<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 Organization chart
 Introduction
 Canal traffic
 Canal operations
 Supporting operations
 Administration and staff
 Financial report
 Statistical tables
 Back Cover


DLOC PCANAL



Annual report
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097367/00009
 Material Information
Title: Annual report
Spine title: Annual report of the Panama Canal Commission ( 1980-<1994> )
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Washington, D.C.
Creation Date: 1983
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: Periodicals   ( lcsh )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Fiscal year 1980-
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends Sept. 30.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Vols. for 1992- distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 1998.
Statement of Responsibility: Panama Canal Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 07777425
lccn - 96645119
issn - 1936-5306
System ID: UF00097367:00009
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report, fiscal year ended ...

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Organization chart
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Canal traffic
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Canal operations
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Supporting operations
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Administration and staff
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Financial report
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Statistical tables
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 81a
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Back Cover
        Page 127
        Page 128
Full Text
/2


PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1983


I ~�


REPO























Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation













ANAMA


CANAL


Balboa


OFFICE


, Republic


THE


COMMISSION


of Panama


ADMINISTRATOR


FROM THE ADMIN


ISTRATOR


It is a pleasure to submit the fourth annual report of the Panama Canal


Commission


covering


Canal


operations


fiscal


year


983.


Fiscal year


marked another successful year for the Panama Cana


in terms of fulfilling its mission to provide safe, efficient transit service to


international


ments


were


improvements


shipping.


Noteworthy among the Commission'


acceleration


to lock


of key


overhaul


maintenance


programs,


projects,
initiation


s accomplish-
technological


a second


generation marine traffic control system designed to improve the survei


lance


control


vessel


traffic,


implementation


a transit


booking system allowing vessels to reserve a slot


in the transit schedule.


Additionally


series


cost


reduction


measures,


aimed


keeping


operating costs down and minimizing the requirement for future tol


rate


increases,


were


implemented.


The actions


represent


significant achievements during a


year


in which


worldwide


recession


in the


maritime


industry


diversion


Alaska
decline


North


in vessel


Slope


trade


traffic and


to a


Canal


trans-Panama


pipeline


operating revenues.


resulted


in a


Through effective


austerity measures and the efforts of


our dedicated and well-trained work


force.


oneratinQ expenditures were controlled


without adverse imnact on






was


achieved


even


while


transits


largest


vessel


Cana


accommodate-


those of 100-foot beam and over


-reached a record setting


20% of tota


oceangoing transit


Improved Cana


service is also reflected


n our safety record which


showed a marked reduction in vessel accidents.


The accomplishments


during the


past year attest to


the extraordinary


contributions


made


men


women


who


work


to keep


waterway operating efficiently.


To retain these strength


in the challenging


years


ahead


, training


programs


have


been


developed


or expanded


with


emphasis


on increased


participation


by qualified Panamanians.


Panama-


nians now constitute over


75% of our work force and much of the increase


been


in senior


supervisory


positions.


number


collective


bargaining agreements al


o were concluded during the year,


establi


hing a


positive


constructive


relationship


between


Commission


employees.


Many challenges remain.


Cana


traffic levels have not yet returned to a


pattern


sustained


growth


however


we are confident that


the Canal's


future will be bright.


Traffic level


are expected to turn upward in the years


ahead


major


projects


important


term


viability


waterway will continue to be accompli


hed.


The Panama Canal Commis-


sion remains


fully committed to serving world trade with the standards of


excellence


that


have


been


tradition


Panama


Canal.


M'cAu LIFE,


Administrator





















TABLE OF CONTENTS


PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


Page


ORGANIZATION CHART


INTRODUCTION


ORGANIZATION . .. .. .. .................... . . . .
THE C ANAL ........................ ..... . .. ..
TOLLS RATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... . .. . . . . . .


BOARD OF DIRECTORS


OFFICIALS IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
OFFICIALS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.......


......... .C .......C



tee........C......
. .. . ... ., . ..
. . . . .. .P . ..
. .... . . .I ...
. ....... .. .. ...


CHAPTER I-CANAL TRAFFIC


TRAFFIC


COMPARATIVE HIGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS


. 7


COMMODITIES AND TRADE ROUTES


.... . . . . .. . .. . . .. . . 8


CHAPTER II-CANAL OPERATIONS
I TRANSIT O PERATIONS . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C . . C . . .
MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CANAL PROJECTS ........ .. . . .............



> CHAPTER II-SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


LOGISTICAL SERVICES .......


COMMUNITY SERVICES


. . . . . .. . .. . . . . ..... 21
. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . ... . .. .. . . 22


SANITATION AND GROUNDS MANAGEMENT
TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES .... ....


PUBLIC UTILITIES AND ENERGY


FIRE PROTECTION . . .. .. . , .... .. C. . . ... . ......
CANAL PROTECTION . . . . ..... . . .... ., .. .C..........


a ...... t
C.. a...C...C
* C .CCCC .C .t


HEALTH AND SAFETY
LIBRARY SERVICES .


CHAPTER IV -ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF
PERSONNEL: FORCE EMPLOYED AND RATES OF PAY


EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM


P 'in, rr' A CCA1DC flu


111


Pllnl rr i~ ccnlar










CONTENTS


Financial Tables


Page


TABLE
TABLE
TABLE


.--Balance Sheet.........


2.-Statement of Operations and Non-Interest-Bearing Investment
3.-Statement of Changes in the Investment of the United States


. . . . . . 34
S. ... . 35


Government


TABLE
TABLE
TABLE


4.--Statement of Changes in Financial Position
5.-Statement of Status of Appropriations ....


6.--Statement of Property,


Plant, and Equipment


* *** S C *S*C C~t e~te


*.. . . . . . . . . .. *.*O.. ..
te a...... CJ * CS . S


Notes to Financial Statements..


CHAPTER


-STATISTICAL TABLES


Shipping Statistics


TABLE
TABLE


.-Panama Canal Traffic


-Fiscal Years 1974 through


2.-Oceangoing Commercial Traffic by Months-Fiscal Years


and 1982 ..


TABLE
TABLE
TABLE
TABLE


3.-Canal Traffic by Flag of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1983......


4.-Classification of Canal Traffic by


--Laden and Ballast


6.-Segregation


. . .... . 54


1983


S"......


Type of Vessel-Fiscal Year


Traffic by Flag of Vessel


of Transits


Registered


-Fiscal Year


Gross


� ... 63


Tonnage-Fiscal


Year 1983


TABLE
TABLE


--Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal by Fiscal Years ...
--Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo Through the Panama
Canal from Atlantic to Pacific During Fiscal Year 1983 Segregated


by Countries in Principal Trade Areas ....
--Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo


TABLE


Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During Fiscal Year


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70


Through the Panama


Segregated


TABLE


TABLE


TABLE


by Countries in Principal Trade Areas
10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over


Atlantic to Pacific ..
.-Important Commodity
Pacific to Atlantic ..


-Principal Cana


S..................... . .76


Principal Trade Routes-


S. . . . . . . . . . . .... 84


Shipments Over Principal Trade


Commodities by Direction


Routes-


-Fiscal Year 1983


.... . 103
.... 122


Other Statistics










































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INTRODUCTION
ORGANIZATION
The Panama Canal Commission is an agency of the Executive Branch of
e United States Government, provided for by the Panama Canal Treaty


of 1977
U.S.C.


, and established by the Panama Canal Act of 1979 (93 Stat.


3601


et seq.),


enacted


September


1979.


The authority


452; 22
of the


President of the United States with respect to the Commission is exercised


through


Commission


Secretary


is supervised


Defense


Secretary


nine-member


Board.


Army.


Five


The


members


nationals of the United States and four are Panamanians. Board members


who are U


consent


nationals are appointed by the President with the advice and


Senate.


The Commission was established to carry out the responsibilities of the
United States with respect to the Panama Canal under the Panama Canal


Treaty


1977


In fulfilling these obligations,


the Commission manages,


operates, and maintains the Canal, its complementary works, installations,
and equipment, and provides for the orderly transit of vessels through the


Canal.


The


terminates


assume


Commission
on December
responsibility


perform


1999,


for the


these


when


functions
Republic


until
of F


'anan


Treaty
la will


Canal.


Commission


revenues,
interest,


costs


depreciation,


; expected
operating
capital for


recover,


through


maintaining


plant


replacement,


tolls


Canal,


other


including


expansion


provements, and payments to the Republic of Panama for public services


annuities,


graphs 4(a) an
Treaty of 1977


the U.
Fund.


in accordance


Article


with


XIII,


paragraph


Article


respectively,


Panama


para-
Canal


Revenues from tolls and all other sources are deposited in


Treasury in an account known as the Panama Canal Commission


Appropriations


operating


expenses and capital improvements


are enacted
estimated r


e


annually
ceints for


--A


by the Congress and are


*


year,


plus


limited


unexpendec


to the sum
1 balances


of the


Panama


Canal


Commission


Fund.


-~ -- - * - - -






INTRODUCTION

Vessels transiting the Canal are raised in three steps to the level of Gatun


Lake
three


, the principal source of Canal water, then lowered to sea level again in


steps.


The


three


Canal


locks


are paired


so as to permit


simultaneous lockage of two


vessels in the same direction or in opposite


directions.


Since August 15,


1914, the official date of its opening, the Panama Canal


has served


world trade virtually without interruption.


Through this fiscal


year,
83.7


a total of 625,510 vessels of all types have transited with 523,339 or


percent


total


being


oceangoing


commercial


class.


TOLLS


RATES


Panama


Canal toll


rates


were increased approximately 9.8 percent on


March


1983.


Toll rates are: (a)


On merchant vessels


, Army and Navy


transports, tankers, hospital ships,


supply ships, and yachts, when carrying


passengers


earning
"Rules


or cargo:


capacity.


$1.83


Such


Measurement


per net vessel ton


tonnage


of Vessels


is determined


for the


100 cubic feet
in accordance


Panama


Canal;"


of actual


with


(b) on such


vessels in ballast


, without passengers or cargo: $1.46 per net vessel ton


on other floating


craft:


$1.02


per ton


displacement.


treaty,


United


States


continues


to provide


Colombia


free


transit through the Cafial of its troops, materials of war, and


hips of war







PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISS


ION


BOARD


DIRECTORS


Beginning Fisca


Year


1983


Honorable
Chairman


WILLIAM R.


IANELLI,


Honorable ANDREW E


President


Assistant Secretary of the Army
(Civil Works)
Washington, D.C.


, Delta Steamship


Lines,


Short


Hills.


Jersey


Honorable J


OHN A.


Deputy Chief
U.S. Embassy


BUSHNELL


Mission


Honorable
Executive
Executive


TOMAS PA


Director


Bureau for


REDES R.


Buenos A


Argentina


Canal Treaty


Affairs


Panama,


Republic of Panama


Honorable PHILLIP DEAN BUTCHER B.


(Member-designate)


Honorable


RICARDO A.


RODRIGUEZ


President.


Inter-American


Panama.


Republic


of Panama


Regional Organization


Workers (ORIT)


Panama,


Republic


Panama


Honorable


WILL


IAM SIDELL


Powa v,


California


Honorable EDWIN FABREGA


Director General


Honorable


WILL


IAM


W. WATKIN. Jr.


Institute of Hydraulic


Resources


Beaufort,


South Carolina


Electrification (IRHE)


Panama,


Republic of Panama


Executive Committee


Honorable


WILLIAM


R. G


IANELLI,


Chairman


Other members to be determined.


OFFICIALS


IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


Administrator


Deputy


Honorable D.


Administrator


.............. Honorable FERNANDO M


. MCAULIFFE
ANFREDO, Jr.


OFFICIALS
Secretary ..........


WASHINGTON


.......... . M ICH


D.C.


AEL RHODE


GIBSON


Panama







INTRODUCTION


BOARD
Ending


DIRECTOR


Fisca


Year


1983


Honorable


WILLIAM


R. G


IANELLI,


Honorable ANDREW E. GIBSON


Chairman


Short Hills, New Jersey


Assistant


Secretary


of the Army


(Civil Works)
Washington, D.


Honorable OYDEN ORTEGA


Honorable LUIs A.


Minister
Panama,


ANDERSON


of Foreign
Republic <


Relations
r Panama


Minister of Labor and


Social


Panama,


Honorable CA


Welfare
Republic of Panama


RLOS OZORES


Ambassador to the


United Nations


Honorable JOHN A.


BUSHNELL


Honorable


Deputy Chief of Mission
U.S. Embassy


Poway,


WILLIAM SIDELL


California


Buenos Aires,


Argentina


Honorable


WILL


1AM W


WATKIN


Honorable


FERNANDO C


ARDOZE


Beaufort,


South Carolina


Panama,


Republic


Panama


Executive Committee


Cut Widening Feasibility Committee


Honorable


WILLIAM


R. GIANELL.


Honorable FERNANDO C


ARDOZE.


Chairman


Chairman


Honorable FERNA


NDO CARDOZE


Honorable OYDEN ORTEGA


Honorable ANDREW GIBSON
Honorable OYDEN ORTEGA


Honorable
Honorable


WILLIA


WILL


M SIDELL


IAM


Honorable


WILL


IAM


W. WATKIN


W. WATKIN,


OFFICIALS


IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


Administrator


Honorable D.


McAULIFFE


Deputy


Administrator


...... ....... Honorable


FERNANDO MANFREDO, Jr.


OFFICIALS IN


WASHINGTON


D.C.


Secretary


.MICHAEL RHODE


Panama,


Republic of Panama










CANAL


TRAFFIC












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Chapter


CANAL


TRAFFIC


TRAFFIC


Canal traffic and tolls
1983 as a result of the loss
trans-Panama pipeline sy
oil pipeline started opera
Total oceangoing tram
11,846 or 32.5 vessels dail
Vessels owned or operated
small Panamanian Govet


transits during the year


Despite t
was eviden


Transits
percent
1982. Ti
5,869 or
percent
Canal n


by
of
ran
49
of


:he l
t int
vess
total
sits 1
.5 pe
total
tonr


remained about
Panama Canal
Total Panam


year 1983
revenue a
effect on
($14.1 mi


from
Iso de
Marc
Ilion i


ss of tl


C
.11


revenue d
of the Al
stem and
tions earl
sits in fis
y from 14
I by the U.
rnment ve
compared
large ANS


declined substantially du
aska North Slope (ANS)
the worldwide shipping
v in October 1982.


