<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 Organization chart
 Introduction
 Canal traffic
 Canal operations
 Supporting operations
 Administration and staff
 Financial report
 Statistical tables
 Back Cover


DLOC PCANAL



Annual report
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097367/00008
 Material Information
Title: Annual report
Spine title: Annual report of the Panama Canal Commission ( 1980-<1994> )
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Washington, D.C.
Creation Date: 1982
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: Periodicals   ( lcsh )
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Fiscal year 1980-
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends Sept. 30.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Vols. for 1992- distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 1998.
Statement of Responsibility: Panama Canal Commission.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 07777425
lccn - 96645119
issn - 1936-5306
System ID: UF00097367:00008
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report, fiscal year ended ...

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Organization chart
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Canal traffic
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Canal operations
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Supporting operations
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Administration and staff
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Financial report
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Statistical tables
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 77a
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Back Cover
        Page 131
        Page 132
Full Text
IJ3.P t


2:1 9SZ


PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30. 1982


RE


ORT




















































































1















































































I













ANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Balboa


, Republic of Panama


OFFICE OF THE ADMINISTRATOR





FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR:


am pleased


to submit


the third


annual


report


Panama


Cana


Commi


sion covering Canal operations for fisca


year


982.


The third year of operation under the Panama Canal Treaty was another
year of growth for most major elements of Canal Traffic. Panama Canal net


tonnage and tolls revenue surpassed all previous annual records.


Shipment


of petroleum and products, combined with improvements in grains and coal,
accounted for sixty-four percent of Canal cargo movements during the fiscal


year


Oceangoing transit


and the number of large ve


ssels also increased over


the prior year.
To respond to the additional demands being placed on the Waterway in


recent


years,


Canal


intensified


planning


efforts


accelerated


investments in transit-related projects.


Operationally, significant strides are


being made to


train


the skilled


people necessary to continue the efficient


operation and maintenance of the Canal.
the training of Panamanian employees to


level


Major emphasis was focused on
increase their participation at all


in the Commission.


The thirty-month transition period,


for a


established by the treaty to provide


mooth and orderly transfer of jurisdiction over the Canal area from


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The successes achieved during the transition period are evidence of the


Canal':


continued


capability


provide


efficient


transit


service


international shipping.


The Canal organization remains committed to this


goal and


the traditional standards of


excellence.


I am confident that the


challenges


future


with


same


responsibility


dedication that has characterized the Commission work force in the past.


McAuuLI


Administrator




















TABLE OF CONTENTS


PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


Page


ORGANIZATION CHART


INTRODUCTION


ORGANIZATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. ...... . . . .
THE CANAL ........................... ..... . ...... ...
TOLLS RATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


TREATY IMPLEMENTATION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS . . .


OFFICIALS IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
OFFICIALS IN WASHINGTON, D.C......


CHAPTER I-CANAL TRAFFIC
TRAFFIC . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COMPARATIVE HIGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS


COMMODITIES AND TRADE ROUTES


CHAPTER II-CANAL OPERATIONS
TRANSIT OPERATIONS ... ...... . .......
PHOTO . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CANALPROJECTS


* * . a a.s.a . .. eat. t..e a . .
....' ............' ...*O..t.t.s


.. . . . . ...... ..... 8


* . " " . " . . . .t.. e at . .... . . . . * . .*
" . " . . a . . . � " � � � . . . t a ., . . * C . s .
*....... S .....* ...... *., .tt ta


CHAPTER III-SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


LOGISTICAL SERVICES .......
EMPLOYEE SERVICES .......


. .'..... a. .


. C . .*t . . .*. .. St .. . a C Ct. * S * . .aa . * C


SANITATION AND GROUNDS MANAGEMENT .................
TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PUBLIC UTILITIES AND ENERGY .................... . . . . ... .. .......
POLICE AND FIRE PROTECTION . ... .... ......................,.,, ..
CANAL PROTECTION . . .... . . .. .. .. .. . . .


HEALTH AND SAFETY
LIBRARY SERVICES


* e S C. * C eC*a*tets* a it C ......t. .* C C..*. a a
*0" *t e* " *SC C ** t * S" C C� 555C Ce e a O. C


CHAPTER IV- ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF
PERSONNEL: FORCE EMPLOYED AND RATES OF PAY


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CONTENTS


Financial Tables


Page


TABLE
TABLE
TABLE


.-Balance Sheet........


-Statement of Operations and Non-Interest-Bearing Investment


-Statement


of Changes


in the Investment


of the United


S..... . 32
. . .... 35


States


Government ........


TABLE
TABLE
TABLE


4.-Statement of Changes in Financial Position
5.-Statement of Status of Appropriations ....


6.-Statement of Property,


Plant


......06.....0...00...
*.c..tctt* ..S..i.i .....


. .t . . . ....... . . . . . 39


, and Equipment


Notes to financial statements


CHAPTER


-STATISTICAL TABLES


TABLE
TABLE
TABLE
TABLE
TABLE
TABLE


-Panama Canal Traffic, Fisca


Years


1972-1982


-Commercial Ocean Traffic by Months, Fiscal Years


3.-Canal Traffic by Flag of Vessel,


S. .. ...... ..... . 50


1982 and


52
53


Fiscal Year 1982.


-Classification of Canal Traffic by Type of Vessel,


.-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Flag of Vessel,


-Segregation


of Transits


Registered


Fiscal Year


Fiscal Year


Gross


Tonnage,


1982.


S.... 59


Fiscal


Year 1982 .........


TABLE
TABLE


-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal by Fiscal Years ...
-Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo Through the Panama


Canal from Atlantic to Pacific During Fiscal Year


Segregated


by Countries


TABLE


in Principal Trade Areas


C CC


9.-Origin and Destination of Commercial Cargo


Through the Panama


Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During Fiscal Year 198


by Countries in Principal Trade Areas


Segregated


...... . 72


TABLE
TABLE
TABLE


10.--Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-


.--Cargo


--Important


Atlantic to Pacific.


Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic.


Commodity


Shipments


Over


Principal


c C C C C C c C C S
CCL CL CL*~'


Trade


Routes


Atlantic to Pacific ..


TABLE


13.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes


Pacific to Atlantic ..


......... . 105


TABLE


14.-Principal Canal Commodities by Direction,


Fiscal Year


. ..... 123


Other Statistics


Shipping Statistics


. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1


......... . 87


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INTRODUCTION

ORGANIZATION
The Panama Canal Commission is an agency of the Executive Branch of


the United State


1977


Government


, provided for by the Panama Canal Treaty of


, and established by the Panama Canal Act of 1979 (93 Stat.


452:


U.S.C.


3601


et seq.),


enacted


September


1979


. The authority


of the


President of the United States with respect to the Commission is exercised


through


Secretary


Defense


Secretary


Army


. The


Commission


IS S


supervised


a nine-member


Board:


members


nationals of the United States and four are Panamanians.


Board members


who are


U.S.


nationals are appointed with the advice and consent of the


Senate.
The Commission was established to carry out the responsibilities of the


United States with re


pect to the Panama Canal under the Panama Canal


Treaty
operate


of 1977


In fulfilling these obligations,


and maintain


and equipment,


the canal


and provide


the Commission manages,


, its complementary works, installation


for the orderly transit of ve


ssels through the


canal.


The


Commission


terminates on December 3


perform


1999


these


function


until


, when the Republic of Panama wil


Treaty
assume


full responsibility for the canal.


The Commission is expected to recover through toll


and other revenues


costs


operating


maintaining


cana


, including


interest


depreciation,
and payment


capital for plant replacement,


expansion and improvements,


to the Republic of Panama for public service


in accordance with paragraph 5 of Article III and paragraph


and annuities,
4(a) and (b) of


Article XIII


, respectively


of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977


. Revenues


from tol


and all


other


sources


are depo


account known as the Panama Canal Commis


ited in the U.S.


ion Fund.


Treasury in an
Appropriations


for operating expenses and capital improvement


are enacted annually by


the Congres


and are limited to the


um of the estimated receipt


for the year,


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INTRODUCTION

Vessels transiting the canal are raised in three steps to the level of Gatun


Lake
three


, the principal source of canal water, then lowered to sea level again in


steps.


The


three


canal


locks


are paired


so as to


permit


simultaneou
directions.


lockage of


two vessels


in the same direction or in opposite


Since August 15


has served


1914


, the official date of its opening, the Panama Canal


world trade virtually without interruption.


Through this fiscal


year, a total of 612,556 vesse


of all types have transited with 511,632 or 83.5


percent of the total being of the oceangoing commercial class


TOLLS


Panama Cana


October 1


Tolls


rates


1979
are:


RATES


I tolls rates were increased approximately 29.3 percent on
These rates remained unchanged through fiscal year 1982.


merchant


vessels,


Army


Navy


transports,


tankers, hospital ships,


upply ships, and yachts,


when carrying pa


sengers


or cargo: $1.67 per net vessel ton of 100 cubic feet of actual earning capacity.
Such tonnage is determined in accordance with the "Rules of Measurement


of Vessels


for the Panama Canal;" (b) on


uch vessels in ballast


without


passengers or cargo: $1.33 per net vessel ton; and (c) on other floating craft:
93 cents per ton of displacement.


Vessel


transiting


of the Government of Colombia are given free transit as are vessels


olely for repairs at Commission facilities.


TREATY


IMPLEMENTATION


Implementation of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977 continues on a daily


basis as


numerous


treaty


mandates are


routinely


observed


by the canal


organization.


The Commission'


Board of Directors and other binational


bodies are meeting periodically to resolve a broad range of issues pertinent to
the Commission.


The thirty-month treaty transition period ended on March 31


1982


as required,


the United States courts,


which had operated in Panama since


1904


civilian


police


force,


with


proud


history,


were


disestablished.


further


organizational


changes


magnitude are


anticipated before


1990 when a Panamanian national assumes the post of


Administrator of the Panama Canal Commission and a United States citizen


becomes the Deputy


Administrator pursuant to provisions of the treaty.







PANAMA


CANAL


COMMIS


SION


BOARD


DIRECTORS


Beginning Fiscal Year 1982


Honorable WILLIAM R
Chairman
Assistant Secretary of


IANELLI.


Honorable ROBERTO M. HEURTEMATTE E.


Panama, Republic


Panama


the Arm v


. (Civil Works)
Washington, D.


Honorable CLIFFORD B. O'HARA


Riverside, Connecticut


Honorable JOHN A.


USHNELL


Honorable TOMAS


PAREDES R.


Deputy Assistant


Secretary


State


Executive


Director


Executive


for Inter-American Affairs
Washington, D.C.


Bureau for Panama Canal
Affairs


Panama, Republic


Honorable J.


Panama


W. CLARK


President, Clark Maritime


Associates, Inc.


Honorable RICARDO A.


Minister


RODRIGUEZ


the Presidency


New Orleans, Louisiana

Honorable EDWIN FABREGA


Director General


Panama, Republic

Honorable WILLIA
Poway, California


of Panar

M SIDELL


Institute of Hydraulic Resources
and Electrification (IRHE)
Panama, Republic of Panama


Executive Committee
Honorable WILLIAM R.


Budget and Finance Committee


GIANELLl,


Honorable EDWIN F


ABREGA


Chairman


Chairman


Honorable JOHN A.


SHNELL


Honorable J


W. CL


Honorable CLIFFORD B.
Honorable RICARDO A.


O'HARA


RODR


IGUEZ


Honorable CLIFFORD B.


Honorable TOMAS


O'HARA


AREDES


Honorable TOMAS


PAREDES R.


Personnel Committee


Long-Range Canal Improvements
Committee


Honorable J.


W. CLARK


Chairman


Honorable EDWIN F


ABREGA


Chairman


Honorable ROBERTO M.


HEURTEMATTE E.


Honorable J.


W. CL


Honorable WILLIAM SIDELL


Honorable


CLIFFORD B. O'HARA


Honorable TOMAS


PAREDES R.


Honorable TOMAS


AREDES


Treaty


ARK


na


------


- -- - ------







BOARD OF


DIRECTORS


BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ending Fiscal Year 1982


Honorable WILLIAM R.


GIANELLI,


Honorable ANDREW E.


GlBSON


Chairman


Assistant Secretary of the Army
(Civil Works)
Washington, D. C.


President, Delta Steamship
Lines, Inc.
Short Hills, New Jersey


Honorable TOMAS


Honorable JOHN A.


SHNELL


Executive


Director


Deputy Chief of Mission
American Embassy


Buenos A ires,


Argentina


Executive Bureau for Panama
Treaty Affairs
Panama, Republic of Panama


Honorable PHILLIP DEAN BUTCHER B.
(Member-designate)
Vice President, Inter-American
Regional Organization of Workers (ORIT)
Panama, Republic of Panama


Honorable RICARDO A. RODRIGUEZ
Panama, Republic of Panama


Honorable WILLIAM SIDELL


Poway, California


Honorable EDWIN FABREGA


Director General


Institute of Hydraulic Resources
and Electrification (IRHE)
Panama, Republic of Panama


Honorable WILLIAM W


Beaufort,


South


WATKIN. Jr.


Carolina


Executive Committee
Honorable WILLIAM R.


Budget and Finance Committee


GIANELLI.


Chairman


Other members to be determined.


Personnel Committee


Membership to be determined.


Membership to be determined.


Long-Range Canal Improvements
Committee

Membership to be determined.


OFFICIALS IN THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


Administrator


Deputy Administrator


.............. ...... . . Honorable D. P
.............. Honorable FERNANDO M


OFFICIAL IN


WASHINGTON


. MCAULIFFE
ANFREDO, Jr.


D.C.


a


PAREDES R.


Canal








6 CANAL


TRAFFIC



~I"
0
S














Chapter


CANAL


TRAFFIC


TRAFFIC


Most major element


of Panama Canal traffic and tolls revenue reached


record level


during fiscal


year


. The


key factors contributing to the


favorable performance were increased


shipment


of Alaska North Slope oil,


harply


higher


grain


coal


movements


continued


growth in


average size of transiting vessels.


Total


oceangoing transits


in fisca


year


1982


rose


percent from the


prior year


3,984 to 14,14


Oceangoing commercial transits accounted for


4,009 of the total transits, compared to 13,884


uch transits in 198


owned


or operated


Panamanian


vessels,


made


. Government,


Colombian and


transits during the year compared


transits in fiscal year 1981.


More important than the growth in number of transits wa


the continued


increase in the size of vessels using the Cana


esse


Is with beams of 80 feet or


greater accounted


7,226


transits


or 5


percent


total


oceangoing


transits.


During the prior fiscal year, transits by vessel


in this beam category


accounted


for 6,364


transits or 45.5


percent of


total oceangoing transit


Almost half of the increase in large beam transits was by vessels with beams


equal to or greater than


00 feet.


Transits by these vessels totaled 2,68


percent of all oceangoing transits, compared to


63 or


percent during


fisca


sear


oceangoing


In term


commercial


of Panama Canal net tonnage,


transit


rose 6.6


percent,


the average


increasing from


size of
13,593


tons per


vessel in


1981


to 14,488 tons in


982.


The growth in the number of


4 - n a 4 n n . 4 C - n I n - a n * -1


- - ,- .r - .J -1 - _ --








CANAL


TRAFFIC


other services,


reached $59.5


million for a total transit revenue of $385.1


million compared to $350.8


million in the prior fiscal year.


A two-year summary of the principal elements of Canal traffic and tolls


revenue


shown in the following table:


COMPARATIVE


HIGHLIGHTS


OPERATIONS


Fiscal year


Oceangoing transits:
Commercial ....
U.S. Government
Free . . . . . . . . . . .
Total ........


14,009


13,884


14,142


13,984


Daily average


Small transits:
Commercial ....
U.S. Government


Free . . . . . ...
Total ...

Total cargo:
Commercial


U.S. Government
Free . . . . . . . . . .


Total


* ** S S S **4~Oa~~* S S * * S S * * * *S **S S S *0*5559


* . S 55~~*~... S S *S*S**** S *5*S~*~* SU*S S * *


* S * * S *SUSSSS* S S S S * St S *SS*S**5 S S S *S
* * *s.*.*.. S C C S C S *q S S S S *@SSS*#SSeS S


1.129


185,453,260
285,451
70
185,738,781


1,066


171,223,117
301,778

171,524,895


Total


Panama


Canal


net tons


ment tonnage .....


and reconstructed displace-


203,999,77


189,565,518


Transit revenue:
Commercial tolls ....
U.S. Government tolls


Tolls revenue


Harbor pilotage, tug, launch,
Total transit revenue.


