef. salt. family................ .........................per Ib 10
Pork. salt......................... .. .................pet lb 15


Price
Ham boiled........ .. ............ .. per Ib 28
Ox toncues. ............. .. ..... ...... .. ..each I 00
Pigs ieet ... .... .. .............. ..per Ib 14
tongues .... ............... ....... per lb 16
DAIRY PRODUCTS.
Butler-Prints, prime quality ......... per lb T42
Cheese-Roquefort ...... .... .............per Ilb 45
Philadelphia Cream ..............each 20
Young America......... ... .......per 1h 22
Swiss ... ............ ............ per lb. 31
Fdam .......................................each 1.05
Camembert.............................. oer lb 28
Neuchatel .... ...... ........... each 6
Goudsa........... ........................ per Ib 34
Parmesan. ......... ..............bottle 20
French cheese in tins-Camembert. Brie.
Neufchslel ....... .. .. .. .. .... I-lb tin 20
M ilk. Briarcliff ............. ........... ......bottle **25
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS
Celery ........... . .........per hd 10
Lettuce .. ....... .. ... ...... ... ... per lb tl5
Potatoes white, old ......... ..... ..per hlb 3W
sweet ... ..............................per Ilb 2%
Onions ... .................... .... ...... per Ib 3
Soiuash Hubbard ............. .......... .per lh 5
Vams .. ............... ...... ....... .. .. .pei lb 3
Turnips.... . ........ .............. per lb 3,%
Carrots............ ....... ....... ..... . .. .. per Ib *4
Beets ............. .... .... ............ per Ib 5
Polatoe-. new ............ ...per lb 3%
Cucumbers . .... per lb 4
Tomatoes . ............. .......... per Ib 5
Lemons ... ......... ... .. ... . dozen 24
Grapes . ..... ................... .per lb 10
Limes ..... ...................... per 10i0 80
Watermelons .......... ............ each 40
Peaches ... .... ........... .. ....per Ib 8
Bluebernes ........ . ...... ..........box 16
Cabbage ..... ....... ........ ............per lb 4%
Pears ..... .... ......** ** **per lb 8
apples ..... ...... .... ........ per lb 6
Oranges... ........................... dozen 12
Grapefruit .... .......................... ... each 4
Plums .. .... .... .. ......... .......... per lb 12

'Indicates reduLtion from last list
"'Indicates 5 cents allowr-d for return of bottle.
f Indicates advance on I s't list
(Sold onlv from Commissarie- no orders taken for
delivery
iSc.ld oulh from Cold Sturn.ge ind not from Com-
missaries
Rainfall, September I to IN, 1009, Inclusive.
iMIDNIC.ET TO MIDNICi T Ir


E.
STArTON-S c '

i F.

/s.'a/l l Drumi'w'n-
Cri global ............ .. 2.36 12 13 64
Brazos Brook.. ........... ....... 1.45 7 7.65
Gatun ... .. ....... . ... 2 88 10 8 94
Bohio .. ................. 1 53 13 7.18
Centru, Diz'ulrow-
Tabernilla ........................ 2 54 11 8 16
San Pablo.. . .. ...... 2 70 11 820
Gorcona ........... ............ 1 41 2 e6 55
Gam boa ... .... .... ..... 44 7 6 49
F.m pire ........ ........ .. ...... 1.7i 13 58
Camacho .... .... .. ..... 1 8 14 25
Culebr.a ....... .... ..... 1 66 13 6 3
ARufAc Dirzun- -
Rio Grande ........ .... ... .... 1 18 7 32
Pedro Miguel .... ..... ..... ..I 1.75 14 667
Balboa ..... ........... ....... 85 14 3 33
Ancon.. ............. .... 92 18 2.73
Al. a ntu ..-
Porto Bello. ....... ... . .. 2.16 13 8.54
Nomhrede Dios, (Sept. I to 11) I 15 7 4 28
ppe Cha gres-
El Vigia .................... .... 2 35 5 7 51
Alhaiuela ................... 1 71 13 5 58

Tide Table.
The following table shows thetimeof high
and low tides at Panama for the week end-


'ol. IlI., No. 4.


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailingsof the Pan
ama Railroad SteamshipCompany. of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company, f the Hamburg-American
Line. and of the United Fruit Company's Line. the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:
NEW YORK TO COLON.
Ancon ..................P. R. R.Thursday .....Sept 16
Oruba..................R.-M...Saturday ......Sept. 18
Colon...... ............P.'R. R.Tuesday.......Sept. 21
Pnuz Aug. Wilhelm..H -A ..Saturday... ..Sept. 25
Panama...... ... .....P. R. R.Monday....... Sept. 27
Cristobal... ... .... .. P. R. R.Thursday......Sept. 30
Magdalena ............ R.-M .Saturday ......Oct 2
Advance............ P. R. R.Saturday ......Oct. 2
Alliance ........ .. P R. R Friday......... Oct. 8
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A...Saturday.......Oct. 9
Colon..................P R R Thursday......Oct. 14
Ancon.............. ...P R. R.Friday.........Oct. 15 -
Clyde............ ... .R -M Saturday ......Oct 16
Panama.... ... ....P.R R Wednesday....Oct. 20
Prinz Aug Wilhelm ..H.-A...Saturday.......Oct. 23
Advance ........ ....P.R R Tuesday........Oct. 26
Thames.. ............. R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 30
Prinz Joachim.........H -A ..Saturday......Nov. 6
Atrato ...............R.-M .Saturday...... Nov. 13
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...R.-A...Saturday ......Nov. 20
Tagus..... ........... R.-M.. Saturday ......Nov. 27
Prinz Joachim.........H -A...Salurday........Dec. 4
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Crisatobal
should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
office. room 8 building No. I Cristobal. for customs
line permits which are necessary to obtain admit-
lance beyond waiting room on pier II.
All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and
Rojal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO NEW YORK.
Magdalena ........... R.-M. Wednesday. ..Sept.22
Allianca .... .........P. R. R.Monday... ....Sept. 27
Ancon ......... ... ...P. R R Thursday......Sept. 30
Colon................. P. R. R Saturday.......Oct. 2
Cl).de ..... ........... R.-M... Wednesday .Oct 6
Panama....... .....P. R. R.Friday ......Oct. 8
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H -A.. Tuesday.......Oct. 12
Advance ............ .... P R. R.Thurstay ......Oc 14
Crnslobsil.... .... .P. P. R.R Friday......... Jet. 15
Alliance ....... ......P. R. R.Wednesday ....Oct. 20
Thames............. ..R M. .Wednesday....Oct. 20
Colon ...... .........P Rt R Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Prinaz Joachim .. .... H -A ..Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Ancon ... ........ P R R Thursday......Oct. 28
Panama.. ..... ...... P. R. R.Monday.......Nov. 1
Advance......... ..... P R. R Saturday...... Nov. 6
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm ..H -A Tuesday........Nov. 9
Prinz Joachim.r.... H -A.. .Tuesday....... Nov. 23
Print Aug. Wilhelm H A Tuesday .......Dec. 7
NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Turrialba .... ....... U.F.C..Saturday......Sept. 18
Ahangarez.. ..........U P.C Saturday......Sept. 25
COLON TO KNEW ORLEANS.
Turrialba.......... ... F.C Tuesday.......Sept.28
Abangarer ............ U F C Tuesday.......Oct 5
COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.
Oruba ......... .....R -M ..Tuesday.......Sept. 28
Sailings of the French line iCie. G4nerale Trans-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports Martinique and
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows' Tamwpuan [or New Orleans. via Kingston.
Ja on or about October 2.
The steamers Datid of the National Navigation
Company. and the Taboga ni the Pacific Steam Navi-
gatian Company leave Panama. for David. province
of Chiriqui. and intermediate points. the first and
third weeks of each month.

Stages of the Chagrea.
Maximum height of Chagres River above
mean sea level for the week ending midnight
Saturday, September 18, 1909:


ing Seplember .,, 1 9, (/75t meridian time): SArioNs.

DATE High Low HighI Low. High. -

SM IA M. A M P M. P.M. a 0 U
Sept. 23. ...... ... 3.01 858 3.44 9.45
Sept 24............. 1008 4.56 11.03
ept. 25 .. .. .. 5 33 11.30 608 ........ Height of low water
P.M. above sen-level. ft.. 125 92 46 1 0 0
Sept. 26 12.19 643 12.46 7.13 ........ Maximum h.iAght ab.
Sept. 27 .. 1.25 7 43 1.50 8.08 mean sea-level feel .
SepL. 2S ... 18 936 2 43 58 ... ... Sunday Sept 12 19.7 96 0 54.5 149 8.0 7.2
Sepi 29 .. 306 923 330 I 9.44 ... Monday. Sept. 13 140 4 O1u 7 54 9 10.9 6.9 6.1
p I Tuesday. Sept 14. 141.4 103 2 61 6 204 11.1 9.6
Wed esday. Sept. 15 132.6 98.5 56 7 18.7 11.7 9.8
The variation of high and low tide at Cris- Thursday. Sept 16 128 2 94.8 50 I1 146 11.0 9.2
Si o h a a t t f t Friday. Sept. 17.. 127.6 94 1 49.3 110 84 6.9
tobal is so slight that a tide table for the Saturday. Sept..18. 127.8 94.2 49.5 8.8 5.8 4.7
Atlantic side is not necessary,














CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1909. No. 5.


The Canal Record
Published weekly under the authority and supervision
Of the Ishmian Canal Commission.

The Canal Record is issued.re aro charge. one copy
eAck, toall employes at the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and bak number can be ablained from
the news stands of the Panama Radroad Company for
'oe cents each.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Aneon, Candal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Partial Collapse of a Cableway Tower at Ga-

The lower portion of one of the head tow-
ers of the lock cablewaysat the Gatun han-
dling plant collapsed on the afternoon of Fri-
day, September 24. The tower was being
moved along the tracks by its own power at
the time. There were several men at wotk
on various parts of the structure, none of
whom was injured. The portion that col-
lapsed was that between .the operating plat-
form and the concrete counterweight. The
tower settled toward the west, away from
the lock site, until the operating platform
rested on the concrete counterweight. The
members that failed were designed for ten-
sion only and were evidently brought in
compression while the tower was being
moved.
Both the lock and unloading cableways
were designed and built by contract under a
guarantee of satisfactory performance anti
none of the cableways at the Gatun handling
plant has been accepted by the Isthmian Ca-
nal Commission. The repairs to this tower,
and the reinforcement of all the other tow-
ers necessary to prevent similar accidents
can be made in a few weeks, the damage and
weakness being confined to structural work
in the lower part of the towers.
A cable message has been sent to the con-
tractor informing him of the accident and of
the Commission's intention to proceed with
the repairs. The contractor will have the
privilege of sending a representative to the
Isthmus while repairs are being made.
This accident will not interfere materially
with the work of placing concrete in the
Gatun Locks. There are three duplex ca-
bleways still available for work and they
will be temporarily strengthened with tim-
ber struts within a few days so that they will
be safe to use. The contractor is expected
to make the permanent repairs.
Cables for Lidgerwood Unloaderes.
A committee has been appointed to sum-
marize the results of tests of cables used on
I Idgerwood unloading machines, and to pre-
pare specifications in accordance with its
x x. .


findings. The tests have extended over a
period of 18 months and a large amount of
data has been procured that will be of value
in the purchase of cable. The representa-
tives of a number of wire rope manufacturers
spent some time on the Isthmus and all of
them state that the service here is as hard if
not harder than any that their cables hate
ever been subjected to. The tests were of a
practical nature, the tien on the unloaders
being required to keep a record of the work
done by the various cables until they broke.
The rope of three companies was found to
have a decided superiority over all others,
and that of one company is superior for spli-
cing purposes. The cables used on the Lidg-
erwood unloaders are 1,1/ inches in diam-
eter and 1,100) feet long. They cost from 36
to 46 cents per foot.
Light- in Colon and Cristobal.
The Commission will assume control of
the lighting of Colon and Cristobal on Octo-
ber 1. A valueof $11,664.73 has been placed
on the pole lines and fixtures to be taken
over from the Panama railroad. For the
present current will be furnished by the cold
storage plant, but as soon as cscle changers
have been installed current will be furnished
from the power plant at Gatun Locks.
Floor of Gatun Locks.
The plau adopted for the floor of the up-
per locks at Gatun has been amended so far
as concerns the part below the intermediate
gate sill. The report of the board, as ap-
proved by the Chief Engineer and published
in THE CANAL. RECORD, July 14. 1909, said:
Below the mitermediude gnte sill the stratum overly-
ing the soft sandstone is of sufficient thickness, and
soundnei' to be trenched for the culverts the floor
between the culvert trenches to be male relatively
thin. For this portion of the floor the Bo-rd recom-
miends that the culverts be placed in trenches under
the walls and floor, and that the fluor between the
culverts be made 3 feet thick, all tobeauchored to the
underlying material with rails penetrating not more
than 10 feet. It is the intention that the penetration
of these anchoring rails shall be such that the hold
developed in the stone will be approximately equal
to that developed in the concrete of the floor latter
being increased by transverse bolts or otherwise.
The plan as changed is to drain the back
of the lock walls, below the intermediate
sill. There will then be no reason to fear
that an upward pressure will develop under
the lower portion of the floor. The anchors
recommended in the report will, therefore,
not be placed.
Economy in Use of Lubricnting Oils.
The expert on lubricating oils maintained
on the Isthmus by the contractor who is
supplying engine, valve, and car oils, has
recommended that oil supply cans on loco-
motives be of uniform size, of standard and
substantial make, and of two-gallon capacity.
In order clearly to distinguish the kind of
oil each can contains, a brass plate will be
attached to it bearing in stencil the name of
the oil. Supply cans now in use on loco-


motives will be repaired where necessary,
and to the future repairs will be made to
cans as soon as the necessity develops.

New Buildings and Changes.
Plans have been prepared at the office of
the Constructing Quartermaster for a dispen-
sary and sick camp at Nombre de Dios, the
site of the sand deposits of the Atlantic
Division. The building will be two stories
in height, 31 feet long by 39 feet wide, and
will be located about 20 feet distant from
the type-5 bachelor quarters completed a
short time ago. The first story will contain
the dispensary, office, and a ward, while the
upper story will contain an additional ward
and be provided with sleeping quarters for
the physician in charge. One of the wards
will be for white employes, and the other for
colored, each having space for four or five
beds. There will be a toilet, lavatory and
shower on each floor.
House No. 141, located below the hospi-
tal road, about 100 yards distant from the
laundry at Ancon, has been converted into
quarters for one family) by changing the in-
terior arrangement and making a 6-foot ex-
tension to the rear. The building was at
one time used as a lield office by the munici-
pal engineering forces.
Construction at the new Gamboa engine
yard is well advanced, and the entire work
will be completed by the contractor within
the next few days.
The second story of the Commission hotel
at East Balboa is being converted into a ball
for lodge and social purposes for the em-
ployes at that point.
Plans have been made for a new yard
office to be built on the west bank of the
Canal, a short distance from the Gamboa
bridge.
A commissary has been authorized for
Corozal, and plans for the building will be
ready shortly.
New Type of Steam Shovel.
A type No. I full circle swing steam shovel
has been received by the Pacific Division,
and as soon as it is set up at the Empire
shops it will be used in the work of excava-
ting the trenches for the culvert system at
the Pedro Miguel Locks. It was manufac-
tured by the Thew Automatic Shovel Com-
pany of Lorain, 0., and in general appear-
ance resembles a locomotive crane, for which
it can be used. It can also be used for
handling clam-shell buckets when equipped
with a special boom with a derricking mo-
tion. It is mounted on car wheels and is
self-propelling, although traction wheels
can be used when desired. The machinery
is so arranged that the operator can do his
own firing, provided only a limited output
is required.
The machine is equipped with a dipper of
one cubic yard capacity, and the hoisting,








THE CANAL RECORD


VoL III., No. 5.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
(Cortlinued.1


swinging and crowding motions are con
trolled by separate horizontal engines of the
double reversing type. The weight is ap-
proximately 50,0010 pounds. The clearance
length of boom detached is 16 feet; clear-
ance height of house, 13 feet 4 inches; clear-
ance width of house, 8 feet 10 inches; clear-
ance swing of rear end, 10 feet 6 inches; clear-
ance swing of boom, 20 feet, 6 inches; clear-
ance lift for dipper, II feet. The radius of
cut at the height of 9 feet is 23 feet 6 inches;
radius of cut at floor level, 15 feet; length
of crowding motion. 7 feet. The swinging
and crowding motions are operated by 5x6-
inch engines. The boiler is of the vertical
tubular type, with dimensions of 45 by 84
inches. The working steam pressure is from
80 to 100 pounds, and the rated capacity of
the shovel is from 511 to 60 cubic yards per
hour .
Galun Dam and Spillway.
The surface of the water in the hydraulic
fill at Gatun Dam was raised three feet on
August 23, and three feet more on Septem-
ber 8. During part of the month of August
only one of the 20-inch suction dredges was
working on the fill, one of them being at
Mount Hope marine shops for repairs, and
the other on its way from a position north of
the Dam to its present position south of the
dam.
The placing of dry fill on the toes of the
dam with miscellaneous spoil from Mindi,
Bohio, Buena Vista, and rock from Culebra
Cut, continues. A trestle is being driven on
the 30-foot contour at the south end of the
spillway and will be continued across the
West Diversion. When thediversion is closed
and the water of the Chagres is allowed to
run through the spillway, a big durup will
be opened on the south, or upstream toe of
the dam, west of the diversion In addition
to spoil from nearbN work, miscellaneous
excavation will be taken from Culebra Cut,
and it is expected that as many as twelve
trains will be run daily from Bas Obispo
to Gatun, a distance of 24 miles.
In August 5.496 cubic yards of concrete
were laid in the spillway and the work is
continuing at the rate of about 2011 cubic
yards a day. The building of the walls con-
tinues, and the floor is practical. completed
both north and south of the site of the con-
crete dam. Excavation is in progress pre-
paring the rock in the entrance to the spill-
way for the concrete facing, and the work
of placing the facing is well advanced.

Rock Crushing Operationm at Porto Bello.
Of the seven steam shovels stationed at
Porto Bello in connection with rock crush-
ing operations, two are employed on pre-
liminary work and two in delivering rock to
the crushers. The completion of the stor-
age bin for crushed rock has enabled the
force to keep well ahead of the stone trans-
portation, as the capacity of the bin is 2,400
cubic yards, or a quantity sufficient to load
six barges. For a time after the plant was
started, it was necessary to convey the rock
directly from the crushers into the barges,
but they are now loaded from the bin, and
the crushers keep steadily at work until the
storage space is filled. The fifth and sixth
No. 6 crushers are being installed and will
be used as reserve in case one or more of


the other machines become disabled. These
machines will increase the total to two No.
9, and six No. 6 crushers.
The work of stripping rock in the quarry
has been greatly facilitated by the installa-
tion of a new duplex compound direct-con-
nected hydraulic pump, with air pump and
jet condenser, made by the Canton-Hughes
Pump Company of Canton, 0. This pump
has a 16-inch stroke, with a high pressure
cylinder 28 inches in diameter, and a low
pressure cylinder 13?' inches in diameter.
It is provided with a 14-inch suction and a
10-inch discharge, and is capable of dis-
charging 1,500 gallons of water per minute,
against a pressure of 250 pounds tothe square
inch. A Smith-Vaile Underwriters fire pump,
with same capacity operating against a pres-
sure of 175 pounds to the square inch, has
been used in the hydraulic operations at the
quarry heretofore.
The installation of two additional 191 -h. p.
Sterling boilers has been completed, increas-
ing the total boiler house equipment to eight
boilers. A new300-h. p. Ball drivingengine,
a duplicate of the one installed when opera-
tions were begun, has been placed in theeun-
gine house, and will be kept in reserve. The
recent machinery installations at the Porto
Bello plant have been made largely with a
view of protection against possible break-
downs, and at the present time nearly all
the parts liable to disablement have been
duplicated.
A new 25-ton locomotive crane of a 3-foot
6-inch gauge, madeby The Industrial Works,
Bay City, Mich.. was received recently, and
will be used as a wrecking crane. A 15-ton
crane of the American Hoist and Derrick
Company is used for ordinary work about
the plant.
New Office at Gorgona -hops.
The recent changes in the Mechanical
Division. by which all work but that incident
to steam shovel repairs will be transferred
from the Empire to the Gorgona shops,
will result in the removal of the drafting
force of the Mechanical Division from the
Administration Building at Culebra to Gor-
gona. as soon as a new office building for its
use can be completed Plans for this office
is now in course of preparation and call for
the erection of a one-stor) frame building,
80 feet long and 34 feet wide, to be located
between the present storehouse and shop
office. It will have a corrugated iron roof,
with skylights on each side 48 feet long and
6 feet wide. Most of the room will be used
by the drafting force, but there will be space
provided for work of a clerical nature. Con-
struction will begin as soon as possible after
the first of October.
The changes also involve the transfer of a
large amount of material, such as car parts,
etc., from the Empire to the Gorgona store-
house.
Cost of Repairs to StPeam Shovels.
Repairs to steam shovels at Empire shops
during the fiscal year 1909 cost only seven-
eighths of a cent per cubic yard of material
excavated, instead of eight cents as stated
erroneously in THE CANAL RECORD of last
week. The total cost of these repairs was
$197,612.42, and the material excavated
amounted to 22,583,099 cubic yards. The
shop cost does not include the cost of re-
pairs made in the field or that of repairs
made to steam shovel parts taken to the shops
while the shovel is kept in service by sub-


stituting other parts. These repairs are
known as field repairs and are made in the
field shops and on the work, often while the
shovel is waiting for cars.
A statement of the cost of steam shovel
repairs in the three construction divisions
from January, 1908, to June, 1909, inclusive,
a period of 18 months, follows:


ITE.M.

Cubic yds.
Field cost.
Shop cost..
Cost per
cubic yd'-
Division
Shop....
Total. .


DrvisIONs.
Central Atlantic Pacific
27.752.750 4 1 48997 1.90.069
$596 059.02 $51.786.4 $19.917.38
5283.746 76 51 78261 522 246.75
carts. Cants. Cets
2 14 1 as 1.01
1.0! 1 25 1.12
3.16 250 2.13


Total.

.n.881.,816
i.57.776.12
Cents.
1.06
3.03


The shovels in the Central Division are
subjected to harder and more constant usage
than those of ote other two divisions. Of
the 101 steam shovels in the Canal and Pan-
ama railroad service 61 are in the serviceof
the Central Division, most of them in Cu-
lebra Cut.
Sample Sales of Scrap Material,
In order that the Commission might have
a practical idea of the value of the scrap iron
and steel to be sold some sample shipments
were made, and the prices which they brought
in the open market at New York were as
follows:
Forty tons American scrap and 370 tons foreign
scrap. $13 bfi per gross ton.
Four hundred and fifty-one thousand four hundred
and twenty pounds of scrap $13.76 per gross ton.
Six hundred and seventy-eight thousand pounds of
scrap. 97n* cents per hundredweight.
F.iht 6 ton boilers. 4.76 per hundredweight: eleven
4bL'-tou boilers. in2.76 per gross ton: five 3-ton car
bodies. 60 cents per hundredweight. 10 tons o crane
parts 6' cents per hundredweight; 65 tons of scrap,
60 cents per hundredweight.
Some old scrap screening was sold for 8/4 cents
per pound.
The eight 6-ton boilers sold for $0.0476 per pound. or
fS0n for each boiler On the basis of what the other
scrap sold for. each of these boilers was valued by the
purchaser as follows Fire thousand one hundred
and filly pounds of brass and copper at 0.097 per
pound amountoeu to about $500 and six thousand six
hundred and fifteen pounds of iron and steel at S0.0092
per pound amounted to about $60. a total of S560.
A quantity of scrap brass and copper mos-
quito screening is being prepared by the
Quartermaster's Department for shipment to
the States where it will be sold in the open
market. A shipment of 103,509 pounds,
consisting of useless old material and waste
bits of new, was made in March and sold in
New York for $7,710. The scrap is carefully
collected by the district quartermasters, and
when an amount suitable for shipment has
been accumulated it is sent to New York.
Fire Station at Bas Obispo.
The contract for the erection of the new
fire station at Bas Obispo has been awarded
to A. Hinselman, a private contractor, and
the work will be started in a few days. It
will be two stories in height, 16 by 20 feet in
size, and of practically the same type as the
stations at Balboa and Corozal. The volun-
teer fire company at Bas Obispo, consisting
of about 20 men, has been occupying quar-
ters in the half of an old building, part of
which is utilized as a storehouse. Living
quarters will be provided above the station
for two or three of the volunteer members,
who will be within easy call in case of an
alarm of fire. The station will be equipped
with a hand reel, about 500 feet of hose, and
other apparatus that goes with a station of
this size.






September 29, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


TARIFF LAW IN CANAL ZONE.
Text of the Opinion of Acting Attorney Gen-
eral on Act of August 5, 1909.
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE,
WasHING TON September 8. 1909
The Honorable the SeLetary of Warv:
Sir-I have the honor to acknowledge your
letterof the 3d instant requestinganopinion
as to whether or not the first clause of the
Tariff Act approved August 5, 1909, makes
its provisions applicable to the Canal Zone;
that is to say, whetheror not the Canal Zone
isa "possession" of the United States within
the meaning of that Act?
The first clause of the Tariff Act provides
as follows:
That on and after the day following Lhe passage of
this Act.except as otherwise specially provided for in
the second section of this Act. there shall be levied,
collected, and paid upon all articles when imported
from any foreign country into the United States or
into any of its possessions (except the Philippine
Islands and the islands of Guam and Tutuilsi the
rates of duty which are by the schedules and para-
graphs of the dutiable list of this section prescribed.
In my opinion the Canal Zone is not one
of the possessionsof the United States within
the meaning of that term as used by Con-
gress in the Tariff Act, but rather is a place
subject to the use, occupation and control of
the United States for a particular purpose,
to wit, the construction and maintenance of
a ship canal connecting the waters of the
Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
It will assist in the consideration of the
question involved to review the acts of Con-
gress and the Executive Orders, which, at
the time of the passage of the Tariff Act of
August 5, 1909, regulated the importation into
the Canal Zone and the exportation there-
from of merchandise.
The XIII Article of the Treaty between the
Republic of Panama and the United States,
ratified by the Senate on February 23, 1904,
is as follows:
The United States may import at any time into the
said Zone and auxiliary lands free of custom duties,
imposts. taxes, or other charges, and without any re-
strictions.any and all vessels. dredges engines, cars.
machinery, tools, explosives, materials supplies, and
other articles necessary and convenient in the con.
struction, maintenance, operation, sanitation and
protection of the Canal and auxiliary works, and all
provisions, medicines, clothing, supplies and other
things necessary and convenient for the officers, em-
ployes. workmen and laborers in the service and em-
ploy of the United States and for their families. If
anysuch articlesare disposed of for use ouLside of Ihe
Zone and auxiliary lauds granted to the United States
and within the territory of the Republic. they shall
be subject to the same import or other duties as like
articles imported under the laws of the Republic of
Panama.
The Act of Congress, April 28, 1904 (33
- Stat., 429), declared that the power to make
all rules and regulations necessary for the
government of the Canal Zone, and all the
rights, powers and authority granted by the
terms of the Treaty should be vested in such
person or persons, and should be exercised
in such manner, as the President should di-
rect for the government of said zone. (See
also 26 Op. Atty. Gen., 113.)
Under the authority conferred by the Act
just referred to the President, by an Execu-
tive Order dated May 9, 1904, directed that the
governmental power vested in him by the
Act of April 28, 1904, should be vested in
the Isthmian Canal Commission, to be exer-
cised under the supervision and direction of
the Secretary of War.
Thereafter the orders of the Secretary of
Wi. r dated December 3, 6. 16 and 28, 1904,
.i0T January 7, 1905, prescribed the condi-


tions under which merchandise might be
imported into the Canal Zone. The first
section of the order of December 3, limits
the importation of merchandise which can
be entered at the terminal and only portsof
the Canal to the merchandise which the
United Stites, under Article XIII, above
quoted, is entitled to bring into the Zone,
free of taxation, for use in the construction
of the Canal, and to merchandise in transit
across the Isthmus for a destination without
the limits of the Isthmus; and, in addition,
to coal and crude mineral oil for fuel pur-
poses. Section 4, of the same order pro-
vides for complete free trade between the
Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama,
both of persons and of merchandise, and re-
peals Section 5 of the Executive Order of
June 24, 1904, which had made operative in
the Canal Zone the provisions of the Ding-
ley Tariff of 1897 respecting importatiou of
merchandise.
The order of December 6, provided that
merchandise which, under the terms of the
first section of the order of December 3,
could not be entered at the Canal ports
might be entered thereupon payment of the
proper duties to the Republic of Panama.
Before the passage of the Tariff Act of
August 5, Congress had declared that the
importations of merchandise from the Canal
Zone, and the entry of persons into the
United States therefrom, should be subject
to the laws of the United States respecting
the importation of merchandise and entry of
persons from foreign countries. (March 2,
1905, 33 Stat., 843.) This act is still in op-
eration.
There is nothing in the Tariff Act of Au-
gust 5, 1909, to indicate that Congress in-
tended to disturb the customs arrangements
effective in the Canal Zone at the time of
its enactment and operative therein by vir-
tue of the authority conferred by the Act of
April 28, 1914, and subsequent acts. To
hold otherwise would lead to the anomalous
conclusion that Congress intended that the
Canal Zone should be regarded a foreign
country as to exports therefrom to the Uni-
ted States, but a possession of the United
States as to importations into the Canal Zone
from foreign countries.
Accordingly, I have the honor to advise
you that, in my opinion, the provisions of the
Tariff Act of August 5, 1909, do not appl>
to the Canal Zone. Respectfully,
WADE H. ELLIS,
Acting Attorney General.
Approved:
Gso. W. WICKERSHAM,
.Alttornes General.

Repairing the Spoil Cars.
In the monthof August, 11,132 construc-
tion cars were repaired at the shops of the
Mechanical Division. This does not repre-
sent all the car repairing done on the Canal
work, as field repairs for the Atlantic and
Pacific Divisions are not done in the shops
of the Mechanical Division. Repairing to
cars is divided into three classes. The first
of these consists of heavy repairs, and for
this purpose cars are hauled to the shops
and, if necessary, rebuilt. It includes such
work as putting in new sills and similar
repairs that could not be handled advantage-
ously in the field. Repairs of this character
were made at Cristobal to 50 cars; at Gor-
gona, where the wood cars are repaired, to


158 cars, and at Empire, where repairs were
made on steel cars, to 171 cars.
Light repairs are made at the shops and
in the "bad order" yards, and they include
such work as cannot be done economically
in the field. In August the following were
handled:
Pedro Miguel. ..... 1.913 Empire .... 20?
La- Ci scadas ..... 1.139
Gorgona . 41 I Total .... .......3.665
Field or running repairs are made in the
small field shops, or by men sent out from
the field shops. They include in general
such repairs as can be made to cars while
they are waiting alongside a shovel or are
standing on the dumps waiting to be un-
loaded. Such repairs were made by the
field shops as follows-
Tabernilla. ... 03 Cablewia ....... 1.759
San Pablo .... 99 carcha ..... 1 278
Bas (bispo ...... I U03 Balboa ............ 748
Whilehouse. ... 2 .'l
Total .......... 7088
Reception to Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn.
An informal farewell reception to Commis-
sioner and Mrs. Blackburn has been arranged
to take place at Hotel Tivoli on Saturday
evening. October 2. It is designed to af-
ford opportunity for a manifestation, on the
eve of their departure for the States, of the
high esteem and affectionate regard in which
they are held by their associates and friends.
The public is cordially invited to attend. A
special train for people from along the line
who wish to attend the reception will leave
Panama at 12.05 o'clock Sunday morning,
and no transportation will be charged on it.
Sailing of the Aunon and Cristobal.
The steamship .-l4lni'on sailed from New
York at noon on Thursday, September 23,
but was delayed in the lower harbor by fog.
No information has been received as to
when she passed Sand) Hook. There are
70 passengers aboard and she has a cargo of
5,70LI tons of freight, 16,5010 barrels and 22,-
000 bags of cement.
The steamship Crislobal will sail from
New York on October 6.
Committee on Standard Specifications.
A committee appointed on August 27 isat
work examining all Isthmian Canal Com-
mission specifications that have been printed
or are under consideration. fhe report will
be submitted to the Superintendent of Mo-
tive Power and Machinery, the Chief Quar-
termaster and the General Purchasing Offi-
cer for comment before it goes to the Chair-
man for final action. The committee is
taking up in numerical order the specifica-
tions already approved by the Chief Engi-
neer, with all the criticism and comments
on file, and will recommend such revisions
as seem desirable. After this work is com-
pleted it will consider the specifications
which have been prepared by the Mechani-
cal Engineer, the superintendents of plumb-
ing and of painting, and others, and will
compile them in form for approval and print-
ing. The report will be accompanied by a
code of instructions for using the I. C. C.
standard specifications.
Food Supplies for Cinmp Elliott.
By order from the headquarters of the
Marine Corps in Washington, all food sup-
plies needed at Camp Elliott during the
present fiscal year are to be purchased from
the Subsistence Department of the Commis-
sion. The marines require about $4,000
worth of food each mouth.







THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. Il., No. 6.


DREDGING IN AUGUST.

Operations In Atlantic and Pacific Divisionls
Show ai Necrease FromI Jul. .
The combined output of the dredges of the
Atlantic and Pacific Divisions for August
amounted to 1,459,961 cubic yards, as com-
pared with 1,775.077 cubic yards for July, a
decrease of 315,116 ouhic yards. Of the Au-
gust excavation, 1,097,S56 cubic lards were
removed from the Canal prism, and 362,105
cubic sards from outside works In the At-
lantic Division, 422,846 cubic yards were
taken from the Canal prism, and 355,505
cubic yards from outside works. In the Pa-
cific Division, 619,663 cubic yardss belonged
to Canal excavation, and 6,600 cubic yards
represented other operations. The dredg-
ing output fell off in both divisions: in the
Atlantic Division it was 230.375 cubic .ards
less, and in the Pacific Division 84,741 cubic
3ards less than in July.
The dredges in the harbor and channel
section of the Atlantic Division removed
388,282 cubic yards of earth, and 34,564 cu-
bic yards of rock from the prism. Of the
307,914 cubic yards taken out by the suction
dredge Caribc'an, 87.130J cubic yards of
earth were drudged from the approach chan-
nel to Cristobal Harbor, and 9,284 cubic
yardsof earth from in front of Pier 11. The
remainder of its output, 211,500 cubic yards
were from the Canal prism. The dipper
dredge Al/dmi took out 2,000 cubic yards of
earth and 43,512 cubic yards of coral and
rock from in front of Pier 11. This dredge
has done no Canal excavation for over a year.
Dredges A'o. /, AVo. 5, and .Vo. 6 worked
the entire month in the prism. The low
record of dredges .Vu 5 and .Vo. 6 is ac-
counted for by the fact that they were exca-
vating in rock nearly the whole month.
In the Gatun section, dredge .Vo. _2 con-
tinued work north of Gatnn Daui until Au-
gust 9, when it was transferred to the new
borrow pit south of the Dam. On account
of a strong current in the West Diversion
the transfer occupied six days, and there
was an additional delay of three dass due
to the installation of a new pump case.
Dredge .Vo. JV worked the entire month in
Borrow Pit No. 1. Dredge 'Vo. XL was in
dry dock until August 23, when it was put
to work in Borrow Pit No. I.
The tabular statement of operations in the
Atlantic Division follows:
DREDri. T, Du. Cu 'dsa

Caribbean ...... .. Suction ........... 30'914
No 5 .. ... Larld .. .... 23 '46
No 6. . Ladder .. I. ." '395
M m di.. ....... Dipper ......... 4 512
No S2 .. -uelmi ..1 31.
No 3 ... on .... .... 13 15
No 85 ... Suc tn ... . 18 093
Total .. ..... ....... ....... 8 351

In the Pacific Division. the dredge Cie-
bra worked from August 2to 4 in deepening
the channel. It was then beached on Naos
Island for general repairs remaining there
until August 17, when it resumed work in
the channel. The ladder dredge Gopher
was out of commission the entire month,
and is being given a general overhauling.
The ladder dredge Mo!e worked from August
1 to 29, continuing the cut along the west
bank of the new channel from buoy No 15
to station 2331. On August 29 and 30, the
dredge excavated 3,000 cubic yards of sand


at Point Chamd. The ladder dredge Badger
excavated during the entire month in the
upper French canal, continuing the cut to
the east limit line. The dipper dredge Car-
Jdeas was put to work on August 2 and 3,
in front of the Panama railroad coal dock
to deepen the basin at that point, and re-
moved 3,600 cubic yards of material. On
the 3d, the dredge was moved to the west
side of the Canal at station 2225 to clean off
a rock shoal, and worked there until the
14th, removing 19,430 cubic yards of earth
and 4,470 cubic yards of broken rock and
boulders. On the 14th the dredge was
moved to the east side of the Canal at station
2213, working at that point for the remainder
of the month, and completing the cut along
bank to station 2206. The ladder dredge
.1larmot worked during the entire month in
the upper French canal completing the cut to
the west limit line, and starting a cut parallel
tothe Canalaxis. The Sandpiper continued
work at the Miraflores Locks, and pumped
51,747 cubic yards of material into the West
Dam core. The orange peel dredge was
not working in August.
The tabular statement of operations in
the Pacific Division follows:


DREDs E.

Culebra. ....... .....
Gopher ....
M ole ...... ... ....
Badger .... ... ....
Ci.rdenns.. ...... ...
M TrmoI. ............
S,andpiper .. .....
Orange Peel..... ...


Type

Suction ............
Ldder .....
Ladder ..... ...
Ladder ... ...
Dipper ...... ....
Ladder ..........
Suction. .. . .
0 P...... ...... ..


Cu Vds.

151 6'0u

142.241
:5.4;62
.1 747


Totil ...... .. .. .. ....... 1 691 610
Includes 3 u(i) cubic yards of sand dredged at
Cha me.
Renumbering of Ancon Hospital Wards.
The additions made to Ancon Hospital
from time to time hive caused some confu-
sion in the numbering of wards anti sections,
and with the approaching completion of the
four new surgical wards it has been decided
to renumber them in a systematic manner.
Under the new arrangement the numbers fol-
low consecutively from the main entrance up-
ward, with the designations as given below:
Section A-Ward. 1. 2 and ri sfortuierly
Section B-Wnrd' d iii-I ,i a- fornierl tc-glher
with the new surgical wards numbered 7. 5 r and If,
Section C-Include; the former Seciton F. wardc 9
ind IN renumbered 11 -id 12
Section D-Replice: ilie former Section C ward-s.
numbered t3 and 14 in-ilteaid of 11 and 1: W'lard ]I to
replace the former 16A :tnd No 16 to replace the
former No. li'a
section E-Replaces The former Section G W6rds
15 14 and 1'. reuunitered 17 lIfitian I.
Section F-Kepl ce;. the former Sectioi D The
former w.rds Noe 1 ai I -A. 18-.und 19-' chunged to
No- 2'.. ?: 2? and 23
Section G-Tuberculo'is wards Nos 24 aiid 25 re
pincing ward No. .'b
Section H-I-olaiion ,yards Nos 26 2". ?s and 29
replacing former ward No 27
Section I-Replice' former -section F. Wards Nos.
'0 21.22 23 24, and 25 renurnumbered 30 31 32.33. a.35
26 mid .7
Under the old s stem of numbering there
were 2i wards; under the new s stem there
are 37.
Navigntion itn Pat ific Entrance.I
In the directions for ships using the five
miles of the Canal at the Pacific entrance
now open to navigation, published in THE
CANAL RECORD of August 25, 1909, and
communicated to the shipping interests of
all maritime nations, an error was made in
the azimuth of the center line, which was
given as 151 degrees, 44 minutes, and 35


seconds. The correct azimuth is 141 de-
grees, 44 minutes, and 35 seconds, and the
directions should therefore read:
The center of the channel at the sea end is about
6 000 feet distant from San Jose Rock. the outer one
of the cluster of five islands immediately south of
Panama and about four miles distant from the city of
Panama The azimuth from this center of channel
point to the triangulation station on San Jose Rock
is 240 degrees.
The channel is open from this point to Balboa
wharf. a diAtance of about fire miles, to its full 500-
foot bottom width, although not to its full depth.
and the azimuth of the center line is 141 degrees, 44
minutes. and .5 seconds.

Addition to Interlocking System.
A new interlocking plant, the largest in
the Panama Railroad Company's system,
was placed in operation at Matachin on Sun-
day, September 19, having been constructed
on the Isthmus by the forces of the tele-
phoneand telegraph department. It replaces
a smaller layout, and was installed in antici-
pation of a large increase in traffic from the
Canal tracks to the main line at this point.
The equipment consists of sixteen levers in
an improved type of Saxby and Farmer ma-
chine, which operates a dump Irack crossover
connection from the Canal tracks, to the
northbound and southbound main line tracks
of the Panama railroad, respectively. Route
signaling is provided, and the entire plant
is in accordance with the standard of signal
practice in vogue in the States.
The first of the six interlocking plants
that now comprise the system was installed
at Miraflores on March 1, 1908. The list is
as follows: Balboa wye, with 6 levers; Mira-
flores, with 13 levers; Paraiso, with 12 lev-
ers; Las Cascadas, with 8 levers; Matachin,
with 16 levers, and Gorgona, with 8 levers.
Changes are made and the service extended
as conditions may require.
In addition to the regular interlockiig
plant, distance switch signals have been
placed at necessary points along the main
line from Panama to Colon, the signal con-
trol in these devices being effected by means
of a two-lever switch and signal arrangemezit,
which provides a signal lever interlocked
with a switch lever. Automatic and semi-
automatic signals are in use at Barbacoas
bridge oser the Chagres River, and at the
Black Swamp crossing.
Work ut the Track Shitters.
The following isa statementof track raised
and thrown in the Central Division during
the month of August, 1909.

No of No. of
track Location. feet
shifter
5 Tabernilla .. ........... .. ..... 231,600
6 Caimito and San Pablo. ............ 79.662
7 Santa Cruo relocation ............. 120,000
S Mlirdtflore ....... ............... 102,25z
) & 9 Balboa .. . .................. 91.300
Total ........... .. ................. .. 624.820

New Bird for Air Compressors.
The bids submitted by various manufac-
turers for two air compressors, one for Las
Cascadas and one for Rio Grande, have been
rejected and new bids will be asked for.
The compressors are neeiled to supplement
those now in use supplying air for the drills
in Culebra Cut. Some of the drills are now
working at night in order.that the blasting
may be kept far enough in advance of the
steam shovels so as not to interfere with ex-
cavation.







September 29, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


ESTIMATES FOR 1911.
Amount Necessary to Carry on Canal Con-
struction *48,063,524.70. W'
The estimates of money necessary to con-
tinue the construction of the Isthmian Canal
in the fiscal year 1911, which will be acted
upon by Congressatthe coming session, have
been forwarded to the Secretary of War.
The appropriations to date and the estimates
since 1907, inclusive, are as follows:
APPROPRIATIONS.
Payment to the New Panama Canal
Com pany.. ........................... 140.,000,000.1XJ
Payment to Republic of Panama...... 10,000,000.00
Appropriation for 190 .................. 10,,000 00
Appropriation ror 1906.................. 11,000,000.00
Deficiency for 1006.................. 5,990.786.00
Appropriation for I'J07 ................. a.,6,415.ti
Appropriation for 190b....... ......... -7,161,iJt;7..M
Deficiency for 1908 ................... 12,17S,900.00
Appropriation for 1909 .............. 29.17,000.00
Deficiency for 1909 .. ...... ...... ,45,000.00
Appropriation for 1910........... ..... 3.,6i8,000.00
Total appropriations to date ......l'10.00,-168.58,
ESTIMATES.
1907............. ............ ............6. t14.81i.40
108 .................. ......... ... .. ... 25.40,58.7:
1900 ............ ... .............. 33, li 3.143.60
1B10..................... ....... ......... 35 186, 19058
1911............................. ... ... 48,0t3,524.70

The estimate of $48,063,524.70 for the fis-
cal year 1911, is made up of estimates under
14 items as follows:
Item /-For salaries of all officers and employes
nla the United States:
Office of the General Counsel.. ..... .T,'343.4
Office of administratlon......... 7.Mi0.00
Custodian's force ....... ............. 7.40.90
Office of General Purchasing Officer 35,940.00
Office of Disbursing Officer........ .. a,060.00
Office of Assistant Examiner of Ac-
counts......... ...... ........ .. ... 10,26. .00
Office of I inspecting Engineer........ 10,60).00
Officeof Assistant PurchasingOfficer,
New York. ..... .............. 5,860.66
Medical Supply Depot, New York.. 3,.300.00
Office of Assistant Purchasing Agent.
New Orleans ..................... .. ,6.00

Total ..................... ........... s163.000.00

Item 2-Incidental expenses In the United States:
Printing and binding................ 3,425.00
Telegraph, telephone, and cable..... 17.57).00
Traveling expenses In the United
Blates.............................. 7,80000
Light, fuel, power.................... 2,500.00
Office supplies and incidentals ..... 10,8 00
Rent of buildings...................... 8,900.00
Additional compensation to Auditor
* for War Department................ 1.010.00
Total................................. 8,000 00
Item 3-For pay of members of the Commission,
officers and employes on the Isthmus, other
than skilled and unskilled labur, iu the De-
partments of Construction and Engineeriug,
Quartermaster's, Subsistence, Disbursements,
and Examination of Account.s:
Construction and Engineering ....... 83,56',392.00
rtQuartserniater'a Department........ 44.5,004.00
S Disbursements ........................ iq,ll000
ExaminaUon of Accounts ........... 216,4h0.00
Total......... ................ .4,0.,2,RHb.00
&Lrem i-For skilled and unskilled labor on the
Isthmus for the Departments of Construct ion
and Engineering, Quartermaster's, Disbu rse-
ments, and Examination of Accounts:
Construction and Engineering....... $14,05,304.90
Quartermaster's Department ........ 897,1il.2"a
Rxaminationof Accounts ............ 900.00
Total .................................15.,04,036.e
Inm -For purchaseand delivery or materials and
S... supplies for the Departments of Construction
and Engineering, Quartermaster's, Bubsis-
tence, DiPbursements and Examination of Ac-

tonstrudtion and Engineering.......18,0565.00
Pla. nt........................... 1,506,01.00
quartermaster's Department........ 882,001.00




.. ....: .


Subsistence Departmecni.. ......... .. b0,(0.00 EXECUTIVE ORDER.
Exaamr nattl of Accouunt.s ..... .... li00. 00
Total. ......... ........... 82R. 1.,'2 i 00 Hunting Laws.
-.- LrUnder authority vested in me by law it is
Hem 6- To continue the P..lulpiilmnt and conirm.ln- ordered:
Lion of the Panaml r'aliald guarninteed lJI, 4
percent bondsofthe railroad rumpini'): Section 454 of Act No 14 of the Laws of
Completion of substructure. election the Canal Zone is amended to read as fol-
of superstructure hbud inaeliineit lows:
for handling freight, Doc'k 1., C is- ".c. 454 Permits to hunt with firearms
tobal ....... ............. ...... $300,1))0.0) 4
Substiucture our dock eL.-ct1ion, upon the public lands of the Canal Zone or
Balboa ............... ........ (.AX,000 iO on the lands of private ownership, but with-
SubtruLture ',ji re.buildniz? o pci- outt prejudice to the rights of the owners,
Slnes, ck 11 l .may be issued by the Treasurer of the Canal
Totl ... ... ....... ............ Sl,00,000 (1 Zone upon application made to him. But
Item 7-Miscellaneous expenditures for tne every person who shall hunt at night be-
partments of C'uostruetion and Engin-emrin, tween the hours of sunset and sunrise with
Quartermaster's, iSubsis.lnce, Drisbursement.-, the aid or use of a lantern, torch, bonfire, or
and Examination of Accountui: other artificial light, or who shall hunt by
Transportationot cureny .... 00 the ue of a g or other rearm intended
Recruiting laborers and iransipol)rn- the e of a gun or other rearm intended
lion ... .. .... .. ........ 1 )%,1.0 to be discharged by an animal or bird, by
Trausportatnion of empl.*ye.' to and means of a spring or trap or other similar
from Unit.d States ............. 0.i.00&i mechanical device, shall be guilty of a mis-

Traveling expenses in irh. L'rnit-d demeanor. Wti. H. TAFT.
'States ............. 4 ..,V100,, TTHE WHITE HOUSE, September 8, 1909.
Passe.ger trunl poitatiin on Ii.. [No. 112b.]
Isthm uis ......... .... ........ .. ,0fl0.00
Freignt ranporti-ation on the Ilth Jury Disagree1.
mts ...... . ..... .. iuDt.(u.e
Telegraph and telephuone........ 1ll',.i.o The trial of Secundino Pinedo, a Colom-
S- bian, charged with murder in the first degree,
,'re ,,,t-For" pay of e trr..mie.ruo f thi l. i was held in the court of the Second Judi-
-Counnis.sion in barge .,f the Depart- cial Circuit at Empire, before Judge Wesley
ment ,,f. .i Adminis traion, and of NI. Owen, on Wednesday, September 22.
all ofrlce and employes tLher tlin Pinedo was arrested on August 14 for the
skilled and unskilled laborers ... ... S4h,040 00
Item9--Forpayuskiledand inskilled killing of Manuel Montalvo, a fellow coun-
laborers lor the Departmenl nt Civii tryman, during an altercation between the
Admin litrtin.. ...... .. 87,721.10 two. The case was given to the jury at 3
ler .'- For iiaterials, supplie-, ,-iltip-
nitni, repair of bu.ldinga nde.t.ii.u- p. m.. on the day of the trial, and at 11
gent expens,.s of f[l Departinent ,i a. m. on the following day the jury report-
Civil Admiii straiuii .. .. li4,>l.',2 ed a disagreement. The case 'will be taken
I/m .'/-Fuor pas of the member oftr., up again at a later date.
Coinumis .on in chaige of the Depart-
rnenit f .Sanitation, and ,.fl officers Culnn Clob Dance.
and employes other than ,killed
and unskilled labourer .. .... 711,lrC.00 On account of the reception to betendered
Hem /.v-For pay of sailed and uin- Commissioner and Mrs. Blackburn at Ancon
skilled laborer?, fur The [Eepritnienl
oaned aion .......... f e .....e 41r n on Saturdieevening, October 2, the regular

Items -tr run.e.al].S'ilplie.,'quip- dance ol the Colon club will be omitted, no
mert, repairs 'md construlctin oir dance being given until October 16.
buildings for the lepartn.uni of S.in- ROBERT BELERLV, Serretary.
ItaLoo n ....... .. ... ..0.. 1,01;.,714 00
ite'm 4e-For reloelnion of the P.iininia Re,.olutions of Sympathy.
railroad, all expeun-, ............ .'00,00).0ii Resolutions of respect and sympathy on
Total....... .. ..... . ...E.,0..I,.524..0 the death of W illiam H. Green, who was
drowned at Balboa on August 21, were
Accounts of Cristobal Fourth of ,July Cele- adopted at meetings held recently by Balboa

The committee that had charge of the lodgeof b Las Cascadasof Pthias of L,asCasdas,
Fourth of July celebration in Cristobal and and byLa. Cascades court, No.4, Independ-
Colon met in the office of the General Man- ent Order of Panamanian Kangaroos.
ager of the Panama railroad, on Septem- Obituary.
ber 21, and accepted the final report, which H. C. Ball died at Ancon Hospital on
had been audited, by request, by the local September 21, 1909. He was 52 years old,
auditor of the Panama railroad. The report was married, and had lived on the Isthmus
is as follows: three years, residing at Empire. His body
Balance left over in handsof Zone Trensurer was sent to Pultney, Steuben County, N. Y.,
t Mr. Williamsil for previous year..... .. ..120.96 o
Balnce left over from previous eaur in hands on the .q/hanca, which sailed September 27.
of local treasurer (Mr. StickleP . .... 00 iig om n
Amount collected by various comnmilers A lMiuie ,oman.
IMr. Perry chairman. ........... .... 2.13.2 The American Consulate General in Pan-
Total fundsavailable ...............$2270.22 ama wishes to be informed of the where-
Expenses as per vouchers submitted lr. about of M iss H. E. Daly, a young American
Pechtig)............ ............... 200(367 woman, who came to the Canal Zone in
Balance on hand. .............. .... $265 March, 1909, to work as a stenographer.
Amount in hands of Mr. Williams. 1908.... $120%6 Mis-ing Man.
Amount to be turned over to Mr. Williom~. by Charles Kenney, member of Port Huron
Mr. R. H. Wardlaw. Cashier. P R R 1909 145 council, No. 521, Knights of Columbus, is
Total in hands of Mr. Williams..... .$266.55 requested to communicate with William J.
Ergenzinger, G. K.. No. 1371, Empire, C. Z.
Taa CANAL RECORDo: In behalf of myself and son
I wish to thank the Commission the members of or-
ganizationsof which my husband w.isa member.and Official returns for the British colony of
all the friends who have ended helpand symp.ithy Jamaica show that 1,191 emigrants left that
to us since the death of my husband. Mr. H C Ball. island for Panama and the Canal Zone dur-
Mas. H C BALL n am a and the Canal Zone dur-
EmpireSeptember 24. 1909. ing the month of July.







TH'E CANAL RECORD


Vol. II., No. 5.


GROCERIES.

Amount Consumed by Canal Workers.-lMeth-
oils of Supply nrd Inlpeclion.
Of the merchandise imported by the com-
missary during the fiscal year 1909, valued
in all at ji3,386,906.06, the articlesthat have
been classed as "groceries" were valued at
$1,023,658.22. Under this classification are
included a large number of edible articles
and materials used in cooking, but all cold
storage articles such as fresh meats, dairy
products, fruits and vegetablesareexcluded.
The chief imports under the classification
"groceries" were as follows:

Cocon ... .. ..... .............. 1 ? 48
Col'cee .......... . . .. .. .. 203 S'
T ea ..................... ..... ..... . 4.41,1
Silm ou in tins .... .... ... . ...... 12 12
Preer'ed fruit in syrup in tins .. ... 439' (003
Jams jellies and pre-erers in glass and tins I93 536
Mteal,. canned .. ........ ............... 437 842
Milk. evaporated and condensed ... .... I 5.' &,40
Tomatloes in tins ....................... 5'6.)S6
Pork and beans in tin .. ... ... .. ... '53 34,
Peas and beans in tins. . . ........ .3in )34
Other vegetables in tins .. ...... .. .. .. 174.192
Lard . . .. .. .. ......... .. .... 43.8 '6
C,,-dfi.h .... . ... ... . ..... .. I.
Flour .. .. . .. .. .. ....... ....... 4 '0 .124
Cereals also form an important class of
groceries, and the average monthly sales
are as follows:
Rice.Carolini. ...... ...... ..... 20 barrels
Rice. Rangon ........... ... . 10) tons
Split peas .......... ... .. 125 barrels
Dried green psas ........ ...... 4( barrels
Red kidney beans. .......... ....... 60 barrels
Lima bean .. .. ........ ...... 41. barrels
While nav., bean- ... .... .. barrels
Corn me'l,. in bulk .. . ... .. ... 50 barrels.
Corn nmiel in cas ......... 2 500 pound,
Hominy ... .. .. .. 4 eC i
Other ceiralE.. ....... .. .. ......... 4 10 cases
An average saleof sugar for one month is
900 barrels; salt, 500 barrels; vinegar, 50
barrels.
Contracts for groceries are placed quarterly
on competitive bids made to standard
samples. For instance, the bids on canned
goods are made on the basis of the high-
est grade of tinned goods on the market,
and the contractor must furnish a product
that will stand a test in the States, on arrival
on the Isthmus, and if necessary, after three
months in storage on the Isthmus In gen-
eral the tinned goods stand the tests well,
and onl0 a small proportion is rejected. A
few days ago a shipment of 41.icasesof tinned
peas, sold by the contractor as "sifted" was
rejected because the peas, although good,
were not of the specified grade. Last week
45 barrels of beans, supposed to be Lima
beans, were received. On inspection they
were found to be mixed with Algerian beans,
which, although wholesome, are thicker,
whiter, and of inferior quality to the Limaa
bean. The whole shipment was rejected
Under the terms of the contract all goods
are delivered on the Isthmus., freight and
insurance paid, and all that are rejected are
sent back at the contractor's expense. The
Government loses nothing by the efforts of
contractors to substitute inferior goods,
whereas the contractor usually loses both
time and money.
The contract for groceries for the present
quarter went into effect on September 1.
Deliveries are made with a frequency and in
amounts large enough to keep a 45 days'
supply in store at Cristobal, which is abun-
dant for any emergency, such as a break
in the deliveries. The supply of groceries in


store is usually worth about $265,000. Much
of the foodstuffs is never subjected to the
test of three months' storage, as it is con-
sumed before that period has elapsed. The
quantity in store will not be materially in-
creased when the new storehouse now under
construction is completed, as the Subsistence
Department makes a point of putting in a
new stock four or five times a year. The
groceries will be kept in better condition,
however, because the new store will be
easier to keep free from ants, roaches, and
other insects than the present wooden store-
house. Half of the new storehouse is com-
pleted and the whole will be in service in
a few weeks. It is two stories high, 200
feet long, and 50 feet wide. The first story
is of concrete blocks, with a concrete floor,
while the second is of frame construction.

PERSONAL.

Lieut -Col. William L. Sibert sailed for the
States on the .llian.,a on September 27, on
his annual leave of absence.
Major Chester Harding and family, and
Dr. Lloyd Nolan and wife of Colon Hospital,
returned to the Isthmus on the .4lliana,
which arrived at Cristobal on September 22.
Mr. Hiram J. Slifer sailed on the Turri-
alba on September 28, on his annual leave
of absence in the States.

Rnptismal Service Postponed.
The funeral of H. C. Ball which was held
at Ancon on Sunday, September 26, caused
a postponement of the baptismal service
which was to have been held at the First
Baptist Church at Empire on the same date,
to Sunday. October 3, at 3 p.m. Mr. Ball
was a deacon, trustee, and an energetic
worker in the Empire Church.

Red Crow. Oflecial-.
During the absence, on leave, from the
Isthmus of Lieut -Col. John L Phillips, Mr.
A. Bruce Minear will act as president, and
Major Charles F. Mason as treasurer, of the
Canal Zone Branch of the American Red
Cross Association.
All remittances of funds belonging to the
association should be made payable to Major
Mason, whose address is Ancon Hospital.