I,
C
b
4
I.
I


:al yeai
,142 or
S. Gove
ssels (e
to 133
tanker,


he percentage of vessels ha
els in that category, which t
oceangoing transits comp
by vessels having beams of
recent of total oceangoing tr
oceangoing transits in the
lage, the average size of c
the same. Oceangoing con
net tons compared to 14,4
a Canal net tonnage decline
204.0 million tons in the pi
lined, despite the toll rate
ch 12, 1983. Total tolls r
of which was due to the 1


$325.6 million during


ring fiscal year
oil trade to the
recession. The


r 1983 dropped 16.2
38.7 daily during the
;rnment and free Colo
.g., health or police)
transits in fiscal year
s, the trend toward lai
ving beams of 100 fee
otaled 2,371, account
ared to 2,681 or 19.0
80 feet and over acc
ansits compared to 7,


prior year.
)ceangoing


ime
88 t
ed t
rior


Ce
La


fiscal vear 1982.


rcial ve!
ons in
o 170.7
year. C


In term


come
ssels ave
1982.
million
orrespo


SE


percent to
prior year.
mbian and
made 139
1982.
"ger vessels
t and over.
ed for 20.0
percent in
mounted for
226 or 51.1
of Panama


rcial transits
;raged 14,485


tons in fiscal
ndingly, tolls


increase of 9.8 percent put into
:venue reached $287.8 million
oll rate increase) compared to
Oceanoine commercial tolls


:







CANAL


TRAFFIC


COMPARATIVE


HIGHLIGHTS


OPERATIONS


Fiscal rear


Oceangoing transits:
Commercial ....
U.S. Government


11.707


14,009


ree . . . .
Total ..


.*a....
" S S S ' . '


a.. a..a... a.0 .. t t"."aa 0""a a ......
* US. S . S . . . * . . . . . . . S * . . . . S . . . . . ..5.


11,846


14, 142


Daily average


Small transit:
Commercial ....
U.S. Government


� . "" . S*.***. t t. a. .. ."... " . . . ".0
"" " "" . "0"*. .a.aaa. .a.a . . . . " . .


ree . . .


Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .


Total cargo:
Commercial . . .. . . ... ...... ........... .


Government


ree . . . �
Total ..


"'''''
a...'..
. amas . .


. *.........t"'.'t".a'...,.... .. ".

" " " " " " " S . " . . . . . . " . � .


1,108



145,591,428
354,878
2,512
145,948,818


1,129


185,453,260
285,451
70
185,738,781


Total
ment


Panama C
t tonnage.


'anal
* " "


net tons and


reconstructed displace-


170,655,341


203,999,77


Transit revenue:
Commercial tolls.. ....... ... .... .......... .......
U.S. Government tolls....... ......................
Tolls revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Harbor pilotage, tug, launch, and other services


Total transit revenue


UPSSS*UP* S
* . ~4S


$286,057,692
1,733,331
$287,791,023


55,381,005
$343,172,028


$324,031,594
1,557,503
$325,589,097


59,466,095
$385,055,192


COMMODITIES


AND


TRADE


ROUTES


Twelve key commodity groups have maintained relatively stable levels of


importance to Canal traffic in recent years.


The groups,


shown on the chart


on page


accounted


88.4


percent


of total oceangoing commercial


cargo,
when


near the proportion observed for these commodity groups in


they


registered


90.3


1982


percent.


Th, m.'tnct cinTff'irrflt Alp/lnnnrmrnt in C anal 2 trsfCi rdriC rna ficacl 17Par 10R2






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMI


ION


waterway.
commercial


Grain shipment


cargo


1983.


primarily due to an increase


million


ong tons,


accounted for 25.0 percent of total oceangoing


The


in corn


strength


hipments,


rising 59.5 percent from


commodity


group


which reached a record


3.6 million long ton


was
21.6
982.


This


increase


offset


nearly


the drop sustained


in wheat


shipments


which declined 60.3 percent to 5.6 million


ong tons from


4.0 million


tons


the prior year


. The downturn


in the wheat


movement was


due to a


decrease
soybean;


U.S.


which


wheat


purchase


China


increased by 8.9 percent to


. With


7.0 million


exception


ong ton


from 6.5


million
decline


tons


the prior year,


, dropping 37.4 percent


tons


982.


Grain


the remaining products


to 2.2 million


shipments


from


in the group showed


long tons
he United


from 3.6 million


State


constituted


84.4 percent


of the tota


movement of this commodity group,


with


Japan,


Mainland


China


South


Korea


being


principal


stinations.


Petroleum and petroleum products,


hipped through the Cana


the second major commodity group


, dropped by 42.5 percent from 59.0 million long


tons


in 198


to 33.9 million


ong ton


, reflecting the loss of the


ANS oil


trade.


Crude oil movements totaled


percent of the tota


commodity group.


.7 million long tons, representing 55
Twenty-four percent, or 4.4 million


long tons,


of the crude


shipments originated from the Ala


ska North Slope


Shipments


coal


million


coke
tons


decreased


52.4


, accounting


percent during fiscal


percent


4


year
cargo


hipment


A major factor in the sharp drop


in coa


shipments through the


Cana


was the slump in the Japanese steel industry which led to a reduction


of metallurgical coal import


by the Japanese.


Coa


to Japan accounted for


7.0 million long ton


or 65.5 percent of the trade,


hipments to


Taiwan


totaled


commodity


million
group.


relative increase


long
Coal


in bypas


proportion of U.S.


tons


12.6


shipments
movements


East Coa


t shipment


may


percent


have


coke


also


been


affected


around the Cape of Good Hope.


to the


The


Far East taking the Cape


route compared


to the Canal route


increased from 24.0 percent the prior


year


to 40.0


percent.


Among


those


commodity


groups


registering


increases


were


nitrates,


phates,


tons;
tons;
1.- - -


ores


d pota
metals.


umber and


which


which


product


- - -,


rose


11.4


increased by


which


were up by


A ~1-


percent


to 9.4


million


1.6 percent to 8.0 million long


1.8 percent to 5.9 million


I *


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CANAL


TRAFFIC


Commodity shipments continued to show concentration to specific areas


and countries of the world.


Trade between East Coast


United States and


Asia continued to dominate Canal traffic with 41.4 percent of total Canal


cargo moving over this route in fiscal year 1983.
than the 38.7 percent observed in 1982. Cargo


This proportion is higher
movements on this trade


route, however, dropped 16.0 percent to 60.3 million long tons in 1983 from


71.8 million long tons in


1982.


The


following


chart


table show the


principal


commodity


groups


moving in commercial vessels in 1983 and a comparison of the major trade


routes in fiscal years


1983 and


1982.


i







PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


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CANAL OPERATIONS











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Chapter


CANAL


Canal operation


OPERATIONS


are comprised of Transit Operations and Maintenance


Other


Canal


Project


various


functions


are divided


among


number of


operating bureaus within the Canal agency.


TRANSIT


Daily average transit


OPERATIONS


by oceangoing vessels decreased from the 38.7 per


day during fiscal year 198


to 32.5 per day during fisca


year 1983.


Average


time


Cana


waters


decreased


from


33.0


hours


fiscal


year


to 20.1 hours in fiscal year


tear


1983.


Percent


Vessels
of 600-foot


Fiscal


over


of total
oceangoing


transit


Percent


Vessels
of 80-foot
beam and over


of total
oceangoing
transit


* . . . . . . . . . S . . . . . . . . . . . * .*
.S . ..* S.......... . .. . .


The number of vessel


4,157
5,534
4,855
4,598
4,089


7,226
6,364
6,089
5,503


transiting at more than 36-foot draft


decreased


percent


during


compared
between


1983
year.


with
The


nches


1,715


vessels


maximum


during


transiting


allowable


draft


six-month


Canal
varied


period


February-August of this fiscal year.
Total jobs performed by Commission tugs decreased from 45,687 in fiscal


year


1982 to 35,454 in fiscal year


1983.






CANAL


OPERATIONS


fix


F~c~;~






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


MAINTENANCE


AND


RELATED


CANAL


PROJECTS


Cana


dredging activity was intensified this


year in


Gaillard


Cut.


The


Mamei Curve widening project,


which was initiated in fiscal year 1977 and


which required the removal


of approximately


lion cubic yard


material,
deepening


was


completed.


When


completed


in early


1985


channel


project will lower the channel an additional three feet below


current


levels


thus


providing


additional


water


necessary


meet


requirement


during


years


while


ensuring,


with


a high


degree


certainty, a year-round maximum draft of 39.5 feet.


During the $4.0 million overhaul at Miraflore


Locks


, this fiscal year,


miter gate


6, 117


and 119 were overhauled.


Commission employee


renewed miter and quoin bearing plate


, pintle and jaw bushings, bottom


seals


strut arms


anchor


castings,


accomplished


miscellaneous


repairs


walkways,


cathodic


protection


systems.


Five


towing


locomotives were overhauled this


year


Ten are planned for next year.


The


240- to 480-voltage conversion project continues. Conversions at Miraflore
and Pedro Miguel Locks have been completed, and the Gatun conversion i


in progress.


With the completion of the High Mast Lighting project at Pedro


Miguel


Locks this year,


pilots can handle wide-beamed vessels for a few


more


hours


at al


lock


Repair


of lock


locomotive tow track


systems continued during fiscal year


1983.


$3.7


construction


million


contract


was


Tug/Miter Gate


awarded


Repair


private


Facility


at the


contractor fc
Commission


Industrial Division at Mount Hope.


The contract was for assembly and the


Civil Work


part


a $6 million project which consists of constructing a


marine lifting table with a net effective lifting capacity of 750 tons,


hoisting


equipment,


finger


piers,


a 400-foot-long


work


area;


providing


appurtenant


specialized


equipment.


The


72-foot


160-foot


ifting table i


suspended from the finger piers by ten electrically operated


hoists.


This


undersized


installation


Marine


replace


Railway


e Industrial
will permit


Division's


work to


be done on


vessels


"in the dry"


without occupying the limited capacity of the drydock.


After completion,


Commission floating equipment,


except the Dredge


Christensen
maintained


Floating Crane Hercules,


Mount


Hope


with


and the two floating cai


considerable


personnel


ssons will be


support


cost


savings.






CANAL


impact, the vertical shaft end


OPERATIONS


slide on phenolic surfaces. Reduction of ship


and lock-wall damage is the purpose of this improvement.


In fiscal year


1983


, $1,284,859


spent


on knuckle fender installation.


Following two-step formal advertising procedures,


a$l


million con-


tract


was awarded


to a contractor to replace the electric power system's


obsolete Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system with


a modern computerized system.


The new system will monitor 332 telemetry


points as


well


as the


status


of 904 electrical


devices and


alarms.


control 580 devices, including generators, circuit breakers, and transformer


under


load


tap-changers


remote


terminal


sites.


This


$1.5


million


project is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 1985


The new system will


provide


power system


dispatcher with improved emergency reaction


capability, as well as with real-time information for more efficient operation


of the entire electric power


generating and


transmission system.


The Mount Hope gas turbine was overhauled to improve its reliability to
generate peaking power as needed, and the third hydroelectric generator at


Madden Dam Power


Plant was rewound and uprated to increase its


capacity


from


8,000


KW


12,000


KW


Completion


project at


Madden Plant uprates the capacity of the entire station from 24,000 KW to


36,000


KW


of hydroelectric


power,


thereby


reducing total


power gener-


ating


costs


increasing


base


generating


capacity


during


years


when


rainfall
Flood


permits.
control,


severe


weather


monitoring,


reservoir


management


capabilities were enhanced with the installation of an S-Band Radar,


of a contract to install an improved weather surveillance system.


part


The radar


was installed in May 1983 and has been operational since early June.


With


the radar in its present operational status, the Meteorological and Hydro-


graphic


Branch


altered


its flood control procedures to operationally


accept an increase of '/2-foot in Gatun Lake level without endangering the


locks.


The


impact


higher


lake


levels


will result


decreasing the


potential of draft restrictions during dry season and,


possibly, in allowing


more


hydroelectric


early


1983


power


generation at


, severe drought


Gatun


conditions


Dam.


required


the Commission to


restrict vessel draft, and to curtail the production of hydroelectric power.


Panama


Institute of Hydraulic Resources and Electrification (IRHE) also


felt the impact of the drought and had to impose brown-outs in many areas


n1 . *


A-it -


* .


I.. I


1


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1 IL W� lu ~CI






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Commission Marine


Traffic Controllers are being provided with a closed


circuit


television


(CCTV)


system


in order


improve


their


vessel


sur-


veillance along the critical sections of the Canal.


Ten of eighteen cameras


have been installed and ten of thirteen towers have been erected at selected


sites along the Canal.


At the


Marine


Traffic Control Center, six of eight


large


video


monitors


have


been


installed.


This


project


is scheduled


completion


in mid-1984.







SUPPORTING


'"ris~


OPERATIONS









fa






mt,


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Chapter


SUPPORTING


OPERATIONS


Supporting


operations


Panama


Canal


Commission


provided


essential support services to the operation and maintenance of the water-


way and


the agency'


facilities,


as well as to other


U.S. agencies on


Isthmus and to employees and their dependents.


These operations included


logistical services, employee services, sanitation and grounds management,


transportation facilities,


public utilities, fire protection,


Canal protection,


health and


safety,


library


services.


LOGISTICAL


SERVICES


The


Storehouse


Division


provided


centralized


procurement,


inventory


management,


warehousing,


distribution,


contract administration, supply


property


disposal


support


to Canal


operations.


Major


contracting


activities included approximately $27.8 million in Bunker "C" fuel purchases
for thermoelectric generation, $6.5 million for light diesel, purchase of the


fourth Alianza Class towboat for $2.1


million


, $1.5 million purchase of a


split hull dump scow for dredging operations, $1.6 million for renewal of


hydro-turbine


runners,


$1.1


million


electrical


power system


Supervisory


Control and


Data Acquisition (SCADA) System, and a $760,000 marine


lifting


table


Tug/ Miter


Gate


Repair


Facility


at Mount


Hope.


The Storehouse Division's excess disposal activities included transfers to


other U.S.


Government agencies of eauioment having an original acouisi-








COMMUNITY


SUPPORTING

SERVICES


OPERATIONS


During


fiscal


year


1983


Comm


mission


managed


housing,


other


Commission-owned buildings,


and recreational facilities


for the agency


employees and


their


dependents.


The


housing


livability program,


which


permits
use by


limited improvement


Commission


employees,


with rental payback to housing retained for


was


continued


were


programs


enhancing quarters security, quarters energy conservation and preventive
maintenance.


Commission


initiated


a multiyear


housing


management


plan


concentrate


ts housing requirements in selected housing area


Implemen-


station of the plan will enable the Commission to utilize housing and related


maintenance resources


in the most cost-effective manner while at the same


time allow the Commission to preserve optimum housing accommodations


for its eligible employees and to meet it


Panama


Canal


Treaty


related


responsibilities
agreements.


in accordance with


SANITATION


AND


GROUNDS


MANAGEMENT


Fiscal


year


1983


was an


unusual


year


in regard


to the


Commission


responsibility to control vectors of disease.