....... ......." " � � S . ....... . S
..5..*.*..... . ...** S. * *"*" " """
. ...... . . . . C. .......... �


and other services


$324,031,594
1,557,503
$325,589,097

59,466,095
$385,055,192


,828,204
,252,154


$303,080,358

47,681,976
$350,762,334


COMMODITIES


AND


TRADE


ROUTES


Twelve key commodity groups have maintained relatively stable levels of


importance to Canal traffic in recent years.


lfal aoP, Q


The groups, shown on the chart


2rrnianted fnr OQn nerrpnt nf tntal nreanonino enmmerpial carron


i







PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


InU, in
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Oo6O @6
C-






CANAL


TRAFFIC


Grain shipments


through


the Canal increased


percent during FY


1982


, reaching a


record


37.6


million


ong tons or


20.3


percent


of Canal


oceangoing commercial cargo.


The increase includes a 12.0 percent rise in


wheat shipments from 12.5 million long tons in 1981 to 14.0 million long tons
in fiscal year 1982; and a 27.1 percent rise in corn, from 10.7 million long tons


million


group,
in 198
States


ong tons in


sorghum and soybeans,


1982.


decreased


to 8.5 million tong tons in 1982.


Asia


constituted


60.0


The remaining products in the


slightly from 9.0 million long tons
Grain shipments from the United


percent


total


movement


commodity


group,


with Japan and


Mainland


China


being the principal


destinations.
Shipments of coal and coke increased 11.5 percent during fiscal year 1982


to 22.5 million long tons, accounting for 12.


percent of all cargo


hipments.


One


tonnage


principal


shipped


factors


through


that contributed


Canal


was


to the increase in


an increase


in imports


the coal
of U.S.


metallurgical coal by the Japanese steel industry during the first half of the


fiscal


year


Coal to Japan accounted for


percent


of the trade or


million long ton


hipments to


Taiwan totaled 1.3 million long tons or


6.0 percent of the coal and coke commodity group.


Other


major


commodity


group


experiencing


gains


during


year


included chemicals and petrochemicals,


which increased 9.1


percent to 4.9


million long tons; miscellaneous minerals which increased 11.6 percent to 4.1


million long tons; and miscellaneous agricultural commodities,
4.5 percent to 5.5 million long tons.


Several commodity movements decreased during the year


which rose


The tonnage of


lumber


products continued


lump,


declining


16.0


percent


to 5.2


million long tons; ores and metals decreased 8.1 percent to 7.8 million long
tons; machinery and equipment dropped 8.2 percent to 2.3 million long tons;


manufactures of iron and


teel declined 2.0 percent to 7


.1 million long tons


canned and refrigerated food dropped


.4 percent to 3.8 million long tons


and nitrates


, phosphates and potash declined 1


percent to 8.5 million long


tons.


One


salient


characteristic


1982


commodity


movements


was


continuation


trend


toward


concentration of shipments to specific


areas


countries


world


. Trade


between


East Coast


United


States and Asia continued to dominate Canal traffic,


with 38.7 percent of










PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


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12 CANAL


OPERATIONS


Cd
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Chapter


CANAL


Canal operation


OPERATIONS


are comprised of Transit Operations and Maintenance


Other


Canal


Projects.


The


various


functions


are divid


among


number of


operating bureau


within the Canal agency.


TRANSIT


Daily average transit


OPERATIONS


by oceangoing vessels increased from the 38.3 per


day during fisca


year


1981 to 38.7 per day during fisca


year 198


Average


time


Canal


waters


decreased


from


40.7


hours


fiscal


year


to 33.0 hours in fiscal year


Vessels
of 600-foot
tarh and over


of total
oceangoing
transit


Percent


Vessels
of 80-foot


beam


5,534
4,855
4,598
4,089
3,842


7,226
6,364
6,089
5,503
5,200


of total
oceangoing
transit


over


The number of vessels transiting at more than 36-foot draft


increased


14.4


percent


during


with


vessels


transiting


Canal


compared


to 2,


200 last year.


The


maximum allowable draft


of 39 feet


inches was maintained for the entire fiscal year


Total jobs performed by Commission tugs increased from 44,638


year


n fiscal


to 45,687 in fiscal year


Fiscal


year


Percent










CANAL OPERATIONS


i ;d;


:'i
tl











'U: P

:I:
,, t






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


MAINTENANCE


AND


OTHER


CANAL


PROJECTS


Installation
commenced i


a high


February


mast
1982.


fighting
Six 1,


system


000-watt


Pedro


metal


Miguel


halide


lamj


Locks
)s are


mounted


clusters


00-foot


poles and


situated


to cast


long narrow


beams at the inner walls of the lock chambers thus providing Canal pilots


with


better


visibility


when


transiting


wide


beam


ships at


night.


Similar


lighting systems were installed at Miraflores and Gatun locks in prior years.
The estimated date for completion of the project is February 1983.
Progress continued on construction of the vessel tie-up station one mile


north of Pedro Migue


Locks on the west bank of Gaillard Cut. Phase


project will be a station, 1,200 feet long by 90 feet wide, with the capability to


berth


a maximum


ships.


The


major


share


project


entails


breaking and removing approximately 300,000 cubic yards of rock material.
The station will include four breasting dolphins, six mooring dolphins, ten


quick


release


linehandler's


hooks


building


with


associated
perimeter


power
fence,


lines


area


, navigational


illumination.


lights,


The


Phase II station, as presently planned, will be located adjacent to, and north
of, the Phase I station and will be identical in construction. An access road


will serve both stations and a launch landing.
provide berthing for a maximum of two ships.


The phase II station will also
This facility will increase the


effective utilization of the Pacific Locks during clear cut transits or periods


of fog, as well as accommodate disabled


hips.


The tie-up station i


expected


to increase the capacity of the Canal by two ships per day.


In fiscal year


1980, a new method was developed to repair the waterside


"alternate


locomotive
tie method,"


track


consists


at the


locks.


The


of removing and


procedure,


called


replacing alternate ties


together with sections of the concrete foundation thus permitting the track
to be repaired without interfering with the movement of transitting vessels.


Through the end of fiscal year


1982, a total of 4,467 lineal feet of rail had


been repaired at Miraflores Locks, 3,673 lineal feet at Pedro Miguel Locks


4,620


lineal


at Gatun


Locks.


Coincident


with


repair,


maintenance crews also began repairing damaged rack sections and other
integral parts of the tow track system as required. Fifty-four 6-foot sections


were replaced at the lock
sections were replaced.


in fiscal year 1981


In fiscal year 198


a total of


n1 1n\ r v P 0 n af * a or n o, nn. ^nn 4C +n ti r+.i*n


\Xlnrt nr\ D~nF6 11


~ ~nl* n*rn ~n


* lk*/ /






CANAL OPERATIONS


Completion


acres.


of Phase


will enlarge the anchorage by an additional 205


Upon completion of the project,


have increased in size by


the total area of the anchorage will


lightly over 50 percent.


The expanded anchorage


facilities in Gatun Lake will provide greater flexibility in the scheduling of


ship


transiting the Canal.


Two Canal improvement projects completed during the year significantly


extended visib


ty and increased the safety of navigation in Gaillard Cut. La


Pita Hill on the east bank of the Canal and Lirio Hill on the west bank are


located


approximately


2,500 feet apart


on opposite end


of an S-shaped


curve in the narrowest portion of the Canal.


To achieve the desired line of


n this critical area


some


700,000 cubic yards of rock material were


removed at La Pita Hill and another 634,000 cubic yard


Hill.


excavated at Lirio


The lowering of both hills to an elevation of 40 feet above the water level


extended visibility roughly


1,000 feet at La Pita and


1,400 feet at Lirio.


The


rewinding


uprating


hydroelectric


generators


Madden Generating Plant was accomplished during the fiscal year


million contract wa


at the
A $1.3


also negotiated to rewind and uprate the third unit with


work


scheduled


to begin in April


1983


The old generators were installed


during the


and converted to 60-cycle operation in 1957


.Completion of


this project will


substantially reduce the probability of generator failure.


addition, the nominal capacity of each unit will be increased from 8,000 KW


12.000


KW


which


provide


more


peaking


power


Increase


hydroelectric generating capacity during wet years, and reduce generating
costs.


In April


a new


Atlantic anchorage surveillance signal station was


completed at a


cost


roughly one-half million dollars.


The marine type


radar, located on top of the Cristobal Administration Building,


greatly


enhanced the capability of


ignal station personnel to detect,


establish the


position,


monitor the


movement


vessels


within


Cristobal


harbor, anchorage, and


up to


12 nautical mile


to sea.


The signal station


houses three work stations and service facilities for Marine


Traffic Control


computer terminals, radio and telephone communications, signal lights, and


remote


closed


circuit


television


system.


The


24-hour


operation


provides for more effective surveillance and control of the anchorage and the
Atlantic approach to the Canal.


A*9 . WY f





PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


increase the real time knowledge of flood events within the Gatun drainage


basin


permit


much


earlier


implementation


flood


control


procedures.
The voltage conversion of the machinery transformer rooms and motor


controllers at


fiscal year


1982.


: locks from 240 volts to 480 volts was continued during
In the machinery transformer rooms, the obsolete Rolls-


Smith breakers are being rebuilt with molded case circuit breakers mounted


on the existing roll-out mechanisms.


In conjunction with the transformer


room conversion, the motor controllers are being replaced on all miter gates,


cylindrical
equipment.


valves,


rising


stem


valves,


pumps,


other


associated


The transformer room conversion at Pedro Miguel Locks was


completed in early 1982.


Work is currently underway at Miraflores Locks on


both the transformer room and motor controllers. Following completion of
the Miraflores Locks portion of the project, the controllers will be replaced


at Pedro


Miguel.


The


Gatun


Locks conversion is the


final


phase


project and


will be programmed for future years.







SUPPORTING


OPERATIONS







I


..~rak'














Chapter


SUPPORTING


OPERATIONS


Supporting


operation


Panama


Canal


Commission


provided


esse


ntial


support services to the operation and maintenance of the waterway


and the agency's


facilities


as well a


to other U.S.


agencies on the I


thmus


employees


Logi,
ment


tical Services


Tran


their


dependent


, Employee Services,


portation Facilitie


These


operations


Sanitation and Ground


Public Utilities


included
Manage-


Police and Fire Protection


Canal Protection


, Health and Safety


Library Service


LOGISTICAL


SERVICES


Storehouse


Division


provided


centralized


procurement,


inventory


management,


property


warehou
disposal


distribution


support


to Cana


contract administration


operation


Major


, supply


contracting


activities


included approximately $14.2 million in Bunker "C" fuel purchases


for thermoelectric generation,


$3.8 million
operations,


purchase and receipt of the tug Amistad for


.5 million purchase of a split hull dump barge for dredging


$1.3


million


purchase


design


materials and


technical


services for uprating the third hydro turbine generator at Madden Dam.


Ten


new


towing


locomotives procured in previous years were received and


placed into


service at Gatun Locks.


The Storehouse Division


's excess disposal activities included transfers to


other


U.S.


Government


agencies


enuinment


havin


t .. . .
.....


nrio; nal






SUPPORTING


OPERATIONS


Commission's


cargo.


Arrangements


were


made


Commission


participate under the


Military Sealift Command'


contract out of the gulf


port


New


Orleans


using


primarily


containerization


capability.


Approximately


15,000


measurement tons of containerized and breakbulk


cargo were


hipped under the contract to the port of Balboa during the year,


at a considerable saving in transportation expense to the agency.


EMPLOYEE


SERVICES


During


fiscal


year


1982,


Commission


managed


housing,


other


Commission-owned buildings, and recreational facilities for the agency, it


employees


their


dependents.


The


housing


livability


program,


which


permits limited improvement


with rental payback to housing retained for


Commission


employees,


continued,


were


programs


enhancing quarters security,


quarters energy conservation and preventive


maintenance.


In accord


with


provi


ions of the treaty and considerably ahead


of the


required time schedule, the Commission determined that 168 housing units
in the Atlantic sector were excess to its needs and transferred the use of those


units to the Republic of Panama. Sev<
e.g., the Balboa Police Station, the U


eral buildings and building complexes,
.S. District Courthouse at Ancon and


former


Supply


Division


Warehouse


Mount


Hope,


were


also


transferred to Panama.


All transfers were made in accordance with Public


Law 96-70.


SANITATION


AND


GROUNDS


MANAGEMENT


The mission of the Sanitation and Ground


Management Division is to


control and


eliminate vectors


disease as well as to manage the care of


grounds in employee housing areas and around Panama Canal Commission
facilities. The Sanitation Division, a former unit of the Office of Health and
Safety, was merged with the Grounds Management Branch, formerly of the


Community Services


Division,


to form a new major division designed to


more


effectively


conduct


vegetation


control


health-related


drainage


maintenance programs.


One


most


significant


adverse


development


area


. .� r� rrr �






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


garbage and


trash


generated


the Cana


area and


in municipal areas of


Panama.


The continuing need to control vegetation along the 50-m


,high


voltage transisthmian power


TRANSPO


ines was also met.

ROTATION FACILITIES


The


Motor


Transportation


Division


operated


maintained


consolidated


motor


pool


of 846


vehicles designed


to meet


vehicular


trans
year


portation requirements of the Commis


included


trucks


various


sion.


The vehicle fleet in fiscal


types,


passenger-carrying


vehicle


and 76


pecia


-purpose vehicles.


Vehicle mileage increased


ightly


from 7,950,000 miles


in fiscal year


to 7,96


,000 miles


in fisca


year


Fully equipped shops, including a tire retreading plant and heavy duty repair
shops, provide facilities for overhauls, maintenance and repairs to the Motor
Transportation Division fleet and equipment of other Commission units. In


addition


some services


were contracted


out where they were available


required quantity and quality in Panama.


located within the


Motor


Transportation


The vehicle inspection facilities
Division areas were used by the


Government of Panama to conduct in


pections of privately-owned vehicles


and by the Motor
inspections.


Transportation Div


PUBLIC


UTILITIES


ision to perform Comm


AND


mission vehicle


ENERGY


Panama


Cana


Commission


facilities


include electric power generation


distribution systems, communication systems,


water purification and


distribution systems, and a central chilled water air-conditioning


certain public buildings on the


system for


Pacific side.


Total Canal area energy demand during fisca


year 1982


was 558 gigawatt


hours, a 0.4 percent increase from the 556 gigawatt hours used last year


peak hourly demand of 89 megawatts reached on March 26,


The


was


percent
energy


above


peak


consumption


of 88


in fiscal


megawatts in


year


the prior year.


electrical


Agency-wide


power


calculated


together in Btu


was reduced a total of 25


percent from the


energy


conservation


consumption


baseline


period


Commission,


of fiscal


72.6


year


gigawatt


hours,


Elect rica


was


power
percent


below the usage


levels


recorded


for comparable operations


in fiscal year


975: fuel consumption (excluding fuel for power generation).


4.4 mil


a. r a


.






SUPPORTING

Water Consumption by Areas


OPERATIONS


Millions of cubic feet)


Fiscal year


Canal Area . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Panama City and suburbs
Colon and suburbs ......


Total


. S . .* SCS . . . cc.... c c . .... . . . . * * .** * . . *t. . *6.
is..S. . c c. .........e..c......S*****. . . . * . ..*. ....
*.* .ce .* . .ct . . .ti S .S.S.S.555 * ccc c * * *.*.*#.* S
*. s S SS.* .*S. 5S.c. . . s. c ...... . .s.. ..........


722
1,612
740
3,074


726
1,638
697
3,061


The water provided to Panama City


n fiscal year


982 wa


.6 percent


below fiscal year


1981


consumption and averaged 32.7


million gallon


day throughout the fiscal year.


POLICE


AND


FIRE


PROTECTION


During


first


6 months


operation


fiscal


year


Police


Division,


coordination


with


Panama


National


Guard,


worked


preserve public peace and order, protect life and property, and prevent crime
throughout Commission areas. The dual jurisdictional concept and joint
patrol with the Panama National Guard provided law enforcement services
in an efficient manner.


The


Panama


Canal


Commission


Police


Division


ceased


operations at


midnight, March 3


, 1982, in conformance with the Panama Canal Treaty.


Police


Division employees


who desired to continue employment with the


Commission were placed in positions under reduction-in-force procedures.


