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PageID P4
ErrorID 5
P8
2006
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2007
scan pgs 10-11 as "00014"
P32
2003
scan pgs 16-17 as "00016"


Panama Canal review
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00212
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: June 1957
Publication Date: 1960
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
sobekcm - UF00097366_00184
System ID: UF00097366:00212
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

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ON OUrR COVER
Thi is what~ mcu'd ee ii \ou ha.ppeneId
to be in Mliratfores lunnel just as a train
came alonec. The thiner ii. that \ou
ha~dn t bvtter be. anid the qluet~ion ii:


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THE GOVERNOR





ALTHOUIGH Mlrs. Calrter and I hater been inl thle Cainal Zonec onii a
little userr a mnllth wre already! fcel quite at home. In1 no small part thiis
is dlue to thle whlole-hearlted receptionl wre ba\e received fromi .1II 1f
ion, no~t only1 ms1 aissociaite* inl the C~ompany!-G~orerinmentt organization i
but iro~m the residents,. chiliann anid nulitnr\. of the Cainal Zoneii and
from thcse w\e hat\e met inl neighboringc Panamall.
I icel .l particular pleasure inl mi assiig~nment onl the Isthmnuj where
;1Il of us whlo represented the Uniited Sltates base an1 uniusual opportunity
to, makie a reall cnrC1Tibutionl toward better inte~rnationll3 uniderstandling


In1 these~ lewr short weeks, I hos~e been extremel imipressedl b! the
elficient ope~ration of the Panama Canal an1d b! the men an1d wo(menl
wrho are hecre to, runl it. I hat e foullInd a ost pleaisanit reintionship exiitinC
.unong11 the emplo ees. both on thle job anid inl their comminiuit! life. \ndt
I amn I'articular(\ pleased w\ith the Ch\ic Councrils w\hich. represeniting
thle demic~ raitic nal1 of life. can1 h~e and are of Sreat \ alue to us5 all.
He w \ ill continuede to, iperrat .Is we base\ doner inl the past. There wrill
b~e so~me chang~es us timle goes o.n. \es. But -surel\. there are noneI1 w1o
woculdl hate~ our-, to be a1 ,talki organizations. I canl see nio re.lunnl for
con~lfusion, as to our future. In1 factl there is eter\ reasonl to marinltain
the etistingS conifidence inl tle n~orthiniese of oiur mliw~inl anid inl \oir
demlonstrated ability to meet its nleedI.
IIn carr~iln o~ut o~ur na3tionls p~olicice here. w\e <.hull conlstanltly. tr! to

inl eter! area of our activity an1d. nithl cooperation1 both amlong our-
gebers andt w~ith our friends in Panamall. nre shall mio~r steadily\ ahe.ad.
fo~rging a model operations.







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\\is I 1111 4.. .\i~r ik.Offinal Panama Canal Companr Publluranon 1.1.r l \ --.='
...( u .1lul.r.. a.... IH~i arPubllahed Monthlr Al Balboa Heights, C.Z2.

,,~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~ .1. !t .1 i .r .... en wr.. I .sr... |4,. r., .. a ... I, .rln .I.r(1**
Suhieriptinns. $In >a cr. mail and backi ~~~cm e. E~to carseah
i . r1,i I,, .,,... .N ... .~e .Ja lp n In le f ls 1 ~'*. .. .cui I r-' ..'' 'I I a ll 1 I....* I I' r i '.. ib ... .., ,,,,1 1 I I i. .II... lI' i l r


.1tIGCiuT 5. 1960


IAz ffgfy Jg44g









~-~b'~"l~c~"~;k&l


F. G. Dunsmoor, Administrative Assistant
and Deputy Executive Secretary. Room
205 Administration Building .. .. .. .. .. 2-2547


Maj. Harvey C. Jones, Military Assistant. .. 2-1993
Room 205 Administration Building


Secretary, Rooms 205-207: Mrs. Margaret M. King, 2-2547, 2-1993, 2-2131, 2-3572


PANAMA CANAL INFORMATION OFFICE
231-239 Administration Building
William G. Arey, Jr., Panama Canal Information
Ofker ... .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2-1880
Mrs. Emelina Frensley, Secretary. .. .. .. . .... 2-1880
Allen Alexander, Assistant: to Information Officer. .. 2-1880
Norman D. Christensen, Press Officer. .. ... .. .. 2-1477
Joseph Connor, Publications Editor. .. . .. . .. 2-2611


CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT
INTERNAL SECURITY OFFICE


EXECUTIVE PLANNING STAFF
228-30 Administration Building
John D. Hollen, Chief. ......... .. 2-2991
Miss Annie F. McDade, Secretary. .. .... 2-2524
T. E. Burrow, Assistant to Chief .. .. .. . ... 2-2524
Thatch~er A. Clisbee, Capital Program & Budget,
229 Administration Building. 2-2941
Hugh A. Norris, Economist, 330 Administration Bldg. 2-2936
Shipping & Traffic Statistics. ... .. . .. . .. 2-2314


PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL
325-342 Administration Building
David J. Markun, General Counsel. .. .. .. .. ... 2-2157
Mrs. Grayce L. Nadeau, Secretary. . .. . .. . 2-2157
Theodore P. Daly, Assistant General Counsel. .. .. 2-2157
SAFETY BRANCH
312 Administration Building
W. H. Smith, Chief..................... ...... 2-3726
Mrs. Beatrice B. Lucas, Secretary. .. .. ... .. 2-3726
Hf. H. Shacklett, Safety Engineer. .. .. .. .. .. . 2-3726
R. T. Wise, Safety Engineer. .. . ... .. .... .. .. 2-3726


114 Administration Building
Robert C. Walker, Chief ... ... . .. .. .. .. .. ..
Ivan D. Hilliard, Assistant Chief .. .. ... .. .. .. ..
Wiliam E. LeBrun, Personnel Security Officer .. ... .


2-1420
2-1420
2-3100


MAGISTRATE COURTS
Judge John E. Deming. ................... .... 2-1426
803 La Boca Road, Balboa
Judge ]Loren B. Hillsinger. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 3-1514
211 Administration Building, Cristobal


PANAMA CANAL COMPANY DIRECTORS AND GENERAL OFFICERS


STOCKHOLDER
AiVilber M. Brucker
GENERAL OFFICERS
George H. Roderick, Chairman of the Board
W. A. Carter, President
John D. McElheny, Vice President,
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Philip L. Steers, Jr., Comptroller,
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
W. M. Whitman, Secretary
Washington, D.C.


BOARD OF DIRECTORS


John J. Allen
Washington, D.C.
John H. Blaffer
Wi boer M rcer
Secretary of the Army,
Washington, D.C.
Robert P. Burroughs
Manchester, N.H-
Ralph H. Cake
Portland, Oreg.
Gov. W. A. Carter
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Maj. Gen. G. E. Edgerton, USA (Ret.)
Washington, D.C.


John W. Martyn
Administrative Asst. to
Secretary of the Army,
How s ngtton, D.C.
Philadelphia Pa.
Charles S. Reed
Omaha, Nebr.
George H. Roderick
Asst. Secretary of the Army (FM)
W~ashington, D.C.
Maj. Gen. J. L. Schley, USA (Ret.)
Washington, D.C.
Ralph A. Tudor
San Francisco, Calif.