Bapti-t Churches and Churth Work.
The corner stone of the new Baptist
Church at Gatun was laid on Sunday, Sep-
tember 19, the ceremony being performed by
H L. Stuntz and Mrs. J. L. Wise. Rev.
C. H Elliott of Cristobal, Rev. J. L. Wise
of Gorgona, and J. C. Foreman of Empire
made suitable addresses. The Baptist Church
work at Gatun was inaugurated about two
sears ago under the direction of Rev. J. H.
Sobey. A building was assigned the mission
by the Chief Engineer in which to hold serv-
ices, but owing to the demand for laborers'
quarters the building had to be given up a
few weeks ago. Prior to this time five serv-
ices were held each week, with encouraging
results.
The new Baptist Church building at Colon
which is nearing completion, and is a sub-
stantial concrete structure, will be capable of
seating five hundred people. The work has
been under the superintendency of Rev. J. L.
Wise, director of the mission, and the
Southern Baptist Convention Home Mission
Board has been a liberal contributor. Rev.
Sobey has been requested to superintend the


work there, and has consented, but will still
reside at Empire, where he holds Sunday
jed week night services.
In addition to the regular mission stations,
the work is now carried on at Cunette, Bas
Obispo, and Chagres, with the assistance of
laymen. Rev. Wise of Gorgona, Rev. Lov-
eridge of Culebra, and Rev. Sobey of Em-
pire share the camp work.

Washington Reading Boom Club.
The gymnasium of the Washington Read-
ing Room Club, located in Lincoln House at
Colon, is to be provided shortly with new
equipment, consisting of rings, trapeze and
horizontal bars, weights, etc. A basket-ball
team was organized some time ago. and the
matter of an indoor baseball team is under
consideration. The Tabard Inn Library sys-
tem is used in the reading room, by which
an exchange of 75 books is effected every
three months, and about 100 books are kept
constantly on hand. The club has a mem-
bership of about 60, consisting entirely of
employes of the Panama Railroad Company.
At the last election of officers H. J. Slifer
was made honorary president, Joseph Beau-
mont active president, C. E. Landers vice-
president, A. C. Harrigan secretary, P. G.
Ho3t treasurer, and F. E. Huck librarian.
The club is governed by an executive com-
mittee, consisting of the president, as chair-
man, and four other members, oneof whom,
the by-laws prescribe, shall be from the of-
fice of the General Manager of the railroad
company.
Sojourners Lodge, No. 874.
Sojourners Lodge, No. 874, A. F. and A.
M., will meet in regular communication on
Saturday evening, October 2, 1909. All
Master Masons in good standing are invited
and will be cordially welcomed. Meetings
will also be held for first degree work on
October 9, for second degree work on Octo-
ber 23, and third degree work on October 16.
Eu D. SisM, R. UI. Master.

Brotherhood of St. Andrew.
A chapter of the Brotherhood of St An-
drew has been organized in Trinity Church,
Culebra. A corporate communion service
will be held on Sunday morning. October 3,
at 11 o'clock. All men are cordially invited.
Notice to Kangaroos.
On account of the death of Brother H. C.
Ball, of Empire Court, No. 1, the masque-
rade ball which was to be given at Kanga-
roo Hall, Empire, on October 2, will be
postponed indefinitely.

Concert by 1. C. C. Band.
AT HOTEL TIVOLI. ANCON.
Sunday. 'c-tober 3 1909, at 7 30 p. m.
PROGRAM.
I March-.-riy and Marine.................Zeble
2 Selection-tar .'s Lamb ................... Care
Sa Scholtische-Four little Blaiktenies.. .
3 O'Conner
S1b Tone Poem-Li as. .................Robert
4 Waltz- Thou saitd and One 'i Ighls ........Strauss
5 Poltpourri oF Popular Songs....... .......Remick
6 Duet-,Vrrrerefrom II Toa/ore, ......... Verdi
Messrs. Jennings and Sedwick.
7 Ballet-F. hioflle Birds ................... Rice
8 Overture-net and Peasant.. ............. Suppe
9 Id yl-Forge in the Fv.st ............. Eilenberg
10 March- The .4ntialor. .................... Fultomn
CHAS E JENNI.NGS. AlusiclaDirector.
The next concert will be given at Cristobal, Wed.
nesday, October 1_3.
LOST-On lug Af E Sc.uly, on September 12, on trip
to Porto Bello. a cinas pin in gold and dark red
enamel, with letters C.S.N." Finder please return
to Chase 1,. Persons, Mount Hope Depo., and receive
reward








September 29, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.

Acting Division Engineer, Atlantic Division.
CRiSToaL., C. Z., September 27.1909.
CictCuL&R No. 278"
Effective this date. and during the absenceon leave
S of Iietul-Col. Win. L. Sibert. Major Chester Harding
will be in charge of t he Atlantic Division. as Acting
Division Engineer. H. F HODGES,
Acting Chareran and Chief Engineer.
Acting General Manager, P. R. R.
PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY*.
COLON. R. P September 25. 1909.
CIRCUcLAR No. 189!
Heads q Depariments-Effective September 28. Mr
G. E. Geer will be Acting General Manager during
the absence of the General Manager on leave.
HIRAM J. SLIFER, General. fanager.
Approved:
BH HODG S. .Srand Vire-.presidentl.

Fire Alarm as.
CULEBRA. C. Z.. September 23. 1909.
CRcuLcAR No. 277:
Inviewof Ihe inflammable materialsof which Com.
mission buildings are constructed and the liability
of small blazes getting beyond control employes are
instructed to turn in an alarm immediately after the
discovery of afire. H. P. HODGES.
Acting Chairman.
Jurisdiction and Duties of Traveling Engi-
neers.
COLEBRA. C. Z September 20. 1909.
CIRCULAR No. 266-a:
1. Travelingengineers. will instructengineers. fire-
men and hostlers in all divisions on all matters per.
training to the proper handling and operation of loco
motives, and to economy in the use of fuel and oil,
riding in cabs whenever possible for this purpose.
2. They will examine engines they ride and will
call the engineers' alltention to any defect. ascertain.
ing from them whether such defects have been re-
ported.
3. They will promptly notify the Transportation
Department of any improper handling or abuse of
locomotives, or occurrences by which they have been
injured, stating all facts leading up to and con.
cerned therewith, thus assisting the superintendents
of transportation, so far as they may be able in
placing the responsibility therefore.
1 4. When casualties to locomotives have occurred.
or any investigations are held relative to the handling
of engines, the traveling engineer concerned shall
be present and submit any evidence pertmient thereto
which may be called for by the Superintendent of
Transportation.
5. Traveling engineers will alternate ever three
months in examining all applicants for the position
of locomotive engineer. and decide whether their
qualifications and experience, from a mechanical
standpoint, are sufficient to warrant their appoint.
meant.
6. They will. so far as possible, provide all hostlers
for all divisions. hostlers being selected with a view
of obtaining men capable of being eventually pro-
moted to engineers.
7. They will visit all engine houses and consult
with the foremen of same relative to running repairs
of all locomotives, checking over work reports turned
in by engineers.
8. They will keep in close touch with master me-
chanics who repair locomotives. advising them as to
thecondition of engines in service the probable date
when it will be necessary to place engines in shop.
and shall keep in touch with the progress of repairs
to engines in shop.
9. They will recotnimend to the superintendents of
transportation when engines should be taken out of
service for general repairs. such recommendation to
be made after consultation with the master mechanic
regarding the amount of work in shops
10. They will make careful inspection of all engines
turned in for repairs, cost of which will exceed $2n0.
and will confer with the master mechanic as to the
specific repairs that will be made.
11. They will make careful inspection of all engines
turned outof the shops. riding upon same whenever
possible during the first few days of operation, and
will report to the master mechanic responsible for
engine's overhauling all defects either in material or
workmanship which may be discovered.
12. Mr. James G. Craig, senior traveling engineer
will cover the Atlantic Division and the engines of
Sth Central Division from Empire suspension bridge
odirt. His headquarters will be Ias Cascadas en-
ise hazse. Mr. Arthur C. Stone, junior traveling
: i eer, will cover the.Pacific Division and engines
" t. ii.'e Central Division from Empire suspension
i .... ..... :.


bridge south, including engines at the Empire ,ard
His headquarters will be Pedro Miruelengine house.
H. H. ROUSSEAU.
,4ssitat t/.) nhe Chu] Engtnere'
Approved: H. F. HOoGes.
elActing Chair-man an.f C(hi Engiveer.
Bills for Hotpital Service.
Effective October 1 the practice of rendering bills_
against employesof the Commission or Panama Rail
road Company for hospital services t, members of
their families will be discontinued- At the ltine 1
patient is discharged from the hospital an insoice
and receipt -howing accrued chairies to date will be
presented to the party responsible therefore or in hi
absence, to the patient treated under his authorize.
IUon Immediate payment oi such bills will not he
compulsory, but it is requested that settlement be
madeonpresentatiqn Incaseof riabilitytodoso the
responsible partly. or the patient will sign an au.
thorization for deduction of the amount against the
employee's wages for the current mouth The amount
will then bededucted on pas rolls without further
notice. JOFN L PRILLttPS
As.ta-tet ChL.'*f SVreaar3 Q'irer.

Supplies for Canal Work.
The following steamers arrived at the porus of Cris-
tobal, and Colon dunne the week ended Sentem.
ber 25 1909, with supplies for the Isthmian Canal
Commission.
Alhtanca. September 22. from New York with 350
couplers and knuckles for car repairs t.2 case elece
tric fuses for stock 9v tons machine, for Pedro
MiRuel Locks 21 coils Mrnila rope for tocxk; 21
tons repair parts for locomi.tives for Porto B,:llo 2'1
towing hooks for Atlantic Di.ision ISn kegs track
bolts for stock 19 case safret- fuse for stock and a
miscellaneous cargo ageTegating 2 5tu packages.
weighing 4:0 ions.
Tri'ra/#Lba. from New Orleans September 24 with
115 barrels fire clay and 600 cases fire brick for stock.
338.000 feet lumber for sand wharf Ealboa Ir tons
castings for car repairs. 20 000 feet lumber for Gatun.
195 cases kerosene oil for stock. 30 '000 feet lumber for
Central Division 300 couplers and knuckles for car
repairs.
innzibvon.k September 24.from Mobile adu Gulfport.
40.120 pounds C I washers. 10.528 feet B MNI. white
oak lumber and iDO untreated piles for ctock 2'0)
tons Dig iron for GorRona foundry, 1)00',feet B M
.ellow pine lumber for Pacific Division. 17 41'. feet
B M wuile oak lumber and 306 creosored piles for
Atlantic Division.
The following ve.sels arrived at or departed from
Balboa during the week ended September 24:
Arrivals-September I cS flo,p'.ir from Puget Snund
September 19. .ansi*ag. from Port Harford Sep-
tember 20 Loa from South ports. September ?2.
Cabra from Callao (Italian warshipl Septem.
ber 21 E it.aor. from Guayaquil September ?% .4a
pu.,o from San Francisco. September 2i. 2atf from
intermediate ports
Departures-September IA Sa'aty bound south:
September 18, Lans',g for Port Harford Septem-
ber 19. A-Inca for Guavaquil September 20. Limawr.
for South ports Septlinber fl. CFhriqrqi for interme-
diate ports: September 23. tanrst'sunia for San
Francisco
Proposals for Building.
Contract building Senaed proposals for labor only.
will be received at the office of the Con'trueting Quar.
termasler Culebra. until 3 p m October 4. 1909.
and then opened for the erection by contract of ra
motor car house at Galun. Plans and specifica-
tions can be obtained from the Constrnictig Ouar.
lerma-ter by making a deposit of $5 Fifty dollars
must be deposited with the proposal and 5200 when
the contract is signed R E WOOD.
Acting Chlrf L&aftermaster
Bids for Clearing Cinnal Prism.
Bids will be received at the office of the Purchasinc
Agent on the Isthmus. Isthruian Canal Commission.
Mount Hope C. Z.. up to 2 p. min.. October 5 19)9 at
which time they will be opened in public for the
clearing and removing of tall grass. brush cane
stumps and trees from eight sections of the Canal
prism. amounting to approximately 842 acres. The
location of these tracts and all information and spec-
ifieations concerning the clearing of same. may be
obtained at the office of tLe Division Engineer Em-
pire. Assistant Engineer. San Pablo. or the Purchas-
ing Agent. Work must be commenced by October
20. 1909 and be completed before April 20. 1910 Bids
will be received for one or more sections Each
bid must be accompanied by 550 deposit as gur-.
anty that contract will be entered into. The suc-
cessful bidders must furnisli for eIch section a de-
posit in the sum of $2 United States currency per
acre as a guaranty that the work will be properly
performed. denoosit to be returned upon satisfactory
completion ai work. No bids will be received from
any United States Government employee. Proposals
should be enclosed in sealed envelopes marked "Pro-
posal for clearing Canal prism." The right is re-
served to reject any or all bids. C Nixon.
Prvhasi i Agent on the Isthmus.


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.

Activities of the Young Men's Chri-tian As-
sociation.
The Hearons Sisters Concert Cnmpanl, of New
York sailed from the Isthmus for the States on Sep-
tember 27. after having given twelve entertainments
which were attended by ahout ? 5ris' people.
Through the courtesy of the Bureau oF American
Republics at Washineton the libraries have received
valuable books on Brazil and Peru. and a copy of the
Burt-au s bulletin which contains an article on the
natural resources of the Republic of Panama
CULEBRA.
The result-, of the bowling tournament games at
Culebra on Sprteniber 22 are I, follows


Cst'ebhrj F,/-'
Lanl=iter . ..... 1l,4
Hayes .... 123
W inters .. .... 161
Cc.fflu .. 1-4
Doutheit. .. .. I\I

Total ..... .... 7; 2

Brown. ..... ..... .t0
Potter .... . . .
Bardelson .. .... 143
Hinckley 12)
Huson ... ... 17s
Total ...... ....... A-


e5,- nJ
I 5
148
151
153

'98


162
141

13S
72.S


T'ta.'
511
417
479
415
V76

2 398


EMPIRE.
The smoker given at the clubhouse at Empire on
MoNndr night September 2il was well attended The
following program was rendered
election Empire mandolin club. song Georce R
Herring indian club exhibition. George R Kramer
clarinet solo John Gray selection Erunire Y M C
A. quartet character sketches in crayon Prof SMl-
berg vocal solo W H Walsh- selection mandolin
club: parallel bars. Miller Kramer. Ludwig selec
tion quartet hand balancing and tumbling Miller
and Wheeler impromptu remark- various speakers
GORGONA.
At the int'ormal smoker given on Monda. night.
September 211 an improtriplu program was the feat-
ure. Among the numbers were music by House ra9
Band s' ongs hv Mele-rs \'right Nand Ch.arnles and
dancing by Mel-srs Robtoy and McRae -nother
smoker will be held on Saturday night. October 9.
E. Emer W J Wnright nud T Cha rnley are the com-
miltteein chargeof preparations.
The moisinc picture chow on Salurdsa night. Sep-
tenmber 2' was so well attended and enve such gen-
eml pleasure that a similar entert.iinment will be
giseu on Saturd ,s. Octloer ?.
The sacred concert given Sund'ay night by the
Hearons Sisters was attended by dn audience that
filled ever, seat in the hall. This was the third con-
cert by the company in Gorgona. and each time the
hall was filled
The bowling games in the tournament series on Sat-
urday night September 25 resulted as follows.
Crttoia.'. Fir-l. Sel-cnd. Thrud. Total
Baite .... ... 166 18 1A2 5'S
Parl-ow ......... .... 1 5 153 164 452
Louch .... ..... ... 147 187 190 5;S
Strong ...... ... ... 160o 178 148 446
Bullard-. ..... ..... ]o2 Itb 138 486
Total .............. 77,1 884 822 2.476
Govg.i..a
Otis ............. 16 175 14h 485
Buchanan ..... 193 197 126 516
L Roper ... ... .. ].1 144 174 438
Kine ...... .... 123 18 1I31 4S2
S xta n ...... .. 1u 153 lIn 468

Total ..... .... ... 795 797 794 2.389

Misdirected Letters.
DrvistoN OF Posrs. CusrTOM AND REVENUES
ANCON. C. Z aepteinmher 2N. 1909
The following insufficiently addressed letters
onginating in the United states and its. possessions.
have been received in the office of the Director of
Posts. and may be secured upon request of the
addressee-
Aarons. Mr and Mrs H. Hams Robert J. Jr
Austin. C B Jiamonn. Rev M A
Bain. H. G or W C Lewis. Edward
Baptiste C F Martin. Capt J
Bartlett,. Emir C Mcl eod. J
Binion. Miss Joe Naimillb. Albert
Cail Peter Nicholson. George
Case Elmer Paul Richerson. Johninoe
Decker Rev William Sweal W Perry
Decker, Mrs Win. H Thompson A R
Driyton. Allan 12) calling C.
Elliott.C H 12d class) Weber. Chas B
Ellison, Charles P. Whitehead Joseph
Gilkey E. L Winnie. N. E
Gilling. George Woodsum. D. M.
Graham, Alet Zelinski, William









40 THE CANAL RECORD o. III., No. 5.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

The hours during which couiainis-inei ,.re open .ire
as follows
Cristobal and Culebra. a an to .12 J n in2 p in.
1o 7 p. m.
All other commiasvrneS a ni. to I a rn. S p m
to 7 p. m.
Retail r.nces of cold ston.gepro, iiions ior the week
beginning Septenmber .5
FRESH MEATS

Mutton-Stewing .............. ... oer lb 7
Shoulder neck trimmed off
14 poutnd and o ri . .....per Ib in
Entire forequarter Inot trim.
medal 1 )pounds and oer .. .per lb 9
Leg tI In 10 pound, ...... ..... per Ib 19
Steak ....... ....... .. .. per Lb 20
Short-cut chop ... .. ........ ... per Ib `2
Lamb-Stewing ...... .. ...... . ... ..per Ib 7
Entire ioreqiu.rter, neck trimmed
off . ..... ...... . .. per lb 11)
Ltg (6 to S pound.'' .. ..... .......er lb '"
Chops ... .................. . per Ib 2`
Veql-Stevng ......... . ..... er lb It
Shoulder for roasting Inot under
4 Its ..... . r, r lb 15
Loin for roauting....... ... ......per Ib 19
Chops .. .... .. .. ....per lb ?2
Cutlet: . ........ ............ per Ib f26
Pork cuts.. .... ....... ......... ... .. per lb 22
Beef-Suet.. ...... ............. ...... per lb 4
Soup .... ........ .. .. ..... . .. er Ib 6
Stew.... .... - .. .. ........... per lb 10
Corned .. ... ............. per Ib 12 14. IB
Chuck roat ................. per Ib 14
Pot roanst. ... ... . ... er Ih In
Rib-ronst second cut inot under
3S" pounds .......... ... per Ib 19
Rib-roast first cut Iriot ulder 3
pounds' ..... .. .... ...... .per lb 21
Sirloin roast .. ......... . per Ib 22
Rump roast.... ......... .. .. .. ...per lb 22
Porterhous'e roast .... .. .or Ib 2
Steak. Chuck...... .... .......... per lb 15
Round .. p er Ih 16
Rib .... ... ...... ...... . per lb 21
Sirloin . .. ... .......... per Ib 22
Porterhouse ............ per lb 22
Rump. ... .. . .. per lb ?22
Tenderloau ......... ...per lb 27
MIbCELLAN holes.
Livers-Beef.... .. ... ............. ..... er lb ll'.i
Calf.. . ......... ...... each 65
Shad roe ... . ......... r 4'1
Sausage- Pork ............... ....... per lb ?17
Bologna . ........ per Ib 17
Frankfurter .... .. . . per Ib 17
Leberwust . ......... .. . ..per Ib 17
Sweet bread-Veal. ... ... ......... .per lb 1 20
Sweet bread-Beef..... ............. .. per lb 30)
Oysters ..... .. .... ... . ....ke I uiS'
Eggs. fresh ........ ............... ...... dozei .?
Bluefish .......... ... ... ..... . .......... per lb 15
POULTRY AND GAME.
Chickens-Fancy Roasting large...... each 1 Sri
medium ... each l.,a
Fowls .... .. ....... ....each 90. i in.
Ducks. failed ... .. ... ... . . .... ..... each I 3'0
medium weight ........ .......pqch 911
Broilers .... .................. .. .. .. each 75
rurkeyi s .. ......... ........... ....... per Ib 311
Squabs ......... .................... ......... e ch
Capon . ......... . .. each ? 50:
Geese. t.itled about I0 pounds .. . .... eich 2110
12 pounds .... .. each 2 .30
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS
Bacon-Breakfast whole piece .. per lb 27
Breaki. sl sliced .. .. .. ... per Ih 29
Ham--Sugar-cured ticed .... ... er Ib 4_5
One-h:.lf for boiling.... ....... per Ih 421
VWestphilia . ... .. ... ...per Ib a5
Hocki ........... ..... ... Per 11 Is
Sugur cured . ............. .. ...-r lb 20
Beef. .ailt family ......... .... .. ..per lb 10
Pork. salt ........ .. .... .... ..... pertlh 15
Hnm boilrd .. .... ...... .. ... per Ib 28
Ox tongues..... ..... .................each 1 I)
Pigs' feet ......... ..... ........o Der lb It
tongues .... .. .. .. ....... per lb 16
DAIRY PrRiD'ICTS
Butter-Pnnts prime quallty. ..... er lb 42
Cheese-Rocqurfort ......... ......... per lb 45
Phil.idelphia Creat ........ euch 2.'
Voung America ....... .... per lb )
Swiss .... .... ...... ... ... per lb 31
Fdam ......... ................ each 1 05
Camembert.............. .... .. per Ih 26
Neufchitel ............ .. each 6
Gouda ............... . . .. per lb 34
Parmesann............... ... .. bottle 20
French cheese in lins-Cametnberi Brie
Neufehalel ............ ....... ... .. 1 tin ?,1
Milk. Briarcliff ............... ... ...... ho tle '5
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS
Celery ...... .. ........... ... .rer hd 10
Let tuce..... .............. ....... .... per 11) 15
Potatoes. white old .............. ...... per Ih 35,
sweet ............. .............. per lb 2
Onions.. .................... ........... ....per lb 3
Squash. Hubbard.. ..... ......................p. per Ib .5


V ram s ...... .. .... .... .... .... .........
Turnip . ... ....... ... .........
CairroL .. ........ ........... ...........
Beet ... . .. .. .. ...
Potatoes. new ....... .... .... .... .. ...
CaRulflower ...................
Cucunlers .. .... .. . ... . .. .
Tnm atc s . ....... .... .
Lemons .................. ......
ir;,pet .. .. ......... .. ....... .. ...
Limes .... .
W term elons ...... .. ..... .... ......
Peache . . .
CtLUloUpDes ......... . .. ................
Blueberries .. ........ ....
Cabbage .. .................. ...........
Apples ... . ........... .. .. ..........
O r na ge . . .... .................
G rapelruil ........ ...... ... ....... .
Plum s .........

Int1dlcale;- reduction from la:t list
-'Indicates 5 cents allowed for retu
tIndicatec advance on Inst list.
sold onl' from Commissaries- no
deliier.
mSold only from Cold Storage and
mis.sanes
Rainaill, September I to 25, 19
(M ID N FIG T TO NrID N IGrF


STATIONS.




Ar!'antic Diat.wuon-
Crisohbl ... . .. .............
Brazos Brook ..... . ... ...
Gatun. ..... .. .... .. . .
Bohio .. .. . .. ...........
Cetn.a' ttn'&ii r--
Tabernilla ... .....
S-an P blo ... ..... ..... ...
lor onia .. . .. . ........
Gam bos ........... .. .
Em pire ..... ..... .. ...
Cam achn .. .... .... ..... ..
Culeh . ......... ....
Pi, '.fc D'rlswro'n-
Rio Grande ...... ....... ...
Pedro Miguel. ..... .... .... .
Balboa .. .. . ... .......
Ancon ...... ..... .. ..... ...
Porto Bello ........ .... .....
Nombre de Diu -Sept I to IS 1.
Up.' Charusrr-
E l Vigir ...................
Alhalueln .... ....... .........

Stages of the Cllagt'
Maximum height of Chagres
mean sea level for the week end
Saturday, September 25, 1909:

Sa t






Sundv .pt. 1 < 4 .9 49
-

Heacht of low water
above se-lrvel. f 1l1?5 92' 46
N 'ixinLum h' ight ab.l

Suanren Sepl. 19 137 I 9.1.9 49
Monday' Sept.20 128 6 94 7 4q.l
Tu sd,, S pt 21 1:7 2 9i 9 49
Wed'esd.a ept 22 126.8 93.5 46.
Thursday' SeL't 32 17 6 91 ?7 4
Friday Set 24 137.5 94 1 4A a
SaturuHy. Sept 25 1?6 5 93.3 IS.-


Tide Table.
The following table shows th
and low tides at Panama for ti
ing October 6, 1909 (75th meri


DTre. Low. High.

A M. A M.
k":L't 1'0 ......... 3.52
t .... ...... 4 3
ct 2. ... 5.18

Oct 3 .. . Bi
Oct .. 1245 647
Oct 5 ..... 1 33 7 36
Oct. .. .. 2 31 6 31


Low.

A. M
10 |':
10 5i
11.38
P. M.
12 .23
1 12
203
3.03


She variation of01 nig and los
tobal is so slight that a tide
Atlantic side is not necessary,


PrAe. MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.
....pe Ilb 3 -
. per lb 3 The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
.per lb 5 ama Railroad Steamship Company. of the Royal Mail
... .per lb 3S Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American
Der Ib 6 Line. and of the United Fruit Company's Line. the
... per lb 4 Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
.. er lb 5 change:
.. b dozen NEW YORK TO COLON.
per 100 s0 Panama................P. R. R.Monday.......Sept. 27
. each 40 Cristobal...............P. R. R.Thursday......Sept. 30
S.per b 8 Maygdalena ............R.-M.. Saturday......Oct. 2
........ each 3 Advance.............P R. R.Saturday ......Oct. 2
. ....box 18
......per lb 04 AIlianca ...........P.R. R.Friday .........Oct. 8
......per lb *5 Prinz Joachim ........H.-A. .Saturday.......Oct. 9
...... dozen 12 Colon.................. P. R. R Thursday......Oct. 14
..... each 4 Ancon................ P. R R.PFrday.........Oct. 15
. per lb *10 Clyde................. R.-M ...Soturday......Oct. 16
Panama............... P. R. R.Thursday...... Oct. 21
ru of bottle. Prinz Aug Wilhelm.. H.-A Saturday.......Oct. 23
Allianca .............. P. R.R.Tuesday........Oct. 26
orders taken for Thames ...............R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 30
Prinz joachim ......... H.-A.. .Saturday...... Nov. 6
not from Com. Atrato .............. R.-M ..Saturday.......Nov. 13
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A ..S.aturday ......Nov. 20
00. Inclusive. Tagus .... ............R.-M.. Saturday.......Nov. 27
IT I Prinz Joachim ........ H.-A...Saturday....... Dec. 4
a Persons desiring to meet steamers at Cristobal
* should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
E 0 office, room 8 building No. I. Cristobal. for custom
28 line permits, which are necessary to obtain admit-
4 -' lance be. ond waiting room on pier I1.
a 5 3 All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and
a "Royal Mill lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO 9EW YORK.
2.26 12 14 02 Colon................ P. R. R Saturday....... Oct. 2
I 15 7 R 5 Ancon. .............. ..P. R R.Wednesday....Oct. 6
2 a 10 9 13 Clyde................ R.-M. .Weduesday....Oct. 6
I 53 13 ?.63 Panama............. ..P. R. R. Friday......... Oct. 8
254 II oa Prinz Aug Wilhelm.. H..A...Tuesday ....... Oct. 12
2 7 I 990 Advance.............. P. R. R.Thursday......Oct. 14
I 41 2 7 36 Cristobal. ........... P. R R.Friday......... Oct. 15
1 44 7 7 12 Allianca ...............P. R R.Tuesday........Oct. 19
L."I 13 6 00 Thames .............R.-M...Wednesday....Oct. 20
S66 14 10 u7 Colon .................P RR.Moaday........ Oct. 25
1 66 13 6.44 Print Joachim .....H.-A ..Tuesday.......Oct. 26

1 :9 IS 741 Ancon.. ..............P R R.Thursday......Oct. 28
1.75 Ia 670 Panama .. ............P. R.R.Tuesday.......Nov. 2
85 I1 3.34 Allianca ..............P. R. R.Monday........Nov. 8
9. 16 2 76 Pnnz Aug. Wilhelm H -A.. Tuesday ..... Nov. 9
2 16 13 1026 Prinz Joachim......... H.-A... Tuesday....... Nov. 23
I 15 7 5 0 Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H. A ..Tuesday.......Dec. 7
NEW ORLEaNS TO COLON.
2 3S 5 950
1.71 13 6.24 Abaugarez ... .....U F.C..Saturday......Sept. 25
Atenas .......... .. U F.C..Saturday...... Oct. 2
e, Turrialba ......... ... U.F.C..Eaturday ......Oct. 9
RiAbangarez .......... U P C..Saturday......Oct. 16
s River above Aena. ............. U F.C.:Saturday......Oct. 2J
ing midnight Turnalba............ U P C. .Saturday......Oct. 30
Ahangarez........... U.F C .Saturday ......Nov. 6
Atenas ........ .....U P C .Saturday......Nov. 13
rONS. Turrialba ... ........ U F.C..Saturday ......Nov. 20
-- Abangarez ....... U.P.C. Saturday......Nov. 27
a a- nr COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.
I 1 B Abangarez............U P.C. Tuesday.......Oct. 5
a U- 0- Atenas .............. U.F C. Tuesday.......Oct. 12
Tu- rrialba ........ .. I.F.C. Tuesday.......Oct. 19
Abangnrez ............U F C..Tuesday.......Oct. 26
I 0 0 Atenas ............. U P.C..Tuesday.......Nov. 2
Turrialba .............U F C..Tuesday ......Nov. 9
3 4 4 3 3.6 Abangare'.......... U P.C..Tuesday ....... Nov. 16
6 6.2 36 2.9 Atenas.. .......... *t.F.C .Tuesday.......Nov. 23
' 8 3 6 2 Turrialha...... ....... U.F C..Tuesday.......Nov. 30
S66 2? 2.1 Abangarez .. ........ LU.F.C..Tuesday.......Dec. 7
67 2. 20 COLON TO BARBAD0S. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.
I 56 2 1 a Magdalena ........... R.-M. Tuesday ...... Oct. 12
Sailings of the French line tCie. Ghndrale Trans-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 2nth of each month.
etimeof high The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
he week end- follows: Tampeian for New Orleans. via Kinagton,
dian time): ]a.. on or about September 30.
The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p.m.
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York.
High Low. A ship of the United Fruit Company's line sails
-- from the dock at Colon, at 3 p. m.. Tuesday of each
P M P. week.
4 59 11 1 The steamers Da'id of the National Navigation
5.43 11.s8 Company. and the Taboga of the Pacific Steam Navi-
gatz3o Company. leave Panama. for David. province
6.28 ........ of Chiriqui. and intermediate points. the fBrat and
7.16 ....... third weeks of each mouth.
S 10 ........
9.13 ........ FPoUD.-On Dock No. It1. Cristobal. after the ar-
tide at rs- rival of the .41rara onl September 21. a manicure set,
V tide at Cris- which the owner can secure by calling at the Pan-
tabje for the ama railroad office in Colon and describing the prop-
erty













CANAL


RECORD


Volume II. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1909. No. 6.


The Canal Record
Published meekly under the authority and supervision
0f the Isthmian Canal Commission.

The Canal Record is issued reeof change, ne copy
each, l all enmployes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Exra copies and back numbers can he obtained from
the newr stands of the Panama Railroad Company for
AN centers earc.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
Nocommunwation. either ot rublicalion or request
ing inlornation, will reeiwe attention unless signed
ith thejull name and address oj the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Gatun Locks.
Notwithstanding the delays incident to the
inferior workmanship of some of the machin-
ery furnished by contract in the States, the
laying of concrete in Gatun Iocksis making
steady progress. Thiswork was begun on Au-
gust 24, and the amount of concrete placed
each week from that time until the close of
work on October 2, was as follows:
Cubic v}'ant:
August28....................... .... 732
September 4 .......................... 1.6.34
September 11............... .. ....... 1.742
September 18 ...........................2.5.98
September 25............................ 3786
October 2..... ........ ................ 3.3210
The laying of concrete continues in the
upper lock above the intermediate gate.
Pour channeling machines are at work mak-
ing trenches for placing lateral culverts in
the upper lock below the intermediate gate.
and two steam shovels are clearing away the
rock in front of the concrete gangs.
A barge load of sand is delivered daily
from Nombre de Dios, and the quality is
better than heretofore due to the fact that
some of the clay is washed out before the
sand is loaded on the barges. The rock
deliveries keep well ahead of the amount of
stone required for the concrete. On an
average, about one-third of theautomatic cars
on the railroad from the material storage to
the concrete mixers are running each day.
The head tower of the cableway which col-
lapsed recently is being repaired and the
other three head towers are being reinforced
with concrete from the concrete counter-
weight to the platform on which the ma-
chinery is erected. On an average, 500
Cubic yards of concrete are placed each day.
Additional Fuel Oil Installations.
The two locomotive type boilers at the
*Cucaracha pumping station at Rio Grande
i e.being equipped for the use of crude oil as
.| and two tanks, of 240 barrels capacity
are being erected to store oil. The
fi tteee boilers in the puminping station at Mt.


Zion, which supplies the high level service
at Culebra, will be taken out and two sec-
ond-band Scotch marine boilers equipped
for oil burning will be installed. Two oil
tanks with a capacity of 240 barrels are be-
ing erected for this station also. Each of
these pumping plants will consume about
800 barrels of oil per month, and the econ-
omy resulting from the use of oil will pay
for the installation within a year.

Operations at Pedro Miguel Locks.
During the month of September, 2,369,'$
cubic yards of concrete were placed in the
lower guide wall at the Pedro Miguel Locks,
an average of 94.8 cubic )ards for each of the
25 working days. The auxiliary concrete
miser in the west chamber was completed
and put into operation on September 23. and
since that time the auxiliary and the portable
mixers have been kept at work. With the in-
stallation of additional auxiliary equipment
to facilitate the handling of the concrete,
which is in progress, a normal daily output
of about 400 cubic yards is expected. At the
end of the month one of the cross culvert
forms had been placed in position, and work
was in progress on others.
The excavation in the east chamber of the
locks is about down to grade, and the work
in the chamber at present is confined to
removing the material carried in by the re-
cent slide.
The storage trestles in the upper forebay
are completed and ready for use. The
regular excavation work in the forebav was
continued during the month. A sump will
be created, and a pumping plant established
near the forebay to keep the water from
flowing into the lock chambers during heavy
rains.
Ancon Rock Crushing Plant.
The Ancon quarry rock crushing plant will
probably be completed and ready for opera-
tion before the end of October. The con-
crete work, with the exception of the founda-
tions for the motors, is practically finished;
the belt conveyor shed has been erected and
part of the conveyor apparatus installed.
The four No. 6 rock crushing machines are
in position, and the large No. 12 crusher is
being placed. A frame superstructure will
be built to enclose the crusher machinery
and the motors which are to drive it. It
will consist of amain building44 feet square.
which will afford shelter for the No. 12 ma-
chine; a second building 22 feet wide for
the four secondary crushers, and a still
smaller building 10 feet wide, which will
protect four of the motors.
The motors, seven in number, consist of
one of 750-h. p.. which will operate the main
crusher, and will be placed at one side of it:
four of 250-h. p. each, which will drive the
four smaller crushers and will be placed di-
rectly below them, and two motors of 30-h. p.


each,which will be located over the storage
bin, one at each end, to drive the conveyor
apparatus.
The stripping operations have been stead-
il, continued, and a considerable portion of
the rock face has been exposed. The switch-
back is completed, and work on the yard
tracks will be finished inside of another
week.
Work on the sand dock and storage bin at
Balboa was continued during September, and
one of the three cranes tobe used in unload-
ing sand from barges is nearly erected.

Consumption of Fuel Oil.
The amount of fuel oil used by the various
departments and divisions during July and
August was as follows:
BARRELS
JuRly Auru't.
Public W works ......... .......... ... 18 700
Motive Power and Machinery........ : I :' 22 4 9
All.n ic Division .............. l.0.. A 2.0'0
Ceutral Division.... ................. 1 691 1 i'
Pacific Division......... ..... .:'.3 7. Sanitation. .......................... 1 02l I 240
Panama railroad. .. .............. 15. 80? 84
Total ......... .... . . .. ... 43.illl
When the power plants at Gatun and
Miraflores begin to use oil as fuel the
monthly consumption will probably amount
to nearly 60,U00 barrels, the quantity agreed
upon in the contract with the Union Oil
Company as the greatest amount that must
be supplied at the rate of $1.10 a barrel.
Effort to Avoid Overtime Work.
In an effort to decrease the amount of
overtime earned on the Canal work, the
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer has
called the attention of the Division Engi-
neers to the following statement of over-
time in August:
DISO. c o Per cent
nor erti l of tolar
overtime.
Atlantic ...................... .5 755.34 a20
Pacific ............ ....... ..204.21 12
Central ... ....... .. 18379.45 56
M echanic l .................. 3.s06.91 12
Total ........ .. . ...... $ 3 6 5 81 I00
Assuming that the overtime for August
was a fair average for the entire year, in
order to accomplish work of a labor value
of $269.000 at standard rates of pay, the
Commission is paying $404,000, or a bonus
of $135,000 a year. It is recognized that it
is impossible to eliminate this extra pay
time. With study and attention, however,
it is believed that it can be reduced. In any
case the extra cost of overtime should be
taken into consideration by those ordering
or authorizing it, and where the conditions
through which it arises are constantly re-
curring, a remedy should be applied so far
as practicable by (1) increasing the day







THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. Il.. No. 6.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
(Continued.)


force, (2) putting on a second shift of men,
or (3) putting men on a monthly basis.
A provision of the Sundry Civil Act of
March 4, 1909, makes it illegal to pay em-
ployes on a monthly basis for overtime work.
Only men employed by the hour are paid for
working more than the regular number of
hours, and their pay is governed by the fol-
lowing rule of the Commission:
Resoa'ed, Thateffective September 1 1909. all hourly
employes who are citizens of the rUnited States will
be paid time and one-half for work over the eight-
hour day: all other hourly employ es will be paid time
and one-half for work over ten hours in one day All
hourly employes will be paid time and one-half for
all work on Sundays and holidays.
Attention iscalled to the fact that the length of the
working day for mechanics and laborers, as now es-
tablished by the United States Statutes. is not
changed by the above resolution. It is merely in-
tended that when alien mechanics are required to
perform emergency work after the close of the eight-
hour day, they shall be paid straight time until they
have worked ten hours: and that laborers, when re-
quired to work more than nine hours per day. shall
not be paid time and one-half until after ten hours'
work.
Pumps for Lock Pits.
The lock pits at Pedro Miguel and Mira-
flores will be drained by pumping during
the construction of the locks. Three 6-inch
centrifugal pumps for this purpose have ar-
rived on the Isthmus, and three 12-inch
centrifugal pumps are expected this week.

Testing Anron Rock and Chame Sand.
A cubic yard of rock from Ancon quarry,
and a similar amount of sand from the de-
posits at Point Chame were shipped on the
Colon on October 2 to the Structural Mate-
rials Division of the United States Geologi-
cal Survey at Pittsburg, Pa., where the sam-
ples will be tested in connection with the
use of this rock and stone in the concrete
work at the Pedro Miguel Locks. The sam-
ples were forwarded at the request of H. M.
Wilson, Chief Engineer of the Technologi-
cal branch of the Geological Survey, who
had similar tests made some time ago of the
rock at the Porto Bello quarry, and sand
from Nombre de Dios and Quango beach.
In these tests the sand from Nombre de
Dios was pronounced superior to that from
Quango beach.

Work at Balboa Shipways.
The work of assembling three of the four
barges received from the States some time
ago is in progress at the Balboa shipways.
One of the barges is nearly ready to be
launched, while two more are well under
way. No work has yet been done on the
fourth barge. The old French barge recov-
ered from the Chagres River at San Pablo
and reconstructed at Balboa for use as a
wrecking crane is about ready to be slid off
the ways.
Gas and Whistling Buoy at Porto Bello.
It is the intention of the Canal Commis-
sion to locate, on or about November 1, 1909,
at Salmedina Bank, about one-fourth mile
off Green Islet, at the entrance to Porto
Bello Harbor, an acetylene gas and whistling
buoy. This buoy will show a fixed white
light at an elevation of 15 feet above the
water surface.
This information has been furnished to


all interested officials of the Panama rail-
road, the Republic of Panama, the Secretary
of War, the Secretary of the Navy, the Nav-
igation Bureau. the Hydrographic Office,
Coast and Geodetic Survey, Chief of Engi-
neers, United States Army, the State Depart-
ment, Department of Commerce and Labor,
the International Bureau of American Re-
publics, the admiralty offices of the various
maritime foreign nations, and others inter-
ested.
Accident to Rock Breaker.
An accident occurred to the rock breaker
Vul can, on October 2, when working in the
rock shoal off the Panama railroad wharf at
Balboa, which caused a suspension of oper-
ations for seven days. The huge cutter, or
ram, used in breaking up the channel bot-
tom glanced off the edge of the rock ledge
and sank into the mud to a depth of 60 feet.
After grappling for five days the ram was
finally secured and brought to the surface,
and on October 9, work was again resumed.

Shipment of Native Lumber.
A second shipment of native lumber on
the order given some time ago by the Istb-
mian Canal Commission's local purchasing
agent, was received from the Bayano River
Lumber Company September 22 and for-.
warded to Gorgona shops, where it will be
tested in the manufacture of wood parts for
cars and locomotives. The shipment con-
sisted of 6,000 feet of espave, 2% x 8 x 10,
about 1,000 feetof alcoviuscolorvie, and 400
feet of colorvie. The total amount received
to date is about 13,400 feet. The first ship-
ment was sent to Empire shops, and a part
of it has been worked up there in the manu-
facture of wood parts for steam shovels.
Some of this wood was so hard that in work-
ing up five or six blocks, the teeth on the
saws were dulled. Its efficiency has not yet
been determined, as the material has been
in use only a short time.

New Buildings at Gatun.
Advertisements are being prepared for the
construction of the Commission clubhouse at
Gatun. The only important change in the
plans since the details were published in
THE CANAL RECORD of July 7 is that two
double bowling alleys, four alleys in all, are
to be built instead of two alleys as was at
first planned. The limit of cost within which
the building must be erected remains at
$25,000. Material will be furnished by the
Commission, and the contractor will merely
erect the building.
Authority has been granted for the con-
struction of a type-27 house for the keeper
of the Agua Clara reservoir, which is to
supply water to Gatun. The work will be
done by contract.
Pacific Division Sand Operations.
A dredge was sent to Point Cham6 twice
during September, and a total of 5.727 cu-
bic yards of sand were removed and trans-
ported in barges to the sand dock at Balboa,
from where it was forwarded to the works at
Gatun and Pedro Miguel. An average of 13
dump car loads of sand a day is being trans-
ported to Gatun, where the Chamd sand is
to be used in the concrete for facings, etc.
The only time lost in dredging sand at
Point Chame isthat consumed in moving the
dredge back and forth. The trip usually
takes two days, the dredge filling all the


barges available, and afterwards returning
to its regular work in the Canal channel. In
taking out sand at Point Cham6 a consider-
able quantity of water is removed with it,
which collects in pockets and remains in the
sand even after it is unloaded at the sand
dock. To avoid this it is proposed to use a
small centrifugal pump to get rid of the wa-
ter when the sand is being loaded.

Moveable Towers at Giatua.
Materials for the twelve moveable towers,
which will be used in holding the plates of
the forms for the face of the walls of Gatun
Locks, have arrived at Cristobal, and delivery
will be completed by a shipment to be made
from Baltimore on October 15.

Changes at Gorgona and Empire Shops.
The transfer of Empire shops from the
Mechanical Division to the Central Division,
for the repair of all steam shovels and the
manufacture and repair of steam shovel
parts, was effected on October 1. In addi-
tion to the force already maintained by the
Central Division at its field repair shop at
Cunette, near Empire, the following force
has been transferred from the Mechanical
Division and will remain at the Empire
shops:
One general foreman. 5 foremen. I assistant to fore-
man, 2 draftsmen, 1 shop electrician, 84 machinists.
21 boilermakers. 18 blacksmiths, 2 electric crane
operators. 9 carpenters. I pipefitter, 2 machinists'
helpers.
For the present the headquarters of the
Superintendent of Motive Power and Ma-
chinery, of the Mechanical Engineer, and
the boiler inspector, will remain at Culebra,
but the office and drafting forces will be
transferred to Gorgona shops, as soon as
the new building being erected there for
their accommodation is completed. The
approved organization of Gorgona shops,
under the Electrical Engineer and Master
Mechanic, provides at present for 652 gold
employes and 980 silver employes, in all
1,632 men, distributed as follows:
Office Force-Chief clerk and 25 men, chief drafts-
man and 15 men, electrical accountant.
Car and Foundry Departmbnt-General foreman of
the car and foundry department and 533 men. To
this department has been added the steel car repair
work. with 112 men transferred from Empire shops.
Eleclntae Shbdnas won-Foreman of construction.
Colon to Balboa, and 121 men.
Locomotive Department-General foreman and a88
men. This department includes the machine and
erecting shop. pipe and copper shop, boiler shop,
blacksmith shop, paint shop, power plant, and night
force.
Engine Houses and Air Compressor--Superintend-
ent of engine houses and air compressor plants at
outside points, and 451 men. The fdrmermater me-
chanic at Empire 'hops has been assigned to this
work. He has under his direction the hoastling at
Empire. Baas Obispo. and Balboa; the engine house
and repair shops at San Pablo and Caimito. Taber-
nilla, and Las Cascadas; the car shop, engine house,
coal chute. and cable splicing forces at Pedro Miguel;
the car inspection and repairing at Balboa: the air
compressors at Rio Grande, Empire. Las Cascadas;
the foreman mason, and the foreman of the air pipe
lines.
Master Car Builder-The former master car builder
at Empire shops will have under him the field force
engaged in car repairs at Las Cascadas, Bas Obispo
and in Culebra Cut. in all 68 men.
The foreman in charge of the scrapping
of old French materials will report direct to
the Electrical Engineer and Master Mechanic
of Gorgona shops.

Los-r-A white opera cloakat dance at Hotel Tivoli
October 2, from ladies' cloakroom. If the lady who
took this cloak in mistake for her own, will return it
to the management of the Tivoli, she canrsecure her
cloak in exchange.







October 6, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


HEAVY RAIN IN CULEBRA CUT.
lskT Thorough Tet of the Drainage System-
Efifet Upon Excavation.
With the exception of the storm of De-
cember 3, 1906, when 6.15 inchesof rain fell
in 24 hours, the heaviest shower ever re-
corded atEmpireoccurred between 12 o'clock
S nqon and 5 o'clock in the afternoon of Oc-
tober 1. At other points along Culebra Cut
the rain was also heavy, but the greatest
precipitation was at Empire. The rainfall
was largest between noon and 1 o'clock, but
throughout the afternoon it continued with
such severity as to seriously hamper the
work. Flooded pits, railroad tracks under
water, and delay in serving the shovels with
ears were the principal difficulties in the
way of effective work. The rain gauges at
both ends of the Cut and at two intermedi-
ate points registered as follows:

StanoNs. 12 m. to 12 m. to
STATOs. 1p. m. 5 p. m.

inches. Inches
Gambia .......................... 2.38 3.29
Empire ........................... 3.52 452
RioGrande.................... 1.58 2.25
PedroMan el................... 2.66 3.34
This shower afforded the first thorough
test of the recently completed drainage sys-
tem of Culebra Cut. The system divides the
Cut into two slopes with the summit at pres-
ent near Empire. All the water that collects
between the summit and the Pacific end of
the Cut at Pedro Miguel flows through the
ditch in the center, and in a diversion ditch
around the Pedro Miguel lock site into the
Rio Grande. All that collects between the
summit and the Atlantic end of the Cut at
Bas Obispo flows into a sump at Bas Obispo
and is raised over a dike into the Chagres
River by three 22-inch pumps. On this slope
the Obispo and Camacho diversion canals,
on either side of the Cut, keep the water
from the adjacent hills from flowing into
the prism.
After the shower the water in the sump at
Bas Obispo stood at 51 feet above sea level,
higher than the water in the Chagres River
at that time. The pumps were flooded,
all the steam shovels in that part of the
work were out of commission, and viewed
from the banks above the excavation pits,
the situation appeared one that it would
require days to clear up. The 20-inch flood
gates above the level of the river were
opened, and the water was thus lowered so
that the pumps could be operated. All night
long the three pumps poured their capacity
teamsm, 15,000 gallons per minute, into the
:river. By noon of the day following the
.'shower, the steam shovels at Bas Obispo
were at work.
As soon as the heaviest part of the shower
was over the Division Engineer and Assist-
ant Division Engineer of the Central Divi-
ion made an inspection of the diversion
channels. They were running about half
f ll and carrying all the water that poured
into them from a hundred small streams
draining the nearby hills. No gauging sta-
b:tion has been established on the diversions,
: .but from the fact that the Obispo Diversion
was-built to carry 6,000 cubic feet of water
p per second and that it was half full, it is es-
tmnated that 3,000 cubic feet per second were
j*i: t. through the channel immediately
b* iuifae storm.
S.' .rain gauge at Rio Grande shows the
pti. i liatatioa fur the vicinity of Cncaracha

,,;5-i.


slide on the Pacific slope of Culebra Cut.
Apparently the rain had no effect on the
slide as a whole, but it sluiced loose clay
from the surface of the slowly moving mass
down around the tracks of a steam shovel
that was working on one of the higher
levels or benches. At a smaller slide, oppo-
site Culebra, another shovel was caught in
flowing mud in much the same way. One
of these shovels was ready for service on
the day after the shower but the other has
not yet been gotten out.
Forty steam shovels were at work when
the shower began-eight in the Bas Obispo
District, 17 at Empire, and 15 at Culebra.
They were under steam about 310 hours,
were kept from working by flooded pits
about 36 hours, and were waiting for cars
about 46 hours. The total delay on ac-
count of the storm was therefore about 80
hours, the largest part of the delay in wait-
ing for cars being due to the rain and to
flooded tracks. When the heaviest part of
the rain was over the shovels resumed work,
and indeed when the Cut was obscured by the
sheet of falling water the spoil trains could
be heard picking their way up to the shovels
and starting for the run to the dumps.
At 5 o'clock that evening the blasting in
front of the shovels began as usual. The
next morning the Cut was fairly free of
water, except for a small section at Bas
Obispo. The effect of the heavy rain upon
operations may be seen from the following
statement of the yardage on the day before
the rain, the day of the shower, and the
day after in Culebra Cut proper:
Vards.
September 30 ....................... 47.693
October I ................ ........... 36.890
October 2............................... 39.000
Acting Depot Quartermaster.
During the absence on leave of Capt. C.
Nixon, Depot Quartermaster, Mount Hope,
and until further orders, Mr. C. H. Mann,
chief clerk of the Quartermaster's Depart-
ment, will act as Depot Quartermaster. He
is authorized to receive and receipt for sup-
plies of the Isthmian Canal Commission con-
signed to Maj. C. A. Devol, or to the Chief
Quartermaster, Isthmian Canal Commission,
to accomplish bills of lading, to certify in-
voices for payment as to quantity and qual-
ity of supplies shown on such invoices, and
in general, to perform such duties as prop-
erly belong to the position of Depot Quar-
termaster. R. E. WOOD,
Acting ChwA ('nuartermaster.
Culebra, C. Z., September 30, 1909.
Bids for Old Iron and Steel Rejected.
Nineteen bids for the old iron and steel,
mostly French material, which the Commis-
sion desires to sell, were opened at the
Washington office on September 16. The
bids were analyzed and canvassed by the
Chairman and Chief Engineer, and after
consultation with the Secretary of War, all
of them were rejected.

To Visit the Interior.
Col. Win. C. Gorgas, Chief Sanitary Offi-
cer, will leavethisweek fora trip to Santiago
de Veragnas, Panama, the capital of the
Province of Veraguas, to investigate the ad-
vantages afforded by Santiago as a place
where Canal employes can spend their va-
cation. Santiago is a town of between
3,000 and 4,000 population located near
the Siprra de Veraguas mountains, one


peak of which, Mount Santiago, rises to a
height of 9,275 feet. The place is about 140
miles distant from Panama and can be
reached by steamer to Agua Dulce, or to
Puerto Mutis, and thence by wagon road to
Santiago. There isa fairly good wagon road,
forty miles long, from Agua Dulce to Santi-
ago.
Sailing of the Anron.
The Panama Railroad steamer Ancon ar-
rived at Cristobal on October 4, and, after
discharging her cargo of cement and mis-
cellaneous supplies, will leave for New York
on October 10.
Applicalions for Family Quarters.
The following is a list of applications for
family quarters on file October 1, 1909:

oc tf Ilor List List
1.C..I No 1. No. 2.

A ncon............ .......... ........... 4 5
Ancon Hospital....... ... ............... 2
Balboa.. .... ...... ........ .... . 3 41
Bas Obispo ....................... b 5
Corozal ..... ........ ... .. ...... .. 2 3
Crisobal. ............................... 8 124
Culebra ............ .. .......... ...... 3 3
Empire............................... ...... 19
Gatun. ...... ............. .... ...... 42 6A
Goigona .. ............. ............... 3 35
Las Cascadas. .............. ............ .. 4 5
M iraflores...................................... I
Paraiso ....................................... 11
Ped o Miguel ... .............................. 2
Porto Bello ..................... ............ .... I
Tabernilla....... ........................ 2 14
Total ....... ........................ 7 339
Applicants on the No. 1 List are employes
who entered the service prior to January 1,
1908, and they are given prior consideration.
The number of applications on the No. 2
List is steadily increasing, while the appli-
cations on the No. 1 List show a tendency to
decrease in number as seen from the follow-
ing statement:

MONTH. List List
No. I No.2.
May. ........ ............... .... 85 249
June........... . ...... ........ ... 281
i .a-- .... 94 281
July..... .......... .............. 115 305
A uguisl .. ........... ... ... .. ...... . 2 332
September. ......... ... ...... ...... 77 339

Commission Freight on Panama Railroad.
The Board appointed by the Chairman to
make an estimate of the actual cost to the
Panama railroad of handling freight for the
Commission, for the period of one year from
October 1, has compiled the following esti-
mate of tonnage handled during the year
ended August 31:
Department or Dn'u ton. 7'ons.
Sanitation ................................... 4.0duo
Civil Administr tion ..... ......... ........ 5
Atlantic ....................................... 125 000
Central . ............................. .. 275.UO
Pacific .. .......... .... .............. .. 90.000
Subistence.................................... 300
quartermaster s....... ................... 75.000
Motive Power and Machinery ............... 7.000
Relocation Panama railroad.................. 30.000
Chief Engineer's office.................... 250
Disbursements................................. 40
Examination of Accounts .................... 60
All other........................... ........ 140
Total......................... ............... 611.790
Name of Tag Changed.
The Acting General Manager of the Pan-
ama railroad has received notice from the
New York office of the Company that the
Commissioner of Navigation of the Depart-
ment of Commerce and Labor, has author-
ized the changing of the name of the Pan-
ama railroad tug Crislobalto Phoenix, which
will be done accordingly.








THE CANAL RECORD Vol. III., No. 6.


DRY FILL FOR GATUN DAM.
Report of the Hoard Appointed In Consider
Proportion of Charge- Approvted.
The Board appointed bN the Chairman anti
Chief Engineer, on August 26, to consider
the proper proportion of charges to be made
to the Atlantic Division for spoil furnished
by the Central Division for use in the con-
struction of the Gatun Dam. has submitted
the following report, and the recommenda-
tions have been approved:
"'From the vicinity of Bohio, there are
about IS0.000 cubic yards of material left to
be hauled and placed in the Gatun Dam.
From experience with similar steam shovel
work in the Central Division, and with the
task work in the same locality, it is found
that this work costs from 30 to 55 cents per
cubic yard, and that the material being
handled under the same management and
hauled to Gatun Dam has been costing 4-0
cents per cubic yard The Board is, there-
fore, of the opinion that the Gatun Dam
should credit the Central Division at the
rate of 7%, cents per cubic yard for all ma-
terial hauled from the vicinity of Bohio to
Gatun, which will be, as mentioned above,
approximately 180,000 cubic yards.
"The proportion of charges to be borne
by the Atlantic Division for material hauled
from the Culebra Cut is rather difficult to
arrive at for the following reasons:
"The present supply of power and car
equipment of the Central Division is barely
sufficient to keep the shovels supplied in
the Cut, with the maximum haul to Taber-
nilla. It has been proven repeatedly that
trains hauling from the Cut to Gatun can
make about one trip per day, while those
hauling to Tabernilla make two trips per
day and those hauling to the relocation two
and three trips per day. Therefore, the
output is necessarily diminished a certain
amount on account of the increased haul to
Gatun. At the same time the demand and
supply of material for Gatun is an intermit-
tent quantity, and, in order not to decrease
the output of the Central Division, dumps
must be maintained in such shape so as to
be able to handle the entire output of the
shovels on any one day. The Central Di-
vision has, therefore, been unable to make
any cut up to date in its force on account of
material sent to the Gatun Dam from the
Cut.
"The average charges made against the
Gatun Dam for Bas Obispo rock for the pe-
riod of 17 months from March, 1908, to Au-
gust, 1909, have been 10 66 cents per cubic
yard. These charges, however, have been
the bare cost of train crews and proper pro-
portion of maintenance of equipment ex-
pense. and have not taken into account the
extra cost to the Central Division resulting
from a decreased output from its steam
shovels.
"For these reasons, chiefly, the Board is
of the opinion that the Atlantic Division
should credit the Central Division with a cer-
tain amount per yard for material delivered
to the Gatun Dam from the Culebra Cut.
"It is a difficult matter to arrive at just
what this amount should be, but the opin-
ion of the Board is that 10 cents per cubic
yard is a fair and just compensation for the
Central Division. It has been evident in the
past that a great deal of delay to Central
Division trains at the Gatun Dam was un-


necessary and that two hours is an ample
and fair time, from the time a loaded train
reports at Tiger Hill until it reaches Tiger
Hill empty. Any train consuming more
than two hours in this vicinity shall be
paid for at the rate of f9 per hour for all
time over two hours. This is to be a demur-
rage and a penalty for not handling trains
promptly, and to be an additional charge to
the freight rates of 7 i; and 10 cents per cu-
bic yard, which are mentioned above."
Recreation Building at Coronil.
The contract for erecting a recreation pa-
vilion at Corozal has been let to James A.
Wiklon, and construction will begin as soon
as the materials are delivered. The pavilion
will be a one-story structure with verandas,
and provision will be made suitable for dan-
cing, public and club meetings, and for a
reading room. It may be found convenient
to open a small branch of the commissary,
at which cigars, candies, and toilet articles
may be purchased The total cost will not
exceed $5,000.
Panama Bathing Beanch.
A petition has been presented by a number
of employes of the Commission asking that
dressing rooms for men and women be built
at the bathing beach in Panama, between
Pefia Prieta and Punta Patilla. A request
that the Panama railroad run trains to the
beach on Sunday has been denied, because
the Company has a right only to carry sand
from the beach, not to run a passenger line.
On this account an investigation is being
made of the cost of a foot path and of a
wagon road from the Sabanas road to the
beach. The decision as to erecting a dress-
ing room will await the estimate of the cost
of building a path to the beach.