The


Balboa Police Station was transferred to the Government of Panama


and is being used as a police station by the Panama National Guard.


The


Cristobal and Gamboa police stations were assigned to the Government of
Panama on letters of authorization agreements for continued use as police


stations.


Police


Division property and equipment were transferred or


disposed of in accordance with excess property procedures.
During the 6-month period, 85 persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction were


arrested compared to 131


year


persons arrested during the same period in fiscal


A total of 484 persons subject to Panamanian jurisdiction were


arrested


Canal


area


handled


Republic


Panama


authorities during this 6-month period, compared with 389 during the same


period in fiscal year


1981.


The Panama Canal Commission Fire Division, in coordination with the
Panama Fire Cmrn i; renn hiple fnr fire nrnteption firefiohtino and reePnip






PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 23

CANAL PROTECTION
The Canal Protection Division provides protection and physical security
for vital installations and related facilities of the Panama Canal Commission
through the prevention and detection of sabotage, theft and pilferage; and
the prevention of unauthorized use of Government property, equipment and
facilities. On March 31, 1982, the end of the transition period, the Canal
Protection Division assumed responsibility for the Commission's
environmental protection function.
A comprehensive professional security assessment of the Canal
Protection function was conducted by the United States Southern
Command during the year.
HEALTH AND SAFETY
The Office of Health and Safety is responsible for the agency's
occupational health, industrial hygiene, safety and zoonotic disease control
programs. The Office of Health and Safety maintains close liaison with the
U.S. Army Medical Department Activity (MEDDAC), Panama on all
matters pertaining to the health care provided to Commission employees,
their dependents and others sponsored by the agency. The office also
maintains liaison with components of the Department of Defense, other
elements of the U.S. Government, and appropriate officials and
organizations of the Government of Panama relative to health matters. In
addition, the Office of Health and Safety is responsible for monitoring,
overseeing and establishing policy for the agency's environmental sanitation
program.
During fiscal year 1982, the Office of Health and Safety, in coordination
with the Claims Branch, arranged with two private clinics, one on each side
of the Isthmus, to provide medical treatment for performance of duty
injuries sustained by those non-U.S. citizens for whom the Commission has
responsibility under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act. This group
of employees lost eligibility for treatment at U.S. Army Medical Department
Activity (MEDDAC), Panama facilities on April 1, 1982.
Work place safety, employee safety training, and accident prevention
continued to receive management emphasis at all levels in the organization.
During fiscal year 1982, the Commission experienced 609 performance of
duty accidents in which the injured employee required medical attention






24 SUPPORTING OPERATIONS

and providing limited general library service to Commission employees and


their dependents,


. Forces and their dependents, and to the extent


possible, other Isthmian residents.


The circulation index increased from 874.6 in fiscal year 1981 to


,942.9 in


fiscal year 1982.


The reference index remained at 9.9


, the same as the prior


fiscal year.


Total items in the library decreased from 252,360 to 246,700.














Chapter


ADMINISTRATION


AND


STAFF


PERSONNEL


FORCE


EMPLOYED


AND


RATES


PAY


At the end of fiscal year 1982,


the total I


thmian force of the Commission


was 8,363 compared to 8,490 employees in fiscal year


1981


Of the total in


1982


9 were full-time permanent and 799 were part-time and temporary


In addition, there were


5 military personnel assigned to the Commission on


Isthmus.


Twelve


persons,


citizens,


were


employed


Commission in New Orleans and


hington,


D.C.


Approximately


75 percent of the total Isthmian force was comprised of


Panamanians; 3


percent of third country nationals;


and the remaining


percent of U


.S. citizens. Rates of pay were established on a Canal Area Wage


Base


occupational


categories


normally


filled


Isthmus prior to the treaty effective date of October 1


recruitment


1979


onaU


on the
. Wage


Base


for positions


normally filled


by recruitment from the


United States


prior to October 1
or after October


1979; on a New Wage Base


1979


and on a Critical Skil


for employees hired locally on


Wage Base for employees


hired


into critical


occupations after October


979.


The following


table shows the Commission permanent full-time


citizen


Isthmian work force by


nship and wage base.


Fiscal


Canal Area Wage Base
U.S. Wage Base......


. S S S S SS SS S* S S*S* ** ... ... . S S


3,570
1,584


Total


3,678


New Wage Base..


Non-







ADMINISTRATION


AND


STAFF


EQUAL


OPPORTUNITY


PROGRAM


During fiscal year 1982,


the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


reviewed


approved


Panama


Cana


Commission


Multi-Year


Affirmative


Action


Program


Plan


982-FY


1986


Plan for


Prevention of Sexual Harassment in the Workplace.


plan reflects the acengy's
establish employment goal
equal job opportunity. Th
commended the Panama (


The affirmative action


efforts to identify areas of underrepresentation,
Is, and develop strategies to eliminate barriers to
e Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Canal organization for its voluntary compliance


efforts in developing and implementing an affirmative action program.
Formal complaints filed with the Commission increased from 8 in fiscal


year


981 to 14 in fiscal year 1982.


Similar to the prior year, the joint factor of


race/color was the primary factor/ basis of the formal complaint


filed


The


number of


complaints filed


on the


basis of handicapping conditions also


increased


No complaints were filed by women during the year


Of the tota


number of complaints filed eleven were non-U.S. citizens. A breakdown of


the ratio of complaint


versus


the work force wa


as follows:


Fiscal year


Formal EEO
Work Force.


complaints
... a... ..'"


7,740
1:550


Ratio of complaints versus work force


8,090
1:1000


Between


fiscal


year


1981


fiscal


year


1982


the agency work force


decreased in total numbers


however, the percentage of males and females


versus the total work force remained the same as shown below


Fiscal year


Fiscal year


Female
Male .


6.955


(10.1%)
(89.9%)


I I


7.124


(10.1%)
(89.9%)


result


efforts


since


treaty


to employ


Panamanians


compliance with the Panamanian Preference Program,


and the cessation of


certain Commission functions which were comprised predominantly of U.S.


citizens


Panamanians now account for


75 percent of the agency work force.


Significant


nroere


cc


beePn


occupational


level in the


~Tr`l 111l11 LIlJLII LIILLUW UE EIIV


m~AP






PANAMA


CANAL


During fiscal


year


COMMISSION


1982, the program responsibility for the Affirmative


Action


Program


Handicapped


Individuals


was


transferred


from


Office of Personnel Administration to the Office of Equal Opportunity


PUBLIC


During fiscal year 1982,


AFFAIRS


the Office of Public Affairs continued to expand


agency


communications


emphasis


placed


with


on creating


local


closer


international


relations


with


media.


local


news


Strong
media


(press, television, radio and


publications) and in participating in exhibits,


symposiums, and seminars in the Republic of Panama.


The Office of Public


Affairs


also


expanded


contacts


with


world


maritime


industry


dedicated considerable effort towards increasing Panama Canal Commis-
sion participation in international conferences and seminars. A new exhibit,
"Shipping is our Business," was placed on display in appropriate forums to


highlight


traffic


records


established


in the


three


years


since


treaty


implementation. The Office of Public Affairs
Miraflores and Gatun Locks and conducted 1,0


handled


287,730 visitors at


7 tours of the


ocks facilities


during the year.


OMBUDSMAN


The


Office


Ombudsman,


established


implementing


legislation for the


Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, continued to respond to


employee


dependent


complaints,


grievances


requests


information.


Generally,


client


traffic


required


Ombudsman


investigate


conflicts


administrative


caused


within


problems,
e Panama


inefficiencies,


Canal


omissions, and


Commission


other


policy


U.S.


Government agencies on the Isthmus as a result of the


widest latitude possible was applied to problem


Treaty. However, the


affecting employee morale


and quality of life.


During


fisca


year


1982,


over


1,920


requests


information


and/or


assistance were recorded by the Ombudsman. As in the previous year, the
majority of the Ombudsman's work concerned Commission employees and
those employees who were transferred with their functions from the Panama
Canal Company/Canal Zone Government to the Department of Defense.


Regardless


ever


changing


variety


scope


complaints


questions raised,


root cause remained the same, i.e., treaty stress and






ADMINISTRATION


AND


STAFF


Union of


America


, the International Organization of Masters,


Mates and


Pilots


, and the Metal Trades Council) representing both a professional and


non-professional


bargaining


unit;


National


Marine


Engineers


Beneficial


Association, District No.


-Pacific Coast District representing a licensed


marine engineer unit; and the
representing a fire fighting unit.


Panama


Canal


pilot


unit,


International Association of Fire


These four bargaining units,


which


is represented


by the


Fighters


together with
International


Organization of Masters,


Mates and


Pilots, comprise the organized labor


structure of the Panama Canal Commission pursuant to the Federal Service


Labor-Management Relations Statute,


5 U.S.


Chapter 71


Based upon July


1982 data (including temporary employees), approximately 8,970 employees
or 94 percent of the work force were represented by labor unions.


Bargaining


commenced


on the


non-professional contract, January


on the professional contract,


March 9


on the licensed marine


engineer


contract,


April


on the


fighting


unit contract


September 20, 1982.
signed on September


A three-year


licensed


marine engineer contract was


982.














Chapter


FINANCIAL


REPORT


FINANCIAL


STATEMENTS


FOR


THE


FISCAL


YEAR


ENDED


SEPTEMBER


1982


The


Panama Cana


Commission is an appropriated fund agency of the


Executive


Branch


United


State


Government


provided for


by the


Panama Canal Treaty of 1977


, and established by the Panama Canal Act of


(Public


Law


96-70).


The


Commission


is expected


recover,


through tolls and other revenues, all cost


of operating and maintaining the


Canal


, including


interest,


depreciation,


capital


plant


replacement,


expansion and improvements,


and payments to the Republic of Panama for


public services and annuities, in accordance with paragraph 5 of Article III


paragraph


4(a) and (b) of Article


XIII, respectively,


of the Panama


Canal


Treaty


. Revenues


from


tolls


other


sources


deposited in the United States


Treasury in an account known as the Panama


Canal


Commission


Fund.


Appropriation


operating


expenses


capital improvements are enacted annually by the Congress and are limited


to the sum


estimated


receipts


for the year


plus any unexpended


balances
accounts


Panama


are kept


Canal


on an accrual


Commission


basis of


Fund.


The


Commission


accounting in accordance with


generally accepted accounting principles,


funds i


while the status of appropriated


determined on a funded (obligation-incurred) basis.


The financial statements of the Panama Canal Commission


,appearing a


Tables


through 6,


with accompanying notes, present the financial position


1 NO'..-. L . .....1- .. . .---- - ---- .. .-


nfrl\arn~m: nn: n~ ne Cn~r nml�Al






FINANCIAL


REPORT


Summary


information


concerning


operating


results


capital


expenditures follows:


RESULTS


OPERATIONS


Net revenue from operations amounted to $1.3 million. Pursuant to the
provisions of paragraph 4(c) of Article XIII of the Panama Canal Treaty of
1977 subject to the limitations set forth in Chapter 3, Subchapter V, Section
1341(b)(2) of the Panama Canal Act of 1979 (Public Law No. 96-70), the net


revenue


reduced


fiscal


year


1981


unrecovered costs


of $0.9


million, leaving a


balance of $0.4 million, payable to the Government of


Panama.


The


Commission


request a supplemental appropriation in


fiscal year


1983 for purposes of making this payment.


CAPITAL


EXPENDITURES


Accrued


capital


expenditures


fiscal


year


1982 amounted


to $24.9


million.


The principal expenditures were $7.4 million for purchase of towing


locomotives,


$5.4


million


purchase


tugboats,


$1.4


million


construction of a ship tie-up station and $0.7 million for chamber lighting at


Gatun and Pedro


Miguel locks.











FINANCIAL


REPORT


Table 1.--Balance Sheet


Assets


PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT:
At cost (Note Ic) ...........
Less accumulated depreciatic


ances (Notes le,


2 and 3) ....


.5


valuation


allow-


$853,314,309

386,676,308


$866,931,982

400,615,590


466,638,001


466,316,392


CURRENT


ASSETS:


Fund balances and cash (Notes 4,
Operating funds ..........


Capital funds...
Emergency fund
Postal fund ....


* SfftSS


Trust fund . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .
Cash receipts for deposit into U


and 6a):


* ftftt S S SSS*tftft** S S S ft ft ft S S
*ftftt S SSS*ft**~ *55 95559 ft.
* ft..... S ft S S S SifteSsyS S S


Treasury


* t f


74,440,013
21,424,115
10,000,000
167,723
1,015,983
576,536
107,624,370


59,43
25,47
10.00


96,642,310


Accounts receivable, less
accounts of $50,612 and $
(N ote If)...............
Other receivables (Note 7)..


allowance


doubtful


,760, respectively


9,987,875
826,867
10,814,742


11,278,598
1,201,581
12,480,179


Inventories, less allowance for obsolete and excess stock
of $800,000 and $717,561, respectively (Note ig)....


34,580,616


40,284,331


Other current


assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


203,737


360,073


153,223,465


149,766,893


OTHER ASSETS:







PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


September 30, 1982 and 1981


Liabilities

INVESTMENT OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT:
Invested capual:


Interest-bearing (9. 178
(Note 9) . . . . . . . . . .
Non-interest-bearing..


Current budgetary
Obligated ope
Obligated cap
Unobligated c
Unobligated e


Employees' repatriation


and 8.402%,


* ft..


*t


respectively)


$89,763,345
258,511,310
348,274,655


accounts (Note 4


rating funds...
ital funds . . ...
capital funds ...
emergency fund


CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Accounts payable (Note 6a):
U.S. Government agencies
Government of Panama .
O their .................


* . ft. . *99.. .....
* ft9 ....... t......
. ... f ... .. ... ..


Note


*. at. ..... .ft ..
* f.. ft...ft.....tftt.t


. f.. ...


Accrued liabilities:
Employees' leave........... ............... ..
Salaries and wages .. . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ..
Cost of early retirement benefits (Notes 1h and 6b)
Retirement benefits to certain former employees of
predecessor agencies (Note Ih)................


Ship accident claims (Notes 7 and 11)
Net revenue payable to Government
(N ote 12) .. . .. . . . . . ......... .
O their ............................


Other current liabilities:
Advances for capital (Notes 1
Unfunded ship accident claim
Other .... .............


of Panama
.*. .t a ......


d and 13) .. ....
s (Notes 7 and 11)


74,440,013
15,705,670
5,718,445
10,000,000
105,864,128
454,138,783


22,808,314
7,090,498
6,197,843
36,096,655


36,427,154
5,624,977
19,560,000

1,483,000
1,743,000
11,032,030

378,635
2,027,612
78,276,408


23,336,205
20,553,489
916,418
44,806,112

159,179,175


$128,419,111
249,101,935
377,521,046



59,433,349
17,371,012
8,104,146
10,000,000
94,908,507

472,429,553




19,367,682
8,397,367
3,672,626
31,437,675


34,711,831
5,278,400
18,130,000

1,506,000
2,427,000
11,514,828


1,120,525
74,688,584


16,785,190
13,870,414
1,195,849
31,851,453

137,977,712










PANAMA


CANAL


COMM1SS


Table 2.-Statement of Operations and Non-Interest-Bearing Investment


Fiscal Years Ended September 30,


OPERATING


1982 and 1981


VENUES:


Note Ib)


Advances for capital
Net tolls revenue .


Other...
Advances


for capital


,589,09


Note


* . . * . .
* �. . S


Note


(681,000)
324,908,097
112,946,382
(5,870,015)
107,076,367


Net other revenue


$303,080,358
(9,876,000)
293,204,358
94,822,263
94...822.263
94,822,263


Total


431,984,464


388,026,621


OPER


EATING EXPENSES:


Payments


to the Go


vernment


of Panama (Note


Public services
Fixed annuity.


* . S S S S . S . S S . * * * S S * S *4 a * 00. . . 9 . .
. S . . . . .5 **.*0 5 .. .. .*. ..S � �4 . S


Tonnage


10,000,000
10,000,000
61,193,887
81.193.887


10,000,000
10,000,000
56,862,970
76,862,970


Maintenance of channels and harbors


Notes IL and 6c)


Navigation service and control


Locks operation..


45,203,812
79,067,472
45,998,340


29.598


65,799,050
41,049,238


General


repair,


storehouse,


engineering and


mainte-


nance services..


11,305,378
36,403,300


Transportation and utilities


11,209,16


36,221


Housing operations


8,136,


7,494


General and administrative


Note


72,226,412


69,979,767


Interest
Other..