The Aedes aegypti mosquito,


dangerous carrier of both
found in the Canal area in


shipping piers.


yellow fever and


1974


dengue fever


which


was last


, returned to reinfest housing areas near the


Intensive control measure


coordinated with Government


Panama


vector control


officials


, promptly eradicated thi


infestation.


After


years


moving


northward


through


South


American


continent following an accidental release in Brazil,


Africanized honeybees


reached the


Panama Cana


in March


1982.


Thus


, fiscal year 1983 wa


second


year


efforts


to control


aggressive


insect


protection


employees and local residents from risk of serious


tinging incident


Over


African


bee swarms and


nests


were destroyed


during the year in the


interest


public


health


prevent


bees


from


being


accidentally transported


Canal


shipping


to uninfested


world


port






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMIS


SION


The Motor


TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES
Transportation Division operated and maintained a consoli-


dated motor pool of 836 vehicles designed to meet the vehicular transporta-


tion requirements of the Commission.


The vehicle fleet in fiscal year


included


trucks


various


types,


passenger-carrying


vehicles,


pecial-purpose


vehicles


. Vehicle mileage decreased


lightly from


7,961,000


Fully
repair


miles in fiscal


equipped


hops,


year


1982


including a


, provide facilities for


7,501,000


retreading


miles in fiscal year


plant


heavy


1983.
duty


overhauls, maintenance and repairs to


Motor


Transportation


Division


fleet


equipment


other Com-


mission


units.


In addition, some services were contracted out where they


were


available


inspection


in required


facilities


ocated


quantity


and


within


quality
Motor


Panama.


Transportation


The vehicle


Division


areas were used by the Government of Panama to conduct inspection


privately-owned


vehicles


Motor


Transportation


Division


perform


Commi


sslon


vehicle


inspections.


PUBLIC


UTILITIES


AND


ENERGY


Panama


Canal


Commission facilities


include electric power generation


and distribution systems,


distribution


communication systems,


water purification and


systems, and a central chilled water air-conditioning


system for


certain


Total


public
Canal


buildings


area


on the


energy


Pacific


demand


during


fiscal


year


1983


gigawatt hours, a 1.6 percent increase from the 558 gigawatt hours used last


year.


The peak hourly demand of 91


megawatts reached on April 4,


1983


was


2.2 percent above the peak of 89 megawatts in the prior year. Agency-


wide energy consumption in fiscal year


calculated together in Btu


to the fiscal year


1983 for electrical power and fuel,


's, was reduced a total of 25.6 percent in relation


975 baseline established by the Federal Energy Manage-


ment


gigawatt


Program.


hours


Electrical


was


power


percent


consumption


below


by the


usage


Commission,


levels


70.9


recorded


comparable operation


in fiscal year 1975


fuel consumption excluding fuel


power


generation,


million


gallons.


was


42.6


percent


below


- -, * U..............






SUPPORTING


OPERATIONS


Water


Consumption


Areas


(Millions of cubic feet)


Canal A rea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Panama City and suburbs........ .. .............. .. .. ........
Colon and suburbs................. ..... .......................


Total


792
1,655
743
3.190


722
1,612
740
3,074


The water provided to Panama City and suburbs in fiscal year 1983 was


2.7 percent above fiscal year


982 consumption and averaged 33.9 million


gallon


throughout


fiscal


year


1983.


FIRE


PROTECTION


The Panama Canal Commission Fire Division,


in coordination with the


Panama


Fire


Corps,


is responsible


protection,


firefighting,


rescue


operations


in Canal


operating


areas,


defense


sites,


civilian


military areas of coordination,


and shipboard firefighting on all vessels in


Canal


Area


waters.


During fiscal year 1983, there were 971 fires (excluding ships), causing a
loss of $233,262 as compared to 726 fires in fiscal year 1982 which resulted


na loss


of $390,455.


There were


14 ship fires during thi


fiscal year versus


prevlou


fiscal


year.


Ship


losses


in fiscal


year


1983


were


$17,670 as compared


to $2,813,155


year


before


CANAL


PROTECTION


The


Canal


Protection


Division


provides a


minimum esse


ntial level of


physical


security for important installations and


facilities


of the Panama


Canal Commission


through the


prevention and


detection of theft


, pilfer-


age,


and sabotage; and the prevention of unauthorized use of Government


property,


equipment and facilities.


Division personnel are also responsible


for the


Commission


physical environmental protection function.


During


fiscal


year


1983,


security


procedures) were


system


improvement


(personnel,


planned for Commission installations.


equipment,
Training of


security


personnel,


a continuous


function,


was


intensified


HEALTH


AND


SAFETY


Fiscal


\ear






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Veterinary


Division


disestablished


December


responsibility for food-inspection services was transferred to the Sanitation


and Grounds
responsibility


Management Division of the General Services Bureau,


zoonotic


disease


control


related


while


inspections


transiting


vessels


was assumed


Government


of Panama.


expanded


role,


Office


Personnel


Administration


responsible


the agency's occupational


health, industrial hygiene, and


safety
Medical


-'-


programs. i ne
al Department


office m<
Activity


maintains


close


(MEDDAC),


liaison


with


Panama


U.S. Army
all matters


pertaining


to the


health


care


provided


to Commission


employees,


their


dependents and others sponsored by the agency.


The office also maintains


liaison with components of the Department of Defense, other elements of


Government, and appropriate officials and


organizations of the


Government


of Panama


relative


to health


matters.


Work-place


safety,


employee


safety


training,


accident


prevention


continued to receive management emphasis at all level


in the organization.


During fiscal year


1983, the Commission experienced 761


performance of


duty accidents


in which


the injured


employee


required


medical attention


beyond


There


first aid,


were


no fata


as compared


accident


to 817
in fisca


uch accidents in fiscal


year


1983


compared


year


1982.


to four the


prevlou


fiscal


year.


LIBRARY


SERVICES


The Library Services Branch of Community Services Division is respon-


sible


providing


mission-support


information


research


Panama Canal Commission, maintaining a special collection of library and
three-dimensional materials relating to the history of the Panama Canal,
and providing limited general library service to Commission employees and


their


dependents,


Forces


their


dependents,


to the


extent


possible,


other


circulation


Isthmian


index


residents.
decreased


from


1,942.9


fiscal


year


1982


1,016.6 in fiscal year


year
from


1982


to 8.6 in


246,700


1983.
fiscal


The reference index decreased from 9.4 in fiscal


year


1983.


Total items in


library decreased


to 239,900.


















Chapter


ADMINISTRATION


AND


STAFF


PERSONNEL


FORCE


EMPLOYED


AND


RATES


PAY


At the end of fiscal year


the total Isthmian force of the Commis-


sion


was 8,344


compared


to 8,363 employees in fiscal year


Of the


total in 1983
temporary.
Commission


, 7,745 were full-time permanent and 599 were part-time and


addition


on the


there


Isthmus.


was


one


Thirteen


military
persons,


officer


U.S.


assigned


citizens,


to the


were


employed


Commission


New


Orleans and


hington,


D.C.


Approximately


percent of the total Isthmian force was comprised of


Panamanians; 3
percent of U.S.


percent of third country nationals;


citizens.


and the remaining 20


Rates of pay were based on a Canal Area


Wage


Base


occupational


categories


normally


filled


recruitment


on the


Isthmus prior to the treaty effective date of October 1


1979


and on a U.S.


Wage
States


Base for positions normally filled


prior to


that


date.


The


New


by recruitment from the


Wage


System


employees


United


hired


locally,
the rate


on or after October


1979


, was revised April 3,


for non-manual grade 9 and manual grade


1983, increasing


10 and above to U.S


Wage


Base


employees
eliminated.


rates.


hired


that


same


into critical skill


The following table


date


Critical


Skill


Wage


occupations after October


Base for
1979 was


hows the Commission civilian permanent


full-time


Isthmian


work


force


citizenship and


wage


base.


Fiscal Year


Canal Area


Wage Base


Wane Base


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98


3,258
I O1C


3,356


.. -. . . a a . .. . . . a. . . - - a- - - - - - . 1


Total


1.11.1 rrr


I


II J _ *


1)1(((






ADMINISTRATION


AND STAFF


EQUAL


EMPLOYMENT


OPPORTUNITY


PROGRAM


Between fiscal years 1982 and 1983,


filed
U.S.


remained essentially unchanged.


complaints


minor


the total number of EEO complaints
A minor increase in the number of


decrease


number


Non-U.S.


complaints were noted as follows:


Fiscal year


United States.....


Non-U united


States


10


12


Total.


Generally,


employees


alleged


disparate


treatment


in appointment


promotion actions.

On September 16,


1983


, the Assistant Secretary of Army for Civil Works


approved a collective bargaining agreement between the Commission and


Maritime/Metal Trades


Council (AFL-CIO).


This agreement covers


employees
employees).
allegations
agreement.


nonprofessional


bargaining


unit (approximately


7,400


The agreement permits members of the bargaining unit to raise


of
Fo


discrimination
r non-U.S. c


through


citizens,


grievance


formal


procedure


administrative


appeal


procedure is replaced by an abbreviated investigative procedure intended to
mesh with the time limits established in the negotiated grievance procedure.


For U.S


citizens in the unit


, the statutory appeals procedure is an option in


negotiated


grievance


procedure.


U.S.


- and


non-U.S.-citizen


employees r
employment


covered


may


continue


negotiated
a file EEO


agreements
complaints


applicants


under the statutory


procedure or the Agency's administrative procedure, respectively.


Between fiscal year's 1982 and 1983


there were negligible variations in the


Isthmian permanent work force composition on the basis of sex as follows:


Fiscal rear 1983


Fiscal year 1982


Female
Male ..


.* * � �* * * . *t * * * * * * * * * * . . . .
...........S.. .....,.. .... ...4...t..


791
7.,051


(10.1%)
(89.9%)


6,955


(10.1%)
(89.9%)


The continued trend in the increasing number of Panamanians in the work






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


PUBLIC


During fiscal year 1983,


AFFAIRS


the Office of Public Affairs continued to expand


improve


agency


communications


with


local


international


media.


Strong emphasis was placed on creating close relations with local


news media (press, television, radio, and publications) and in participating


in exhibits,


symposiums,


seminars


Republic


of Panama


abroad.


The Office of Public Affairs also continued to expand its contacts


with the world maritime industry and dedicated considerable effort towards


increasing


Panama


Canal


Commission


participation


international


conferences and shipping exhibitions.


Two new presentations were created


year


into


use in internationally-based


forums


in London,


England and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Both emphasized the Canal's efforts to


provide its customers with safe, efficient transit service,


while at the same


time striving to maintain and improve the waterway to ensure its maximum
operational effectiveness.


During the year,


the office


handled 288,435


visitors at


Miraflores and


Gatun
visitors


Locks and conducted 809


were


numerous


tours of the locks facilities. Among the


representatives


international


press,


representative


of television and


the motion


picture industry involved in


making documentaries about the Canal.

OMBUDSMAN
The Office of the Ombudsman, established by the Implementing Legis-
lation for the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, continued to respond to


employee a
formation.
administrat


dependent


complaints,


grievances,


requests


Generally, complaints required the Ombudsman to investigate
ive problems, inefficiencies, omissions, and oolicv conflicts


caused within the Panama Canal Commission and other U


i Sr


Government


agencies on the Isthmus as a result of the treaty. However, the widest latitude


possible was applied to consideration
morale and quality of life.


problems


affecting


employee


During


fiscal


year


1983,


over


3,043


requests


information and/ or


assistance were recorded by the Ombudsman. As in the previous year, the
majority of the Ombudsman's work concerned Commission employees and
those employees who were transferred with their functions from the Panama
Canal Comnanv/ Canal Zone Government to the Denartment of Defense


/


I ,


*






ADMINISTRATION


AND


STAFF


Pilots, and the Metal Trades Council) representing both a professional and


non-professional


bargaining


unit;


Marine


Engineers


Beneficial


Association, District No.


1-Pacific Coast District representing a licensed


marine engineer unit; and the International Association of Fire Fighters,


Local


representing


a firefighting


unit.


These


four


bargaining units,


together with


Panama


Canal


pilot unit,


which is represented


by the


International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, comprise the total
organized labor structure of the Panama Canal Commission pursuant to


Federal Service Labor-Management Relations Statute, 5 U.S.C.


Chapter


Based


upon


May


1983


data


(including


temporary


employees),


approximately


percent


work


force


were represented


labor


unions.

Bargaining commenced on the non-professional contract on January 21,
1982 and culminated in an agreement which became effective on Septem-


ber 16,


1983. Negotiations on the licensed marine engineer contract, which


began on April 6,


1982, produced an agreement which became effective on


October


1982.


September


1982;


Bargaining


that agreement


firefighter


became effective


contract


started


on April


1983.


Negotiations on the professional unit contract commenced
1982, but were suspended on May 12, 1983 due to th


S


w


on March 9,


filing


decertification petition by a member of the bargaining unit. A new labor


organization,


National


Federation


Professional


Employees


(Panama),


intervened,


and


Federal


Labor


Relations


Authority


scheduled to conduct an election early in fiscal year


1984.















Chapter


FINANCIAL RE



FINANCIAL


SPORT


STATEMENTS


FOR


THE


FISCAL


YEAR


ENDED


SEPTEMBER


1983


The


Panama


Canal Commission is an appropriated fund agency of the


Executive


Branch


United


States Government provided for by the


Panama Canal Treaty of 1977


and establi


hed by the Panama Canal Act


1979 (Public


Law


96-70).


The Commission is expected to recover,


through toll


and other revenues, all costs of operating and maintaining the


Canal


, including


interest,


depreciation,


capital


plant


replacement,


expansion and


improvements, and


payments to the


Republic of Panama


for public services and annuitie


pursuant to paragraph 5 of Article III and


paragraph


Treaty of 1977


4(a) and (b) of Article XIII, re


Revenues from toll


pectively, of the Panama Canal


and all other sources are deposited in


United


Commission
improvement


States


Fund.


Treasury


in an account


Appropriations


known as the


operating


are enacted annually by the Congress


Panama


expenses


Canal
capital


and are limited to the


sum of the estimated receipts for the year, plus any unexpended balances in


Panama


Canal


Commission


Fund.


The


Commission's


accounts are


kept


an accrual


basis


accounting


in accordance


with


generally


accepted accounting


principles,


while the status of


appropriated funds is


determined


on a


funded


(obligation-incurred)


basis.


The financial statements of the Panama Canal Commission, appearing


Table


through


with


accompanying


notes,


present


financial


S S -n -


I- A --- -_B __ *- L1 a *. *


a K


l A A


I � . r�


r






FINANCIAL


REPORT


Summary information concerning operating results and capital expen-


ditures


follows:


RESULTS


OPERATIONS


Net loss from operations amounted to $4.1 million.