Southern Editors to Vi'it the- Isthmui.,
Members of the Louisiana, Mississippi and
Arkansas Press Associations to the number
of about fifty have arranged for an excursion
to the Isthmus. They are scheduled to leave
New Orleans on October 19, on the Paris-
mnria of the United Fruit Company's line,
and will spend five days here inspecting the
work on the Canal. Returning, they will
sail from Colon on October 27, and brief
stops will be made at Bucis del Toro, Li-
mon, Belize and Porto Barrios.

An IsthminiR Society.
THE CANAL RFCOREa
Since the Government has gone to the
length of issuing medals to emplo:.es of the
Canal, why not go a step farther and form
an order to which Canal men could belong,
and of which the medal would bethe insignia'
It would enhance, if possible, the decora-
tion's value, create a strong espril de cops
among the Isthmians, and perhaps eventu-
ally grow into an organization of as much
moment as the G. A. R.
Entitle it, for instance, "The Isthmian
Society,"and its members "Fellows" of that
society. Such a bond among Canal men
would be undoubtedly of lasting benefit, and
besides being the cause of reunions of old
Canal workers in the future, would be an
ever-living monument to a great national
enterprise.
Make it a Government institution, legal-
ize it with an act of Congress, and thus the
society would acquire a national importance,
fully in accordance with the national achieve-


ment of building the Canal itself. It would
be the nucleus for an American legion of
honor. Why should not we Americans have
an official national honor order such as other
nations have? Why should not we of the
United States be able to point to an institu-
tion similar to that of which the French Re-
public is so justly proud?
I may make bold to state that no matter
how high or how important his present po-
sition in the Isthmian economy, there is no
man who would not be proud to call himself
"Fellow" of such a society.
I would respectfully beg to call the atten-
tion of the Isthmian Canal Commission to
this. J. LovAL SGWARD.
Gatun, C. Z., September 28, 1909.

School for Spanish Children at Culebra.
In reply to a petition of 24 Spanish resi-
dents of Culebra, employes of the Commis-
sion, a building will be assigned for use as
a primary school for Spanish children. A
woman teacher will be engaged and paid by
the petitioners. The school will be con-
ducted without expense to the Commission,
as the building to be assigned will be one
of those not in use for other purposes.

Obituary.
A. G. Lythgow of Illinois. died at Ancon
Hospital on September 26, 1909. He was 42
years old, unmarried, and had lived on the
Isthmus four years. His brother, F. S.
Lythgow, lives at No. 3119 Michigan avenue,
Chicago, Ill.
Missing Men.
Information is desired in regard to T. B.
Hodge of Mississippi and R. K. Noel of
Oklahoma. Any person having knowledge
concerning either of these men is requested
to communicate with the American Minister,
Panama.
Any person who knows of the whereabouts
of Jack Selenkow, employed during August
as pipefitter in the Pacific Division, is re-
quested to communicate with THE CANAL
RECORpr in order that his address may be
sent to his family in New York.

Homicide at Monte Lirio.
Herman Brewster, a Barbadian, was fa-
tally stabbed by Francis Bardigua, or Bar-
digno, near Monte Lirio, a point on the
Panama railroad relocation, Thursday morn-
ing, September 30, as the result of a fight
in which the two men had engaged. Brew-
ster was stabbed in a leg, the instrument
puncturing an artery, and died from loss of
blood while being transported in a canoe to
Gatun. Bardigus made his escape, and up
to the 5th instant, had not been captured.
Both men were employed by the Panama
Railroad Company on relocation work near
where the affair occurred.

Shooting at Gorgona.
Jacob Bell, a Barbadian, living at Gorgona,
went to the house of a Barbadian woman
named Eliza Taylor late Sunday night, Oc-
tober 3, and after engaging in a quarrel, at-
tempted to kill her by shooting her in the
head with a 32-caliber revolver. He then
turned the weapon upon himself inflicting
three wounds, two of which were insignifi-
cant. The woman was removed to Gorgona
hospital and the man held at the police sta-
tion, but subsequently both were taken to
Ancon hospital.


THE CNLRCR


Vol. III., No. 6.









October 6, 1900. ThE CANAL RECORD


YEAR WITH THE CLUBHOUSES.
Report for 1908-09 Shows increased Patron-
age and Activities.
During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1909
the number of gold employes in the four
towns where the Commission clubhouses are
maintained, was about 400 less than the year
before, but there was an increased patron-
age. Twenty-one hundred and forty em-
ployes availed themselves of membership
privileges during the year, and the average
paid-up membership at any given time was
1.268. The highest membership was 1,359,
the lowest 1,190, with 1,222 at the close of
the fiscal year, which represented about 50
per cent of the gold employes within reach
of the clubhouses.
From a test count of attendance taken at
various times, a daily average of 1,380 per-
sons was indicated. This is 172 per day
greater than estimates secured in a like man-
ner during the previous year, and aggre-
gates more than a half million visits in a
twelvemonth. Beginning with the fiscal
year 1909, the membership rates were re-
duced from $12 to$10 per annum, and from
$7 to $6 for the half-yearly period. Not-
withstanding this reduction, the gross re-
ceipts for the year were $57,586 32, or an
average of $4,798.86 per month, which was
$317.99 per month greater than during the
preceding year. There was a net balance on
hand June 30, 1909, of $1,169.43, above es-
timated liabilities. The sale of refreshments,
consisting chiefly of ice cream and soft
drinks, amounted to $21,230.40, of which
only a small portion was profit, as this feat-
ure is intended for asocial attraction, and is
operated on a narrow margin.
The totaf number of books in the club-
house libraries on June 30, 1909, was 3,148;
number added during the year, 750; total
number circulated, 15,717. Each reading
room was supplied regularly with 100 pub-
lications. About 50,000 letters were writ-
ten at the correspondence tables.
Gymnasium activities were confined prin-
cipally to basket-ball and indoor baseball,
though some systematic class work was con-
ducted. An athletic park, where field sports
are held occasionally on moonlight nights
and holidays, was constructed near the Cris-
tobal clubhouse. The total attendance at the
gymnasium exercises was about 7,172, in
which about 295 different members partici-
pated. There we r e 56,835 bowling games,
S and 148,088 pool and billiard games played
during the year, and several interesting
tournaments were held.
Sighty-oneconcerts, entertainments, etc.,
were given by talent secured in the States,
and an attendance of 18,225 was recorded.
Local talent was enlisted on 104 occasions,
which drew an attendan attendance of 26,170 people.
One hundred and twenty-one functions not
under the management of the association
were held at the clubhouses, at which there
was an estimated attendance of 14,000.
Women are granted the use of clubhouse
privileges, including games on two after-
noons each week. Advantage was taken of
about half the afternoons offered, and the
attendance during the last fiscal year was
about 2,500.
eveningg educational classes were con-
.. ducted throughout the year, with the excep-
tion of the month of June. The studies in-
i luded Spanish, mechanical drawing, arith-
S -,:' .


metic, shorthand, electricity and wireless
telegraphy, and 148 different students were
enrolled. Chess, checker, glee, minstrel, dra-
matic, camera, and orchestra clubs were suc-
cessfully maintained. Seventy-nine joined
voluntary Bible clubs, and 17 Sunday meet-
ings and concerts were held, with a total
attendance of 1,337. Committees for pro-
moting the association enterprises averaged
a membership of 78. More than one thou-
sand calls were made on members in hospi-
tals during the year. The membership of
the junior department averaged 58, with an
average attendance of 41 on three afternoons
of each week. Junior activities consisted
largely of games, gymnastic work, outings
and visits to places of recreative and historic
interest.
The clubhouses cooperated with other
agencies in promoting enterprises lookingto
the general welfare, such as the Red Cross,
the various churches, Sunday schools, and
Women's clubs. During the two visits of
the First Squadron of the Pacific Fleet at
Panama-December 13 to 22, 1908, and Feb-
ruary 22 to March 4, 1909-the V. M. C. A.
operated a sailors' headquarters in the city
of Panama, cooperating with a committee of
Panamanian citizens, including provision for
a shore patrol, regarding which Rear Ad-
miral William T. Swinburne, commanderof
the squadron, subsequently wrote express-
ing his appreciation.
The association has met with some diffi-
culty in maintaining its staff of secretaries
on the Isthmus. Seven left during the last
fiscal year due to improved] prospects else-
where. The advisory committee represent-
ing the Commission's interests in the club-
houses, consists of Col. W. C. Gorgas, W. W.
Warwick, Joseph Bucklin Bishop, H. L.
Stuntz, and A. Bruce Minear.

Civil Service Examinations.
On October 24, beginning at 9 a. m., Civil
Service examinations for the following posi,
tions on the Isthmus, will be held in the
Commission clubhouse at Culebra: Clerk,
stenographer and typewriter, and trained
nurse.
At the same place and hour, any of the
examinations offered in section 1 of the Civil
Service Manual, revised to July 1, 1909, will
be held, provided applications for any such
examination are filed with the local Civil
Service Board at Culebra, prior to the close
of business on October 10.
Copiesof the Manual and application forms
can be obtained from the secretary of the
local Civil Service Board, officeof the Chair-
man, Cunlebra.
P. R. R. Classiliention of Expenditures.
On the first of July, 1909, the Panama
Railroad Company adopted the Interstate
Commerce Commission classification of ex-
penditures in so far as the conditions on the
Isthmus warranted such an application. The
Interstate Commerce Commission does not
recognize the Panama railroad as coming
under its jurisdiction, but the officials of the
railroad company held the view that a Gov-
ernment owned railroad should adopt the
modern methods prescribed by the Govern-
ment.
The classification of expense accounts
hitherto used by the railroad company was
very good in its day, but because of isolation
from other railroads it has not kept up with


modern methods. The classification of the
Interstate Commerce Commission is the r.-
suit of many Nears of careful study on the
part of some of the most expert railroad ac-
countants in the United States, and is', there-
fore, considered the best arrangement of
operating expenses yet made.

'itil Seni' e RetiremnenIu ,i.- n-i;milion.
THE. CiNAL RECORD,
I am in receipt of a letter from Mr. M.
F. (C'Donoghue. president of the United
States Civil Ser.-ice Retirement Association,
requesting, m:, assistance in the organization
of a branch of the Association on the Isth-
mus. The purpose of the organization is to
create sentiment in favor of a sEstem of
retirement peniC'ns for superannuated em-
plo.es in the Civil Service of the United
States. Any one familiar with coalitions in
the department' at Washington, and other
Government offices in the United States,
will realize that a system of compulsory
retirement on pension would d probably result
in an improvement of the service, as well as
undoubted benefit to individual employes
who have spent their lives iu the employ of
the Government and are no longer capable
of an efficient discharge of their duties.
Such emplo.es are now either dismissed in
their old age, when they are no longer capa-
ble of earning a likelihood at other pursuits,
orelse are retained, from motriesof charity,
to the detriment of the service.
The dues ol the as-ociation are 25 cents
per annum. The funds collected from dues
are expended to secure publicity for theaims
of the Association. The Association has no
paid officers.
There are, possibly, lew persons on the
Isthmus who intend to remain permanent ly
in the service of the Government, and who
might expect toderite personal benefit from
the proposed sN stem of retirement pensions,
but many local employes ma% feel sufficient
interest in an improvement of the general
conditions of ouremplo\ ment, to contribute
the moderate annual dues required by the
Association to promote its work. I will be
glad to receive subscriptions for membership
and, if sufficient interest is manifested, I
will call a meeting to perfect a permanent
organization of a local branch of the Asso-
ciation. JOHN K. BAXTER.
Culebra, C. Z., Oct. 2, 1909.

Card of Tlhanka.
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Tanner of An-
con, wish to thank their friends for the
many kindnesses shown them during the
illness of their son Harold. who died on Oc-
tober 1, from injuries received from a fall
at Paraiso on August 30.

A storehouse for the joint use of the Com-
missary Department and the electrical sub-
division of the Mechanical Division will
be erected at Cristobal in the near future.
It will be located near the cold storage plant.

Ship. to BR.ijuete.
The ieumaner Tat,,a of the Piefic solemn Navi-a.
lson Compripan' S i 'ed ltultd ito s;iil from PinriinnL for
Pedregal I David) on October 13 and October 2?.

LOsT-C-.'nil medal No 5 somewhere between
house No. 6Q Cri-lobal. and the P R R roundhouse
at Pnnaiuin ..ilong the nlm in line of the Panama rail.
road. Finder is requested to return it lo B L LA.ir
coon. locomotive engineer. P. R R Box 310. Antoi i
C. Z., and receive reward.


October 6, 1909.


TR CNL ECE








THE CANAL RECORD Vol. IlL, II.. 6.


SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.
Women's Clubs and Other Features.
The past two weeks have marked the gen-
eral opening of the Canal Zone Women's
Clubs for the season. Since the first of June
the Pedro Miguel Woman's Club is the only
one that has been holding regular sessions.
At Gatun monthly business meetings have
been held; at Gorgona frequent called meet-
ings have brought the m embers together, and
at Ancon the club has been active through its
library work.
The Paraiso Woman's Club convened at
the call of the president on Wednesday,
September 15, for the purpose of electing
officers for the coming year. Those chosen
were: Mrs. W. Ellenwood, president; Mrs.
W. McIntyre, vice-president; Mrs. T. C. Mc-
Laughlin, secretary, and Mrs. R. S. Conley,
treasurer. Mrs. H. Bain was elected chair-
man of the entertainment committee. The
club holds its meetings in Kangaroo hall on
Wednesday afternoons at 2 o'clock.
The Cristobal Woman's Club will open the
season with a reception to the outgoing presi-
dent, Mrs. Lorin C. Collins, and to Mrs.
Hiram J. Slifer, the incoming president, on
Wednesday afternoon, October 6. A musi-
cal program will be given. On the same
day the Ancon Woman's Club will open the
season in the new rooms in Ancon hall.
At the meeting of the Gorgona Woman's
Club on Thursday afternoon, September 30,
Mrs. Frank W. Morrison was the guest of
honor. In recognition of her service the
members presented her with sil er plates for
bread and cake. Mrs. Morrison was the
first president of the club, which was organ-
ized in July, 1907.
The meeting of the Canal Zone Federation
of Women's Clubs will be held at Gatun on
Tuesday. October 12, the business session
beginning at 1.30 p. m. The board has
been active in preparing a program of work
for the Federation, and it is expected that
the meeting will be one of special interest.
A request has been issued by the president
that each club president report a plan of the
work it is intended to take up for the season,
and also to show the difficulties and prob-
lems of her organization. The work to be
undertaken by the Federation through its
various committees will be outlined and dis-
cussed. A musical program is being arranged
by the entertaining club. Through thecour-
tesy of the Panama railroad, transportation
will be furnished to delegates and alternates
and Federation officers. The meeting will
be held in the church building, which is
near the railroad station. Mrs. J. Ponton
has been designated acting corresponding
secretary during the absence of Mrs. Fred-
erick Mears.
The Gorgona Dramatic Club has effected
a permanentorganization, with the following
officers: D. E. Hayes, manager; L. M. Mc-
Reas, secretary and treasurer; E. W. Mitchell,
stage manager; H. J. Humphrey, electrician
and property man; A. L. Hackenberg, stage
carpenter. In connection with the club, a
literary branch has been organized, which
meets at the homes of members on the first
and third Thursday evenings of each month
for social purposes. Plays have been sent
for, and it is expected that the club will be
ready to present a new comedy about the
beginning of next year. The club has a
membership of thirteen. At the perform-
ance of the comedy, "Capt. Racket," given


at the National theater, Panama, for the
benefit of the Red Cross, the sum of $560
was realized.
The residents of Gorgona tendered a re-
ception to Mrs. Frank W. Morrison, who re-
cently removed to Cristobal, on the evening
of August. 11. The arrangements for the
entertainment were in the hands of commit-
tees consisting of men and women who had
known Mrs. Morrison during her residence
in Gorgona. The Commission clubhouse,
where the reception took place, was deco-
rated with palms and flags. A musical pro-
gram by local talent was rendered, and
games and contests furnished diversion.
Refreshments were served. The members
of the Odd Fellows lodge at Gorgona pre-
sented Mrs. Morrison with a linen table cover
and a set of Japanese hangings. There were
about 100 people present.
The Gorgona Dancing Club gave a dance
at the Commission clubhouse on Saturday
evening, October 2.
The Gorgona Woman's Club and parents
of school children will give a reception to
the local school teachers on Wednesday
evening, October 6.
The Cristobal Dancing Club gave a dance
at the clubhouse, Cristobal, on Saturday
evening, September 25.

PERSONAL.

Mr. George D. Brooke has resigned his po-
sition as Superintendent of Motive Power
and Machinery and will leave for the States
on the Ancon, due to sail on October 10. He
entered the service of the Commission on
October 17, 1904, and arrived on the Isth-
mus the following month after having as-
sisted the Chief Engineer in the purchase of
part of the equipment now in use on the
Canal. A dinner in his honor was given at
the Hotel Tivoli on the night of October 2,
by the employes of the Mechanical Division.
Capt. C. Nixon sailed for the States on his
animal leave, on the Colon, on October 2.
Resolutions of Sympathy.
WBERAS., The Almighty God in Hisinfinite wis-
dom. has seen fit to take from u, our friend and
Brother Knight. H. C. Ball: be it
Resoltied, Thai in remembrance of him, of his
knightly virtues and of his friendship For all men.
that the charter of this lodge be draped for a period
of thirty days, as also his station. that we express to
the wife who mourns his departure our s5 mpathy for
her in her bereavement that these resolutions be
spread upon the mitiutesof this lodge andthat a copy
be furnished THE CANAL RECORD for publication.
EMPIRE LODGE. No. 2. KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAs.
Empire. C Z.. September 29. 1909.
WHEREAS. Our Heavenly Father. in His Divine
Providence on September21. 1909. called from among
us our dearly beloved brother in Christ Mr. H C. Ball.
leaving a devoted wife and two sons to mourn his de-
parture and
WHEREAS Said brother wasa regular and faithful
member of our Church, his having been a Baptist
since 1894 when he joined the Park Avenue Baptist
Church Rochester. N. V and has served as Deacon
in our church since organization. therefore be it
Re,olzed Thai the members of the First Baptist
Church of Empire. C. Z do hereby tender our heart-
felt and Christian sympathy to the bereaved ones in
their affliction and recommend to them the love and
sympathy of our loving Savior. Who wept with those
who wept. and to his tender beatitude' Blessed are
they thal mourn, for they shall be comforted," and
be it further
Resolwtd, That a copy of these articles be furnished
the family the Baptist press THE CANAL RECORD
and a copy be incorporated into the minutes of our
church of this date
Done by unanimous vote of the Church. September
26. 1909. J. C. FORMAN.
Church Clerk.
Empire. C. Z.. October 2. 1909.


CHINA AND POTTERY.

Record of Commissary sales for the Fiseal
Year 19o08-09-New Orders.
About $75,000 worth of china and pottery
were sold to the Canal and Panama railroad
employes by the commissary in the fiscal year
1909. This does not include the crockery
used in the Commission hotels, which is par-
chased through the Quartermaster's Depart-
ment. Most of this ware is purchased in the
United States, although much of it originates
in Europe and is merely sold by American
importers. Its sale is not confined to the
fifteen hundred American families entitled
to purchase supplies at the commissaries, for
the silver employes, mostly negroes, pur-
chase a large proportion of it. In Augnst
there were only 965 negro families in Com-
mission quarters, and 279 families of ESro-
pean laborers, yet the purchase of crockery
and china from the "silver" sides of the com-
missaries was large.
The commissary has recently received and
has now on sale a quantity of Tobey and
Meakin ware. The Tobey ware includes jugs,
mugs, tea sets, and individual dishes, and
the most popular patterns are in imitation
-of old English crockery. An order has been
placed for four hundred sets of Doulton,
Booth, and Wedgewood china of assorted
designs, which will sell at from $15 to $30
per set. Some sample orders of German
glassware are expected shortly.
An order for a five month's supply of mis-
cellaneous kitchen and dining room ware
was sent to the States in September. It com-
prised 193 distinct items, 76 of which were
for enameled ware, 34 for glass and china-
ware, and the remainder for kitchen utensils
and cutlery. This was not an experimental
order in any sense, as the articles are those
for which there is a steady demand. Among
the items were 700 dozen Berlin kettles, 300
dozen tea kettles, and 675 dozen sauce pans
of blue and white enamel, known as Vene-
tian ware.
The glassware included 500 sets of pitch-
ers with glasses, seven pieces to a set, 1,200
dozen glasses to match the pitchers in the
sets, 685 dozen glasses of various kinds, 12
sets of cut glass water sets, and 100 dozen
sugar bowls.
The miscellaneous ware included 600 dozen
galvanized iron wash tubs, 100 dozen wash-
boards, 100 dozen alarm clocks, 300 earthen
pudding dishes.
Some dishes decorated with the Canal Zone
seal are being manufactured in the United
States and will be on sale at the commis-
saries within the next few months.
Band Concert.
The Isthmian Canal Commission Band will give a
concert atCristobal. C. Z., on Wednesday, October 13.
1909. at 8.15 p. m. The program follows:
i March-Festal Day........................ R.ux
2 Selection -Mary's .iLa ....................Carle
f a Bolero-r/w/lina......................L...abory
Sb S. R. Henry's Barm Dance.............Henry
4 Waltz-Idle Hours.........................Woods
5 Medley Selection- Glitesring Gloa IVorm.4afarge
6 Caprice-Dann,; and His Hobbyhorse.......Pryor
I By request )
7 1a Intermezzo-Rainhboa (By request).Wenrich
b Rag- Hoop-e- Kack ....................... Allen
8 Overture-La stpes .................... eler-Bel
9 Ballet-F/ight ofthe Birds .................. Rice
10 March-The Sirft Massachusetts..........Missed
CHAS. E. JNNINGS. ,Vlfa.us/DwvFr,
The next concert will be given atCulebra, Sunday,.
October 17.
FOUND-At Cristobal Y. M. C. A.. a pair of gold
rimmed spectacles. Owner can recover same by cal-
ing and identifying property.


Vol. III., No. 6.


TECANAL RCR









October 6, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


OPPICIAL CIRCULARS.


OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.

Form for Recruiting Employes.
CULPESA, C. Z.. October 1. 1909.
SCncnuLAR No. 280:
It is directed that Departments and Divisions re-
quiring employes to be recruited in the United States
forward their requisitions in future on Form C. E. 236.
A limited supply of these forms is attached to this
circular. A further supply can be secured by requi-
sition on the Depot Ouartermaster. It is thought
that instructions relative to the use of the form. other
than those printed on its face. are unnecessary.
H. P. HBoDGEs. Acting Chairman.
Fbrm C. E. 236.
ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION.

(Department or Division.)

CHIEF QUARTERMASTER.
(Through Office of the Chairman.)
Six:
Requisition is hereby made for men to fill the fol-
lowing positions, to be obtained from the United
States, in the event that suitable men are not avail-
able for appointment on the Isthmus:



0i U 5 a-- .3 A

gw. a a a





Requisitioned by
..............................
Title.
Approved, by direction of the Chairman.
........................................
Assistant to the Chairman
NOTE: This form should besubmitted in triplicate,
properly executed.

Transfer of Property.
CULEBRA. C. Z.. September 27. 1909.
CrCULAR No. 18&3-N:
Effective October 1. 1909. the Superintendent of
Motive Power and Machinery will transfer to the
differentdepartmentsanddivisionsnow holding same
(including the Master Mechanic of Gorgona shops)
allithe property for which he is accountable. in accord-
ance with the provisions of paragraph 3 of the "Gen-
eral Rules Covering Property Accountability and
Responsibility." Equipment loaned to the Panams
railroad will be invoiced to the Depot Quartermaster.
Cars will be invoiced to the different divisions as
carried on the records of the Mechanical Division
and readjustment will be made later.
H. F. HODGES.
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer.

Acting Purchasing Offcer.
CULEBRA. C. Z October 1 1909.
CRacULAR No. 279:
During the absence of Capt. Courtland Nixon on
leave, theduties of Purchasing Officer on the Isthmus
will-be performed by LieunL E. Wood. Assistant
Chief Quartermaster. Effective October 2. 1909.
H. F. HODGES. Acting Chairwman.

Starting Passenger Trainm-Colon and Panama
PANAMA RALaROAD COMPANY,
OFFICE OP SUPERINTENDENT.
COLON, R. P.. September 27. 1909
Cmaecoza No. 733:
All Concerned-Commeneing October 1. 1909, the
following will govern the starting oi passenger trains
- at Colon and Panama passenger stations:
One (1) tap of the bell will be given five (51 minutes


SrATIONs.




C rtoal.............
.. CUebra ..............


SA




29.84S
29.844


Temperature.




I *a

S i
79.1 90 27 71
78.6 9t 17 69
78.9 93 21 70


before schedule leaving time: another tap one minute
before leaving time. and two (2) taps of the bell at
leaving time.
The gates will be closed immediately on two taps
of the bell, and the train started by hand signal from
the conductor. J. A SMITH. Suteriialndenl.

Changes In Quartermaster's Department.
CULEBRA. C. Z. September 30. 1909.
ALL CONCERNED-
The following appointments in theQuartermaster's
Department are announced, effective October I
Mr. W. G. Ross. to be District Ouartermaster Em-
pire District.
Mr J. D. Eason. to be Assistant District Quarter.
master. Empire District
Mr.J. T. Smith, to be Acting District Quartermas.
Ler. Pedro Miguel-Paraiso District
R. E. Woon. actingg ChKf Q)artermaster.

Rainfall, September I to 30, 1909, Inclusive.
fMIDNIORT TO MIDNIGHT.)
a
*.
STATIONS.



Atlantl Division-
Cristobal ...........................36 12 1633
Brazos Brook ................... 1.45 7 9.66
Gatun................... ......... 2.8s 10 10.66
Bohia ......... .................... 1.53 13 1043
Central Divzsion-
Tabernilla..... ................... 2.54 11 13 10
San Pablo.... ......... ......... 270 II 12 17
Gorgona........................... 1.41 2 844
Gam boa............................ I 44 7 7 9.0
Em pire............ . ...... ..... 1.78 13 7.22
Camacho .............. .......... 1.66 14 13 01
Culebra ...................... 1.66 13 8 40
PIaci t Division-
RioGrande...................... 2.58 30 11.2;
PedroMiguel..................... 1.75 18 1022
Balboa ........... ................ .65 14 4.11
Ancon.. ....................... .92 18 3 86
Atlantic Coast-
Porlo Beo. .................... 2.16 13 13.99
NombredeDios ................. 1.46 27 7 7;
UpPer Chares-
El Viia ........... .............. .. 2.5 5 10 91
Alhajuela................... ..... 1.71 13 7.50


September Rainfall for Three Years.


STrATON.



Atlantic Diuision-
Porto Bello ..
Nombre de Dios.
Cristobal... .....
Brazos Brook....
.latun ...........
Gatuon River..
Trinidad .....
Bohio. ..........
Central Dwmeit-n-
Tabernilla.......
San Pablo........
Gambosa..........
Gorgona ........
Empire.........
Camacho ........
Culebra ..........
Rio Grande......
Pai8c Dn-MIen-
Pedro Miguel....
Balboa ........
Ancon ...........
Uter Chagrer-
El Vigia ........
Alhajuela.......


1907. 1908. 1909.


* kot including 1909.


Precipitation Wind.


5-- u


3- B F B. E
16.33 12.48 .... 4.367 SE. 30
S840 1158 17 3.584 N.W. 28
386 802 16 4.570 N.W 21


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.

Activities of the Young Men's Christian As-
sociation.
CULEBRA.
An entertainment of moving pictures will be given
on Friday evening. October 8. The some films have
been exhibited with satisfaction in other clubhouses.
EMPIRE.
The bowling tournament games atEmpire on Wed-
nesday evening of last week resulted as follows
Empire. First. &Scond. Third. 7/al'.
Brown .............. 148 170 233 i51
Potter .......... .... 148 191 183 52?
Bardelson ......... 160 119 155 50i
Hinckley. ... ....... 191 165 163 521
Huson .............. 157 180 198 515
Total ......... 80r, 95 934 2.6?9

Lamrnter............ 1-8 146 135 459
Herringlon. ..... .... 162 14 178 504
Cohen .......... .... 164 160 It19 493
W inters ............ 224 151 155 530
Doughert.y ... .. 161 181 Ir0 SiP

Total .. ........... 8 4 895 1.43 2,494
An exhibition of moving pictures was given on
Tuesday evening of this week.
GORCONA.
Twenty-nine new library books of popular fiction
have been received and placed in circulation
A moving picture entertainment was given last
Friday night to fair-sized audience
On Saturday night. October 9. there will bea smoker
for the men of Corgona. The entertainment will
consist of singing, dancing and a nine-act %aude-ille
performance Messrs Emery, Wrighlt and Charaley
have the arrangements in charge
The bowling tournament games at Empire last
Salurdao, night resulted as follows
CGogcfna FiPr1. Secrend. Thid. Total
. ........ ....... 169 137 15; 463
King ...... ......... 15] 119 147 450
Buchanan.. 166 168 !23 462
Roper. ............... 151 152 145 44.
Sexton ......... 157 1:1 134 51i
Total ......... .... 797 7T0 761 2,338
Cilebi a.
Lamsler. ..... ... 179 145 16? 486
Herrington.... ..... 131 135 178 444
Cohen .............. 168 169 159 496
W inters..... ..... 156 139 143 443
Dougherty ........ 175 164 1"9 498
Total .. .......... 309 752 806 2.367
CRISTOBAL.
The concert by the P. R. R orchestra on Tuesday
night of last week was attended b, a large num-
her of people. the Drogram consisting of len regular
numbers Mr E Sale is manager of this orchestra,
and Mr G. E Thompson is conductor.
The bowling tournament games at Cristobal last
Saturday night resulted as follows
Critoba!. Fu.st. .Second Thred Tota'.
Bullard.............. 137 1.54 196 537
Barlow. ............. 151 158 153 462
LIouch............... 164 167 146 497
Strong .......... .. 153 ISO 2A6 544
Barle.... ......... 162 156 161 Sill
Total .... ........ 822 83; 82 2,.541
Em Pire.


B
P
B
H


rown. ............. 177
otter ............... 23J
ardelson. ......... 182
linckley......... .. 162
lusonf ............. 10
Total ....... ..... R91


Tide Table.
The following table shows thetime of high
and low tides at Panama for the week end-
ing October 13, 1909 (75th meridian time):

DATE. High Low. High. Low. High
&. M A M. A. M. P. M. P. M.
Oct. 7...... .......... 3.38 9.40 4.12 10.30
Oct. 8....... ........ 4 55 11 03 S.2 1154
P H.
Oct. 9....... ...... 6.13 12.29 6.39 .......
Oct. 10...... 1.ns 7.20 1.38 7 38 ........
Oct. 11 ..... 1.57 8.11 2.28 8.26 ... ...
Oct. 12...... 2.43 8.52 305 9115 .
Oct. 13. ... 3.18 9.28 3.38 941 ...

The variation of high and low tide at Cris-
tobal is so slight that a tide table for the
Atlantic side is not necessary.


WEATHER CONDITIONS. CANAL ZONE, SEPTEMBER, 1909.








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III., No. 6.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

The hour' during which conmmissanesare open are
ait follow
Cn t.abal and C'ulelhr- '4 a to 17? F p in. 2 p. m.
t1 r. in
All othcr coumitli-annes n. m11 to 1 p m p. mn
to p iu
Ret il pincea of cnld stornIae rovisions for the week
beginning lcItober ?
FRESH MEATS.
P"ce.
Million-Stewing ..... ..... . .. ...... per lb 7
Shloulr. neck trimmed off
i pound aInd c er .. .. per lb 10
Entir- firtquuuritr 'not rim-
mnd i I pounds and oaer per Ib 9
Leg 6i to 1) uound. .. ........ per lb 19
hit k. .. . ... per Ib 2')
Short cut choans ...... ...... pr lb 22
Lam b-Stewing .... ...... ... .. ......... ...per Ib 7
Entire ior-quirter neck trnmmrd
off .. . . . .. per Ilb 10
Leg iA to p.uuds ...... ...... per Ib 2?
Chops .. ... ................. .. ..... .per Ib 29
Veal- SIivi ng .. Der lb W10
Shoulder for roasting ntol under
41 lbs .. .. .... .... perlb 15
Loin for roauting...................per b 19
Culeop ... ...................per Ib Z2

Polk cuts...... .... .. ner Ib 2)
Beef uet ...... ..... ........ ..... .... per Ib 4
Soup.... .. .. ........ . per Ib 6
Stew .. ..... ........ ... .... .............. per Ib 1D
Corned .................... per lb 11 1
Chuck rojitl....... .... .......... .Der Ib 14
Pot roast .. ...... .... .. .... ..... per Ib 16
Rib-ruast second cut Inot under
3"-' pounds) .. .......... ..... er lb 19
Rjb roust. first cut I not under 3
poiin(Ldu .... . ... .......... ... per Ib 21
Sirloin roa 1 .............. .. . per Ib 2?
Rump rost . . ..............per lb 22
Porterhouse roast .. . .... per lb 2"
Steak ChIck. . .. .. ................per lb 15
Round . . ... per lh 16
Rib . ................... .. uer lb 21
Sirloin . .. .. ........per lb 22
Porleriou-e .... ....... .per lb 22
Rump .... .............per lb 22
Tenderloin .. ... .... ... per lb I 7
MISCELLANEOUS.
l.;ers-- Bcef .............. ..... .. ......... per lb 111i ,
Calf . .... ........ ...... .e.ch
Sh id rots ... ......... . ... ... prir 40
Sausage-Pork .. . ...... .. ............ per p b 17
Bologna ........ .. .......uer Ib I
Fratikfurte ... . .... . per b
Leberwur-t .... ......... ....per lb 1'
Sweet bread-Veal. .... .. .......... ... per lb 1 20
Swcet bread-Be'e ... ............. per lb 30
O ters . . .. ...... keg I 61)
Eg s fresh....... . ......... .... ... dozen 32
Bluefish ....... . .. .. per Ib 15
POULI.TRY AND GAME
Chickens-Fanue Rons-tine lure ..... each I 50
medium. erich 1.31.
Fowls ............ ..... .. ...... . .. each 911. I 00
D ck til . . .... . . . each I 30
medium n w ight ................... each 9.,
Broiler- ........ ............... ....each "5
rurkevs ........ .... ..... ... ... ... .. per lb 3,u
Squahs ........ ... .......... ...... ..... .each 35
Ca pon r, ............................... each 2. 5i
Geese :iltid nhroiu I'i pound- ...each ?2 ui)
12 ood'id .... .... each 2 30
Ct1RED AND PICKLED MEATS
B'con-Bre.ikfa-t. whole pice. .... per Ib 2"
Breaklasi sliced .... ... .. .per lb 29
Ham-Sugar- Oiie-h,,lf for boiling........ ........per lb 21
Ve'itphili .. ... ...per lb 45
Ho ks .. .. ....... .. per Ib i
Suu;Pr curred ... ..per lb 20
Beef silt fomil ....................... per lb 1C
Po -rk sail .......... ...... .....per b 15
Ham boil-, .... .... per lb 2A
OK tongute .. ........ ....... each I ic)
Pigs' feel ... .... ....... .... ..per Ib 14
lon ..... ... ... ... .. per Ib 16
DAIRY PRODUCTS.
Butter-Pnnrs rnme quality. ......... per lb 42
Cheese- Riquefort .. ..... ...... per lb 45
Philidelphtia Crem ...... ech 20
Voutig Amenca .... ...... per Ih 22
Swiss .. ............ ..... ..... per lb 31
FdP a I.n ...................... .... each 05
Camembert ................ ..... per Ib 26
Neufchatel ....... .... ........... each 6
Gouda ............... ........ per Ib 34
Paresan .. ....... ..... .... bottle 20
Prench cheese In tins-Camembert Brie.
Neufchanlel ........ . ............ I-.Ib tin 20
Milk Berarclitff ... .. ... .... ........ bottle 5as
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS
Celery .... .. .. .... ... ..per hd 10
.It liice .. ...... ... ........ per Ib 15
PoLaloes while, old ................. per lb 3N;
sweet ....... ........... per lh 2!,
O nions.. .... .... ........... .......... per Ib 3
Squash. Hubbird ...... .. .............. per lb 5


Price
Yams............................ .. ..per lb 34
"Turnips ......... ...... ........... .. per Ib 3,
Carrots ......... .. ...... ...............per lb *4
Beets ............ .............. ......... .per Ib 5
Potatoes. new . ...... ............ per lb 3K
Caulicwer ... .. ........... .... per Ib 6
Cucumbers ........ ... ..... .....per lb 4
Tomnatoe ............... .... .... ... .per lb 5
Lemons ......... ... . ............... ....dozen 24
Grapes- ... .. ............. ... ......... per Ib '8
Lim es ... .. .................... ..... .per 100 80
Watermelons .......... ..... ..... ..... each tO
Peaches .. ............ ...... . per Ib
Ca talouoes ... ..... ....... ........... each I
Blueberries ... ...... ...... .. ............ .....box 18
Cbbage ......... ......... .... ............per lb 4
apples eating ...... .. .. ... ... .... ... ..per lb 16
Oranges .. ...................................dozen 12
Grapefruit ...... ....... ....... .............each 4
Plum s .. . ....... .... ....... ...... .. . er lb '10
Pear .. .. .. .... ........... per lb 7

*Indic-ites reduction from last list.
""Indicate S cents allowed for return of bottle.
tIndicates advance on Irnst list
Iold unIt from Commis.sries. no orders Liken for
delhiers'
Sold" onlt from Cold Storage and not from Coin-
miissarnes

Stages of the Chagrea.
Maximum eight of Chagres River above
mean sea level for the week ending midnight
Saturday,, October 2, 1909:

I STATIONs


So a


HFeight of low water
above .ea-level ft 125 Q2 46 I 0 0
Ml-xinmun b- igh rib
mean sei level feet
Sunday Sept 26 126 6 03 31 4 1 52 2 1 1.7
MctoudaN. Sept 2; ?.0 ,6 93 48 2 5 1 5i 1 7
Tuesday Snti 28 In 7 13 1 Ms 1 1 0 28 2 6
Wed esda.i, Sept. 29 12 S 91 a I* 6 1 3 36 3.2
Thur-daj Seot 31 `66 6 Q5 b 4 7 lila 49 4 2
Frndai Oct 1 129 1 as 4 5 7? 7 i0 ,.9
Saturday. Oct 2 127 6 94.6 52 1 15 0 96 8.2


Supplies for Canal Work.
The follow ing steimersd barred It the ports of Cris-
tob-al and Colon dunrne the week ended Octo-
ber 2. 1, J9. with supplies for the slthmiian C-inal
Commission'
LOi.Sa. September 26, from New York. with ?0(0
caSe, .apoli., for 4 T7 Iow',.an Sepitembtr 2'. from Liverpool with 2n00
h,'rrel '.arbolic acid for he tnanufactureof larvacide
L't'' ptlealember 2', front New York wilh 43 (:P:)
feel triple tape fuse :i C10 bl.iting caps 36,A10 elec.
tric fuses 2,)0 col; mniuila rope. 5 "0o pounds caustic
od'l. 13 to3,s c 'r and air bruke Darts. 19 tons Teell
b r ani 210 tons black ir,.i pipe for stock 1 rock
crniher Department of Public Works Gorgona; 30
ton- Luiloa.der caine p.,rts Balboa. o unloader cables
`49 l..Lake poucket.1 ri) bundles of brake shoes and
'' XTii.ounds ingot copper for Gorrois shops and
i rr.i;cellaneous cargo aggregating 2 316 packages
veighinc 1600l tons
Sib.',"o September 23 from New York with10tons
lktes and tools for stock.
..la-(ar,':. September 30 from New Orleans with
25.ii pounds cotton seed meal and 8 Ioif pounds bran
for An:onu dairy, I1s tons cast iron pine. Gatun' 12 OCU
feet ,ellow pine lumber and 17 tons castings for car
repairs. 2',1) pieces witchsalunds for stock, 15 tiOi feet
fellow pine lumber Ganlun.
,ALiL1I /..,- September '0 rroem Baltimore with
8'i0 tons -tructural material for moveable towers, lock
wall formsn at G'itun 32 loit 'tructural material for
culi rt form- Gatun Locks 4' tons steel axles. Gor-
gori shop'" 3' tons steel angles 10ii tons corrugated
iron 2'' tons steel bars 67S.313 pound1 dinaonite,
13? 5S9 feel yellow nine lumber 386 crates handles.
1.4't'0 kegs rack spikes. 6640 pieces drain tile and
sewer pipe and 5uO '0i building brick for stock. 125
Tons cqsat iron pipe ind specials Gatun 3i1 tons axles
anid wheels for corral repair,. 12a.C'00 feet while oak
lumber for car repair;" 39 tons steel pinles I 000car
.heels 33 1on' caslingS Gorgona -hops- one 20-toa
locomotive cooling crane. Pacific Division.

The following vessels arrived at and departed from
the port of Balboa during the week ended October 1:
Arrivals-Septenmber .30. .-rte o from South ports;
October 1. Ss,, fhoa, from San Francisco. Depar-
lures-September?5 P2Ann't,!,'.ra for San Francisco.
Seolember 26 oa fInr South ports September 28.
i-a,'aliaa (Italian warships bound North September
29 Ecuador. for Guayaquil. and (pitr for inter-
mediate ports -


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American
Line. and of the United Frail Company's Line. the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:
NEW YORK TO COLOR.
Cristobal...............P. R. R.Tbursday......Sept. 30
MaNdalena ........... R -M .Saturday.......Oct. 2
Advance...............P. R. R.Saturday ......Oct. 2
Alliance ............... P. R. R.Friday.........Oct. 8
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A...Saturday.......Oct. 9
Colon.................P. R. R.Thursday......Oct, 14
Ancon ............. ...P. R. R Fnday......... Oct. 15
Clyde ............... R.-M...Saturday...... Oct. 16
Panama .......... ....P. R. R.Thursday......Oct. 21
Pnnz Aug. Wilhelm .H -A ..Saturday.......Oct. 23
Alliance ...............P.R. R.Tuesday........Oct. 26
Thames.... .........R.-M.. .Saturday......Oct. 30
Pnnz Joachim......... H.-A Saturday...... Nov. 6
Atrato. ............ .. R -M ..Saturday. .....Nov. 13
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm tE.-A...Saturday ......Nov. 20
Tagus..... ....... ....R.-M...Saturday.......Nov. 27
Prinz Joachim........ H.-A ..Saturday.......Dec. 4
Persons desiring to meet sleamers at Cristobal
should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
office, room 8 building No. 1. Cristobal. for customs
line permits which are necessary to obtain admit-
tance beWond waiting room on pier II.
All the steamers of the Hamburg-Americatn and
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO NEW YORK.
Panama................P R. R Friday.........Oct. 8
Ancon ................. P. R. R.Sunday........Oct. 10
Prinz Aug Wilhelm...H.-A ..Tuesday .......Oct. 12
Advance ...............P R. R Thursday......Oct. 14
Cristobal ... ... .....P RR R Friday... .....Oct. 15
Alliance ...... .......P. R. R.Tuesday........Oct. 19
Thames.............. R -M. Wednesday....Oct. 30
Colon ................P R. R.Monday....... Oct. 25
Pnnz Joachim. ... ... H.-A...Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Ancon .... .... .....P R R.Thursday......Oct. 28
Panama ...............P. R.R.Tuesday....... Nov. 2
Alliance ......... ...P. R. R Monday.... ...Nov. 8
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. .H.-A .Tuesday ......Nov. 9
Prinz Joachim ... H.-A...Tuesday.......Nov. 23
Prior Aug Wilhelm. .H -A Tuesday....... Dec. 7
NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Atenas ............... U F C. Saturday......Oct. '2
Turnalba .............U PF C .Saturday...... Oct. 9
Abangarez .. ... ....Li.F.C..Saturday......Oct. 16
At.nas. ............. U F.C Saturday......Oct. 23
Turrialbat.............. U F C. Saturday......Oct. 30
Abangarez ............ U.F.C..Saturday......Nov. 6
Atenaas. ........... ...U.P.C Saturday......Nov. 13
Turrialba .. ..... ...F.C..Saturday .....Nov. 20
Abangarez . ..... F C..Saturday ......Nov.' 27
COLON TO NEW ORL&ANS.
Atenas ... .... ...LIU.F.C..Tuesdsy.......Oct. 12
Turrialba. .... ..... U F C .Tuesday.......Oct. 19
Abanrgarez ........... U.F.C .Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Atens ..... ....... U F C..Tuesday.......Nov. Z
Turrialba ............U FC..Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Abangarez............ U F.C .Tuesday.......Nov. 16
Arenas ..............U.F.C .Tuesday.......Nov. 23
Turrialba............. U.F.C..Tuesday.......Nov. 30
Abangare ............ U F C..Tuesday.......Det. 7
COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.
Magdalena ... ........ R -M ..Tuesday ......OcL 12
Sailings of the French line ICie. G&n6rale Trans-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and
fluadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows- BRara.ian for New Orleans, via Kingston,
Ja.. on or abott October 11
The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m.
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York.
A ship of the United Fruit Company's line sails
from the dock at Colon. at 3 p. m., Tuesday of each
week.
The steamers David of the National Navigation
Company, and the Taboma of the Pacific Steam Navi-
gation Company, leave Panama. for David. province
of Chiriqul. and intermediate points, the first and
third weeks of each month.

Contract Building.
Senled proposals. for labor only. will be received at
the office of the Constructing Ouartermaster. Cule-
bra. until 3 p. m October 15. 1909. and then opened.
for the erection by contract of a type-27 house, at
Agua Clara reservoir-Gatun. Plans and specifica-
tions con be obtained from the Constructing Quar,,
lermaster by making a deposit of 55. Fifty dollars:.-j
must be deposited with the proposal and 5200 when ..
the contract is signed. R. E. Woon.
.rtn ... thg CAi -Ovm 'at..-"-


~














CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1909. No. 7.


The Canal Record
Jlished weekly under the authority and supervision
Is the Istkmian Canal Commuission.

Trhe Canal Record is usuedfreeo change, one copy
each, toeall employes of the Commiisson and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
A'Er copies and back n umbets can be obtained Jrom
the items stands a/ the Panama Railroad Company for
ae cents each.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
No communication. either lor publication or request-
ing n/ormation. wil/ receive atten!tion unless signed
with theJill name and address ol the wrier.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Gatun Locks.
At the close of work on Saturday, October
9, there had been laid in Gatun Locks, 18,-
668 cubic yards of concrete. The average
for the week ended October 9 was 828 cubic
yards a day, the highest daily average yet
reached. Since the beginning of the work
on August 24, the amount of concrete laid
each week is as follows:
Cubic Yards.
August 28 (four days).................. 732
September 4.......................... 1.634
September 11 .. ...................... 1.742
, Septem ber 18 ............................ 2.S98
September 25........................... 3.786
October 2 ...... .... ..... .. ........... 3.210
October 9 .......... .............. ... 4,966
Miraflores Power Station.
The first of the three turbo-generators at
at the Miraflores power station has been
completed, and was given its preliminary
trial on Saturday, October 2. It has been
operated at intervals since, and as soon as
some insulation troubles are cleared, will be
ready to furnish current. Two wires have
been strung on the transmission line to the
Pedro Miguel Locks, and work will shortly
commence on the new substation at that
point, which is to be equipped with two 500-
* k. w. converters.
Improving Panama Suburbs.
Sanitary building improvements on Pan-
Samia railroad land in the districts of Gua-
Schapali and Santa Cruz, in Panama, were
u.egun on June-f.l, 1909, when the Health
.Office ordered 152 houses and shacks in the
district of Guachapali to be destroyed. At
the same time permission was granted to the
owners of 73 houses to more them so as to
.coiform with the new lot surveys. Under
te present regulations houses cannot be
*ected to occupy the entire width of a lot,
ta space of 1% feet must be reserved on
l& side for ventilation. Of the total of
.. -iises in this tract to be demolished or
vd 83 were either wholly or in part
St-heptroposed street lines, and action
LO taken o1 about 90 per cent of them,


so that on September 30, the new street lines
were cleared sufficiently to permit of the
laying of sewers on Panama railroad land
whenever the municipal engineering forces
are ready.
The Health Office had issued 35 building
permits in Guachapali up to September 30,
this number not including houses moved to
new locations as authorized on June 21. It
is estimated that the work of moving and
demolishing houses in this section is about
75 per cent completed.
In Santa Cruz, 57 houses and shacks were
condemned on June 21, and permission was
given to the ow ners of 40 houses to move them
to conform with the lot surveys, making a
total of 57 on which action has been taken.
Very little work has been done so far in this
district, on account of the more extensive
operations in Guachapali, and only one
building permit has been granted to date.
Clearing in Gatun Lake Region.
A contract has been made for clearing all
trees, brush, and grass from the Canal prism
between the mouth of the Trinidad River
and Tabernilla, and work will be begun this
month. About 842 acres are to be cleared,
and when the work is completed only a
small amount of clearing will remain to be
done in the channel through Gatun Lake.
The material cut is to be burned. The con-
tract has been awarded to the lowest bidder,
the bids being as follows:
Per
Amount cre.

B B. Duncan ........... ...$29 I '5. 1 ? 3I .45
E C. McFarland .............. 40 50o iO 48 39
R W. Hebsrd ... 45 214 00 53 64
Charles Alberts ............. .. 47 %8 0l 57 00
Enri Sard............ .. . ... 56 19 0u 6.46

New Quarters nt Camp Elliott.
New quarters for the commandant at Camp
Elliott are under construction at one of the
highest points on the bill, on the former
site of the band stand and flag staff. In
style, the plans of an Isthmian Canal Com-
mission type-10 house have been followed,
with the single exception of an addition, or
ell, to the right of the front. The house
will be 32 feet wide and 40 feet long, and
the ell 15 feet by 18 feet. The living room,
dining room, servant's room, kitchen, etc.,
will be on the first floor, and the sleeping
rooms and bath room above. All the work
on the building is done by the marines.
Gorgona Office, Central Division, Abolished.
Mr. R. W. Hebard, assistant engineer in
charge of the Gorgona office of the Central
Division, has resigned, effective November
2. As the work in the territory between
Bas Obispo and Gatun is becoming less, the
Gorgona office has been closed and the engi-
neering formerly done from that office has
been taken up by the Resident Engineer at
Empire and the assistant engineer at Las
Cascadas.


CANAL HALF EXCAVATED.
HaLfway Mark Passed-Figures of the Work
in September.
The grand total of Canal excavation down
to the end of September was 87,172,058 cubic
yards, which was only 322,479 cubic yards
short of one half of the total excavation to be
made for the completion of the Canal. As the
average daily excavation is over one hun-
dred thousand cubic yardss the output of the
first week in October was ample to put the
record safely past the halfway mark. The
details of the excavation since the beginning
of American occupation, by divisions and
sections, are published elsewhere in this
issue of THE CANAL RECORD.
The grand total of Canal excavation in
September was 2,836,385 cubic yards, which
is 81,207 cubic yards more than the total for
August, and 1,043,952 cubic yards less than
the highest record, that of March, 1909. Of
the 2,836,385 cubic yards, 2,771,245 were
charged to "work" excavation and 65,140 to
"plant." The dry excavation amounted to
1,713,233 cubic yards, and was principally
by steam shovels. The dredges removed
1,123,152 cubic yards, in addition to the
amount pumped into Gatun Dam by the
three suction dredges on that work.
In the construction of the locks, 13,733
cubic yards of concrete were laid; 3,741 cubic
yards were laid in the spillway of Gatun
Dam, and 4,023 cubic yards were laid in
municipal work, a total of 21,497 cubic
yards of concrete. The fill placed in dams
amounted to 451,783 cubic yards.
There were 25 working days during the
month, one less than in August. The mean
rainfall in the territory in which excavation
was in progress was 10.07 inches, as com-
pared with 9.28 inches during August.
In the Atlantic Division the work of con-
structing Gatun Locks was continued, and
II,364 cubic yards of concrete were laid. In
Gatun Dam spillway 3,741 cubic yards of
concrete were laid, and the hydraulic and
dry fill added to the Dam amounted to412,-
152 cubic yards. The total excavation was
540,114 cubic yards, 9,555 cubic yards more
than in August. Of this total, 113,827 cubic
yards were dry excavation, principally by
steam shovels, and 426,287 cubic yards were
removed by dredges.
The total excavation in the Central Divi-
sion was 1,471,796 cubic yards, practically
all of which was by steam shovels. This
was 66,883 cubic yards more than were re-
moved in August. Of this total, 1,235,183
cubic yards were taken from Culebra Cut,
65,841 cubic yards more than were excavated
in the Cut in August.
In the Pacific Division the work of plac-
ing concrete in the locks at Pedro Miguel
was begun on the first of the month with a
temporary plant. During the month 2,369
cubic yards of concrete were laid. The total








50 THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. II., No. 7.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Continued I

excavation in this division was 824,475 cubic
yards, of which 696,865 cubic sards were re-
moved by dredging, and the remainder was
dry excavation. The fill added to the dams
at Pedro Miguel and Mirafloresamounted to
39,631 cubic yards.
A detailed statement of the excavation
and of the lock and dam work follows:
ATLANTIC DIVISION.
"Work." "Plant." Total
LocA&LITv. tiEcava Excavi. excava.
lion. tion. Lion

Dry excaiatton- Cu. Vds Ca. Yds Cu Yd .
Locks. Dam and Spill-
way ....... ... 49945 2.445 52 393
Minds ..... ........... 61.437 61 4S7
Total..... . ... 111.382 2.443 113827
'Wt ercaation-- --
Atlantic entrance .... 410.574 ........ 410 574
Locks. Dam and Spill-
wn. .. .... ..... . ... 14 13 14 113
Permanent Pdlnts .... .... .. 1.0 1 6"'1
Total..... .. ...... 4110 5; 15.713 426.287
Total wet and drN
ezcavabot.. .. I21.956 I1 158 540 114
CENTRAL DIVISION.
.41/dr.n eetaiataon-
Culebra ut.. ....... .235 183 ..... 1.235 183
Chagres section.. ..... 235.816 ....... .35.818
Obispo Diverion .... 79 . ..... 795
Total .... . I 471.7% ..... 471. 6
PACIFIC DIVISION.


Dr fe rci'-zon-
Locks D., nis and Spill-
ways ...... ..
Diversions. ..... ...
To ial ..... ... ....
PWet erxc:artwn-
Pacific entrance ...
Mirafr.res Locks ....
Diversions. ..... ....
Total................


Ill) 62S

80 626

33889

696.863


46S.95

'6 962


127.610

127 610
612.976
3 3.889

6.9 665


Total wet and dry
eirravraion.. .. 1777.493 46.982 624.475
TOTAL CANAL EXCAVATION.
Dry ex.avation ... 1 663.8.16 2415 1.713 233
Wet excavation .... I 107.4- 62 69 i 1.123 152
Total. ... .. 2 771 245 65 140 1 36 "'5
Mean rainfall along Canal eleven stations' 10 07
inches Twenty-five working days.
Ba "Work" ExcaIation is meant excavation actu-
ally made for one of the constituent riartsof the Canal.
such as Pnsm Diversions or Locks etc.. that is. it
represents maternl iaken from the area to be occu-
pied by the Cinal and constitutes excavation useful
for the completed Canal
B, Plant Excavation is meannexcavation outside
of any of the constituent paris of the Cinal such isa
Prism Diversions or Locks. elc It includes male-
rial neces poses only and is chargeable against the particular
plant item for which it is performed such as Prism.
Diversions Locks etc.
DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION.

MATERIAL Atlantic Pacific Total

Fill placed in damsnand Ca. I'd Cu I'ds Cu Yds.
spillways ... 412.152 :4 631 451 7E.3
Concrete laid in dams
and soillwais 3741 ... 3.711
Concrete laid in locks 11.364 .69 13733

Canal Palenntology in Qtmithsonian Instltu-
tion.
WASHIu-GTON. li. S A September 21. 1'I9
Dear Sir-The specimens of fossil shells
from the Culebra Cut, thirteen in number,
which you so kindly transmitted under date
of August 28, have been duly received and
recorded as an accession to the collections in
the National Museum under the Isthmian
Canal Commission. The interest of the
specimens to the Museum is considerably


enhanced by the fact that up to this time the
locality where they were obtained had not
been represented in the paleontological col-
lections.
With assurances of my thanks for this ev-
idence of your interest, I am
Very respectfully yours,
R. RATHBUN, Acting Secretary.
LIHUT.-COL. GEO. W. GOETaaLs,
Chairman. i/thinta l Canal Commassin. Culebra.
C. Z.
Opening of Public Schools.
The Canal Zone schools opened on Octo-
ber 4, with a total attendance of 1,025, as
compared with 937 in 1907, and 668 in 1908.
In the schools for white children 45 pupils
were registered in the high school course,
11 at Culebra, 9 at Gaton, and 25 at Cristo-
bal; 270 pupils in the intermediate grades,
and 345 in the primary grades. The attend-
ance by schools was as follows:
Ancon .............. I Las Cascadans........ 38
Corozal .......... 7 Gorgonn .......... 32
Pedro Miguel. ... 31 Tabernilla .......... 9
Paraiso ........... 20 Gatun .......... 47
Culebra .... ... 70 C nstobal ........... 105
Empire .. ...... .. 83 Colon Beach ........ 33
In the schools for negro children the at-
tendance on the first day was as follows:
Balboa .......... 20 Gorgona ........... 39
Las Sabanas ....... San Pablo....... ... 14
Paraiso ........... 34 Tabernilla........ 24
Culebra ............. 34 Frijoler.............. 9
Empire .......... 69 Bohio .... .. ..... '0
Las Cascadas .... i Gatun ...........
Mlaachin . 30 Mount Hope ...... 34
Cruces .... .... Cri~tohal .. ........ 62
Pleya de Flor ...... 21
The attendance in the negro schools is
always light during the first week, and
especially during the first three days. At
Las Sabanas, for instance, where there were
no pupils the first day, there were five on
the second, and 6 on October 8.
As a result of the examination for teach-
ers for the school for colored children held
on September 17, fifteen of the twenty-eight
applicants qualified. These with the men
who qualified in the spring examination
made it possible to open the schools with
qualified teachers. An examination to pro-
vide an eligible list will be held on Novem-
ber 13
The medical examinations by district phy-
sicians, begun last year, were resumed on Oc-
tober 4. A thorough examination of each
child enrolled in the schools is in progress,
and after it is completed and the data are
compiled, an examination will he made each
month.
Extermi-nating Larvae with Fish.
The Department of Sanitation will soon
take steps to destroy mosquito breeding in
the stagnant bodies of water in the marshes
between Sosa Hill and El Diablo. Before
work was begun on the abandoned Sosa-
Corozal dam salt water invaded the marshes
regularly, but in constructing the rock and
earth fills the tidal channel was obstructed,
and the rains soon created fresh water pools
in the low, hemmed-in places.
It would be possible to inundate the local-
ity at high tide by opening a passage through
the embankments, but it has been consid-
ered more economical to treat the fresh wa-
ter with copper sulphate in order to kill the
algal growth, which furnishes food and a
hiding place for the larvae. It is further
proposed as an additional precaution to stock
the pools with small varieties of fish, which
will be caught in traps and placed in them.
Some of the fish, especially the surface-


feeding kind, have proved good destroyers
of anopheles larvae where algae and aquatic
vegetation do not exist.
The breeding of the species of diminutive
fish known as "Millions," brought here in
July, has proved successful. They were
placed in a tank in the court of the Admin-
istration Building at Ancon, where they
have multiplied rapidly, and where none
hasdied so far as observed. When thenum-
her of these fish increases sufficiently, it is
proposed to transfer a part of them to the
fresh water lakes and ponds.
Cocoli Lake, near Miraflores, will he con-
trolled in much the same manner as the
pools in the marshes. Considerable work
has already been done in that vicinity. The
shore of the lake nearest the labor camp
has been cleared of brush, resulting in an
immediate and decided diminution of.mos-
quitoes in the barracks at that point.