* St * SOSSSS *555SSs
* S S S S S S S S * S S * * * 54


*
4


Total operating expenses .


NET OPERATING REVENUE (Loss)


INVESTED CAPITAL


-NON


* S 555 * S S S S S S S S S SOS****
* StS00 50 5* St ISISSeeSS S
* at...... S S S S S 55555555


Notes


b, 8 and 12)


-INTEREST-BEARING:


Unrecovered costs for fiscal year 1981


(recovered


deferred


Notes lb and 8)


,123,826


42,029,589
430,688,571


1,295,893




(917,258)


11,254,


40,292,686
388,943,879


917,258)


917,258


nue payable to Government of Panama


Tolls


reve


-- --


operating revenue










FINANCIAL


REPORT


t'


N &E
0%


C4
Ic
S
S
C:
cu
U,
I

4


* P P * S
* P * 5 5
* P P S S
* S S S S
* P 5 5 5
* P 5 5 5
* S S S S


Svj



. -


S-w
*













PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


a00 00



b49


**F
* O000





.0-
.mn


'or~jnocav
0% C C tf





nO


* . 4 . 4
* a S 4 4
* a a a a
* .! a * a
* * * a a
* * S * *
* a 4 * *
* a a a a
* at * . U
* a a S
* a a a *~
* a a -


0%-0




Ol~n


*
*f




* 0C
* S
* a


* a a
* a a.
* * *
* . 5:

* a S

* * *
* a St
* a a

* a * '


Sc
4'1

* -

0%
Ca-
A:r


* a a *
* a a* f
ft a a a
*f a a a
* ft 4 a
* S * *
* a a


**
**
**


* S S S S
- - a a S
* a a a U
* a a a
* a a a *~
* a * S


- an





* -


* 00
* V-r
* 4N


*
* a
*
ft
* a
Is

* a


SOl

00
...o









. - * -
0~c


* 0000^

*. a. -




* a - - - ,

* .00 .






c0 l 0) .
tK -)6-


'* S. S
.'IC0

*r


aS S a
* . . .* ..a a




. S - aS



. . . . 0 . . 4,
* a a . S S







* S *| S.
. * *" I-ao- * . S -


t ) - . - U *




a- , n .4 )
-a cd 0
* d'- o4 *
*&
clB S Q- O

-c e"'.^ :^


.00 00
Sc"-I
S. S.


*-
,0
a. . .... S



Eg
"E



* U .Sy







g~SS
a.C - -
S E
me.D



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.-
3a 00 '-
- a - -
si-sy s�
-g^ is




-*) ZO ' ;0
" 00 ^- 0


.


rtSW





* Ca

~C L


tm-







FINANCIAL


REPORT


Table 4.-Statement of Changes in Financial Position


Fiscal Years Ended September 30,


SOURCE OF FUNDS:
From Operations:
Revenue....


1982 and 1981


$431,984,464


$388,026,621


Less operating expenses:
Interest on interest-bearing investment


9,123,826


1,254,119


Payments to the
(Note 12). .....
Other expenses...


Government


Total operating expenses ...


of Panama


......:.
*. . S S. U S * S


Net operating revenue (loss) (Notes Ib, 8 and 12)
Unrecovered costs for fiscal year 1981
(recovered) deferred (Notes lb and 8) ........
Net revenue payable to Government of Panama
(Notes Ib, 8 and 12) ...... ................


Add transactions not requiring outlay of funds:
Depreciation (Note le) . . .. .. . . . ... . . ..


Amortization


adjustment


of deferred


item s .. . . . .. ... . . . . . . . .. . . .
Provision for lock overhauls (Note li).
Provision for casualty losses (Note Ij).


Interest on interest-bearing investment
Other (Note 6b) . .. . . . . . .. .. . . ..


f


* SS S
* C * CS
* S S S C
* t S ft S
.f ... S


Total source of funds ...............


81,193,887
340,370,858
430,688,571

1,295,893

(917,258)

(378,635)


18,754,070

204,106
3,544,000
12,200,000
9,123,826
6,249,901

50,075,903


76,862,970
300,826,790
388,943,879


917,258)


917,258




17,813,844


251,607
3,093,000
2,200,000
1,254,119
326,901


44,939,471


APPLICATION OF FUNDS:
Lock overhauls expenditures.
Casualty losses�...........


Accrued capital expenditures....
Reduction in investment of the U


* C S S*C****SC C C C C C C
*e*t*tit*** S


Government


Total application of funds ..............


INCREASE (DECREASE)


WORKING CAPITAL


ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN WORKING CAPITAL:


Increase (decrease) in
Cash..............
Receivables ......
Inventories ........
O their. . . . .. . . . . . .


current assets:


3,214,853
12,288,023
24,903,322
38,370,217

78,776,415

$(28,700,512)




$ 26,439
(1,665,437)
(5,703,715)
(156,336)
(7,499,049)


156,466
5,379,383
25,565,636
18,509,914

49,611,399

$(4,671,928)


$(1,474,849)
(14,635,204)
14,541,037
(1, 150,006)
(2,719,022)










PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Table 5.-Statement of Status of Appropriations


Fiscal Years Ended September 30,




SOURCE OF APPROPRIATIONS (Tables 3A and 3B):


1982 and 1981


Operating funds:
Current year operating appropriation ..........
Obligated operating funds brought forward .....
Appropriation for repayment to the General
Fund of the U.S. Treasury for the fiscal year 1980
appropriation . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....
Restoration of fiscal year 1980 operating
appropriation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..


$400,754,000
59,433,349


" a * . ' . a. . . . .


460,187,349


Capital funds:
Current year capital appropriation (no year)
Obligated capital funds brought forward ...
Unobligated capital funds (no year) brought
forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Emergency fund


no year) . ......................


TOTAL SOURCE OF APPROPRIATIONS . .................


9,766,000
7,371,012


8,104,146

45,241,158

10,000,000

$515,428,507


3,050,000
6,894,964


350,000.000


4,892,198

804,837,162


31,560,000
16,630,877

3,555,245

51,746,122

10,000,000

$866,583,284


APPLICATION OF APPROPRIATIONS (Tables 3A and 3B):

Operating funds:
Expenditures from operating appropriations ...
Expenditures from operating appropriations for
repayment to the General Fund of the U.S.
Treasury for the fiscal year 1980 appropriation
Obligated operating funds ....................
Unobligated operating funds lapsed............


Capital funds:
Expenditures from capital


Fiscal year 1
Fiscal year 1
Fiscal year 1
Obligated capital
Fiscal year 1
Fiscal year 1
Fiscal vear 1


980...
981 ...
982...
funds:
980...
981...
982...


appropriations:


...............o...mi..

...s.*.*.s ..asst ..a .....

*S.t. . ��.*. . ......

" .555...I.. saasaag *a.


$379,957,490



74,440,013
5,789,846

460,187,349



4,492,971
14,559,299
4,764,773

358,549
4,618,448
10.728.673


$363,891,567


350,000,000
59,433,349
31,512,246

804,837,162



14,734,646
11,536,318
......o.. ...

4,162,768
13,208,244
















FINANCIAL


REPORT


* ft a a a a
* a S * ft a a S S
* a a a S C S S S
* C S ft ft S ft ft
* a ft S S C S S
* S S C S S ft ft *
* S S C ft ft ft a S
* ft S S S S a ft ft
* ft S S 5 ft S S


h rJ

r Q"
OI

CL

O
cl O

er( n


* f S
* a ft * S t 5 ft S


* ft S S C a
* S S S ft C S ft ft
* C a ft S ft ft ft *
* C a ft S S C ft S
* a a S ft S ft ft ft
* S S S C S ft a S
* 5 ft 5 ft ft 5 5 ft
* ft S 5 ft S S a ft
* ft a 5 ft ft C ft S
* ft C 5 ft * 5 ft a
* 5 ft S S ft * S S
* ft ft S 5 S ft ft S
* a ft S ft ft ft C S
* S ft 5 5 ft S S ft
* S 5 5 ft ft ft 5 ft
* S S C ft ft S ft
* * a S S S S ft C
* S 5 ft ft 5 ft S ft
* 5 5 ft a C ft ft S
* 5 ft C ft 5 ft S ft
* ft ft S 5 ft ft * S
* ft S S 5 ft S S S
* ft S S S ft S ft S
* 5 ft ft ft 5 ft ft S


* ft S C S f
* ft S C 5 f
* ft S S 5 f
* ft S S ft f






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMIS


SION


NOTES


FINANCIAL


STATEMENTS


Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.
The Comptroller General of the United States approved the Accounting


Principles and Standards Statement of the Panama Cana


Commission in


letter dated September


1982.


A summary of


significant accounting


policies follows:


a. Accounting


and


reporting.


required


section


1311(a)


Panama Canal Act of 1979


, hereinafter referred to as the Act, the accounts of


the Commission are maintained pursuant to the Accounting and Auditing


1950.


This


requires


that


principles,


standards


related


requirements


accounting


met,


as prescribed


Comptroller


General
Treasury


United


States


after


Director


consulting with


Office


the Secretary


Management


of the
Budget


concerning their accounting, financial reporting and budgetary need


The


Accounting and


Auditing Act


950 also


requires


that the accounts be


maintained on an accrual basis.


Cost


application


recovery.


generally


required
accepted


in section
accounting


1341(e)(l)
principles


to the


Panama


Canal Commission, a


United States Government agency comparable to a


rate-regulated


public


utility,


determines


manner


in which


costs are


recognized.


The basis for tolls rates is prescribed in section 1602(b) of the


Act.
that:


This section of the Act


known a


the "statutory tolls formula,


" provides


"Tolls
cover


hall be prescribed at rates calculated to produce revenues


as nearly


as practicable


costs


maintaining and


operating


appurtenances


Panama
related


Canal,
thereto


together


with


, including


facilities


unrecovered


costs


incurred on or after the effective date of this Act, interest,


deprecia-


tion


, payments


to the


Republic


Panama


pursuant


para-


graph 5 of Article III and paragraph 4(a) and (b) of Article XIII of


the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977


and capital for plant replace-


ment, expansion, and improvements.


Toll


shall not be prescribed


at rates calculated


to produce revenues sufficient to cover oav-






FINANCIAL


Property, plant and equipment.


REPORT


Property, plant and equipment are


recorded at cost


or, if acquired from another Government agency


at the


value determined by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget.


Administrative and other related general expense


are recovered currently


and therefore not capitalized


The co


t of minor item


of property, plant and


equipment is charged to expense a


incurred.


Advances


capital.


portion of toll


in excess


depreciation


recoveries may be programmed annually by the Board of Directors for plant


replacement,


expansion,


or i


improvements.


Such


fund


are considered


capital


amortized
calculated
advances.


advances


from


through


Canal
offset


users.


Upon


utilization


depreciation


to approximate the depreciation


these advances are


expense


on assets acquired


amount


with such


Depreciation.


Depreciation i


provided using a straight-line method


with additional annual depreciation,


identified a


composite,


to provide for


premature plant retirements.


f. Accounts
Panama Canal


receivable.


U ncollectible


accounts


receivable


Commission are recognized as a reduction in revenue when


written off.


Any subsequent collection


of Commission account


receivable


previously written off are recorded as revenue.


The allowance for doubtful


accounts


which appears on the Commission books i


applicable only to the


receivables of predecessor agencies.


Inventories.


Operating material


and supplies


are stated at average


cost


,plu


cost of transportation to the ultimate destination on the Isthmu


Panama.


An allowance ha


been established to reflect the estimated cost of


obsolete and excess stock.


. Retirement benefits.


Employer payment


to the contributory United


States
Social


Civil


Service


Retirement


Security System are charged


System and


to the


to expense.


Republic of Panama


The Commission ha


liability for future payments to employees under these systems.


Non-United


State


citizen


employees


who


retired


fro m


predecessor


agencies prior to October 5,


1958 are not covered by the United States Civil


Service Retirement System but do receive benefit


under a separate annuity






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


or on behalf
provisions o


of, employees and their survivors under the early retirement


Act.


The annual


installment


to liquidate the


increased


liability is determined by the Office of Personnel


Reserve for lock overhauls.


Management.


A reserve is provided through an annual


charge to expense to cover the estimated cost of periodic lock overhauls.


Reserve for casualty losses.


A reserve is provided through an annual


charge to expense to cover the estimated cost of marine accidents and other
casualty losses.


Housing


use rights.


monetary


value


is assigned


to the


rights


granted to the United States Government by the Republic of Panama to use
Canal Area housing transferred to the Republic of Panama under the terms


of the


Panama


Canal


Treaty


The cost to manage, maintain and


provide


livability


improvements


to these quarters


is charged


to expense.


Rental income is included


n other revenues.


Dredging


costs.


The


recurring


costs


dredging the


waterway are


charged


expense.


Non-recurring


dredging


costs


substantial


improvements and betterments to the waterway are considered additions to
plant and are capitalized and depreciated over their estimated service lives.


Plant


Valuation Allowances.


At July
equipment


Canal


1951,


certain


transferred


Company


valuation


from


Canal


allowances


Panama


Zone


Canal


Government


for property,
(agency) to tl


were


plant and
e Panama


established,


reduce to usable value the costs of the assets transferred. At October 1, 1979,
such valuation allowances as were applicable to the assets transferred from


Panama


Canal


Company


Canal


Zone


Government


to the


Panama Canal Commission were carried forward. At September 30,


and at September


1982


1981, these valuation allowances amounted to $99.3


million and $116.6 million, respectively, comprised of: (a) $5.6 million and


$5.9


million


to reduce


to usable


value


cost


property,


plant


equipment transferred; (b) $50.9 million to offset interest costs imputed for


(Thn21


fnnntrumntinn


nprinr .


nllnn


tCO2


t...V '-.II C~ .. a ..I t--..~.. tIa*.2* t4~ulttJ. *'tjk *ttA aLI~ It-*. I tUIIIycI.t Nll *l E* I tDN C lt 1


nri oinal


CdR







FINANCIAL


REPORT


Depreciation as a Percentage of Average Cost of Plant.
The provision for depreciation, expressed as a percentage of average cost


of depreciable plant exclusive of valuation allowances,


was 2.49% for fiscal


year


1982 and 2.41


for fiscal year


1981


Fund Balances and Cash.
The fund balances and cash are composed of the following:


Millions
of Dollars


Operating and capital funds
Emergency fund .........
Postal fund ..............
Trust fund . . . . . . . . . . ....
Fund balances and cash....


* * * * ** * * * * * * * * S * S S S * *0 * S * * * S S S S S *dStSd** * S S S S *
* *SS*S*tS S S * * S S S S *O S S *4 * S S S S S S S * S S S S S * S S S * S S * S


$95.8
10.0


S....... . . . . . ... . .. .. . . . . . . . . 0.2
. .......... . . .. .... .. . . . .. ... .. . . . . 1.6
� . . � . �. S . . . . . . . . . ......... $107.6


The fund balances and cash of $107,624,370 are made up of $104,375,796


deposit


United


States


Treasury,


$2,0


1.770


on deposit


commercial


banks and $1.226.804 on hand.


Of the total


, $105,864,128 is


comprised of current budgetary accounts which include appropriated funds


for operations,


capital and the emergency fund.


The emergency fund represents the amount on deposit in the United States


Treasury which is to be used


. . . to defray emergency expenditures and to


insure


the continuous efficient and safe operation


of the


Panama


Canal


when fund


appropriated for the operation and maintenance of the Canal


prove insufficient for


uch purposes


The postal fund consists of outstanding money orders,


interest accrued thereon.


postal savings and


This fund will remain available until liquidated.


The trust fund


primarily include


deposits


made by customers for future


tolls


, other service payments and undeposited receipts.


Panama Canal Commission Fund.


The


Panama


Canal


Commission


Fund


as established


by the


Panama


Canal Act of 1979 (Public Law No.


96-70),


made up of receipts deposited


n the United States


Treasury less appropriation warrants issued during the


r ~ ~ ~ ~ t -, -,, -, 1 ---a .a


e1 II Al fl aa nlY a n nl atCat~.n na 1


CI__,1


~~l~��YI






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


Operating Appropriation.
Capital Appropriation ...


of Dollars


$427.


$463.8


Returned to General Fund (9/80)
Withdrawn from General Fund (1


Repaid to General Fund (7/81)
Returned to General Fund (9/8


Returned to General


Fund (9/8;


Amount owed General Fund of U


September 30,


2/80)


(350.0)


I) .....
2) .....