ORGANIZE ATION DIRECTORY

August 5, 1 960


OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR-PRESIDENT
220 Administration Building, Balboa Heights

GOV3ERNOR W. A. CARTER. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. 2-2131
Miss Eloise Smith, Secretary. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 2-2779

Lt. Gov. JOHN D. McELHENY. .. .. .. .. ... 2-4117
Mrs. Jean Deer wester, Secretary. .. .. .. . .... .. . .. 2-1449

P. M. Runnestrand, Executive Secretary. .. .. .. .. 2-2131
Room 207 Administration Building
Miss Mary F. Maguire, Secretary. ................... 2-2131





OFFICE OF THIE COMPTROLLER
232-240 Adminis hnsonBuilding,


PHILIP L. STEERS, Jr., Comptroller.... 2-4184
Miss Bertha I. Frensley, Secretary.. .. 0--1151
Arthur J. O'Leary, Deputy Comptroller. .. "- 12 1
J. Patrick Conley, Asst. to the Comptroller 2-2577
Ralph K. Skinner, Staff Asst. to the Comp-

Mis arthleen M. MlcGuigan, Administra- 227
tive Asst. .......... .... 2-2515

ACCOUNTING DIVISION
103 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
Thomas H. Scott, Chief Accountant. .. 2-2513
Russel J. Jones, Asst. Chief Accountant and
Chief, Reports and Analysis Staff...... 2-2540
Daile D. Keigley, Reports Section...... 2-2512
John Montanye, Analysis Section........ 2-2517
James R. Johnston, Agents Accounts Branch 2-2544
DoP Ides chLueGeneral Ledger and 227

Hran A ad~wirnn la t lcou tr g Branch 2-1436
Accounting Br., Bui ding 365, Ancon.. 2-1332

GENERAL AUDIT DIVISION
100 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
Lawrence L. Jenrich, General Auditor.... 2-2553

Harr D.Ry d, 1is Bach....r -23

BUDGET AND RATES DIVISION
100 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
Le Roy B. Magnuson, Chief ... .. . .. 2-3583
Robert Lessiack, Budget Branch......... 2-2104
James L. Fulton, Rates and Analysis Branch 2-4118

ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND
PROCEDURES STAFF
106 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
John E. Fisher, Chief. ................. 2-2586

TREASURY BRANCH
Building 287, Ancon
Joseph C. Turner, Treasurer. ........... 2-2525




NEW YORK OPERATIONS
21 West Street
Peter DeStefano, Assistant Comptroller and
Administrative Officer
Capt. William J. Steffens, Chief, Steamship

J~... h FI..Hlrogh, Chief, Procurement Division
John Cusick, General Agent, Haiti Office

WASHINGTON OFFICE
425 Thirteenth Street, NW.
W. M. Whitman, Secretary




SELECTIVE SERVICE

STATE HEADQUARTERS-
CANAL ZONE
209 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
F. G. Dunsmoor, State Director.. .... ;-^E)
Mrs. Carol M.l.1s..W Secretary. ... .*-;-191`
H. I. Perantie, Deputy State Director, 242 2~7
Administration B...I.i~rc ......227
J. Bartley Smith, CIh...rna mi Local Board
No. 1, Building 911, La Boca. .. .. ... 2-4472

B ard NS 2, er inalh Bid g, Cri
tobal..... .....,... .. 3-2139


.\DMINISTRTITIVE BRANCH



II I. Perantie. Ll.(_! ... 2-2776
11 1 @..., rs.. I rSectio 2-3192



..r. ........ 2-1529
'\ r. t11 I,.)rl n ~i~. crint ( 2-21
.rl 120Db..1.J ....... 2-3788
I F, ..t.. .1~rntr.1,t~. ra .e.ng lant 2 18

H ...h..r Pr~talc P ...t. B l.. .s 23 8

Isrl!..:1. R......sl 12 Ba..anent~ Adminis-
tr at~...r. Bull..1,...c ....... 2-2564
\\ E tcorn. Ph.I..l s-strl:.I. Hoom 13,
IBi ni.,:r~r Whomi-tr~rlr~ at... biing.... 2-2838


_ ~cBc.-- --


ENG;INEERINGBAND CONSTRUCTIONN


318 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
Lt. Col. ROBERT D. BROWN, Jr., Director 2-1226
Mrs. Lucille M. Fulop, Secretary. .. 2-1226
F. M. Brma\des. rr .Lsst. Director. .. 2-1226
h E. \\I:. bu..I.l.t and Projects Coor-

M.dm~ F.1 Milrfe Repr exetative / 216
Mrs. Faye C. Minton, Administrative Of- 2-1226
ficer.... .......... . 2-1226


ENGINEERING DIVISION
343 1..hs..o..rr at!..r, HIIullane. Balboa Heights

J. M. Cooke.. Designing Engiineer........ 2-4126
M. S. I..rks... Asst. Designing Engineer... 2-4126
CI1. i, s. p I Studies. . . ... . ... .. 2-1 92

.. r r- heCI ,1 tE;. tui 1 r. 2. 228 0

D. I E >!-~ . ~ Ci Spc fca ions an l2-4
F.E ima ig Br ..... 1 .. ..... -263
1. B. Ely, CI.. t~ surveys Br., Bldg. 911'
La Boca. .......... .... 2-3286
J. M. W~atson, Administrative Asst....... 2-4126



DREDGINGC DIVISION
Gamboa
P. .4. White. Chief. ................... 6-186
1 H .rt.. Asst. Chief .. .. .. .. 6-182
G; D *re .,ry, Chief, Navi'gational Aids
....I E.. poor Br. ......... 6-113
C I.1. il.- Superintendent, Operatim 6181

1, .1 Le it-.... Administrative Asst....... 6-178



ELECTRIC IL DI\'IIION
320-30 1~.h~r..s..
J. Barties Smith, El.:Err.. 1 Ernc....:.r -2

ii..i ..lD e, I.-r bE~l n..I E 2-1265
C. W. Chase, i 0lu. ? El,-.. .. k 2165
H > s.: II.. l.. e r .. ..na ...:11 ..r Br., 5
?? .lirrnr..rr ~!...i. B~lIC ............ "-I 15
l\i H E-lluso-r. Chs1:! H ..Irographer, 280
.ir.o r as...H .lc .. ... .. .. 2-2605
I i I~r-rr l...lwrr..l Trlaining Coordi-

I J. 1\I, 5 .1 lii l!r tr l \r ,\ F hst.... 21 6



111111TEN.NCEE DI\'ISION
309 Administration .I~l~ll...c.~ 13.11... Heights
F. H. Lerchen, Maintenance E..; or.--- 2-1269
C T Bron~ e S..p~-r;!irdi~i T..T.-r.L a lb..r-i
011.. blI: 1 8,1... ........... 2-2179
O: .1 D.--c; 5..0--rintendent, Cr;:i..h.1
I so..1 Or~tis... 172* Canal St., Crser~...il. 3-2151

Et iesh Br. haflor s ltxraidnP atora- 2-1490
H,-r;:1..el andy, Administrative Asst..... 2-1269


CONTRACT IIND InSPECTION DIVISION
.nII 1.imln me..a....l B! 3.!1.u ~l.lw Balboa Heights
H. H. Feeney, Chief.. ........ 2-1201
Chrl. I..n~rC...rr.: ..3~ r.-ra.. .2-1201
( 11.0.. Brandl, f r.:.:..t El.;.vor--r (`ut
Widening P-r..;.... ................. 4-674
Mrs. Nita B. H lilra so, Administrative Asst. 2-1201