Rare,. to New York for Employe and Family.
THE CANAL RECORD.
Will you kindly inform me through the
columns of THE CANAL RECORD how long
I am obliged to be employed in the Canal
service before being entitled to a $20 rate to
the States, and also what return rates apply
to my family? "GOLD CLaRK."
Empire, C. Z., October 3, 1909.

[Circular No. 175-A, published in THn
CANAL RacolRD of January 27, 1909, defines
the conditions under which rates on Panama
railroad steamships will be granted to em-
ployes. Provided the employee was appointed
in the United States prior toJanuary 1,1909,
and resigns after six months service and less
than two years service he may be granted
the $20 rateon proper application. The de-
pendent members of an employee's family
may be granted a rate of $20 if the employee
was employed in the United States prior to
January 1, 1909, and a $30 rate provided he
was employed in the United States after
December 31, 1908.]

Increased Pi-t-Omere Registry Free.
The Postmaster General at Washington,
in Order No. 2617, effective November 1,
1909, has increased the fee of registering
mail matter from 8 to 10 cents for each piece,
addressed to either foreign or domestic des-
tination; and the amount of indemnity for
loss of domestic registered mail matter of
the first-class is increased to a maximum of
$50. The Head of the Department of Civil
Administration has approved the recommen-
dation of the Director of Posts that the pro-
visions of this order be made applicable in
the Canal Zone Postal System. The order
is as follows:
OFFICE OP THE POSTrMAsTRa GENERAL.
Was rHING N. D. C September 13. 1909.
ORDER NO. 2617.
By authority of Section 3927, Revised Statutes, it is
hereby ordered that the fee for registering mail mat-
ter he. and Ihe same hereby is. fixed at ten cents for
each piece, in addition to the regular postage, both to
be. in all cases. prepaid.
And by authonly of the Acts of April 21. 1902.
Chapter 563. and March 3, 1903. Chapter 1009. it is
further hereby ordered that the maximum amount of
indemnity to be paid for lost domestic regisltend
mail matter of the first class be. and the same hereby
is. fixed at fifty dollars
This order shall take effect and be in force on and
after the first day of November. nineteen hundred
and nine.
All regulations of the Department that may be in-
consistent with this order are hereby modified to
conform thereto. P. H. HITrCCOCe,
Astmaster Generat.









Octoer13 190. TE CAAL RCOR


UNUSUALLY HEAVY RAINS.
looked Lock Pitsa at Pedro Miguel and Mira-
flores.
The rainfall at Pedro Miguel from mid-
night of September 30, to midnight of Octo-
ber 9, amounted to 10.55 inches, or more
than the entire precipitation at this point
daring the month of September, which was
10.22 inches. Two heavy storms accounted
for the greater part of this rainfall, one on
October 1, when 3.36 inches fell, the other
on October 6, when the record showed 3.82
inches. Asa consequence Canal work in this
section was retarded to some extent.
The rain of October 1 caused Cocoli Lake
to overflow into the lock pit at Miraflores,
flooding the pit with an amount of water
estimated at about 8,000,000 gallons. The
rain of October 6 caused a delay of two full
days in concrete operations at the Pedro
Miguel Locks, due to the accumulation in the
pit of about 7,000,000 gallons of water. The
excavation work was also impeded. On Oc-
tober 5, the day's output amounted to 2,340
cubic yards; on October 6, the day of the
rain, to 1,400 cubic yards, and on October 7,
to only 540 cubic yards. On the 8th the
yardage was 1,550, and on the 9th the rec-
ord was normal again, both as regards exca-
vation and concrete operations.
Considerable difficulty has been experi-
enced in getting rid of the water rapidly
at the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores Locks
with the present pumping facilities, but with
the installation of the new pumps received
recently and shortly to be placed, this prob-
lem will be practically eliminated. The
pumping machinery at the Pedro Miguel
Locks consists of one 14-inch centrifugal
Spump, with a rated capacity of about 2,500
gallons per minute, and five smaller pumps.
with a total capacity approximating 1,500
gallons per minute. These figures do not
represent the actual work the pumps accom-
Splish, but refer to the water that can be
actually ejected from the lock pit.
Various low levels exist in the west chamber
of the Pedro Miguel Locks, some with a
bottom elevation of three feet above sea level;
others at six feet. and so on. These various
excavations fill with water, and in order to
drain them with the present pumping facili-
ties, one set of pumps forces the water out of
the low to higher levels, and another set car-
r. ies it free of the locks. The actual working
..capacity of these smaller pumps when all are
in operation is probably close to 5,000 gallons
per minute.
The distribution of the new centrifugal
pumps provides for the placing of two 12-
iinch and one 6-inch at the Pedro Miguel
'ac ks, and one 12-inch and two 6-inch at
the Miraflores Locks. The bulk of the water
that flows into the Pedro Miguel Locks
Si0comies from the upper forebay, attaining
i:..large volume in such rains as those of Oc-
..tober I and 6. This outlet will be blocked.
..d the water thus held back will be pumped
from a sump by a 12-inch centrifugal pump
which will be installed within the next ten
:i.Kys. All the new pumps, as well as those
!bw in use, will be operated by power from
*electric plant as soon as the power house
;jtftedy and the connections are made.
The rain of October 6 did not interfere
ii:prations at the Miraflores Locks to
flapreciable extent. 'In the interval


between the 1st and 6th dikes were built to
protect the pit from another overflow of the
lake, and the only water that collected in
the locks was that which came from within
its own area. The second heavy rain caused
a :rise in Cocoli Lake to 41 feet above sea
level, or 6 feet above normal, and a veritable
torrent poured over the spillway of the lake
into the Rio Grande at this time.

Nearly Five Inches of Rain in One Hour.
At Cristobal, on the afternoon of October
8, a heavy rainfall began at 3.40 o'clock and
lasted until 5.15 o'clock. In that time-1
hour and 35 minutes--6.03 inches of rain
fell. During the hour of the heaviest fall
4.90 inches of rain were recorded. For the
first five minutes the rainfall was 0.57 of an
inch; first 10 minutes, 1.06 inches; first 15
minutes, 1.66 inches; first 30 minutes, 2.901
inches. The storm was purely local toCris-
tobal and Colon, as at the nearest gauging
station, Gatun, only 0.85 of an inch fell dur-
ing the afternoon.
The heaviest rain recorded on the Isth-
mus was that of June 2, 1906, at Balboa,
when 5.86 inches fell in the hour from 4 to
S o'clock in the afternoon. At Bohio, on
August 7, 1908, in the hour from 3.50 to 4.50
in the afternoon 4 51 inchesof rain fell, and
on August 25, 1909. at Cristobal, 4.30 inches
fell between 1.56 and 2.56 o'clock in the af-
ternoon.
Gauging Floods in Cnlebra Cut Diversions.
During the heavy rain on theafternoon of
October 6, when the total rainfall at Empire
aggregated 2.60 inches, the recently com-
pleted Obispo Diversion was gauged at "Sta-
tion 1680," a few hundred feet north of a
point opposite Empire, where the Las Cas-
cadas plantation road crosses the Diversion,
and it was found that the discharge was 1,9801)
cubic feet per second. The mean velocity
was 7.2 feet per second, and the cross sec-
tion of the stream was 275 square feet. The
bottom slope of the Diversion at this point
is 13.2 feet per mile, and the sides and a
considerable portion of the bottom are cov-
ered with a thick growth of tropical plants.
The total drainage area above the gauging
section is 6.9 square miles.
Two gauging stations have been established
on the Obispo Diversion and one on the Ca-
macho Diversion. The first station on the
Obispo Diversion is at a point near the out-
let into the Chagres River at Camboa, and
the area of the cross section is 387.5 square
feet. In the flood of October 6, the mean ve-
locity of the stream was 3.64 feet per second.
The discharge was 1,410.5 cubic feet per sec-
ond, or 10,551 gallons, equal to 633,030 gal-
lons per minute. The other gauging station
is at the point referred to above, opposite
Empire. The method of gauging, with the
cross section known, isto note the height of
the water on the gauging staff, and find the
velocity on the surface by allowing a float to
pass through 100 feet, the mean velocity being
eight-tenths of the surface velocity. This
method is accurate enough for practical pur-
poses.
In the floodof October 6, the discharge was
306 cubic feet per second more at the station
opposite Empire than at the outlet. This is
due to the fact that the fall at the station
opposite Empire is 13.2 feet per mile, while
at the outlet it is 5.2 feet per mile, and that
between the two stations the water spreads


out in a number of basins, and thus takes
more time to run off.
The gauging station on the Camacho Di-
version has been established at the entrance
to the tunnel near Bas Obispo.

RIinfaJl in Culebra Cut.
In the first week in October the rainfall
in Culebra Cut was so heavy as appreciably
to interfere with the excavation. For the
week ended at 5 o'clock in the afternoon
of October 7, the record at four points along
the Cut was as follows:
Inchvs.
Gamboa .................................. 6.76
E m pire ........... .... ...... ...... .. 9 30
Culebra ................ ................ 7 34
Rio G runde.. .. ...... . ............. 7.09

Lidgerwood tI'loudera in September.
A statement of the work of Lidgerwood
unloaders in the Central Division during
the month of September follows:

Dump No. of No. of No. of
unloaders trains. cars.

Balboa................... 3 815 15.485
Miraflores.............. 3 682 12958
Taberoilla............... 5 1 329 23.922
Total ................ 11 2.826 52.365

Registration of Births.
THE C.ANA. RECORD.
Will you please tell me where the birth of
a child should be registered. I have asked
the doctor and the police sergeant here in
Paraiso, but they did not know.
WILLIAM CLAUS.
Paraiso, C. Z., September 27, 1909.

[The laws of the Canal Zone, under the
chapter Sanitary Rules and Regulations,
provide:
[* Every physician ur midwife attending at
the birth of a child must report the same to the Boaid
of Health upon blank forms furnished for such re-
ports, within three days after a * the birth of
said child.
[Section 12, paragraph 4, under the head
of Municipal Governments, provides:
[The municipalsecretary * shall keep aciil
register for the municipality. and record Iherein all
births. I Physicians and midwives residing
or practicing their profession within the limits of the
municipality shall forthwith forward to the municipal
secretary notification of every birth or death that
occurs under his or her professional observation, to-
gether with the necessary information for making
the proper entry in the cinil register
[Under the present organization of the
Canal Zone Government the district tax col-
lectors take the place of and perform the du-
ties formerly assigned to the municipal secre-
taries. It is the duty of the attending physi-
cian at the birth of a child to make a return
in accordance with law. If he fails to do so
the district tax collector will register the
birth, upon presentation of the proper facts.
in a register furnished him for that purpose.]

Obituary.
Harold Tanner, a seven year old son of
G. W. Tanner of Paraiso, fell from a ver-
anda on August 30, striking his head on a
concrete drain. He died at Ancon Hospital
on October 1.
Stephen Kennedy, an enlisted man in the
Marine Corps, stationed at Camp Elliott,
was struck bya railroad train near the camp
on October 7 and killed. He was born in
Bristol, Conn., January 31, 1882, and had
been on the Isthmus sixteen months. His
father, Thomas Kennedy, of 25 Valley street,
Bristol, Conn., survives him.


THE CNLRCR


October 13, 1909.








THIE CANAL RECORD


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October 13, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


CEMENT UNLOADING PLANT.
System of Conveyors to Be Installed on the
Wharves at Cristobal.
In order to facilitate the unloading of ce-
ment at the piers at Cristobal a contract has
recently been let by the Panama Railroad
Company to the Alvey-Ferguson Company of
Louisville, Ky., for a system of cement con-
veyors. The contract was signed on August
25, 1909, and delivery of the first complete
conveyor unit, forcement in barrels, is to be
made at New York within sixty days from
that date, and two complete units for either
barrels or bags are to be delivered at inter-
vals of thirty days thereafter until all the
units are delivered. Thirty days areallowed
the contractor for the installation of each
complete unit after the material reaches the
Isthmus. There will be six conveyor units,
two for cement in bags and four for cement
in barrels, and each unit is to have a maxi-
mum capacity of 1,000 bags or barrels per
hour. The price of the complete system of
conveyors is $29,760, and the contractor
agrees to furnish any additional units,,that
may he required within one year, at a speci-
fied price.
Over 4,000,000 barrels, or over 800,000
tons of cement, of theamount contracted for


inches by 20 feet, except batch No 4, which
has an opening of 19 feet 6 inches by 20)
feet. It is the intention to have one unload-
ing conveyor unit in each of six hatches
and the vessel will be so loaded that the
conveyor in the forward hatch. No. F, can
be used exclusively for cement in bags;
those in batches Nos. 2 and 3 for cement in
barrels, that in No. 4 for bags. and those in
Nos. S and 9 for barrels. The cement in
bags will be conveyed to the pier for load-
ing into freight cars fur transportation by
railroad to the locks at Pedro Miguel and
Miraflores, or to any other point where it
may be needed, and the cement in barrels
will be conveyed to barges alongside the
ships for transportation by water to Gatun.
The accompany ing diagram shows the ar-
rangement of a conveyor unit for bags and
one for barrels. The unit for bags is com-
posed of three parts: (1) a vertical elevator
for raising the bags of cement from the hold
to the deck of the ship, consisting of a ver-
tical shaft on which revolves an endless
chain of brackets; (2) a portable apron con-
veyor at right angles to the ship, built in
sections 2u feet long, which conveys the
bags from the deck of the ship to the pier,
and which has two towers for adjusting the



--t -. --- -.... .
...a- 7- ii


in placing the bags. or barrels of cement in
position on stationary brackets, located on
each of the three decks of the hold, so that
the brackets on the vertical elevator can
raise them; on the pier, in transferring the
bags from the stationary conveyor to the
freight cars, and in the hold of the barge.
in removing the barrels from the lowerer
and stowing them away.
Each vertical elevator in the conveyor sys-
tem will be operated by a 10-h. p. electric
motor, each barrel lowerer by a 5-h p. mo-
tor, each complete portable apron conveyor
b a 3-h p. motor, and each section of the
stationary apron conveyor on the pier by a
7 '-h. p motor, making a total of 20,%-h. p.
for each bag conveyor unit, and 15-h. p. for
each barrel conveyor unit. All motors will
be totally enclosed and will he dust and
moisture proof. Electricity for the motors
will be supplied from the power bouse of
the Gatun handling plant.
It is expected that one complete unit of the
conve'or system will be in operation b) De-
cember 1, and that at least two units a month
will be completed and in operation there-
after until the entire system is installed.
Any part of the conveyor system which may
prove defective in workmanship, material, or


A. Vertical elevator
B. Portable apron conveyor
C. Adjusting tower
E. Barrel lowerer.


by the Isthmian Canal Commission in June,
1908, are yet to be brought to the Isthmus
for use in the construction of the locks of
the Canal, and for other purposes, most of
which will be carried in the steamships An-
. co and Cristobal. Each vessel makes one
Sround trip a month between New York and
...Cristobal, and each has a maximum capac-
ity of approximately 10.000 tons of cargo,
'sUally about equally divided between ce-
* magt and general freight. As the Ancon
and Cristobal are twin ships, each vessel
ilhai the same arrangement of hatches, all of
'wbih have a clear opening of 17 feet 4


SKETCH OF CEMENT UNLOADING PLANT
F. Stationary apron conveyor.
C Barge emoty
H. Barge loided
I Ship loaded

aprons as the vessel lightens and rises in
being unloaded, there being a difference of
12 feet between loaded and empty draughts;
(3) a stationary apron conveyor, built length-
wise on the pier, which delivers the bags to
any point along the railroad track.
The conveyor unit for barrels is composed
of two parts: (1) a vertical elevator, the
same as in the unit for bags; (2)J a barrel
lowerer, with an adjusting lower, which con-
veys the barrel of cement from the deck of
the ship into the hold of the barge along-
side. Hand labor will be required at three
points only with the conveyor system, viz.,


K. Ship enitv
L Univerwnl joint and coupling.
M Loading stationary bracketLs
N. Surface of water.


design, within one year will be replaced by
the contractor without cost to the railroad
com pany.

tnirersity Club Elecmion.
The annual election of the University Club
will be held at the clubhouse in the city of
Panama on Saturday, October 16. The polls
will he open from 5.30 to9.30 o'clock in the
evening. After the election a smoker will
he given at which only members may be
present. A special train will leave for points
between Panama and Colon at 12 30 o'clock
the following morning.








THIEF C:AN AL R RECORD


Vol. II., No. 7.


SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.
Women'. Clubla and Other Feature-..
There was a large attendance at the re-
ception given by the Cristobal Woman's
Club in honor of Mrs. Lorin C. Collins, pres-
ident for the past two years, Mrs. Hiram J.
Slifer, and the new members, at the Com-
mission clubhouse on Wednesday afternoon,
October 6. The short business meeting was
followed by an address by the new president,
Mrs. Slifer. Music was given during the
reception, and refreshments were served.
The Ancon Woman's Club inaugurated
the season by a business meeting held in the
club reading room on Wednesday afternoon,
October 6, at 3 o'clock. Owing to removal
of officers, two vacancies were filled, Mrs.
W. A. Schwab being elected second vice-
president, and Mrs. Charles XW. Boxer, re-
cording secretary. Mrs. Boxer also con-
sented to act as librarian until the post can
be filled. The club library, with the libra-
rian in attendance, is open on Monday even-
ings. During the past months, the number
of volumes has been increased by gifts and
donations. The club is discussing wa;s and
means of extending this branch of its activi-
ties.
The Paraiso Woman's Club gave a card
party on the evening of October 9. An ad-
mission of twenty-five cents was charged.
The Pacific Social Club, recently organ-
ized at Paraiso, gave its opening ball in
Kangaroo hall on Saturday evening, October
2. A part of the Tivoli orchestra furnished
the music. A special train brought guests
from Panama and intermediatestations Re-
freshments were served. This club was or-
ganized in August to give dances and pro-
mote the social life of the community and
adjacent stations. Its membership includes
residents of Pedro Miguel, Miraflores, and
Corozal. It is expected later to extend the
organization to include residents of Balboa.
The officers are: R. B. Swartwout, president;
A. R. Stony, secretary and treasurer. W. E.
Elmwood, R. C. Smith and 0. C. Kenealy
constitute the committee on finance. The
present membership is 35. The club will
give a dance on the first Saturday evening
in each month. Arrangements for special
trains for members and guests will be made.
Church Notes.
The laying of the corner stone for the new
church building for St. James' mission, Em-
pire, will take place on Sunday afternoon,
October 17. The rector, Rev. W. H. Decker
will be assisted by Mr. W. W. Warwick and
the fraternal societies of Empire. The site
for the church is near the market, on land
owned by the Panama Railroad Company
and leased at a nominal rent. The lumber
and building materials have been furnished
by the Commission at cost price. The build-
ing will be erected at a cost of S750, the
greater portion of which sum has been raised
by subscription. The church draws on a
population of about 500 West Indians.
The Empire branch of the Woman's Chris-
tian Temperance Union continued its fort-
nightly meetings on Thursdays during the
summer months. On August 26 an elec-
tion was held with the following result:
Mrs. IH. C. Ball, president; Mrs. Nellie M.
Holcomb. vice-president; Mrs. J. C. For-
man, secretary, and Mrs. Dollie Shaw, treas-
urer. Five new members have been admit-
ted since August. The Empire branch was


organized February 17, 1909, by Mrs. Abbie B.
Hillerman, authorized organizer forthe Canal
Zone The Loyal Temperance Legion, or
junior auxiliary, was organized under Mrs.
Ball on March 9, with 15 members. A sec-
ond union was organized on March 12 at
Gorgona, with Miss M. Berry at its head.
The annual meeting of St. Lnke's Wom-
an's Guild, Ancon, will take place on No-
vember 1, and during the same week the
guild will give its annual reception to the
members of the congregation, residing at
Ancon, Balboa, and Corozal. The memorial
window for the chapel is nearly completed,
and the new lectern has been shipped and
will be placed within a few days.
Archdeacon Bryan left last week for a visit
to Barranquilla,Santa Martaand'other points,
in connection with the work of the Panama
mission of which be is the head. He ex-
pects to be absent about a month. Rev. Ar-
thur Peck, rector of St. Paul's, Panama, will
take the duty at St. Luke's Church, Ancon,
during the absence of Archdeacon Bryan.
Rally Day was observed by the Union Sun-
day school of Empire, on October 3, in ac-
cordance w-ith the custom of the affiliated
schools in the International Sunday School
Association. There was a large attendance.
A program was given, the pupils of the
school taking part. The collection will be
applied to the scholarship fund which the
school is raising for the purpose of main-
taining a pupil at the Methodist college in
Panama. The day was marked by a similar
observance in the Cristobal Sunday school.
The members of the Sunday school, and
children residing in Corozal, were given a
party at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. P.
Crafts on Saturday afternoon, October 9. Ice
cream and cakes were served.
Lshibition Baseball at Ancon.
An exhibition game of baseball was played
at Ancon park on Sunday, October 10, be-
tween teams made up of players from Ancon
and Balboa, in which the No. 1 team was
victorious by a score of 12 to 5. An admis-
sion fee was charged, and the proceeds will
be applied to the purchase of new uniforms
for the members of the Ancon club.
A meeting of the league organization to
consider plans for the coming season will
probably be called shortly.
51l siing Man.
Information is desired in regard to Allen
Har\ey. who left Porto Rico in May, 1907,
with the intention of coming to the Isthmus.
Anyone having-knowledge concerning him
is requested to communicate with J. M \Vil-
kins, Las Cascadas, C. Z.
Stenm %hovet ntd Drelgemen.
Local No. 19, International Brotherhood
of Steam Shovel and Dredgemen will hold
its monthly meeting in the Commission
lodge hall at Empire, at 2.30 o'clock in the
afternoon of October 17. S. I. LYONS,
Sccreta"' and Treasurer.
Empire, C. Z., October 8, 1909.
Civil Service Examinarions.
On October 24, beginning at 9 a. m., Civil
Service examinations for the following posi-
tions on the Isthmus, will be held in the
Commission clubhouse at Culebra: Clerk,
stenographer and typewriter, and trained
nurse.
At the same place and hour, any of the
examinations offered in section 1 of the Civil


Service Manual, revised to July 1, 1909, will
be held, provided applications for any such
examination are filed with the local Civil
Service Board at Culebra, prior to the close
of business on October 10.
Copies of the Manual and application forms
can be obtained from the secretary of the
local Civil Service Board, officeof the Chair-
man, Culebra.
PERSONAL.

Commissioner Jo C. S. Blackburn and Mrs.
Blackburn sailed on the Ancon on October
10 for the States. Mr. Blackburn will ten-
der his resignation as a member of the Isth-
mian Canal Commission to President Taft
on his arrival in Washington.
Mr. Earle J. Banta. mechanical engineer,
returned from his leave in the States on the
A4dvawe, which arrived at Cristobal on Oc-
tober 9.
Dr. A. B. Herrick and Mrs. Herrick sailed
for the States on the Panama on October 8.
Col. John L. Phillips, accompanied by his
wife and daughter, sailed for the States on
his annual leave on the Ancon on October 10.
Mr. R. W. Fenn, formerly manager of
the local office of the Union Oil Company,
has been transferred to the California office
of the company, where he will become head
of the geological department. Mr. James
Stokoe, formerly of the Mechanical Depart-
ment of the Isthmian Canal Commission, has
succeeded him as local manager.

The petition of employes for a bathing
house on Panama beach has been denied.
Band Concert.
The lithmian Canal Commission Band will give a
concert .atCulebra. C. Z .on Sunday. October17, 1909,
at 5.45 p m. The program follows:
1 March-indomdable ......... ..............Pulton
2 Selection-.VarJ'5 Lamb .................. Carle
J Caprice-Dann. and HM Hobbyhorse....... Pryor
4 Waltz- Thousand q(d One Nghts ........ Strauss
5 Medley Selection-Harl'and's Harmoaies... Halle
6 Idyl- -Forge t' the Fopset By request)..Miehaelis
Oerture-Lu itsped....... ........... Keler-Bela
a Bolero-Isotna .. ..................... Labory
3 6 SchotLische-- Four Lilte Blackerres.
O'Connor
9 March--Semprw FMie' .. ................... Sousa
CuAS E JsNNiNGaS. MfusalfDcitor.
A concert will be given at Gatun. on Sunday. Octo-
ber 24.
LEGAL NOTICE.
United States of America. ) In the Circuit Court.
Canal Zone. I First Judicial Circuit.
A petition having been filed by the Collector of
Revenues for the escheat of the estate of Richard
Prince. whodied intestate at Balboa.on or about the
17th of November 1908, leaving property tothe value
of $S1 25 U.S. currency, notice is hereby given toall
heirs creditors or other claimantsof the said estate
toappearat the courthouse at Ancon on or before
the 10th da. of December. 1909. for the purposeof fil-
ing their claims. P. H. SSEIBLEY,
Actzng Circuit Court C7erk.
Commission Clubhouse at Gatan.
Contract building. Sealed proposals for labor only,
will be received at the office of the Constructing
Quartermaster. Culebra until 3 p. m., October 25.
1909. and then opened. for the erection by contract of
a Y. M. C. A. clubhouse at Gatun. Plans and sped-
fications can be obtained from the Constructing
Quartermaster by making a deposit of $5. Fifty
dollars must be deposited with the proposal, and 500
when the contract is signed.
R. E WOOD, Acting Chief Oafterf aster.
Contract Building.
Sealed proposals for labor on ly, will be received at
the office of the Constructing Quartermaster. Cute-
bin, until 3 p. m.. October 15. 1909. and then opened,
for the erection by contract of a type-27 house, at
Agua Clara reservoir. Gatun. Plans and specifica-
tions can be obtained from the Constructing Quar-
termaster by making a deposit of $5. Fifth dollars
must be deposited with the proposal and 1200 when
the contract is signed. R. E. WooD.
Acting CAWef QOurtermaster.








etober 13, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.

Acting Read of Department of Civil Admin-
istration.
CuLsaBRa, C. Z.. October 5. 1909.
Cncmat.JA No. 281:
During the absence of Mr. Jo C. S. Blackburn. Mr.
3. H. Rousseau will have charge of the Department
of Civil Administration. Effective October 10. 1909.
H. F. HODGES. Acting Chairman.

Annual Reports for Employes.
CoULEBRa, C. Z., October 7. 1909.
: CmcuL.a No. 284:
A Limited number of copies of the Annual Report
of the Isthmian Canal Commission for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1909. will be available for distribution
to employes on the gold roll as soon as they are re-
ceived from the United States, where they are now
being printed. It may be several months before this
distribution is made.
A blank form of 'Application for Annual Report"
hasbeen provided and may be obtained at department
or division offices. Requests For copies of the report
will not be considered unless made on this form.
properly approved.
These reports are given to employes for their in-
: formation and to stimulate an intelligent interest in
theconst ruction of the Canal, and are for distribution
on the Isthmus only. Requests will be honored in
the order in which they are received at this office.
and when the available supply is exhausted no fur-
ther copies can hbe had. H F. HODGES.
Acting Chairman.

Records of Overtime.
CULEBRA. C Z October 4. 1909.
Ci:RC.atLR No. 282:
Responsibility for all overtime. i e. "extra pay
time." as regards compliance with the "eight-hour
law" and regulations of the Commission in cases
where shop or other work is performed by one de-
partment or division for another department or di-
vision, rests with the head of the department or di-
vision ordering theovertime. and records of overtime
shalt be so kept as to show what part of the overtime
of a department or division is performed at the re-
quest of another department or division.
All overtime performed by one department or di-
vision for another must be authorized in writing by
the head of thedepartment or division requesting the
overtime, whenever possible in advance. or. if the
emergency does not permit, written confirmation
shall follow by first mail. H. P. HODGES,
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer.

Additional Ratings, Commissary Employes.
CULEBRA C. Z.. October 5. 1909.
CIRCuL.AR No. 229< REVy :
The following additional designations and rates of
pay are authorized for employes in the Commissary
Department only
Salesman-S30. $35 $40, and $45 a month.
Tank and Luggerman-$25. 30. .$3, $40. and $45 a
month.
Laundress-7.i cents. 9 cents. 10ceuts. I 1 cents and
L2.5 cents an hour.
Laundryman-10 cents. 12.5 cents. 15 cents. 17 5
.cents. 20 cents, and 22.5 cents an hour.
H F. HODGES.
Acting Chairman. Ialtmisan Canal Cowim siuoim.
Send Vice-falisdent. Panama Railroad Company.

Fractional United States Coins.
CXRCmLALt No. 285.
CULEBRA. C. Z.. October 9. 1909.
Notice is hereby given that hereafter fractional
United States coins of all denominations will be ac-
cepted in exchange for United States money of larger
denominations at the Disbursing Office at Empire.
oral the branch pay offices at Ancon nod Cristotml.
in any amounts, and will be received by the post-offi-
ces of the Canal Zone in payment for postage stamps
r money orders in amounts not exceeding Iweuly
dollars.
H. P. HODGES. Acting Chairman.

The Birthday of King Edward.
CULTEBRA. C. Z., October 5. 1909.
CERCnI c.A No. 383:
SHeads of Departments and Divisions.-In order to
permit British subjects in the employ of the Commis-
i. dea and Panama Railroad Company to observe the
; anniversary of the birthdayof King Edward. Novem-
I ti: .ritisdirected that their absence from duty on
St*at y shall not affect their standing in the serv-
S;iilzded they report for duty on November 10.
Mutio::' that thisapplies only lo British subjects.


and they will not be entitled to pay except for services
actually performed. H. F HoncES.
Acting Chaimrman lshirann Canal Commimsson.
Second zc'e-preizdent Pana'.na Railroad Co'nicaz')

Acting Assistant Chief Sanitary Officer.
ANCON C.Z .OctoGber 11 191.
During theabsence of Col John Phillips. Assist
ant Chief Sanitary Officer. on leave Capt Robert E.
Noble is assigned as Acting Assistant Chid Sanitary
Officer, and, in accordance with paragraph 2. minutes
of the 119th meeting of the sthmian CanalJ Commis-
sion held in Washington D. C January ?1 9I "' is
authorized lo approve for payment all vouchers pay
rolls and public bills relating to this Department
"By direction of the Chief Sanitar Officer.
W C GORe-AS LCh-f. So'arf- 0Lerit'

Landeuape Gardening.
O.iUArraERM STER s DEPaRTMENT
Crt.LSaRA C Z October 6. 199.
The gardens heretofore maintained by this depart.
ment have been disrontinued.and landscape garden.
ing around Commission buildings will be under the
charge of the District Quarlermasters
R E. WOOD. Acting Chri Okaitemritsat'r.

Supplies for Canal Work.
The following steamers arrived q the ports of ris-
tobal and Colon during the week ended October 9
1 )A with supplies for the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion.
Paiana.Oclober from New Vork with 40barrels
alcohol for Department of SaniLntion. I 3i) kegs red
and white lead 4-1 case electric fuses I :0 bundles
galvanized corrugated iron 12 1100 bundles tie plates.
250drums calcium carbide. 5.1100 gallons marine lubri.
eating oil for stock: 9 tons electrical machinery for
sand unloaders. Balboa. and a miscellaneous cargo
aggregating 15.2us packages weighing E00 tons
.nicon October 4. from New York. with 2 000 bags
cement for Pacific Division- 16 500 barrels cement for
Atlantic Division `65 tons structural material for
Pedro Miguel 1 5U0 kegs wire nails for stock and a
miscellaneous cargo aggregating 40 692? packages.
weighing 194 t Ions.
4dcenas October 7 from New Orleans. with 130 bags
cottonseed hulls for Ancon Dairy 47 tons casting.
12 reels unloader cable for Gorgona shop'- F. tons
cast iron pipe for Gatun. 21 685 fet- yellow pine lum.
ber for car repairs 19 barrels seacoal facing for
foundry- I railroad water tank for Ceutrai Division
.d;,ronce. October 9 from New York. with 3 12 inch
centrifugal pumps for Pacific Division 3 cutler en-
wines for suction dredge at Gatun: 18 trolleys for
sand unloader cranes. Balboa 3 000 bundles tLie plates
for stock, 52 tons castings for steam shovel and car
repairs- 78 tons structural material for niortable
towers. Galun' 165 tons steel plates. etc 2J.r "i0gallons
lubricating oil for stock. 30 tons iuvot copper for
foundry antd s miscellineoiuscargoaggregating 9 320
packages, weighing U40 tons

Misdirected Letterr.
DrvisION OF POreTS. CrSrTOMS A.n REVENUES.
A.mcoN. C Z October 13 1909.
The following insufficiently addressed letters
originating in the United Stmtes and its posesitoons.
have been receied in the office or the Director of
Posts, and mat be secutred upon request of the
addressee
Baratl. Andrew Hill. P M.
Baumgardner, J. H. Howell. Robert
Clark. George Jacobs. W J.
Coloma Pedro Jenkins, Charles
Conoerly. B E Mallon. James Patrick
Dickinson. Miss Mar, Martin. L D.
Dogan, Daiec Martines. Fomasa
Dogana. L M. McCumber Adriana de
Donnelly. H A. Murray W. X.
Dunn. George Nicholson. E. P.
Ellinger. B. P. lI) Norton. Mrs Fred
Flake. H. M. Pearny.J
Foster. Fred E Sandersl. J T
Gambrill. William S. Sheridan. P. L.
Grosvenor Mrs. F. Stevens. F. J.
Hill. Mrs. Lyman C. Stevens. Mrs E W

Vessels arriving at and departing from Balboa dur-
ing the week ended October 8. 1909. were
Arrivals---Octoher 2. CArriqui. from intermediate
ports. October 4, Chide. from south parts October 5
Arnia. from Guasaquil: October 7. Alanaz-i. From in-
termediate ports.
Departures-October 3. Araapulco for San Fran-
cisco. October 5. fexico. for south ports October 5.
Chirnqua.or intermediate ports. October 7. T7-nrlaor
for Puget Sound.
LOST-On the relocated line of the Panama rail-
road. September 26. Canal Medal No 1758. belonging
to Mr. John Miller Finder will please send same to
Mr. P. Mears. Acting Chief Engineer of the Panama
railroad, Colon.


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.

Activities of the Young Men's Christian As-
sociation.
BOWLING TOURNAMENT.
Following is the standing of the teams in the bowl-
ing tournament up to October 6
if n. Lost Rr ceint. .n rage.
Empire ........ 12 3 8.k 858 7-15
Crnsiobal . ..... 8 7 533 836 14-15
Culebra ..... 7 i 4(6 809
Gorgona ...... 3 12 200 781 7.15
The bowlers with the five highest averages are as
follows
-.I4 n. .cwtn.1. gnuts Average
Husun Empire 15 1835-15
Hinckley ... Empire s15 173 4-15
strong .. .. Criltohal 12 173 2-.1
Bre ... Cristoh.l s1 1728.13
Brown. ..... Empire 15 171 12 15
The bowling games of the tournament series at
Cristobal la-t Saturday night resulted as follows
Cn tobal Fi. it .Sec,.'d Th ird. 7r.aI
Bullard .... .. 161 1iii 174 537
Barlow ... 1.. -. 13l1 139 511
.ouch .. . .' lato 168 552
Collins ... ... 193 153 141 487
Strong ...... .. .. 4 199 14A 548
Total .. .... 995 q62 788 2 635

Lamslmer .. ... .1S 20') ['I t54
Herri gton ...... .. I1 1%3ss la7 460
De Moll ... .. .150 17 126 433
Winters ... ...... .1l 149 162 46S
Dougherty ... 186 160 184 5;1)
Total ..... ..... .. 853 S19 7N0 2.462
On account of the stoker at Gorgonia last Saturday
night the bowling tournament games between Em-
pireand Gorgona were postponed until Monday night
of this week and were rolled at Empire with the
following results


Efi tie. Fi i..
Brown ... 1
Poler ...
Bardelson .. .. it
Hincklev .... 1
HtsOn. ... .. .. 16
Total ..... ...... 1 .2
GTotal
O tis .. ..... .. 153'
King . ....... 152
Ha)ps .... 13l
Haldeman ....... .. Ian
Robertson ...... 119
Total .......... 681


.Sreo'vd.
21t
IrS
I>n
1r.8
210
917


Thint.
I7
2'6
137
IJnj
170
s;iJ


Tota.'.
573
5;3
463
i74
0)6
in 7SV


CRISIOBAL.
Mr. W S Whilbeck. a graduate of the V M C. A.
Training School at Sprinfield. Mass has been ap-
pointed to succeed Mr Cundiffas assistant secretary
of the Cristobal V Mt C A Mr whitbeck will ar-
rive this week on the .4/t'ranca.
The Hagy Scenic Company from the United States
will give s moving picture entertainment Salurd.sy
night of this week.
CULEBRA.
The moving picture show given on October 8 by
the bpanish company under Hector M Del Rio. -as
attended by large audiencee The quality of the en.
tertainment was sery s.itisf-icor
A liberal _uppl of new book. for the pianoln has
been received.
The public is cordially initled to make the club-
house their convenience next Sunday evening when
the I. C. C. band will gve a concert.
EMPfRE.
A full assortment of supplies has been received for
the use of the cimera club Owing to lack of mate-
rial there has been same deliy in the construction of
the dark room. but this will be pushed to earl com-
pletion.
The Hagy Scenic Comtany presented their moving
pictures to a well-pleased audience on Monday night
of this week.
GORGON A.
Saturday night October 9 n smoker was given un-
der the direction of Ihe V M. C. A entertainment
committee. Messrs E L Emery W I Wright and
Tom Charnley A special train from Las Cascadas
brought a number of guests from that place The
program consisted of songs. dances, sketches, piano
numbers. and music by the Gorgona Band Light
refreshments were served. About 250 men were
present
The Hag'y Scenic Company will give a moving
picture show Thursday nightof thisweek. This com-
pany is from the United States and the picture titles
will be in English.
Judge Thomas E. Brown. Cristobal. will deliver the
address at the monthly praise service on October 31.









THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. IH., No. f.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

The hours dunug which commisanrlesare open are
as follows
Cristobal and Culebra, 8 a m to 13 30 p. m.; 2 p.m
to 7 p. m
All other commissaries an. m to Ip m.: 3 p. m.
top m ____
Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning October 9"


FRESH MEATS.


Fn.


Mutlon-Stewtig .. ... .. ................ per lb
-houlder. neck trimmed oil.
a14 pound. and oetr'i ............ per lb
Eutire forequarter lnot trim-
med I 10 pounds and over ... per Ib
Lea (i to 10 pounds ............ -per lb
Cutlets. ... ........ .. .......... per lb
Short cut chops........ .. .....per lb
Lamb-Stewing...... ........... .......... .per Ib
Entire forequarter, neck trimmed
cf..... ...................... per lb
Leg L6 to 8 pounds). ...... ... ...per lb
Chops ...... .......... ..... ...... per lb
Cutlets.... ........... ..... ..... .. .per Ib
Veal-stewitig ... .............. .. ........per Ib
Shoulder for roasting .not under
4 Ibs' .. .. ... ............ per Ib
Loin for roasting .. .. ........... per Ib
Chops... ........... ........... per lb
Cutlets........ ....... .......... per lb
Pork cut ................ ............... per lb
Beef-Suet ............... ..... ..................per lb
Soup.... . .... ............... .....Der lb
Stew...... ...... ... .............. per lb
Corned.. ............... ...... per lb. 12. 14.
Chuck roa .. - .. .. .... .... per lb
Pol roast ....... ........ . ...... er lb
Rib-pMisi second cut lnot under
31, pounds' ........... . ......per lb
Ribroast. first cut tnot under 3
pound.i ..... .. .......... ...........per Ib
Sirloin roast .... ............. ....per lb
Rump ronst . ....... .......... per lb
Porterhouse roast ..... ..... .... er lb
Stea.k. Chuck .. . ..... ..... . per lb
Round ...... ... ...... .. per Ih
Rib .... ........ ...... ... per lb
Sirloin........ ............ .. ,er lb
Porterhouse................ per Ib
Rutm p.......... ....... ..... .per lb
Tenderloin ................ ...per Ib
MISCELLAN EOUS.
Livers- B ef ............ ..... .. ........... per lb 1
Calf. .. ................ ........ ... each
-Shad roes ... .. .. .. .. ..... ........ air
Sausage- Pork ...... ...................... . per It,
Bologna ... ............ ..per lb
Frankfurter .............. ..... per lb
Leberwur.t . .... ......per ib
Sweet bread-Veal. .............. .........per lbh 1
Sweet breid-Bee ... ...............per lb
O sters . ... ....... .............. ...... keg
Fgs. fresh .... .............................. dozen
Bluefish ........ ................. per lb
POIILTRY AND GAME.
Chickens-Pancy Roasting.large ........ li
medium... escl
Fowls ..............................each 75. 'c1. I
Ducks. fatted ............ ........ ... each I
medium weight. ................. .. ..each
Broilers ........ ............ ..... ..... ... .. each
Turkeys ......... . ... .per Ihb
Squb. s. ................... ............ each
CaRpons ........ .... each
Geese. fitted lnout If, pounds ..... ... ench
12 rounds . each
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS
Bacon-Breackfait whole piece . .per lb
Br'Laklaslt sliced. ........ ..... .. .per Ih
Ham-Sugar-cured sliced ... ........per lb
Onir.h.If for boiling ..... ........ ..per lb
'cst lihali. . .. .. ........per ]b
Hocks . ................. per lb
Su. nr cured ... . .... ... ...per lb
Beef, salt. fam ily .. ... ........ ...... ... .. per Ihb
P rk.s.ilt ........... .. .. . .. ......... er Ib
Hnni. boiled . ...... .. ... ... ... .. .. per lb
On longues .................... ... ...........each
Pigs' feet ....... ... .. .... ... .. per Ib
lougues .. ....... .. ... ... ...... per lb
DAIRV PRODUCTS.
Buttcr-PInnsL Prime quality......... per bIh
Cheese- Roquefort ........... ........... per lb
PhilaIdelphia Cream..... .... .... each
Voung America .. ..........per Ih
Sw iss ..... .............................per lb
Fdam .. .............. .................. each
Camemberl ......................... rner lb
Nufchatel ... ... ............. each
Gouda ..... ........ .............. per lb
Parmesan .................... .....bolttle
French cheese in tins-Catmembert Brie
Neulch-ilel .. ..... . ...... .... . .. I-lb tin
M ilk. Briarcliff ............ ... ......... .. ...bottle
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.
Celery ..... ... ......... .... ............ ..... per hd
Lettuce .. ..... .. ....... .. ... .. ....per lb
Potatoes white. ..... ... ....... ................ per lh i
sw eet . ....................... ...... per lb
Onions..................... ... ...... .. ...........per lb


re.

10

9
19
20
22


10
27
29
29
10
15
19
22
26
22
4
6
10
16
14
16

19

21
22

15
16
221
IS

22
22
27


It2
65
40
17
17
17
17
10
30
(0
ti4
15

50
31"
1101
.3n
90
75
35
2 50
' or),


27
29
1125
421
45
18
20
10
15
28
I O)
'8
16

42
45
20
22
31
1.05
28
6
34
20

20
"25


Price.
Rqunsh Hubbard ..................... ....per lb 5
Vams ........pe lb 314
Turnips . .. ... ..... ......... ... per lb 3-
Carrots .............. .......... . ......per lb 4
Beets ........ ................. ..... per Ib 5
Cauliflower .. ..... ...... .. ... . r.er lb fl2
Cucunmbers ... .. .......er lb 4
TomatOes .. ....... ..... .... ... per Ilb S
Lem ons ........ .......... . ... ... .. dozen 24
G rapes ....... ............. ... .. .. ... per lb S
Lim es ................ .... . ... . .. per 100 80
W term elons ..... .... ... ....... ... ...... each to
Peaches ....... ... ... ... .... ..... ....per lh it
Cantaloupes . .. .. .. ......... .. ..... ... .eich 8
Blueberries ..................... ....... .......box 18
Cabbage .. ....... .. ..... .......... per Ib 4
Apples.; ... ................. .. .. .. per lb 5
Oranges.. ... ...... .. .... ......dozen 12
GraDefruit ..... ............ .... ..... each 4
Plum.... ........... per lb Il
Pears ... ....... ............ per 11) ;
'lnidicates reduction from liast list
"Indicites 5 cent. allowed for return of bottle.
tindicaits advance on list list.
[Sold onla from Coiumis-iries uo orders taken for
delivery
?Sold orly from Cold Storn.ae and not from Com-
missanes
Rainfall, October I to 9, 1909, Inclusive.
IItiDNIGHT TO itnsicGRTr I



STATIONS. E 3 '




Atlaaltre Divistioan -
Cnstohal ......... .. ............ 603 8 10 43
Brazor Brook.... ... .... ...... 2.35 6.63
G, tun ........... . ...... 2 16 1 616
Bohio .... .. .. ... ............. 2.89 1 5.62
Central Diisiov-
Ta.bernilla...... .... ... ........ 6 I 590
San Pablo . .... ..... 02 1 16I
Gorgona ..... ........ ......... 3 U 1 666
Gamrboa.. ... ....... ... .. 3.32 1 6 77
Em pire ....... .... .... .. ..... 3.5 1 9 3
Camacho .. ... . ......... .. ......
Culebr . .......... .... ...... .. 2.65 6 7.35
Pciisci DIL OSron-
Rio Gr nde ................. ... .. 2.61 6 7.11
Pedro Miguel ..... .... ...... 382 6 10 55
Balbo.a ...... .. .. ...... .... ... 1 43 5 5 06
Ancon .... .............. 1 5 1 4 03
Mir.iaflores .... .. .. 20 3 11.91
A/Hnt/flic CLaol--
Porto Bello. ..... . .. ... 1.69 6 3.54
Nombre de Dios ..... ....... 3 33 6 603
t'pe Chagper!-
Et'a .. ..... 244 5 832
Alhajuela ... . .. .. I 7 11

Sunies or the Chragres.
Maximum height of Chjgres River rboie wean sea
ie'el for the weck ended midnight Shaturda,. Octo-
hbr 1 I'au:

STATIONS


3t



Height of low w.I.tr
aboE* e n iE t ft I/? 792 16 1 0 0
MNI xriiin height ab
rmin rien level feet I
i.nti.n Oct A 1 9 1 '.5 1 51 4 12. 3 1 ".4
Mondari Oct 4 ,1? 0 93 51.4 12 6 72 6 I
TlS'd.%, Ot 5 13 1 o 1 55 110 6 5 6
WEo esd'. ...Oct r, l1: :a 1 55 I li 1 5 9
Thursd-,a Ot 7 1 4 1 | 7 1t 4 69 5 S
PFrda Oct 8 I N I 95 5 Si 6 155 83 7 1
Saturday Oct. 9. 10 4 q5 51- 9 I 6 0 3 9


Tide Table.
The following table shows theltine of high ad low
tides at Pi.mania for time week ending '-rober ?u. 19u9
S'"th nierlnd"n time)

DATE l.ow. Hih Low High Low

A I M. %. 1 P P 1U
Oct 1 .. 3 49 .I 1 10 1 .13
Oct. 15 ...... 4 16 1 31 3 1 44
Oct In ...... .. 4 44 11 03 5 05 1 15
Oct 17 ..... 5 11 11 3 5 34 11.46
P. M
Oct ]A. 5.. .. .41 12 i? 6 05 .......
Oct. 19...... 12.20 6 15 1.24 6.42 ... ...
Oct. 2 .... 12.57 654 1.26 7 ?5 .....

The variation of high and low tide at Cristobal is so
slight that a tide table for the .AFnlii 4idl is not
necessary.


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
ama Railroad SteamshipCompany. of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburlg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line, the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
chance
NEW YORK TO COLON.
Alliance ...............P. R. R.PFriday.........Oct. 8
Prinz Joachim ......... H.-A...Saturday....... Oct. *
Colon ................. P. R. R.Thursday......Oct 14
Clyde................ R.-M ...Saturday......Oct. 16
Panama ......... .... P. R. R.Thursday......Oct. 21
Prinnz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A.. Saturday.......Oct. 23
Ancon.. ......... .. P. R. R....... ....... Oct. *
Alliance ...............P. R. R.Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Thames .. .... ....R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 30
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A...Saturday...... Nov. 6
Atrnto ........... .. R.-M ..Saturday.......Nov. 13
Prnz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A...Snturday ......Nov. 20
T.-1U-. .... ......... R.-M...Saturday....... Nov. 27
Prinz Joachim ....... H.-A. .Saturday.......Dec. 4
Oruba ..... ...... R.-M...Saturday.......Dec. 11
Prini Aug. Wilhelm... -A. Snaurday.......Dec. 18
NlAgdalena ............ R.-M. .Saturday......Dec. A5
Prinz Joachim ......... A...Saturday..... Jan. ,J
Clrde ..........R -M...Saturday..... Jar. 8.
Prinz Aug Wilhelm ..H.-A...Saturday....... Jan.'IS
Thames ............. R.-M...Saturday.......Jan. fd
vAncon will probably leave New York on or about
October 24
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Cristobal
should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
office. room S. building No 1. Cristobal. for customs
line permits, which are necessary to obtain admit-
tance beyond wailing room on pier II.
All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO NEW YORK.
Advance..............P. R. R.Thursday...... Oct. 14
Cri-tobal. . ...... ... P. R R ... .............Oct. *
Alliance .............P. R. R.Tuesday........Oct. 19
Thames................R.-M...Wednesday....Oct. 20
Colon..................P.R. R.Monday....... Oct. 25
Prinz Joachim.... .. H.-A.. Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Panama................P. R.R.Tuesday.......Nov. 2
Atrato ............. R.-M..Wednesday.... Nov. 3
Ancon ........ .... P. R R ..... ... ......Nov. t
Alliaanca. ............ P. R R.Monday.......Nov. 8
Prinz Aug Wilhelm. .H -A.. Tuesday...... Nov. 9
T., puis ..... ..... R -M ..Wednesday. .Nov. 17
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A...Tuesday...... Nov. 23
Oritbi ... ..... ... R.-M. Wednesday.... Dec. 1
Pnnz Aug Wilhelm.. H. A. Tuesday...... Dec. 7
Mngd ilen .. .....R.-M.. Wednesday....Dec. 15
Prinz Joachim ... H -A Tuesday.......Dec. 21
Clyde. ................R -M...Wednesday....Dec. 29
Prinz Aug Wilhelm H.-A .Tuesday.......Jan. 4
Thames... ..... ... R.-M ..Wednesday....Jan. 12
"Cri-tobal will probably leave for New York on or
about October 1i
tAticon will probably leave for New York about
November 6.
NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Turrialba ............ I F C .Saturday......Oct. 9
Abangarez..... .. ....U.F C..Saturday......Oct. 16
Atena .. ...... .. I.F.C..Saturday......Oct 23
Turriilba .... ..... U F C Saturday......Oct. 30
Abangarez ............U F C. Saturday......Nov. 6
Atenas... ...........U.F C..Saturday......Nov. 13
Turnralba ...... ... U F.C. Saturday...... Nov. 20
Abangarez.... ........LI.F.C .Saturday......Nov. 27
COLON TO NNW ORLEANS.
Turnalba ........... U F.C .Tuesday.......Oct. 19
Aban.rez ... ..... U F C. Tuesday ......Oct. 26
Atenas .......... U F C. Tuesday ....... Nov. 2
Turrialba. ............U F C. Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Abangarez............ U P C .Tuesday.......Nov. 16
Atenas ..............U F.C .Tuesday.......Nov. 23
Turrialba ............. U.F.C Tuesday.......Nov. 30
Abanarez ............ L F C..Tuesday ......Dec. 7
COLON 'TO BARBADOS, CtALLINU AT TRINIDAD.
Clyde............ ....R.-M.. Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Sailings of the French line (Cie. Gfnerale Trans-
atlantique- for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and
Cuadelou.e on the 3d and 201th of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows ,t1e, uia for New Orleans. via Kingston. Ja..
on or about October 31
The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m.
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York.
A ship of the United Fruit Company's line sails
from the dock at Colon. at 3 p. m., Tuesday of each
week.
The steamers Davird of the National Navigation
Company, aind the Tabasa of the Pacific Gteam Navi-
gation Company. leave Panama, for David, prouinme
of Chiriqui, and intermediate points, the first and
third weeks of each month.















CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1909. No. 8.


The Canal Record
Psfi) 0ked weekly under the a nrhaory and suspension
of the Isthmian Canal Commission.

The Canal Record is issuedfree o charge. one copy
each, to all employes of the Comm ssion and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
4Jitra copies and back numbers can be obtained Jrom
Sthe news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for
pue cents each.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
No communication either lor ubalialon orrequest-
iwg information, will receivee attention unless signed
witk the ull name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Acting Chairman's Monthly Report.
The report of the Acting Chairman of the
Isthmian Canal Commission for the month
of September is published in full in other
columns of this issue of THE CANAL REC-
OR.D. It gives a detailed account of the
progress of Canal work in all departments
and divisions.
Building Gatun Locks.
The total amount of concrete laid in the
locks at Gatun at the close of work on Sat-
urday, October 16, was 25,938 cubic yards.
The record is as follows:
Cubic Yards
August 28 (seven days).................. 1.298
September (26 days) ................... 11.934
October 1 to 9 (nine days) .............. 6.014
October 10 to 16 (seven days)........ .. 6.692
The daily average for August was 185 cu-
bic yards; for September, 459 cubic yards;
for the first nine days in October, 668 cubic
yards; for the week ended October 16, 956
cubic yards.
On October 13 the thousand yard mark
for a day's work was passed, and this rate
was maintained until Octobir 16, when a lack
of materials and some minor mishaps at the
handling plant reduced the total. The
amounts laid each day in the week euded
October 16 were as follows:
Cubic Yards.
October 10.............................. 926
October II ..................... .......... 916
October 12 ... ......................... 822
October 13 ................................ 1.092
October 14................................ 1.054
October IS.............................. 1.160
October 16................................ 722
Total................................ 6.692
In order to procure an additional supply
of crushed rock for the mixers, in view of
the fact that the unloading cableways are
. nott handling as much rock as was expected,
wharf is being built on the unloading slip
e: ar the cement storehouse, at which barges
e 6:' tic up. The rock will be unloaded with
iLi.ljes.and stored in binz from which it will
|| charged by gravity into the auto-


matic cars. The concrete gangs continue to
work in two 6-hour shifts, and on October 3
Sunday work was begun.
It is expected that the cableway tower,
that collapsed on September 24, will be ready
for use early in November.
A battery of two 2-yard concrete mixers
will be erected at the south end of the lock
site for the purpose of furnishing concrete
to be laid in the part of the south or upper
lock approaches that is not covered by the
cableways. A steam shovel is at work on
foundations for the new mixing plant, and
two of the mixers intended for the Pacific
Division will be installed, two others having
been ordered for the work in the Pacific
Division.
Pedro Miguel Locks.
At the close of work on Saturday, Oc-
tober 16, there had been laid in Pedro Mi-
guel Locks, a total of 5,1464' cubic yards of
concrete. Heavy rains interfered with oper-
ations to a considerable extent during the
first seven daysofOctober. The daily average
amount of concrete laid for the week ended
October 16 (seven days), was 248,' cubic
yards, the highest daily average made up
to that time. The force worked on one Sun-
day, October 10. The detailed statement
since the beginning of the work on Septem-
ber 1. 1909, is as follows:
Cubic Ya d.'.
September (25 days) ............... 2. 69S .
October 1 and 2 twodays). .... .... 31634
October 4 to 9 (six days) .. .. ........ 9n2
October 10 to 16 (seven days) ........ 1 7371,

Handling Plants of Pacific Division.
All of the parts for twoof the four cham-
ber cranes to be used in connection with the
handling plant at Pedro Miguel Locks have
been received, and work on the erecting
plant at the lock site has begun. As soon
as it is completed the installation of the
handling equipment will be carried forward
as rapidly as possible. None of the ma.
chinery for the four berm cranes has been
received, but a shipment is expected soon,
as reports from the factory state that the
work on them is well advanced.
One of the unloading cranes at the Balboa
sand dock has been placed in position, and
the material for the other two is on the
ground.
Heavy Rainfall in Culebra Cut.
The rainfall in Culebra Cut for the first
sixteen days of October, was greater than
for any whole month in the present rainy
season, and almost twice as great as for the
whole months of October, 1906 and 1908. At
Empire, midway between the ends of the
Cut, the rainfall of 15.67 inches for the first
sixteen days of the month was greater than
for the whole month of October, 1907, and
about two inches short of the total rainfall
for the whole month of October, 1905. The


record for the first sixteen days at five sta-
tions along the Cut was as follows:
Inches
Gamboa .. ........... ... ............ 1125
U m pire ............ .................. 15.67
Culebra ... ... ... ... .... 12 22
Rio G rande.. ..... .... ....... ....... 13 18
Pedro M iguel......... ... ......... 1376
An unusually heavy rainfall occurred on
the afternoon of October 15, when the gauges
at three stations for the period from 3 to 5
o'clock registered as follows:
iiches
Empire .......................... ...... 1.91
Culebra ... ...... ............. 2 79
Rio Grande .... ..................... ... 2 77
Steel Rail for Lock Reinforcement.
The straightening of old rail, for use in
reinforcement of the concrete in the locks,
which was begun by beating and hammer-
ing them out. has been discontinued. About
fifty tons of rail will be straightened cold in
the hydraulic forming press at Empire shops
and sent to the Atlanticand Pacific Divisions
to be tested. The results of the tests will
determine whether or not the remainder of
the rails will be straightened by heating or
by the cold process.
Porto Bello Rock for Pedro Miguel.
One of the stiff-legged derricks on the bank
of the French canal at Mindi has been put
in order to unload crushed rock from barges
into cars for transportation to Pedro Miguel.
where it will be used in the concrete work
in the locks. The unloading plant at Mindi
was used in handling rock for macadamizing
the Mount Hope-Gatun road. As the output
of crushed rock at Porto Bello can be made
much greater than the unloading plants at
Gatun can handle, five carloads, or 1100 cu-
bic yards, will be sent to the Pacific Divi-
sion each day until such time as the crushers
at Ancon quarry are able to supply rock.
The cars that haul Cham6 sand from the
Pacific Division toGatun will take back rock.
Colon Public Improvements.
The old station site of the Panama Railroad
Company in Colon is being leveled and laid
out as a part of the city park. All the land
on which the park is located is owned by
the Panama Railroad Company and is leased
to the municipality for a nominal consider-
ation. The present improvements are han-
dled under contract with J. M. Hyatt. a res-
ident of Colon, and will involve the expendi-
ture of upward of $20,000.
The park, when completed, will extend
north to Third street, south to Fifth street.
east to Avenidade Paez and west to the spur
railroad track alongside the freight house.
The new section of the park will be enclosed,
like the rest with a 6-foot iron picket fence,
with concrete walks on either side. An ad-
ditional fountain has been placed south of
the band stand, making two in the park.
Cuttings from the royal palm, and a collect-
ion of tree plantings, especially suited for








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III., No. S.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Continued)

shade and decorative purposes, have been
set out. The collection was secured from the
botanic gardens at Kingston, Jamaica, and
brought to Colon by Governor Melendez.
A concrete walk has been built by the
Panama Railroad Company from the new
station to Fifth Street, and with the com-
pletion of the new park walks, it will be
possible for pedestrians to go from the Cris-
tobal commissary to the Washington House,
without crossing to the east side of Front
Street. This will not only relieve the con-
gestion on the Front Street sidewalk, but
will prove a convenience to passengers
alighting from trains.
A modern two-story public school build-
ing, to contain 12 rooms, will be erected by
the Panama Government on Second street,
opposite the children's playground It is
estimated that it will cost from $-lC',000 to
$30,000, and bids for its construction were
opened in Panama on October 18. At the
present time the Colon public schools are
maintained in rooms rented for the purpose
in different parts of the city. When the new
building iscompleted they will becentralized.
Operations at Gatun Dam.
The surface of the water in the hydraulic
fill of Gatun Dam stands at about 30 feet
above sea level, and filling by three 20-inch
suction dredges continues. In the spillway
the work of laying concrete in the walls
below the site of the concrete dam contin-
ues. and the east wall has been completed
beyond the point where the power house
waste culverts will open into the spillway
channel. At the southwest corner of the
entrance to the spillway the concrete mono-
lith, which will form the corner, has been
laid.
North of the dam material is being
dumped across the old channel of the Chag-
res, with the purpose of filling it, and thus
keeping water from the river from backing
up into the French canal and creating the
cross current that has proved to be an obsta-
cle in the towing of the sand and rock
barges to the material wharves.
Chame Sand Service.
A total of 331 carloads of sand was fur-
nished by the sand service of the Pacific
Division during the month of September.
Shipments to Gatun aggregated 219 cars,
each containing 20 cubic yards. One hun-
dred and ten carloads of 12 cubic yards each
were supplied to the works in the Pacific
Division, one car containing 15 cubic yards
to the Central Division, and one car of 12
cubic yards to the Panama railroad. The
dredge .leg" took out 3,400 cubic yards of
sand at Point Chamrn on September 18 and
19, and the Gophcr began dredging another
supply on the 29th.
Work at Dock No 12.
The work of filling in the land approaches
to dock No. 12, which is to be built between
docks Nos. 11 and 13, is in progress. Some
of the dirt for the fill has been obtained
from Mindi, but a spur track has been laid
recently east of the main line at Mount Hope,
which extends back into the small hills on
the north side of the cemetery, where an
abundance of suitable material is available.