This amount will be


recovered from subsequent revenues as required by section 1602(b) of the


Panama


Canal


1979


(Public


Law


96-70).


Accrued


capital


CAPITAL
expenditures


EXPENDITURES


for fiscal


year


1983 amounted


$21.7


million.


The principal expenditures were $3.3 million for replacement of


dump scows, $2.3 million for navigational improvements, $1.4 million for
replacement of launches and launch engines, $1.3 million for improvements
of the wingwall knuckle fendering systems, $1.3 million for construction of


a ship
project.


tie-up


station,


$0.9


million


marine


railway replacement










FINANCIAL


Table


REPORT


1.-Balance Sheet


Assets


PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT:
At cost (Note Ic)... ..........


:ss accumulated
ances (Notes le,


depreciation
2 and 3) ..


valuation


CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash and fund balances (Notes 4 and 5):
Deposit funds and undeposited receipts:
Postal fund ............. ...
Trust fund . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
Cash receipts for deposit into U.S.


Unexpended appropriated funds:
Operating funds ........
Capital funds ............
Emergency fund ..........


Ac


allow-


Treasury


* . ..as.. .... S..e.m
.' . '' . ...m' . ..."
"'....' .m .. ''...s "


:counts receivable, less allowance fo
accounts of $50,612, for fiscal year 1982
(N ote If) ................. .. .. . ......


Other receivables (Note 7)


doubtful


. em...us..
* ...a.....


Inventories, less allowance for obsolete and excess stock
of $750,154 and $800,000, respectively (Note Ig)...

Other current assets..... ...................... . .


OTHER ASSETS:
Deferred charges:
Cost of early retirement benefits (Note Ih)....
Retirement benefits to certain former employees
predecessor agencies (Note h) .............
O their ....................... . . . .... . .


$869,818,221

402,676,579

467,141,642






158,657
1,132,860
282,793
1,574,310


45,222,217
28,517,883
10,000,000
83,740,100
85,314,410



11,043,545
826,867
11,870,412


42,010,283

354,383
139,549,488


312,960,000

10,776,000
612,319
324,348,319


853,314,309

386,676,308


466,638,001


167,723
1,015,983
576,536
1,760,242


74,440,013
21,424,115
10,000,000
105,864,128
107,624,370



9,987,875
826,867
10,814,742


34,580,616

203,737
153,223,465


332,520,000


,940,000
816,426


345,276,426


-.










PANAMA


September


CANAL


COMMISSION


1983 and


1982


Liabilities


INVESTMENT OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT:
Invested capital:


Interest-bearing (9.885%
(Note 9) ............
Non-interest-bearing....


and 9.


* .
* a.


Current budgetary accounts (Note 4
Obligated operating funds .....
Obligated capital funds........
Unobligated capital funds .....
Unobligated emergency fund...


178%,


respectively)


'... ...... . . ..
. a. a..a ea .e.a. ...

):
. a . .. . . " " . . a a a

"a " e a.......a a
..C.C .....a .......


$108,905,590
268,748,245
377,653,835

45,222,217
18,031,685
10,486,198
10,000,000
83,740,100

461,393,935


$89,763,345
258,511,310
348,274,655


74,440,013
15,705,670
5,718,445
10,000,000
105,864,128

454,138,783


CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Accounts payable:
U.S. Government agencies
Government of Panama.
Other ................


Note


*. 5.*5....*.S .....ttC U.
*.....a.t .teC .C .a *aaaa ...


Accrued liabilities:
Employees' leave . . ........ . . . .. ... . .
Salaries and wages.. .................... . .
Cost of early retirement benefits (Note lh)....
Retirement benefits to certain former employees


predecessor agencies (Note


Ih) .....


*


Employees' repatriation................
Ship accident claims (Notes 7 and II)..
Net revenue payable to Government of
(N ote 12) ..a......... ............
O their ......................... .. . ..


Other current liabilities:
Unfunded ship accident claims
Advances for capital-unexpende
O their ......................


DEFERRED CREDIT:
Advances for
6d and 13).


capital
.....CC


being
a a a as


C


t* C
* C*
* a a


of


* a a a
"....
.I....


Panama

5......sb


(Notes 7 and II)
1 (Notes Id and 13)
.....*a...C... aaa


amortized
seat......


(Notes


3,914,323
6,205,923
4,708,282
14,828,528

38,075,806
6,124,362
19,560,000

1,364,000
1,457,000
9,818,560


2,432,361
78,832,089


17,890,038
13,231,035
1,114,088
32,235,161

125,895,778


14,437,009


22,808,314
7,090,498
6,197,843
36,096,655


36,427,154
5,624,977
19,560,000

1,483,000
1,743,000
11,032,030

378,635
2,027,612
78,276,408

20,553,489
11,379,967
916,418
32,849,874

147,222,937


11,956,238


LONG-TERM LIABILITIES AND RESERVES:
Cost of early retirement benefits (Note
Retirement benefits to certain former


Ih).......
employees


293,400,000


312,960,000










PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 2


.-Statement of Operations and Non-Interest-Bearing Investment


Fiscal Years Ended September 30, 1983 and 1982


OPER


ATING REVENUES:


Tolls (Note Ib)


Advances for capital
Net tolls revenue .


Other.............
Advances for capital
Net other revenue


(Note




(Note


* * S S S S * S S S S S S


$287,791,023
(4,078,000)
283,713,023


111,417,549
(1,173,549)
110,244,000


$325,589,097


(681,000)


324,908,097


112,946,382
(5,870,015)
107,076,367


Total operating


revenue .......... . . . . . . . . .


393,957,023


431,984,464


OPER


ATING EXPENSES:


Payments to the Government of Panama (Note 12):


Public services
Fixed annuity.


Tonnage


10,000,000
10,000,000
51,190,136


71,190,


35,970,930


Maintenance of channels and harbors
Navigation service and control ......


Locks operation..........


72,45


2,357


45,641,090


10,000,000
10,000,000
61,193,887
81,193,887


45.203


79,067,472
45,998,340


General


repair,


storehouse,


engineering and


mainte-


nance


services..........


9,625,


,305,378


Transportation and utilities


Housing operations...............
General and administrative (Note 15)


42,104,53


S... . . . . 8,87


Interest on interest-bearing investment (Note 9)


Other . . . . . . . . .
Total operating


expenses


* S S S S 55****
* S4S S S 55556


* S C S S S St
* . S SC S S S


NET OPERATING REVENUE (Loss) (Notes lb, 8 and 12)


INVESTED CAPITAL-NON


69,126,899
9,943,192
33,164,463
398,089,827


(4,132,804


-INTEREST-BEARING:


Unrecovered costs (recovered) deferred


(Notes


lb and 8) .................


revenue


payable


to Government


(Note 12). .....�..............
Investment at beginning of fiscal year


4,132,804


of Panama


* . . . . S *
* 5064~~


.....


258,511,310


36,403,300
8,136,555
72,226,412
9,123,826


42,029,589
430,688,571


1,295,893




(917,258)

(378,635)
249,101,935


* . *,.S.....* SttSStt* S * S * S C S S S
* 55SS*9C9 S S * * S S S 55555555C*~***











FINANCIAL REPORT


C




a,C


e4O C) ~C)C~
'ntr4- -
6cC 4rro

-0'~


I'I



Ste



E



CI)

C.,




Cc



C a




'u
Ic0)


* S * S I
* a a a at
* S I a a
* S a a a
* a t at a
* a S a* S
* a a a S
* I S a a
* a a p a


.rnt r4



:.-i 428
.CNIO~r
a en-I 0


.....0
fle
*5d
I-



I-


,rt
* ** a S I I I
* ** a S a a O
* a *a 5


* a a a.
* S a
* . S
* S I
* . . .1
* a a a
* 5 I
* a * a
* a a S
* a a S


* 4 4 5 * S
a a a S I a


* * *
**
* S


Z : :~:: C


.I- .e :-L :



:vj oZ ~* 5


401s CaLO. Cu *j U)
-;. 0tz *: )1-
a*Owut *> ~�
*L *m t


* * * * a
* 4 * U *
* aM a


a co

* a ac -*"
*. C a

* a 3 S
S ^ e
.' a
a
a0a




' '-r EO
EC>.




;o
I^4) Sea
C C.*- ,- *
3"Sat
-, "^0-r"^ i- /a











PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


.4O- vr
.Nr~rr
.00 t
* . CJ,
eNr~40
r~r-r-
5-


cc c~ r~ rb
C F * * C


.4.90


S



ca
*o


0\





O


a ha




S: -




C


C Ct
NN F
a - u
000' o
*r C F
S 0%r
*


* 9 5 5
* S S S
* * 5 5
* 5 6 5
* * S S
* S S S
* S S


5-

* : .




* S S- Sn
*' S
*V S, S 4




*~ S 5 4) 5
S~~ard)1
I..b.ka>~


* S


* S S )
* S S





*> a SO






Uj at -







FINANCIAL


Table 4


REPORT


.-Statement of Changes in Financial Position


Fiscal Years Ended September 30, 1983 and 1982

1983


SOURCE OF FUNDS:
From Operations:
Revenue ......


Less operating expenses:
Interest on interest-bearing investment
Payments to the Government of Ps


Qote 1


2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


mnama


Other expenses...............
Total operating expenses .....


Net operating revenue (loss) (Notes lb, 8 and 12)
Unrecovered costs for fiscal year 1981
(recovered) deferred (Notes lb and 8) ........
Net revenue payable to Government of Panama
(Notes lb 8 and 12).......................
Unrecovered costs for fiscal year 1983 deferred
(Notes lb, 8 and 12) .......... ...........
Add transactions not requiring outlay of funds:
Depreciation (Note le) .... ...........
Provision for lock overhauls (Note li).....
Provision for casualty losses (Note lj)......
O ther.............................. ...


Change in investment of the U.S. Government:
interest on interest-bearing investment .....
Receipts deposited into U'S. Treasury......
Disbursements from appropriated funds ....
Repayment to the U.S. Treasury of the fiscal
year 1980 appropriation lapsed..........


Net property transfers..........
Other........................


* CcS** *c S


Amortization of advances for capital.


Advances for capital
6d and 13).......


being amortized (Notes


Total source of funds


APPLICATION OF FUNDS:
Lock overhauls expenditures....
Casualty losses..... ..........
Accrued capital expenditures....
Total application of fu
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN WORKING Ci


*nd c S 9**S........c
* ee *e m. 99 ** *


ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN WORKING CAPITAL:
Increase (decrease) in current assets:
Cash .......................... .....


Receivables.........
Inventories .........
Other......... . . . . .


* 9
* S S S S S S


* C * 9


$393,957,023


9,943,


71,190,136
.. 316,956,499
398,089,827


(4,132,804)


m�...... .. . .


,132,804


18,514,996
4,354,000
3,117,088
1,970,819
27,956,903


9,943,192
(398,461,068)
446,006,200
(28,200,421)
(202,466)
293,744
29,379,181
919,711

2,480,771
60,736,566

5,040,623
4,214,134
21,704,598
30,959,355
$29,777,211


$ (185,931)
1,055,670
7,429,667
150,646


$431,984,464
9,123,826
81,193,887
340,370,858
430,688,571


,295,893


(917,258)
(378,635)



18,754,070
3,544,000
12,200,000
6,454,007
40,952,077


9,123,826
(440,139,216)
403,774,533

(2,291,082)
285,548
(29,246,391)


11,956,238
23,661,924


3,214,853
12,288 ,023
24,903,322
40,406,198


$(16,744,274)


$ 26,439
(1,665,437)
(5,703,715
(156,336










PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 5.-Statement of Status of Appropriations
Fiscal Years Ended September 30, 1983 and 1982



1983


SOURCE OF APPROPRIATIONS:
Operating funds:
Current year operating appropriation ..........


$405,378,634


$400,754,000


Obligated operating funds brought forward:


Fiscal year 1980.....
Fiscal year 1981 .....
Fiscal year 1982.....


. .a . . . . m e... .

etc........cc....


23,684,912
5,623,556
45,131,545


27,699,623
31,733,726
... m .......


74,440,013


479,818,647


59,533,349


460,187,349


Capital funds:
Current year capital appropriation (no year) ....


29,024,000


19,766,000


Obligated capital funds brought forward:


Fiscal year 1980
Fiscal year 1981
Fiscal year 1982


. . ... . . .... ...O....Q,�IQDO . . .. "
... ....ca m........ CSC***.c* c...
* cc..c.me......... *....a.. c


358,549
4,618,448
10,728,673

15,705,670


4,162,768
3,208,244


17,371,012


Unobligated capital funds


(no year) brought forward:


Fiscal year
Fiscal year
Fiscal year







Emergency fund (no


* e.e . et.. ........ C S C . eec
eeccc..........c.*m.ecc.c. .
eec.. ...c.....me.........c ...


599,957
845,934
4,272,554

5,718,445

50,448,115


10,000,000


1,288,708
6,815,438


8,104,146

45,241,158


10,000,000


year) .................�� �����







PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 5.-Statement of Status of Appropriations


Fiscal Years Ended September 30,


1983 and 1982


APPLICATION OF APPROPRIATIONS:


Operating funds:
Expenditures from operating appropriations:


Repayment to the U


Treasury of the fi


year 1980 appropriation lapsed
Fiscal year 1980 . . . . . . . . ... ..
Fiscal year 1981 . . . . . ..........
Fiscal year 1982. .......
Fiscal year 1983. ........ .. ....


�. ......d

* a .a.. .. C
�..........


$28,200,421
21,121,981
2,830,821
38,274,112
333,648,633


u.a...s...
4,927,818
26,279,322
348,750,350


424,075,968


379,957,490


Obligated operating funds:
Fiscal year 1980 ....
Fiscal year 1981 ....
Fiscal year 1982....
Fiscal year 1983 ....


" a *. . ".." .... . . . .. . .

� . . . . . . . * e. . . .. . . .
�.. " t ...s".. eta. .....


Unbligated operating funds lapsed .............


Capital funds:
Expenditures from capital appropriations:
Fiscal year 1980 . ........ ...
Fiscal year 1981 .... ..... ..
Fiscal year 1982. ....... .. ..
Fiscal year 1983 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Obligated capital
Fiscal year
Fiscal year
Fiscal year
Fiscal year


funds:
980..
981 ..
982..
983..