BALBO4 BRIDGE PROJeiCT
BanIJlan '-1ll. La Boca


fI/ L.Bo Amns trativ essrt....... 2- 10


PERSONNEL BUiREAU


'1: .1Jm~!~r r.El*i OuI-l c E.foa Heights
ED11A.RD .1. DOO~L.LN. Director.2-2610 2-2561
htr. L~...r...r.~ C~ Le.: Scrr riv. .. 2-2561
nml~ I F'..Il.l 1!I~~ tr Drectoa. 2-2625

Ir, th st .. .. .. 2-3660
F iI N Ii-! ,, ri n.. .Il .~stant &
b*...ceE Ok, r....... 2-1077
Iir-Lee... R Ba~rnl~nm ..p. ~r I.-.r? Employee
D. .. 1..pr... a (t thee r tol.W.4l~r 0602,
0...... ..2-2901 2-1673


EMIPLOR1IENT .in I'TILIZATION



CGordoln ht. Frick. CI.. I1 .2-1423 2-3057

\11: lirlr1. l .ra 1 .11 CIl., 1 Records
Br :. I..2-2647 2-3013
\lr E, b 1. .l~~inur.rus? I.: nit. ... 2-1320
i:. rrr \ u. \\ ir..rT Eil~lt --l- Servic -2 61
F.. I; r D I. 1rs- ,rrC ....... 2-2661
, .,....... 3-1229


H\ 4G; Eh' DCL 189F ICATION
IM\'jON


SU;PPLY' AND CO[~ SER\'ICE BUIRE.11'


MARINE BUREAU


Capt. \\IlhlM C. HUif.llEj. Jr.. I'5N.
Dire or
111 1:.. C- Cljr 1 s-..r, r ~


( itt..er






rue-rT re T.-r 9.elB i Bal.... .


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PORT C lPTAIN. BALTBOL


C'apt. Claude 5. Farmer. Us\. i...t C apt..rs


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POR.C*H! Thnpol CIT IN. CRIS~TOBL
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Rir..r. El Da...! Pl or ErFCi.. .

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3- 17-15

14I-21


Detail Slore Maonauer


L. .4. FERCL'SON. Director. ........ 1-

H. O. Theriu t.~ .1 m //|1\se o ..r. -,




COM11UlNIT' 'sERI ICES DIl ISION


I. C. Randall. Ch!~ .
li FR \rI.!~ ~ I .r ar, l~


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RMIlN.4LS BURE10



SR11LHOAD DIllSION
,,,,,,1~ Fl.... T,-nl~i... ll ic~ ln `~ t ..l.I
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2-3614
.2-1676 2-2597
-ihma 2-2597 2-3614


CE~NTRIL E11PLO111ENT OFFICE


( l.. I\ Csnrir,,.h1 r . I~~ i
FI b. II tr ..r..bil Bra int.


tBr.~!. l...1 2 14
....2-2596
...3-1228


1~-1





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. -21 1


(11l~L ZONE CI11ILlIN PERSONNEL
PO)LICl COOR~DIN 4TING BOARD
B luttl er.i: ;,.` 1.~I. ...


.......2-1 817


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15-21.


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1. ist.Init..acli. U..== ..r-enD
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THE PA1r4A


~~L REVIEW


August 5, 196C'


L COMPANY ~


A PANAMA C


SUPPLEMENT





CIVI AFFAIRS BUREAU
205 Civil Affairs Building, Gaillard Highway
HENRY L. DONOVAN, Director. ... .. 2-1682
Mrs. Virginia K. Roberts, Secretary. .. 2-1663
James Marshall, Assistant to Director..... 2-1532
E. L. Farlow, Administrative Assistant... 2-1663

CUSTOMS DIVISION
J. B. Clemons, Jr., Chief, 101 Terminal
Building, Balboa. .... ....... ....... 2-2628
B. E. Lowande, Chief Inspector, Balboa,
101 Terminal Building, Balboa. .. ... 2-2628
B. C. Sanders, Jr., Chief Inspector, Cris-
tobal, 200 Administration Building,
Cristobal. . ... ... .. .. .. .. .. . ... 3-2139

FIRE DIVISION
105 Civil A~fairs Building, Gaillard Highway
W. G. Dolan, Chief .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 2-2101
F. A. Mohl, Administrative Assistant. .. .. 2-2101

POLICE DIVISION
B. A. Darden, Chief, 201 Civil Affairs
Building. ......... ... 2-3400
Capt. Gaddis W~all, Commander, Balboa
District, Balboa Police Station. .. ... 2-1277
Capt. E. S. Shipley, Commander, Cristobal
District, Cristobal Police Station. .. .. 3-2111
Capt. W. H. Munyon, Warden, C. Z. Peni-
tentiary, Gamboa. .. ... . .. .. .. .. 6-128
G. L. Koontz, Administrative Assistant, 201
Civil Affairs Building. .. . .. .. ... 2-2560


HEALTH BUREAU
265, 267, 269, 271, 272, 273, 276, 277, and 279
Administration Building, Balboa Heights
Col. ERLING S. FUGELSO, Director. .. 2-3206
Miss Martha R. Podbielski, Secretary... 2-3208
William Brown, Asst. to Director. .. ... 2-1417
Lt. Col. Harvey E. Meagher, Asst. to Di-
rector .. ... .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. 2-1740
A. B. Carr, Jr., Administrative Assistant.. 2-1417
Mrs. Marcia Van Horne, Administrative
Assistant ......... ..... ..... ....... 2-1417
DIVISION OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
AND QUARANTINE
Dr. Sidney B. Clark, Chief ... .. .. .. .. 2-1416
DIVISION OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
Dr. Robert G. Matheney, Chief .. ... . .. 2-1416
DIVISION OF SANITATION
John P. Smith, Jr., Chief .. .. ... .. .. 2-3616
HOSPITALS AND CLINICS
GORGAS HOSPITAL
Col. Clark B. Meador, Director. .. .. ... 2-6433
Lt. Col. Dee C. Buchanan, Executive
Officer. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2-6430
Robert L. Thompson, Administrative Assist-
ant. ....... ..... 1. 2-6440
Information. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. 2-6436
Chiefs of Service, Gorgas Hospital
Dr. I. Robert Berger, Outpatient. .. .. .. 2-6454
Dr. Lewis E. Fontaine, Dental. .. .. ... 2-3765
Dr. Daniel Hirschl, Pediatrics. ... .. .. 2-6437
Lt. Col. J. C. Kennedy, Neuropsychiatry. 2-6380
Capt. Qguentin H. Lehmann, (Acting),
nadiology. .. 2-6449
Lt. Col. Carl M. Lineback, Ear, Nose, and
Throat. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. 2-6453
Dr. Harold Mondragon, Laboratory. .. .. 2-6442
2t. ole Jhn E.u RObs tMadcl... g -4
Dr. Evganie P. Shirokov, Surgical. .. .. 2-6363
Dr. Irving J. Strumpf, Obstetrics and
Gynecology ................. ... 2-6456
Dr. Rodolfo V. Young, Chest. ... . .. ... 2-6332
District Physician
Dr. David Senzer, Camboa. ... .. .. .. 6-161
COCO SOLO HOSPITAL
Lt. Col. Ralph E. Conant, Superintendent 36-617
David C. McIlhenny, Administrative Of-
ficer. ... .. .. .. . . .. 36-742
Information. ........................ 3-1211
Chiefs of Service, Coco Solo Hospital
Dr. Willard F. French, Dental. .. .. .. .. 34-13
Dr. J. W. Hearn, Obstetrics and Gynecology 34-03
Dr. Oren C. Irion, Medical. . ... .. .. 34-60
Dr. Henry de la Garza, (Acting), Out-
patient. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. 34-55
Dr. Harry Westerberg, Surgical. .. .. ... 34-60
COROZAL HOSPITAL
Lt. Col. Arthur L. Hessin, Superintendent 2-1568
PALO SECO LEPROSARIUM
Dr. Ezra Hurwitz, Superintendent. .. .27-4-3234


POSTAL DIVISION
Earl F. Unruh, Director of Posts, 300 Civil
Affairs Building. ..... ..
Robert S. Herr, Administrative Aide, 300
Civil Affairs Building. ... .. .. .. .. .
Arthur T. Cotton, Postmaster, Balboa....
Frank G. Farrell, Postmaster, Cristobal. .