There is only a short haul from this point
to the fill, and as the operation of dirt trains
will all be within the Panama railroad yards,
the necessity of employing qualified train
crews will be obviated. The space between
the Mount Hope railroad yard and the Folks
River docks, part of which is still covered
with water, is gradually being filled in, and
eventually the entire area will be reclaimed.
Bids for the construction of the new dock,
which will probably be built under contract,
have been opened and are under considera-
tion.
Visit of the Congressmen.
The Committee on Appropriations of the
House of Representatives will leave New
York on the Cristobal on November 3, and
will arrive on the Isthmus on November 10.
The committee will be accompanied bymem-
bersof theSenate Committee on Interoceanic
Canals, and by several members of the House
Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com-
merce. None of the Members will bring
their wives or other members of their fami-
lies, and the Chairman of the Committee on
Appropriations has expressed a wish that no
social functions be arranged for the enter-
tainment of the party, because it is expected
that all of the contemplated stay of eleven
days will be required in going over the Ca-
nal work, and conducting hearings with re-
gard to the estimates. The party will num-
ber about thirty-five persons, including
clerks and stenographers. They will be
quartered at Hotel Tivoli in Ancon.

Immigration of Spanish Laborers.
A steamship of the Compagnie Gen&ale
Transatlantique arrived at Colon on October
14 with 144 laborers from Spain. These
laborers form the largest single party that
has come from Spain since recruiting in
that country was forbidden by Spanish law.
Between September 1 and October 12 only
130 laborers came here from southern Eu-
rope, but the continued unsettled conditions
in Spain have stimulated emigration. Eu-
ropean laborers who come to the Isthmus of
their own accord and apply for work with
the Commission are employed at a rate of 16
cents gold per hour, and after a six months'
trial, if their services are satisfactory, they
are advanced to 20 cents an hour.

Knights of Pythias.
THE CANAL RECORD'
On behalf of the Knights of Pythias, I
have accepted a courteous invitation from the
Mayor of Panama to join in the parade and
celebration on the anniversary of the inde-
pendence of the Republic of Panama, to be
held in the city of Panama, on November 3,
1909.
Free transportation will be furnished our
members to Panama, and all members of the
order of Knights of Pythias. whether mem-
bers of the Canal Zone lodges or not, are
cordially invited to join in the parade and
celebration. A. M. WAR.NER,
Ditd'tt DepHu, Supremie Chancellod.
Las Cascadas, C. Z., October 11, 1909.
Knights of Columbus.
Panama Council, 1371, K. of C., will exem-
plify the first degree on Sunday. October 24,
at 10 a. m., in Kangaroo Hall at Empire.
All members and visiting brothers are re-
quested to be present.
JoHN A. DALEv, Financial Secretary.


P. R. R. RELOCATION WORK.
About Five and One-half Miles Yet to be
Completed Between Gatun and Gamboa.
About five and one-half miles of construc-
tion remain to be done in order to have
standard gauge track connection over the re-
located line of the Panama railroad between
Gatun and Gamboa, a distance of 24 miles.
The work is advancing steadily on both the
north and south ends.
It is expected that track work will be com-
pleted to the Quebrancha River, four and
one-half miles south of Gatun by December
1, 1909. A gap approximating five and one-
half miles in length exists there and extends
to a point about a mile north of Bohio ridge
where track laying is in progress. Track
will probably be laid as far as Rio Juan Ga-
llegos, one and one-half miles north of Bo-
hio ridge, by November 1, and on that date
a stretch of roadbed one and one-half miles
farther north will be graded and ready for
the track construction crews.
By the middle of November, it is expected
that track will be laid as far as station 515,
about eight miles from Gatun, and by the
end of December, it will reach the edge of
Gatun River valley at Monte Lirio, seven
miles from Gatun. From there to Bohio
ridge, the roadbed is graded, but it is not up
to permanent level in many places. It is
planned to have the trestle over the Gatun
River completed by the middle of January,
1910, and the existing gap will then be nar-
rowed to about two and one-half miles.
From Bobio ridge, south to Gamboa, a dis-
tance of 13 miles, track laying has been fin-
ished, but the roadbed will require leveling
to grade in a number of places.
On the south end operations have been
largely confined to making the permanent
fill over theold Commissson dumps between
Paraiso and Corozal on the east side of the
present main line. This work has reached
a point a little north of the Cardenas River,
between Miraflores and Corozal, where it
will be necessary to make a change in the
location of the present main line tracks to
make room for the relocated line. These
tracks will be carried a little west of their
present location for a length of half a
mile, and will occupy a temporary roadbed
three or four feet above the surrounding
level. A trestle 22 feet high has been con-
structed over the present tracks to enable
dirt trains to make the necessary fills on
the west side. The relocated line will be
built between the new and old locations of
the present main line, will cross the Car-
denas River on concrete arch bridge and
will join the old line at a point a little
north of the Corozal hotel. From there into
Panama the road is already permanent.
The permanent track laid on the new line
up to October 1, 1909, aggregated 111,297
linear feet, or about 21 miles.

Obituary.
James C. Worrall, a trainman employed
in the Central Division transportation de-
partment, residing at Pedro Miguel, died
on Sunday, October 17, at No. 223 Avenue
B, Panama. He was 25 years old, married,
and had been on the Isthmus since Febru-
ary, 1908. A brother, L. P. Worrall, re-
sides at Empire. The funeral will be heldat
Ancon, Sunday, October 24, under the aus-
pices of the Independent Order of Kangaroos.


58







October 20, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


TRANSISTHMIAN TELEGRAPH.
Panama Railroad Company Building New
Lines for the Republic of Panama.
A contract has been entered into between
the Panama Railroad Company and the Re-
public of Panama, providing for the con-
struction and maintenance of telegraph cir-
cuits between Panama and Colon, and be-
tween Panama and Empire, for use of the
Panama Government. The contract, which
was signed on August 20, 1909, by Hiram J.
: Slifer, General Manager, on the part of the
railroad company, and by Ernesto T. Lefevre,
Director of Telegraphs, on the part of the
Panama Government, was approved by Presi-
dent Obaldia on August 31, 1909, and reads
in part as follows:
WHEREAS. The Republic of Panama desires that a
telegraphic service be installed and maintained in and
upon and as an integral part of the line of telegraph
poles and wires belonging to the Panama Railroad
Company that cross the Isthmus of Panama: there-
fore, the contracting parties have mutually agreed
upon the following clauses:
First-The Panama Railroad Company agrees to
erect and maintain two copper telegraph wires.
standard No. 10. between the cities of Panama and
Colon, and two copper telegraph wires, standard No.
10. between the city of Panama and the town of Em-
pire, which service should be installed on and as a part
of the actual line of posts and telegraph wires of the
Panama Railroad Company, and be maintained in
good condition of service by the Panama Railrqad
Company for the exclusive use of the Government of
Panama. It is understood and agreed that no tele-
graphic message shall be received for transmission
by the Government over the lines herein provided
for. at a rale lower than that charged by the Panama
Railroad Company and the rate for general commer-
cial messages from time to time. and whenever it
may be deemed convenient, as may be mutually
agreed upon by the contracting parties.
Second-The Republic of Panama agrees to pay to
the Panama Railroad Company. as the price agreed
on for the installation of the telegraph service above
provided for. the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10..
000). United States currency, and it is understood
that the said Government shall not be obligated to
S pay any otheramount for rent. but the sum of u10.00).
as expressed in this contract.
. Third-The Republic of Panama. moreover, agrees
to pay to the Panama Railroad Company its propor-
i.. tion of the cost of repairs for the maintenance aud
changes in the line which may become necessary
from time to time, and said payment will be com-
S pued, taking as a basis the proportion of the wires
used by the Republic of Panama to the total number
of wires installed on the telegraph line in which the
repairs or changes of place are required. The bills
for maintenanceand repairs shall besent monthly by
the railroad company to the Director General of
Posts and Telegraphs of the Republic of Panama. for
approval and payment. This contract, which is to
remain in force fifty (50) years, requires for its
validity the approval of the President of the Re.
public of Panama.
The work of placing a fifth arm on the
railroad company's poles, to carry the new
circuits, is in progress and will be completed
in a short time. The remaining space on
this arm will be utilized in the extension of
the railroad's telephone and telegraph serv-
ice by the stringing of a new No. 9 copper
circuit from Panama to Colon, and a new
No. 10 copper circuit from Empire to Colon.
Upon the completion of the telegraph cir-
cuits for the Panama Government, it is pro-
posed to abandon the telegraph office which
has been maintained for several years in the
old Administration Buildingin Panama. The
Panama Government's telegraph depart-
meat will establish offices of its own in Pan-
ama and Colon for the transaction of official
and commercial business, and will also have
an office and switching station at Empire.
It will construct a new No. 10 copper cir-
.;lt. t from Empire to Chorrera, which will
.. aect with the transisthmian line at Em-


pire, and with its up-country line at Chor-
rera. The Panama Government has also hail
built recently, by contract, a new telegraph
and telephone line carrying a No. 10 closed
copper circuit from the Rio Lagarto, near
Chamd, to Santiago, capital of the province
of Veraguas, which forms part of the main
line from Panama to David.
Under the terms of the contract, the main-
tenance of the new circuits from Panama
to Colon, and from Panama to Empire, in-
cluding the testing out and clearing of all
troubles, will be handled by the railroad
company's telephone and telegraph forces,
but the Panama Government will assume its
proper proportion of such expense.
The latter is prohibited from doing a tele-
phone business over the new circuits, but
the contract permits of the transaction of
commercial telegraph business, with the un-
derstanding that the existing rates, which
are based upon a charge of 25 cents, United
States currency, for a 10-word message, in-
cluding the address, and two cents for each
additional word, shall be maintained. Only
through business can be handled under the
new arrangement, and no messages may be
transmitted over the Panama Government's
circuits to points along the railroad in the
Canal Zone. Persons in Panama or Colon,
desiring to transmit telegrams to these points
will file them at the offices of the Panama
Railroad Company in either city.
An agreement has been reached between
the Panama Government and the United
Fruit Company, whereby the latter will es-
tablish wireless stations at Colon and Bocas
del Toro similar to the one the company
maintains at Limon, Costa Rica. Through
its new land telegraph facilities, and the
proposed wireless system, the Panama Gov-
ernment will be able eventually to route
messages from Panama to Bocas del Toro,
Limon and other points. Under the agree-
ment with the fruit company, the Panama
Government is permitted to fix its own rates
for wireless messages.
Civil Service Examinations.
The Civil Service examinations, previously
announced in TiHE CANAL RECORD, will be
held on Sunday, October 24, beginning at
8 45 a. m., instead of at 9 a. m., and in the
I. C. C. hotel at Culebra, instead of the
Commission clubhouse.
Competitors, who file their formal applica-
tions prior to the close of business on Thurs-
day, the 21st uinst., will be admitted to the
examination without further notice, but no
one will be admitted whose application is
not filed prior to the date here specified.
All competitors will be expected to provide
their own pencils, pens, ink, and erasers.
Competitors in typewriting, who use any
machine other than the Underwood, must
furnish their own typewriters. Underwood
typewriters will be provided by the exam-
ining board. JOHN K. BAXTER,
Secrearv. Isthmian Ct-d Serr:,' Board.
Culebra, C. Z., October 18, 1909.
University Club Officers.
At the annual meeting of the University
club in Panama held on October 16, the
following officers were elected:
President, A. S. Cooper; first vice-presi-
dent, F. B. Pearon; second vice-president,
IL. K. Rourke; secretary, J. E. Marsh; treas-
urer, B. C. McFarland; governors, Malcolm
Elliott, J. H. Flynn, jr., W. M. Wood, C.


C. Metcalf, John Ehrman, W. E. Decks.
A. E. Bronk. Hon. Jos6 Domingo de Obal-
dia, President of the Republic of Panama,
was made honorary president, and Mr.
Joseph Gales Holcombe was made honorary
vice-president.
Killed by Lightning.
During the heavy rain storm in Culebra
Cut on the afternoon of October 15, Licardo
Salas, a Spanish laborer, was struck by
lightning and killed. He war 26 years of
age, was born in Aridillos, province of San
Tadir in Spain, and bad been on the Canal
Zone two yearsand nine months. A brother
living at Paraiso survives him.
The accident occurred shortly after 3
o'clock. Seven men hail taken refuge from
the rain under signal tower E at Cuca-
racha. The lightning struck the tower and
grounded along an electric wire. Salas
was sitting with his back to this wire and
was killed instantly. Seven other men, one
of them, a white foreman, and the others,
laborers, were stunned. Three of them
were taken to Ancon Hospital, but were dis-
charged within three days, one of them on
the day of the accident. The tower was not
damaged.
Policeman Struck by a Train.
Leo A. Mclntire, a first class policeman
on the Canal Zone police force at Las Cas-
cadas, was struck by the locomotive of
passenger train No. 3, due at that place at
about 6.50 a. m., Monday, October 18. He
had started to walk along the track to Buena
Vista, and when the accident happened had
reached a point a little north of Las Casca-
das where there is a sharp curve. He was
taken to Ancon Hospital on the same train,
where it was found that he had sustained
internal injuries, together with a scalp
wound. His condition was reported critical
on October 19.
Cous icted of Manslaughter.
Secundino Pinedo, a Colombian, who in-
flicted fatal injuries on his country) man, Man-
uel Montalvo on August 14, 1909, and whose
trial for murder in the court of the Second
Judicial Circuit at Empire on September 22,
resulted in a disagreement by the jury, ap-
peared before Judge Wesley M. Owen at Em-
pire on Tuesday, October 12, and pleaded
guilty to manslaughter. He was sentenced
to serve one year in the Canal Zone peni-
tentiary.
Kangaroo Ball.
Cristobal Court No. 8, I. 0. P. K., will
hold its first annual ball at Lincoln House
ballroom, Colon, Thanksgiving Eve, No-
vember N4, 1909. All Kangaroos in good
standing, with their wives and lady friends,
are cordially invited to attend. Special
trains will be provided to and from Colon, the
schedule for which will be announced later.
C. D. HOPFMAN,
Comftr/'-.'. Court .'V S.
Cristobal, C. Z.. October 12, 1909.
The proposed visit of the members of the
Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas Press
Associations to the Isthmus, which was to
have been made this month, has been post-
poned.
Launch Service to Taboga.
The steamer Soairdad leaves the dredge landing at
Balbon at 9 o'clock Tuesday. Thursday and Saturday
mornings. On he-return trip it arrives at Balboa
about 4 30 p. n. in time to make connections for the
S.30 train at Panama.








THE CANAL RECORD


vol. III., No. 8.


CANAL WORK IN SEPTEMBER.
Monthly Report of the Acting Chairmaun tothe
Secretary of War.
CULEBRA, C Z., October 14, 1909.
The Honoadbe thek Seetartas r I,' a ,
il'ashiijoan D. C
Sir-I have the honor to submit the fol-
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus
for the month of September, 1909:
The following table summarizes the prin-
cipal items of construction work accom-
plished by the Atlantic, Central and Pacific
Divisions during the month:


originally occupied by cableway No. 1. The
tail tower was moved by a five-part tackle,
the running line being led through a snatch
block and attached to the hook on the car-
riage of the south strand of cableway No. 2.
The head tower was moved by the winch
provided and designed for that purpose.
The head and tail towers were moved suc-
cessively 12 or 15 feetat a time. Before the
accident occurred, the tail tower had been
moved 15 feet south of the position occupied
by the head tower. The movement of the
tail tower was then stopped. The bead


Item. Unit. Atlantic. Central Pacific. Total.

Work excavation, dry ................... ... Cubic yards..... Ill 382 1.471 796 80 628 1.663.806
Work excavation. wet.... .. .... ....... Cubic yards..... 410.574 ............ 69o.865 1.102.439
Total work escalation ......... .. Cubic yards..... 521 956 1.471.796 777 493 2.771.245
Plant excavation dry ......................... Cubic 3ards ..... 2 445 ............ 46982 49,427
Plant excavation, wet ...... ..... ........... Cubic yards..... 1.713 .......... .......... 15713
Total plant excavation.... ............... Cubic yards. 1. I 158 ........... 46.982 65 1.0
ToIl Canal excavation. .. ...... ... ..... Cubic yards .. 540.114 1.471.796 824 475 2.636.385
Explosives used ....................... .... Tons i22401bs) 31 23 36020 2990 420.33
Rock drilling. ............................ Feet ............ 65.297 35.t660 86.385 517.342
Track removed ............. .... ...... ............ ..... Miles.......... ........... 10 20 ............ 10 20
New track laid ............................... Miles........ .... 3.36 13.90 4.96 21 22
Material placed in dams .................. Cubic yards..... 411.652 ...... .... 39.631 451.283
Rock crushed ... ....... .............. .... Cubic yards..... 19.215 7.9a1 4.348 31 544
Cement used.................. ............. Barrels ........ 18.716 ...... ..... 3.033 21 749
Concrete placed ............................ Cubic yards..... 17.007 ............. 3.0K 5'0 20.107 50
N ew roads built.................... ......... M iles.............. .......... ......................... ...........
Water mains laid ...... .. ................ Feet ... ......... 560 4 3A2 2639 10.591
Sewers laid............................. ..... Feel.............. .. 2.021 372 864 3.?60
New drains and ditches dug .. ............. Feet ...................... ..... 3% 525 921
Average dlily force ......................... ... ......6.178 9.159 4 141 19.476
Rainfall, average ..... .. .... ... .. ..... Inches ............ 10.86 7.2? 386 100:oo


Atlantic Division.
GATLUN LOCKS.
E.xcavaltio'n-Excavation was continued
during the month in all three chambers of
the lock, but the principal work was done in
the middle chamber.
Receiving and Issuing Material-During
the month, all of the cranes in the cement
shed were more or less modified by trans-
ferring the cages to a position under both
girders, taking off foot bridge and by stiff-
ening trusses in the case of crane No. 2. At
the end of the month, four cranes were ready
for operation. The modification of the au-
tomatic cars was continued, and the number
of cars kept running during the month av-
eraged approximately ten.
Co'cirete Jli.ring P/lant-Various attempts
were made during the month to render the
connection between the superhopper and the
mixers more satisfactory, but the results
mere not successful.
Indstria/a Rjad-This road was operated
successful> during the month.
Cabl/e:t-ays-The operation of the unload-
ing cableways was unsatisfactory during the
month Irom the standpoint of material de-
livered The total amount of material un-
loaded by the cableways during the month
was about 20,000 cubic yards. One strand on
one of the duplex unloading cableways was
out of commission during the entire month,
due to broken buckets. The lock cablewa s
were operated successfully, although the
brakes as originally designed were not satis-
factory. The head tower of lock cableway
No. 2 collapsed on September 24, under the
following conditions:
Cableway No. 1, which had been working
over the northern line of monoliths in the
forebay, was successfully moved to a posi-
tion over the southern line of monoliths in
the forebay. Cableway No. 2 was then
started south to move it into the position


tower was next moved south with its own
power and was moving quietly and slowly,
having reached a point almost abreast of the
tail tower, when, without warning, the rear
legs below the platform supporting the
cableway machinery collapsed, and the tower
settled to the west, moving downward until
it came to rest on the concrete counter-
weight. As the tower settled backward, both
traversing lines parted; the main cable, the
button lines, and the hoisting lines did not
part. While the towers were being moved
there was no weight on the main cables
other than the carriages and the weight of
the various cables. The tail tower moved
easily, but the head tower moved with some
difficulty, due to settlement in the track.
Thesettlement, however, was fairly, uniform
and was no greater than had previously
occurred when the towers were being moved.
The collapse of the rear legs and the conse-
quent settlement of the tower resulted in
the deformation of all of the members of
the structure below the machinery platform
to such an extent as will require their re-
moval and the replacement of new members.
Concrete Wf "*k-The la% ing of concrete in
the forebay and in the upper lock was con-
tinued during the month. The steel forms
for culverts, and the cast iron forms for
orifices, proved satisfactory. Four side wall
culverts were erected complete, and six par-
tially assembled. The work on the telltale
system was continued, and 1,550 feet of tile
drain in the system were laid.
Ne,a Power /ant/-The plant generally
was kept in operation, although several mis-
haps occurred during the month. The
amount of power generated was 114,350 k. w.
hours.
GATUN DAM.
Construction during the month increased
the total fill by 402,152 cubic yards, making


the total at the end of the month, 4,258,435
cubic xards.
Sripping.--Strippingof the east valley was
extended during the month up both bill-
sides, the work being performed by loading
Decauville cars by hand and dumping the
material just outside of the limits of the
stripped area. The work extended the
stripped area by nine-tenths of an acre. The
total area stripped at the end of the month
was 198.3 acres.
Hydraulic Fill-Allowing 10 per cent for
loss, the hydraulic fill in the dam was in-
creased by 238,442 cubic yards, making the
total at the end of the month 1,483,032 cubic
yards.
Enrockments-The material received from
Bas Obispo, Buena Vista, Bohio, the Locks,
Mindi, and the spillway, amounting to 163,-
710 cubic yards, was placed on the north
and south toes of the dam. The total dry
fill at the close of the month was 2,775,404
cubic yards.
Trestles-The trestle at the head of the
spillway at elevation plus 30 was extended
during the month a distance of 674 linear
feet, and the trestle on the south toe beyond
the old Chagres River was extended toward
the west end of the dam a distance of 508
linear feet.
GATUN SPILLWAV.
E.rt'azvaion-Excavation at the head of
the spillway was continued by steam shovel
No. 51, the output being 7,586 cubic yards.
An additional amount of 712 cubic yards was
handled by cranes Nos. 44and 48 in prepar-
ing foundation for concrete side walls and
floor. The total spillway excavation at the
close of the month was 1,309,314 cubic yards.
Concrelte-Work was continued on the
. east and west walls north of the spillway
dam and on the east face wall and floor
south of the dam. The total amount of con-
crete placed during the month was 3,741 cu-
bic yards, making the total at the end of the
month 46,031 cubic yards.
HARBOR AND CHANNEL SECTION.
Dry Excavation Below Sea Level at Min-
di-During the month, 19,240 cubicyards of
earth and 42,197 cubic yards of rock were
removed from the prism.
Dredg'-egt'rom the Ocean to Mlindi-Four
dredges removed from the prism 410,574
cubic yards of earth during the month. In
addition, the dredge Car-ibbean removed
26,S;0 cubic 3ardsof earth from theapproach
channel to Cristobal Harbor, and 19,445
cubic yards of earth from in front of Pier 11.
The Caribbean was in the drydock, under-
going general repairs, from September 15 to
September 27, inclusive. The dredge Mlindi
also removed 8,500 cubic yards of earth and
1,550 cubic yards of rock from the approach
channel, 6,209 cubic yards of earth and
19,562 cubic yards of rock from in front of
Pier 11, and 800 cubic yards of earth and
800 cubic yards of rock from the drydock
slip. On September 30, 40 feet of water
could be carried from 0 to mile 2 plus 3,800
feet; 30) feet to mile 3 plus 2,200 feet, and
20 feet to mile 5 plus 200 feet.
PORTO BKLLO.
General miscellaneous mechanical and re-
pair work was continued during the month.
During the month, 30,699.5 cubic yards of
rock were loaded into cars for crushers and
fills, and 9,100 cubic yards of earth were re-
moved hydraulically from the quarry. In-







October 20, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


eluding material cast over and removed by
hand to strip rock, and in track work, the
total yardage for the month was about 46,-
556 cubic yards.
NOMBRE DE DIOS.
The dredge Chagres was engaged for the
first half of the month in dredging the north
end of island No. 2 for the purpose of get-
ting into lake No. 2. The channel to lake
No. 2 was completed on September 24. The
suction dredge .Vombre was undergoing re-
pairs and alterations the greater part of the
month, and on the night of September 27,
during a heavy rain squall, sank in lake
No. 1. The work of raising the dredge was
in progress at the end of the month.
MONICIPAI ENGINEERING AND BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION.
Building and municipal work were satis-
factorily continued during the month.
Central Division.
During the month, the total amount of
material excavated in the Central Division
was 1,471,796 cubic yards, of which 364,147
cubic yards were classified as earth and 1,-
107,649 cubic yards as rock. Of this quan-
tity, 1,454,287 cubic yards were removed by
steam shovels, 16,714 cubic yards by hand,
and 795 cubic yards by sluicing fill in the
Obispo Diversion. The quantity of material
removed from the Canal prism was 1,471,001
cubic yards, while 795 cubic yards were
sluiced in the Obispo Diversion.
The daily average number of steam shovels
at work during the month was 46.60, as com-
pared with 46.73 for the month of August.
For comparison with the work done by
steam shovels during the corresponding
month of the previous year, the following
table has been prepared:

Classification of 0o '"
Excavated material. Z o 0 a
eodby shovels ____ -.
Rock. Earth. o<' <

1908: c. yds. cu. yds. cds. .ys. uds.
ept... 1.465.05 1.04.136 417.669 49.68 25 .180.2
1909.
Sept... 1.454,287 1.104,505 349.782 4660 251.248.3
Rainfall at Empire: 1908. 9.75 ins.. 1909. 7 22 ins.
The above table shows that the average
output per shovel day was almost 6 per cent
greater in September, 1909, than in the cor-
responding month of the previous year.
During the month, 227,024 cubic yards of
material excavated from the prism were
transported to the relocation of the Panama
railroad at Caimito and Santa Cruz and
dumped as filling in the embankment for the
new roadbed, the total at the close of the
.month for this purpose being 1,914,377 cu-
bic yards.
During the month, 48,500 cubic yards of
earth from Buena Vista, and 35,275 cubic
yards of rock from Bas Obispo, were trans-
ported to Gatun for use in the construction
of the dam. At the end of the month, 104,-
200 cubic yards of earth and 521,288 cubic
-yards of rock bad been transported for this
"purpose.
The daily average number of laborers at
work was 8,258, while the average number
of gold men at work was 901.
Pacific Division.
S DISTUCT NO. 1-LOCKS AND DAMS.
ii; total excavation during the month
aii :fauntted to 161,499 cubic yards. During
g|:Stehaber, no yardage was added to the


prism of the west dam at Pedro Miguel,
leaving the total, as for August, 169,946
cubic yards.
At Miraflores, 9,131 cubic yards of dry
filling were added to the toe of the west
dam, increasing the total to 426,661 cubic
yards; 30,500 cubic yards of hydraulic filling
were added to the core of the west dam, in-
creasing the total to 111,640 cubic )ards;
and 6,032 cubic yards of dry filling were
placed in backfill, increasing the total to
18,282 cubic yards.
At Pedro Miguel, Miraflores, and Ancon
quarry, regular operations were continued.
Concreting in the lower guide wall at Pedro
Miguel was begun, and continued intermit-
tently during the month. Progress was re-
tarded on account of the foundations not
being fully prepared and the installation
being incomplete.
DISTRICT NO. 2-DREDGING.
Five dredges were in operation during the
month, the amount of material excavated by
each being shown in the following table:
Drdg P CUBIC 'ARDS.
Dredge TvP c --ic VAos Remarks.
Work Plant.
Culebra Sucion 307.69l 16,SW Scow measurement
Mole.. Ladder 105.79 ........ Pacemeasure anent
Badger Ladder 5 ....... Place measurement
C'denas Dipper. 31.953 ....... Place measurement
Marmot Ladder 114.795 ........ Place measurement
Totnl. ........ 646.0S6 16.890
The work of clearing on the Canal line
was continued. An area of 503,560 square
feet was cleared during the month, and an
area of 63,000 square feet was grubbed of
stumps, roots and brush, which were piled
and burned.
The dredge Mlole was taken to Cham6 on
September 18, and after dredging 3,400 cu-
bic yards of sand on that and the following
day, she was returned to the work in the
Canal prism. The Gopher was taken to
Chame, September 29, and dredged sand on
that and the following day.
During the month, 4,380 cubic yards of
sand were supplied to the Atlantic Division,
15 cubic yards to the Central Division and
12 cubic yards to the Panama Railroad Com-
pany.
The necessary work in connection with
the maintenance of equipment was satisfac-
torily performed.
DISTRICT NO. 3-MUNICIPAL AND BUILDING
WORK. .1
Building and municipal work was contin-
ued during the month. A thin layer of clay
was spread over the entire length of the
Corozal-Panama road; two road rollers were
kept at work rolling the clay in, 10,925 lin-
ear feet being completed at the end of the
month. Clay was spread on the Corozal-
Pedro Miguel road for a distance of 3,425
linear feet, and upon 2,600 linear feet of road
in Corozal proper.
The Ancon pumping and steam plant and
the Rio Grande rock crusher were success-
fully), operated.
Mechanical Division.
The usual work of this Division wassatis-
factorily performed during the month.
Relocation of Panama Railroad.
During the month, 187,484 cubic yards of
material were excavated, making the total
excavation at the close of the month 1,957,557
cubic yards, and 310,193 cubic yards of ma-


trial were placed in embankment, making
the total for this purpose at the end of the
month 5,910,794 cubic yards.
During the month, 1,605 linear feet of
temporary trestle were driven, and numer-
ous small culverts were completed; 1,568
linear feet of permanent track were laid,
making the total at the close of the month
121,708 linear feet.
The force of laborers during the month
averaged 2,486 men.
Qunrteriunster's Depnrtmient.
The total effective working force on Sep-
tember 29, including the Panama railroad
and the Commissary forces, was 35,210.
The steamship .-Ipi'o', which arrived on
September 2, brought 1,500 Barbadian labor-
ers to the Isthmus. This was the largest
single shipment of laborers ever brought to
the Canal Zone. The steamship O/eri put
into the port of Colon and on September 25
sailed for Barbados, carrying a total of 196
passengers, of whom 134 were European
laborers. Since April, between 900 and
1,000 European laborers working for the
Commission have been taken away by the
representative of a railroad enterprise in
Brazil.
Although the total effective force working
for the Comiission was the largest on record,
the gold force showed a slight decrease,
indicating that the general tendency is to-
ward a reduction in the number of super-
visory positions.
Subsistence Department.
The operation of the Hotel Tivoli during
the month showed a loss of $1.727.44. There
was a loss of $1,741.71 on the operation of
the line hotels, and a profit was made on
the operation of the mess halls and kitch-
ens. The net operations of this department
for the month showed a profit of $2,487.95.
Department of Civil AdIuinistratioin.
COURTS.
The Supreme Court of the Canal Zone dis-
posed of one criminal case during the month.
In the circuit courts, 13 civil and 24 criminal
cases were disposed of, and in the district
courts 92 civil and 545 criminal cases were
disposed of.
DIVISIONOF POSTS, CUSTOMS AND REVENUES.
The total net revenues of the Canal Zone
for September were 518,371 24. Collections
of the Division of Posts, Customs and Rev-
enues amounted to $17,634.41, and collec-
tions on account of court fines, costs and
fees were $3,383.87. Money order sales dur-
ing the month amounted to $-41-,809.89, of
which amount $312.02b.49 was payable in
the United States and foreign countries other
than Martinique, and $273.50 in Martinique.
Seventeen vessels entered at and twenty
vessels cleared from the port of Ancon, and
seventeen vessels entered at and sixteen
vessels cleared from the port of Cristobal.
DIVISION OF POLICE AND PRISONS.
The number of arrests during the month
was 559, as compared with 535 in August.
There were 134 prisoners confined in the
district jails at the close of the month. Four
convicts began penitentiary sentences dur-
ing the month, 7 were discharged at the
expiration of their sentences, and on Sep-
tember 30 there were 120 convicts confined
in the penitentiary. The cost of guarding
and subsisting the convicts was $2,578.96,









TIlE CANAL RECORD Vol. LII., No. 8.


and the value of the work performed by them
was $1,;51 10.
DIVISION OF PrUBLIC WORKS
The regular in-.pection and maintenance
work of this division was performed during
the month. In the cityof Panama the aver-
age daily consumption of water was 966,966
gallons, .and in the city of Colon 665,657
gallons.
DIVISION OF I-IRE PROTECTION.
Thirteen fires were reported during the
month, 9 being in the Canal Zone, 3 in
Colon and I in Panama. The estimated
value of Commission and Panama railroad
property involved was 597,505, and the dam-
age S851.12; of private property. the esti-
mated value was $2, 10U. and the damage $97.
DIVISION OF SCHOOLS.
It was decided that October 1, the day
provided for the opening of the Canal Zone
schools, should be devoted to a preliminary
meeting of teachers, and that the opening
of the schools should be postponed until
Monday. October 4.
An examination was held at the Ancon
school building on September 17 for colored
school teachers. Of the 2S applicants that
presented themselves, 15 qualified for the
service.
Department of %gnnilation.
During the month of September the health
conditionsof the forcecoutinued satisfactory.
The following table shows the death rates
for September, 1909, both among employes
and the general population, as compared
with the same month in previous years since
American occupation:
i.C c. "'hoe
Annual average per thouiniud. P h popR "
em eR.la ion

Se lteinber. 1404 ... . ... 14 31
Sepiemliber 1iW ... ... .... rRJ 5? ;1
Sei-eiber 'S ... ... . .... 5." 4 4i 54
September 19 ... ......... .. N o 3 2 c3
Seplteni her 1,' ....... ..... 127 24 91
Sepleiber. ... 1276 1901
During the past four months there has
been a marked decrease in the number of
cases of It phoid lever. In June there were
78 cases, in Jul 4?cases,. n August 15 cases,
and it1 September S cases.
The malarial rate was small as compared
with the same month in former years. For
September. 1904, theannual rate wa- IS per
thousand: for September. 1905, 533 per thou-
sand. for September, 19u6. S8? per thou.-and:
for September, 1907, 554 per thousand; for
September, 1910, 375 per thousand, and for
September, 191.19, 252 per thousand.
The following table shows the 'constantly
sick" rate among the force as conipared
with former % ears:

Sellirnhcr 1 . .I I')7
Seplenilm r. 190 .... 2 -"
September tw . .. ... s C
Sepeinber 119 ....... .. .. 22 31
No cases of yellow fever, bubonic plague
or smallpox occurred on the Isthmus during
the month. Respectfully,
It F. Hor, .s, .-ifrl ,g Chairman.

It has been decided by the Board of Gover-
nors ol the Tivoli Club that the dance
scheduled fnr Saturday, October 23, will not
be held The next dance scheduled is for
November 13.


FEDERATED WOMEN'S CLUBS.
Seventh Meeting Held at Gatun-Progress
and Plans.
The seventh meeting of the Canal Zone
Federation of Women's Clubs was held at
Gatun on Tuesday, October 12. A special
train carried the Federation officers and
delegates from Cristobal at I o'clock, and
the club women from points south of Galan
were given a special coach attached to the
rear of the train leaving Panama at 10.45
a. m. A committee of the entertaining club
met the visitors and escorted them to the
Commission hotel, where lunch was served.
At 2 o'clock the company assembled in the
Commission chapel, which was decorated
with palms and the colors of the Gatun club,
red and white. The meeting was called
to order by the president, Mrs. Thomas E.
Brown, jr. Each of the seven federated
clubs was represented by four delegates,
these, with the officers and chairmen of
committees constituting a voting number of
34 Beside this number, there were present
more than fifty club women and guestsof the
Federation. On behalf of the Gatun club,
Mrs W. H. Stoddard welcomed the dele-
gates. The reports of the officers were fol-
lowed by the president's address, in which
she urged the unifyingof interestsand sym-
pathy in the Zone clubs.
The reports of the club presidents gave a
survey of the existing conditions in the va-
rious organizations. The Ancon club was
represented by Mrs. J. I,. Storla who re-
ported the opening of the clubseason on Oc-
tober 6. The principal activity of the clubs
its library, which has been extended during
the past few months. The reading room is
open daily, and the library on Monday
evenings. The business meetings of the
Pedro Miguel club are held in the clubroom,
over the Commission hotel, semimonthly,
alternating with the social meetings, which
are held at the homes of members. The his-
tory of Panama has been taken up for study.
The club has recently donated a box of
books and magazines to the prisoners' li-
brary in the Zone penitentiary. Prepara-
tions are being made for a bazaar, to be held
in December, for the purpose of raising funds
toward a Christmas entertainment. Mrs.
W. S. Jennings is the acting president.
On September 22, the Paraiso club re-
sumed meetings, after a vacation extending
over several months. In her report, the
president, Mrs. W. E. Ellinwood, outlined
the difficulties existing in the Zone clubs,
the chief of which is the frequent transfer
of families, thus reducing the club member-
ship, and often causing serious loss by re-
moving active and efficient workers.
The club year at Empire was opened Sep-
tember 30. The matter of raising funds for
the treasury is the one with which the club
is immediately occupied. This will probably
take the form of a bazaar or sale. Mrs. E.
C. Mills is the president.
Mrs. Charles H. Tobeter, president of the
Gorgona club, reported that the election of
officers will take place on October 21. fol-
lowing which the plans of the year will be
made. Mrs. \V. H Stoddard, acting presi-
dent of the Gatuin club, stated that monthly
business meetings have been held during
the vacation. The regular weekly meetings
of the club were resumed in September.
The children's library has been increased


by a gift of books from club women in the
States. The library is kept in the school-
house and is open twice a week, when a
member of the club is in attendance.
Through its education department, the
Cristobal club has equipped and presented a
public playground to the city of Colon,
which was formally opened on August 25.
The department was greatly assisted in this
work by the cooperation and assistance of
the Panama Railroad Company. Playground
equipment for American children has also
been placed on the point at Cristobal. A
drinking trough for horses has been placed
in Cristobal, near the clubhouse, by the phi-
lanthropy department. The home depart-
ment is planning for a bazaar, which will be
held before Christmas. It is proposed to
offer inexpensive articles for Christmas
gifts, and a special booth, containing toys
and articles for children, will be a feature.
The president of the club is Mrs. Hiram J.
Slifer.
The work of the Federation committees is
outlined as follows: The art and literature
committee, with Mrs. Henry Ropes Trask
as chairman, holds the art portfolios and
books in reference to art belonging to the
Federation. The committee will advise and
assist the clubs, outlining programs or
courses of study. The home committee,
bMrs. H. J. Slifer, chairman, assists with pro-
grams along the line of household econom-
ics and domestic science, and will also com-
pile a cook book to be published and placed
on sale by the Federation. The education
committee is working on the kindergarten
problem in the Canal Zone, under the di-
rection of the chairman, Mrs. J. L. Storla.
Mrs. Ralph Blunt, acting chairman of the
committee on library extension, has out-
lined a practical plan for a children's trav-
eling library. The Cristobal and Gatnn
clubs have turned their libraries over to this
committee. All the clubs having libraries
are requested to send in a list of the juve-
nile books which they are willing to place in
the traveling library. The teachers of those
public schools in the Zone in which libra-
ries have been established, will be asked to
cooperate in this work. It was suggested
that each club should contribute either in
books, or by subscription, for this purpose.
The botanical committee will be active in
collecting new specimens for the Field Co-
lumbian Museum, Chicago. The chairman,
Mrs. I. P. Eppelsheimer proposes to call a
meeting of her members in the near future,
in order to give specific instructions regard-
ing the treatment of specimens.
Miss G. Marie LePrince was appointed
chairman of the forestry and waterways
committee at the meeting of the Federation
in January. Miss LePrince is not on the
Isthmus, but she will continue in the office
for the present and is active in the work.
Her method is to interest school children in
the work of the Canal and she has offered a
prize to the children of the Canal Zone
schools, under the high school grade, for the .
best essay on the "Waterways of the Canal
Zone. "
Mrs. E. C. Mills, Empire, is acting chair-
man of the Canal Zone Federation badge
committee, and all matters pertaining to
badges may be referred to her.
The Cristobal club extended an invitation
to the Federation for the January meeting.
It is expected that the Federation will en-


Vol. Ill., No. 8.


T-E ANL ECR









October 20, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


certain a guest from the States on that
occasion. The delegates authorized votes
of thanks to the Panama Railroad Company
for courtesies extended, and to various in-
S dividuals and clubs in the States for gifts.
Mrs. Lorin C. Collins, honorary president,
made a few remarks at the close of the meet-
ing.
A short musical program was given by the
following ladies, all residents of Gatun:
Mrs. Natt Johnson, piano solo; Mrs. Brown
and Mrs. Alice P. Schreiber, songs; Mrs.
George McPherson. recitation, and Miss
Maria Elise Johnson, violin selections. The
accompanists were Mrs. Edward Keator and
Miss Virginia Chinn. Mrs. Mark Martin was
chairman of the program committee.
Refreshments were served by the Gatun
dcub,

PERSONAL.

Maj. Eugene T. Wilson, Subsistence Of-
ficer, returned from his annual leave in the
States on the Magdalena on October 10.
S Lieut. Frank 0. Whitlock, Assistant Sub-
sistence Officer, sailed for the States on his
annual leave on the Allianca on October 19.
Mr. A. B. Nichols, office engineer at Cu-
lebra, returned from his leave in the States
on the Allianca, which arrived at Cristobal
on October 14.
Mr. Earle J. Banta, mechanical engineer
in the Mechanical Division, has resigned to
enter business in Cincinnati, Ohio. and
sailed for the States on the Allianca on
October 19.

OFFICIAL CIRCULAR.

Commission Equipment on P. R. R. Main Line.
C o CU-LEBRA, C. Z October 9. 1909.
SCncuLta No. 286:
Employes will hereafter be governed by the follow-
ing regulations in submitting requests for permis-
sion to run Commission equipment over the main
line of the Panama railroad:
Requests for permission to run Commission equip-
ment over the main line of the Panama railroad
must be submitted in writing to the office of the
Chairman at least three days prior to the date on
which the train is desired. This is necessary in or-
der to allow sufficient time for forwarding the request
to the Panama railroad and receiving reply as to
whether it is practicable to grant the permission for
the date specified.
Requests should sate;
Whether permission has been secured for the use
of Commission eq ni pment.
Whether a qualified crew will man the train.
The points between which the train is to be run
Time of leaningand arriving at terminals and in
t.rmediate points at which train will stop, in order
Itat the despatcherof the Panama railroad may ar.
range a schedule accordingly.
In all cases qualified crews must he used, and train
f" equipped with flags. markers, torpedoes and fusees
H. P HODGoS.
AIdt" Chairiman. Isthmmn Canal Commission
l Semid Vice-fresideant. Pasam t Railroad Compown.
Band Concert.
'The Isthmian Canal Commission Band will give a
concert at Gatun, C. Z.. on Sunday. October 24. 1909,
at 2 p. m. The program follows:
I March-Army and Marine. ................Zehle
2 Selection-7"l Grad lMotul..........L.uders
a Bolerno--Isotina........ .......... Labory
3 6 Schottislhe-Four Litle Blackberrrns
SO'Connor
4 Waltzr- oisaand and One ihts ........Strauss
J .5 Potpourri of popular songs ............La Parge
.. loduc g "Sambo." "If l had a Thousand Lives to
lve. I've Loast My Teddy Bear,' "I am Longing
Ifor Someneto ne ve Me,"' Glow Worm.... Ada. My
": et FPotater." Henry's Barn Dance," and "The
ft: ag d Shawl."
e:...:. a-The Dawn of Loam.......... Bendix
IItW. U.aalcBt-ird f he .t,-ts .................. Rice
IP'S t'rts-L-l Cavalry .................. Suppe
r m .............................. Merritt
| i|tell-7b T 2oli ...................... Jennings
*,. Cras. 2. Ja, mruos. Musical Di ector.
will be glRet at llalbca, on Sunday, Octo-


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.

Activities of the Young Men's Christian As-
sociation.
The Canal Zone V M. C As have received nn in-
vitation to send representative athletes to compete int
the athletic games in connection with the interna-
tional festivities in San Jose. Costa Rica. at the end
of December. Any members who are interested and
who could possibly arrange to go to Costa Rica at
that time are requested to communicate with any
secretary of the V. M C. A for further particulars
CULEBRA.
Notwithstanding the unfavorable weather. a good-
sized audience was present for the moving picture
show on October 12.
On Wednesday night of last week a meeting was
held for the purpose of reorganizing the Bible club.
Theclub voted to meet each Wednesday evening from
7.10 to 7 50 o'clock for the next nine weeks, during
which period the:: will follow the discussions out-
lined by Dean Bosworlh of Oberlin on 'Jesus con-
ception of the Disciple and hiq mission." Mr. F. C
Freeman is leader and 21 men have thus far expressed
their purpose to take part in the discussions. Others
who are interested should join the club at once in or.
der to get full benefit of the entire series of meetings
Last Friday evening the chess club held a farewell
meeting in honor of Mr. G. W Strong, who has been
president of the club for two years The meeting
was in the nature of a rapid transit chess tournament
in which fourteen players look part Mr William
Du Bois won the tournament The club will meet on
Friday night of Ihis week to elect Mr. Strong's sue
cessor and transact other business
There is considerable demand for increasing the
activities of the Camera Club. A meeting will be
held soon for reorganiaztion. All who are interested
should see Mr. Lawlor or leave their names at the
secretary's desk
A large and appreciative audience was present at
the clubhouse Sunday evening for the concert by the
I. C. C. band.
Empire will bowl at Culebra in the regular tourna-
ment series on Wednesday night of this week
Mr. Goodman has returned from leave and resumed
his duties as secretary
EMPIRE.
A Bible club has been orrsnized with an initial
enrollment of eleven members New members will
be welcomed at any regular meeting on Thursday
evenings from 7 to 8 o'clock Mr Gobrecht is leader.
The five billiard and pool tables in use up to the
present time have been so inadequate to the demand
that the association has purchased one billiard and
one pool table additional These tables have just
been installed in the snace adjacent to the bowling
alleys.
GORGONA.
One of the largest crowds ever present at a moviuR
picture entertainment in fGoresona wilnes ed the
show last Thursday night. The subjects were well
selected.
CRISTOBAL.
Theenlertainment hall was well filled for the Hngy
moving picture show list Saturday night.
The series of bowling tournament games against
Gorgona on Saturday night resulted as follows.
Crlstobal Faist. Second. Third. Total.
Bullard ..... ....... 189 143 182 514
Barlow .............. 212 168 173 553
I.ouch... ........ ... 156 140 172 466
Collins ............. 186 128 180 49t
Strong ............. 146 191 219 556
Total .............. 889 770 926 2,585
Goreosa.
Humphrey ......... 178 133 150 461
King ...... ......... 133 126 155 414
Hayes ............ 114 ... . 114
McConaurhy ....... ... 130 133 263
Haldemanu.......... 162 131 106 399
Buchanan .......... 171 152 177 500
Total ............. 758 672 721 2.151
Resolutions of Sympathy.
At a meeting of Empire Court. No I Indeend-
ent Order of Panamanian Kangaroo%. held on Sep-
tember 25.1909. the following resolutinns were passed:
WHEREAs. The Almighty God in his infinite wis-
dom. has called from among us our beloved brother.
Harrison C. Ball: it is therefore
Resolved. That Empire Court of the Independent
Order of Panamanian Kangaroos mourns Ihe loss of
an esteemed member whose unsullied honor integ-
rity and dealings with his fellowmen have so en-
deared him to us that in this hour of grief we stand
appalled by our loss! and be it Iherefore Furlher
Resold,. That this order do hold a court of sorrow
and therein mourn the loss of our beloved brother.


and that in the stricken family of hin who ha- uton
before the sympathy of thiscourt which so keenlt
feels his loss. be extended iand be it further
Reso/i ed That our comrade who-e mortal sears ire
done and whose soul is now in the talley of iierce.
has left naught behind but his love .nd that we do
supplicate Thou. who to the mercy seit our souls
doth gather to give it us to follow one day in the
fonesleps of him whom we now mourn.

Suppliers for Canal Work.
The following .teaimers arrived at the ports of Cris
tobal and Colon during the week ended October 16.
19(1Q. with -upplies for the Isthmiau Canal Commis
sion:
S.arni.. October 12 from New York with I1 tons
unsl.cktd lime. for stock: 10'n tons sewer pine. for
Panalnia.
Cr,.' .a.' October :3. front New York with 13.187
barrels cement for Atlantic Division- 2J..sill bags ce-
ment for P uLfic Divi-on lPil tons structural material
for moveable lowers Gtlun 54 Iona structural ma-
terial for sand unloader cranes Balbon. 60 tIons
?Lructur.l m.iarntal for handling pl.nt Pedro Miguel.
Fitiz/biir. October 14 from New Orleans with 100
tons rice slriw. I tons oats. for corrals 21 tons cast
iron ris- for Gatun reservoir 35 ?Ai,', eet y-llow pine
lumber. for :.ar repairs. A tons concrete mixer parts.
for Gatnn %55 piecc soil pite for stock .3.715 feet
yelloww pine lumber for Balboa
.-I,''aiu:a October It from New York with 7100
pounds smooth.on compound IS oill gillons engine
oil 10 0sl01 gallons valve oil I1 9o2 electric fuses 6101
kegs wire nails I50 ranges for stuck. 15 tons sicel
pile for Gorgona shoDs 1 235 steel knuckles for c'ir
repair .I tons crane parts for Balboa. and a miscel-
nlaneous cargo agrregating 7 :ii0 pckiges. weighing
a56 tonU
Misdirected Letters.
DIVISION OF PosTs. CrisTOMus A.N RE .FNtES.
ANcoN C Z O.:robrr 20. lrfig
The following in.sufficiently addressed letters.
originating in the Unic.-1 iintI- and its pr'se.siouis
haitc beeu received in the office of the Director of
Po.ts. and may be secured upon request of the
addressee"
Ander;ron C-,rl Kinw.orlh:' R A.
Bker. Aubrey Krcanz Herman
Barkley J M. Lord. Mrs E F.
Biesen, P A Lough. Mrs Mike H.
Brown. William C Major Mr. J I
Burke. Mrs Mabel I.!l Mc-Call Lmi i1n (.'
Callahan Fred IMcDonlid H M
Camobell. Allan jo.ice McG;ee James
Clark Miss Hazel McKeliy J
Coyne John Murrini Samuel
De Lapura Rosario Nicola. Albanese
Don-ihue D F Nonuan F. L.
Dohle Percey J I Ryan. Phil
Edwards Richerd Roberts Dr Grant J.
Ergensinger Wm. J Sawaia. R. A.
Erion C M. (2) Shirle' William
Exiine Jess Shoesmith. George
Field William Stine Win P. (2d class)
FoPer Ihiss Maltie Towntsend J E
F' -an k. Charles S Verniier Philip S IS. P 4)
Gabbs Fannie R Vonder Leith T R
Hall Percy H Walker Amos
Hartiein F L Walraven Friincis W.
Hill Iver C Warren. Claude
Hernandez Manuel Washburtn F J (11
Howe Mrs \rn Wilde 0 IP
Johnson G Jr. WillinTi Geo. 12d class)
Jones. Harry Wright. George
Jordan. Mrs J. P. Young J C

LEGAL NOTICE.

United Stales of America. ) In Ihe Circuit Court.
Canal Zone. I First Judicial Circuit.
A Delition having been filed by the Collector of
Revenues for the eschtat of the estate of Richard
Prince whodied intestate at Balhon.on or about the
17th of November. 9I1i` leaving properly to the value
of $1i25 IU S. currency. notice is hereby given loall
heirs creditors or other claimantsof the said estate
lo appear at the courthouse at Anciin on or before
the Illth day of Decamtber 1909. for the purpose of fil-
ing their claims. F H. SHai.BL EV
.4c1/rrg cLuruit CourAtf Clerk.

Commission Clubhouse at Gatun.
Contract building. Secaled proposal for laboronly.
will be received at the office of the Coustructing
Q1,arlerm-ister. Culebra. until 3 p in October 25.
19I'9 and then opened for the erection bh contract of
a V. M C A clubhouse at GClun. Plans and spect.
ficatious can be obui.ned from the Constructing
Quartermaster by making a deposit of 1$. Fifty
"dollars must he deposited with the proposal.and 5500
when the conlrnct is signed.
R. E WOOD. Ac/gin C-hulf Ofartera-maater.

Losr--Between Corzal and B.ilboa. or Panama. or
in one of those towns, two medals from Ancon ath-
letic meet of July 4. 1909. Finder please return to
revdward Robertsat Balboa and receive a reward.









THE CANAL RECORD


I'ol. Il., No. 8.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

The hours during which commissainesare open are
as follows
Cristobal and Culebra. 8 a m. to 12.30 p. m ; 2 p. m.
to 7 p in.
All other commissaries 8 a. m. to I p. m.: 3 p. m.
to 7 p. m
Retail prices of cold storageprovisions for the week
beginning October 16:
FRESH MEATS.
Price.
Mutllon-Slewing ..... ..... ............ per lb 7
Shoulder neck trimmed off
.1 pounds and over .. ....... per lb 10
Entire forequarter nool trim-
med 10 pounds and over... per lb 9
Leg Li to 10 pounds' .......... per Ib 19
Cullets .......... .............per Ihb 20
Short-ctl chops....... .... .....per Ib 22
Lamb-Stewing ................ .... ............per Ib 7
Entire forequarter, neck trimmed
of ... .... ...... .............. per b 10
L, (6 to g pounds: ........ ... per b 27
Chops .... ........ ..... .........per lb 29
CutleL. .... .......... ..... ..... ... per Ib 29
Veal-Stewing............. .................. .per lb 10)
Shoulder for roasting (not under
4 lbs . ... ............... .......per Ilb 15
Loin for roasting... ................. per lb 19
Chops ............................ per lb 22
Cutlets .................................. per lb 2n
Pork cuts ............ .................. per lb 22
Beef-Suet...... .................................per lb 4
Soup..... ......................... ..... per lb 6
Stew ..... ....... ..... .... ...........per lb 10
Corned....... ..... ............... per lb.. 12. 14. 16
Chuck ro-st .......... ........ ......per Ib 14
Pot roast............ .......................per b 16
Rib-roast second cut (not under
35 pounds ...... ............ ..... per lb 19
Rib-roast. first cut (not under 3
pounds).............. ...... ............per lb 21
Sirloin roast ......................... ... per Ib 22
Rump roast .. .......................... per Ib 22
Porterhouse roast ................... per Ilb 22
Steak. Chuck ..... .......... .........pet lb 15
Round . ..... .. ..... ..... per lb 16
Rib............... ......... per Ib 21
Sirloin..........................per ib 22
Porterhouse .................. .per Ib 22
Rump............ .................per Ilb 22
Tenderloin........................per lb 27
MISCELLANEOUS.
Livers-Beef......... ...................per lb 11
Calf.... ............. .................... each 65
Shad roes ... . ............... ....... pair 40
Sausage-Pork ................ .. ........ perlb 17
Bologna .............. ..... ...per lb 17
Frankfurter .... ............per Ib 17
Leberwurst ........................per Ib 17
Sweel bread-Veal. ..................... ........ per Ib 1.20
Sweet bread-Beef............................. per lb 30
Oysters ... . ............ ........ ...... ......... keg 90
Eggs. fresh.............. ....... .. .. ......... dozen 34
Bluefish ......... ...... .................. per lb 15
POULTRY AND GAME.
Chickens-Fancy Roastinglarge ........ each 1.50
medium.., each 1.303
Fowls ........... ....... .....each 7Lu 32, 93 1.04 1 15
Ducks, fattled .................... .. each I 30
medium weight...................... each 90
Broilers .... . ......................... ...... ..each 75
Turkeys ............... ...... .........p.. er Ilb 30
Squabs ..... .................................each 35
Capons .. ................................. ... .....each 2 50
Geese, fatted about 10 pounds ............. each 2 CO
12 pounds. .... ... .each 2.30
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.
Bacon- Breakf-ust. whole piece .. ... per b 37
Break.fa5l. sliced . ............ .per Ib 0o
Eam-Sugnr-cured. sliced .................. per Ib 25
One-half for boiling..... ...... .... er lb 21
We-tphalia .. .. .. . ........... per Ib 4,5
Hocks .... ... . .... .. .....per lb 18
Sugar cured. ...................... per ib 20
Beef. salt. family ........ ....................per Ib 10
Pork.salt........................................... per Ib 15
Ham. boiled ... ....... .. per lb 28
Ox tongues... ... ..... ...... ... .... ...........each 1 00
Pigs' feel . ............ ................ ....per lb 3
longues..... .............................. per Ib 16
DAIRY PRODUCTS.
Butter-Prints prime quality .... ......... .per lb 42
Cheese-Roquefort... .. ...... .. ....per Ib 45
Philadelphia Cream ...................each 20
Young America.. ..... . ....... per lb 22
Swiss .......................................per Ilb 31
Fdam...................................each 1 05
Camembert ....... ............ per lb 28
Neui'chatel......... .......... ... each 6
Gouda ..... ......... ..... ... ...... er lb 34
Parmesan..... ................. bottle 20
French cheese in tins-Camembert. Brie.
Neufchatel . . ...... ............. Ilb tin 20
M ilk. Briarcliff......... .... .... ................bottle 25S
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.
Celery..... ...... ... ........................ .......per hd 10
Lettuce ....... ...................... per lb 15
Potatoes. white............ ...............per Ib t3.s
sw eet .................. ................per lb ?54
Onions..... . ... ..... .................... er Ib 3


lire.
Saqush. Hubbard ..................................per lb 5
Yams...... ... ... ........... .......... . .. per lb 3M
Turnips ..... ........ .............. ..... ......... per Ib 3M
Carrot.s........ .....................................per lb 4
Beets .......................... ............... .......... per Ib 5
Cauliflower .... ........................... PerT lb 12
Cucumbers ....... ........ ... .. .... .. ........ per lb t6
Tomatoes...... ..... ..... .. ..... ...... ..... .per lb f7
Lemons............... ......... .......... ... dozen 24
G rapes. .... ................ ...... ...............per lb 8
Lim es........ ... ............................ ... per 100 80
SWatermelons........... ........................... each t45
Peaches....... .........................per lb t12
Cantaloupes.............. ..... ... ........... each t10
Cabbage..................... .......................per lb 4
Apples ............................. per b
Oranges............................................... dozen 12
Grapefruit ...........................................each 4
Plum s .. . .................. ........ .. per lb 112
Pears ... . ......................... . per lb 7

'Indicates reduction from last list.
"Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle.
tIndicales advance on last lisl.
TSold only from Commissaries no orders taken for
delivery.
PSold only from Cold Storage and not from Com-
missaries.
Rainfall, October 1 to 16, 1909, Inclusive.
(Mtr,INIGHT TO MIDNIGHT J


STrA ONS.