(378.2)


$ 85.6


Treasury as of


1982


Accounting Changes.


The financial statements reflect various


changes a


follows:


"Unobligated


operating


funds


returned


U.S.


Treasury


"has been deleted.


change ha


no impact on the financial


position or the operating results of the Commission.
b. The cost of early retirement provisions of the Panama Canal Act


been


added


to the


balance


heet


as a liability


Commission
Retirement


for future


Fund


payment
an equal


to the


amount


United


States


is recorded


Civil Service


as a Deferred


Charge.


This


change


no impact


on the


financial


sition


operating results of the Commission.


Effective with fiscal year 1982,


there wa


a change in the method of


applying the accounting policy for dredging cost


The effect of this


change


was


increase


expense


reduce


capital


advance


requirement.


The precise dollar magnitude of


this change cannot be


measured since these amount


operating account


However


s were not isolated in the Commission's
, the change did not have any impact on


net operating revenue.




Other Receivables.


Other


receivables


represent


services


provided


connection


with


ship


accidents
settlement


for which the vessel is considered to be responsible awaiting final
t. This amount is also included in the computation of estimated


. ~1 P


1 * *


^ 1�n I Tn r * i n *a .. *i r c n r rI C' - an Y� nf� n n nh* nl . .


Millions


;I


Iftllllf


L1'


* *ra






FINANCIAL


REPORT


Interest-Bearing Investment of the United States Government.
The interest-bearing investment of the United States Government in the


Panama Canal i


determined based on section 1603(a) of the Panama Canal


1979.


The


interest-bearing


investment


United


States


Government at September


, 1982 wa


determined as follows:


Millions of Dollars


Investment at September 30, 1981
Fiscal year 1982 transactions:
Disbursements........
Receipts . . . . . . . . . .....
Net property transfers .


*. *. *. **t. ... sea .s.t .. .. . . . ...
*.. * . a a........ a...........e
S ....a.* a ..t . a ....*.E ....S1.
*. a * st. a a ...... .s........S..


$128.4


$403.8
(440.1
(2.3


Net change..


S. ..................... . . . . (38.6)


$ 89.8


Investment at September 30, 198


Accounts Payable-United States Government Agencies.


Included in the accounts payable to United States Government agencies
are ship accident and other claims in the amount of $19.1 million that were


forwarded to the Department of Justice in Washington,


D.C. after reaching


a settlement or receiving a judgment for approval for payment.



11. Ship Accident Claims.
Liabilities arising from ship accident claims are divided into fund and non-


fund categories.


The fund category is made up of the following:


a. Accidents which occurred prior to October


1979.


Accidents


which


occurred


within


locks after September


1979.


c. Accidents which occurred outside the locks after September


1979


, for which the claim or estimated liability is $120,000 or less per


ship per accident.


Settlement


of liabilities


accidents


which


occurred


outside the


locks


where


claim


exceed


$120,000


requires


specific


Congressional


approval.
Congress.
accidents


Hearings


Until


covering


Congressional


initial


action


three


claim


is completed,


are underway


abilities


these


are booked as non-fund.






PANAMA


CANAL


COMMISSION


extent


that


such


revenues exceed


expenditures of the Commi


ssion.


This


amount


subject


to the


imitations


set forth


in section


341(e)


Panama Canal Act of 1979 (Public Law


96-70).


Advances for Capital-Transit Booking System Revenues.


During fiscal


year


1982,


with approval


of the


Board


of Directors,


Commission


tested a system


whereby shippers,


for a


could


make an


advance reservation for vessel transit.


The test continued for approximately


four months generating revenues of $5.9 million. By direction of the Board


of Directors, these revenues were set aside for capital improvements.
funds are considered capital advances from Canal users.


Such


Reserve for Casualty Losses.


The


reserve


casualty


losses


at September


1982 of $9.1


million


includes $8.8 million for marine accidents and $0.3 million for other casualty


losses.


The monthly accrual for the reserve for marine accidents in fiscal year


1982 was $1.0 million per month for a total of $12.0 million.


Extraordinary


Retirement.


The


retirement


SIP-7


Emergency


Gates


Miter


Gate


Latching


Devices was approved at the March 1982 meeting of the Board of Directors.


The


retirement


of these systems


was recommended


by the


United


States


Army


Corp


Engineers


reviewed


selected


specialists


Panamanian
Panamanian


Society


Board


Engineers


members.


The


Architects


specialists


at the


also


request


recommended


elimination of these


systems.


The net amount charged to operations was $2.6


million.



16. Contingent Liabilities and Commitments.


addition


to recorded


abilities,


the estimated


maximum contingent


liability
'1*ii"


which


could


I- S


result


from
w axn a


pending claims and


lawsuits was $10.9


. .a n t a n V~ fl *H - ar ... Sl t. w I l n n wr n. a an tr .t n n rr a a mr a ia


J






FINANCIAL


REPORT


Cash and negotiable securities of a kind acceptable by the United States


Government


in the amount


of $7.0


million


were


held


United


States


depositories desi


gnated by the Panama Canal Commission at September 30,


982 to guarantee payment by third parties of their obligations.


The Panama Canal Treaty of 1977


Article XIII


, paragraph 4(c),


provides


that


an annual


amount


to $10


million


year


paid


to the


Government


of Panama


out of


operating revenue to the extent that


revenues exceed expenditures.


subject to the limitation


Payment to the Government of Panama is


set forth in section 1341(e) of the Panama Canal


Act of


979 (Public Law No.


96-70).


In the event operating revenues in any


year do not produce a surplus


efficient to cover this payment, the unpaid


balance shall


paid from


operating surpluses in future years


up to the


amount


available


from


these


surpluses.


September


, 1982


, the


balance contingently


payable to


the Government


of Panama amounts to


$26.9 million.
The long-range financial impact of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977 is
not considered in the financial statements of the Commission.










Chapter


VI


STATISTICAL


Shipping


TABLES


Statistics








STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 1.-Panama Canal Traffic-Fiscal Years 1973 Through 1982


Traffic assessed tolls
on net tonnaee basis


Traffic assessed tolls
on displacement
tonnage basis


Fiscal


year


Long tons


Number
of
transit


cargo


Number
of
transit


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


Number
of
transit


Displace-
ment
tonnage


* 4 9 9 A 99 9 9 A 5* 99

* 4 At t S 9 * 9 9 #9
S 49. . A A..A .
.. ... ..... ....
.. . . . .. . .. . .. ..
........... ...
...............
...............
...............
...............
.. . . .. ... . ..


13,609
12,157
3,037
11,896
12,677
12,935
13,507
13,884
14,009


ANGOING

111,032,08
119,422,5(
141,898,2
134,204,4(
35,272,3(
163,826,5#
194,773,1
208,376,74
291,838,59
301,762,6(
323,958,34


COMMERCIAL


26,104.
47,906,
40,101,
17,212,


TRAFFIC'


,203,549
,715,628
,053,680
,778,919
,686,757
.353, 132
,907,260
,470,601
,063, 175
,656,491
,884,207


52,025
00,376
71,006
31.258
23,205
08.642
09.798
36,600
37,593
11,418
29.684


OCEANGOING


GOVERNMENT


AFFIC


* 9# S 9# P 499 9 ** * 49
* #9 #9 A 969 9.99HB J l k
* * * 9 49 9 A49 4 * 9.�
* P4 4 9* 9 * * 9. S A * 9
* 4 * 5* 5 * 49 4>* * * � * U
* S 9 : * 9 9 A 9 *9 * 9 S *
* 54 9l S 9 4 * * 9 * 99 *
* 9* A A 4 A 4 9 � * * * 94*
49* * 9 9 9 A l 4* 9 9 4 * 4I


,285,727
,831,535
,376,797
727,983
166,779
805,983
889,093
,054,169
,515,326
,241,442
,546,746


,405.428
,748,963
526,497
177,508
55,383
212,677
291.115
357,482
396,481
301,776
285,451


478,646
021,966
287,777
641.137
118,300
577,483
589,085
726,755
844,748
705.936
794.282


FREE OCE


ANGOING


TRAFFIC'


. . .. . ..
S 9 99 .


9. .9 . . .9 .#


* 9 4 9


12,810
At ..At. ..A - A 4


5,


42.633
56,364
694
22,854
1,474
21,252
3,789
4,527
1,686
2,248
5,010


S* 9 5* 4 5** �* �


20,640
27.244
10,400
41,655
1,800
10.380
1,100
2,194
4,810
8.544
21.903


TOTA


L OCE


ANGOING


TRAFFIC


****** *9 9 99 9 *9 9* 99*
* S 9* 94<* * * 9* 9 9 999
99 9* 54 . 9. 99 4 *49
* #9 96 P 9 95 9 944 * * *
* 9 9 9 * 99 9 95 9 * * * *


14,238
14,304
13.786
12,280
3,059
11,997
Ii ') 7Q


317,815
254,103
275,015
932,385
439,079
632,554
At) I AA


27,522,
49,655,
40,627,
17,395,
30,943,
23,191,
A9 Ano


26
87
95


a .I t


4,121
4,213
3,715
2,208
3,047
1,935
9 791


128,724,828
137,793,958
136,342,151
128,442.910
33,806,531
133,951,867
1C7 nA I 14


475,698
370,427
304,359
260,641
90.030
284,170
'r1 fiAt


Total traffic









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 51



Table 1.-Panama Canal Traffic-Fiscal Years 1973 Through 1982

(Continued)


Total traffic


Number
of
transits


Long tons
of
cargo


Traffic
on net
Number
of
transit


assessed tolls
tonnage basis


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


Traffic assessed tolls
on displacement
tonnage basis


Number
of
transit


Displace-
ment
tonnage


SMALL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC3


f.* 4 9 9 4 9 9 4t 9* S * 49

* 4 9, 4 9* 9, 9 * * 44�*

* S * 9 9 * * - * 9 99* 9 9 *
* 9 9 * 44 9 * 9 4 49 44*
* 9 1 4* t 4 4 -9 * 94*
,..............


... .... ... ....

....... ... ....


73.228


SMALL U.S.


39,466
23,496
7,939
6,866
1,236
2,820
6,962
7,718
787
1,355
928


GOVERNMENT


611
1,120
1,229


50,281
15,389
48,717
57,827
69,229
52,052
44,962
50,399


TRAFFIC3


* II 4 9. 9 9t 44 * * * * 99*

* 4 * 4 *9 * 9 4 9 4 4 . 4*

* 4 4 *9 94 * 4 4 44 . 9

* 9. 9 * 9I . 4 * * *49

* 4 9 94 4 4** * 9 4 4 944*

* ** * * * *4 4 * * 9 *9 9 94
...............
.. ............
...............
1...............
...............
...............
. . . . . . . .,
...............


$4,065
3,312
4,729
6,168
1.613
12,851
9,504


*. . . I
I


. . .9 . . .9

* 9 .9 9 4 . 4


6,848
5,088
6,382
8,019
2,144
6,769
0,742
5,519
4,313
0,431
0,973


MALL FREE


* 9* 4 44 44*

* * S 9 * 4 99*

* 9 * 94 9 **
* 9 94. .. ..


S*r *9 9 .


RAFFI


31
50

10
20
3


7


AL PA


* 9 * * * * 94 9 * 9 99 4 4.
* 9 * * 4 9* 9 49 44 4. **


* # 4 44 * * #4 9 * 9 99*
...............
...............


NAMA


15,109 $113,381,398
15,269 121,319,791
14,735 143,332,428
13,201 134,987.867
3.313 35,465,477


ii nQ'


I\fA B

1
I
1
I


I 1lif ll '' .t fl.A ' l


ANAL


27,561,73
49,679,37
40,635,92
17,402,32
30,944,94
23 194.67


TRAFFIC


_ I


4,892
5,084
4,570
2,994
3,269
2.758


28,800,796
37,873,248
36,398,866


483,594
377,043
312,046


128,495,
33,823,
134.004.


Fiscal


,ear


I '


Jir JL7 JVLJLJ











STATISTICAL TABLES


d 3(r-~ ~ 0no0 90rnr drOo


00U O\ NOO QO OQ N -O hflt
-*r40%d noC'OOIr
fl-sOtsorr~nt'~tn
e, 0'rl33(1nlr 3
eblW)r

64"9c ~g r IO~90




*~ c .l ~r c * . rrd ~
r-rd no~ r* nf'Or- - \
9O Cn C9QQ%%Q0 0 t ~ v
343 J N 3No ra r-r-'r l4
rwCrrtfr


(Y~~ 9~00 00I 00 ('
ON- OO000%flC'IN c ~ ~
r4NO% r-\oC d r n ~oN-n~I






nn--ool 00r4 00r' I -\o
00 LF 0 n-r--Qctn3rnrI'



vlnn I n rr 9 n osotn


00~ ~ tf s ON ~ ~iV


CO 5 00 0i ~ \

no\O~6~900O--o
n-soe1r~vlt~ -o~Cennrnrn9o3
-r-- M rj nr r rq\ON







3 ~ONf 0000 fW ~(lVW-CfONi

ma VI9 r n C0~F~~
c - -i ---- '�-"-- ----�




---- ('4 r4 ----Url~I .r*
- - - ---- -,- I- -




Con N0oen'oCl C alJ(U~IF*C
4* C* C( ** C r Pt -


* * ft ft a * a a


* t S f t f


* a S S ft ft ft * S ft ft a
- a C S S ft S ft S S 5 ft S
* S C S S a * * S S ft S
* ft a S S ft ft C S S S ft S








PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION



Table 3.-Canal Traffic' by Flag of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1982


Measured tonnage


Number
of
Flag transit


Algeria .........
Argentina ......
Austria .......
Australia ......
Bahamas ......
Belgium ........
Bermuda ......
Bolivia ...... .
Brazil . . . . . . .
Bulgaria.......
Canada ........
Cayman Islands.
Chile . . . . . . . .
Colombia ......
Cuba . . . . . . . .
Cyprus.........
Czechoslovakia .
Denmark.......
Dominican Repul
East Germany ..
Ecuador........
El Salvador.....
Finland ........
France.........


Ghana .......
Greece .......
Guatemala ...
Honduras ....
Hong Kong...
India . . . . . ...
Indonesia ....
Iraq .........
Ireland ... . . .
Israel . . . . . .
Italy ....... ..
Japan........
Kuwait......
Liberia ......
Malaysia . ..
Malta .......
Mexico ......
Morocco .....
Netherlands .
New Zealand
Nicaragua ....
Norway ......
Panama ......
People's Repub
Peru .........
Philippines ...
Poland.......
Portugal .....
Republic of Ch
Saudi Arabia .
Singapore ....
South Africa..
South Korea..
Spain ........
Sudan .......
Sweden ......
Switzerland...
Tonga .......
Turkey.......
fi.lJ*~A A._�-nL


I
I
8
13
26
79
9
9
37
27
10
13
III
138
126
97
5
285
3
34
273
1I
13
88
3
1.155
8
50
16
48
22
3
15
64
141
1,145
4
1,673
19
10
85
17
226
4
7
410
1,805
184
315
146
77
4
114
2
173
I
213
131
I
165
66
I
3
�t


* . . . . *




















.ic of C




ina (Tai
* a. . . . .



* . * . . .
* * . * *

W * .-1 .r- -
*n.a...
* . . . . .

. . . . . . .



* . . . . ..





* . . . . . *



S. . . .
ma (Ta i


ia .(Tai*

. . . .. . .


n. ..a..