2-3106

2-3106
2-2454
3-2133


DIVISION OF SCHOOLS
106 Civil Affairs Building
Sigurd E. Esser, Superintendent. .. .. .. 2-3311
R. W. Collinge, Asst. Superintendent. . .. 2-1379
Charles A. Dubbs, Assistant to Super-
intendent..... ................... 2-1379
G. C. Lochridge, Supervisor, Physical
Education and Athletics. . .. .. .. .. 2-2905
A. H. Byrd, Administrative Assistant. .. .. 2-1897

CIVEL DEFENSE UNIT
Philip L. Dade, Chief, 102 Civil Affairs
Building. .. ... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. 2-4169

CANAL ZONE LIBRARY-MUSEUM
Mrs. Eleanor D. Bunhm, Librarian-
Curator, Civil Affairs Building. .. .. .. 2-4326


LICENSE SECTION
J.W.Hare, Chief, 111 Civil Affairs Building
Michael Zombory, Asst. Chief, 111 Civil
Affairs Building. .. . . ... .. .. ...


2-2816

2-2563


CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT


pelm




























Mrs. M. W. Foscue of Diablo Heights,
:" ~~e~~e~ee~ee~e~~e~~e~ee~ee~e~~e ~ 1. and her daughter, Carrie Lee, are
among those taking Spanish this sumn-
., a~l mer at the Panamanian-North Amer-
ican Association center in Panama.





ISTHMIAN FRIENDSHI
betee to eopesliin sie y id







ofliving tworkingplayling togethyier


J Iv 1960, the fifty-sixth mes de -julio
smece the United States brought its en-
ginleers. railroad men, steam shovel op-
erators, and other construction forces to
the Isthmus to complete the dream of
centuries-the building of the Panama
Canal-was pretty much an ordinary
morith hereabouts.
Except for the arrival of the Canal
Zone's newr Governor, the swearing-in
ceremony at Balboa Heights and the
annual flurry of July 4 celebrations, it
.* a just about like any other month of
th'year. Isthmians went about their
buylives as usual as the rainy season
slwly climbed toward its end-of-the-
;ecr deluges.


There were well-publicized efforts to
increase associations and friendships
between..Zonians and Panamanians and
vice versa.
In the Canal Zone, Maj. Gen. Theo-
dore F. Bogart officially launched "Op-
eration Friendship" and in Panama,
President Ernesto de la Guardia, Jr.,
issued an official invitation for all North
Americans in the Canal Zone to visit
Panama.
Less publicized activities were also
going on, jutas they have been for
more than hafa century.
Last month the people of manyn-
tionalitiesh1ving along the banksofte
Canal continued to associate socially


and professionally, sharing their reli-
gious, charitable, cultural, and athletic
interests.
Here is a partial diary of some of the
things the people living together on the
Isthmus did together, in July 1960:
July 8: The American Legion's All-
Star baseball teamn of teenagers, wvho
will represent the Canal Zone this month
in national tournaments at College Park,
Md., embarked on a series of practice
games at the Panama Stadium. Their
opponents in the series were members
of an amateur team. from Panama spon-
sored by the Lions Club.
July 9: The Balboa Woman's Club;
called a meeting of its charity committee


TH~E PANAMIA CANAL REVIE


~I;i


-- PnB
~: ATF ~~L_L(I~'
:.~r~*.

~jL4b.~~
~(nP











a-,


These pictures represent twro Panamla-Canal Zone groups: .Above~.
from the Isthmian Psychiatric Association. from left: Dr. Julian C.
Kennedy, newrl\ installed president: Dr. .Adolfo Mjalo, president.
Panama Mledical Association, Dr. Alberto Bissot, Mlinister of Public
H-ealth: Dr. Erling Fugelso, Canal Zone Health Director: Dr.
Raymond .4rango, Director Hospital Dis ision, Panamla Public
H-e'alth Service; Dr. Mariano Gorriz, outgoing president. At right:
from the Interamerican Woman's Club: Mrs. Irene Donovan, Mrs.
Yvonne Bennett, Mrs. Lolatin Boyd, and Mrs. Marge Daniels.


to plan activities for the coming year.
For many years, this Canal Zone Club
has lent a helping hand wherever on the
Isthmus it was needed.
July 11: The board of the 15-year-old
Interamerican Woman's Club held its
first meeting; by provisions of its con-
-stitution, women from the Canal Zone
and Panama alternate in its principal
offices and women from both jurisdic-
tions serve on its board.
Its activities are many and varied.
Members study each other's language,
learn each other's cooking. Orphanages
in Panama City benefit from their ef-
forts; a special committee raised $21,000
for the Nuestra Sefiora Children's Home
in the past five years. Some of this came
through regular gifts from men of
the Signal Corps stationed at Quarry
Heights.
July 13: A Zonian, Capt. Axton T.
Jones, Cristobal Port Captain; spoke,to
the Cristobal-Colon Rotary Club on
various aspects of his job. The program
for the following week was to include
speakers discussing operations of Colon's
Free Zone.
July 14: At its Post Home on the
banks of the Canal, the American Legion
successfully launched a series of pro-
gasdesigned to honor outstanding
fgrsin the Republic of Panama. The
program, attended by a large and enthu-
siastic audience, honored the French
Ambassador to Panama on his country's
national day. Later in the month, two
former presidents, publishers, and other
community leaders from both sides of
the border were to be honored.
July 17: Thirty energetic teenagers
from Ancon s Cathedral of Saint Luke


spent a hilarious afternoon at Goofy
Falls, a few miles beyond Panama's
Tocumen Airport. T-he next Sunday,
they became tourists for the afternoon,
making the rounds of such spots as the
French Plaza, the Church of the Golden
Altar, the Flat Arch, and other spots
alwayss included on the itinerary of
visitors to Panama City. Oldtimers in
:t ~~the garoupexplained t~~~he sights to their