Unbligated capital fund
Fiscal year 1980 ..
Fiscal year 1981..
Fiscal year 1982..
Fiscal year 1983..


me..*mC*S Ca *55* SCCS as..
IssacCe. 55*CCC**Si *SSCC


" ".* "''. t ".... t ". ...


s (no year):
" i... ....C.C a "...... .
* a'. ....' ".. "."....." a
.* ''... m. "". . "..m..C
..e................... *


2,543,398
3,424,423
4,717,168
34,537,228

45,222,217

10,520,462

479,818,647


483,026
3,088,345
11,799,504
6,559,357

21,930,232

273,632
2,058,558
924,503
14,774,992

18,031,685

201,848
317,480
2,277,219
7,689,651

10,486,198


,684,912
,623,556
,131,545


74,440,013

5,789,846

460,187,349


4,492,971
14,559,299
4,764,773


23,817,043

358,549
4,618,448
10,728,673


15,705,670

599,957
845,934
4,272,554
..i...7 8.445

5,718,445


I












FINANCIAL REPORT


tPs









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I






PANAMA


CANAL


COM MISSION


NOTES


FINANCIAL


STATEMENTS


Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.
The Comptroller General of the United States approved the Accounting


Principles and


Standards Statement of the Panama Canal Commission in


letter dated September


1982.


A summary of


significant accounting


policies follows:


a. Accounting


and


reporting.


required


section


Panama Cana


Act of


hereinafter referred to as the Act


the accounts of


the Commission are maintained pursuant to the Accounting and Auditing


1950.


This


requires


that


principles,


standards


related


requirements


accounting


met,


as prescribed


Comptroller


General
Treasury


United


States


after


Director


consulting


Office


with


Secretary


Management


Budget


concerning their accounting, financial reporting and budgetary needs.


The


Accounting and


Auditing Act


1950 also


requires that the accounts be


maintained on an accrual basis.


Cost


application


recovery.


generally


required
accepted


section


accounting


1341(e)(1
principle


to the


Panama


Canal Commission, a


United State


Government agency comparable to a


rate-regulated


public


determines


manner


in which


costs


recognized.


The basis for tolls rates is prescribed in section


1602(b) of the


Act.
that:


This section of the Act


, known as the "statutory tolls formula,


"provides


"Tolls
cover


hall be prescribed at rates calculated to produce revenues


as nearly


as practicable


costs


maintaining and


operating


Panama


Canal


, together


with


facilities


appurtenances related thereto,


including unrecovered costs


incurred on or after the effective date of this Act, interest, deprecia-


tion,


payment


to the


Republic


Panama


pursuant


para-


graph 5 of Article III and paragraph 4(a) and (b) of Article XIII of


the Panama Canal Treaty of


, and capital for plant replace-


ment


, expansion,


and improvements.


Tolls shall not be prescribed


at rates calculated


to nroduce revenues sufficient


to cover oav-






FINANCIAL


Property, plant and equipment.


recorded at cost or, if acquire
value determined by the Direc
Administrative and other rela
and therefore not capitalized.'
equipment is charged to expe


ed
tor
Lted
The
nse


REPORT


Property, plant and equipment are


from another Government agency, at
of the Office of Management and Bud
I general expenses are recovered curre
e cost of minor items of property, plant
, as incurred.


d. Adva
recoveries r
replacement
capital adv
amortized
calculated
advances.


nces
nay
it, e


for capital.
be programme
expansion, or


A portion of 1
d annually by t
improvements


tolls in excess of depreciation


he Board of Di
. Such funds


recto
are


Seances from Canal users. Upon utilization, these ad
through an offset to depreciation expense in a
to approximate the depreciation on assets acquired


rs for plant
considered
vances are
n amount
with such


e. Depreciation. Property, plant
their estimated service lives at rates c
with additional annual depreciation,
premature plant retirements.


and equipment are depreciated over
omputed using a straight-line method
identified as composite, to provide for


f. Accounts
Panama Canal
written off. An
previously writ
accounts which
was applicable


receivable. Uncollectible accounts receivable of
Commission are recognized as a reduction in revenue
y subsequent collections of Commission accounts recei'
ten off are recorded as revenue. The allowance for dou
appeared on the Commission books at September 30,
only to the receivables of predecessor agencies.


the
when
able
btful
1982,


g. Inventories. Operating materials and
cost, plus cost of transportation to the ultimate
Panama. An allowance has been established
obsolete and excess stock.


supplies are stated at average
e destination on the Isthmus of
to reflect the estimated cost of


h. Retirement benefits. Employer payments t
States Civil Service Retirement System and to
Social Security System are charged to expense.
liability for future payments to employees under


o the contributory
the Republic of P
The Commission
these systems.


United
anama
has no


Non-United


States


citizen


employees


who


retired


from


predecessor


agencies prior to October 5,


Service
plan. P
expense
sL..na r


Retirement Syst
payments made un
e. The liability o
a - a - a -I a a . a


em
ider
f the


1958, are not covered by the United States Civil
)ut do receive benefits under a separate annuity
this annuity plan are recorded as a current year
e Commission for future annuity payments to
L ..: - ~~~~i : n ...:AII t..i . : A** .ZI A, .ai a nn aA : Ii- t n


I






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Reserve for lock overhauls.


A reserve is provided through an annual


charge to expense to cover the estimated cost of periodic lock overhaul


Reserve for casualty losses.


A reserve i


provided through an annua


charge to expense to cover the estimated cost of marine accidents and other
casualty losses.


Housing


rights.


monetary


value


signed


to the


rights


granted to the United States Government by the Republic of Panama to use
Canal Area housing transferred to the Republic of Panama under the terms


of the


Panama


Canal Treaty of 1977


The cost to manage,


maintain and


provide


livability


improvement


to these quarters i


charged


to expense.


Rental income is included in other revenues.


Plant Valuation Allowances.


At July
equipment


Canal


1951


certain


transferred


Company


valuation allowances for property,


from


Cana


Panama


Zone


I


Canal (agency) to the


Government


plant and
Panama


were established


reduce to


usable value the costs of the assets transferred.


At October


1979


such


transferred


valuation


from


allowances


Panama


were


Canal


applicable


Company


Canal


assets
Zone


Government to the Panama Canal Commission were carried forward.


September 30,
amounted to


1983 and at September 30,


$99.3


million


1982


comprised


, these valuation allowances


(a) $5.6


million


to reduce


usable
$50.9


value
million
*


construction


the cost o
to offset


property,
interest c


period;


$42.8


plant and


equipment


imputed


million


offset


transferred


the original
the cost of


I Canal
defense


facilities and suspended construction projects,


the latter being principally


the partial construction of a third set of locks abandoned in the early part
of World War II.


Property,
or partially


plant and equipment offset by valuation allowances,


reactivated


are reinstated


a reduction


in the


when fully
valuation


allowance and by an increase to the non-interest-bearing investment of the
United States Government in proportion to the value to the Commission of
the reactivated asset.


Depreciation as a


Percentage


Average


Cost


of Plant.


The provision for depreciation, expressed as a Dercentaee of average cost


* ntcs






FINANCIAL


REPORT


As of September


1982


, the cash and fund balances of $107,624,370


were made up of $104,375,796 on deposit in the United States


Treasury,


$2,021,770 on deposit in commercial banks, and $1,226,804 on hand.


Of the


total


$105,864,128


was comprised


current


budgetary accounts which


included appropriated funds for operations, capital and the emergency fund.
The emergency fund represents the amount on deposit in the United States


Treasury which is to be used "


. . . to defray emergency expenditures and to


insure


the continuous efficient and safe operation of the


Panama Canal


when fund


appropriated for the operation and maintenance of the Canal


prove insufficient for such purposes. . . ."
The postal fund consists of outstanding money orders, postal savings and


interest accrued thereon.


The trust fund


fund will remain available until


primarily includes deposits


iquidated.


made by customers for future


tolls


, and other service payments.


Panama Canal Commission Fund.


The


Panama


Canal


Commission


Fund


as established


by the


Panama


Canal Act of 1979 (Public Law No.


96-70),


is made up of receipts deposited


in the United States Treasury less appropriation warrants issued during the


fisca
1983


year.


The balance in thi


and $143.9 million a


account, $146.3 million as of September 30,


of September 30,


1982


is available for future


appropriations.
Section 1302 of the Panama Canal Act of 1979 (Public Law No.


provides


that all appropriations necessary to operate the


Panama


96-70)
Canal


shall


issued


from


Panama


Canal


Commission


Fund


The


appropriations for fiscal year 1980 were issued to the Commission from the


General Fund of the United States


Treasury.


The status of the amount still


owed to the General Fund of the United States Treasury for fiscal year 1980
is as follows:


Millions


of Dollars


Operating Appropriation.
Capital Appropriation ...


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S . . a. a . a � . . . . . S " " " "
. . ... . .0. 0"0"000"'''''''''''''''.'..''." . . . .


$427.2


$463.8


(350.0)


Repaid to General Fund (07/81)
Repaid to General Fund (12/82)


Amount owed General Fund of U.S.
September 30, 1983 ............


Treasury as of


............ . $ 85.6


6. Accounting Changes.







PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Effective with fiscal year 1982,


there was a change in the method of


applying the accounting policy for dredging costs.


The effect of this change


was to increase expense and reduce the capital advance requirement.


The


precise dollar


amounts


were


magnitude


isolated


this change cannot


Commission'


be measured


operating


since these
accounts.


However, the change did not have any impact on net operating revenue. The


recurring


costs


dredging


waterway


are charged


to expense.


Non-


recurring dredging costs for substantial improvements and betterments to


waterway


are considered additions


to plant and


are capitalized and


depreciated over their estimated service lives.


Amortization of Advances for Capital (see Note Id) was implemented


in fiscal year


1983 based on the following procedure:


At the beginning of


each


fiscal


year,


an amount


equivalent


capital


advance


funds


disbursed


plant


replacement,


expansion,


or improvement during the


previous fiscal year is reclassified and amortized over the average accounting
life of assets acquired in the fiscal year in which the funds were expended.
e. The intent of the lock overhauls reserve policy is to normalize costs


directly related to the periodic repair and maintenance of the locks.


Repair


maintenance


costs


caissons,


which are


used


exclusively


lock


overhauls


have


increased


dramatically


recent


years.


minimize


significant fluctuations in results of operations, these costs are now charged


to the reserve. In fiscal year 1983


$754,136 for repair and maintenance of


caissons was charged to the reserve for lock overhauls.


Other Receivables.


Other


receivables


represent


services


provided


connection


with


ship


accidents for which the vessel i


settlement.


considered to be responsible awaiting final


This amount is also included in the computation of estimated


liabilities established for ship accident claims.



8. Unrecovered Costs Due from Subsequent Revenues.
Pursuant to the provisions of section 1602(b) of the Panama Canal Act of


1979 (Public Law No.


96-70),


the fiscal year 1983 net loss from operations of


A-A 4


*fl.


C A' C


tS


*


IC


I fl i . * U * a a. . a la A a a a na -I - a a a a a aa a a a a a a a


ir


r







FINANCIAL REPORT

Interest-Bearing Investment of the United States Government.


The interest-bearing investment of the United State


Panama Canal is determined based on section


Government in the


603(a) of the Panama Canal


979.


The


interest-bearing


investment


United


States


Government at September 30,


1983 and September 30,


1982


was determined


as follows:


Millions of Dollars


Investment at September 30, 1981
Fiscal year 1982 transactions:
Disbursements.........
Receipts .............. .
Net property transfers .


* S * S Se4 *Se* .** . .S* S * ~ **


$128.4


$403.8
(440.1)
(2.3)


Net change........


Investment at September 30, 1982
Fiscal year 1983 transactions:
Disbursements.........
Receipts ... . . . . . . ..
Repayment to United
1980 lapsed funds ....
Net property transfers ..


... .. . .. ................... $ 89.8


States


Treasury


$446.0
(398.5)


of fiscal


Net change.........


. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 19.1


Investment at


September 30,


$108.9


. Accounts Payable-United States Government Agencies.
Included in the accounts payable to United States Government agencies


are s


hip accident and other claims in the amount of $19.1 million for fiscal


year 1982 that were forwarded to the Department of Justice in Washington,


D.C.


after reaching a settlement or receiving a judgment for approval for


payment.

11. Ship Accident Claims.


Liabilities arising from ship accident claim


are divided into fund and non-


fund categories.


Accident


The fund category i


made up of the following:


which occurred prior to October


Accidents which occurred


within


1979.


ocks after September 30,


1979.


Accidents which occurred outside the locks after September 30,
, for which the claim or estimated liability is $120,000 or less per


(38.6)


-�






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


cents per Panama Canal net ton. In addition to these payments, an amount


of $0.4 million wa


paid to the Government of Panama during fiscal year


1983 in accordance with paragraph 4(c) of Article XIII


which states that an


annual amount of up to $10 million will be paid out of operating revenues to


the extent that such revenues exceed expenditures of the Commission.


This


amount
Panama


is subject


Cana


to the


limitations


set forth


Act of 1979 (Public Law No.


in section


96-70).


Advances for Capital--


Transit Booking System Fees.


During fiscal


Commission


year


tested a


, with approval of


system


whereby shippers,


SBoar
for a


"d


of Directors


fee, could make an


advance reservation for vessel transit. The test continued for approximately
four months generating funds of $5.9 million. The system was activated in


fiscal


year


1983


generated


funds


million.


Such


funds


considered capital advances from Canal users. By direction of the Board of


Directors


, these fees are set aside for capital improvements.


Reserve for Casualty Losses.


The reserve for casualty


losses at September


of $12.8 million


includes


million


marine


accidents


$0.3


million


other


casualty lo


sses.


a res


ult of a management analysis of accident frequency


severity,


regular


monthly


accrual


of $0.8


million


adju


downward


to recognize


n the reserve account balance the decreased loss


trend for larger vessel


the reduced


potential loss exposure resulting


from the significant drop in overall transit level


marine


accidents


was


adjusted


during


Accordingly,


fiscal


year to


the reserve
maintain a


balance of $12.5 million in the account.


The


reserve


casualty


losses at


September


of $9.1


million


included


$8.8


million


marine


accident


$0.3


million


other


casualty losses.


The monthly accrual for the reserve for marine accidents in


fiscal year


1982 was $1.0 million per month for a tota


of $12.0 million.


Extraordinary Retirement.


During fiscal


year


the retirement of SIP-7 Emergency Gates and


Miter Gate Latching Device


was approved at the March 1982


meeting of the


Board of Directors.


The retirement of these systems was recommended by


United


State


Army


Corps


Engineers


reviewed


selected


specialist


s of the


Panamanian Society


of Engineers and Architects at the


w






52 F

the opinion of management and Commission counsel,


FINANCIAL


REPORT


these pending claims


and lawsuits will be resolved with no material adverse effect on the financial
condition of the agency.


Commitments


purchase


under


orders amounted


uncompleted


to


$36.4 million at September 30,


$30.8
1982.


construction


million at Se
Of this amount


contracts and


ptember


unfilled


1983


$0.2 million in unfilled


purchase


orders were prepaid as of September 30,


1983


and $0.1 million as


of September 30,


1982.