Atlantrc Dnrwzin-
Cristobal .................... ..... 603 5 15.67
Brazos Brook................ ..... 2 35 1 1095
Gatun........ ........ ..... 2.16 1 10.10
Bohia ............................. 2.89 1 10 55
Cnmfra DrLion-
Tabernilla .. .. ................. 3 23 A1 1204
San Pablo.. .. .... ... .... ..... 3 25 10 11 30
Gorgona ......................... 3.10 1 664
Gamboa....................... 3.J: 1 11 35
Em pire .......... ................. 4.55 1 14.4.
Camacho ......................... 33 1 1384
Culebr ...................... .. 2.86 15 12 2?
Patfi' Drvsiwon-
RioGrande....................... 3 07 15 13.18
Pedro Miguel...................I 3 6? 6 13 76
Balb a ............. ...............I 1 3li 5 7.30
Ancon.. ........................... 1 25 1 587
%M ir- fBores ........... ...... 4.2') 3 14 52
At.antic/t CCaj--
Porto Bello (lo5 p. m. Oct. 14)... 1.69 6 6.35
Nombre de Dins........ ....... 3.33 6 9 98
pL'fe Chagre,-
El Viga ......................... 2 44 5 1370
Alhajuela ....................... l.8' 13 12 43


Stages of the Chngres.
Maximum eight of Chagres River above mean sea
level for the week ended midnight Saturday Octo-
ber 16. 19U9:
STATiONS.


- .. 0 CU C3

> < u

Heibght of low water
above sea.level. f 125 9Z1 a 1 0 0
Maximum height ab
mean ser, level. feet
Sunday Oct 10 18 0 94.5 526 130 56 5 0
Monday.0ct.ll. I27 94.3 52.6 14.2 7b 65
Tuesday Oct 12 130 3 96 0 51 4 132.2 69 5 b
Wed esdaty Oct 13. 129 8 96.0 52 4 138 9 '8 6.4
Thursday. Oct 14 1306 96 2 51.2 12 1 6 9 6 0
Friday. Oct. 15 131.71 065 b 3 135 72 6 2
Saturday. Oct. 16 133 71 98.01 53 6 13.9 72 6 2


Tide Table.
The following table shows thetime of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending October 27. 1909
175th meridan time)


DATE. High.
A I
Oct 1. .... . .
Oct 22 .... ..... ..
Oct 24 .

Oct. 25
Oct. 26.. 1 258
Oct. 27. .... 1 53


High Low. High.

A. M P. U. P. M.
7 39 2.16 8.18
8 35 316 9.23
946 4 26 10 40
11 10 5.40 11.48

1226 6.48 .......
1 29 7 43 ........
222 8 33 .......


The variation of high and low tide at Cristobal isso
slight that a tide table for the Atlantic side is not
necessary.


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
ama Railroad Steamship Company. of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line, the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:
NEW YORK TO COLON.
Colon..................P. R. R.Thursday......Oct. 14
Clyde................. R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 16
Ancon .................P. R R.Wednesday....Oct. 20
Panama.... ...... ....P.R. R.Thunrsday......Oct. 21
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A...Saturday.......Oct. 23
Alliance ............... P.R. R.Thursday......Oct 28
Thames................R.-M.. Salurday......Oct 30
Cristobal.............. P. R. R.Wednesday... .Nov. 3
Colon...... ...........P.R. R.Thursday......Nov. 4
Prinz Joachim.........H.-A...Saturday......Nov. 6
Advance............... P R. R Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Atrato ................. R.-M...Saturday....... Nov. 13
Panama ....... ..... P R. R.Monday .......Nov. 15
Ancon.................P R R.Wednesday....Nov. 17
Alliance ........... ...P. R. R.Saturday...... Nov. 20
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A...Saturday ......Nov. 20
Colon..................P. R R Saturday.......Nov. 27
Tagus .... ...........R.-M...Saturday.......NoT. 27
Cristobal. ....... .... P. R. R Wednesday.... Dec. 1
Advance.............. P. R. R.Thursday......Dec. 2
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A ...Saturday.......Dec. 4
Panama..............P. R. R.Thursday.. ...Dec. 9
Oruba . ... . ... R.-M... Saturday.......Dec. 11
Allianca............... P. R. R Tuesday........Dec. 14
Ancon...... ..........P. R. R.Wednesday.....Dec. 15
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H.-A. .Saturday.......Dec. 18
Colon..................P. R. R.Tuesday....... Dec. 21
Magdalena ............R.-M...Saturday...... Dec. 25
Advance ..............P. R. R Monday .......Dec. 27
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Cristobal
should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
office, room 8,. building No I. Cristobal, for customs
line permits, which are necessary to obtain admit-
tance beyond waiting room an pier 11.
All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO NEW YORK.
Cristobal......... ... P. R. R.Thursday...... Oct. 21
Colon..................P R. R.Monday........Oct. 25
Prinz Joachim......... H.-A...Tuesday....... Oct. 26
Panama ................P. R.R.Tuesday....... Nov. 2
Atrato...... ..........R.-M..Wednesday....Nov. 3
Ancon ............... P R. R.Wednesday....Nov. 3
Allinca. .............. P R.R.Monday.......Nov. 8
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H.-A ..Tuesday ......Nov. 9
Colon.................. P. R. R.Tuesday....... Nov. 16
Cristobal .. .........P. R. R Wednesday...Nov. 17
Tagus .............. R -M Wednesday.. Nov. 17
Advance............. P.R R.Sunday........Nov. 21
PrinzJoachim .........H.-A. .Tuesday ......Nov. 23
Panama .............P R. R.Saturday ...... No. 27
Ancon ....... . ......P. R. R.Wednesday ...Dec. 1
Ciruba ...... .. ....R M. .Wednesday....Dec. I
Allianca............. P. R. R.Thursday......Dec. 2
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. H -A...Tuesday.......Dec. 7
Colon..................P. R R.Thursday......Dec. 9
Advance ... ......... P.R R Tuesday...... Dec. 14
Cristlobal .. ........ P R. R Wednesday....Dec. 15
Magdalena............R. -M... Wednesday... Dec. 15
Panama ............. P. R. R.Tuesday....... Dee. 21
Prinz Joachim ........ H.-A ..Tuesday ....... Dee.
Alliance .............. P.R. R.Sunday .......Dec. 26
Ancon ............ P. R.R.Wednesday....Dec. 29
Clyde................. R.-M ..Wednesday....Dec. 29
NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Abangarez .......... U F.C .Saturday......Oct. 16
Atenas.... ......... U F C. Saturday......Oct. 23
Turrialba............ .P1 C..Saturday......Oct. 30
Ahangarez .......... U.F.C..Saturday......Nov. 6
AtenaS ... ............ U P C..Saturday ......Nov. 13
Turrialba ............. U.P.C..Saturday......Nov. 20
Abangarez .. .... U.P.C..Saturday......Nov. 27
COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.
Abangarez....... ..... 1 F.C. Tuesday.......OeL 26
Atenas............... U.P C.. Tuesday.......Nov. 2
Turrialba.............. U P.C..Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Abanrarez ........... U.F C..Tuesday.......Nov. 16
Atenas. .......... U F.C..Tuesday ......Nov. 23
Turrialba.............. U.F C..Tuesday....... Nov. 30
Abangerez ....... ....U.F.C...Tuesday.......Dec. 7
COLON TO B&RBADOS. CALLINGor AT xTrIXDA.
Clyde........ ........ R.-M...Tuesday.......Oct. 26
Sailings of the French line (Cie. Generale Trals-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and
Guadelounpe on the 3d and 20th of epch month. .
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows: Merriam for New Orleans. via Kingston, ja.,
on or about October 31.
The steamers David of the National Navigation
Company. and the Taboga of the Pacific Steam Navi-
gation Company, leave Pgnama. for David, province
of Chiriqui, and intermediate points, tW. first a4
third weeks of each month.















CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1909. No. 9.


The Canal Record
Publised weekly under the authority and superisian
ao the Isthmian Canal Commuswon.

The Canal Record is issued/ re ao charge. one copy
each. tall employes Io the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from
the nee's stands of the Panama Railroad Company for
fiwe cents each.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Aneon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
o communication. eitherfor publsation or request-
isa isormatin., will receive attention unless signed
with the ull name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Slide at Ancon Quarry.
A slide, involving the bulk of the loose
material lying directly below the site of the
new rock crushing plant on the west slope
of Ancon Hill, gave indications of activity
several days ago. The movement was very
slow at first, but during the heavy thunder
storm on the night of Thursday, October 21,
the slide attained serious proportions, and
by morning had moved in places from four
to six feet. The mass had sunk in some
places and weaved up in others. The great-
est depression is immediately in front of the
crusher foundations where the earth settled
about 20 feet on the face of the rock. When
this settlement had reached a depth of 10
feet a large stream of water became visible
which is probably responsible for the move-
ment, as the entire mass is saturated.
The last movement dislodged the north
wing of the concrete retaining wall at the
crusher site. This wall, was carried out-
ward, but had not become entirely loos-
ened from the remainder of the structure.
To relieve any strain that it might have
caused to the other portion, the wall was
shattered by dynamite on Friday. There
" has been no damage to the rock crusher ma-
chinery, or its foundations, with the excep-
tion that a piece has been chipped off of one
of the lower crusher foundations. The
trestleworkovir the crushers, and the south
wing of the retaining wall still stand, but
a crack has developed in the latter on the
side nearest the machinery, two or three
inches in width, extending from near the
outer edge at the top of the wall downward
toward the base in a diagonal direction. As
the foundation of this portion of the wall
rests on rock, and as the wall itself is an-
chored by steel cables to the rock face of
the hill, it will not be affected by the slide.
To relieve pressure from behind it, how-
S"er, the loose material previously filled in,
Being removed.
T,: he hill back of the crusher plant is com-


posed of solid rock, and is in no way af-
fected by the movement, which is wholly
confined to the natural earth and toes of the
slope that have been formed between the re-
taining wall and the storage bin structure.
The slide moved the foundations of the con-
ve)or shed, extending from thecrusher plant
to the storage bins, out of position, and to
prevent any pressure being exerted on the
rock bins, the conveyor superstructure was
entirely dismantled. The movement also in-
volved a portion of the inclined cable track
over which supplies were hauled to the higher
levels, necessitating its reconstruction.
In order to check further movement, and
to remove any danger of the mass encroach-
ing on the foundations of the storage bin
structure, two steam shovels, one working
from each direction, have been making a cut
at the foot of the slide. When theexcavation
is completed, a crib wall will be constructed
of timber and piling and filled in with rock,
which, it is believed, will stop any further
movement. Previous to the slide some piles
had been driven at the foot of the slope,
but these were overwhelmed. A 6-inch pipe
line has been laid to the spot to permit of
sluicing the mud away in front of the rock
bins in case such action becomes necessary.
Work at the quarry plant had so far ad-
vanced that regular operations could have
been started by November 1, or shortly
thereafter, but the slide will cause some
delays.
Cont rete Laying at Catun.
The greatest amount of concrete laid in a
single day at Gatun Locks was placed on
Sunday, October 24, when 1,304 cubic yards
were added to the 33,248 cubic yards that
had been placed up to the close of work on
October 23. The record up to the end of the
week closing on October 23 is as follows:
CuaS }'ards.
August (seven daysl ................. 1 398
September 0.6 d'Ls) ... ......... 11 934
October 1 to9 I nine days) ....... ... 6 014
October 10 to 16 (seven da)s) ......... 6692
October 16 t1 23 (seven days) ..... 310
The daily average for the week ended Oc-
tober 23 was 1,043, and the record by days
follows:
Cuba Yahd'a
October 17 ...... ........... .... ...... 778
October IS ............ .... ......... 924
October 19. .. ... ... ...... I 058
October 20 ..... ....... ...... ... ...... .1 4
October 21 ....... .. .. .... .... ..... 146
October 22 ...... ..... .. ......... I 066
October 23 ...... .. ... . ....... I iA
During the week there were laid in the
spillway of Gatun Dam 916 cubic yards of
concrete, making the total concrete laid at
Gatun 8,226 cubic yards, for the seven days
ended October 23.
Concrete Work at Pedro Miguel Locks.
A total of 2,5414. cubic yards of concrete
was laid at the Pedro Miguel Locks dur-
ing the week ended October 23, which


was about one-half of the total laid up to
October 18, since the beginning of the con-
crete work on September 1. The record
shows a steady gain for each of the six work-
ing da:. s of the week with one exception, and
on Saturday. October 23, the record for the
entire period was broken, when a total of 541
cubic yards was laid during the day. The
detailed statement follows-
Cubic 1'atVA.
Prior to October 1 ............... .. 5 146K
October IS .16... .. .. ...-...-. 4'
Octobher 1H .. .... ...... .... -38? *
October N . ........... ....... - 36U
October 21 .. ......... ............ 395
October22 ... ... ........ ......... 521.
October 2. .... .... ... ... . 5.541
rotat ....... ........ ... 7.6s6
Bortom of Canal at lDinli.
One of the steam shovels on the dry ex-
cavation in the Miudi Hills near the Atlan-
tic entrance is working on the bottom of the
Canal at 41 feet below sea level. Less than
half a mile north a ladder dredge is digging
rock and mud out of the channel in Limon
Bay. and two miles south the concrete gangs
are at work in Gatun Locks. The Mindi
work is the only steam shovel excavation
between Gatun and the Atlantic entrance,
and it was believed that it presented drain-
age problem that would make dry excava-
tion impracticable, because the cut is only a
few feet from the French canal, and within
a mile of the Mindi River and Limon Bay.
Contrary to expectation little water has
seeped into the cut from the nearby canal,
bay, and river, and most of the difficult so
far experienced has been with rain water.
A system of diversion ditches has been
dug on either side of the cut to keep the
water from the surrounding country from
flowing into it, and such rain water as
cannot be diverted is collected in a sump
near the north end of the excavation and
raised thence over a dike into the French
canal, a total lift of 45 feet. The pumping
plant consists of one 16-inch, and three 8-
inch old French centrifugal pumps and one
6-inch duplex pump, run by two old French
engines which are supplied with steam by
two Scotch marine boilers taken from the
French dredges at Chagrecito. This plant
took the place of one of less capacity, and
the installation was completed on August 1.
During August and September the 6-inch
pump was able to keep the pit clear of
water, but the heavy rains of October have
made recourse to the other pumps neces-
sary. Before the new plant wasestablished.
during the heavy rains of June. the lower
levels were flooded and the work interfered
with by water, but the present plant will
easily handle all the rain water that collects
and any but an exceptional amount of seep-
age water.
The bottom of the Canal was struck on
October 12 by the only 90-ton steam shovel








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. 1IL., No. 9.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Connrnad I

on the Mindi work, and a cut is being made
along the west side of the excavation at 42>,
feet below sea level, the extra foot and a
half below the bottom of the Canal being
for the purpose of draining water from other
parts of the excavation into the sump. The
other two shovels now at work there are on
the east side and on higher levels.
At the south end of the cut and along the
east side some difficulty has been experi-
enced with sliding material. On Septem-
ber 23 the shovel now at work in the bottom
of the Canal was caught b. a quantity of
mud sliding on slick rock and together with
the tracks was pushed 20 feet out of its orig-
inal position. Shovel 101, which was exca-
vating this sliding material earls in October,
settled gently into the mud and overturned.
On the east side of the cut about midway be-
tween the two ends is a mass of loose dirt
.n which shovel 104 is working. It is said
that this material was pumped from the
French canal behind a row of piles into its
present position and that this accounts for its
lack of coherence. During September one of
the shovels excavating in this material was
caught, and although not damaged was sent
to the shops for general repairs. The shovel
now at work there is withdrawn every night
to a point behind a ledge of rock where it is
safe from the sliding mud, and is "'cut in"
again each morning.
The steam shovels are served bv five 1'0-
class, two 200-class, and two 300-class loco-


motives; also, one of the French type. The
spoil is dumped at Gatun Dam. In making
the ascent from the bottom of the cut to the
dike above the level of the French canal
two locomotives can haul out sixteen 10-
yard, or twelve 18-yard dump cars in dry
weather, while three locomotives are re-
quired for wet weather. The force on the
work at present consists of 42 gold men and
between 350 and 400 laborers.
The excavation at Mindi was begun in
July, 1907. The total amount excavated up
to October 1. 1909, was 1,362,169 cubic yards
and the amount remaining was about 1,087,-
20S cubic yards. This work has been done
at an average cost of 59.79 cents per cubic
yard for the fiscal year 1909, and 56.75 cents
per cubic yard for the fiscal years 1908 and
1909. The proportion of rock to earth and
the cost per cubic yard excavated during
the first six months of the current year are
shown in the following table:
CeBIC VanRs.
Earth. Rock. Total. Cents.
] IoN rn. -- :

January ........... 8.096 37.565 45.664 63.56
February ........ 7.951 38.095 46.046 6639
March ............ 28.ck57 41.756 70.713 61 09
April ............ 20.630 53.736 74.368 36.74
May.... .......... 17.206 54.201 71.407 45.60
June ............ 25.730 54.371 80 101 43.10
The quotations of cost are for division
costs plus the overhead cost added by the
office of the Chief Engineer. The earth ex-
cavation being done at the present time is
more expensive than rock. In September
the excavation pershovel dayaveraged 1,117
cubic yards: the blasting involved the drill-
ing of 6,985 feet of holes and the use of


LABOR FORCE CONTINUES TO INCREASE.
Largest Number of 1.aborer-~t-inie Canal Work wnn Begun Iteeorded During Seplember-De-
creae in [lie Goil Forre-' lemwent of Labor, Force and Quarters.
The largest number of employes e\er at work on the Canal and Panama railroad was
that of September 29, when the force numbered 35,210. Although the total effective force
during September was the largest on record there wasa decrease in the number of "gold,"
or skilled American employes, iudicating a tendency toward a reduction in the number of
supervisory poaiti-ins. The l.50i0 Barbadian laborers who arrived on the Isthmus on Sep-
tember 2, formed the largest single shipment of laborers ever brought to the Canal works.
During the month 134 European laborers were taken from the Isthmus by a labor contractor
in the employ of a railroad enterprise in Brazil. Since April, 1909, between 900 and 1,000
European laborers working for the Commission have been taken from the Isthmus by this
recruiting agent.
The report of the Acting Chief Quarterma.ter for the month of September shows that of
the 35,210 employes on the rolls of the Commission and Panama railroad. 23,158 were
laborers for the Commission. 4,11q were on the "gold" roll of the Commission, and the
remainder comprised the "gold" and silverr" forces of the Panamarailroad. During the
month the total of separations from the "gold" force of the Commission was 215, and of
additions 214. making the net separations 1.
The number of family quarters occupied by "gold" employes was 1,494, and the oc-
cupants numbered 4,471; bachelor quarters by "gold" employes, 2,208, and the occupants
numbered 3,407, of whom 113 were women. The family quarters occupied by West Indians
numbered 971, and the occupants 3.064; bachelor quarters, 235, number of occupants, 5,274.
The family quarters occupied by European laborers numbered 308, and the occupants 801;
bachelor quarters 133, and the number of occupants 4,618.
The force actually at work on September 29, 1909, was as follows:
European West Indian
Ar, n. Laborers Laborers
STotal Grand
DPARTMr-ENTr Silver. C Total.

2 2f . i S .. __
Cons! ctn and Enzgr ng 2 9'7 1249 357 I r5l ]'.4 3 123 51 5 1 (93 2.5,1 4.955 320 16.866 3.144 22.010
Civil Administratiii. 152 1 1'. |.. .... ... .... 171 270 441
Sanstatior, ..... ... 616 5 I .... 62 5 1 271 7 912 36 1.277
Quartermaster E ...... 1.o04 4 2 4. 166 210, 31 24 4 4 779 15 2,575 242 2.817
subsistence ... 61 I 2 ... .... ..... .... 1 ..... .. 619 5 67
Disbursenmenta .. a .... ........... ..... ............ ............. 8 21 29
t nof Acc nt .. ................. ..... ... 7 91 98
TOL1as. ..... .. 5 30 30 51 411 I i?. 2 2:4 3 442 54 1.102 2.577 6.009 342 23.158 4.191 27.349
Panama railroad force. 7.043 Panama railroad commiasary force. 818


8,770 pounds of dynamite; 1,627 feet of new
track and 4,816 feet of old track were laid.
The rainfall at Cristobal was 16.33 inches
and at Gatun 10.86 inches, and Mindi is be-
tween these two stations.
No Reservations on the "Crlstobal."
The members of the Committee on Appro-
priations, and the Senators and Members of
the House accompanying them, are expected
to leave New York on the steamship Cristo-
hal, scheduled to sail November 3, and will,
in all probability, return to New York on
the same boat. All cabin accommodations
have therefore been reserved for the next
sailing of the steamship Crislobal, scheduled
to leave for New York on or about Novem-
ber 17, and no requests for other than steer-
age accommodations will be issued for this
sailing until further notice.
Police Record for September.
The report of the Chief of Police and
Prisons foc September, 1909, shows that 559
arrests were made in the Canal Zone during
the month, as compared with 535 in August,
an increase of 24. Of the September arrests,
528 were men and 31 were women, the of-
fenses with which they were charged aggre-
gating 52.
The police force numbered 244 men on
September 30, including 68 men on special
duty, a net decrease of seven for the month.
The pay rolls amounted to $17,088.84.
There were 31 criminal cases tried in thecir-
cuit courts, two of which were dismissed, 10
continued, and 17 in which convictions were
secured. Thirty-two civil cases were tried
during the month, and the sum of $836.11
was collected by the marshal in executions.
An additional sum of $212 was collected by
the marshal while acting as receiver.
The Zone convicts numbered 123 on Au-
gust 31: received during September, 4; dis-
charged, 7: total on September 30, 120. The
number of district prisoners on the same
date was 134. The prison pay rolls for the
month amounted to $1,547.51; cost of pris-
oners' subsistence, $1,031.45, a total ex-
pense of $2,578.96. The value of work per-
formed by prisoners on Zone roads was
$1,751.10.
There were 10 deaths by violence during
September, requiring action by the coroner,
four of these being due to accidental drown-
ing, two to electric shocks, one to railroad
accident, one to accidental traumatism, and
two to wounds inflicted by another person.
There were four deportations during the
month, one to the United States, one to Ja-
maica, one to Spain, and one to France, the
last two for soliciting and recruiting labor.
September Money Order Business.
During the month of September, 1909, the
sixteen post-offices of the Canal Zone in
which a money order business is done, sold
16,331 orders aggregating in value $417,-
803.50. This is an increase of 865 over the
number issued in August, but an increase of
only $8,322.28 in value. Of the September
business, $311,734.23 represented orders
drawn payable in the United States, $105,-
795.77 in orders drawn payable in the Canal
Zone, and $273.50 in orders drawn payable
in Martinique. In August, the first month
of operation under the money order conven-
tion with Martinique, the value of orders
drawn was only $28. The postal sales were
$6,617.60, of which amount $3,970.56 accrued
to the Canal Zone postal system, and $2,647.04
to the Republic of Panama. The revenue
from newspaper postage was $10.80.








October 27, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


EXECUTIVE ORDERS.
Humane Laws For Children Under 18 Years,
land For Animals.
Under authority vested in me by law it is
ordered:
1. Chapter II of Title XII of Act No. 14,
of the laws of the Canal Zone, is amended
by the addition thereto of the following
section:
Section 210-K. Every person who shall torture.
cruelly beat. abuse, wilfully maltreat or unnecessa-
rily deprive of liberty any child under the age of
eighteen, and every person having custody or pos-
session of a child under the age of fourteen who shall
expose it in any highway, street. field, house or other
place with intent to abandon it, is guilty ofa misde-
meanor.
2. Section 423, Chapter XIV, Title XVI,
.of Act No. 14 of the laws of the Canal Zone,
is amended to read as follows:
Section 423. Every person who shall overdrive,
overload, torture, cruelly beat or injustifiably injure.
maim, mutilate or kill or deprive uf necessary food.
drink or shelter, or work when unfit for labor, any
animal whether wild or tame and whether belonging
to himself or to another. or who. being the owner or
possessor or having charge or custody of a maimed.
diseased, disabled or infirm animal shall abandon it.
or leave it to die in a street. road or other place, is
guilty of a misdemeanor. Any police officer may
lawfully destroy or cause to be destroyed any ani-
mal found abandoned and not properly cared for.
appearing, in the judgment of two reputable persons
called by him to view the same in his presence, to
be injured or diseased past recovery for any useful
purpose.
3. Any duly appointed agent of a regularly
organized humane society in the Canal Zone
may be commissioned by the proper authori-
ties of the Canal Zone as a special police of-
ficer for the enforcement of the provisions
of this order and of any other law, regula-
tion or order in force in the Canal Zone for
the prevention of cruelty to children and
animals, and when so commissioned shall
be vested for that purpose with all the au-
thority of a member of the Canal Zone police
force. WM. H. TAFT.
THE WHITE HOUSE, October 2, 1909.
[No. 1130.]

Board of Local Inspectors to License Officers
of Vessels.
Under authority vested in me by law, it
is ordered:
Section 1. The Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission shall appoint three per-
sons who shall constitute a "Board of Local
Inspectors." The members of this Board
shall be employes of the Isthmian Canal
Commission, or the Panama Railroad Com-
pany, or both, and shall perform the duties
hereinafter specified without additional com-
pensation.
Section 2. The Board of Local Inspectors
shall recommend the classification of mas-
ters, mates, engineers, and pilots of steam
vessels propelled upon the waters within the
jurisdiction of the Canal Zone. Upon such
recommendation, in writing, the Head of the
Department of Civil Administration, Isth-
mian Canal Commission, shall issue licenses.
Section 3. Whenever any person applies
to be licensed as master, mate, engineer, or
pilot of any steam vessel propelled upon the
waters within the jurisdiction of the Canal
Zone, the Board of Local Inspectors shall
tmake diligent inquiry as to his character,
sad shall carefully examine the applicant,
b well as the proof he presents in support
t this claim; and if, upon full consideration,
7t are satisfied that his character, habits
ifW knowledge, and experience in the


duties of master, mate, engineer, or pilot,
are all such as to authorize the belief that
he is a suitable and safe person to be en-
trusted with the powers and duties of such
station, they shall recommend that a license
be issued to him, authorizing him to be
employed on any vessel propelled upon the
waters within the jurisdiction of the Canal
Zone, in such duties, for the term of three
(3) years; but such license shall be sus-
pended or revoked upon satisfactory proof of
negligence, unskilfulness, or intemperance.
The Board of Local Inspectors will recom-
mend the assignment of mates or engineers
to an appropriate class designated "Chief,"
"first," or "second."
Section 4. The Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion shall not engage for permanent em-
ployment upon any of its vessels propelled
by steam, any master, mate, or engineer,
who shall not be duly licensed by the Uni-
ted States, or the Government of the Canal
Zone, and who is not a citizen of the United
States, unless an American citizen is not
available; and all officers at present employed
who do not bold United States licenses will
be required to qualify before the Board.
Section 5. The Government of the Canal
Zone may issue licenses as masters, mates,
engineers, or pilots to persons who are not
citizens of the United States.
Section 6. The Executive Order of the
Governor of the Canal Zone, dated Decem-
ber 8, 1905, is amended by this order only
in so far as it provides for the examination
and licensing of pilots.
WM. H. TAFT.
TEa WHITE HOUSE, October 2, 1909.
[No. 1131.]

Isthmian Baseball for 1909-10.
The indications are that the Atlantic Base-
ball League will consist of four clubs during
the coming season. Three are already as-
sured, and an effort will be made to have
Gatun the fourth. Last season there were
five teams in the Atlantic league, all in
Cristobal and Colon. Two, the Dry Dock
and the Civil Administration teams, have
dropped out, leaving the Panama Railroad
Company, the Commissary, and the Colon
clubs still in the organization. A meeting of
the league, of which R. H. Wardlaw is
president, will be called soon to consider
plans, including the matter of a site. There
are no available grounds at Gatun, and
in case a club is organized at that place,
all of its games will probably be played in
Colon. The Panama Railroad Company
team has been able to obtain some valuable
practice lately through exhibition games with
a picked team from the cruiser Tacoma.
Thecall for theannual meeting of the reg-
ular Isthmian league organization of which
Col. Goethals is president, appears below.
Ancon, Empire and Gorgona are reasonably
sure of a team this season, but the make-up
of the fourth team is somewhat uncertain.

Meeting of Isthmian Baseball League.
As required by the constitution and by-
laws of the Isthmian Baseball League, the
regular annual meeting is hereby called for
2.45 p. m., Sunday, October 31, at the office
of the president in Culebra. All members
of the league are earnestly requested to be
present as upon this meeting a great deal
pertaining to the future welfare of the league
depends. Each member is requested to


come prepared to express his opinion in re-
gard to all matters of interest to the league,
some points of which are covered in the
following:
1. Number of teams to comprise the league.
2. What teams.
3. Date of beginning of season of play.
4. Number of games to constitute the
schedule.
5. Opinion of various clubs as to signing
of players who will probably leave the Isth-
mus before the expiration of the season.
6. Extremely heavy expense to which the
park associations are put by maintaining a
team and paying expenses while away from
home, one of the largest items in which is
railroad fare to the Panama railroad.
7. Consideration of an agreement between
the Isthmian and the Atlantic Leagues tend-
ing to prevent taking of players of one
league by the other.
8. The selection and appointment of um-
pires. WM. M%. WOOD,
Sctre'avy and Treas rer.
Empire, C. Z., October 25, 1909.

PERSONAL.

Lieut.-Col. Geo. W. Goethals, Maj. Gen.
Thomas H. Barry, Maj. C. A. Devol, and
Federico Alfonso Pezet, Peruvian Minister
to Panama, sailed from New York on Sun-
day, October 24, at 7 a. m. on the Ancon,
due at Cristobal on October 31.
Chief Justice H. A. Gudger and Mr. E. J.
Williams, Disbursing Officer, are passengers
on the Panama, due to arrive at Cristobal
on October 27.
Capt. G. M. Hoffman, assistant engineer
at Gatun, sailed for the States on his annual
leave on the Al/ba L1 on October 19.
Mr. C. M. Saville, accompanied by Mrs.
Saville and their sou, returned from his
leave in the States on October 14.

Red Men.
A very courteous invitation having been
extended to all the chiefs of the Improved
Order of Red Men on the Isthmus, by His
Honor the Alcalde of the city of Panama, to
attend and partake in the celebration of the
sixth anniversary of the Independenceof the
Republic of Panama to be held in Panama
on November 3, I therefore, as Deputy
Great Incohonee for the Canal Zone, have
accepted the invitation in behalf of the order
and would request that every Red Man on
the Isthmus attend. Transportation will be
provided from Colon and intermediate points.
In F. F. and C.
ELI SIMS, D. C. I.
Cristobal, C. Z., October 23, 1909.

Band Concert.
The Isthmian Canal Commission Band will give a
concert al B.,lbon C Z on Sunday. October31. 1909.
at 3 p.m. The program follows;
I March-L Esnipance ............. Bonnissenu
2 Selection-.4 St/,born Cnderella......... Howard
3 Wallz-Santiago ............. ........ Corbin
Ia Caprice- Thtlthldoav. ..... ........... Bagley
4 b Descriptive March- Trading t e
nTu ........................... Spauldiug
5 Ouerture-Lwght Ca.,a'ry i.......... ..... Suppe
6 Flower Sag- Adoraton .................Barnard
7 Patrol-.4AmeTwan. ......... ......... Meacham
8 Potpourri of popular songs ......... ..La Parge
Introducing 'aimbo 'IF I had a Thousand Livesto
Live." "I've Lost My Teddy Bear." I am Longing
for Some One to Love Me."' Glow Worm." "Ada My
Sweet Potaler Henry s Barn Dance." and "The
Big Red Shawl "
9 Intermezzo-.-{/ftr Sau et ...................Pryor
10 March- U' 'd e ie ........................ Losey
CnAS H. JENNINGS. Musial Dtreclor.
A concert will be given at Las Cascadason Sunday.
November 7.








68 THE CANAL RECORD Vol. II., No. 9.


HALFWAY MARK AT CULEBRA.

Lxcaiation in Iie Cut Under American Su-
per% vision Pab.,ee That Stage.
Culebra Cut was half completed on Octo-
ber 23, when 39,002.299 cubic 3ards had been
excavated, and a like amount of digging re-


0 .


_ _, :_ .... ,*I I M I
PROFILE OF CULEBRA CUT ON CENTER LINE OF THE CANAL.
Culebra Cut extends frum lihs Obizpo t. Pedro MNiuel Locks a distance of 9 miles. The horizontal scale
of ihe above oronle is I io 20u 0(Y. and the vertical scale is I to 2: )
A-Higheit point of exc.aation. .34 feet above sea levtl. which is at Gold Hill. near Culebra.
B-Highe.t point of e-xcavation on the southh tide of Culebra Cut at Contractor s Hill. 410 feet above sea
level
C-Highest point ol excavation on center line ol the Canal belwten Cold and Contractor s Hills. at312 feet
above sea le\el
D-Normal elevation of aater in Culebr.a Cut A5 ielt above sea level
E-Proposed bottom of the Canal at 41, leet a.boe sea leel.
F-Excavalion on center line done by the French
G-Excitanon on center line done by the .mericrns
Part marked "Cultbra Cut" nhow' amount of excavation on the center line yet to be done between Bas
Obispo and Pedro Miguel


mained to be done. This hallway mark that
has been passed refers to the amount to be
excavated by the Americans. Counting the
work done by the French the excavation in
Culebra Cut is nearly two-thirds completed.
The record on October 23, 1909, stood:
Cubir Yard,.
Excavation by French ...... .... .5 20 i2ii
Excavation by Americaus ...... 9.10... 2'
Excam action remaining . ....... 39 .)."' 29'
The section of the Canal work referred to
as Culebra Cut is nine miles long, extend-
ing from Bas Obispo to Pedro Miguel Locks.


excavation each year since then has been as
follows:
Cubrl Va'ds.
1 r s4 (, months).. ................. 213.472
1905 ....... ............ .... ....... 14 254
1906 ......... ....................... 2.702.991
190:. ......... ... ......... ....... 9.177,130
1908 ........ . ........ ..... ..... 13,912.453
1909 (9 month il.... ............. 11,17,217
At present the work is being prosecuted
without appreciable inconvenience on ac-
count of the rainy season, because of the
effective drainage system, and at a rate that
should insure the completion of all excava-
tion in the Cut within four years. At the
summit of the Cut near Empire, the lowest
-point at which a steam shovel is working, is
94 feet above the bottom, at Las Cascadas37
feet, and at Bas Obispo one cut has been
made for drainage purposes below the level
of the bottom,' at 33 feet above sea level.
On the south slope of the summit the low-
est excavation at Gold Hill is 78 feet above
the bottom, at Cucaracha 31) feet above bot-
tom, and at Pedro Miguel part of the exca-
vation is down to the bottom.
As the excavation advances the amount
of rock handled in proportion to earth in-
creases as do the grades up which the spoil
trains must go to leave the Cut. The pro-
portion of the total excavation that it has
been necessary to blast during each Septem-


CROSS SECTION OF CULEBRA CUT AT EMPIRE.
A-Excavation by the French.
B- Excnantiorn b> the American'.
C-E.xcavatoni for Obispo Diversion by the Americ->n-
DI-Surface of the water at elevation 65 feet.
E- Bottom of Cannil at elevation 411 feet
P-Dike built bi the Americans along Obispo Diversion
G-Ex.ravation by the French for Obispo Diversion channel.
H-Berm on which Panama Railroad will run through Culebra Cut at elevation 95 feet above sea level


her since the Americans began work is shown
in the following statement:


E n' aF.. R. eTotals
E excavation

Ca.. Fd.
19.4 . .. .... .. 25 720
19U5 ........ ................ 44.10615
l'6 : 291 45,
! -. ," ... ..... .. .... .953 4h
9 8 ... .. ... .. ... ...... 1.12?.E60
1 J9 ......... ... ... .. 1.,2 978


( I


Bla.sted
material.

Cu. Fds.
13.367
15.520
198 083
566.063
896.346
1.(34.016


F--= -== J- --
CROSS SECTION OF LULEUIR.A CUT NEAR CULEBRA.
A-E'xcavation by the French D-uti face of water at 85 feet above sea level.
B-Excavation by the Americnu- E-Bottom of Canal at 40 feel above sea level.
C- Remain ing to be excavated.

It will have a width of 300 feet at the but. 7. '
tom, which will be at40 feet above sea level.
the normal level of the water being fixed at
85 feet above the sea. Excavation was be-
gun at Empire by the French on Januarvy 20,
1882, and was continued by them until 1889, ^
when the first company became bankrupt.
The new French company resumed the work CROSS SECTION OF CUI.EBRA CUT AT BAS OBISPO.
in 1895, and continued it until May 4, 1904, A-Excavation by the French. D-Surface of water at 85 feet above sea level.
B-Excavation by the Americans. E-Bottom of Canal at 40 feet above sea level.
when the Americans assumed control. The C-Remaining to be excavated.








October 27, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


DREDGING IN SEPTEMBER.
Operations in Atlantic and Pacific Divisions
Show a Slight Increase Over August.
The combined output of the dredges of
the Atlantic and Pacific Divisions for Sep-
tember amounted to 1,473,574 cubic yards,
as compared with 1,459,961 cubic yards for
August, an increase of 13,613 cubic yards.
Of the September excavation, 1,090,549 cubic
yards were removed from the Canal prism,
and 383,025 cubic yards from outside works.
In the Atlantic Division, 410,574 cubic yards
were taken from the Canal prism, and 362,-
735" cubic yards from outside works. In the
Pacific Division, 679,975 cubic yards belonged
to Canal excavation, and 20,290cubic yards
represented other operations. The dredg-
ing output in the Atlantic Division was
4,942 cubic yards less, and in the Pacific
Division 18,655 cubic yards more, than in
August.
The dredges in the harbor and channel
section of the Atlantic Division removed
410,574 cubic yards of earth from the Canal
prism. Of the 169,978cubic yards taken out
by the suction dredge Caribbean, 26,870 cu-
bic yards of earth were removed from the
approach channel to Cristobal Harbor, and
19,445 cubic yards of earth from in front of
Pier 11. The remainder of its output, 123,-
663 cubic yards, was taken from the Canal
prism. The Caribbean was laid up under-
going repairs from September 15 to 2,, in-
clusive. The dipper dredge.llivdi took out
8,500 cubic yards of earth, and 1,500 cubic
yards of rock from the approach channel;
6,209 cubic bards of earth and 19,562 cubic
yards of rock from in front of Pier 11, and
800 cubic yards of earth and 800 cubic 3ards
of rock from the drydock slip, a total of 37,-
371 cubic yards for the month. Dredges
No. 1 and 'No. 5 worked the entire month
in the prism, while Dredge 'No. 6 was laid
up for repairs the whole of September.
In the Gatun section, Dredge Ao. 32 con-
tinned excavating south of the dam, while
Dredge .Vo. 83 continued work north of the
dam. Dredge 'o. 85 was at work north of
the dam until September 24, when it was
transferred to the lock slip to excavate for a
new dock north of the cement shed. It re-
turned to work on the dam at the end of the
month, having taken out 14,113 cubic yards
from the lock slip.
The tabular statement of operations in the
Atlantic Division follows:

DREDGE. TyDe. Cu Yds
Caribbean............ Suction ......... 169.972
No. ................. Ladder .............. l3.u7,)
No. 5 .... ............. Ladder .............. 151 41
M indi ................. Dipper.............. 37 11i
No. 82............... Suction ............. I.10.792
No. 83............... Suction............ 101 487
No. 85................ Suction........ .... b6.770
Total .............. ................. .... .23309
In the Pacific Division, the dredge Cue!-
bra worked during the entire month deep-
ening the chantiel outside of the Mole's
position, except that it took one load a day
at high water from in front of the shipways.
The dredge M/ole worked northward the
whole month, with the exception of one
triptoChamd for sand. The Badger worked
during the month between Station 2164, plus
75 feet, and Station 2167. Its operations
were somewhat delayed by two breakages
of lower tumbler shafts, and the fact that
C considerable of the cut was in rock. The
Cardenas was out of commission a total of


18 days during September, from the 1st to
the 10th, and from the lhth to the 27th. Its
working time was spent cutting along the
east side of the Canal prism for a distance
of 625 feet. The .1farinol worked the whole
month in the French canal. Its only delays
were due to shaft breakage. The Savdp,,er r
continued the hbraulic fill in the core of
the west dam at Mirafloresduring the month.
Repairs were complettil to the Go,t ','r to-
ward the close of the month, and on the 29th
it went to Cham6 to dredge sand.
The tabular statement of operations in
the Pacific Division follows:
DRF.DGL. Tp.e Cu Yds.

Culebra. .... .... ..Suction . 3.
Mole. . .......... Ladder i.. 149
Badger ...... .. Ladder I 5 '
Cardenas ...... ... Dipprr 11 .. 1 953
Marmot ............ Ladder 14 ,9,
Sandpiper.. .. ... Suction .. .... 33" ,
Total ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ;0l* u>5
'Includes 3.400 cubic sards of sand dredged at
Came.
Fatal Accidents.
Pedro Navaso, a Venezuelan, employed
in the Pacific Division, check No 29,040,
was run over by a labor train in the Canal
prism, opposite Cucaracha. on Thursday
morning, October 21, receiving injuries
which resulted in his death shortly after his
removal to Ancon Hospital. He attemitledi
to board the train after it was in motion and
fell under the wheels. He was 21 year, old
and married.
Richard Deane, a Barbadian, employed in
the Atlantic Division, check No. 33,742, was
instantly killed by electricity near the con-
crete mixer building at Gatun, on Friday,
October 22. He was tryingto crawl through
an opening between the track rail and the
power tail on the industrial road. when the
back of his head came in contact with the
power rail.
John Mayers, a Barbadian,. employed in
the Atlantic Division, check No 51,157, was
killed at Gatun on Tuesday, October 19,
while working on the south toe of the dam.
He was helping to pull a dump car from its
dumping to its running position, when one
of the stay chains on the opposite side broke
and as the other pin became unfastened at
the same time, the car swung back pinning
Players beneath it and crushing him to
death.
Canal Zone Revenue Operations.
The total revenue collections in the Canal
Zone during the month of September, 1909,
amounted to $9,181.28, derived from the fol-
lowingsources: Distillation licenses, $225.55;
burial permits, $2: taxes, licenses, etc.,
turned in by tax collectors. $8,954 2-8.
The total collections on account of general
taxes and licenses for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1909, amounted to $96.970.S6, as
compared with $77,467.47 for the pre-.ious
fiscal year. Distillation licenses, 65 in num-
ber. amounted to $2,209, as compared with
(3,814.94 for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1908.
Sojourners Lodge No. 874, A. F. and A. M.
The regular communication of Sojourners
Lodge, No. 874, A. F. and A. 51., will be
held on Saturday evening, October 30, in the
Masonic hall, Colon. at 8 o'clock. As there
is business of great importance all members
are expected to attend. Visiting blaster
Masons in good standing are always welcome.
ELI Sims, R. If'. .aster.


STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS.
Vourk ACeeomplia.hed in the Centrna Dihiioni
During Septembler.
During the month of September the total
amount of material excavated in the Central
Divi-ion was 1,471,796 cubic yards, of ushich
364,147 cubic %ards were classified as earth
and 1,107,649 cubic %ards as rock. Of this
quantity, 1,454,2S7 cubic yards were removed
by steam shhotels, 6.,, 14 cubic yards by
band, and 795 cubic yardss hb sluicing fill in
the ObIispo Ditersion. The iquantitv of ma-
terial removed from the Canal prism was
1,471.0iil cubic %ards, while ?95 cubic sards
stere removed from the Obispo Diversion.
The hiidh record for the month was made
by shovel No. 225 io-rking in the Culebra
District, which excavatet 4,Sl.icubic yards
of earth in 25 workirin .lays Shovel No.
256 working 23 das inthe BasObispo District
excavated 43,b72 cubic )~ rds, the second
best record for the month These shovels
are in the 9'J-ton class.
The best record for a shovel in the 7i)-ton
class was made be shovel No 122, wr.rkiug
in the Bas Obicpo District, which excasatrd
37,S93 cubic yardss of earth in 23 working
days.
Shovel No. 224, of the 90 ton class, work-
ing in the Culebra Disitrict, male the high
record for one das by excavating 2,753 cubic
yards of rock and earth on September 23
Shovel No. 127 working in the labernilla
District excavated 2,110 cubic yardss on Sep-
tember 4, the high record for one day for
a 7U-ton shovel.
Monthly records are computed by place
measurement, while the daily record-, are
based on car measurement. The 21i.0 class
shovels are rated as 9u -too hovels, and the
100-class as 70)-ton. The best records for
the month and for one day in each district
are shown below:
TABERNILLA DISTRICT.

Shovel Cr~"iC Y,'ADS. No 0of
id... at
No. Earth Rock Totl work

23 t
111 .. ..4 .l ; ,' I : 2$

A4 OU[PO DICTRIC. T.




as: ... 29.b9 .... 39? W 3 2

CtLEBRA DTIi KICT
2?3 I ~oD I 3r" I v .5
21-I . ... . 41 :1 I 25
BESr RECORDi ]i.'t ONE D YV


.

S Location


12. Taberuilla .. .
25. Taberailla.....
25bi Ba% Obispo.
256 Bns Obispo...
232 Bas ilbuspo
2,7T Empitre ....... .
225 mp [.re .. .
224 Culebri .... ....
20 Culebra.....


Cth:r.icter of V-,
UDie. matenul ex-.
c ...ied .c

Sept 4 I irl hi .. .. ?.110
Sept 11 Et rth .... 2.E.; 0
Sept 20 kc.ck.... -2.752
Sept 1i Rock .. ? 4
Sept 1; Rock .. .... 31
Sept 9 Rock ....... I .. 1
Sept 5 I Rock 553
Sept 2' Rock and earth 2 ;55
Sept ?3 Ro uk anud earth 2.'36


Launch Ie r% ite to TImlilga.
The steamer San,dad leaves the dredge landing at
Balboa it 9 o clock Tueaday Thiurtda' and Silurdmiy
mornings. On the return irip it arrives at Balboa
about 4 30 p m in time to make connecUons for the
5.30 train at Panama.


69









THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. HI., No. 9.


CHURCH AND MISSION WORK.

New Baptist Church at Colou-Snnilny School
Actiuities--Misslon Rally at Empire.
The opening of the new Baptist Church
building in Colon took place on Sunday, Oc-
tober 17, meetings being held at 10.30 a. m.,
3 p. m., and 7.30 p. m. Assisting the min-
isters in charge of the mission, the Rev.
Messrs. Wise and Sobey, was Mr. J. C. For-
man, chairman of the proceedings. Judge
Wesley M. Owen was the speaker in the
morning. During the week following, meet-
ings were held at 7.30 every evening, the
speakers being the Rev. Messrs. Elliott,
Cook, King, and Loveridge. On Saturday
evening a concert was given, to which an
admission of 25 cents was charged. On
Sunday, October 24, Rev. C. H. Elliott was
the preacher in the morning and Rev. J. L.
Wise in the evening. The afternoon meeting
was in charge of G. W. Smith, secretary of
the Cristobal Young Men's Christian Associa-
tion, and W. H. Cutler. The church is a
concrete structure, with a seating capacity of
500. It is situated on land leased from the
Panama Railroad Company, adjoining the
Salvation Army Social Institute.
The Isthmian Sunda% School Association
held its fourth quarterly meeting for the
current year at Empire, October 10. There
were present the following delegates, repre-
senting eight schools:
S. H. Harrison of Corozal, president; J. C
Forman of Empire, vice-president; L. C.
Vannahof Corozal, secretary; H. A. McCon-
aughey of Gorgona, treasurer; W. H. Kro-
mer, Miss Thomas, Cristobal; W. H. Standi-
fer, Gatun; M. P. Pitts, Empire; Mrs. Van
Hardeveld, Mrs. McNamara, Bas Obispo;
A. H. Shrimpton, Miss Norcross, Pedro Mi-
guel; Rev. C. H. Elliott, Cristobal; Mrs.
Kelly, Miss Kelly, Miss Avis Green, Pedro
Miguel.
Encouraging reports were received con-
cerning local Sunday school activities, and
plans were discussed with relation to more
and better work. Action was taken prelim-
inary to the introduction of the new Inter-
national Beginners', Primary and Junior Les-
son Series. The full course in the grades
named covers uine years' study. The text
books for the first year are now ready under
date of October 1.
L. C. Vannah and F. E. Moore of Corozal,
and J. M. Weaver of Culebra were chosen
to organize systematic training of teachers.
Rev. A. Lucas, international secretary for
the West Indies, Central and South America,
will visit the Isthmus early in January for
two or three weeks. A general rally will be
held at Empire the second Sunday in Janu-
ary. The following committees were ap-
pointed to arrange the details:
Program-M. P. Pitts, Empire; Judge W.
M. Owen, Ancon; Carrie M. Grigsley, Bas
Obispo. Transportation-J. F. Warner, Cu-
lebra; H. A. McConaughey, Gorgona: W. H.
Standifer, Gatun. Reception and itinerary
for Mr. Lucas-J. C. Forman, Empire; A.
H. Shrimpton, Pedro Miguel; W. H. Kro-
mer, Cristobal.
The laying of the corner stone of the new
church for St. James' Mission, Empire, took
place on Sunday afternoon, October 17, un-
der the direction of the rector, Rev. William
H. Decker. Fifteen hundred people took part
in the procession, which included a band of
United States Marines, a corps of uniformed
police, fifty choristers and vested acolytes
bearing the cross, and large delegations of


friendly societies. Judge Thomas E. Brown,
Jr., delivered the address. The collection
amounted to $145 gold.
Adjutant Filmer Watson and Mrs. Wat-
son, in charge of the Salvation Army on the
Isthmus, have been spending six weeks' va-
cation in the States and Canada. During
their absence the work has been in charge of
Staff-Captain Dabneyof Kingston, Jamaica.
Various Society Meerings.
At the meeting of the Gorgona Woman's
Club ou Thursday, October 21, the officers
for the year were nominated. Elections
will be held at the meeting on October 28.
when a full attendance is desired.
The Sunshine society at Gatun, Mrs. H.
Porter, president, meets in the chapel fort-
nightly, on Thursday afternoons.

Claims Resulting from Sinking of Finance.
PANAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LeINE.
24 STATE STREET. N.EW YORK
To Passenger b. the Steamsvhip Finance on the Voy-
ae .from .Vew' Yro in Notaember., :.
The attention of passengers who may have sus-
rained losses by the sinking of the steamship Finance
on November 26. 1908 after her collision with the
White Star Line steamship Georg-. is called to the
citation to present claims against the steamship
Geaorgr issued by the United States Marshal for the
Southern District of New York. of which a copy ap-
pears below
Such claims are to be sworn to. with an attached
list of the articles lost or damaged, giving the sepa-
rate items which is to be filed with Thomas Alexan-
der Esq United States Commissioner. Post office
Building New York City. on or before November 30
next at 10 30 a min Yours respectfully
PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY
By E A. DRAKE. Vice president.
Dated September 25. 1909
NOTE-If you have not already a proctor in ad.
miralnt to represent your claim, it is suggested that
.ou place the same in the hands of Mr Evan Shelby.
of No 46 Cedarstreet. New York City. who represents
a number of Ihe passenger claims, and who will be
able to save expense to individual claimants by dis-
tnbuting the cost over a large number.
MARSHAL'S NOTICE.
'afted States of Amerca. Southern Distrut of ,New'
F-ik.ss
WHEREAS. a petition was filed in the District Court
of the United States For the Southern District of New
York on the 24th day of December. 1908, by the
Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, Limited. owner
of the steamship Georgk. her engines. boilers, etc..
for limitation of its liability for any loss, destruction.
damage and injur- caused by a collision between said
res.sel and the steamship Finance. on the 25th day
of November, 19f'8 in the main channel near Sandy
Hook, New Jersey and
WHERFAS. the petitioner has given a stipulation to
pay into court the sum of three hundred forty-two
thousand and eighty-six and 85-10Odolla r3 (fj.42.086.85)
and interest, the aDpraised value of said steamship
and her freight pending,
Now therefore to pursuance of the monition issued
by said court. to me directed and delivered, I do
hereby cite all persons claiming damage for loss,
destruction. damage or injury occasioned by the said
collision, to tile and make due proof of their re-
spec'ive claims before Thomas Alexander. Esquire,
a United States Commissioner, at his office. in the
Post-office Building in the City of New York. on or
before the 30th day of November 1909. at 1030 a. n .
and alsoto appear before said court in said building
on the 301h day of November. 1909. at 1A 30 am., and
answer sid petition otherbwie they will be defaulted
and barred from participation in the said stipulation.
Dnted New York August 20. 1909
WILLIAtI HENKEL a n/ed States Marshal.
ROBINSON BRInILE& BI.-NBODICT
Pro,'tars fo. ltilwier ;N' at' street..Veu' York Citp.

Lil of Parrzengers Lacated on the Isthmus nith Their
Add'esse.
M C Azema,. I C C Empire. C Z.
S E Blackburn care of I C. C Aicon. C. Z.
Pred. H Brundage Pedro Miguel C. Z
Mrs M J Cod. Gorgona. Z
R. A Conrad Cornzal. C Z.
H. E Fluhnrty. Emitire C. Z.
E L. Galliher. rTabernilla. C. Z.
irs K M Gelhart. Empire. C. Z.
I. E. Goldman Commiissary Depnrtmentl. Cristo-
bal. C. Z.
Stanley Greenidge Dr3 dock. Crislobal, C. Z.
Paul Groff, care of H. F. Cody. Crilobal, C. Z.
Mrs. Thomas Halligan, Gorgona. C. Z.


C. H. James. Division of Posts, Customs and Rev-
enues. Bas Obispo, C. Z.
Richard E. James, Department of Construction and
Engineering. Empire, C. Z.
Ignaco Kagdan. Bas Obispo. C. Z.
Mrs Sarah E. LePrince. Cristobal, C. Z.
Mrs. Mary A. Lincoln, Culebra, C. Z.
Miss Minnie Mahaney, Gorgon. C. Z.
Charles S. McCollum. Division of Municipal Engi-
neering. Cristobal. C. Z.
John F. McGovern. Las Cascadas. C. Z.
Philip 0 McOueen. Department of Construction
and Engineering Gatun.C Z.
George R. McKee, San Pablo. C. Z.
B. F. Metcalf. Tabernilla. C. 7.
Mrs A.G. Meyer. Cristobal, C. Z.
Crawford Moor. Cnstobal.C Z.
Nettlelon Parrotl, Department of Construction and
Engineering. Galun. C. Z.
Joe Perry. Ancon P.O.. Ancon, C. Z.
Dr. F. M. Rodriguez. Panama Journal, Panama,
R. P.
George H. Simmonds. fireman in charge. Balboa.
C. Z.
LeRoy Smith. Gorgona. C. Z.
Mrs. S. F Talbot. Cristobal. C. Z.
John R. Sweeney, Mechanical Department. Cristo-
bal. C. Z
F. A. Thompson. San Pablo, C. Z.
E. L. Warren. Tabernilla, C Z.

Unclaimed Laundry.
Packages of laundry received at the Cristobal laun-
dry. from the following persons have remained un-.
claimed for a period of more than six months. If not
claimed and charges paid before December 1. 1909,
they will be sold at public auction at the laundry
of the Panama Railroad Company. located in Cris-
tobal, Canal Zone. on the date first mentioned, to
satisfy charges due the Panama Railroad Company:


NAME. Mark.