Panama
Canal
net


14,968

163,067
288,411
146,677
1.,552.289
68,250
76.599
304,961
186,816
61,355
25.923
937.462
1.794,083
762,980
439,668
45.944
4,648,678
7.161
179,750
2,480,947
1.,143
190,942
1,578,915
29,523
15,812,800
25,056
288.217
302.430
905,446
285,069
19.694
213.247
1,270,426
1.654,682
18,702,981
51,550
29,238,546
285.068
110,338
1,419,673
63,862
2,176,082
144,980
59,507
8,071.655
20,096,828
3,212.570
3,194,222
1,866,314
501,928
22,053
2.236,337
20,535
3,050.642
13,925
3,347,472
706,775
8,679
2,952,402
599,716
739
63,281
to '-nt


Registered
gross 2
17,693

187,571
351,076
168.195
1,846,161
63.943
96,030
363.360
222,408
77.736
28,124
1,077,083
1.982.583
910,831
475,732
55.778
5,940,110
7,493
194,748
2.969,922
1,146
228,883
1,521,978
39.012
18,267,390
30.632
352,364
380,149
1,095,543
345.703
23,811
252,420
1.664,295
2,030,665
16,436,363
64.388
30,589,614
329.675
133,703
1,784,725
69,100
2.496,058
169,104
67,200
8,780,512
20,735,447
3,857,322
3,794.656
2,037.209
523,516
25,427
2,849,806
25,843
2,945,940
16,250
4.118,123
760,586
10,066
2,611.968
705.819
707
83.657
-n^ n-^


Tolls


$24,997
3,295
262,659
481,646
233,055
2.534,027
104,051
127,920
506,027
294.915
101.817
41,847
1,559,063
2,914,858
1,256,946
719.695
75,334
7,633,164
10,428
277,083
3,913,063
1.520
318,873
2.650,120
49,303
25,484,930
39,461
442,003
499,725
1,489.917
457,046
30.878
356,122
2,121.611
2,707,922
29,711,038
81,459
46.949,233
476,064
169,575
2,188.142
97,254
3,545.569
242,117
96,486
13.205,784
32,203,839
5,063,590
5,251,949
3,073,127
830,394
34,871
3,718,634
31,418
4,850,450
23,255
5,521,692
1,177,556
14,494
4,884,502
998,490
1,234
105,679
nnk a a*


Long
tons of
cargo
20,283

183,293
184,959
78.619
2,074,502
22.870
39.141
141.291
94.648
94,968
19.353
707,695
1,229,191
645,067
288,005
47,807
3,391,558
817
52,100
1,957,126

329.542
1.188,674
21,664
19,968.114
28,662
86.261
435,535
1,226,224
197,187
11,934
323,376
739,774
1,159,628
9,901,470
54,350
31,208.73
457,678
48,626
1,349.1 11
46,793
1,390.539
73,703
23,927
7,076,393
19,319,416
3,909,635
3.386.089
2,303,432
333.567
9,244
1,542,007
11,512
2,640.971
24,636
4,005,421
480,507
3.213
1,399.136
200,051
36
98,366
-









STATISTICAL


TABLES


Table 3.-Canal Traffic'


by Flag of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1982


-Continued


NOTE.-In
ment of 300 ne
tons and over,


ment tonnage.
the following


Canal


traffic


statistics,


t tons (Panama Canal


are classified


foreign naval


measu


as oceangoing


vessels


rement) and
commercial


have been included in the table


table shows


statistics


covering 33


above.
vessels


such as transports, supply ships, tankers,


over,


vessels.


and vessels of war, dredges,


Statistics


on these


vessels,


etc., with


a measure-


etc., with a displacement of 500


except


as related to displace-


As displacement tonnage cannot be combined with net


which transited the Canal durin


tonnage,


1982 and paid tolls on


displacement


tonnage.


Number


tranrsits


Displace-
ment
tonnage


Argentina
Chile ....
France ...
Honduras
Japan ....
Mexico ..


Netherlands


Peru ..
Spain .


* St 9


United Kingd
United States


United


......................... Naval..
. .............. ....... . . do
............. . .. .. ... do
. ... . .... . ... ...... . . . do


* **** S SO S 505
* 0* *1 5 9


* 9 0 1 t t* *0 #90 0
* 0 * S 0 $ *


S.. .... . . .. . .. .. . Dredge
. . . . .. . . * . * * . . . . . . . . . . . N aval ..
. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . do
om ................... do
..... . ... . .. .... . . Dredge


States ...


West Germany ..


3,543
3,100
28,911


14,460
7,840
27,005
8,654
3,543
10,290
2,268


* 0 0 50 5 * * *9 9 * 0*
11, 1) 1111 (.


...... . . . . . .. .. Naval..
. ........... ... .. . do


11,023
129,684


Total ....


$3,295
2,883
26,887


13,448
7,291
25,115


10,251


$120,606
















STATISTICAL TABLES


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PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION
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PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 59



Table 5.-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Flag of Vessel

Fiscal Year 1982


leader


Ballast


t Num-
her
oftransits
Iransitls


Algeria ....... .... ..
Argentina..........
A ustria ............
Australia ....... .
Bahamas ............
Belgium ............
Bermuda............
Bolivia . . . .............
Brazil ..............
Bulgaria ............
Canada .............
Cayman Islands .....
C while ...............
Colombia .......... .
C uba ...............
Cyprus .............
Czechoslovakia ......
Denmark ...........
Dominican Republic .
East Germany .......
Ecuador ............
El Salvador .........
Finland ............ .
France .... ..........
Ghana..............
G reece ..............
Guatemala ...... ..
Honduras....... .
Hong Kong .........
India ...............
Indonesia ....... .
Iraq .. .. . . .. . . .. . . ..
Ireland .... ........
Israel ..... . ... .. .
Italy ............. . .
Japan .............
Kuwait .............
Liberia ............
Malaysia........
M alta .... ..........
M exico .............
Morocco.........
Netherlands .... .. . . .
New Zealand ........
Nicaragua...........
Norway.............
Panama ...........
People's Republic of C
Peru ...............
Philippines .........
Poland ........ . . .
Portugal............
Republic of China (Tai
Saudi Arabia ........
Singapore......... ..
South Africa ........
South Korea ........
Spain ..............
Sudan ............. .
Sweden .............
Switzerland .........
Tone a ..............


* .
7
13
17
72
6
9
36
24
7
11
103
123
113
82
4
244
2
21
206

13
80
3
952

29
15
44
20
2
15
64
124
914
3
1.364
19
5
49
5
180
4
6
360
1,477
138
291
135
72
3
112
I
140
I
202
123
I
153
65
I


Panama
Canal net
tonnage
14,968

134.646
288,411
1 1,691
1,380,832
39.054
76,599
295.378
136,617
59,454
21,675
909.869
1.555,080
712.301
396,873
41,848
4,265,949
2.658
1 11,811
1,804,129

190,942
1.539.047
29,523
1 099.723
18,048
170,192
286,743
840,216
229,129
13,780
213,247
1,270,426
1,491,749
14,184,193
37,934
23.711,670
285,068
67,134
860,839
36,228
1.841,958
144,980
51.006
7,266,126
16,103,1 1
2,326,094
2.928,192
1,738,029
478,911
16.297
2,189,135
12,079
2.332.636
13,925
3,145,748
688,970
8,679
2,817,079
590,787
739


Tolls
$24.997

224,859
481,646
186,524
2,305,989
65.220
127,920
493,281
228.150
99,288
36,197
1,519,481
2.596.984
1.189,543
662.778
69,886
7.124.135
4,439
186,724
3,012,895

318,.873
2.570,208
49,303
21,876,537
30.140
284,221
478,861
1,403.161
382,645
23.013
356,122
2,121,61 1
2,491,221
23,687.602
63,350
39,598,490
476,064
112,114
1,437,601
60,501
3,076,070
242. 117
85,180
12,134,430
26.892,196
3,884,577
4,890,081
2,902.508
799,781
27,216
3,655,855
20.172
3,895,502
23,255
5,253,399
1,150.580
14,494
4,704,522
986,614
1,234


Num-
her
of
transit
* �* *

I

9
7
3

1
3
3
2
7
15
13

15
41
I
13
67
I

4

203
2
20
1
4
2



17
227
1
309
..... !
5
33
12
42


50
328
46
19
II
5
I
2
I
33

II
7

12
I
....* .


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


28.42 I

34.986
171,457
29.196

9,583
50.199
1,901
4,248
27,593
239,003
50,679
42,795
4,096
382,729
4,503
67,939
676.818
1,143

39,868

2,713,077
7.008
118,025
15,687
65,230
55.940
5,914


162.933
4.518,788
13.616
5,526,876

43.204
558,834
27,634
334.124
......8.6i
8,501
805.529
3,993,717
886.476
266,030
128,285
23,017
5,756
47.202
8.456
718,006

201,724
17,805

135,323
8,929
*. .. . . . .


Tolls


$37.800


46,531
228.038
38,831

12,745
66.765
2,528
5,650
36,699
317,874
67,403
56,917
5,448
509.030
5,989
90.359
900,168
1,520

53.024

3.608,392
9,321
156.973
20,864
86.756
74,400
7,866


216,701
6,009.988
18,109
7.350,745

57.461
743,249
36.753
444,385

11,306
1,071.354
5,311,644
1,179.013
353,820
170,619
30,613
7,655
62,779
1 1,246
954.948
.... .....
268,293
23,681

179,980
1 1,876
.....................


Iittirt~rrt~r~~t














STATISTICAL TABLES


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PANAMA CANAL COM MISSION






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Table 9.-Origin and Destination of Commerc

Fiscal Year 1982 Segregate



| 1 ' """'" "


WEST COAST NORTH AMERICA:
United States:
AlIaska * ... - ..,. , .. ..- .
Hawaii ..... ... . ......
Mainland.... * ........... . **
Total United States ......���


Belgium
5,300

427,421
432,721

454,195


WEST COAST CANADA .


Den-
mark



25,015
25,015


East
Germany




. . . . . . * *


France



233,360
233,360


342,785


Italy



605.756
605,756


611,006


Nether-
lands
46,159
57,807
1,705,688
1,809,654


388.317


WEST COAST CI
Costa Rica ....
El Salvador ...
Guatemala.....
Honduras .....
Mexico........
Nicaragua ....
Panama .......
Central America
Balboa, R.P.2 ..


CENTRAL

........


4.....,.,




(other)'
C . S � . " * .


Total Central America .

WEST COAST SOUTH AP
Chile�.......@......*..4
Colombia. ..............
Ecuador................
Peru .*. .....* ...... ..
South America (other)'...
Total South America...


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286



2,264

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304,113
10,795
25,689
294,458
9,337
644,392


OCEANIA:
Australia .......
British Oceania..
French Oceania .
New Zealand....
Oceania (other)'.
Total Oceania.

ASIA:
China (Mainland)
China (Taiwan) .
Hong Kong.....
Indonesia.......
Japan........ .
Malaysia .......
Philippine Islands
Singapore ......
South Korea ....
Thailand .......
Asia (other)' ....
Total Asia ....


6,924

20,490
44,986
18,932
91,332


4.45....
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268
12,606
73,868
8,903
186,887


10,335
22,735
43,492

5,122
81,684


346
1,366

4,865




40

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17.382


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3,401
12,848
125
7,331
1,063
51,712
10,288


117,073


143,000
637
54,828
133,053
18,063
349,581


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440
2,296
13,489


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148

351







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4,102
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30,028

25,676
42,793
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309,759

14,314
180,838
24,938
529,849


2,871
23,349

5,490
14,277
45,987


7,547
501



84,939

3,609






96,596


PC


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I;


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S..

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STATISTICAL TABLES


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PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


- N-000NGN

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* - 0 * .^ - .71 0
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* * - *
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* * * *

- . * *


* * * - .
* . * . *
* * * * *
* * - * *


* - * * * * * * .
* * - * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * .
* * * - * - * * * *
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STATISTICAL TABLES


Table 10.--Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific



[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal tear


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO:
West Coast United States ......
West Coast Canada ...........
West Coast Central America ....
Balboa, R.P. . . . ..... . . . . .
West Coast South America......
Chile ... ..


2,388


2,067


* C3 C C C C C C C C C C CCCCC*
* ..ei.i*.. * * tern..~.


5,000
1.480


2,703


2.595


5,27J
1,845


2,604


3,325


4,873
1,786


Colombia.. ....... t .....


Ecuador


1.936


2,108


1,592


Other .. . ...... . ...
Hawa . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . .


Oceania


1,952 2,136


2,502


Australia


1,137


1,554


1,728


New Zealand . . . . . . . . . . . .


Other


A sia.... . . . . .


China . . . . .
Taiwan ...
Hong Kong
Indonesia ..
Japan . . . . .
Malaysia...


62,254 55,060 50,083


* S C S 3CC C S. . S C . .
. .3 . . . . .C 0 3 .C C .* . C C
. C . *.e.e ...C ..4 .
* a a e me m .00 . .
. e . . m m . . .. iC. CA.
* t . m m.. .... C..


* * a . 0 0 C 0 C S * 0 A 0 S C C * C
* 00000* ....e... C C C
* * '.me mmcm u mc a .
* C C *600** C40*C*S*S*
* C C Si * 0**~~~CC C 6e~~
* SSCSC * C C C C C C 64 CC 3*


10,641
5,463


36,980


9,767
3,864


32,806


6,266
3,642


32.141


Philippine Islands ... . . ..
Singapore . . . . . . . .. ..
South Korea .. . . . . . . . . .
Thailand...............
U.S.S.R.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


* C C C * CCC * .C.em.ee me
* , , C C C C CC6CCC0C eeC.
* C C C 0*#C*~e~ *3* '3Am
* C C C C C CC*5* 3ti*ii*0


411
5,439


5,242


4,248


Other


1,362 1,352 1,334


T otal .. ...... . . .. .. .... . .... .... . . m. � � �


74,618


68,965


64,643


EAST COAST CANADA TO:
West Coast United States...
West Coast Canada ........


West Coast Central America
West Coast South America.


C C 43 eseSiCie C ice * mete
eCae*A.CSS C S Weammmcem a cc


Balboa, R.P.
Oceania .......


184


* 2. 00
200


A ustralia .. .. . .. . .. .... ..... . ... . .. .
New Zealand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O their ........... . . . . ... . . ...
A sia ........ .......... . . ...... ... . . .. . . .


1,219 1,580


1,486


China . . . . .
Taiwan ....
Hong Kong


*I C I C


* C C C . C . C . C . C C C C C C 8 C S . C A A * a . 0 .
*... .. . . 3.........C..........ei C ..


3
224









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


Table 10.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific-
Continued

[Thousands of long ions]


Fn- u fl ear
* i ~, -. **- *" f ,: ,:T .:.,- - i


EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA TO-Continued
Oceania . . . . . . . . . .. . .� . * *


Australia .....
New Zealand ..
Other .... . .


Asia . . ..
China
Japan
Other


*. lj C C4


Total .......


* . C C *
* I a *


* C * S C * - S -
* a a * * * * *
* S S S S S S a *
* S C C C C * S C
* . S C C C C C C


152

93
59
2,767


221
20


163
30


65 21
1,918 1,724


EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO:
West Coast United States...
West Coast Canada ........
West Coast Central America
West Coast South America..


Chile ....
Colombia
Ecuador
Peru...
Other
Balboa, R.P.
Hawaii . . . . . .


Ocea nia


Asia. . . . . . . . .


China ....
Japan .....
South Korea
U.S.S. R.....


Other ..
Total.


* S . .S S S S a
*. S . C . C S S I
.....S ..S C..S. S
* C..C SC C* C S


..S. S * C C S
. . C . . a. * * *. a
... C C C S C
* S S S C S C S * S C C C


.... . �... ..o .. .� ......
* C C C S S . . C C C C * � a a *... .
�.. . . .S. ..*.. S.� C. . C
* .a .*.*. a. . . .. � * S
* S S S S C S * C C * C
* C C S C .C C * S . .C . . C . C . C S
* S C . C S C C C C C C . S a . .* C
* C . C S S S . .* a a . . .* . .a * . *


* C q S S S S S C 4 * 0 5 5 4 5 5 a a a * * *


408
37
1,014
1,845
1,203
285
249
23
85
46
38


21
1,273
1,904
1,431
284


9 2
2,208 2,475


1,924
240
S . ..S S


88
2,020
259
77


30 31
5,605 6,136


46
1,854
1,506
1,162
223


77
117
106
10
1,883
34
1,750
51

48

6,490


CRISTOBAL, R.P., TO:
Balboa, R .P. ..* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -
West Coast South America.. ...... .......... ......
Other territories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ..
T total . . . . . . . . . .... .. . . . . . . . * . �. . . . . a . .


3
3


* * * * C
...... C


WEST INDIES TO:
West Coast United States ...
West Coast Canada ........
West Coast Central America
Balboa, R.P. . . . . . . . . . . ....
West Coast South America..


Colombia hile.....
Colombia


* S S 544045
I... *4SCS


* S CSSSSCIS a a a a S S
* C S S CqSC**CC*


* C S * S
* S C a a


* a * . s.c.. C C * S C I S C C 555*#
* a * . * *..** aia S S S C C SSqSa


S S 55 55 C C S C 59 * S 55 **


752
12
728
195
1,479
905
96
-^ ^0


1.024


296
339
1,117
427
82
A"mf


* ....C... q* ..** * C
* . . .C C .S . . S . . . . . . S
* �C0 S� C C C


396
250
751
108
161
1" 0









STATISTICAL TABLES


Table 10.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific-

Continued


[Thousands of long tons]

Fiscal tear


WEST INDIES To-Continued
Asia-Continued
Japan . .. ... . ........
M alaysia . .... ..........
North Korea .. ... . .........
North Vietnam ..
Philippine Islands........