In addition


the Panama Canal Commission is liable


for an indeterminable amount with respect to death and disability payments


under the Federal Employees'


Compensation Act.


h and negotiable securities of a kind acceptable by the United State


Government
depositories


1983


in the amount


designated


$7.0


of $6.5


million


Panama


million


were


Canal


September


held


United


Commission


1982


State


at Septem-
> guarantee


payment by third parties


of their obligations.


The Panama Canal Treaty of 1977


Article XIII


, paragraph 4(c),


provides


that


an annua


amount


to $10


million


year


paid


to the


Government of Panama out of operating revenues to the extent that


revenues exceed expenditures.


Payment to the Government of Panama is


subject to the limitations set forth in section 1341(e) of the Panama Canal


Act of 1979 (Public Law No.


96-70).


In the event operating revenues in any


year do not produce a surplus sufficient to cover this payment,


the unpaid


balance shall be paid from operating


urpluses


in future years up to the


amount


available


from


these


surpluses.


of September


1983


balance contingently payable to the Government of Panama amount


$36.9 million.


of September 30,


1982


, the balance contingently payable to


the Government of Panama amounted to $26.9 million.


. Treaty Impact.
On September 7,


1977


the United States of America and the Government


of Panama signed the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977


The


Treaty provided


for the establishment of the Panama Canal Commission on October 1


1979


to assume certain operational responsibilities for the Canal until December


1999.


When


Treaty


terminates


December


1999


Government


Panama


shall


assume


total


responsibility


S


F. I n n r r I. 1~ ri








Chapter


VI


STATISTICAL


Shipping


TABLES


Statistics







STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 1.-Panama Canal Traffic--Fiscal Years 1974 Through 1983


Total traffic


Number
of
transit


Long tons I
of
cargo


Traffic assessed tolls


on net

Number
of
transit


tonnage basis


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


Traffic assessed tolls
on displacement
tonnage basis


Number
of
transits


Displace-
ment
tonnage


OCEANGOING


COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC'


119,422,568
141,898,218
134,204,402
35,272,300
163,826,571
194,773,111
208,376,741
291,838,590
301,762,600
323,958,366
285,983,805


47,906,914
40,101,459
17,212,266
30,888,300
22,978,785
42,518,288
54.110,866
67,214,935
71,221,762
85,452,332
45,590,759


3,984
3,565
2,123
3,031
1,868
2,647
2,902
3,476
3,847
3,976
1,668


135,715,628
135,053,680
127,778,919
33,686,757
133.353,132
156,907,260
167,470,601
182,063,175
188,656,491
202,884,207
169,503,918


200,376
171,006
131,258
23,205
108,642
109,798
136,600
137,593
S11,418
129.684
132,431


OCEANGOING U.S.


GOVERNMENT TRAFFIC'


* a *O* * eSSS~t .
* . . .e. ..b * * a.


e.. a..*.......
* . . S Ct
* S t*IO


$1,831,535
1,376,797
727,983
166,779
805,983
889,093
1,054,169
1,515,326
1,241,442
1,546,746
1,721,925


1,748,963
526,497
177,508
55,383
212,677
291,115
357,482
396,481
301,776
285,451
354,873


2,021,966
1,287,777
641,137
118,300
577,483
589,085
726,755
844,748
705,936
794,282
812,840


142,807
122,953
87,728
65,025
165,148
214,145
207,640
217,055
143.121
309,206
350.699


FREE OCEANGOING


TRAFFIC'


...............
*.C.B .*.C.BSCS. S


""CS ...... S
* * S ....S. ....


.... ....... .C.C
ee.....c..C .... C


..... *0***t**


.. C* S S S S C


* C U S S S S

C. S C


2,504


56,364
694
22,854
1,474
21,252
3,789
4,527
1,686
2,248
5,010
9,119


27,244
10,400
41,655
1,800
10,380
1,100
2,194
4,810
8,544
21,903
5,986


4,304 $
3,786
2,280
3,059
1,997
2,785
3,056


TOTAL OCEANGOING TRAFFIC


121,254,103
143,275,015
134,932,385
35,439,079
164.632,554
195,662,204
209,430,910


49,655,877
40,627,956
17,395,409
30,943,683
23,191,842
42,809,403
54,468,349


4,213
3,715
2,208
3,047
1,935
2,721
2,990


,793,958
,342,151
,442,910
,806,531
,951,867
,500,134
,201,883


370,427
304,359
260,641
90,030
284,170
325,043
346,434


Fiscal


year








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION



Table 1.-Panama Canal Traffic-Fiscal Years 1974 Through 1983

(Continued)


Total traffic


cargo


Traffic assessed


on net
Number
of
transits


tonnage basis


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


Traffic assessed tolls
on displacement
tonnage basis


Number
of
transit


SMALL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC3


* I * I S C C S * * I SOS
*I * * e c s *SI 51511

* I.S.SatSU C i., It
* at.......a.....
*........s...a. a


* .C ..* . . . .. ..a *..
* *Stltl~ eISS S C
*. I . I I C. a.a C...
............... I �


$62,376
52,684
49,314
24,785
39,960
63,526
76,591
74,898
65,604
73,228
73,887


23,496
7,939
6.866
1,236
2.820
6,962
7,718
787
1,355
928
669


77.722
54.174
50,281
15,389
48,717
57,827
69,229
52,052
44,962
50,399
48,033


SMALL U.S. GOVERNMENT TRAFFIC3


.Ia*S*SS.C*CC*C*


. . . l. . .





.. .. .s.a a...a . *..
. ..... .I~ a S S CSS. .
..... .........


$3,312
4,729
6,168
1,613
12,851
9,504
14,375
15,129
10,712
10,757
11,406


I

23

8
9


5,088
6,382
8,019
2.144
6,769
0,742
5,519
4,313
0.431
0,973
1.177


SMALL FREE TR


* I C SS)a1 to..

a~t SS* 5* 510


S1t CC** *i***


5,269
4,735
3,201
3,313
3,087
3.808


* tat... a *. ....
- - 0 5 a . S S S S S S S S .


AFFI


CC C 31
50
.. CS1 0i
20
3


70
8


TOTAL PANAMA CANAL TRAFFIC


$121,319,791
143,332,428
134,987,867
35,465,477


I %.. I.LT


49,679,373
40,635,927
17,402,325
30,944,942
23,194,672
42.816.393


C ~tJ I


137,873,248
136,398,866
128,495,834
33,823,345
134,004,377
157,562,393


---5.


377,043
312,046
270,590
92.174
302,513
336.897


Number
of
transit


Displace-
ment
tonnage


. '71


*









56 ST AT IST ICA L TABLES





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0O -
Ca� .y L









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 57



Table 3.-Canal Traffic' by Flag of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1983

Measured tonnage


Number
of
transit


Argentina ...............
Australia ..... . . . . . .
Austria ...... . . . . .
Bahamas ................
Belgium ............ . . .
Bermuda ................
Bolivia .......... .. . . .
Brazil ................. ..
Bulgaria ................
Canada .......... .. . . .
Cayman Islands ..........
C while ............. .... ..
Colombia ...............
Costa Rica ..............
Cuba ... .............. .
Cyprus..................
Czechoslovakia ..........
Denmark. ..............
Dominican Republic......
East Germany ...........
Ecuador.. ..............
Egypt ...................
Finland . .. .. .. .. .. . . .. ..
France ..... ............
Ghana ... .... .... .. .. . .
Greece ........ .........
Guatemala ..............
Honduras . .............
Hong Kong..............
India ...................
Indonesia ...... ....... . .
Iraq . ................. .
Ireland............. . . . .
Israel ............. ... .
Italy ................... .
Japan...................
Kuwait........... . .....
Liberia ..................
M alaysia . . .. . . .. . . . . . . ...
M alta ... ................
M exico ................
M orocco ................
Netherlands .............
New Zealand ............
Nicaragua . . .. .... .....
Norway .. .. . .. ... .. ..
Panama .. ...............
People's Republic of China
Peru ...... ...............
Philippines ..............
Poland..................
Portugal ... .............
Republic of China (Taiwan)
Rumania .......... .....
Saudi Arabia ............
Singapore ... ... . ......
South Africa .......... .
South Korea.............
Spain.............. .
Sri Lanka..............
Sweden .. .. .. .. ..... ....
Switzerland..... .... .. .
Turkey ....... ...... .. ..


I
15
2
20
51
10
10
32
16
16
5
112
141
3
153
71
1
254
2
11
358
I
21
84
2
888
2
47
5
25
18
2
4
70
110
1,165
4
1,555
15
8
70
3
239
4
5
413
1,697
104
272
155
62
3
122
2
7
219
4
220
137
I
150
69
9


Panama
Canal
net

380,957
45,554
255,501
1,084,038
110,521
85.110
253,354
97,459
131,700
10,716
1.282,436
1.924,545
2,841
901,481
564,397
16,610
4.546.296
2,784
58,918
2,997,876
18,762
212,150
1,496,272
19,682
13,617,830
7,008
276,234
80,531
419.780
241,636
11,828
56,739
1,413,719
1,294.145
21,049,780
48,289
28,673,392
279,173
118,953
1.248.997
18,755
2,355,427
108.735
42,505
7,621.610
20,310,756
1,939,476
2,705.136
2,035.462
406,069
1,890
2,491,328
9,650
43,696
4,477,634
23,080
3,662.743
845.012
29,301
3,070,948
694,445
75.729


Registered
gross2

460.882
53,688
303.233
1,281.913
108,357
106,700
323,074
121,343
158,667
11,856
1.408,953
2,148.547
2,976
1,063,467
634,399
20,596
5,863,577
2,380
68,959
3,541,583
22,606
268,171
1,420,859
26,008
15.768,158
8,256
344,957
95,332
510,672
292,548
13,952
68,056
1.857,746
1,591,775
18.494,869
62,257
29.731,447
315.464
140,821
1.566,224
23,432
2.645,123
129,661
48,000
8.368,058
20,586,091
2,241,344
3.283,154
2,209,170
460,200
3,770
3,186,114
12,506
42,336
4,234,306
26.692
4,439,018
898,669
32.758
2,528,601
823,754
99.250


Tolls
$3,295
660,562
79.720
444,940
1,848,925
165.970
148.942
432.765
165,831
225,001
19,344
2.196,417
3,287,920
4,252
1,536,804
948,214
27,739
7,829,863
4,580
89,328
5,031.222
31.333
360.894
2.634,354
32.377
22,853,694
11703
462,940
144,884
688,553
421,535
18.688
99,295
2.483,997
2.238.082
35,093,265
80,046
47,896,173
480.548
187,546
2,029.990
34,241
4,042,106
189.758
75,064
13,014,280
34,185,992
3,226,307
4,628,169
3.522,025
708,018
5,184
4,326,065
15,874
71,180
7,474,962
40,578
6.311,106
1.479,093
53,621
5.352,258
1,184.547
129,173


Long
tons of
cargo

211.718
36,523
329,685
1,316.523
9,743
61,070
112,049
78,768
120,327
14,832
1.508.319
1,309,372
591
702,175
537,850
27.299
3,209,756
589
11.545
2.528.540
31.096
237.412
1,058.455
8,056
15,588,888
8.688
98,574
114,364
417,307
255,086
3,948
87,383
928,884
877.832
11.674,473
30,199
28,160,094
443.472
72,638
1.078,764
19,568
1.387.142
36,623
29,989
7.086,846
18,385,482
1,881,661
2.930,110
2.605.550
259,889
836
1.445,579
2,145
8,075
3.372.335
17.423
4.331,706
622.210
46.640
1,257,727
275.470
81.645


�11���1��1��������1���








STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 3.-Canal Traffic'


by Flag of Vessel


-Fiscal Year 1983


-Continued


NOTE.--n Canal traffic statistics, foreign naval


vessels


ment of 300 net tons (Panama Canal measurement) and


tons and


over.


are classified


as oceangoing commercial


ment tonnage, have been included in the table above.


the following table shows statistics covering 39
displacement tonnage.


vessels


such as transports, supply ships, tankers.


over, and vessels


vessels.


of war, dredges.


Statistics on these


vessels,


etc., with


measure-


etc.. with a displacement of 500


except


as related to displace-


As displacement tonnage cannot be combined with net tonnage,


which transited the Canal during fiscal


1983 and paid tolls on


Number
of
transit


Argentina
Ecuador..
France ...
Japan....
Mexico ..
New Zeala
Netherland


* . S * * **~ ca.. *** SSS Naval.
* S 5 * * SW S S* S 5 5 9*5do
* 5e *5tt S 5* * 9*t 55*S . .do
* S * S ** S ** S S S S 50* * *do


nd
s..


People's Republic of China


Peru . ... . . . . . .
Portugal ........
Republic of China
Spain .. . . . . .. ...
Spain . . ..... . . .
Turkey. . . . . ...
United Kingdom
United States ...
United States ....
Venezuela ......


(Taiwan)


S. . . . . . . Naval. .
.. .... . . .do


.Floating Drydock
. . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . ... Naval. . . . . . . . .
. . ... .. . ... .. . do ... ... ..
do .........
S......... .. ...D. Dredge ........
S. . ........ ....... Naval..........


Total......


Displace-
men?
tonnage
3,543
4,683
24,227
8,615
1,750
2,550
15,877
19,487
13,374
1,840
2,850
6,983
5,162
3,002
8,353
3,060
4,535
2,540
132,431


$3,295
4,718
22,660
8,787
1,628
2,372
16,194
18,123
13,416
1,877
2,907
6,802
5,265
2,792
8,261
2,845
4,626
2,591


$129,159


*


................ Dredge















STATISTICAL TABLES


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59 39 4a 5 55 954


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PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


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* C S S
* S S S C
* a S S 9
* S S C S
* S C C S
* C S C S
* C S S C
* C * C S
* S S S S
* C C S S


* C S S
* S S C C
* C C S S
* C 9 5
* C S S
* S U C
* S 5 5
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* C S S
* C S C S
* C C C S
* S S S
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* S S S S
* 5 5 5


.C*u :-cn lI




*C c * �j - j e '-a
:Wh0( CU O Y1Oc
e "o 1 : , : L coS~;













PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION



Table 5.-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Flag of Vessel

Fiscal Year 1983


Laden


Ballast


Plum. 1


ber
of
transit's


Australia . .........
Austria ... . . .. ..
Bahamas...........
Belgium ..........
Bermuda.... .......
Bolivia ............
Brazil ...... ......
Bulgaria ...........
Canada............
Cayman Islands ....
Chile .. ....... ....
Colombia..........
Costa Rica.........
Cuba. ......... ...
Cyprus ..... ...... .
Czechoslovakia.....
Denmark ..........
Dominican Republic


East Germany
Ecuador .....
Egypt .......
Finland......
France ......
Ghana .... ...
Greece.......
Guatemala...
Honduras....
Hong Kong..
India ........
Indonesia ....
Iraq .........
Ireland ......
Israel.... .. ..
Italy .... ....
Japan . . .......
Kuwait ......
Liberia ......
Malaysia.....
Malta .......
Mexico ......
Morocco.....