July 18: Music-loving readers of local
newspapers discovered they were in for
a treat at a series of chamber music
concerts by musicians from Panama and
'the Carial Zone. The first was to be
given at the Pananianian-North Amer-
ican Association in Panama (Zonians ac-
count for 11 of its 36 charter meinbers)
and the second at the Balboa JWB,
where many of Panama's leading mu-
sical artists have presented concerts.
July 19: The Bfrst contingent of young
people from the Balboa Union Church
took off for the annual summer camp,
held this ~year at Santa Clara, one of
Panama's wyhitest, longest beaches. Long
a favorite of Isthmians, Santa Clara this
year includes among its new residents
the Wesley Kennedys of Curundu. At
their new weekend home, they joined
such beach enthusiasts as the George
Daniels of Ancon and Mrs. Rsle
Demers, who retired recently from the
Cainal organization and who has just
acquired her second Santa Clara home.
July 20: Sixty-four strong, members
of the Atlantic side Newcomers' Club
made their annual trek across the Isth-
mus to Panama City. One of their first
stops was at the historic Presidencia,
where President de la Guardia took


time out of his busy day to greet them.
The same day, the Soroptomists Club
met at El Panama Hilton for its monthly
tea. Charter members of the 4-year-old
club include Miss Sara de la Pefia, first
woman to serve as Clerk of the United
States District Court in the Canal Zone;
Mrs. James jPrice. of thie Canal Zone
Libra[\! staff; Miss Elsa V'aldes, who
holds one of the top' posts il. Pannama'j
Sociad Seculit! on ganizationl, and Mits.
Berta de Moscote, principal of the Girks'
Professional School in P~anaina.
July- 21: A new era in relations be-
tween students in Panama and the Canal
Zone was inaugurated when three rep-
resentatives of the University of' Pan-
ama's Law School delivered a formal
invitation to Joe Reynolds, president of
the Canal Zone Junior College Student
Association for a get-together at El
Rancho on August 6, celebrating thei
University's 25th anniversary. Delivery
of the invitation was the occasion for a
little party at the Reynolds' home in
Balboa.
The same day, the Panama Rotary
Club, which numbers nine Zonians as
members, inducted newly-arrived Co\.
W. A. Carter as an honorary member
and applauded enthusiastically as the
Lieutenant Governor of the Canal Zone.
Col. John D. McElheny, spoke bried!
in Spanish.
And that night, the Panama Mlarlin
Club met at the Canal Zone Police
Lodge on' the Chiva-Chiva Trail to,
award prizes for the previous year's
fishing tournament.
July 23 and 24: This was a buwy
weekend. As part of the 50th: anniv~er-
sary of the founding of the Boy Scouts


AUGUST 5, 1960







of America, 30 Bo\s Scouts from Pan-
ama joined 30 International Boy Scouts
of the Canal Zone anld o\er 120 members
of the Canal Zonle Bov Scouts of A~mer-
icai for a Camporee at Camp Chagres
on Madden Lake. The location w\as
considerably more con\enient than the
longtime Scout camp at El 1'olran in
Panama's highlands which w\as abanr-
donerd a \ ear or so ago in favor of a new
camp site, more easily accesjsib~le.
At For-t A~mador senior golfers-they
had to be 50j-years-old or more-g~t
together fiom P[anama and the Canal
Zone for their annual tournament. This
s ear's winner was Paul J. Mloran, of
~Curundu H~eights, who works For the
Ar-my at Corozal. His score for the, twio-
day play was 149. One of those playing
for both days was Panama's ranking
golfer, President de la Guardia.
And, at Colon .during the anniversary
celebration-~ of the city's Bomberos, At-
lantle sidle posts of the American Legion
awarded their "Merritor~ious Award" to
Julio Salas, past .commandant of the
Bomberos. The award was given for his
"outstanding contribution and tireless
efforts and accomplishments in assisting
the Good Neighbor Policy."
July 24: Volunteers from the Carial


Mlrs. J. E. Snodgrass. of Dia~blo, left, and
ht. s Rsia Thm d.d oinama, spen sn't


Zone joined friends across the border in
rehabilitating Colon's Amador Guerrero
Hospital. Their labor was free; the ma-
terials writh which they worked were
Tur~nished by firms in the Free Zone,
Panama, andl the Canal Zone. By work-
ing Sundays, the c~leaned up most of
the exterior of thekbig building.
And finally, on July 29g: Five young
wromenl fro~n the Canal Zone, white-
gow\ned and w~hite-glovetd, were for-
mall\ pr~esented to Isthmnian society at
a charity ball at the Union Club in Pan-
ama City. On hand to see them make
their boiws were a number of- other
Canal Zone girls, who had been pre-
.sented in pre\ ious balls.
SAll in all, it turned out to be a busy
month-in the Canal Zone, in Panama,
and across the border. The natural as-
sociation between people appeared to
be more widespread than ever, even
though the 1960 census showed the
Canal Zone's population to be the
smallest for many years.


Mangoes and limes
at the big market
ip jPanama are lureS
for fruit lovers.
From left:
Mrs. D. C. Buchanan,
Miss Carmen Smith,
Mrs. R. E. L. Brown,
and
Miss ]Lynn Chandler.


THEi PA1NAIMA CANAL REVIEW i































L;ewis A. Taber and James Hoverson, w~ho
helped teach Mr. Taber refrigeration trade.



Five


YOUng




COmplete








F(IVE YOUNG MEN ended 8,320 hours.0f
work and study last month when they
moved up from the ranks of apprentices
to join th~e select group of journeyman
craftsmen who keep the mechanical
wheels of the Canal Zone turning.
The quintet of one Panamanian and
four U.S. citizens began rigorous train-
ing together on July 2, 1956. They
received certificates in, their various
crafts four years, to the day, later.
They spent the intervening years
learig the practice and the theory of
their crafts-not just how to do some-
thing, but why they wNere doing it. They
averaged some 750 hours of classroom
work each--aside from -the "'home-


Ra!mond Cargus, a new craftsman. learned mluch of his skiill 'from E. J. Friedrich. right.


\\ork," -or after-hours stud\ the\. all had
to do. The reslt of the times the\ mo\ed
from' sho to shop. watching, and le~ari-
ing from nlaster claftsnien of their
trade.
As skilled- craftsmen :they will work
n ithi so-me of th~e other Prlalna Canal
aippren-tices, including the class of 1964
--the 10. U.S; citizens.: and :27. Pan-
amanians' who" fornri the largest single
gro"up-'of~~plebitices elen to be trained
here. *
The app~~rentic e prorarih is' one of the
oklesit'of thi- Calnal organizationl'j train-
ing' act~ities. It wa.s started in Ap\lril
1906, althonugh formal applrenticeship
rules were not adopted uiitil 1911.
Since thenl it has hadt its ups and dowrns
':but, genelallly, the program has been in
full sks ing m~ Its present formi sin-ce 1935.
Exactly hou m~n! former appretnticeis
now are w~olkingS for, the Canal is not
known; flur years ago \\hen the ap-
::prentice trainling program celebrated its
50th annit e~lsary~. 212 former appren- -
tiices w\ere on handt to obse~r-\e it.
All five of` this learl's niew\ craf'tsm~n
are graduates of Canal Zone High
Schools. Edw\ard Armistead. \Ihose ap-
prenticsi was~ as an Electronics Ale-
~.chanic a~ndho jhas ,been :assigned to


:the Elretr~ical Di\ rsson,~ ij a graduate cf
Balboa High School. He is a former
parah"ltrope and had w\or~ked on Locks
o~ierhaull before he began his~appren-
ticeship). He is; the soni of Roy F. Armis-
tead, a welder in the Inldusltrial DI\ ijion~
Rupert Chin, a brand new electrician,
is a graduate of Cristobal High School.
He has been assigned tosthe .Eltctleal

SRobert \\'. Dailet, another Cristab JI
HIghI School graduate, is now writh the
-Indujtial Disiioni as a sheetrnct J
\\orker-l. He IS the son of Earl W. Daikti
of the Ele-ctricalI Division and glaindson
of C~harles F. Wahl, former presidedll
of the Central Labor- Union,
l~ias mondt Cargus, who grasduaited
flaml Balbon High Scholol also isi a grnd-
unite of the Canial Zone Junior Collegee
and an Arm\ \eteran. He is assigned to
the Industrial Dixision as a machinist.
Last of thle five, alphabeticalll. lj
Leav~is A. Taberr, a Cr~istabal Highl School
graduate:t~e is the soni of CaPt. J. .1
Taber of the Fire Di\ision. He nio\< is
a refr~igeratio n m~chlanic inl the Alain-
tenlance Division.
:The fi\e ne\\ craftsmnc l and tlhemenn
who helped to train them on the job
appear in the accompanying~pictur~es.