Singapore....
South Korea
U.S.S.R. . . . .


*. B. . . .S.C.*. .
*. 9.99 C .C C9 C
*. 9 .9 . . .99 . .49. .


Other


Total... .


EUROPE TO:
West Coast United States ..
West Coast Canada ........
West Coast Central America


1980 1

403
* 4 C 9 9 9


* . *9*S* * 94. * *4. 4e

ik* 9 l 9 4 C S 9 9 9 9 C C * 9 9 *
* . . . . C B B 9 B 9 * * * S. .

* . . . m e. ....... 9 9.9

*....m e ee..eec .e .c .
* *9.. C... 4.. e. m. ...


5,690


2,208


105
3,945


2,084


90
27
4,097


2,155


* 94SC C C C C C C C C9*t 5.9 9 9 9


Balboa, R.P. . . . . . . . . . .
West Coast South America.


S * . . m e... . . . * . * . . . # . 19


S * C94I


1,308 1,628


1,211


Chile . . . . . . .. . .
Colombia......
Ecuador .......


Peru
Other


* � 99994999
S C....9...


9 9 C a * . S a . a * * e S * S S 5 4 * C S S S
. I C C * S C ~ S C C * 9 5 9 * 4 5 9 5 5 9 9 4


C 9 9 C 9 . 9 C 9 9 * C * * B B B a . S S * S S C S C . C 9


Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oceania ..... ....


Australia ....
British Oceania
French Oceania.


New Zealand ...
Other ........
Asia ..............


Singapore......
Taiwan ... .
Hong Kong....
Japan . . . . . . . .
U.S.S.R.. . . . . . .
South Korea
Other ...... . .
Total..... .


.............e....eC...e...e...*
�.......a....54...*.. 4 � S ..S
* . S . . . .CC e ec c . c. . c. . C .. S .
* 9 6 U . * C C S S C S C S C C c C C C C C S C C C C C . 4
. . . . . .C U. .C C.�C. .e.e. e� � C Se


106
5,607


100
5,770


113
5319


AFRICA TO:
West Coast United States ...............
West Coast Canada . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
West Coast Central America ........
West Coast South America.............


* S * S S S S I
C S S a a a


A 7 ~


828


673


751


346


371


26


m �


fl~


7









PANAMA (CANAL. COMMISSION 83



Table 11.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic

[Thousands of long tons]


WEST COAST UNI ID STATES TO:
East Coast United States......
East Coast Canada .............
East Coast Central America ......
Cristoba!, R P . ...............
East Coast South America ......


Argentina . a
Brazil ....


Colombia..
Venezuela..
Other . ....
West Indies ....
Puerto Rico


Other


Europe .....
Belgium
Denmark
East Gerr
Finland.
France .


Greece..
Italy ...
Netherlar
Poland


Rumania
Spain-Po
Sweden
United K
U SS.R
Yugoslav
West Ger
Other ..
Asia (Middle
Israel...
Lebanon
Saudi Ar.
Other ..
Africa . .....
Algeria .
Egypt ..
Morocco
South Af
Tunisia .
Other ..
Total


S* S 4 4 4 4 4 4 a a a a * *
* 4 4 9 9 9 5 4 4 4 9 9 4 4 9
* 9 9 9 9 9 9 3 5 9 a 9 4' 9 4
* a a 4 9 9 9 9 9 9 * 9 4 4
* 4 S 4 a S a 4 4 4 4 t 9 4 9
* 4 4 4 4 4 a 9 4 9 5 4 4 9 9
* 9 9 9 4 4 4 4 4 4 ** 4 4 4 9
.. . . . . . . . ..
. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .

. .. . . . . .. .. .
... . .... ... .


a a 9 9 4


. * a 4 4.4. . 9 9 .


ds * * * * * * * * ........


rtugal . . . . . . . . . . . .

ingdom . . . . . . . ..

ia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I a . * . a 4 9 . * . * 9 . 4 4 9 a
many * * * * * * * * * *
*ia 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a
I tst) * * * * * * . . . . * .



a bu. . . . * .* * * * * . * * * *
East) . . . . . . . . ..



abia.............a






rica ....4 9.4
� . � � . � . . � . . .
.� . ..�. ..0. . . . . . . .


� . . 9 9 9 4 4 4 4 4 . 4� S �
* .. * * * 9 * 9 S a a 4 9 9 S * 4
* * 9 4 9 * 4 9 . a a a a a a a a a
* a 9 9 * 9 4 4 * 9 9 9 4 9 9 S S * 4


1982 1981 1980
3~~c o


32,865
10


38
338
8


. . . . . .. . . . . . 1 15


* 4 * S 9 9 * * a a
. 4 4 4 * a a a a 4
. . . . .a a a 9 9
*. * .a a .a .a 4 . . 9
* . . . . 4 9 9 . 4


. 9 4 4 9 9 9
*. a .a 4 .4 . a
9. 9 9 4 . . 9
*. 4 .9 4 .9 . 9
*. a .* * .a . S


* 9 9 * 9 4 4 4 * 4 4 4 9 4 5 4 5 a 4
* 4* 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 a * * a a a a a a 9

* 9 4 9 4 a a a a 9 9 a * a a a * a a
* 9 9 9 a 9 5 a a * * * a a 4 4 4 4" 4
a * . 9 9 4 5 * * * . a a 4 a . . 4

* 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 a a
* 9 9 9 9 4 4 9 4 * 4 4 4 S a 9 9 * 4

S* 4 4 4 4 4 a * a * * a 4 9 9 a 9

* 4 4 * a a a 4 4 9 9 S 9 9 4 4* 9 9 9
* 4 4 4 4 * a a 9 9 9 9 9 9 * 4 * 4
* a . * * . a 9 9 9 4 4 * * . * . a a
* * a a 4 9 * . a 9 9 S 4 * * a a 4 a
* 9 4 . * * a 4 . a a a a a * * a 4 S







* * * a 4 4 a * a 0 9 9 9 * S a a 9 a
* * a a 4 9 9 4 * . a a a 4 . a a a .a
4 4 9 . . 9 * . a a 9 . a 9 9 a a . 9
a a a a a 9 . . * * * a a 4 a a a 4 9
* a 9 9 4 9 4 4 9 4 4 4 4 4 5 a a 9 9
. a 9 . a a 9 . 4 4 . 9 . 9 4 * 5 . 9


* a a 4 9 9 * 4 * * a 4 a a a a * a a


3.676
3,437
239
5,044
433
25

28
233
29
606
1,752
1

144




I
10

1,260
85
18

33
34
1,880
43
1,701

56


1I
43,985


25,256
26


12
435
8
202
10
205
10
4,197
3,164
1,033
4.411
234
50
26
30
257
18
519
1,428
80
42
105
138
134
9
61
151
1,129
174
36
23
81
34
2,145
63
1,576
264
154
81
7
36,667


21,316
4
24
5
480
9
274
16
157
24
3,401

2,651
750
4,978
409
89
32
4
183
77
449
1,418
1 1
17
376
97
190
151
28
221
1,226
34
27

2
5
471
47
193

152
44
35
30,713


WEST COAST CANADA TO:
r.^ *-- 3* . I -l I t"i tOI ttf


nl~ Into


n~n








84 STATISTICAL TABLES


Table 11.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]

Fiscal year
WEST COAST CANADA TO -Continued I
West Indies-Continued


Other .. . ....
Europe . . . . . . . . . .
Belgium ... .
Denmark ......
Finland....... .


France


Greece.........
Irish Republic ..
Italy ....... ...
Netherlands ....
Poland ..... ...


Romania ..
Spain-Portugal .
Sweden . . . . . . .
United Kingdom
U.S.S.R........
West Germany
Other .. . . . .
Asia (Middle East)..
Israel ..........


Other ..
Africa . . . . . . . .
Algeria . . . .
Egypt ..
Morocco....
South Africa
Tunisia . . . . .
Other ......
Total.....


* C C CS C S C S C
* CCC * S * CCC


* . C * * * S S S S 58* C C C C C egegeete C S C
* * C S * S S S S S C S C C C C C g a . C S S S S S C C C S


..". .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .


6,144
454
4
110
343
68
54


..... .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . 388
. ..... . . . .. . 160


S C C . . a *.. . . . . . .* C . . C
* G*. C. . S. . . . . .C.C . C . . . . S


I* C II S
* C . . e .g g


e. g...... S S .S S .....*C CSC.S S
* S . .C....S S ..S.ee gge .. C S * C... S
. . . . . . . C . . . 4 C C C C. S. S S S C g


* C S S S S C C S S * C C C C * * C * C S S S S C C * C C ft C C S
�* S C S C S S C C C C C C S S S S S C S C S S S S C S * C * * Ct
. .* S�g S.. .....CS C O S S SO O S C

. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
e. g. . . . . . . . . . ........ SCCCCS S C CC S t e*
egacec...S.C .....S..CCC............ S


. * C S C C C . . . . .C C . . C C .C C
.e. . . 5e. . 555 S*S*S. . . . .
. . .S .S C .S . .S . .C.S. .S.SCCSS


* 5 5. . . . . C
* S . . . .*. SC.
* C .C S C .SC C C


27
115
862
939
672
1,337
186


28
1,308
180
57
505
128
424
14
9,437


6,754
640
20
47
378
145
42
816
320
161
... ..
98
167
709
944
621
1,646
91


1,425
224
90
470
160
440
41
10,419


20
8,169
580
203

504
202
29
1,098
630
298
52
186
56
1,121
891
625
1,694
30
30

1,250
257
62
311
243
338
39
12,238


WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA
East Coast United States...
East Coast Canada........
East Coast Central America
Cristobal, R.P. .. . . . . ..
East Coast South America


West Indies .. . . . .
Europe . . . . . . . . . . .
Belgium .
Bulgaria .....
Denmark


TO:


* .S a.*. . e...... S.C.S....... C

.. . ...... SC C C.S C * e .. C ...


* S S .SSS .SS ..C ..... ..CS ....CS CS ..... C

Sc... e... c. S. S.. C. S..c.. ....�..
* . c. . . . . . . . ........ CCSC5 C C~ CC ee ..


France


Italy .... .
Netherlands .
Poland .....
Spain-Portuge
Sweden ....


S Ct.....C*...5.55.CC...5.C......
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .� "


S . . . . .C c C . .S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S


768

151

83
141
899
3
21
29
15
117
101
3
92
. . ..C S


16
40
142
882
4


S..S..C


1
41
139
981
7


8








PANAMA CANAL. COMMISSION 8:


Table 11.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


F-isctal fear


WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA 10:
East Coast United States....
East Coast Canada.........
East Coast Central America.
Cristobal, R.P. . . . . . . . . . . . .
East Coast South America ..


Brazil


Colombia ......
Venezuela.......
O their ..........
West Indies . . . . . . . . .


* . . . . *
* . 4 * . *


Cuba ................
Netherlands West Indies
Puerto Rico...........
Trinidad Tobago ......
O their ...... .........

Belgium . . . . . . . . . . .
Bulgaria . . . . . . . .. . .
Denmark . . . . . . . . . . . .
East Germany ...
Finland .. . . . . . . .


France


Greece. . . . . . . . .
Irish Republic ..
Italy .........
Netherlands ....


Poland . ......
Rumania ....
Spain-Portugal
U.S.S.R ......
Sweden ........
United Kingdom
West Germany
Yugoslavia .....
Other .. . ....
Asia (Middle East)..
Iran...........
Lebanon.......
Saudi Arabia...
Other .........
Africa . . . . . . . .
Total.......


* a * 4 * 4 4 * *� . .� 4* . a * a a 4 S * S 9
* a a a a * 9* 9 * 4 4 a a a a a a * a 4 * 9
.......................
.......................
....... ....... .......


. . . 4. 4 4. . ..
.* .a a . a.. *
*. a a . .a a 9 .* 4
*. 4 . . . .* * .U . U . 9
*. a .9 . .9 .9 . .a


a a . 4 a 4 4 4 4 4 * a . a a a a * * * * a
. . 9 . a a a . . * . . . 4
. . 4. . 4 .9.4...4 . 4 . * * .9 9 9

... .. .. .. .. .. ...
* 4 * 4 4 4 4 . 4 . . . a . a * a. 9 4 4
* U U S S U S U S 9 * U * 9 9 4 * 4 a a 4 4 9
�* 9 4 * a a a a * a 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 a a a a 9
* a a a a a a a 9 a 9* 4 * * 4 * 4 * a a * . .


* a a a a a . a 4 a a 4 4 9 4 9 .
* a a a a a a * a U 4 9 * 9 9 9 *

* a a a a a a * a a a 9 4 * 4 * 4
* a a a a * a 4 4 4


1982

6,60 I
151
295


1,627
314
903
386
24
1,194
59
331
357
224
223
4,692
644
54
4


Sa . * a a a * . . * * a


a * 4 4 a a . S 40 4 9 U S U
* U U 4U 4 a a a a a a a a a a a 9 9 4 * 4 4 4 4 *
* * * * a * a a a a a a a 9 4 9 * 9 4 4 . a a * a a a a U *
a a . . a . - 4 . . . . . . . 4 . S . S S U 9 * * . . . 4 U

9 9 S S 9 S S * 4 * 9 4 4 * 4 * a a * a S S 9 U * S S 4 4 a


* 9 4 9 4 4 a a a a 4 . * 4 a a a * a a U S 4 U
. 4 4 9 4 9 . * a . . . 4 . . . a a a a a a a
......44....a ......*.U .. a


* a * * * * a * * a * . a S 4 9 4 4 U U U U U 4 a a a a 9 4
* a a * * * * . S a a a * * a * a a 9 * S * S U U 4 a a a

* * * a a a a a a a a * a . S S 4 4 4 5 5 9 a 4 9 U U S * S


9 U 9 9 5 5 U 9 4 9 U 9 * I U * * * 4 4 4 * 4 4 4 * 4 5 5 4


173
614
60
273
899
208
388
94
22

67
5
168
14,827


1981

5,33 I
70
222


1,807
166
972
550
119
2,879
106
2.116
42
33
582
3,851
364
32
3
35
37
108
15
54
311
426
73
94
169
480
33
289
790
174
364
123
40

54
29
106
14,392


19801

6,986
21
523


1,631
73
1,106
386
66
3,291
76
2,513
176
41
485
5,541
460
10
19
48
18
174
38
24
359
451
127
806
280
413
42
288
949
531
504
166
60
12
14
80
115
18,276


BALBOA, R.P. TO:
W est Indies . ......... . . .......... ... . ... ......
O their territories ....... ... . .......... ... ........








16 STATISTICAL TABLES


Table 11.--Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]

Ftical year


OCt EANIA TO--Continued
West Indies-Continued


1980


Jamaica . ..
Puerto Rico.....
Trinidad/Tobago


Other


Europe .. . . . . . . . ..
Belgium ... ..
France . .. . .
Italy . . . . . . .
Netherlands ....


Norway . . . . . . .
Poland .. . . . . . .
Spain-Portugal .
Sweden . . . . . . .
United Kingdom
U.S.S.R. . . . . . ..
West Germany .
Other . .. . . . . .


� . . �. . .......

� . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .
. .��w .� .... .. ..
. .� �.w � . . . . . . .
. . . . . . ... . .. .I � . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .... . .w � . . . . . ..


� . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . .�. . .
� ...... .. ..S S................

� .. . . .......
* C. C . C C C . . * . . . . . * * . * . C6. * . . .t. . .


A frica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total ... . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * . * . . . ......


31
1,143
91
82
13


40
13
24
913
69
94
8


. . . . . . 1 1
46 2
9 11
457 354
21 15
208 49
170 238
3 10 ...
3,905 3,861


38
16
69
1,309
49
114
9
86


4,354


ASIA TO:
East Coast United States......
East Coast Canada..........
East Coast Central America .
Cristobal, R.P. ... . .......
East Coast South America ....


Argentina
Brazil . . . .
Colombia.
Surinam..
Venezuela.
Other ...
West Indies ..
Cuba.....


* S C C C C C C 4 0 9 0 C .
. . . . . . . . ..S S.S C S . .