Netherlands .... .
New Zealand.....
Nicaragua........
Norway.. ...... .
Panama .........
People's Republic
Peru ............
Philippines.......
Poland ..........
Portugal.........
Republic of China
Rumania ........
Saudi Arabia.....
Singapore ........
South Africa .....
South Korea .....
Spain ...........
Sri Lanka .......
Sweden..... .....


C........ .4c..cc.
... ... ....... C* CS *
.. * * C * * C." . "
I @ � �b �� � � "


* * * * etecc..SC*c
* c *te et ee** e C C *
*..C.e.eS.S.C.....
*.t .....c.C.......
*.c.4t*.q*........
c... cc.. ....c..


* c s c.... . C *tcCe* C
* . b eee* S* C ent ....


e.g............. eeeceCcc
*..e.C.C.........e.... c * e

cc..ee..ee.C....s.......
....Ce........ ceSc*....C


*..g.............C. �
* e.CC.tt ...tt. C ....* .S


* *** * .C.*.*.C..e...... ,,c
CC............. eccccC*ce

* S C .ttct9 . ..C......e..


* ** ccc...... cc*


of China......
of China


(T..iw.n).

(Taiwan)


.........

Ce, cc....


3
199
128
1I
138
j> a


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


380,957
45,554
241,216
946.743
39.214
85,110
232.378
79.614
94,107
9,995
1,153.839
1.690,531
947
789.742
448,735
16,610
4.070.045
1,392
32.257
2,252,808
18,762
183,584
1,426,303
9,841
10,476,183
7,008
189,790
80,531
280,221
241.636
5,914
56,739
1,.413.719
1,226,294
15,492,296
36,195
21.739,615
250,961
61,741
744.843
18,755
1,986,629
108.735
42,505
6.558.578
16,272,688
1,540.413
2,334.855
1.846,152
391.662
1,890
2,359,175
4,825
25,057
3.371.127
20,568
3.295.649
812,531
29.301
2.931.825


$660,562
79.720
424,930
1.657.890
68.601
148.942
404.867
140.716
170.115
18,291
2.014,805
2,972,889
1.733
1,384.277
788,393
27.739
7,155,150
2,547
53,869
3,974,860
31.333
321.098
2.512,349
18,009
18,447,991
11.703
339,561
144.884
492.680
421.535
10.823
99.295
2.483.997
2.144.227
27.276.983
62.389
38.225.919
443.026
108.255
1,314,093
34.241
3.500,417
187.387
75.064
11,520.013
28.571,641
2,668.095
4.095,361
3,257.594
686.984
3.308
4,135,013
8,830
43,967
5,918.777
37,238
5,806,991
1.420.613
53,621
5,155,714


Num. I


transit
..CC...
* S S * C C
. . . . . . .
2
5
5

4
3
6
1
16
15
2
22
10
* S * * * C S
34
I
5
90
SC.....
3
7
1I
194
cC.....
16
e......
7

I


8
243
I
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137,295
71.307

20,976
17.845
37,593
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128,597
234,014
1.894
111.739
115,662

476,251
1,392
26,661
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28,566
69,969
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86,444

139,559

5,914


67,851
5.557.484
12,094
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28,212
57,212
504,154

368.798


1,063,032
4.038.068
399,063
370.281
189.310
14,407
132,153
4.825
18,639
1,106,507
2,512
367,094
32,481

139,123


S20,010
191,035
97.369
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27,898
25.114
54.886
1.,053
181,612
315.031
2,519
152,527
159,821

674.712
2,032
35.459
1.051,643
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99,345
14.368
4,405,703

123,380

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195.874

7,866


93.855
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17.657
9,670,253
37,522
79.292
714,269

525,494


1.494,266
5.614,351
540.089
519,391
264,431
21,034
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188.145
7,044
27.213
1,556,185
3,341
504.116
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PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION





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�& 9 4 � * * � � *
CtC-N-o N.oo' -
r^^- ri -^ CaM"- �o
INk- a' - - N -r4*I


;a






.o~n



* ap
a2
S10
ar


a( I






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* S


fr-i-








nFr4


rico's








a~ce



* S
- -(
S~c
a'd


Iorm

I~b4
at'.'-
S


rlN


SI S
f-


- V.'
r)-r-cW
V.' t V.

4kIYP


.mm a


ero
~""


J *
















Table 9.--Origin and Destination of Comme

Atlantic During Fiscal Year 1983 Segregat





|iiiiiiii iin 1 111111 iiiiiiin iiiiiiii iiin .... iiiii ir - -Li m M L ^ i i i iii i l l1 1 - -_ _111 1 I _


I
big/run


WEST COAST NORTH AMERICA:
United States:
Alaska ........ ... ........


Hawaii.............
Mainland...........
Total United States


,.I aS


* C * S S* * * 4* 4 * 4 *** ** S
* *........ .. a.......a.... a.


*ll *S S S6S *


WEST COAST CANADA.


561.974
561.974


386.148


2.906
2.906


19)4.116


Finland



86
86


187,430


France


303,181
303.181
303.181


a197439


*******.

271,506
271,506

384.786


Nethr-r
lends



1,676.101


562,611


WEST COAST CE
Costa Rica ....
El Salvador...
Guatemala,.....
Honduras .....
Mexico.......
Nicaragua .....
Panama .......
Central America
Balboa. R.P. ..


CENTRAL
**44#* *4


4.. *5*4*
* .*. * a a a *
*5S44t4� * *

(other)'
�.......


ERICA:


842


3.101
758




5.244


Total Central America *...........


a.*......

a.S.a....

St......
* . ......
Set7a


4...... a

.....* ..

39
4.......
.....q4.
*5.....t


4.350
5.064

921
11,549

531

23.896


34.908
2,796
6,760
505
4.309
4.426
51,998
4.303

110.005


5.370
3.067
10,003

1,348
32.168
1,083



53.039


WEST COAST SOUTH /
Chile............ ....
Colombia.............
Ecuador.. . . . ..........
Penru .................
South America (other)'.
Total South America.


MERICA:
*4545 0*

asi t. e a5
... as a


170.357
14,402
46.853
190,225
19.596
441,433


863

9
2,186

3,059


31.790
23,810
49
78,246


133.895


82.987
683
4.589
56.642
39,615
184,516


176.747
148
52.560
101.729
16,233
347.417


248,530
25,959
8,703
81,944
58.310
423,446


OCEANIA:
Australia .......
British Oceania..
French Oceania .
New Zealand....
Oceania (other)'
Total Oceania.

ASIA:
China (Mainland)
China (Taiwan) .
Hong Kong......
Indonesia.......
Japan ..........
Philippine Islands
Singapore ......
South Korea....
Thailand .......

Asia (other)' ....
Total Asia ....


Grand total


1,530

23.780
21.630
14.412
61.352


*5Sara4(
*4*t*SS

*5 aa*S**
*4~t5*t


15,253





15.253


3.999
34.256
62.350



100.605


620
1.435

3.166
47


5aW~5Sti 4~b 55*5* S 5*555*4


33,009

1,489,160
'I


Percent of Atlantic-Bound Carso .................


428

203,009
, A


.5......


336.703
nA


5,634
10.902

820,589
IA


262
19,282
10,750
I10
549
30,953


9
130

48
846





165
1,198

1.145,865
I n


6,326


6,606
6.802
19,734


33,828
9,853

1,880
5.4...,.* �


45,561

2.780,492
AG


.1
A
a-
S.
a
A
t


S.






a.


4.


S.
a.


* |



* |


i a
* S




4
















STATISTICAL TABLES


* c9nl n

-~r -"
~ o

~s:B -


- (4 000 O N-G
190c6Q:
-yIOooe-'OGO--
- - (9 vs $-


0r'4 a v
Vrir~rFu--


-n vns




4r -4 N

~rd


E L.

cR -




* U

aC'


3.. C t



Sac~



i00
SQE





SU


N IN 40
g~m'00
nOO 4


* . S * S
* , S * S
* a a *
* . S S S
* , a S *
* a * * a
* a a *
* . . S S


0qecr
00

0-O


*i S S S


* . a
* . 9
* a
* a
* . S
* . S
* S
* * S


* S a
* a a a
9 9 a a
S 9 5 5
* 9 9
* S * S
* 9 9 5
a a S S
* S S S
* 5 4 5
* 9 5 *


S*


m~m~rrYI~N
dddd~ddd





























PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


owimv~ooenriv


a a a


~r~~0.


fin ctf:



vI -cc--


* S * *
* * 9t *

* * * *
* 9 * S


* S S *

* S * *

* S S *
* . 9 5

* S * 9

* 9 9 9
* * * *
* S S S

* * * S
* 9 5 5
* 9 5 *

* S * S

* 5 0

* S S S
4 O * a



* * 9 9



* 9 5 5
* S S S

* S S S
S 9 9 5

*t S S S
* 5 S 0

* S S S
* 5 5 5

* * * S

* 5 9
* 9 * 9


* S S *
* . S S

* 5 5 5
* S * S

* . S S

4 S S 9
* S S S

* 9 9 9

* S S S
* S 0 5

* S 9 *

* S S
* 5 5 5

* S * S
* S S S

* S S S
* S S S

* S S S

* S S
* S S S
* S S S

* S S S
* S S *

* S 5 5
* S 5 9

* S S S

* S 9 9
* S S S

* S S S
* . S S

* S S S

* S S S
* S S S
* * a e


* S S
* S

* S S
* S S

* 5 5
* S S
* S S

* 9 0

* S S
* S S

9 5 5
* S S

* S S
* S S

* 5 9

* S
* S S
* S S

9 5
9 5 S
* S S

* S S

* S S
* S S

* 9 5
9 9 5

9 5 5
* S S

9 5 5

9 * S
* S S

* S S
* S

* 5 5


- c


* a








STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific

[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
UNITED STATES:
Canned and refrigerated foods, miscellaneous
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals ........
Caustic soda ...................... .
Chemicals, unclassified ..............
Petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous ....
Machinery and equipment, miscellaneous ...
Manufactures of iron and steel .. ......


Plates, sheets, and coils .
Other and unclassified ..
Nitrates, phosphates, and pot,
Ammonium compounds
Fertilizers, unclassified..
Phosphates............


Ores and metals


Ore, alumina/bauxite


Petroleum and products
Crude oil .........
Fuel oil, residual...
Gasoline..........
Jet fuel . . . . . . . . . .
Kerosene .........
Lubricating oil ....
Other and unclassified
Miscellaneous .........
All other and unclast


Total.....


*.........*
. . c.scec
..S.....0.0
*.*....5..s
*......... S
* as......
.........t


ash ..s...............S...tS

......s..e....as........s
*.....eas ......... ....... C
.............t.t.*t....


55*dWt*t*t* a * * * * * ***C*S C S
* C *C**S**CS S *c aCt.. *C*tC*


* ss.C.atgt C *t C * CSCCC*Ccc


*s...ses 5 5555555 * C C *CC*CCU


I
309
127
54
128
8



76
49

27
30
30
800

381
87
45

186
101
413
413
1.637


Fiscal year
1982


1
371
154
92
125

7
7

135


135
90
90
1450
65
159
494
160

346
215
334
334
2,388


560
210
156
194
4
27
14
13
119
10
55
54
254
254
1461
58
75
757
108
5
330
128
278
278
2,703


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST


CANADA:
Nitrates, phosphat
Phosphates..
Miscellaneous ...


es, and potash

..I.....'..


Clay, fire and china .....
All other and unclassified
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


sh.C *....5...C.C......CC



a..........etc...... c...
* .c..*........S.........
. ..n. . . " " . " " . . ..�


569
569
27

27
596


601
601

* c.. ..
.. . .


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA:
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous
C oal ........... ....... .... ................


844
844
32
29
3
876


ccc.:


88


505


277








PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes

Atlantic to Pacific- Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA-Continued
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash .......


Ammonium compound
Fertilizers, unclassified
Phosphates..........
Potash .............
Ores and metals .........


Metals, miscellaneous
Ores, miscellaneous .


Other agricultural commodities


Oilseeds .........
Sugar ...........
Petroleum and products


Diesel oil
Gasoline.


.me...
�a'��0


Fuel oil, residual
Lubricating oil .
Miscellaneous ......


s * 5.......... . mamas.a.b...m
a..... s*.a ..csa S * *b ...
ea...s........... S mS~a 5m*
* .b. be. m . .a * s a * - ae .. .ad
*.a. .......*....a.a ......... p


..*......... ** * * *b* mac..
. S abs.... . ma. ...... **


* ma.......CC...... a*aa.... 5*
*..... ..Stat......ta......Ca*..
a. ..... .. *.... .*a .. *taS**am..b
* . S a ...... a 4 5 5 . .*. C * b . . . .
*.a.a.a ..* .......... a a ..* .. ..b..
a. css.. ... *bcsm ...e......m..


a..... a. ...a........ .....-. ...a
... * a a... C * a * * . . .�.


Flour, wheat..........
Paper and paper products
Tallow ................
All other and unclassified


*.......aa. a .... a... m..as
*. .. . .a..b...., an a aSa m
b......mm..........a....
"'..���.�'''�..ie .. .����


Total.


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
SOUTH AMERICA:

Canned and refrigerated foods, miscellaneous


Chemicals and petroleum chemicals ....


Caustic soda ........
Chemicals, unclassified
Petroleum chemicals, n
Coal and coke...........
Grains.......... ........
Corn .......... .....
Oats ..... .... ....
Rice..... ...........
Sorghum ...........
Soybeans .......
W heat. . . . . . . . . . .
Other and unclassified


Lumber and pr
Pulpwood


oducts ....


......niscellane..ous
p �m... . . a
miscellaneous


* .4# .. S ..S"b.
....�.. a.a.a *
a.........a... 5


...........a . .me ........ a*t*
.......a.... ma C.a.a.*.. a.a. ...
a..a.a..amm.......si c ..... aa
.*..mace........, ~a.....*


* 1983


334
117
121
71
25



77
55
22
54
2
2
45
5
85
2
30
10
43
2,593


29
186
45
134
7
227
3100
619
7


a ... aC * . . .. t . C tc m.s b a .
.. .m S . ...... s m a m..aa. .a..s .
*cm......*.a.a.ma.a..... .a.
a.a.....t.sass...,...ts.m..s


5
15
13


Fiscal year
1982


459
25
214
204
16
2

2
164
136
28
33
22


10
83
3
18
4
58
2,067


16
171
33
125
13
100
3.231
824
15
7
75
146
2,156
8
15
10


1981


621
79
376
164
2

8
3
136
13
123
42


18
23
61
11
27

23
2.595


29
215
64
119
32
347
2,723
771
21
128
II
55
1,730
7
18
10








STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST
SOUTH AMERICA--Continued
Minerals, miscellaneous.........
Soda and sodium compounds
Sulfur .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other and unclassified ......
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash.