Au~sw':5, 1960







WOrt #DOWing -..

A4 COMPLETE SET Of color transparencieS of every postage
stamp, envelope, and postcard used or issued by the
Canal Zone postal service since its inauguration, has been
presented to the Canal Z~one Library by the Postal D~i-
visioix. The color transparencies are accompanied by a
viewer. The slides are listed numerically, according to
Scott's Standard Postage Stamp Catalogue. As5 newr stamps
are issued, correspondinlg transparencies will be added to
thre Ble. The set is part of the permanent record of Canal
Zone histor\ maintained bs- the Library-Museum.


A4 NEW PLAN for the pUrc~hase and diStribution of school
supplies in the United States schools has been worked out
jointly by the Supply Divis ion and thre Diil is ion of Schools.
Under the new plan, supplies for B'rst through sixth grades
wrill be, delivered at the \arious schools, e-limninating the
usual 16ng wait in line for the parents of approximately
-4,000 pupils. Supplies fdir the' highergrdssent
thirough high school, will be prepackaged this \ear and
Sold at the retail stores. The ~new\ plan w\ill prevail during
the tBrst two weeks -of school. After that, all supplies wrill
be handled by the retail outlets.


ONE OF TH CANAL ZONE S Outstanding former students is
winning honors right and left in the United States. Her-
:rjrigton Bryce, son of Sam Bryce of the Motor Transporta-
tion Division, has accepted a teaching fellowship in soci-
Sology at Syracuse University for the second semester next
year. A senior at Mankato State College in Minnesota, he
had fellowship offers from the Universities of Nebraska
and Wisconsin. During the past year, he spoke at six i~nter-
scholastic events and won the state championship during
a contest held at Macalester College. He is a graduate of
SPara2iso-.High School.


'hA(AITENAN~CE. MENIat Canal Zone Hospitals last month
joined the lists of those in uniform. The new uniforms are
now being worn by the men who handle such jobs as
carpefitry; 'plumbing, painting, and repair of furniture
Sand hospital equipment. The Maintenance Division has
pro\'ided the uniforms, which say on the back, "Mainte-
nance Div~ision. (the name of the) Hospital/Maintenance."
The maintenance forces at Corozal Hospital are wearing
green -uniformsth'ad those at Gorgas and Coco Solo H~os-
pital are in gray. Supervisors wear colored trousers with
white shirts.


.:Emwr International Bo) Scouts~fromn the Canal ZiIone had
their' frst taste of mountain air last month when they
joined thousands of. Scouts from all over the world at the
World Jamboree in Colorado. The boys--all Senior Scouts
-from Rainbow City, Camp Coiner, Camp Bierd, Santa
Cruz, and Paraiso, were accompanied by Thomas UJ.
Sawyers, Pac~i~e District Cub Commissioner. They were
guests of the Chicago Council an1d the Boy~ Scouts of
America National Coungil during the Jamnboree.


Robert 11'. Daile.1, light, writh Jour~ne! man-tearchr John 11'. Irre.


Ruipert S. Chin, left, with Electrician-instructor~ George Egger, Jr.


Edward F. Armistead, left, with Paul Elia, Electro~nics Mechanic.


THE PAN.OArr CANAL REVIEW












IGEORGE W. GOETHALS


for two .construction-day .to~wns. -now
buried under Gatun Lake.
The 12 tugs now li use all carry the
names of townsites, rivers, or islands.
The new tugs are to be the most
powerful in the Canal service. They are
2,400 horsepower, single-screw diesels
with controllable pitch propellers op-
erating through a reduction gear. The
hulls are of an ultra-modern design
which has proved itself in harbor service
in East Coast ports.
The new tugs are 105 feet long, some-
wha shore rh sera to nv
Terted sahl\age tug Taboga, which meas-
ures 113i feet. They will, howre\er, hale
considerably more power. The Tabogpa.
most powerful in Canal service at pre-
sent, has 1,530 horsepower.
The tugs will have a cruising speed
of 12-14 knots and a Canal transit speed
of six knots. The new tugs are designed
especially for use in the narorower see-
tions of the Panama Canal to assist
super-tankers and large ore ships during
transit.
The three tugs will be the first new
Ones added to the Canal tug fleet since
acquisition of the Taboga .in 1944. In
addition to the Taboga, those tugs now
in service with 1,000 horsepower or
more are the Gorgona,. San Pablo, Car-
denas, and Culebra.
The Diamond Manufacturing Co. of
Savannah, Ga., is building the tugs on
a low bid of $1,824,261 submitted late
last year. The new tugs were designed
by Thomas D. Bowes, naval architect
and engineer of Philadelphia, Pa.


JOHN F". WALLACE


ticularly thought it a good idea for some-
Sthing to be named for Stevens, smece his
contribution to the construction of the
Canal was so important and since we
don't believe there is a visible reminder
of his work on the Isthmus. Much praise
has already been given Goethals, brit
we~ felt that in using the three engineers
it emphasized the continuity of their
-work'."
Late last month, Col\ eror Carter ap-
proved the Historical .Soci-ety's sugges-
tion*
The use of the names, of men asso-
ciated with construction of the Canal
originally was suggested for tugs back
in 1914, brit wras rejeited inl favor of
townsite names. The first two tugs
ordered for use in the completed Canal
were named Gorgona and Ta~Ecenello.


FOR TH-E first time in the history of the
Panama Canal, the names' of famous
personages" associated with the construc-
tion of the Canal will be assigned to
tugs in Canal service.
Three new tugs now nearig comple-
tion at Savannah, Ga., will carry the
names of the three successive chief- en-
gineers in construction of the Canal
-John F. Wallace, Joh F. Stevens, and
George WT. Goethals.
The names were suggested by the
board of directors of the Isthmian His-
torical Society, which was asked to
submit recommendations. In the letter
setting forth the board's recommenda-
tions, Cornelius S. M~cCormack, pres-
ident of the Historical Society, said:
"These three men were the first and
only Chief Engineers during the build-
ing of the Panama Canal. We par-


AUGUST 5, -1960


JOHN F. STEVENS


THREE TUGS NAMED


Labor Leaders


i:Honor Govenrr

"I will appreciate your suggestions--even
your complaints," Gov. WV. A. Carter told
more than 100 delegates from unions affi-
liated with the Central Labor Union and
the Metal Trades Council during a luncheon
last month. The Governor spoke ,briefly as
the 30 affiliated unions extended their wel-
come to him. A number of the~ Governor's
staff attended the luncheon in the Fern
Room of The Ti\oli.
~From left are: Governor Carter. stand-
ing; E. W. Haatchett, President of the Cen-
tral Labor Urnion-Aletal Trades Council;
,:Lt. Gov. John D. McElheny; Samuel Car-
riel, Labot Representative~ on the WVage
and Crier ance Board; and Lt. Col. R. D.
Birgown, Jr., Engineering and Construction
Director. In the foreground is Louis F.
Braden. delegate frorn the International
Brotherhood of Electrical W\orkers, Local
397.












