Cameron D..... ........
MceMilter, W............
Marshall. Wm ... ......
Wilder. G. B..............
Ragan. F J...............
Chowning, J. W.........
Person. J. T..............
Mayers. W. H ............
Baker, A. T.............
Davis. S. L .............
Robinson, Joseph......
Field, H.G...............
Gores, P. E ... .........
Tomlinson. A. J..........
Manuth. B ............
Weird. J. B ..............
Reeder. W. E ............
Welder. B. W............
Pake. J ..............
Gerry. Dan.............
Evans. F. M ..............
Martin. J. A.............
Proctor. Clyde............
Brennan. T. H ...........
Crosby. T. L .........
Dakin L. W..............
Davis. E. M..............
Core, H. C...............
Davies. H M ...........
Cooper. Arthur...........
Daly. C. C .... ... .....
Caldwell. Wm ............
Brown. Jan. ............
Remick. Jno. M..........
Johnson C. H ........
Wardlaw. J ..........
Caloher, G G .........
Terry.J V................
Heslop. W. J .........
Brown. Jto ..........
Greenman N E ... ..
No name ................
Lebrelt. M ................
Spaulding, G. B..........
Sullivan. J. F..... .......
Steiner. Henry..........
Shaw. G ..................
Reichwaldt.C. H ........
Flynn. E. M............
Abbott. Mr...............
Avary. A. B .............
Alien. Joseph............
Bernard. E............
Bethea. J R .............
Betebenner, H. ..........
Bowman. T ...............
Bryan, J. P ...............
Garham. John ...........
Hayden. John...........
Ragsdale, H. C. .........
Roberts. J...............
Long. W. H...............
Lee E. E ................
Lively. A. J...............
Lincoln, R. H............
Boles. P. M...............
Lewis. C L ...............
Hilliard. G L,............
Floyd, R. F...............
Perry. W. L. ...........


C-5......
Mc-21 1..
M-240 ..
W-193...
R-187...I
C-12 ....
P-173 ...
M-138. .
B-555....
D-258...
R-285...
F-177...
G-183...
T-213...
M-253..
W-323...
R-180...
W-352...
P-119. ..
G-246...
E-106....
M-305...
P-184....
B-56 ....
C-62....
D-9......
D-108...
C-51 ....
D-20M....
C-209...
4-6 ... .
C-315.. .
- 118...
R-80 ....
J-60 ..
W-26....
C-443....
T-160....
H-386 ..
B-663....
0-250..
Y-8......
L-264 ..
S-116....
S-453..
S-103....
S-136..
R-45. ...
F-202....
A-103 ....
A-88....
A-47 ...
B-646....
B-34 ....
B- 2.....
B-198 ...I
B-671....
G.-9.....
H-283....
R-129 .
R-209.. .
L-237....
L-274 ...
L-256....
B-207....
L-54.....
H-401....
1.-t......
P-192....I


Residence.

No address.
Gorgona.
Empire.
Gatun.
Tabernilla.
Paraiso,
Gatun.
Gatun.
Gatun.
Culebra.
Gatun.
Culebra.
Culebra.
Culebra.
Empire.
No address.
Bas Obispo.
Gorgona.
Gatun.
Paraiso.
No address.
Paraiso.
Corozal.
Bas Obispo.
Las Cascadas.
Cristobal.
No address.
No address.
No address.
No address.
No address.
Cristobal.
San Pablo.
GorgTona.
No address.
Bas Obispo.
No address.
San Pablo.
San Pablo.
Balboa.
Tabernilla.
Culebra.
Bas Obispo.
Cristobal.
Cnstobal.
Cristobal.
Cristobal.
Cristobal.
No address.
Empire.
Ancon.
Cristobal.
Cristobal.
No address.
Cristobal.
Cristobal.
No address.
Cristobal.
No address.
No address.
Cristobal.
Cristobal.
No address.
Criatobal.
No address,
Bas Obispo.
Cristobal.
Cristobal.
Cristobal.
Culebra.








October 27, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.

Ativites ofat the Young Men's Christlan As-
soetation.
REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER.
Total membership...... ....................... 1.104
Total number of bowling games ............... 4042
Number different tournaments, billiard, pool.
chess, etc ..................................... 5
Total number of tournament players .......... 52
Total number of pool and billiard games ...... 13.715
Total income from soda fountains ............ $1.822.74
Number different men using gymnasiums .... 119
Total attendance of men using gymnasiums.. 470
Number enrolled in chess aud checker clubs.. 39
Number enrolled in glee clubs................. 9
Number enrolled in dramatic and minstrel
clubs ........... ...... .............. ....... 10
Number enrolled in camera clubs ............. 74
Number enrolled in Bible clubs................ 5
Number of members of library ................ 56.3
Total number of books withdrawn ....... .... 1.349
Number of Sunday meetings.................. I
Attendance................................ 275
Number of imported entertainments .......... 8
Attendance................................ 1.726
Number of local entertainments .............. 4
Attendance....... ......................... 755
Number of functionsoutside association man-
agement ..................................... 9
Attendance................................ 1.010
Number of afternoons for women............. 25
Attendance....................... ........ 250
Number evening functions to which women
were invited........... ..................... 14
Attendance ........ .................... 265
Different men on committees.................. 14
Number of men called on in hospitals ......... 158
Number of letters written at public tables..... 4.885
Total attendance at clubhouses ...... ......... 47.630
Average attendance per day.................. 1.579
BOYS'DEPARTMENT (AGES 10-16I).
Number of members.................... ...... 53
Number of afternoons open to boys ........... 66
Attendance (average per afternoon I............ 36
Total attendance in systematic gymnasium
work ......................................... 553
Outings and other special features ............. 2
CULEBRA.
At a meeting of the chess club held Friday evening.
October 22, Mr. C. R Harrington was elected presi-
dent. A "knockout" chess tournament open to all
players, will be started Thursday evening. October
28. The pairing for the first round will be made nt 8
p. m. All games are to be played before November I.
when the pairing for the second round will take
place. Remaining rounds follow at intervalsof three
days The handball court is again being used and
tournaments will soon be started. Fifteen men at-
tended the opening session of the Bible class last
Wednesday evening. All men who are interested
are cordially invited toattend. A smoker for mem-
hers will be held at the V. M. C. A.. Friday evening
October 29. Many novel features will be produced
The bowling tournament games rolled at Culebrn on
Thursday evening of last week resulted as follows;
Culetra. First. Second. Third. Total.
Imaster............. 193 152 202 547
Hayes............. 155 141 178 474
SWinters ............ 151 142 154 447
Cohen............. 176 141 139 456
Dougherty ......... 165 157 184 506
Total ..... ........ 840 733 857 2.430
Empire.
Brown .............. 166 146 153 465
Potter................ 175 155 170 500
Gorham........... 189 173 145 507
Hinckley .......... 167 156 165 488
Huson.............. 168 175 160 503

Total .............. 865 805 793 2463
EMPfRE.
A duck piu contest between a team from the Dis-
bursing Office and a team from the Post-office, on
Monday evening. October 18. resulted in a victory for
the Post-office team, with the following score*
Disburing Office. Past-office
itirt game .................. 444 414
Second ame ................ 4L3 433
Third game ................. 428 496
The line-up for the two teams was as follows- Dis-
bursing Office--Woods (captain). Huson, Porter.
Akersuand Pinharty. Post-office--orham (captain).
Herrings Shsnghnessey, Roggherro and Gustavesou.
The oPost-office team rolled the highest five-man score
ever rolled in the Zone. the previous high score being
478, made by Cristobal. A return game was played on
Tuesday evening, October 26.
S Ada gymnasium class, numbering eight men, was
organized for night men on Monday night. October


18. This class will meet every Monday and Friday
from 2 until 4 p. m.
GORGONA.
The Cristobal indoor baseball team played the GorT
Eona team at Gorgona last Srturday night, resulting
in a victory for Gorgona by a score of 43 to 18 The
line-up was as follows: Cristobal-McSparren Tally.
Russell. Humphrey. Swallenburg Tuttle, and Sims
Gorgona-Buchanan. King Cuff Ridge Weiser. Har
prison. and Colberson.
The monthly praise service will be held next Sun.
day evening. October 31. with Judge Thomas E.
Brown. Jr. of Cristobal as the speaker. Special music
will be provided.
The tournament bowling games between Cristobal
and Gorgona which were scheduled for last Saturday
night were postponed and will be rolled at a later
dale.
CRISTOBAL.
Last Saturday, the membersof the boys department
enjoyed 'hike" to. and a swim in. 'Slip in-Ba'
under the directionof Physical Director Whittbeck. A
new first class massage machine has been installed
in the barber shop. Mr. Olyphant has resigned as
librarian. His successor has not yet been named
An executive committee representing the Woman's
club. the public school, the Union church and the
Y. M. C. A.. will meet at the clubhouse in the near
future to arrange for a Christmas entertainment and
other festivities The Thanksgiving DOy bowling
tournament will be held at Cristobal this year F C
Freeman and F G Smith are a committee of two to
arrange for entries prizes. etc. It is desired to make
this year's tournament the greatest of its kind eter
held. Cristobal bowlers are enthusiastic and promise
a large number of entries
The Cristobal clubhouse has been extending its
courtesies for the past 30 days to the officers of the
United States cruiser Tacoma A visit to the war
vessel by the secretary and phy sical director resulted
in arranging a basketball game between the Cristo-
bal V. M C. A .anria team from the Tacoma ResulLs
will be announced lnter. Commander Niblack paid
the clubhouse a visit on Sunday afternoon The
membership of the association is steadily increasing
Physical Director Whiltbeck has arranged Lhe fol
lowing schedule for ryninasiiim work
Monday evening. basketball: Tuesday afternoon.
boys' gymnasium class. Tuesday evening men s
gymnasium class. Thursday afternoon. boys' gvm-
nasium class: Thursday evening, indoor baseball
Friday evening, men s gymnasium class Siturdlay
morning, "hike" and swim for the boys.

Stages of the Chanres.
Maximum height of Chagres River above mean sea
level for the week ended midnight Saturday Octo-
ber 23. 1909:


Height of low water
above sea-level. ft
Maximum height ab
mean sea-level feel
Sunday, Oct. 17....
Monday. Oct. 14 .
Tuesday. Oct. 19...
Wed-esday. Oct 20
Thursday. Oct 21
Friday. Oct 22 ...
Saturday. Oct. 23


STATIONS

- S c -

J






133 8 95 4 52 7 15 7 8 2 7.3
12 8 95.41 6 0 146 84 7
12 2 93.9 53 7 102 6 5.6
127.0 93 71 49.5 79 43 3.5
124 6 91 8 48 8 10 2 4 5 3.5


Auction Sale of Dairy Cows.
On Monday, November 15. 1909. at 10 a. m., there
will be sold at public sale at the Ancon Hospital
dairy. seven dairy cows. ranging in age front seven
to ten years. The dairy is located near the insane
asylum buildings in the rear of the hospital grounds.
The terms of the sale will be cash.
CaAS. F. MASON. Super'ntendent.
Ancon, C. Z October 19. 1909.

Supplies for Canal Work.
The following steamers arrived at the ports of Cris-
tobal, Colon. and Balboa during the week ended Oc-
tober 23. 1909. with supplies for the Isthmian Canal
Commission.
Sarstooa. October 19,from London.with )10 barrels
carbolic acid, for the manufacture of larvacide.
Colon,. October 20. from New York. with 38 tons
material, for handling plant. Pedro Miguel and
Miraflores: 71 tens wrought pipe. for stock. 3 reels
wire rope. for dredges. Gatin: and a miscellaneous
cargo aggregating 3,370 packages, weighing 350 tons.
fbanigarrs. October 21. from New Orleans, with 90


tons fire brick. 5.OXI1 pounds black grease, for stock.
540 sacks oats. for corral use 166 pieces bellow pine
piling for Gatun.
City o/ Paa October 20. from San Francisco. with
23 bales rubber sleeves for suction dredge Sandfpir.

Bidr for Excavntion In Cannal Prism.
Bids will be received at the office of the Purchasing
Agent on the Isthmu. Isthmian Canal Commission.
Culebra C Z up lo 2 p n.. November 10 1909. at
which time they will be opened in public, for six t61
sections of excavation in the Canal prism north of
Barbacoas bridge as follows
Section A Consisting of approximately 33.000 cu-
bic .ards of earlh
Section B Consisting of two 12) parcels of excava-
lion
I Containing approximately 70.000 cubic yards. of
which it is estimated that 70 per cent is soft rock and
30 per cent earth.
2. Conisiming of approximately 1.213 cubic yards of
earth
Section C Consisting of two 12) small parcels of
excavation-
1 Containing approximately 1 529 cubic yards of
earth
2 Containing approximately 1.102 cubic yards of
earth
Section D Consisting of approximately 9,092 cubic
yards of earth.
Section E Consisting of two 12) parcels of excava-
tion
I Containing approximately 39 950 cubic yards of
earth
2 Containing approximately 2.447 cubic )ards of
earth
Section P Consisting of five 15i small parcels of
excavation in the town of Bohio. containing in all
2 614 cubic yards of eirth
Tne location of these sections of excavation and all
information and specifications concerning the same.
ma,. be obtained at the office of the Division Engi-
neer Empire. C. Z
Work must be commenced before December 1.
1909. and completed before October 1. 1910.
Bids will be received for one or more sections and
nmut be accompanied by a deposit of 550 LT. S. cur-
rency which deposit will be returned the unouc
ce sful bidders A suitable bond or a deposit equi.
talent to percent of the amount bid. will be required
from the successful bidder, as a guaranty.lhat the
work will be satisfactorily performed said deposit or
bond to be returned on the satisfactory completion
of the work
Bidders will iubmtot a single unit price per cubic
yard for all excavation in each section. which price
will include ril the necea-ary clearing for the prose-
cution of the excavation
No bids will be received from any United Stales
Government emplose Propo-als will be received in
sealed enveloptis, marked.' Propos3ls for excavation
in the C'nal prism north of Barbacoas bridge." The
right is reserved to reject any or all bid'
R E WOOD.
.Acting Purchaarg Ament on Istihmus.

Misdirected Letters.
DrvnsioSN or Pors. CSTroMS AND REVENUES.
A.NcoN C. Z October 27. 1909.
The following insufficiently addressed letters.
originating in the United Sates and its possessions
have been received in the office of the Director of
Po~Ls and may be secured uDon request of the
addressee
Anthoney Frank McLean. Miss C F (cd
Bennick. F G. class. I
Bolsr. James Needham. Henry
Chadfield. Russell E. Newbold. Mr. and Mrs
Costa. John A G W K.
Co:yer. John J. Nichols. Frederick Chester
Decker Ed. Perry James E.
Gonzalez Simeon Round. Arthur B. (3)
.orsuck. Jacob Rufaiel. George
Graf Walter W. Sinders Mrs Mary
Gutierer Zoila Smith Frank
Jonesi.0 C. Smith. Albert O.
Kincaid. Mrs C 42d class Webster. William
Mantooth Anderron Winquist Chis
McGill. Peter Ipkg. Whitney. Geo. A.

LEGAL NOTICE.

United States of America. In the Circuit Court.
Canal Zone. I First Judicial Circuit.
A petition having been filed by the Collector of
Revenues for the escheat of the estate of Richard
Prince who died intestate at Balboa, on or about the
17th of November. 190'. leaving property to the value
of $18 25 U.S currency notice is hereby given to all
heirs, creditors, or other clatmantsof the said estate
toappear at the courthouse at Ancon on or before
the 10th day of December, 1909 for the purposeof fil-
ing their claims. F It. SIEraLLET .
Acting Circut Court Clerk.
Vessels that arrived at or departed from the port of
Balboa during the week ended October 22. were as
follows
Arrivals-October 19. Limnar. from south. October
20. Cil.y r" Para. from San Francisco. October 21.
Quito. fiom intermediate ports Departures-Octo-
ber 19 Ecuador for Guayaquil Ckhn-iui. for inter-
mediate ports and Ajsen. for south ports: October
17 Barraroula. for Ceqnral America.









THE CANAL RECORD


'ol. 1t., No 9.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

Cousituis-ary Slo-trekeeperr..
CRisroBAL C Z october 23 l0(r)
CLRaCi. t r NO It
TL .-/ Co' i. 'i- d-EfectclV the 25th iiitant Mr.
.i H J in-cn will i-ke chair' of tLhe Empire comnis.-
sir 4- -torek-eper JoiN BIRKE alflafiifr
.A .roi; e
Fti r Ni T WitLo*v .Su-is/te*iie 6'ce'r.
Csi'roaaL..C Z October .3. 19)
CiPrCi- No h9
T.- .i l, ,-l cFd-Iflecntle the 25th instant. Mr
R M M:i. nnii will -.kech.rge of the Culebra com.
iri -- .r ar .sturekeeper JOHN BURKE: ,t/liiagrr
Aprcated
Fi' Nt. T. ST "a'l.u .Sii'.1; it ir l'tL- t''

CRiaTOa iL C Z October 23. 1W'9
Cilet LAR NO 91"
7 '." ..'' ( ,,er./---.flectlne the lit proxim-. Mr
H P Slte.en, will take charge of the GC itun .cmmi.
sar .1az storekeeper JOHN BU13RKE. .1fa'iger
Arpr-,)ed
i i iENE T WIL-ON S'r. eLic ,1~ OrF er.
The hour- during which commiisariesare open are
a- isollows
Cristlobl and Culebri 3 m. to 12 It, p m 2 p. m.
to'" p ml
All other comrmisrnes AS i to I p m 3 p. m.
to. p. m
RcLail price= of cold storage proi-iions for the week
beginning LOctuber '3!
FRESH MEATS.

Mutton-Stewing ..... ........... ............per lb 7
-.houlder. ick intnmimed off
1 pound' and ocr i.. ... per lb 10
Entire forequarter not trim-
wned I 10 pounds and over... per lb 9
.iEg I" to lIl poundil .... .... ... per lb 19
Cutlet- ..... .. . ... .. per lb 2')
Short-cul chops .... ..........per lb 22
Lamb- Ste-ina ... .. ... ............. per Ib 7
Fntire Iorequarter neck Inrmmed
,'fl .. .. . .... .. .o er lb I0
Leg '6 to S poundsJ ....... .. per lb 27
Chops.... ..... .. .... per lb 29
Cutll s .. ...... . ... .. ... per lb 2Q
Veal- Stewing .. . ............... . er lb 11)
Shoulder for roasting Inot under
I Ib ...... . per )lb 1I
Ioin for roasting........ ......... per lb 19
Chop ...... ... .... .... ... . .prr lb 22
Cullets ..... .. ... . .. .........per lb 26
Pork cu s ... .. ....... ... ... ....... r b 2
Beef- lue.l .......................... per lb
Soup ... . .. ....... ..Der lb 6
Ste ... ....... ...... ... . per lb Itn
Corned .. ............... per lb 1) 14. 16
Chuck roast ...... per lb 14
POI rOit ..... ........ ............ .. Der lb lb
Rib-roast. second cut Iiol under
31 poundal ........ .. .... per Ib 19
Rio-roiE;t. first cut lnot under 3
pounds ........... ... per lb 21
Sirloin roast ....... ... .... .. .... per lb 22
Rump roast ... ..... ............per b 22
Porterhouse roasl .. .......... .. per Ib 2?
Steak Chuck.................. per lb 15
Round ....... ... per Ih lo
Rib .... ..... ... ..... .....per lb 21
Sirloin .... ... ....... ........ er b 22
Porterhouse. .... ............ Ter lb 22
Rum p............. ........... .....per lb 22
Tenderloin ......................per Ib 27
MISCELLANEOUS.
Livers-Beef ...... ............... ............ .....per lb IHL
Calf ..... ......... ................ each 65
Shad roes ..... ......... ..............pa r 4,)
Sausage-Pork .. ...... .... ..............per lb 17
Bolorgna ....... .......... per Ib I1
rankiurle ...... .... ... ...per Ib 17
Leberwrurst. .................. per lb 17
Sweet bre.d-.'eal .. ........... .... . er lb '11
Sweet bread-Beef. ......... ...... ..... per lb 30
Oysters... .. ..... ..... ..... ... ...keg 90
Eggs fresh .. ...................... dozen 34
Bluefish ....... .. ...... .......... ...perb 15
POULTrR AND GAME.
Chickens-Fancy Roasting laige each 1 5
medium.. each 1 30
Fowls .... .. . .. each 0. a. 93 1 64 I 15
Ducks. tailtted ..... ........ .......... each I 30
B il medium weight .......... ... each 90
Broilers .... ............................ each "5
rurkeys .......... .... ............... ....... per lb si
Squabs ............................... ... ........ each 35
Capons ............ ............... each 2 5n
Geese fatted aho.t I0 pounds .. .....each 2 00
12 pounds ..... ....... each 2 30
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.
Bacon-Breakfast. whole piece ............ per lb 27
Brcnki.ael sliced...... ............. per lb 29
Ham-Sugar-cured sliced .................. per lb 25
One-half for boiling..................per lb 21
Westph-ia. .............. .......per b 45
Hocks .. ...... .. ......... per Ib IB
Sugar cured. ........ ..... ...... per lb 0


Pri e.
Beef salt. Fam ily....................... ......... per Ib 10
Pork silt ...... ... ................ ........... per b 15
Ham boiled ......... ........... ............... per Ib 28
Ox tone ues .. ...............................each 1 00
Pigs' feet ... ..... ......... .......................per lb 8
longues .... .................... .... per Ib 16
DAIRY PRODUCTS.
Butter-Prints. prime quality ...........per Ib 42
Cheese--Roquefort .............. ...... per Ib 45
Philadelphia Cream ............. .... each 20
Voung America........... ............per Ib 22
Swiss ............. .....................per lb 31
Fdam ....................... .... .......each 1.05
Camembert ............. ........ ner lb 28
Neulchntel.................. ............each 6
Gouda...... ... ...... .............. per lb 34
Parm-san............... .. ...........bottle 20
French cheese in tins-Camembert. Brie.
Neufchatel .......... ..........-lb tin 20
Milk. Bnarcliff .......... .... .... ......bottle v'25
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.
Celery .. ..... ... ......... ........ .... .......per hd 10
Lettuce.. .... .. ..... .......... ......... per lb 15
Potatoes. white ....... ..... ... ... .. ....per Ih 3%
sw eet .. .................. .........per lb 21K
Onion. .... ....................................per lb 3
SquIsh Hubbard ........ ................per Ib 5
Y m s .... ... ...... .. ........ .. .. .......... per lb 3%
Turnips.... ..... ......... ..... .. ...per Ib 3%
Carrou ......... ................. .... per lb 4
BeetL .... ............... .. ... ... .......... per Ib 5
Cadliflo-er. .. ................... ..... per lb I2
Cucumbers ........... ......... .... per lb 6
Tomatoes ..... ............ ... ... per Ib 7
Lemons............................ ..... ... dozen 24
Grapes . ......... .... .. per lb 19
Limes.. ........ ........... ..... per 100 80)
'atermelons ...... ..... .. .......... each 45
Peacihea .. ... ........ ... ..... ....per lb 1?
Cantaloupes ........ ...................e...ach 10
Cabbage ....... ........... ........ ... ... .. per lb 4
Apples. .. . .. .................. per lb 5
Oranges ..... ..... .............. ............ dozen 12
Grapefruit ........ .......................... each 4
Plum .... ........... ... .......... per lb 12
Pears .... .. . .......... ..... ..... per Ib If

*Indic.tes reduction from last list
"'lnd1,c.te centsallowed for return of bottle
Intdicaites advance on last li't
I'Sld onl from Commissaries no orders taken for
delivery
'Sold onl. from Cold Storage and not from Com-
mi zm.ne'
Rainftill, October I to 23, 1909, inclusive.
I MIDNIGHT TO MrDNIGRT I

a.


SrATIONs. :t




flatiatec Dnrioln-
Cristobnl .... ..... ........ 6 0 S 1; 93
Brazos Brook .... ...... ... . 35 1 I f ,
G-itun. .. ....... ... ....... 2 16 1 12 50
Bohio ... .......... 2.89 1 II 40
Ct e2. Dr if.4 -
T-, bern illa ................. 3.23 10 1391
San P blo ... ..... .. . .... 325 10 13 7
f.orgtona .... ......... .. ...... 365 23 11.01
Gam bo ... .......... .... .. .. 3 32 I 14 48
Em Dire ..... ......... .. .... 55 I .i 51
Camscho .... ....... ........ 3 3 I 1? :'
Culebr- .. ................ .. . 6 15 15 6'
rli. .i~ D.i n on--
RioGrande......... ....... .. 3 07" 1. 15 s
Pedro Miguel ................... 3 82 6 15 .4
Balboa ..... .. ......... 1 43 5 9.39
Ancon ... ......... .... 1 25 I 6 92
lir.ifltotes.. .. .......... 4..0 .1 162
Ati'llil s 4 2 3 15 h2-
Porto Bello no 5p in Oct 31 .. I 6~ 6 8 6
Nombre ae Dios LOc I Io 16). 3 33 6 9 91
L 'ppep 7ibagres-
El V3gia ....... .. .......... 244 5 15 12
Alha.uela.. .................... I E6 N1 1658

Tide Table.
The followiDng table shows theltne of high and low
tides at Pmamani for the week ending November 3.
190r' I7th mendun time

DATE Low High Low High. Low

AM ,1 M. A A P B. P. M
i. 31... ..... ...i 910 3.11 9.21

Occ 3 4.11 I0C 31 4 40 10.51
Oct 31 4 55 11 16 5.23 11.37
P. M
No .. .. 540 1202 6.10 .
Nov 2 .. 12 2 625 12.49 6 5
Nov 3 I 15 7 14 1.40 7 51

The variation of high and low tide al Cristobal is so
slight tha.i a tide 'able for the AUtl aic; tide is nq,
necessary.


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company. of the Hamburg-American
Line. and of the United Pruit Company's Line. the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:
NEW YORE TO COLON.
Panama................P. R.R.Thursdayv..... Oct. 21
Prinz Aug Wilhelm ..H -A...Saturday.......Oct. 23
Allianca. .............P. R. R.Thursday......Oct. 28
Thames.... ..........R.-M...Saturday......Oct. 30
Colon ............... P. R. R.Thursday......Nov. 4
Prinz Joachim.... ... H.-A.. Saturday......Nov. 6
Ad'ance............... P R R.Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Atrato ...............R.-M...Saturday.......Nov. 13
Panama . ....... P. R R.Monday.......Nov. 15
Alliance .. ..... P. R R.Saturday......Nov. 20
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm ..H.-A.. Saturday ......Nov. 20
Colon...................P R. R Saturday...... Nov. 27
Tagus .... .......... R.-M.. Saturday...... Nov. 27
Advance ..... ....... P. R R.Thursday......Dec. 2
Prinz Joachim ........H.-A...Saturday.......Dec. 4
Panama............. P.R R.Thursday... Dec. 9
Oruiba ............ R..M...Saturd y .......Dec. 11
Allianca...............P. R. R Tuesday........Dec. 14
Prinz Aug Wilhelm ..H. A ..Saturday.......Dec. 18
Colon ....... ........P R R Tuesday.......Dec. 21
Magdnlena ............R -M ..Saturday......Dec. 25
Advance ............. P.R. R Monday .......Dec. 27
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Cristobal
should apply in advance of arrival at the Customs
office, room S. building No. I Cristobal for customs
line permits which are necessary to obtain admit-
tance beyond waiting room on pier 11.
All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON To NEW YORK.
Panama ...............P. R. R.Tuesday....... Nov. 2
Atrato........ .... R .M .Wednesday....Nov. 3
Allianca. ..............P. R. R Monday.......Nov. B
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm ..H A .Tuesda& ......Nov. 9
Colon. ............... P.R. R.Tuesday....... Nov. 16
Tagus ............... .R.-M... Wednesday... Nov. '17
Advance ..... ........ P. R. R.Sunday....... Nov. 21
Prinz Joachim......... H -A Tuesday ......Nov. 23
Panama..............P. R. R.Saturday......Nov. 27
Oruib; ........ ..... R .M ..Wednesday ..Dec 1
Allnnca .... ...... P R R Thursday. ....Dec. 2
Prinz Aug Wilhelm H A...Tuesday ......Dec. 7
Colon.................. P. R. R.Thursday......Dec. 9
Advance .......... P R R Tuesday...... Dec. 14
Migdnlenai ........ R M...Wednesday...Dec. 15
Panama.............. .P R. R.Tuesday.......Dec. 21
Prinz joachim... H -A .Tuesday.......Dec. 21
Alliance ... .......... P. R. R.Sunday .......Dec. 26
Clyde. ... .... .....R -M Wednesday....Dec. 29
A forlnightly service of the steamers Ancon and
Cristobal will be maintained as nearly as possible but
changes from the schedule may be found necessary.
The following is the schedule.
NLEt YORE TO CRISTOBAL
Ancon ............ .P R. R.Sundsay........Oct. 24
Cristobal...............P. R. R Wednesday....Nov. 3
Ancon. ............. P R R Wednesday....Nov. 17
Cristobal........... .P R. R.Wednesday .... Dec. 2
Ancon...... .......... P. R. R Wednesday.... Dec. 15
CRISTOBAL TO NE'W YORE.
Ancon ................P R.R .................Nov. &
Cristobal.............. P.R. R.1ednesday.. .Nov. 17
Ancon... .............. P. R R .Wednesday ...Dec. 1
Cristobal.............. P R R Wednesday....Dec. 15
Ancon. ............. P.R R Wednesday ..Dec. 29
"Ancon will probably sail for New York during the
first week in November.
NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Atenas. ...............U F C .Saturday......Ocl. 23
Turrialba............. U PC Saturday......Oct. 30
Abangarez. ........... L P.C .Saturday...... Nov. 6
Atenas................. .PF C..Saturday...... Nov. 13
Turrialba .. .... F.C..Saturday......Nov. 20
Abangarez .. ..... U FC..Saturday......Nov. 27
COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.
Atenas....... ...... U.F.C. Tuesday....... Nov. 2
Turrialba...... .......U P C..Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Abangarez.............I.FP.C..Tuesday ......Nov. 16
Atenas ............. U.P.C Tuesday......Nov. 23
Turrialba............ U.F.C. Tuesday ......Nov. 30
Abangarez ..........U.F.C..Tuesday.......Dec. 7
COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.
Thames ..... ........ R.-M. .Tuesday ......Nov. 9
Sailings of the French line (Cie. Gtarale Trans-
allantique) for Venezuelan ports. Martinique and
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows' Mescrian for New Orleans, via Kingston. Ja..
on or about October 31.
The steamers David of the National ?Navigation
Company. and the 7aboga of the Pacific Steam Navi-
gation Company. leave Panama. for David, province
or Chiriqui and intermediate points, the first and
third weeks of each month.














CANAL


RECORD


Volume III.


ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1909. No. 10.


The Canal Record
a-lished weekly under the authority and supervision
of the Istkhman Canal Commission.

The Canal Record is issued.free of charge one copy
each, toall emtlojes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Comtany whose names are on the gVod roll.
Extra copies and tac numbers can be obtained ]rom
I. he s stands of the Panama Radpead Coupany for
dw cents each.

Address all Communications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Aneon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.
No command nation. eithe or frubl eatzon or request-
ins information, wril receive attention unless signed
iath th full name and address al the wrier.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Heaviest Rainfall in Culebra Cut.
The rainfall in Culebra Cut for the month
of October was the heaviest since work was
begun there by the Americans in May, 1904.
At Empire 21.13 inches fell. and the previ-
ous high record for this station was that for
November, 1906, when 21.05 inches were
registered. The heaviest showers occurred
in the afternoon between 1 and 5 o'clock,
I at a time when they caused most inconven-
ience. On October 1, one of the heaviest
showers ever recorded at Empire occurred
between noonand 5 o'clock, when 4.52inches
fell. In the afternoon of October 6 a shower
of 2.60 inches was recorded at Empire, and
the record for the week at that point was
9.39 inches. Between 3 and 5 o'clock in the
afternoon of October 15 the ganges at Em-
pire registered 1.91, and at Culebra 2.79
inches,
Notwithstanding the unequaled rainfall,
..the excavation in Culebra Cut in October
was greater than that of September, accord-
ing to car measurement, and it is believed
the cross section measurement will show an
increase in the yardage.
Building Gatun Locks.
The greatest amount of concrete laid in a
week at Gatun Locks was placed during the
week ending October 30, when 7,988 cubic
yards were added to the 33,248 cubic yards
that had been placed up to the close of work
on October 23. The record of October 24,
1,304 cubic yards, was equaled on October
28. The record of concrete laid to October
is as follows:
Cubic Yards.
August (seven days) ................... 1.298
September (26 days) ................... 11.934
'October to9 (nintdays).............. 6.014
getotber 1 to 16 (seven days)........... 6,692
.:..Octber 17 to 23 (seven days).......... 7310

... ................... ............ 41.236
average for the week ending Oc-


tober 30, was 1,141 cubic yards, and the
record by days follows:
Cub?,- V)'d.
October 4 ........ .... ............ 1 304
October 25 ..... ........ ..........
October ?6.. ......... .. . .. .... 1 164
October -7 ........ ......... ... ... 1 121-
October 2 ............................ 1 304
October 29 ......... ........... ..... 1 I 30)
October 30 ....... ... . ... 952
The work is constantly retarded by the
failure of the unloading cableways to deliver
rock over the storage bins with sufficient
rapidity to charge the cars as they pass un-
der the storage piles. A gang of laborers
has been set at work shoveling the rock
from the storage piles to the charging valves,
but it is not possible to fill the cars quickly
enough to keep them moving at their full
speed. During the week 23 of the auto-
matic cars between the storage piles and ce-
ment shed and the mixing plant were in
operation. Representatives of the contractor
who is furnishing the steel for the wall
forms, have arrived on the Isthmus and the
work of erecting the towers has been begun.

Concrete Work at Pedro Miiguel Locks.
In the week ending October 30, the con-
crete laid in Pedro Miguel Locks amounted
to 2,991 '4 cubic yards, the greatest amount
laid in any week since the beginning of the
work on September 1. The highest record
yet made was that of October 30, when 563
cubic yards were laid. This work is still
being done with the temporary) mixing
plant. The record for the week is appended:
Cufc Faordi
Prior to October 24 ......... ....... 7 o88
October 24 .............. ........ ... 85
October .5. ......... .... .... ..... .. 35
October 26. ............. ..... ... 469;,
October ? ....... ... ..... . i4 V"
October 28 ... .... ............ ...... .'
October 29 ................. ........ .... 4 3
'October 30 ...................... ...... 5. 63
Total............. ......... ..... ....t. 10 79!.
Slide on Enmpire-Paraiso Highway.
The material in part of the old French and
American dump back of Gold Hill has settled
in some places as much as fifteen feet. The
slide is near the old French powder house,
and involves the abandoned French building,
formerly used as a powder house by the
Americans. The located line of the high-
way from Empire to Paraiso, now under con-
struction, runs across this dump, and the
line will be changed for a distance of eight
hundred feet by moving it westward toward
Gold Hill. _____
Camacho Reservoir Full.
The heavy rains in Empire and vicinity
during October have filled Caruacho Reser-
voir, and water is now flowing over the
spillway, the capacity of 295,867,000 gallons
having been reached. In order toanticipate
any shortage in the supply of water for the
territory served from this reservoir it is pro-
posed to put flash boards in the spillway and


thus raise the level of the water an addi-
tional foot. Allowing for a daily consump-
tion of 1,701)1,000 gallons (exclusive of what
is pumped from Camacho River below the
reservoir, which amounts to 700,000 gallons
per day, until the middle of March, and from
that time until the end of the dry season
gradually decreases to about 150.000 gallons
per day i the water now stored in the reser-
voir would lat until June 5, without addi-
tional rainfall. The rainy season usually
does not end until about the first of January,
and begins again in April or May. The
water at present stored therefore seems am-
ple to cover the needs of the coming dry
season.
Escavnlion and Clearing it Tnbernilla.
Excavation of the 364.472 cubic yards of
material, to be taken out of the Canal prism
at Tabernilla on the east bank of the Chagres
Ruer, will be begun as soon as the track
now being laid from the shop tracks at Tab-
ernilla into the section to be excavated is
completed. A steam shovel from the work
at Caimito will be used for beginning the
digging, but a small part of it will be done
by hand. The first cut will be made along
the channel excavated b\ the French for
their canal. Later on a second shovel will
be cut in. Clearing under the contract re-
cently let has been begun on the 1,000 foot
channel from Tabernilla north.
New Connmi.-sion Buildings.
Plans have been approved for a recreation
ball at Porto Bello, to be located near the
dispensary. It will be a two-story frame
building, 43 feet wide and 69 feet long, with
a veranda on both floors extending along
either side and across one of the ends. An
assembly hall, into which a stage will be
built for use when dramatic and other en-
tertainments are given, will be on the sec-
ond floor, together with a ladies' dressing
room. On the first floor there will be a
reading room, pool and billiard room, and
a men's toilet.
Plans are being prepared for a new com-
missary at Porto Bello. It will be a one-
story frame building, 30 feet wide and 65
feet long, will be located on the beach near
the old tug landing, and will contain a sales-
room 30 feet long, a storeroom, and a cold
storage department with an overhead icing.
The commissary facilities at Porto Bello at
present are limited to a small space beneath
the Commission hotel.
Plans for a commissar% at Corozal are also
under consideration. They call for a one-
story frame building. 40 feet wide and 75
feet long, with a salesroom 45 feet long.
The remainder of the space will be used as
a storeroom, in one part of which an ice box
will be installed. An unloading platform
will extend along one side of the building.
The exact location has not yet been deter-
mined upon, but the building will be so








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. IlL, No. 10.


NOTES OF PROGRESS.
Contt'ned J


placed that a spur can easily be run to it
from the railroad track.
Bids for the new V. M. C. A. building at
Gatun were opened at the office of the Con-
structing Quartermaster at Culebra on Mon-
day, October 25. Awarding the contract is
still under consideration.
The new fire station at Porto Bello, which
was erected under the contract plan, is nearly
completed.

Orders for Native Lumber Cancelled.
The trial orders for native lumber, aggre-
gating 148,043 feet B. M., to be paid for at
the rate of 140 per 1,000 feet B. M., placed
with the Bayano Lumber Company sometime
ago, have been cancelled. Up to the time
of making the cancellation of the orders, the
company had furnished only 14,300 feet.
Some of this lumber was shipped to the Em-
pire shops, and the remainder to the Gor-
gona shops where the hardest grades were
tested and found fairly satisfactory. The
softer varieties, however, were attacked by
a species of wood worm, and became utterly
valueless in a very short time. so that on the
whole the lumber could not be used profit-
ably.
Lumber Shipments.
The elle// Sco!/and is due at the port of
Balboa on or about November 5, with a cargo
of about 3,500,000 feet of Douglas fir lum-
ber. Another steamer, the .Sralhgj/qe, is due
at the same place later in the month with
about 2,500,000 feet. On July 1 of this year
about 18, 500,000 feet of lumber of all kinds,
both for stock and for sepcial uses, remained
to be delivered. Since that date, about one-
half of the amount has been received. Bids
have been opened and contracts awarded on
all stock orders, and but one special requi-
sition remains on which bids have not been
opened.
Triangulation %uisrvey.
A reconnaissance for stations in the tri-
angulation survey of the Canal Zone was be-
gun in September, and positions have been
located from Panama to Gorgona. At pres-
ent the organization on the survey consists
of two locating parties of ten men each,
which are clearing and erecting stations,
and two observing parties to follow the lo-
cating parties and do the necessary) in-
strumental work. The precise methods of
the United States Coast and Geodetic Sur-
vey, and those used on similar work are be-
ing followed.
Henllh Condilhiou- on t paper Anzorn..
The Panama Star arn! /',,',!/ of October
29 published a cablegram from Berlin in
which it is stated that the German govern.
ment has warned itscitizensof the unbealth-
fulness of the Amazon region, to which some
of the European laborers engaged on the
Canal work have been emigrating. The ca-
blegram follows:
"BERI.IN, October 27.-The .Vor,/Jdea/, he,
commenting on the publication at Hamburg.
of a statement that the Foreign Minister
bad granted permission to German workmen
to enter the employ of the American cornm-
pany engaged in building a railroad in the
upper Amazon, says it is totally untrue.


Not only has the Foreign Minister failed to
encourage any such movement but he has
taken occasion to warn Germans against the
unhealthfulness of the country in which the
railway in being constructed."

Trinidad Ridge Explorations.
The work of making borings along the
westerly ridge of the Trinidad River basin,
in order to determine the nature of the ma-
terial in the saddles, is almost completed,
and the report is being compiled. This
ridge will form the west shore of Gatun
Lake. The explorations have been made by
means of diamond drill borings.

Precautions Against Lightning.
A committee has been appointed to report
on the cost and practicability of installing
lightning arresters on telephone and elec-
tric light wires, in order to prevent a recur-
rence of accidents such as that which re-
sulted in the death of a laborer at signal
tower "E" in Culebra Cut on October 15.
After the accident referred to, on recom-
mendation of the Division Engineer of the
Central Division, the Department of Sanita-
tion was directed to compile rules for the
resuscitation of persons struck by lightning
and have them printed in English, French,
and Spanish and posted at conspicuous
places along the line of the Canal. The re-
commendation states:
During the past three summers, a number of men,
(over a dozen in all i hae been struck by lightning
and killed or rendered unconscious 11 is my im-
pression that some of the men who died might have
been revved and saved had those who were present
.t the time been familiar with the proper means of
rcruscitating pers -nS injured by lightning I find a
very general opinion among our employes that there
is nri use doing anything for a man injured by light-
ning except Ltaking him to the nearest hospital if he
still apLeirs to be living

Esperiments with Eucalyptus Pile, and Lum-
ber.
The Bureau of Forestry of the Department
of Agriculture in a letterof recent dateasked
the Commission to use some eucalyptus piles
and lumber on the Canal work for the pur-
pose of ascertaining the value of this wood
under conditions such as exist in Panama.
The Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer
replied that a small shipment of such piles
and lumber will be ordered provided the
cost delivered on the Isthmus is not pro-
hibitiv'e. The purpose of the Bureau of For-
estry is stated as follows:
In its work on the western coast the forest service
is now undertaking practical espenments with sev-
eral vaneties of eucalyptus. These experiments are
primirinl for the purpose of determining its compar-
ative valuee with other species such as Douglas fir,
yellow pine. white oak. tanbark oak etc.. for use as
piling. posts, crossurms insulator pins. construction
work etc and hase br-n confined so far to the State
of California
Az eucalyptus will undoubtedly be in the market in
considerable quantities within a comparatively few
years, the service is desirous of coenrng a rather
wide field in its preliminary investigations and ex-
periments with this wood Twoquestions of interest
on which information is desired from a region with
climatic conditions such as obtain in the Canal Zone
are
f i The action of teredo in salt water on eucalyptus
piling.
J21 Its resistance to the attacks of ants when used
for construction lumber
Concerning the first question the following informi-
tion is of interest
'The SaLie Board of tHarbor Commissioners of San
Frincisco recently withdrew four eucalyptus piles
which had been exposed to the attacks of marine
borers for about ten years In no casehad the borers
penetrated the heartwood and the piles appeared to


be good for an additional service of ten years. As a
result of this demonstration the State Board of Har-
bor Commissioners is installing number of eucalyp-
tus piles in the water front of San Francisco."
So far as the ant attacks areconcerned. the service
believes, on account of its very great density and its
constituent oils. this wood will offer much more re-
sistance than those woods now commonly used for
construction in the Canal Zone.

Money in Scrap Material.
A statement of scrap material shipped to
the United States between January 1 and
October 21, 1909, follows:
FRENCH SCRAP IRON.
Cristobal. August 8. 650 400 pounds, at $13.80 per
gross ton. 4 006 93
A Ianra, August 11. eight 10-ton boilers, 105.900
pounds, at $24.26 per net ton. $1.284 57 eleven 4X-ton
boilers 93 600 pounds. at $20 70 per long ton. $867.47:
five .3-ton car bodies. 10 ions crane parts. 65 tons scrap
iron 180 000 pounds, at 60 cents per hundredweight
(Weight approximate. Returns not yet received.)
Crislobal. August 26. 428.850 pounds, at $13.76 per
gross ton. $52.634.78
Panama, August 28, 665,350 pounds. at $0.935 per
hundredweight, $6.221.02
.4 nfci, September 15, 1.176.(0} pounds, at $14.52 per
gross ton. $7.623
Ancon. October 10, 344.000 pounds (no returns as
yet )
Crslobal October 21. 1.003.700 pounds (no returns
as yet )
Total shipped to date. 4.652,800 pounds
Total received for French scrap iron. $22,637.77.
SCRAP SC R EENTNG.
.4/Aliaca February 25, 103 509 pounds. $7.355.
Panama. July 6. 42,910 pounds. at $0 825 per pound.
$3 540. Total for scrap screening $10,895.
Co/on. October 2. 18.300 pounds (no returns as yet.)
Total shipped to dale 164.719 pounds.
SCRAP RUBBER. PACKING. BOSE. ETC.
bPaiaia. July 6. 28.436 pounds $846.28.

Rainfall, October 1 to 31, 1909, Inclusive.
IMIDNIcHT TO MIDNIGHT.)



STATIONS. An




Cristobal ....... .................. 6.03 8 19.13
Brazos Brook ...................... 2.35 1 14.75
Central Dniston-
BoG io......... ................... 2.89 1 15.60
Taberilla..... ................... 3 10 17.02
San Pablo .... ................. 3.25 lu 15.81
Gorgona.......................... 3.65 24 15.48
Gumbo ......................... 3.32 1 16.98
Empire ........................... 4.55 1 21.14
Camacho......................... 3.23 1 20.63
Culebra........................... 2.86 15 17.70
Pacific Di'iWon-
Rio Grande....................... 3.07 15 18.52
Pedro Miguel..................... 3.82 6 17.47
MSraflores....................... 4.20 3 17.30
Ancon ....... .................. 1 25 I 8.76
Balboa............................ 1.54 27 11.20
Atlantoi Coast-
Porto Bello...................... *1I.69 6 8.40
Nombre de Dios ............. .... t3.3S 6 15.29
Upper Chagrers-
El Vigia........ . ............... 2.44 5 20.70
Alhajuela........................ 1.86 18 19.21
October I to 29 f October I to 23.

Tide Table.
The following table shows the Lime of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending November 10.
1909 175th meridan time)!

DATE. High. Low. High. Low. High.
A.M. A. A. M. P. M. P. M.
Nov. 4...... ....... 2.12 8 10 238 851
Nov. 5 .............. 3.16 9.15 3.45 10.03
Nov. 6... ... ... . 4.29 1036 4.55 11.21
Nov. 7 .......... ... 5.43 11.59 6.05 ........
Nov. .... 12.30 648 1.06 7.03
Nov. 9.... 1 23 7.38 1 56 7.53 .
Nov. 10...... 2.07 8.1b 2.23 8.31 ........

The variation of high and low tide at Cristobal is so
slight that a tide 'able for the Atlantic side is not
necessary.









November 8, 1909. THE CANAL RECORD


COCOLI LAKE WATER SUPPLY.
Auxiliary to Rio Grande Reservoir-Character
of the Water and Means for Purification.
Plans are being perfected by which Cocoli
Lake, an artificial body of water formed by
the damming of the Cocoli River, at Mira-
flores Locks, will be used as an auxiliary
water supply for the Rio Grande reservoir.
A pumping station will be located near
the Miraflores power house, about 1,000 feet
2 from the lake, and will be equipped with
two horizontal turbine pumps, each operated
by a 65-h. p. motor, driven by current gen-
erated at the electric plant. The filtration
apparatus will be located in the basement of
the Miraflores power house, and will be a
duplicate of that in use at Ancon and Mount
Hope, with the exception that whereas the
plants at those places consist of three units
each, the one at Miraflores will have only
two units. Each filter will have a guaranteed
capacity of 500,000 gallons every 24 hours,
with a minimum pressure of 66 pounds, and
maximum pressureof 75 pounds, tothesquare
inch at the influent. The elevation of the
filtration plant will be about 20 feet above
sea level, and that of the pumping station
about 40 feet. Water will be carried to the
filters through a 16-inch suction pipe ex-
tending to and along the shore of the lake
to the point of its lowest elevation, where
the intake will extend out for a distance of
65 feet. Connection between the filters and
the Rio Grande 16-inch main, about 60 feet
west of the power house, will be by means
of a 10-inch pipe opening into a 16-inch pipe
at the point of junction.
Cocoli Lake has an area of about 100 acres,
and is estimated to contain at its normal
elevation of 35 feet above sea level, approx-
imately 57,176,000 cubic feet, or 428,820,000
gallons of water, which is about 50,000,000
gallons less than the capacity of the Rio
Grande reservoir. The lake is mostly shal-
low, and for the greater part of its length is
very narrow. The water wastes into the Rio
Grande above the 35-foot level, but during
the heavy rain of October 6, the lake filled
so rapidly that it reached a height of six
feet above normal. A portion of the bed of
the lake was formerly the site of an orchard
of tropical fruit trees, orange, mango, mar-
afnon, etc., and their tops still show above
the water.
An analysis of two samples of Cocoli Lake
water shows that it very closely resem-
bles that of the Brazos Brook reservoir in its
organic content, which is the determining
feature in the purification of the waters of
the Isthmus. Bacillus coli, was present in
10 cubic centimeters of each of the samples.
This is higher, than in the other reservoirs,
due to the new bed, on ground formerly
cultivated, and to the uncleaned watershed.
It, however, presents no difficulty in puri-
lying the water for use, and a system of sed-
imentation and filtration make it entirely
safe and desirable for domestic purposes.
On the watershed of the Cocoli River are
35 plantations, 25 houses, 9 shacks, II sheds,
a small amount of growing crops, and some
frnit trees. A trail from Miraflores and one
t from Balboa cross the watershed on their
: way to Arraijan. The village of Arraijan,
I'which is about one-quarter of a mile outside
f.. the Zone boundary line, does not drain
btolthe watershed, as there is a deep gulch
-i e it and the Zone line, which leads


southwest to the Pacific. A committee ap-
pointed to consider the matter has recom-
mended that all inhabitants be removed from
the watershed, and that the trail be aban-
doned as far as possible.
In view of the fact that the lock work at
Pedro Miguel and Miraflores will require
a large amount of water during the period
of construction, the project of establishing a
pumping plant at the Pedro Miguel River
was at one time considered. The use of
Cocoli Lake as a reserve water supply will
guarantee an adequate amount for all pur-
poses, and at all times. It will be used only
in case the supply of the Rio Grande reservoir
is becoming low.
Women's Clubs and Other Organizations.
The art collection belonging to the Canal
Zone Federation of Women's Clubs has been
placed in the hands of theart committee for
circulation among the federated clubs in the
Canal Zone. The collection includes37 re-
productions of paintings mounted and suit-
able for- exhibition, portfolios containing
photographs, examples of the world's twelve
great masterpieces with notes explanatory
and historical, copies of Italian, French,
English, Holland, German, and American
paintings, and books containing photographs
of ancient Greek and Italian renaissance
sculpture. Besides these there are five books
on art, including two valuable volumes on
American painters and paintings in the
Nineteenth Century. The collection will
be sent through the Zone for the use of the
clubs, and it is expected that it will be lent
to the public schools for exhibition purposes.
The business meetingof the Ancon Wom-
an's Club was held on Wednesday, Octo-
ber 20. The club gave a complimentary-
evening to friends of the members on Mon-
day, November 1, at Ancon hall. There
was an exhibit of pictures and informal
music. Mrs. Henry Montgomery and Mrs.
H. C. Bovay constituted the refreshment
committee, and Mrs. Charles W. Boxer had
charge of the music. A second entertainment
is planned for the near future. Owing to
Independence Day in Panama, the next
meeting of the club will be held on Thurs-
day, November 4.
Election of officers in the Pedro Miguel
Woman's Club held on Wednesday, October
13, resultedas follows: Mrs. George Brown,
president; Mrs. Mark White, vice-president;
Mrs. E. L. Brown, secretary; Mrs. W. E.
Smith, treasurer. These officers are elected
for six months. At the business meetings
the members work on articles for the pro-
jected bazaar. The social meeting on Wed-
nesday, October 20, was held at the home
of the president.
The meetings of the Paraiso Woman's
Club are well attended and the interest of
members sustained. The club gave a Hal-
lowe'en dance at the lodge hall on October
30. Favors of appropriate character were
distributed. The Las Cascadas orchestra
furnished the music.
Preparations are being made by the Pa-
raiso District of the Canal Zone Red Cross
for a dance to be given at the lodge hall on
Thanksgiving Eve. Tickets for men will be
sold at $1, and for ladies at 50 cents. The
music has been engaged.
The Pacific Social Club of Paraiso holds
a dancing class every Monday night. A


dramatic club is projected. The club will
give its regular dance on Saturday evening,
November 6.
The Palm Club of Las Cascadas gave its
regular dance on Saturday, November 30.
The Gatun children's library is closed,
owing to the removal of the books from the
schoolhouse to the Commission chapel. As
soon as the necessary shelves are in place
the books will be circulated as heretofore on
two days in the week, a member of the
woman's club being in attendance.
An Irlmhmian Society.
THE CANAL RrE)RD
Mr. Seward, in your issue of October 6,
has written a letter which I doubt not meets
with commendation by most of the workers
on the Canal. I have thought for a long
time that the workers should organize into
some such society as he suggests, and be-
lieve were the matter brought more forcibly
to the attention of all that it would not be
difficult to perfect an organization immedi-
ately. Surely the work is of sufficient mag-
nitude for all of us to feel proud that we
can participate in it, and if we are proud of
the fact, what more fitting tribute to the
work than to organize an Isthbmian Society,
which shall stand for all future time, so far
as we personally are concerned. A society
of this kind will prove interesting to all of
us after the work is completed. My sug-
gestion is that all shall be eligible who
served more than one year prior to January
1, 1907, and more than two years subsequent
to that time. We need not have any more
expense attached to the society than that
necessary for such events as shall be decided
upon.
Why not call a future meeting at one of
the clubhouses, to which those who are in-
terested will go with individual ideas as to
what would best constitute such a society,
and then organize? If you are interested in
this matter, drop a card to Mr. Freeman,
general secretary of the Y. M. C. A., Cule-
bra, and he will arrange for a meeting and
ample notice of same through THE CANAL
RECORD. WM. F. BENNYHOFF.
Cristobal, C. Z., October 23, 1909.
ii.'sintg Men.
Any one having information as to the
whereabouts of one Thomas E. Evans, sup-
posed to be on the Isthmus, is requested to
communicate with the Assistant to the
Chairman, Culebra.
Any one who knows the present address of
George Hiller, who worked as a steam shovel
fireman in the Pacific Division up to six
weeks ago, is requested to communicate with
Wm. H. Gilson of Tabernilla, C. Z.
. The Masonic club, Empire, held its semi-
annual election of officers on Wednesday
evening, October 20. The following were
chosen: Rev. William A. Decker, president:
Herbert Pierson, vice-president; M. Van
Brocklin, secretary and treasurer. There
are 54 members. An informal smoker fol-
lowed the election.
Personal.
Dr. W. E. Deeks returned from his leave
in the States on the Panama, which arrived
at Cristobal on October 27.

Losr-A lady's umbrella, with black metal knob
and twisted snake handle, on October 25at Cristobal.
The finder will please return it to House 88, Cristobal.


TH CNL ECR


November, 1909.











SUBMARINE PAINTS.
Ebtimainles of lihe ADioInrl| 'eed *aild Melhod
of P tilha-c.
CULEBRA, C. Z.. October 7, 1909.
The Ho'oiab'le the S.'o,-tar.,' e ea,
Jt'as/h i,ngos. D. C
SIR-I have the honor to submit the fol-
lowing report on submarine paints used by
the Commission. iii compliance with your
telegram of the second ultimo to the General
Purchasing Officer of the Commission in
Washington, covering Congressman Ben-
net's letter to you of August .25:
1. Description of atvun.,! o. 'ae/.7;li/g and
mlitd'L/s u11Sd.
The floating equipment of the Isthmian
Canal Commission and Panama railroad (not
including vessels of the Panama Railroad
Steamship Line) is painted at Cristobal dry
dock on the Atlantic side and at the Balboa,
shipways on the Pacific side. The Commis-
sion paints all Panama railroad marine equip-
ment as well as its own. Three blueprints
are enclose herewith marked "A," "B" and
"C," showing in detail the \essels cared
for, as follows:

Large Small quare feft
"Tlin immersed
surface.