Ammonium
Fertilizers, u
Fishmeal...
Phosphates.
Potash ....
and metals


compounds
classified.


* S * C * *
.....*.C
...... C


Ores, miscellaneous
Metals...........


Scrap


COAST


c...............t.. S
. . . . . . . . . . . . � . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . � a . . . �
........ ..... ... ...C


* S S *St*S**P* . S.C... *5*~
Sc S S S S SOOt *9*W*CS* * * S * S S


..................�.t.....�S �
........................�'�S
*................** .* .......S..S..50
.......................**..... ~0~S* te~
............S............... S S C* *
....Sttc.tc.........CS S.........S.S
....*.** .*.*.**....*.....S.*.S*..*


Tin, including tinplate


Other and un
Other agricultural com
Oilseeds ........
Sugar ..........
Other and unclass
Petroleum and produce
Diesel oil .......
Gasoline........
Jet fuel ........
Liquefied natural
Lubricating oil ..
Residual fuel oil.


classified
imodities


ified
ts .


gas


Other and unclassified ...
Miscellaneous ..............
Bricks and tile..........
Carbon black...........
Clay, fire and china .....
Flour, wheat ...........


Groceries, miscellaneous.
Oil, coconut............
Oil, vegetable...........
Paper and paper products
Resin ..................
Rubber, manufactured...
Tallow .... .. ........
Textiles................
All other and unclassified
Total.......... ......


.......* ..........a..
. . * . . . S . C . . CS . . . C C C �
.....*....... * .....


* * ** * �* *S*** * * C * * * *#* *ISS * *
*.c...c........cc...c......c.Sc
i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


� * c*c*c�* ***�*�*** S *S * * * S S * * * *
*......*.....c...*............
...c......e.................cc

*.............ac........... .
.............c.. ...c..S....


. e . . . . . . . . . ..



S� e �c S ....�.5c
e.... .............* ..
*.ccc.c....c...........
cc. .. . .......... S S *S S C


*..*.*...c........eecce..

ccc.c........tea........s
. . . ....� ... � .. ..


' 1983


23
18
2
3
282
8
150


13
46
7
39
30
3
6
10
5
2
3
439
130
134
12
54
37
29
43
670
3
I
10
59
7
4
127
99
33
7
49
8
263
5.124


Fiscal year
1982


34
27
1
6
236
17
109

96
14
51
14
37
26
4
7
12
10

2
170
53
14

20
41
40
2
721
6
1
12
56
15
2
104
135
37
7
34
10
302
5.000


41
33

8
432
34
167
5
184
42
75
17
58
30
11
17
188
17
167
4
59
I
1I


54

3
743
8
2
15
39
14
I
85
140
58
17
37
20
307
5.271








PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific--Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal rear


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO BALBOA.
M miscellaneous ...................


.-Continued


Oil, vegetable...........
All other and unclassified


Total....


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO HAWAII:
Petroleum and products ........


Jet fuel ... ..... ... ..
Other and unclassified
Miscellaneous ...........


* S * S * * S S * * S S 550****C*S S * *
* ~0~****S .5.5 * * * * S 5455555
* S * S S S SO S SOS *S*tS*5S S S S S S


All other and unclassified
Total................


53
53


... .. . . ... . . . . . 53


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO OCEANIA:
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals .


570


Caustic soda .................


Chemicals


unclassified


Petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous
Coal and coke. ...... . . . .. . . . . . . .
G rains. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Rice. . ... . . . . . . . .
Soybeans ...... . . . .
Other and unclassified
Lumber and products ....
Pulpwood...........
Machinery and equipment


* . S " " 5. � � � �"." . . . S * t.
* . .S. . . . S . .. . . S S . * S SO. .


..S 'S.


*......OS.S. S..*.S.* .....S....*
*.S.......S.S.S..............S S


12


Agricultural machinery and implements..........
Automobiles, trucks, accessories and parts .......
Construction machinery and equipment..... ..
Electrical machinery and apparatus..............
Other and unclassified ...... . . . ..... . . . . . ..


Manufactures of iron and steel,


Minerals, miscellaneous........
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash


Ammonium compounds ..
Fertilizers, unclassified....
Phosphates..............
Potash ...... *..........
Ores and metals, miscellaneous
Petroleum and products ......


Liquefied gas........
Lubricating oil ......
ra -~~:-a. I .- :


miscellaneous


.................... 710


SS... S.S.....S C..S .S S...
*.S.........S.........
..S.* ...SSSS SS .S ..4* ..*
*......... . *S*...S... C ..


.. .. 7


293


* 55555055* 5555* *SSOSSSCS


9j fl


144


1981 1


128


101


130
501


110
303


86
232


52
52
52


51
51
92


427


602


116


27


5


22


2
2
13


488


471


159


188


30


34








STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO ASIA:
Canned and refrigerated foods...
Canned foods, miscellaneous
Refrigerated foods ... .....
Fruit .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Meat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other and unclassified ..
Chemicals and Detroleum chemical


da .. . . . . . . . . . . . .


.s3


Caustic so0


Chemicals, unclassified
Petroleum chemicals, n
Coal and coke...........
Grains..................


Barley...
Corn ....
Oats ...
Rice.....
Sorghum
Soybeans
Wheat...
Other and


niscellane


"�'���0"0� ��0....
* " * * " " g " * * * e . . . �







o � " " " " � . . . � . .
.O* S . 0 � � . . . .S . . . ...
. .t. . * . *. ***SS . . . C .S.
.e..........S.S.S.S


~ous .....S.S ..C C* *. *


* S * * S SWCCe~** . . C * * * C C C C C
* C~**~C~S *ecgus 55*.C*CSS S


. . . . .g.e.**. ***. . . . . .*.C.SS.C. . . t . .. . C . .
.........*..................U......... SS S C
.....ge .* w..............S ..............C
*...* **S* *.*. *.. ..g.. .... e... g..ese.......

..........S.SS S. *.. .. . S.. ....e~ e . e. e. c...


unclassified


Lumber and products ....
Pulpwood...........
Other and unclassified
Machinery and equipment


Agricultural machine
Automobiles, trucks,
Construction machine
Electrical machinery
Other and unclassifie
ufactures of iron and


.... .... ..C. ......... *S3* e ae
.S.C . .. . m S . S S C S CC.S. C . g.se.gS.
.S.....................S.*


*. . ...................e..e ..
Sg " . " . " . �.. C g . . . . . . . . g . . ..S
.'US.'�'''�S.�S...........


ry and implements...
accessories and parts
ery and equipment...
and apparatus.......
d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
steel ..............


Angles, shapes, and sections
Plates, sheets, and coils ....
Tubes, pipes, and fittings ..
Wires, bars, and rods......
Other and unclassified .....
Minerals, miscellaneous........
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash


Ammonium
Fertilizers, u
Fishmeal...
Phosphates.
Potash ....


compounds
classified.


.". ...
.e....e.


g......
*.......
.......
.e.....


".� '. ...... . . . . . .
.cc......e..C.g......

" . . . . . . . .. . . � ..
...''.S...e..� See...
....................


gee...... .. .....e . .... .
.. .. . ...c. ....... CSSS*S S e SS
" � . . ... ...e e . . S
. �ee...... ge..�...
...C.*.gu........... ..*....


7
182
89
2
91
2,257
56
1,494
707
8,729
29,326
104
20,103

25
834
6,264
1,955
41
281
258
23
67
6
7
23
11
20
96
33
8
21
4
30
1
4,961
47
401

4,477
36


Fiscal year
1982

215
7
208
107

101I
2,212
2
1,498
712
20,484
28 896


12,515

50
1,650
6,074
8,477
130
196
174
22
67
11
8
23
10
15
162
30
19
21
16
76
I
3,981
40
232

3,659
50


v w


215
4
211
113
1
97
1,708
31
1,219
458
17,818
24,851

9,320
3
329
2,044
5,932
7,167
56
292
229
63
110
13
18
36
26
17
295
12
31
48
44
160
I
3,941
5
399

3,533
3








PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes


Atlantic to Pacific


- Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal iear


EAST COAST UNITED STATES
Petroleum and products


' 1983
TO ASIA-Continued
. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . 1,234


Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .....
Liquefied gas . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ..
Lubricating oil . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Petroleum coke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ..


Diesel . . .. ....
Residual fuel oil
Jet fuel . . . . . . . .


. . S S * * . . . . t a a a a a . m at . C S . C . . . . .S
* S C C C . SO . S . t . t . t . . t . S S S . S . .


a. . . S S
* .a . . .
* . . ."


Other and unclassified ...
Miscellaneous ............
Bricks and tile. ......
Carbon black..........
Clay, fire and china .....
Fibers, plant ........
Flour, wheat .........
Groceries, miscellaneous
Marble and stone .......
Oil, vegetable..........
Paper and paper products
Resin m......... .......
Rubber, manufactured...


Tallow .................
Textiles................
Tobacco and manufactures
All other and unclassified.


4,039


4115


4,243


. . . S . S . . . . . S . S . . O . .. .t
ate**..** . .S.t. .C.a ..
* . . .. . . CSC. . .. **..**
*. a...... .. .. . ...a*.....
*.........a.a. a.a..a. ace ..
* . 545 *.t..a.. tt * .C a ..


* S S S C S S 455 S St......
* a a *Ce**Sa** S etae*aC*
*tet***** S S S S 5555*545
*SS......s C *45 S S S S C S
CCC...... 005~~~Se** * S


Total.


EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES:
Manufactures of iron and steel, miscellaneous ...
Petroleum and products .....................


3,110
53,049


2,768
62,254


C * . *


26


2,660
55.060


C S S 5


Gasoline....
Miscellaneous ...


Pulpwood.......... . ..
All other and unclassified


S C S SS S C S S S 45444C


Total....


II


� ..... 26


12


9
11 1


38


6

""6
13


EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA:


Manufactures of iron and steel,
Miscellaneous ... ..........
Paper and paper products.
All other and unclassified .


miscellaneous


Total...


EAST COT C CANADA TO WEST COA


ST SoIrru AMFRICA


709


230


57


19


26


58


9
27


10
53








STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 10.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific- Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal rear


EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST
SOUTH AMERICA-Continued


Miscellaneous ..............
Paper and paper products
All other and unclassified
Total............. ..


EAST COAST CANADA TO OCEANIA:
Miscellaneous ..............
Paper and paper products
All other and unclassified
Total............... .


* 5.....S...............a
. ....e��...0 g�e.g.sse .


89
45
44
133


100


100


EAST COAST CANADA TO ASIA:
Canned and refrigerated foods
Refrigerated foods ......


Fish. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other and unclassified


* ~ * C C t*5CgegC5* C ~ C ~ C C
* * C C *S*55*g*ee* C g g * g C
* g*eeg**g* gsC*5C*** *


Chemicals and petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous
Grains.........,..... ..... . .. ........... .


Barley ...
Corn ....


t5 asagt..a
C C t*~ *CC~##t


Soybeans ...........
W heat........... .
Other and unclassified
Lumber and products ....
Pulpwood...........
Other and unclassified


* a gee *ee*a***et S ~ * ~ ~ gee..
* egge .S.S....... S CSCCgS*g
* *******t* CC* *SC*CSCC *55*
* *555554**** ***** ********
* a *'g*~~*g* . e.e*s*a. C
* **SSCCC5 CCSS*5C~ C
*5 gte C*SCSC *5* C*5C5555 55*
~**t**tS* S **S*SSSS *Cg*C


Machinery and equipment, miscellaneous


Manufactures of iron and
Minerals, miscellaneous..


miscellane


ous ... . ..


49
31


88
. . e e .
C * . . .


146
144


"58
...���C
tg gg


60
39


145
8


71
71
52
19

439
25


60
43
14
120
120


218
129
53
184
154
30
3
88
1


2
37
......


Asbestos ..........
Ores and metals .......
Ores, miscellaneous
M etals�. ...........
Aluminum ....
Iron..........
Scrap ........
Other and uncla
Other agricultural comm<
Oilseeds ..........
Petroleum and products


Other and unclassified


. . C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


.ssifie ...... ............

odities . ...... ............*
. a....a... ...... a..a.a.a .ag ... a


Se .


gag.. .g .......g... Caa
ga. gg. .. . a a a a a .. a a a.. ..


550
108
442
142
87
160
53



� . � . . .


203
74
129


......
* . . g.a .
......
Ce....
e.g....
. .. . S .


94
54
40


85
50
35


184
17
167
184


200
46
154
200


S..... !1


160
82
78
2
13
37
26
35
35
13
13








PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 10.--Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific--Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal rear


EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA TO WEST COAST
UNITED STATES-Continued
Petroleum and products .................


Liquefied gas.......
Residual fuel oil ......
Miscellaneous ..........


. e.. ...... .... .. . .a.a C
. ...�.. .� . �. � . .


All other and unclassified


Total.....


.. ... *

19
19


.. . ... ........... .. . 47


106

106


135


13
13
a. .8..
18
18
3'


EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA:
Minerals, miscellaneous................. ...


C C * C C C


Sulfur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash


5


C~~l


. . . . . 5


102


101


Ammonium compounds


Phosphates.
Fertilizers..


* *4*a:a


* se e... . C Ceea ***** C.* C C S


Petroleum and products


Crude oil ......
Diesel oil ......
Liquefied gas...
Fuel oil, residual
Gasoline .......


**** **** * C ga e eS C * CC
*.*.S....S .t .............CC....C *t


102
3247
1,378


2,199


31
31


1,344


198
1,396


Other and unclassified ...
Miscellaneous ............
All other and unclassified


3
3
3,352


Total


6
6
2,306


2
2
1,382


EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA TO WEST COAST SOUTH
AMERICA:


Nitrates


, phosphates, and potash


20


Se. ...


.. ..a .


Fertilizers, miscellaneous..
Other agricultural commodities
Sugar ... ..... . . . . . . . . . .
Petroleum and products .....
Other and unclassified ....
Miscellaneous ............
Cement ........... . . .
All other and unclassified .


. . . . . .. . . . 20


* .. C 5

5


39


S ~ ** ~ .7


39
64


Total.


10


5


17


41


42


45


42
69


38
91