TRANSPORTATION and


TERMINALS BUREAU


SOLE BUREAU of the Company-Govern-
ment with its headquarters on the At-
lantic side of the Canal Zone is the
TTransportation and Terminals Bureau,
which has .charge of all of the organiza-
tion's rolling stock.
Its varied operations are coordinated
through mamn offices in the Terminal
Building at Cristobal, where Director
B. I. Everson and his staff tie all the
loose ends together.
And the tie-ins of its three divisions
are apt to be closer in the Transporta-
tion and Terminals Bureau than in
many of the other seven major units in
the organization. Cargo arriving by Pan-
ama- Line, for instance, is unloaded by
stevedores on the rolls of the Terminals
Division, put aboard the rolling; stock
of the Railroad Division, and unloaded
in Balboa onto trucks for which the


Motor Transportation Division is re-
sponsible.
The. Bureau is not only multi-funo-
tional; it is multi-national as well. Its
2,500 employees represent at least a
dozen nationalities. Of the total, only
254 are citizens of the United States.
Among the others are Panamanians, in-
cluding a number of San Blas Indians;
East Indians-there are only 40 of them
left, but several years ago their turbaned
heads were common sights on the
docks; Ecuadoreans--who seem to have
a peculiar affinity for cargo handlig;
and representatives of a good many
other Central and South American
countries.
The Bureau also is unique in that it
serves, as general agent for the Panama
Line and steamship agent for a few


other ships which do not have local rep-
resentation.
Another unique feature of the Tran-
sportation and Terminals Bureau, pos-
'sibly due to its location, is the close
across-the-border relations it maintains
with the people of the Republic of Pan-
ama, particularly in Colon. On various
occasions certain equipment and facili-
ties have been made available for
meritorious community activities and its
people are active after hours in affairs
of the twin city. An exmpe of this is
the Bureau Director himself; not long
ago he was made a "Meritorious Citizen
of Colon," for his cooperation with its
people.
Some of the Bureau's operations and
the people who do them appear on the
following pages.


THE PANA1A. CANAL REVIEW





























Sam Bryce, wridel! -known on the Pacific side as the --friendl\ tire repair
man," checks the hra\ duty tires of a truck in the garage at Ancon.


Folklift trucks ured bi thie Termninal., Di\ irioni oni the pier beingr srr<- Hithandl Iiro~i. Icplaces headllicht. 11ilfordl Melise irenitei. miower-
icerd b\ 11'. P. Leslie. D. G. Nellis. H. F. Painel. anld J. F. Edmnllldson. Fieeland Hoillo\\ell walk-- oni rnrbuee Iluck inl C:rllobal Mlotor P .







MOTOR TRaANSPORTATION I


Ilainlbon\ C'its \counateu boasdl ther *chool b~usses whi lh w\ill take them l
Iiomei lor lunich.. Ilhen return themi to irchool for the alternloo nl sesiioi.


*cclel,. Ilin!I the \;iha l If the11' raIhoad

hla., ar rIII~?. h i distllln baiCk S1 toh d oe




*IIta'~ Ll~l I4 dki t s ; 10 t .14 lilL C. 3rd Lll
(:l..woli when thei Dlc-stls .ner runlning
thunIIII the d!.\ season! Le t \cas, th~\

Theln Ulad~l~llem operate ther truck


.I lim1~.lll Ilrri..s bre e-s mashl~ toi.)~ M indi



Dalt il c~lesl.,. l tunes 1..aICh t, ek-3.-100 ~


-s.. itC~S las le r T e\ h se te


thil.: I.I1.. l i Zun 1.1.. !k l ~ld sit i n.l .ii in-

Pmtli~ .me~l naliican ue- .It tl,< <: s. .llli



at .ll? I I..s in tl.. job~ .L the ( l.llmpany




Ltn! tlI-., Ts on th ( Dll, in -t c..nitius -II

rInI,.I ... IrI, ,,t, ..Is tl M ol Ctlnli Tran


He nrz COMPANY of the Canal Zone and
centlral trucking outfit cowllill.hind- thisZ is
tJ he Motor Transportationr DI\ raisio. line
I.f theII Llile major unlits of the Trans-


""i \it* ~ 11{ I 05 i)F inl--lt- -l.115Al Ult ~UI
Various units ofrt tle~ Corlnlp~lit -Gen t e rl-



Sc~flnll
Zonians whose famlil\ automobiles
are being Iatpain1 lcan makeh no~I use of
themel Hel~tz-type operations; the drive-
I[-\lolnlelf cars are re~senaclr stlictl\ for
oiFfcial use by -such ptlrsons~ as plumlbe<. ~
physicians at oult-patlrlnt clinics, tel-
ephone ma3in-tcnnllctllcn. ekeltait~ials
.Ind~ others who are on call .1o-undlc th,


The-; len~inlderl oft hthe \hic~les in- the


on1 Conslpanil!-Cowanme-nltlt bus~ineCSs 1,,
trac to~r-lrallers: withI a1 L;apaIst! ot 60
tons or more. The latter carry heavy

job site to another~l. Listte among the
Division's vehicles are the two cars


assigned to the use of~ tll- (... an....l-
President, a new air-c~...nchtionaIr.l Alle-
cury and the Cadillac se~l Jan li l b w as
used by Harold Stassenl (on hiis last ..t-
ficial duty in 11ashl-inlgton
Th.-~ j~.ll,b of the.433 men awl wanI I \~--cn,
--the women are in a Inst~lolrt\ here1. are
many and \;;tde and a pF.ireast1 sre
11 VI O 1'.1311, .IU O ic -Ij 1 l I li lc

SeOTVice and 63 have wo-rked~t I o~r me e
years.
More than a third of thle Diaiilson'
employees are drivers .ind~ thgsc hal\te an -
enviable safe-driving !-c.l.IJ. ToJ qua.I;t
for such an anajld, a dlites mlust hate
a full year of accident-frle operaI.tllonl jf
motor vehicles. A totall ofI 17-1 of the


years of aFt Jlri\ ingi.
Last fiscal year, the \tlhiclrs o~pera~ted
by the 1Motor Transporltaition~ Dlarill>n
chalked up a total of 6~ll.100.000 miks in
it, 31-h~..aur a day, srl-sen-day .l \ttk

in these days of spacr tlaterl. .11~.l they
did this in a number o-f \ a\<. For~ ii-
stance:
During the past p.ar. Dix isilon we-


7 ...,


Cleveland James delivers fuel oil to the Gorgas Hospital steam plant.


THe E'.1NAM.4 C.4Neu. REUEWT


DIVT~ISIONV




















MOST OF THE valuable metal which
crosses th;. Isthmul~s by rail these days
is in the j~eweby aInd coins c.-rrlied by
passengers on th~e Panama Railroad, a
situation in sharp contrast to the gold-
plated business the railroad once did in
moymng precious metals between the
oceans.
The nature of the Panama Railroad's
bulsinless has shifted cons~?ideraibly since
its first 12 years of operation from 1855
to 1887, when it transported 750 million
dollars worth of gold and silver across
the Isthmus. But the freight, personnel,
and mail which the Railroad Division
now carries are more important to life
inl thet Canal Zone and the Re.public ,F
Panama than all the gold and jilv er it
moved in those bygone days.
In that period of a century ago, and
for many years afterward, the Panama
Railroad served as the shortest con-
necting link between east and west, just
as thec Panamna Canal is today. Then the
Railroad's primary function was car-
rying cargo, both human and inanimate,
from one ocean to the other, with very
little of it remaining on the Isthmius.
Today, the Railroa~d's primary function
is to deliver cargo on the Isthmus, with
very little of it being bound from
ocean to ocean.
The Panama Railroad, with slightly
less than 48 miles of main hine track
and a 105-year history as flecked with
color as a faceted diamond, has been
switched, mn short, from an intercoastal
carrier to the role of a supporting agency
for an mnter-oceanic canal.
Today, twelve passenger trains daily
handle its regularly-scheduled passen-
ger load and four freight trains move all
in-and-out bound freitht be-tween the
terminal cities. In Ikeepinlg w\ith the
times,. the Railroad- offers an excellent
p~iggyack;" senlric On numelr~us oc-
casions cargo has been discharged in
Cristobal an~d delivered in Balbo n \\ithlin
three and a half h~our~s after the caarir-
ing vessel tied up at the C~ristobal piers.
Passenger service on freight trains,
especially thie arl\ morning'locals" has
a tremendous appeal to commuters.