Atlantic side .s -5 4 31l 0n
Pacific side. .. .. .. ... 25 It Msi 1 a0
Toal .. . ............ l. u 2' 59 :.0
On account of the limited docking facilities
and the fact that the dock at Cristobal has
been, in the past, occupied the greater part
of the time by vessels undergoing general
repairs, it has been impossible to clean and
paint vessels on an average oftener than
every six to twelve mouths. The Division
Engineers of both the Atlantic and Pacific
Divisions are unanimous in considering that
this is not often enough and recommend
for the future that vessels be cleaned and
painted whenever practicable every four
months, or three times a year. All submarine
paints known or tried deteriorate- very much
faster in Isthinian waters than in the higher
latitudes. The best paint on the Isthmus
will not last a lg s long a inferior paints in
northern waters.
2. .4-iln'tOI ol aind lit ic/.
Enclosed herewith is a statement marked
"D," giving full data in reartd to subma-
rine paints ordered and usd used during the pres-
ent calendar year to October 1, 1909, which
may be summarized as follows:
O)n hanrl. lantinti I i'j. irh eriQu lr tern' ster s De
partmln-ult 4torehuuse, .on . None.
Oil h..ind. .Iniiuars 191 i Crit,:bal and Bal.
boa. i driwn out not nu ted .. .. .. 17b
QI i tiiIiF received, roi ro .I niar) 1 I1lr,' io date. I' I-'i
Amunit drsiiu frorn LQu.iircril.i-ler c DOieart
inent itorehutr from 1.,iir\ I [o Octo'
her 1 1 --j-- -- --.-. . 6 323
Anioun on hiand al Cri.tobibl and B. ihon on
October 1 lp' i e drawn hlnt 110)1 ti u-d -
Amount on h.,iid ini uiiarltern i-t-r F Dliart'
meint lor'-'huies Jctoljcr 1 I'-- .... .75
Net aIoUnt i uf proprietr, i u nitb, irmne pilrant ap-
plied lo se,-eI- froni J.itii nr\ 1 I"i'] In Sep.
tenmber ,3v I'.. .. .. l']
Or an a't erave C- UIIIDIion per nwnailh of .. '5,6
It should be stated that this does riot in.
clude several hundred gallons of anticor-
rosive paint manufactured on the Isthmus
and applied to vessels for trial. Including
submarine paints mixed on the Isthmus, the
total consumption of submarine paints dur-
ing the past nine months on the Isqthmus
has not been over the rate of ,O')U gallons
per annum, or about 5.3 gallons per month.
There remained in the Quartermaster's De-
partment storehouses on October 1, 1909.
3,875 gallons, and at Cristobal and Balboa
there were drawn but not used, 1,670 gal-
lons, making a total on hand on October 1,
1909, of 5,545 gallons, or very nearly ten


THE CANAL RECORD

months' supply at the present rate of con-
sumption.
I beg to enclose herewith letter of the
Acting Chief Quartermaster, dated Septem-
ber 30, 1909, (marked "E"), giving expla-
nation of the different. requisitions for sub-
marine paint, which have been placed during
the present year. Regarding the requisition
for 20,000 gallons of paint, for which bids
were called under Poster Circular No. 502,
classes 70 and 71, opening of May 3, 1909,
requisition covering same was forwarded
from the Isthmuson January 25, 1909. Bids
received on these two classes were rejected,
and the material covered was readvertised
for in Poster Circular No. 522, opening of
July 23, 1909. As has been stated in corre-
spondence on this subject, bidders on the
annual contract are required to submit prices
on Proposition 'A," which permits the
Commission to increase or reduce the quan-
titiesspecified by 50 per cent, and on Propo-
sitild "B," which allows the Commission
to purchase any part, or none, of the mate-
rial advertised for and, also, to increase the
quantities called for by 50 per cent or less,
as under Proposition '"A." Had award been
made on submarine paint under Circular No.
502, or No 522, on Proposition "A," it is
true that the Commission would have been
obligated to receive 10,000 gallons of paint
prior to June 30, 1910, which it is now seen
would not have been needed. But, with the
award made on Proposition "B," the Com-
mission would not have been obligated to
take a gallon of the paint. Before award
would have been made either on Circular
No. 502, or Circular No. 522. it is but fair to
presume that the amount of paint ordered,
after the original requisition for 20,000 gal-
lons was forwarded on January 25, 1909, a
large portion of which is now on hand,
would have been taken into consideration in
determining whether award should be made
on Proposition "A" or on Proposition "B,"
from a later and more correct estimate as to
requirements.
The reasons which led the Chief Quarter-
master to originally estimate, in excess of
requirements, for 20.001, gallons of subma-
rine paint are given in the enclosed letter,
marked "F.'' It is further stated therein
that the specifications for the containers for
the paint were made b, the Washington
I.flice of the Commission and were not speci-
fied by him.
J. Estfimli.s 'of ll ,re usest.
The number of square feet of immersed
surface to be protected is about 539,200. As-
suming an average covering capacity of 350
square feet fur one gallon of paint for one
coat, for all submarine painting work, based
on two-coat work, 3.2('0 gallons of paint will
be required for each complete painting of
the marine equipment. Assuming that the
equipment is painted every six months, 6.400
gallons of paint will be required annually.
With complete repainting of equipment
every four months, or three paintings per
year, 9,60i. gallons of submarine paint will
be required. It seems evident, therefore,
that the aiinnual requirements of the Com-
mission for submarine paint will not exceed
10,u0 gallons Based on an average of $1.50
per 100 square feet, for two-coat work, in-
cluding cost of cleaning and docking, the
cost of one complete painting of all marine
equipment amounts to $3,400, or $16,800 per
annum for two complete paintings, and
$25,200 for three complete paintings.
4. The miosl ct'omin.'."/ pai'l/.
As stated hereinbefore, in order to properly
preserve the exterior hulls of vessels, the
Division Engineers concerned recommend,
with present materials, that all hulls be
painted three times each year. The cost of


vol. Il., No. 10.


the material and labor is not the main cost
to be considered. A more-important item
is the loss entailed in lessened output when
vessels are laid up for cleaning and painting.
The average output per working day of the
dredging fleet during the past year has been
50,000 cubicyards, and the cost $7,500. The
average time required for docking and un-
docking, and cleaning and painting a vessel
with two coats of paints is about two days.
If the entire marineequipment were cleaned
and painted at one time the total cost of
cleaning and painting added to the cost of
reduced output would be $15,000 for the two
days. In docking vessels one at a time,
owing to the fact that they are sometimes
cleaned and painted while out of serviceun-
dergoing repairs, it would probably not be
fair to charge up more than $10,000 as the loss
on account of one complete painting. With
two paintings per year thisamounts to $20,- .
000, and with three paintings per year to
$30,000. With three paintings per annum
the total cost to the Commission, therefore,
amounts to about S25,000 for the direct cost of
labor and material in painting, and to about
$30,1100 for lessened output due to the loss
of time in dredging. II a paint or protective
material can be purchased that would be so
efficient as to last fully six months, requir-
ing only two paintings per annum, it isthus
seen that it would be economy to purchase
such a paint even though its cost were more
than double that of the paint which lasts
only four months.
.5. F. iture potlic' io be followed.
The present situation is as follows: We
have on hand nearly ten months' supply of
paint, and uo further purchases need be made
until the expiration of that time. During
that period the results obtained from the
different paints now in use will be closely
watched and a careful record kept of both
their costs of application and efficiency, so
reliable data will beavailable when thetime
comes to purchase more submarine paint.
So far as can be anticipated three methods
of procedure at least will be open for con-
sideration at that time:
First-To continue the purchase of pro-
prietary paints under general specifications
on an annual contract: amount called for
to be not over 10,000 gallons.
Second-To purchase submarine paints
from the Navy Department ingeneral accord-
ance with the General Purchasing Officer's
letter to the Chief Quartermaster, dated July
20, 1909, copy enclosed herewith marked
"F."
Third-To continue experiments with sub-
marine paints made on the Isthmus with a
view of manufacturing same on a larger
scale. To date, several formulae have been
derived which give fairly good results for
anticorrosive use. The experiments have
not been carried far enough to develop a
satisfactory antifouling paiut.
No conclusive results has'e as yet been
obtained from the tests of proprietary sub-
marine paints.
It is the endeavor of the Commission to
carry as little stock on the Isthmus as the
needs of the work will permit. The list of
material ordered from the United States
numbers upward of 25,000 different items,
the demand for a large proportion of which
is constantly fluctuating. The Quarter-
master's Department endeavors to regulate
orders for material so as to secure the great-
est economy practicable. Any instances re-
ported by any one interested in the work,
suggesting points where improvement can
be made, are always welcomed, carefully
investigated, and correction applied.
Very respectfully, H. F. HODGJS,
.4ctin Chairman avd Chief Engineer.








November 3, 1909.


SANITATION OF PANAMA.

Plans Approved for Work to be Done in
Suburbs.
Plans have been approved for a part of
the work to be done in portions of the city
of Panama not heretofore placed in sanitary
condition. The work is undertaken at the
instance of the Department of Sanitation of
the Isthmian Canal Commission, because, in
-the opinion of the Chief Sanitary Officer, the
districts to be improved "are already closely
occupied and would be very hard to sanitate
in case of the introduction of plague." Un-
der Article VII of the Treaty of February
26, 1904, the work will be done by the Com-
mission, and payment will be made by
amounts deducted from the water rates col-
lected for the city of Panama. The Sundry
Civil Act of March 4, 1909, contained an ap-
propriation of $800,000 for sanitary work in
Panama and Colon, and of this amount not
over $250,000 will be spent in Panama.
The work authorized involves the opening
of streets through sections not regularly laid
oat, the installation of water mains and
sewers, and the macadamizing and drain-
ing of the roadways. In all the districts
to be improved a certain amount of filling
will be necessary. As much as is used be-
tween curb lines of the streets, will be paid
for from the appropriation. As far as it in-
volves an improvement to land not in the
streets the filling will be paid for by property
owners or lessees. By direction of the Chief
Engineer only such work will be done before
the coming dry season as may be accom-
plishedwithout extra expense on account of
the rains. Meanwhile the materials for sew-
ers.and curbs have been ordered, and private
holders are preparing for the work by mov-
ing buildings, or erecting new ones within
the approved lines.
The improvements proposed may best be
understood by dividing the property to which
they are applied into three parts:
First-All that property between Centril
Avenue and the Sabanas road on the west,
extending eastward about 2,000 feet. On the
south it is bounded by East Sixteenth and
East Fifteenth streets, and on the north it
extends to a point on the Sabanas road about
1,300 feet north of the Caledonia Bridge.
Second-The property bounded by Central
Avenue on the east, the Canal Zone line on
the west, Fourth of July Avenue on the
south, and on the north by a line extending
west from the point on the Sabanas road
1,300 feet north of the Caledonia Bridge.
Third-About 22 acres of land in the sec-
tion commonly known as Cocoa Grove, lo-
cated between the beach and the Balboa
road, near the Panamanian cemetery.
East of Central Avenue.
Work has already been begun in the section
east of Central Avenue and the Sabanas
. road, where buildings are being torn down
in order that they may be rebuilt in places
where they will not encroach on the street
lines. The districts in the order in which
the work will be taken up are: Marafion, El
Trujillo, Guachapali, Caledonia, Sixteenth
street district. All the districts except the
Sixteenth street district, lie east and north
of the Panama railroad yards. Between
a.igh water mark in the bay and Caledonia
i dge, seven streets have been laid out at a
distancee of 250 feet from center line to center
LtAe, and extending from Calle del Istmo,

5,:


THE CANAL RECORD

which runs parallel with the railroad yards,
to the end of the inhabited section, thus
dividing Marafion. Guachapali. and El Tru-
jillo into regular blocks about 600 feet long
and 250 feet wide A similar plan has been
followed in laying out Caledonia. In all,
13 streets, each with a roadway 24 feet wide
and sidewalks 13 feet wide, and with a total
length of 9,600 feet, have been laid out.
The estimated cost of making the improve-
ments in this section, including filling. mac-
adam paving, curbs, gutters, sewers and
water mains is $39, 16. 50.
A 10-inch trunk sewer with 8-inch con-
necting sewers will be laid through thecen-
ter of the streets and will connect with the
outfall sewer that runs along the edge of the
beach and finally empties into the bay. The
total area of the property to be improved
is 127,767 square yards, and the amount
of filling necessary to bring it to grade is
10,7S2 cubic yards. More than half of this
property is owned by the Panama Railroad
Company. The population of Maraflon, El
Trujillo, Guachapali, and Caledonia has been
determined by a health department census as
4,900, an average of one person to 26 square
yards. This average is misleading unless it
is understood that the population is not
evenly distributed, some parts of the dis-
tricts being unoccupied, while others are
dense in inhabitants.
The Sixteenth street district is comprised
between the Panama railroad yards on the
east and Central Avenue on the west, East
Sixteenth street on the south and the tri-
angle near the Panama railroad station on
the north. It is 16.52 acres in extent, 1.15
acres of which belong to the Panama Rail-
road Company, and the remainder to private
holders. Avenue B, recently opened from
the railroad station south toward the cen-
ter of the city, runs through the eastern
part of this district, and Central Avenue
bounds it on the west. A street will be
opened from Central Avenue, at the corner
of West Sixteenth street near the Episcopal
Church, to Avenue B. This street will be
520 feet long, and will be known as L)onsu
street. From a point on Central Avenue,
opposite Fourth of July Avenue, another
street, to be known as Obarrio Place, will
be opened to Avenue B. Between Obarrio
Place and the triangle near the Panama rail-
road station the alleys known as East Twen-
tieth, East Twenty-first. East Twenty-second
and East Twenty-third streets, will be im-
proved. Each of these streets will be 18 feet
wide, will contain a 6-inch sewer, a 6-inch
water main. and will be macadamized, and
curbed with concrete. The cost of this im-
provement is estimated at $15,352.62. The
property benefited is 36665 square yards in
area, and the necessary filling to bring it to
grade is estimated at 5,114 cubic yards.
West of Central Avenueand the Sabanab Ronad
The section for which sanitation has been
recommended west of Central Avenue and
the Sabanas road, is in four districts, known
respectively as La Calzada, Pueblo Nuevo,
Santa Cruz, and San Miguel. Work in the
last named three districts will be taken up
last, and the extent to which it is carried
will be determined somewhat by theamount
of money available.
La Calzada is the district hounded on the
west by the Canal Zone line, on the east by
Central Avenue, on the north by the Tivoli
road and on the south by Fourth of July


Avenue. It has an area of 10 33 acres,
and an estimated population of 1.5(0. All
the land is owned by private holders. An-
con Boulevard runs practically through the
center of the district from Fourth of July
Avenue to the Tivoli road, and Jose Higinio
street connects Ancon Boulevard with Cen-
tral Avenue. It is not proposed to open new
streets in this district at present, but merely
to improve the streets already laid out, and
install sewers and water mains. Ancon
Boulevard is to be macadamized to a width
of 20 feet, concrete gutters will be put in,
and 6-inch sewer and water mains laid,
the estimated cost being S6,b17.81. Jos6
Higinio street will he improved in the same
way, at a cost of S2,307.20. The whole im-
provement contemplated for this district is
estimated to cost $10.710.'02.
For the present no work will be under-
taken in Pueblo Nuevo, because the Pan-
ama Railroad Company has decided to move
all the inhabitants off from its half of the
district. An estimate has been made, how-
ever, of the cost of installing sewers and
laying water mains, and the amount re-
quired will be $1,928.76 for Panama railroad
property, and l1,326.04 for private property.
Cocoa Grose District.
Some work has already been done in the
Cocoa Grove district where Panamanian
prisoners, under the direction of the engi-
neering department of that Government,
have done some grading. In the 22.96 acres
contained in this district 2,564 people are
living. At present this district is entered
from the Balboa road by four streets-Six-
teenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nine-
teenth streets west-which are crossed by a
street running practically parallel to the
Balboa road. Nearly all of the center block
of the inhabited part is occupied by a soap
factory.
Plans for the improvements in this dis-
trict have not yet been approved, but they
will be of the nature of the improvements
elsewhere-the opening up of new streets,
widening and paving old ones, laying sewers
and water mains, and providing drainage.
A tentative estimate of the work proposed
places its cost at $33,641.90.
Washington Reading Room Club Meeting.
At a meeting of the Washington Reading
Room Club held on Friday evening, October
15, the positions of secretary and librarian
were consolidated, and Mr. A. C. Harragin
was elected to fill the office. Mr. F. W.
Blair was elected treasurer to fill the vacancy
created by the resignation of Mr. P. G. Hoyt.
A constitutional amendment was adopted
providing for the control of the club by an
executive committee to be elected annually.
Band Concert.
The Ibthmian Canal Commission Rand will rive a
concert at Las Caocadti. C / on Suud-, No,rnimbr
7. 19)9. at 6 p m. The Program follows-
I March--.';'antigo F/i.n .. .... .....Morse
2 Selection-.' II a/t D,, .r ... ..Sirauss
3 Ballet-Fli At otht ik iBu ............ Rice
S1I a Caprice--Th sf'dtoa ............... Bngley
4 h Intcrm e'ijo--.%'ip1r1n'e .. ..... 'illh.i ms
5 Overure--Liqht Cai; ai,' .... ........ ppe
6 .Vatiz-T77iusand ad One .\'gls ... .Srauss
7 Serenade--La ft 'wa ... ...... ........ Xntder
S Medley Selection-- 7ze n G.',ltri g Glfi
It ,'ern ................ .... .. ........ Ia Farge
Introducing Sanmbo." If I id a Thousian l.iresi
Live."' I've LosL Msy Teddy Bear.' "I ai I.onging
for Some One to ove Me 'Glow Worm." "Ada. M>
Sweet Pointer.' Henry's Barn Dance." and 'The
Big Red Shawl."
9 Descriptive-- Heat Rii fia un ...... .. Sawyer
10 March-C (ide' the Da,ic E.g.le .... Wagner
CRAS E.JENmiiNCS lustca1 Dzl,'fo,.
& concert will be given at Gorguns ou Sunday
November 14.








THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. I1., No. 10.


CANAL ZONE CHURCH WORK.
Efforts of Regular and Missionary Organiza-
tlonll.
Bishop Junguito of Panama has appointed
Rev. Henry C. Pouget, late a member of
the faculty of St. Charles' College, Ellicot
City, Md., pastor of the Roman Catholic
congregation at Balboa. Father Pouget
will begin to hold servicesat Balboa as soon
as a proper building for that purpose can be
procured. A meeting of the Catholic men
of Balboa has been called for S o'clock, Fri-
day evening, November 5, to consider means
of establishing a church and building a
school house.
There will be two masses celebrated every
Sunday morning in the new Joseph's Cath-
olic church, Cristobal, at 7 and 8.30, respec-
tively, beginning November 6. The first
one will be a low mass with a sermon in
French, and the second one will be a high
mass with a sermon in English. Catechism
classes will be held at 4 30 p. m. Sunday,
and at 4 p. m. Tuesday and Fridays.
Episcopal Church Work. 16
The second annual meeting of the Wom-
an's Altar Guild of St. Luke's Church, An-
con, was held at the home of Mrs. Charles
H. Mason, November 1. The meeting was
preceded by corporate communion of the
Guild, which took place at the morning
service.
St. Luke's Guild was organized on De-
cember 2, 1907, by the Chaplain, Ven. Arch-
deacon Henry B. Bryan, at the home of Mrs.
Fleetwood Gruver, with 16 charter members.
Of this number, several are still active in the
work, others have become associate mem-
bers, and honorary membership has been
conferred on five, on their removal from the
Isthmus. The opening of the year just com-
pleted was marked by the annual reception
to members of the congregation, and resi-
.dents of Ancon, Balboa, and Corozal, given
at the Hotel Ticoli. This was followed by a
cake sale, at which the sum of $50 was
realized. On Christmas Day, 1908, the first
service was held in the new chapel; the
Guild assisted in the removal from the tem-
porary chapel, prepared the hangings and
the decorations, and arranged for the special
music of Ihe day. The Sunday school fes-
tival, under the auspices of the Guild, was
held in the old chapel on December 28.
The tree was presented by the nurses of
the Ancon Hospital staff, the gifts by the
church, the Guild, and individual members.
During the l.enten season weekly meetings
were held at the home of the chaplain, when
there were readings by the rector or his rep-
resentative, and the members sewed for
various charitable purposes. The Easter
offering of the Guild was a baptismal font
of Caen stone. A gift of .l25 from the pupils
of St. Mary's school. Garden City, Long
Island. enabled the Guild to purchase hand-
some silk hangings for the Trinity season
and other necessary furnishings for the altar.
Bibles for distribution in the wards of the
hospital were also purchased at this time.
Since the organization but one meeting has
been omitted, that which fell on the Fourth
of July, 1909 Although the Guild is not a
social organization, the meetings which are
held at the homes of members on the first
and third Monday in each month, are pleas-
ant social occasions.
The first anniversary of the laying of the
cornerstone of St. Mary's Church, Empire,


was observed on Sunday evening, October
24. At the close of evening prayer a pro-
gram was rendered consisting of vocal se-
lections by Mrs. Faure, Mrs. Ludwig, Mr.
Dorman, anid Mr. Conner, and selections
on the violin by Mrs. Decker and Miss
Smith. One hundred people were present.
The cornerstone of the building was laid on
Sunday, October 25, 1908, by the Ven.
Archdeacon H. B. Bryan, assisted by Lieut.-
Col. H. F. Hodges, and the fraternal
societies of Empire. The church was com-
pleted and occupied on November 29. A
Sunday school was organized on the first
Sunday in September, with 24 members.
Services are held on Sunday evening at 7.45,
and holy communion on the first Sunday in
the month at 7.30 a. m., and on the third
Sunday at 10 a. m.

Mission Work Among Negroes.
Rev. George H. Penny, superintendent of
the Christian Mission of Barbados is on a
visit to the Isthmus inspecting the branches
of his organization established in the Canal
Zone and in Panama. The first branch was
established at Panama in 1905, and now reg-
ular meetings are held in Colon, Gatun.
Gorgona, Culebra, and Balboa. A meeting
house is in course of construction in Ancon,
and a school is maintained in Colon. The
Christian Mission is affiliated with the Chris-
tian Alliance of New York. Its home office is
in Bridgetown, Barbados, and it has branches
in Trinidad, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Domin-
ica, Antigua, St. Eustatius, St. Thomas,
Saba, British Guiana and Panama. There
are thirty stations in Barbados alone. The
services conducted under the auspices of the
organization are undenominational in char-
acter. A 12-page monthly publication is is-
sued by the home office, and four hundred
copies of it are sold in the Canal Zone and
in Panama. Bibles are also sold and dis-
tributed free.

A Beleaguered Chapel.
Standing near the edge of a 40-foot cliff,
which forms a bend in the Panama railroad
near the old section of Bas Obispo, is the
little Protestant Episcopal Church, known
as the Church of the Ascension. It is one
of the oldest places of worship along the
Canal, the corner stone having been laid in
1885, and the building completed the fol-
lowing year.
When the site was selected the railroad
was quite a distance away. The widening
of the Canal compelled the moving of the
tracks farther westward, until at the present
time only a piece of ground a dozen feet in
width separates the foundations of the church
from the railroad cut. The building not only
occupies a precaridos position on account of
its proximity to the verge of the cliff, but as
it stands directly opposite a portion of Bas
Obispo cut where heavy blasting is done,
every little while it is a target for falling
rocks and other objects. Two pieces of rail-
road iron, each weighing several pounds,
are retained as souvenirs of these visitations,
which fortunately have generally happened
when the church was empty, although the
catechist lives in the rear.
The side of the cliff, which is composed of
earth and rock, is slowly but surely crumb-
ling away. Each severe blast as well as every
heavy rain loosens it a little, and but for the
trees that grow in the narrow space between
the church and cliff, the insecurity would be
intensified. The Division Engineer of the


Central Division has notified the church offi-
cials to report if the danger of a cave-in be-
comes imminent, and he will take steps to
have the building moved to a safer location.
The church is on private land and serves
the colored laborers and their families at
Matachin, Palmito, BasObispo, Hau tObispo,
and from across the Cut. There are accom-
modations for 150 persons, and the attend-
ance at services ranges from 50 to 100. A
catechist has charge of the work, and serv-
ices are held each Sunday., A private school
is conducted during the week.

OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.
Independence Day in Panama.
COLEBRA C. Z., October 29.1909.
CIRCULAR No. ?89.
Wednesday. November 3. 1909. the anniversary of
the Independence of the Republic of Panama. will
be observed as a holiday in the Canal Zone, and as
far as possible, all public business will be suspended
on that day. H. F. HODGES. Actrag Chawman.

Atring Superintendent of Clubhouses.
CULEBRA. C. Z., October 23,1909.
CIRCULAR No. 263.
Mr. A Bruce Minear superintendent of clubhouses,
having resigned. effective October 25. 1909. Mr. Floyd
C Freeman will temporarily assume his duties.
H. F HODGES, Acting Chairman.
Acting Superintendent of Publie Works.
ExECUTIVE OrFFCE.
ANCON, C Z October 26, 1909.
CIRCULAR No. 90:
Mr J. J Reidy. Assistant Superintendent of Public
Works is designated as Acting Superinlendent of
Public Works. effective October 26. 1909. to continue
during the absence on leave of Mr. Geo. H. Ruggles.
H. H. ROuSSgAu.
Acting H'ad id Depatmns'nt o Cwi ,4dministr aioa.
Resolutions of Sympathy.
At a meeting of Paraiso Court No 5, Independent
Order of Panamanian Kangaroos, held on October 23,
1909. the following resolutions were passed:
WHERE %s, The Almighty God in His infinite wis-
dom has called from among us our beloved brothel,
James c Worrall- it is therefore
Reo',ved. That Paraiso Court of the Independent
Order of Panamanian Kangaroos, mourns the lossof
an esteemed member, whose honor, integrity and
dealings with his fellowmen baveso endeared him to
us that in this hour of grief we stand appalled by our
loss. and be it therefore further
Reo.,':de That ihis order do hold a court of sorrow
and therein mourn the loss of our beloved brother,
and that to the stricken family of him who has gone
before the .ympathy of this court, which so keenly
feels the loss be extended: and be it further
Ac.su.'.ed Thai our comrade whose mortal years are
done and whose soul is now in the valley of the peace,
has left naught behind but his love. and that we do
Eupolicate Thou who to the mercy seat of our souls
doth gather to give unto him eternal rest. and let Thy
perpetual light shine upon him.
W B. JORDA.n Chairman. W. E. ELLFrsNWOOD, JA-
COB GRAFFr Co.ui'aee
Pedro Mieuel. October 28. 1909.
Misdirected Letters.
DrVISION OF POSTS CtsTOMS .ND REVENUES,
ANCON C. Z. November 3. 1909.
The following insufficienily addressed letters,
originaling in the United States and its possessions,
have been received in the office of the Director of
Posts, and ma bhe secured upon request of the
addressee
Allexan, Jos. Martin. L D.
Anderson. Mrs Nellie McCullock A P.
Blanco. Jost 121 Mclnnes. Miss Katherine
Bodle. Robt. Mulcare. Rev.J. T.
Bradshsw. Ben Nash Supl
Carter. C P. Nick. Edwin
Clare Thomas Nutter. R. B.
Coyne, Jno.J. Ousley. G. T.
Fields. Robert Park. Charles E.
Green. Frank Ripley. J.
Geibm. Mrs James R. Rossiter LawrenceJ.
Halstead William Mau- Sherry, Miss Laura E.
rice Smith. F. T.
Hebmeyer. E H. Stevens. William H.
Kennedy. Maurice Sweeny, Miss Elizabeth
Kimball Master James Vincent, J. A.
Stewart Webster, William
LanLa, A. G. Willour. Joseph
Lowe, William E. Wood, Emory B.
Majors, Mrs. J. I. Woodring. Harvey









November 3, 1909.


THE CANAL RECORD


COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES.

Activities of the Young Men's Christian As-
sociation.
BOWLING TOURNAMENT CONTESTS.
The bowling tournament games between Empire
and Culebra,at Empire, Wednesday night, October
27, resulted as follows.
Empire. First. Second. Thi i. To7btal.
Brown .............. 172 166 169 507
Potter................ 210 155 185 550
Gorham.............. 169 186 137 492
Binckley .......... 157 194 177 528
Buson............... 216 178 189 593
Total ............ 929 879 857 2.665
Cule6ra.
J Lamster ............ 179 169 149 497
Hayes................ 124 182 173 479
Winters ............ 142 155 150 447
Cohen................ 119 152 146 417
Dougherty ......... 146 165 157 468

Total ............. 710 823 775 2.308
The bowling tournament games between Empire
and Cristobal. at Empire. on Saturday night. October
30, resulted as follows:
Empire. Firs/. Second. TAird. Total.
Brown ............... 160 178 149 487
Potter ............... 163 152 145 460
Bardelson............ 136 171 155 462
Hinckley ........... 171 130 152 453
H son.............. 154 162 197 513
Total .............. 784 793 798 1 2.375
Cristobal.
Bullard.............. 213 178 181 572
i.poch................ 192 184 164 540
Collins .............. 186 143 154 483
Strong ............ 183 157 189 529
.. Gilmartin ............ 16B 166 153 487

Total.............. 942 828 841 2.611
The bowling tournament games played at Gorgona
on Saturday night. October 30 between Gorgona and
Culebra. resulted as follows
Gorgona. First. Second. Thrrd. Total.
Otis ................ 134 159 144 4,37
Haldeman .......... 151 142 130 423
Roper............... 185 140 182 507
Humphrey .......... 121 127 133 381
Sexton ............. 150 174 147 471
Total .............. 741 742 736 2.219
Culebrai
. amster ............ 203 180 177 560
Herrington ......... 139 170 115 444
Winter............. 145 153 136 4,4
Morgan ............ 148 163 145 456
Doungherty.......... 159 180 1*0 479
N- -- -
Total............... 794 846 733 2.373
GORGONA.
The Hagy Moving Picture Company gave a second
entertainment on Friday night. October 29. before a
fair sized audience.
On Friday night. November 5. a meeting for the


purpose of organizing a chess club will be held in
the game room at 8 o'clock.
Sunday evening Judge Thomas E Brown. Jr of
Cristobal, made an addressat the monthly song sern-
ice. Special music was rendered by Miss Edith
Anderson and H. R. Salmon.
CRISTOBAIL.
On Monday night a game of basket ball was played
between a team from the U. S. cruiser Tacoma and
the V. M C. A. team. The V M. C. A. team won by
a score of 17 to II.
On Thursday night Cristobal V M C A defeated
a team from the Tacoma in a game of indoor base-
ball by a score of 28 to 21.
The association has extended the courtesies of the
V. M. C A. building to the officers and men of the
U S. cruiser D's .toines. Basket ball and indoor
baseball games will be arranged between teams from
the Des Moines and the Y. M. C. A
EMPIRE.
The tie bowling game between Messrs. Mead and
Barretl, left over from the June tournament, was
rolled off Saturday night. The scores were Mead
131. Barrett 197. Barrett winning the medal
Until further notice Monday. Wednesday and Fri-
day nights will be reserved for duck pin bowlers.
All other nights will be held for 10-pins.
CULEBRA.
The average attendance in the Monday"nld Wednes-
day night gymnasium classes for the past mouth has
been thirteen. The musical accompaniment to the
drills has proven popular and will be continued.
The weekly Bible class under the leadership of
Mr Freeman met Wednesday night, with ten men
present. This week owing to Mr. Freeman's illness,
Mr. Goodman will take charge, and the class will
meet Friday evening instead of Wednesday. owing
to the holiday on November 3.
A members' smoker was held Friday night with a
good sized and enthusiastic crowd present. The
program included selections by the orchestra- quar-
tet numbers by Messrs. Kramer Kersey. Tupper
and Case' solos by Messrs Case and Kersey: mono-
logue and -ongs with illustrated slide by Mr. Flynn:
Indian club swinging by Mr. Kramer: parallel bar
exhibition by Messrs Ludwig. Heinrich and Kramer
blind folded boxing by Messrs. Lindsay and Fitz-
gerald. and wrestling by Messrs. Bandford and
Hartman. Old popular songs were sung.
Gorgona defeated Culebra Saturday night in in.
door baseball by the score of 19 to 12. The following
was the line up of the teams:
Gorgona. ostsions. Cu'eb a
W eiser........ ...... Pitcher............ .....Tupper.
Robertson ...........Catcher ....... ... ...Cushing.
Cuff .................. st base .. ........ Fleishman.
Blackburn ..........2d base............... French.
Ridge............... 5d base ...... ......Goodman
King .............. Fielder Kirk.
Carpenter ... .. .. Kirk....
Beginning with Friday November 12 an informal


" Stunt Party" will be held each Friday night at the
V. M. C. A. Music, singing and one or two regular
numbers will be given. The t1pe of vaudeville pro-
gram has proved so popular here that this scheme
will be tried.
The indoor baseball team plays Cristobal at Cule.
bra Saturday night. This game will be preceded by
a handball match between teams from the same
towns
Supplies for Canal Work.
The following steamers arrived at the ports of Cris-
tobal and Colon during the week ended October 3u.
19Ct. with supplies for the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission
Rosa Lea. October 24. from Gulfport and Mobile.
with 1.398 pieces yellow pine piling,. and 18 tons
washers,. for stock 463 pieces yellow pine piling. for
Galun 16 67 feet white oak lumber and 150.000 feet
yellow pine lumber, for car repairs 200 tons pig iron.
for foundry 30 tons washers.for Gatun and Miratlores
Sibmr.a. October 26. from New York. with 420.000
pounds hay. for corrals 3iA, barrels coal tar. 10barrels
sulphate of copper, and 50 cases lye. for stock. 11 500
pounds caustic soda. for use in manufacture of lar-
vacide.
Panama. October 27. from New York with 635 kegs
rivets. for car repairs.'Corgona. I 287 kegs. bolts nuts
and rivets. 27 cases electric fuses, and 80n cases lubri-
cating oil. for stock: 5 reels wire rope. for floating
equipment. i9 tons car forgings. for Gorgona: and a
a miscellaneous cargo aggregating 5 825 packages
weighing 613 Ions.
Merctian. October 28. from Liverpool. with 144 bar-
rels carbolic acid. for use in the manufacture of lar-
vacide.
Afenas. October 26. from New Orleans with 91.
pieces yellow pine piling, for Gatun 80 tons ire brick
and l.Ou0 cases kerosene oil for slock 260 tons cast
iron water pipe. for Balboa water extension. 25 tons
car castings, for Gorgona 29 730 feet yellow pine
lumber, for sand wharf. Balboa. 9.000 feet ash and
hickory lumber, for wagon repairs.
V'rscaina. October 30, From Baltimore. with 785.550
pounds dnuamite. 6.00( pounds track spikes 30.rui
pounds boat soikes, and 120,950 feet yellow pine lum-
ber for stock: 1.8iU car wheels, for Gorgona: 3.845
pieces 8 inch vitrified pipe. for Panama improve.
ments. 108 tons structural material for locks. 107
tons steel plates, and 17.363 feet oik lumber for car
repairs: 470 tons structural material, for moveable
lowers. Gatun. 12 tons discharge pipe. for dredge
Cri'I",
The following vessels arrived at or departed from
the port of Balboa during the week ended October
20 Arrivals-October 24. Alnci from Guasaquil
Lasting north (Union Oil Compansl: October 2
Rfrn. from San Francisco: Chi rqr from laterme-
diate ports. Guatemala, from south ports Depart-
ures-October 23 Litman. for south. October 24. La'.
sing. for Port Harford: October 28. Cturia for inler-
mediate ports. October. 29 .4n a. for Guayaquil


PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY.

PASSENGER TRAIN TIME TABLE No.5-IN EFFECT AUGUST 15. 1909.


SOUTHWARD.

SUNIDAYS AND HOLIDAYS. WEEK DAYS.


23

A M.
10.00
10.05
f 10.10

10.18
f 10.27
f 10.33
10.40
10.47
10.55
1100
11.02
f 11.08

11.13
11.18

11.22
11.29
11.34
11.39
11.47
11.51
11.56
P. M.
12.04
12.15
P. hr.

S3


A. M.
1030
f 1,.37
f 11.42

10.50u
f 11.00
f 11.06
11.13
11.22
11.31
11.37
fll.40
11.45

11.53
11.58
P. M.
12.03
12.10
12.17
12 22
12.32
1238
12.43

12.50
1.00
P. M.

B


STATIONS.



I Leave. fColon Arrive.
............. iMount Hope.........
S ............. .M indi................

.........t...Gatun ...... ... ..
..............Lion Hill. ...........
. ............. Ahorca Lagarto .....
i .... ... .. Bohio................
............. Frijoles..............
............. Tabernilla ..........
.......... tSan Pablo ...........
............. Bailamonos..........
S........ .... tMamei.. ...........

........ .. .iGorgona .........
S ............. tMaetachin............

............. fBas Obispo..........
........ ... tLas Cascadas.......
............ tEm pire.............
I ............. tCulebra .............
.. . ..... Paraiso...............
............. tPedro Miguel .......
S..............tMiraflores ..........

.............tCorozal...............
* Arrive. i Panama Leave


3 tTelegraph station, f lagstation. a 4


NORTHWARD


WEEK 05S.

4 0 8 20
P. M P. M P. M. A M
1.15 3 50 8.00 9.r-)
1 1 07 f 3 42 7 52 A.53
f I 01 f3 36 f 7.tI f 47
12 54 ? 30 7.32 840
f 12.42 3.19 f 7.23 f 8 a9
f 1235 3 13 f7.16 f 23
12 .9 305 709 618
f 12 21 f 2 56 659 8 10
12 15 2 50 6 50 8 04
12.06 2 Io bo45 7 57
f 12 03 243 16.47 f 7 53
12.01 2 411 6 '9 7 49
P. M
I1 53 32 6.33 7.42
11 48 f ; '. 6.28 1 37

11 43 2.23 621 733
11 35 2 16 6 1; 7.25
11 29 2.10 6.12 7 21
11.24 2 05 6 08 7 15
11 11 150 554 17 16
11.07 1.48 5.50 7.03
11 02 f 44 5.46 7.00

10.54 1.38 5 38 6.53
10.45 1.30 5 30 6.45
A.M P M. P M. A M.


suNr.AvS A.ND HOLIDAYS.


282
P. M
12 15
[ 12 t,1
f 1? (32
P M
li.5i
f 11.44
1 11 38
11 33
f II 25
11 19
f l 112
f 11 08
11 u4

10 57
10.52
10.48
10.40
10 36
10 30
i 10 ?1
10.18
10 15

1008
1000
A.M.

28


An


30
P. M
11 55
fll 48
fII I_

11.35
f ll 24
f 11 1t
11.13
f 11 05
10 59
10 52
f 10.48
1044

10 37
f 10.32
f nf 28
10.20
10.16
10.10
10.01
9.58
f 9.55
9.48
9.40
P. M.

30


I









THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. Il., No. 10.


COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

The hours during which comtntissanesare open are
as follows
Cretobal and Culebra 6 a m. to 12 30' p m 2 p.m.
to 7 p min
All other cominiesaries S a m to I p m.. 3 p. m.
to 7 p. m.
Retail price! of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning No"iiiber I
FRESH MEATS.
Prce.
Multon-Siewing ...................... per lb 7
Shoulder. neck trimmed off
4 pounds anl ocri ..... per lb 10
Entire forequarter Inot trim.
nmedI l pounds and over. .. per Ib 9
Leg (8 to 10 pounds).................per lb 19
Cutlets.. ................... .. per lb 20
Short-cut chops..................... per Ib 22
Lamb-Stewing......... .......................per lb 7
Entire forequarter, neck trimmed
off ....... ............ ............per lb 10
Leg (6 to 8 pounds) ......... ....... per lb 27
Chops....... ............................. per lb 29
Cutlets .... .... . . . .... per lb 29
Veal-Stew ng .................................. per lb 10
ShouldeP for roasting (not under
4 lbs) ... . ....... ... ............. per lb 15
Loin for roasting .. ......... ......... per Ilb 19
Chops ... ... ....... ......................per lb 22
Cutlets ....................................per lb 26
Pork cuts ............... ..... ... .... .... per lb 22
Beef- Suet.. ............................ .......... per lb 4
Soup .... .. ........ .. per lb 6
Stew ....... ....... ..... ... ...............per Ib 10
Corned ............. .......... per lb 12. 14. 16
Chuck roastl .... .... ................ per lb 14
Pot roast.. ....... .................... per lb 16
Rib-roast second cut (not under
3 pounds) ...................... ..... per Ib 19
Rib-roast. first cut (not under 3
pound _) ...... ......... ...... .......per Ib 21
Sirloin roast............... ....... ..per lb 22
Rump roast ... .. ............... ....... per lb 22
Porterhouse roast ......... .. .. .. .per Ib 22
Steak. Chuck ........................ per lb 15
Round. ... .............. ...... per Ib 16
Rib. ................. ... ..... .. per Ib 21
Sirloin .. ............... ........per lb 22
Porterhouse ........ .... ......per Ib 22
Rum p. .. .... ............ .....per lb 22
Tenderloin.......... .............per lb 27
MISCELLANEOUS.
Livers-Beef. ........ .... .............per lb 11\i
Calf ...l...................... ....... each 65
Sausage-Pork ...... ..................... per lb 17
Bologna ...... ..... ... ............ per lb 17
Frankfurter . .. ................per lb 17
Leberwurst....... .... per lb 17
Sweet bread-Veal ....... ..............per lb 1.20
Sweet bread-Beef................... ... ....... per lb 31)
O ysters........ ... .......... ..... ... .....keg 9n
Eggs. fresh ..... ....... .......... .... dozen 31
POULTRY AND GAME.
Chickens-Fancy Roasting large .... ...... each 1.50
medium ... .. each 1.30
Fow ls ..... ............ ......... each 70. ,5.2, 93 1 04. 1.15
Ducks. fatted ...................................... each I1.
medium wight .. ......... .. ....... each 90
Broilers ... ... ............ ..... .. ........... each 75
Turkeys ................ ................ ...... per lb 30
Squabs ....................... ..... ................. each 35
Capons. ... ....... ........................ ..... each 2 50
CURED AND PICKLED MEATS
Bacon-Breakfast, whole piece ..........per lb 27
EBre.iikfaist sliced .. ............. per Ib 29
Hanim-Sigar-cured sliced ...................per Ib 25
One-half for boiling.... ........... per Ib 21
Viestphalia . . .. .... . per lb 45
Hock .... ................... per lb 18
Sugar cured. .. ................. per lb 20
Beef, sal.3t. fid l .. ............. ...... ..... per Ib Iti
Pork. salt .. ........................ ................ per b 15
Ham boiled .............. ... ...... per Ib 28
Oa tongue ...... .. ....... . ....... each 00
Pigs feet . ....... .......... ..............per Ib
tongues..... .... ............. .... ... per lb In
DAIRY PRODUCTS.
Butter-Pnnts prime quality .............. per lb 42
Cheese-RoSiuefort ....................... per lb 45
Phil.ilelphi i Cream ................. each 20
Young America.......... ... per lb 22
Swiss ....... .....................per lb 31
F-LEim....... ...... .............each 1.05
Camembert ......................... ner lb 28
Neufchatel ..... ........ each 6
Gouda.................. .. ...... per lb 34
Parmesan..... ....... .. ... .. bottle 20
French cheese in tins-Camemhert Brie.
Neufchatel . ................. ....... 11 t.'in 20
Milk. Briarcliff ... .......................bottle 25
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS
Celery... ....... ............ ...... ...per hd 10
Lettuce... .. ............. .... ........ per lb 15
Potatoes, white.... ............. ... per lb *3
S sweet . ....... ... .. .. ........per lb 2
O nions ...........................................per Ib I
Squash. Hubbard........ ............... per lb 5
Va imsns....... .... ........ .. .................. ...per lb 3M
Turnios ..... ..... ...... ................ per lb 3K
Carrots .. .. ..... ...... ......... ... per lb 4
Beets ...... ...................... ................... per lb 5


Price.
Cauliflower ...... ........ .... .. ..... per lb 12
Cucum bers .. ....... ............. ..per lb 6
Totrti loes . .... .. .. .... ......... per Ib 7
Lemons .................................. ...... .. dozen 24
G rapes.. .. .. ..... . ........ ......per lb 9
Lim es .. . .... .. ... ... ....... .... .. per Itu 80
W watermelons .. .... .... ..... .... .. ..... each '35
Peaches .............. ...... . .. ...... per ib '10
Cantaloupes .. ....... ... .............. .... each 10
Cabbage e. ................... ....... ...... per b 4
Apples.. ... ... . .......................... per lb t.;
Oranges .............. ...............dozen 12
G rapefruit. .................... ......... .............each 4
Plum s .... .... ........... .... .... ... . ............per lb 12
Pears. ... ............... .... .. .... per lb 8
"Indicates reduction from last list
SIndicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle.
tIndicates advance on last list.
ISold onlc irom Commissaries. no orders taken for
delivery.
mSold only from Cold Storage and not from Com-
mnissaries
LEGAL NOTICE.

United States of America, In the Circuit Court,
Canal Zone. I First Judicial Circuit.
A petition hating been filed by the Collector of
Revenues for the eschest of the estate of Richard
Prince. whodied intestate at Blboa. on or about the
1.th of November 190I. leaving propert.. to the value
of $1825 U.S currency, notice s herehv given toall
heirs creditor.for other cliimantsof the cnid estate
to appear at the courthouse at Ance.n on or before
the 10th day of Deceruber 1909. for the purpose of fil.
ingtheir claims. P. H Sau:tE.Ev.
.-4tlig Coatc ht Court C'le

Auction Sale of Dairy Cows.
On Monday. November 15. 1909 at I0 a m there
will be sold at public sale at the Ancon Hospital
dairy. seven dairy) cows. ranging in age from S.even
to ten years The dairl is located near the insane
aslum bu;ldingrs in the rear of the hospital grounds.
The terms of the sale will be ca-h.
CHAS F MAsoN., Sl le'itcnalntl
Ancon. C. Z October 19. 19L9.

Bids for Excavation in 'nnnl Priem.
Bids will be received at the office of the Purchasing
Agent on the Isthmus Isthmian Canal Commission
Culebra C Z ip to 2 p na November 10. 1909, at
whith time they will be opened in public for six 1.61
sections of excavation in the Canil orism north of
arhaicoss bridge as follows
Section A. Consisting of approsximatelv 3 0/1h) cu-
bic yards of earth.
Section B Conistling of two i C) parcels of excava.
I0on'
I Containing approximately 70 000 cubic sards. of
which it i: estimated thdl 7ii per cent is soft rock and
30 per cent earth.
2 Cousisting of approximately 1 ?13 cubic yards of
heart h
Section C Consisting of two 121 mall parcels of
excrsatton-
I Containing approximately I 523 cubic .a rds of
eirth
2 CoaLiiilug approximhntel, I 10?i cubic yards of
earth
Seclirn D Consisinig of approsiminatel. 9,(i:' cubic
3ards uf e.irth.
Section E Consisting of two 121 parcels of excava-.
tion
I Containing approximately 39.950 cubic i.irds of
earth.
2 Cont.idnin i approximately 2 -47? cubic yards of
earth
Section F Cotisilting of five iSI simll parcel of
escavwition in the town of Bohio. contitaining in all
I2 i cubic yardss of earth
Tne location of there secLio.nU ofexca'ation until all
information aind specifications concerning the snine,
mrn. be obtained at theoffice of the Dim 'ion ongi.
neer Fmpire C Z
Work must be commenced before December 1,
1909 and completed hbeore october I 1910
Bids will be recCei'd for one or niorie se-tions and
must be nccoinpanied b. a deposit of 150 [i S cur-
rency which deposit will he returned to the untuc
cessful bidders. .\ ;uitLble bond or a depuosi eqlui-
valent toS per cent rf the amount bid ill he required
from the successful bidder As a 'uaranly.that the
work will be satifa.:torily performed said deposil or
bond to be returned on the sntisfinclor. completion
of the work
Bidders will 'ubmit a single unit price per cubic
yard for nil excavltion in each section. which pnce
will include all the necessary clearing for the prose-
cution of the excavation
No bids will be received from any United States
Government employee Proposals will be received in
sealed envelopes, marked "Proposals for excavation
in the Canal prism north of Barbacoas bridge.- The
nghl is reserved to reject any or nil bids.
R. E. WOOD.
Acting Purhlcasc Agenlt Oa //iM-iir..


MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following is a list of the sailings of the Pan-
ama Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line, the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:
NEW YORK TO COLON.
Allianca ..............P. R. R.Thursday......Oct. 28
Thames.......... .....R.-M...Saturday ......Oct. 30
Colon .................P. R. R.Thursday.......l v. 4
Prinz Joachim........ H.-A. .Saturday ......Nov. 6
Advance............... P. R. R Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Atrato..................R.-M...Saturday....... Nov. 13
Panama. ........ ... P.R. R.Monday...... Nov. 15
Allianca.......... .... P R R.Saturday......Nov. 20
Print Aug. Wilhelm...H.-A...Saturday ......Nov. 20
Colon................. P.R. R Saturday.......Nov. 27
Tagus..... ............R.-M...Saturday.......Nov. 27
Advance...... ........ P. R. R.Thursday......Dec. 2
Prinz loachim.........H.-A ...Saturday....... Dec. 4
Panama............... P.R R Thursday......Dec. 9
Orubas..................R -M. Saturday.......Dec. 11
Allianca...............P. R R.Tuesday........ Dec. 14
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm H A ..Saturday.......Dec. 1S
Colon .................P.R R Tuesday ....... Dec. 21
Magdalenn ............R -M. .Saturday.. ...Dec. 25
Advance....... .......P R. R.Monday .......Dec. 27
Persons desiring to meet steamers at Criatobal
should appl in advance of arrival at the Customs
office, room 8 building No. 1. Cristobal, for customs
line permit which are necessary to obtain admit.
stance beyond waiting room on pier 11.
All the steamers of the Hamburg-American and
Royal Mail lines call at Kingston enroute to Colon.
COLON TO NEW YORK.
Alliance ..............P. R. R Monday.......Nov. 8
Pnrnz Aug U ilhelm H -A.. .Tuesday......Nov. 9
Colon............ .....P. R. R.Tuesday.......Nov. 16
Tagus................ R.-M ..Wednesday...Nov. 17
Advance...... ........ P R.R.Sunday........ Nov. 21
Prinz Joachim ........ H.-A.. .Tuesday ......Nov. 23
Panama.............. P. R R Saturday ......Nov. 27
Oruba ........ ......... R M. .Wednesday....Dec. I
Allianca............... P. R. R Thursday......Dec. 2
Prinz Aug. Wilhelm .H.-A...Tuesday.......Dec. 7
Colon.................. P. R R.Thursday......Dec. 9
Advance. ......... ....P. RR Tuesday ..... Dec. 14
Magdalena ............ R-M ..Wednesday...Dec. 15
Panama............... P. R. R.Tuesday ......Dec. 21
Prinz Joachim ..... H..A. .Tuesday.......Dec. 21
Alliance .. ..........P. R. R.Sunday .......Dec. 26
Clyde ......... .......R -.M Wednesday....Dec. 29
A iortnightly service of the steamers Ancon and
Cri'tobal will he maintained as nearly as possible but
changes from the schedule may be found necessary.
The following as the schedule.
NEW YORK TO CRISTOSAL.
Critobal .............. R. R.Wednesday ... .Nov.
Ai-ncon ... ........ .P R R Wednesday....Nov. 17
Cristobal..............P R. R Wednesday ....Dec. 1
Ancon ...... .......... P. R. R.Wednesday ... Dec. 15
CRISTORAL TO NEW YORE.
Ancon .................P.R R.Sunday.......Nov. 7
Cristobal. ............ P. R. R.Wednesday... Nov. 17
Ancon .. ............ P. R R.Wednesday... Dec. 1
Cristobal. ............ P R R Wednesday....De. 15
Ancon ................. P. R R.Wlednesday....Dec. 29
.NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.
Turrialba ........... U.F C. Saturday......Oct. 30
Abaugarez. ........... U.P.C..Saturday ......Nov. 6
Atenas. .............. U.F.C..Saturday ......Nov. 13
Turrialba.............. U P.C. Saturday...... Nov. 20
Abangnare .. ...... F C .Saturday.... ..Nov. 27
COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.
Turrialba. ............ U F.C..Tuesday.......Nov. 9
Abangarez .......... .U.F C. Tuesday ......Nov. 16
Atenas ............ .U.P.C .Tuesday.......Nov. 23
Turrialba..............U.F.C Tuesday.......Nov. 30
Abangarea ............. U F C Tuesday ......Dec. 7
COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLtNG AT TRQTrwDAD.
Thames ....... ........R.-M. .Tuesday.......Nov. 9
The Panama railroad steamships sail at 3 p. m.
from dock at Cristobal direct to New York.
A ship of the United Fruit Company's line sails
from the dock at Colon. at 3 p mu.. Tuesday of each
week
Sailings of the French line (Cie. Genbrale Trans-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and
Guadeloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.
The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as
follows Cut-an for New Orleans, via Kingston. Ja.,
on or about November 13
The steamers David of the National Navigationu*
Company, and the Taioga of the Pacific Steam Navi-
gation Company, leave Panama, for David, province
of Chiriqui. and intermediate points, the first and
third weeks of each month.















CANAL


RECORD


Volume III. ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1909. No. 11.


The Canal Record
mF iskaed meekly under the authority and supenirwn
at the Isthmian Canal Commission.
The Canal Record is issued /re ol charge. one copy
each, taail employes oa the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copes and back numbers can be obtained from
the news stands a] the Panama Railroad Company for
Swe cents each.

Address all Commnunications
THE CANAL RECORD,
Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Record Mouth in Culebra Cut.
The excavation in Culebra Cut in October
was greater than that for any previous rainy
season month, and second only to that of
the highest monthly record, which was made
in March, 1909, when 1,511,397 cubic yards
were excavated. A comparison of the exca-
vation and rainfall in October of 1909, 1908,
and 1907 follows:

1907. 1903. 1909.
ICu. Yds Cu Ids. Cu. Vds.
Excavation ............ 834.499 1] 160.101 1.302901
Rainfall: incAe In lahes. /nicri
Gamboa ................ 1302 8 90 16 98
Empire ................ 15.44 887 21.14
Rio Grande ........... 15.09 8.59 18 52
The halfway point in the excavation in
Culebra Cut was passed in October, and an
article giving details of the work was pub-
lished in THu CANAL RECORD of October 27.
The total amount excavated at the close of
work on October 31 was 39,309,197 cubic
yards, and there remained to be excavated
38,733,098 cubic yards.
Canal Work in October.
The grand total of Canal excavation in
October was 2,827,798 cubic yards, which is
8,587 cubic yards less than the total for
September, and 1,052,539 cubic yards less
than the highest record, that of March. 1909.
Of the 2,827,798 cubic yards, 2,775,427 were
charged to "work" excavation and 52,371 to
"plant." The dry excavation amounted to
1,770,996 cubic yards, and was principally
by steam shovels. The dredges removed
1,056,802 cubic yards, in addition to the
amount pumped into Gatun Dam by the
three suction dredges on that work. The
progress on the locks at Gatun and Pedro
Miguel is referred to elsewhere in this issue
of THu CANAL RBCOaRD. The total amount
of concrete laid in October, was 41,650 cubic
lards.
In the Atlantic Division the total excava-
:tion was 452,142 cubic yards, 88,072 cubic
,rdsless than in September. Of this total
;;.,364 cubic yards were dry excavation and
mit nainder was removed by dredges.
the total excavation in the Central Di-


vision was 1,524,310 cubic yards, which was
52,514 cubic yards more than in September.
The features of the work in this division anil
in the Culebra Cut section in October are
referred to elsewhere in this issue of THE-
CANAL RECORD.
In the Pacific Division the excavation
amounted to 851,346 cubic yards, of which
742,024 cubic yards were taken out by the
dredges in the Pacific entrance.
A detailed statement of the excavation
and of the lock and dam work follows:
ATLANTIC DIVISION.


LoCAL ry.

Dry e.rcawat irn-
Locks Dam and Spill-
w ay .... .......
M indi ..................
Total ..............
Wet erxca aslen-
Atlantic entrance ...
Locks. Dam and Spill-
way ................
Permanent Plants .
To al .............. .


'Work."
Eicava
tion
Cu. i.
57 321
72.643
1X9 964


"Plant."
Exca--a.
tion.
Cu. Yds
7.40(0

7,4100


Total
excava.
Liou
Ca Eds.
64 721
7?,643
137.3>4


314.778 ......... 314.77


314 78


314.7,78


Total wet and dry I
excavation ....... .444.742 I 7.40 I 452 142
CENTRAL DIVISION.
A; dry exzcazvaion-,
Culebra Cut. ..... ... 30.9ul .. . ... 1.302..91
Chagres section........ 221.409 ... ... 21.409
Total ............ ... I 524.310 .... I 5 4.310
PACIFIC DIVISION.
D- excavation-
Locks Dams and Spill-
ways ............. .. 4 351 44.9;1 109.."2
Diversions............. .. .. ....
Total ... .. ......... 64 44.91 1093-22
Wle t m altto \ -_ -
Pacific entrance .... .. .91.......... ;20.920
Minflores Locks ... 1.1 21.1.04-
Diversions....... ..... ............. ..... ..
Total.............. 74 .024 .... 742.04
Total wel and dry
excavation....... 806.375 44.9;1 851 46
TOTAL CANAL eXCAVATION.
Dry excavation.. 1.718625 52.371 1.70.996
Wel ezcavalion 1.06.803......... 1,06.0b
Total ... .......... 2.775.427 52.371 2.827.798
Mean rainfall along Canal (eleven stations) 17 16
inches. Twenty six working dais.
DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION.

MATERIAL. Allantic. Pacific. Total

Fill placed indaumsand Cu Yds Ca. Yd' Ca. Yds.
sp illways ......... 521._)94 32.300 i53.594
Concrete laid in dams
and spillwars...... 3.516 18 3 534
Concrete laid in locks. 29.378 735 38,116

Central Division Excavation.
The excavation from the Canal prism in
the territory of the Central Division during
the month of October was 1,524,310 cubic
yards, which is the next to the highest ever
made in a rainy season month. The highest
record for a rainy season month was made in


October, 1908, when 1.551,409 cubic yards
were excavated. October, 1909, breaks all
previous records for rainfall, the total being
21.13 inches, or almost two and one half
times that of October, 190S, when the total
was 3 88 inches. The excavation on various
parts of the work in that division during Oc-
tober was as follows:
Cubic Yards.
Bohio ......... ............... ... 29.926
Buena l isin. ................. .. 37.473
Caimilo ........ ... .... ..... 52.978
M am ei ..... .. .... ... ..... .. 22.520
Taberailla ..... ......... .......... 142.897
Bas Obispo .... ....... ... ...... 304 S
Empire .. .. ... .... 550 384
Culebra .... .......... .. ............ 526 21
Total. .. ........ ............... 1.524 310
The total amount of material excavated in
the Central Division at the close of work on
October 31 was 46,819,110 cubic yards, and
the amount remaining to be excavated was
42,975,383 cubic Nards.
The Atlantic Entrance.
In the Atlantic entrance to the Canal, ex-
tending from deep water in Limou Bay to
Gatuu Locks, a distance of seven miles.
there are four distinct classes of excavation-
dredging under water, cutting a channel
into the land by means of dredges, steam
shovel excavation, and excavation by suction
dredges. The channel is to be 500 feet wide
and 41 feet deep at mean tile.
From deep water in the bay to the shore
line the material is largely earth and loose
rock, and it is handled readily by ladder
dredges, a dipper dredge and the sea-going
suction dredge Caribbean. Some hard rock
below a depth of 30 feet is drilled and
blasted. The channel has been dug to a
depth of 40 feet for a distance of about 2K
miles from the 41-foot contour in the bay,
to a depth of 30 feet for 3S miles from
the 41-foot contour, and of 20 feet for a
distance of 5 miles. The amount of silt
carried into the channel by the various cur-
rents has been determined by surveys to be
as much as 25 per cent, and this requires a
large amount of maintenance work, which
is done chiefly by the dredge Caribbean.
To lessen the amount of maintenance work
and to protect shipping in the harbor from
the violent northerss" that prevail once a
year, it has been recommended to build
breakwaters across the front of the bay leav-
ing an opening 2.000 feet wide for ships to
enter. The preliminary surveys for this
work have been completed, suitable rock
for the substructure has been located near
the site, and plans are in course of prep-
aration. Preliminary plans contemplate a
west jetty with the outer end in 48 feet of
water and trending toward Toro Point, and
an east jetty from 44 feet of water, trending
toward Manzanilla Point.
From the shore line to the bills at Mindi,
a distance of one mile, the channel is through
a salt marsh in which a layer of earth overlies







THE CANAL RECORD


Vol. III., No. 11.


hard rock. This material is blasted in the
dry with dynamite, and then is taken out
by the ladder and dipper dredges which
work their way into the land, making a
channel 500 feet wide and 41 feet deep.
The dredging fleetat the Atlantic entrance
consists of the sea-going suction dredge
Caribbean. three rebuilt French ladder
dredges, and one modern diaper dredge.
Dredging in the Canal prism was begun in
June, 1907, and up to November, 1909, there
had been taken out 12,392,825 cubic yards.
There still remain to be excavated between
deep water in the bay and the hills at Mindi
7,819,637 cubic yards. The work is advan-
cing at the rate of over 400,000 cubic yards
a month.
An article on the work at Mindi was pub-
lished in THE CANAL RECORD of October
27. At that point four steam shovels are
working below sea-level in a pit kept dry
by pumping. One of these shovels is ex-
cavating at 41 feet below mean tide; in other
words, on the bottom of the Canal.
No work has yet been done on the section
between Mindi and Gatun Locks. It con-
sists of a channel 500 feet wide up to a point
4,000 feet north of Gatun Locks, and 1,000
feet wide from that point to the locks. Suc-
tion dredges are to be used on this work,
and about 4,500,000 cubic yards will be ex-
cavated.
Visit of the Congressmen.
The Hon. James A. Tawney. chairman of
the Committee on Appropriations of the
House of Representatives, accompanied by
a majority of the members of that Committee,
sailed for the Isthmus from New York on
the Crzstbal on November 3, and is due to
arrive at Cristobal on November 10. The
members of the Committee include Repre-
sentatives Henry H. Bingham of Penn-
sylvania, Washington Gardner of Michigan,