* U Slee. * . . c S C S


Haiti-Dominican Republic
Jamaica . ... ........
Netherlands West Indies ..
Puerto Rico . . . . . . . . .
Trinidad/Tobago ....


Other


Europe . . . . . . ....
Belgium .....

Italy . . .. . . .

Netherlands....


* c a . S
* . . S S S


. . . * a,.
......U


* . C
ft ft f


* c C S * * C S S S S S S S S S S S 4 0 C


* C C U C C C S *a * * C C *4 * * 5tB t f
.� . � . . . . . . . .

� �.. �.�.�..... �.. . �


t.e .e. . . . S
Gee......... C S
....e....... C 5


*.C.* .* .......* ...CG.C..C
* . . C * C . 4 4 U S S . * C C C C 9 C C
. C C C C C . 9 9 9 . 4 9 . 4 C S S S S S
. . S C C C S C S S 4 S U S U C S C . c S
tee.......... ... ...


* . . . . a a a a . a . C. .
* C te e.e et U.
* C . S C . C .G.e. . . U


* C C . . . . -.e.e.e . . . . 5 . . .C


11.490
284
418
131
990
24
94
124
13
599
136
898
457
57


10
91
103
116
231
52
17


11,398
298
302
152
865
35
106
114
14
471
125
866
425
76


1 1
127
76
92
928

9


33


11,263
306
208
151
1,256
29
101
288
10
700
128
986
406
125
52
30
145
136
92
169
11
15
8
20
35


.^*r









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 87


Table 12.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes

Atlantic to Pacific

[ thousands of long tons]


El~I I ear


EASI COASI UNIFE) SIAIES I( WiSI COAST I
UNITI) STAfFS:
Canned and refrigerated foods, miscellaneous
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals ........
Caustic soda ....... . . .. . .. . . . . .
Chemicals, unclassified ...............
Petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous ....
Machinery and equipment, miscellaneous ...
Manufactures of iron and steel .........


371
154


125


7


560
210
156
194


27


Plates, sheets, and coils .. . .
Other and unclassified ....
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash
Ammonium compounds ...
Fertilizers, unclassified .....
Phosphates .......... . .
Ores and metals .. . . . . . . . . .
Ore, alumina/bauxite......
Petroleum and products .......


Crude oil .. . . . . . . . . .
Fuel oil, residual. . . ..
Gasoline . . . . . . . .
Jlet fuel .............


Kerosene


Lubricating oil ..
Other and unclassified
M miscellaneous ... ........


All other and unclassified
Total................


9
*


* S 9 S S* S S * * * S S S 4 4 S 4 5 9
.... .... .. . . .. .

...................
* 9 9 9 4 4 9 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 S
* 9 4 9 C C C 4 4 4 4 S 4 9 9 9 9 9 4


* 4 5 * 9 5 9 9 9 4 4 4 4 9 4 4 4
* 4 C 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 C 9 4 C S C
* C 9 4 9 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 9 4 C S C


* 9 S U . .S S . . 4 . .5 9 S 9 . . . .4 . 5


135



135
90
90
1,450
65
159
494
160
I I
346
215
334
334
2,388


10
55
54
254
254
1.461
58
75
757
108
5
330
128
278
278
2,703


4-

252
22
48
182
133
133
1,414
190
175
143
312

534
60
281
281
2,604


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CANADA:
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals


Caustic soda ..............
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash.
Phosphates ............. . .
M miscellaneous ....... .........
Clay, fire and china . ......
All other and unclassified ...
T otal...................


* 9 9 9 S
a * . . .
* S 4 ft
* 4 9 C 9
* . 9 . 5
* 0 S . S


.*. . .. . 13
. . . .. . 13


* . . . S U . . .4 .. 9
* . 4 4 9 . . 5 4 9 4
. . . . .5 4 4 4 4 C 4 9


601
601




601


844
844
32
29
3
876


851
851
41

41
905


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA:
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous


r ,, a


S *.. 13


.rn


.7 rr-,


91)


1
520
208
159
153


EIIE ~~"IC


r,,


i









STATISTICAL TABLES


Table 12.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued

[T housands of long Ions]


EASI CoASr UNITIT) STATES TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA Continued
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash.......


Ammonium compounds .
Fertilizers, unclassified....
Phosphates. ...... . . . .
Potash . .. .. .. . ......


* a S * * * * . 9 a
..*.S . .* * 9
. . . . . . . . .


459
25
214
204


FI'tcal ear
1981

621
79


1980 '

399
44


Ores and metals


Metals, miscellaneous
Ores, miscellaneous ..
Other agricultural common
Oilseeds . . . . . . .
Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . .
Petroleum and products ..


* a * a a * a a a a * * a * a a a a a P C' S S S *
...t . .es .. ....... . ....
ities . . . * * * * . a . * . * * a a * a
* . * . a . * * * � * a * a * a .
* S 5 9 C 9 9 a a .. * * * a * a * a a a a a . *


164 136
136 13
28 123


42


. ................ * * *.. II


. . 28
28
28

18


Gasoline . . . . . . . . .
Fuel oil, residual. ..
Lubricating oil ....
M miscellaneous .........


Flour, wheat . . . . . ........
Paper and paper products.
Tallow . . . . . . . . . . .......
All other and unclassified .
Total. ...... ... .......


* S 9 5 * P * * * 0 0 0 9 a * a a S a a
. I . . . 1 . . . . .. . . .
,.. . . � � . . . ... . . O . . .
* . . . . . .a. . . . . . .. . a


:* * P 0 S C
* a a a
* . . . . . C


* 0 0 3 C
* a a * e
* 0 0 9 a
* a a * a
* a 0 * S


* 9 0 * S S 0
*� . .a .* a . . a


105


80
2,067


61


23
2,595


52


17
3,325


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
SOUTH AMERICA:
Canned and refrigerated foods, miscellaneous
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals .......
Caustic soda .... . ... . . . ..........
Chemicals, unclassified .............
Petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous ....


Coal and coke.
Grains . . . .
Corn .....
Oats
Rice... .


Sorghum .
Soybeans
Wheat..


..0 5u 4.#.O...a..... a.. ... . o ...
*. C.....5.9 . .a. a .* pa aa.a... ....



e q.... a aa.aa b ...... .*.* ....*

a. e... .......CC.0.ee.aC.. ... *
G. S...a *..* ....... ...... .C ...


Other and unclassified................


Lumber and products


Pulpwood. . . ...... . . . ... .......
Other and unclassified . . . . . . . . . . ..


Machinery and equipment


Agricultural machinery and implements ....


* * .. C
* S* 0 5
* a * a p
* a a a a
* a as.
* 0* � 9
* S S C *
.....
.....
.....

. . ..


* * a.* *
* C * 9*


a.. ..

a....
* . . * C
* 3 9 C S

* C * C a
* * C * *


171
33
125
13
100
3,231
824
15
7


75
146
2,156
8


215
64
119
32
347
2,723
771
21
128


11
55
1,730
7


15 18


139
29


253
45


272
76
179
17
507
2,436
667
13
47
49
49
1,590
21
13


191
39









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION


Table 12.--Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes

Atlantic to Pacific-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal rear


EAST COAST UNIIDI) STATES TO WESI COASI
SOUTH AMERICA Continued
Minerals, miscellaneous-Continued


Other and unclassified ...
Nitrates, phosphates, and potasl
Ammonium compounds ..
Fertilizers, unclassified....
Fishmeal. . . ... ......
Phosphates�. ... . .....


Potash
Ores and me


talks . . . .. ....


Ores, miscellaneous ......
M etals. a e.............
Scrap ...... . ......
Tin, including tinplate
Other and unclassified
Other agricultural commodities
O ilseeds . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ..
Other and unclassified ...


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* c S S U S S * c * a * * * * c . S * S S
. . . . * * . . . . . . . *
h . . .. . .. ...... um l

* t S�


* . * * . . . . . . .
�.. S... �..��......�


(* t* C C * * C S S S t * 4 * C C S S * � S

* . - * 5 5 5 5 5 c* C C S S C S * * a C S
4....te.s..... S.S.....*


* . U S S . S S S U S S S S . S . S C S .


6
236


8
432
34
167


96 184
14 42
51 75
14 17


37
26
4
7
12


2
170


Petroleum and products


3
366
45
104

182
35
33
9


58 24
30 8


188


64


47


Lubricating oil . . .....
Other and unclassified ...
M miscellaneous . . . . . .. . ...
Bricks and tile... . . . .
Carbon black...........
Clay, fire and china .....
Flour, wheat . . . . . . . . . ..
Groceries, miscellaneous
Oil, coconut .. . . . . . ...
Oil, vegetable. . . . . ... . .
Paper and paper products.
R esin................. .
Rubber, manufactured..
Tallow .... . .. . ......
T textiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
All other and unclassified .


Total ................


* S C a C C S * t * * S C C C S S S S S C
� . . . . . . . . . . . .. . � � . � � .

� . . . �........
� S S � S C U S S S S . S . S S C C C C .


129
721
6
1


�* U S a S S . a U .S S . 5 5 * S . C .
..C..C.....*.aa.....5 * S S . *


.S t. .. .. . S S S . .C C . .. c .
* . S C * C S S S S * * . # S . # . C C .
* C C S C S C C C C C S C S S S S C S * I


10
302
5,000


738
8
2


14

85
140
58
17
37
20
302
5,271


705
8
1
15
15
16

114
120
54
19
39
16
287
4,873


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO BALBOA. R.P.:


Canned and refrigerated foods, miscellaneous
G rains ... . .. .... . ........ . . .. .....
C orn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Other and unclassified................


* S * S C S C C S
* C .S.C S .S S


92
37
55
S C . . .


90
38
51


6
82
29
44


r









90 STATISTICAL TABLES


Table 12.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes

Atlantic to Pacific-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


Fiscal ear


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO HAWAII-Continued


Petroleum and products---Continued
Jet fuel . . .. ..... ... . ... ..


Other and unclassified ....
Miscellaneous . ...... .....
All other and unclassified .
T otal.................


a I a a .
* . . 4
* a a * S
* a . *


. . . . . . . a * a. 4. 4 . . .
*. a. a a a .a * a


12
51


52
52
52


26
55


51 55
92 81


EASI COAST UNITED STATES ro OCEANIA:
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals ....
Caustic soda . . .. . . . . .. .....
Chemicals, unclassified .. .........
Petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous


Coal and coke .. . . . . ... . . ... ..
Grains..... .....................
R ice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soybeans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other and unclassified . . . . .....
Lumber and products ............
Pulpwood .. . . ............
Other and unclassified .........


Machinery and equipment


* a a


* 4 4 �* * * * * a
. O. ... . .
.........


427
274
117
36
21
27


. . . . . . . 1I


458
113
31
33
44


671
453
181
37
20
29


* 444a6I


. . . I.


22


13


26


Agricultural machinery and implements ..
Automobiles, trucks, accessories and parts
Construction machinery and equipment..
Electrical machinery and apparatus .......
Other and unclassified .. . . ............
Manufactures of iron and steel, miscellaneous


* 4 4 * 4 4 4
. . . . . .. a


6

2


5

6


Minerals, miscellaneous........
Sulfur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ..
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash
Ammonium compounds ...
Fertilizers, unclassified.....
Phosphates . . . . . . . . ..


Potash . ......... ...... .
Ores and metals, miscellaneous


*


*.4..4.....4 .... *
* a a a a 4 * * * * * a a
*.a.....4 4..4..a.
* a a a a a a a a . a a a
. . . . .a . .a * a . .
*. . . .* . S . .* * . 4 .
*.a.......4S ....*


* 4 4 4 * 4 4


*44 * '44


488
21
104
358


. . ... 5


471
21
91
323
36


Petroleum and products ....
Liquified gas . . . . . . . .
Lubricating oil . .. . ....
Petroleum coke...... ...
Other and unclassified ..
M miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . ...


Bricks and tile..... ...
Carbon black...........
r'lwxv firen mn rhin2


* . a a a a a 4 4 4 4 4 . 4 .4
* S 4* ** * * ** 4444.*
* * 4 4444444* ** 4 a
* a * e a * 4 a .* a a a a 4 4
* a a . a a .. . a . a
.....a ..a a. a..a..a


* a * a 4 a * a 4 a 4 � a a
*. a . a . a .a a .a a .a . .a


* a a a . a.
* a a a .a . *
*. a .a a .a . a
* a a . .a 4
4. 4 0 . . 4
* 4 4 4 4 . a


159 188
25 57
30 34


36
800


9d
* a a a a
* a a a 4


.1


58
58
654
24
72
552


185
31
36
92
26
843


I









PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION 91


Table 12.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes

Atlantic to Pacific-Continued

[Thousands of long tons]


li'Lcal ear


EASI COASI UNITED SFAIES 10 AsIA-Continued
Canned and refrigerated foods Continued


F ruit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M eat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other and unclassified ........
Chemicals and petroleum chemicals ....
Caustic soda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Chemicals, unclassified ...........
Petroleum chemicals, miscellaneous


Coal and coke
Grains. . . . . .
Barley ...
Corn ....
Oats . . . .
Rice . . . .


Sorghum
Soybeans
Wheat...


* 9 .9. 9 . 9 .
* S S S 9 9 5 9 9





* . 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
. . . . . . . . .
. ... . ...


* 9 9 9 9
* 9 9 S 9
. . 9 9 9
* 9 9 9 9
* 9 9 9 9
* 9 . 9 9
* 9 9 * 9


* 4 * 9 9 9 * 4l l 9l 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 I




* ..... .*.*.*.* 4. * *

* 9 9 9 9 S S S 9 9 5 S 5 9 * S S * S


. . . .9 9 5 9 . . 9


Other and unclassified


Lumber and products ...
Pulpwood..........
Other and unclassified
Machinery and equipment


* 9 9 9 * 9 . 9
* 4 9 4 9 9 .9 .


�.... ...
� .......
. . . h i . . .

..... ..





..... .
* 4 4 4 9 4 9 9
* 9 4 9 4 4 4 9

* 9 9 9 9 * 9 4








...o...
..... ..
* 9 9 9 4 4 9
* 9 4 9 9 9 9 9
* S 9 9 9 9 9 5
* 9 9 5 9 9 9 9

* 9 9 9 4 9 9 5

* 4 9 9 9 9 9 4
* S .9 . .9 . 5
* S .9 . .4 . 9
*. 9 .9 . .9 . 5
. 9. 9 9. 5. 9


107

101
2,212


1,498
712
20,484
28,896

12,515

50
1,650
6,074
8,477
130
196
174
22


Agricultural machinery and implements. .
Automobiles, trucks, accessories and parts
Construction machinery and equipment.
Electrical machinery and apparatus......


Other and unclassified . ....
Manufactures of iron and steel .
Angles, shapes, and sections
Plates, sheets, and coils . . ..
Tubes, pipes, and fittings ..
Wires, bars, and rods......
Other and unclassified .....
Minerals, miscellaneous.. .....
Nitrates, phosphates, and potash


Ammonium compounds ..
Fertilizers, unclassified. . .
Fishmeal . ..... ... ...
Phosphates . . . . . . . ... . .
Potash .................
Ores and metals .............


Alumina/bauxite ....
Other and unclassified


* 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 .
*. 9 . . . .9 . 9 . .9 . 9


* 9 4 9 4 9 9 9 9 9 S S
* 9 9 9 9 9 9 . 9 5 9


* . 9 . . 5
. . 9 .9 9 9


* 9 9 9
* 9 .


* 9 9 9 9 . 9 4 4 4 9 9 9 9 9 9 4 . 9 9
.......... ... ......

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


* C 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 * 9 9 9 9 9 9




* 9* 5 * * a 9 9 9.9.9.9* * 4
. . . . . . . . .9 .9 9 * . . . . . . 9
* S 9 9 9 9 9 9 S 5 9 9 9 9 .9 . 9


15
162
30
19


16
76
I
3,981
40
232

3,659
50
1.015
12


12


97
1,708
31
1,219
458
17,818
24,851

9,320
3
329
2,044
5,932
7,167
56
292
229


110
13
18
36
26
17
295
12
31
48
44
160
941
3,941


3,533


o4
1,683
160
1,102
421
13,490
22,460
25
10,395

162
2,586
6,294
2,905
93
319
163


105
5
14
42
13
31
275
20
88
83
52
32
7
4,485


466


4,003


3 12
1,171 2.453
24 43


24


fin-,1 * 4 - A


nr\i


II. r I.