Reorganization andit conso-lida~tion \\ !thinr
the Company-Government in the past
several \teas hadS aCaCtt d a class o~f "d1s-
placed per-sonls"-thol:se <\ ho li\e on ~one
side~o at th Isthmusl bu~t \\:,h or k o the
other-.rnel thet aret the- commlrnuters. And~
one of ther biggest tou~lrizt aIttraction~s is
the trainl lidll crosss thc Isthmul~s.
Six so-ca~lled "sputnik~s me~chan~icatl

cargo at below--zerlo temn~pleratwes.~; To1
the RaihodDisinhl-10iih



s~me of the inctlustrial fa ilities ini the
Rcpub~lic of Pa~l~nam
Fromi the standlpoinit of malnp~o\ er
-a1 foue of .316-thet Raihoa:,d Dil ision
is relate e~ll small as C(I:smpa ld 'to,other.
opert~lational- 3 units. TIo quote11( a hlL\ IJask-
!I1 ralihoa~dclr, Nl~e\ er hate\ so few done
so, mluch wi\ithl so- little~ for so long."
Manle~td w\ith the coldl staticticj is
a~rt ne a ichl Irefl.e ts a glinemer(.l of thie PanI-
:lina~ Railroad's colorful past. .AI ll equip-
ment and trkkag;~e is: five feet in wa-dthi.
raltherI than thle fourII feet, 512 inches of
the "standard gauge" `trackagi usedt b\
:1ll stateside railroads. The fi e-foot~


gauge was a llap~tedl. Sub11Sequent sug-
gestions that[ the' ISthmi;.n~ trackage;1
adopt th; \tandaul~l Illgcug hlave been
dt!elash< eac~h timec they~ \ere made
because of the expense involved, com-
pared with the relatively minor cost of
ob~tainling~ equlr~ipmen-t bulilt to. the fire-
t-oot requirements of the' present track-
age.
The gaug-'F '-f the: tracI on the~ statistics
which cltscrlbe its physicall properties
do not I.plemen~rt .I lith-e reistthe Pan-
ama Rai~lroad. hakete\r. .Its cnolrfull
past, its actinl. pre~set an~id itsi pro~spec-
tive futw~e blend inlto a flclths \\h-ole

and elexates it to al positionl of plm-
minence and importance in the history
of the hemisphere, the Isthmus, the
Canal, and the two oceans which it
first linked artificially.


Cope a.d dshughnuti r rone hidns relatiel C~~ nibo thlehr TlS


RA4I LRO ADI


D~ IVISION









































DouRNG 1116 COnStruction days the materials
which went into the building of the Panama
Canal flowed over its piers. Its men handled
precious cargo, like gold and Panama hats,
worth millions of dollars.
Today, the Canal's terminals still handle
cargo from all parts of the world, consigned
to almost every place on the globe.
A day spent wandering on thiis waterfront
is still a capsule round-the-world tour-and
considerably less expensive to take.


THE TERMINALS DIVISION, which op-
erates the docks, pisrs, marine bunker-
mng and tank farm facilities at Cristobal
andl Balboa, is the largest of the three
divisions which make up the Transpor-
tationI and Terminals Bureau.
The Division employs approximately
1,800 of the 2,500 workers in the Bu-
reau and takes pride in its cargo-
ha~ndhog~l facilities, which are as modern
and efficient as those in even the largest
and most well-equipped of the world's
ports.
To provide economical and depend-
able service to the many vessels calling
at the deep water ports of Balboa and
Cristobal, every effort is made to con-
tinually keep abreast -of new develop-
ments in the cargo-handling and trans-
portation fields.
Two-ton-capacity fork-lift trucks for
handling palletized lot shipments in the
confines of shipholds are now in use as
well as big, fast-moving 10-ton-capacity
fork-lifts on the docks and piers for the
heavier containerized cargo, machinery,
and larger items.
Until these machines were put into
service, palletized cargo had to be
broken down for manual handling in
shipholds, while two of the regular
three-ton-capacity fork trucks working
together were required to move the
heavier lifts on the docks. As expected,
dhese newr iems sup0plem en tohraegreat
capacity fork trucks which continually
are mn use simplifying and speeding up
work on the piers.
The use of larger skid loads, partic-
ularly for bagged commodities, the in-
creasmng use of conveyors, sectional
rollers, rain tents aboard vessels, and a
dependable labor force undergoing ac-
celerated industrial training all combine
for a progressively improved working
organization,
The Terminals Division is responsible
for assigning ship berths at the seven
docks and piers at the Atlantic Ter-
minal, which have some two miles of
lineal berthing space and at the four
docks and piers at the Pacific Terminal
which have~ about one mile of berthing
s ace
The average age of the 11 piers op-
erated by the Division is 40 years, but
because of the advanced-design features


Rubber from Malaya, silk from Japan, or refrigerators from the United States may be
among this cargo on Pier 7 in Cristobal. Some of the cargo here is local, some transshiped.


included in the original construction,
and a continual maintenance program,
the piers still are considered "modern"
by shipping terminal experts. The six
covered transit sheds and complete rail
and truck facilities provide the Canal
Zone and Panama shippers and con-
signees the expeditious service so often
needed.
The Division normally moves cargo
between ships and piers and between
ships and land carriers in well estab-
lished procedures, but it can and often
does give special handling to materials
which are needed urgently.


Contractors' materials frequently are
needed even before they arrive on the
Isthmus and on several occasions during
the present Cut-widening project the
Termninals Division has sorted through
several hundred packages of incoming
material to locate two or three con-
taining repair parts or other items
needed immediately.
Of a more mundane nature, but
nonetheless urgent, was the shipment
of fireworks used in the Canal Zone
Pacific Side celebrations of the Fourth
of July.. The ship carrying the fireworks
did not arrive at dockside until 2 p.m.


AUGUST -5, 1960


TER MINWAL~ S


DI VI SI ON

























Some cargo is loaded directly from the piers to railroad cars. Here one of
the mobile cranes transfers lumber to a gondola for trans-Isthmian shipment.


Tractor-trains like this move cargo on the piers.
On July 4, they haul youngsters instead of cargo.


Forklift trucks are used to speed work on the docks.
This pipe is being moved on the apron of Pier 7.


on the Fourth,~ but the fireworks were
located in the cargo and delivered to
the proper authorities in time. for the
evening blast-off.
Outlets on the Division's piers pro-
vide vessels at berth with water, power,
and telephone service on a 24-hour
basis. Ships also can receive various
types of bunkers from large, well-known
companies operating over the piers.
With vessels now designed for a va-
riety of petroleum blends, the Division
reports that during the past few years

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15


a number of oil companies have in-
stalled blending machines which can be
used to combine various grades of
petroleum products to provide exactly
the fuel needed by any ship.
The Marine Bunkering Unit performs
an important function of the Division,
particularly in 'round-the-clock opera-
tions which assure prompt scheduling
for Canal transits and departures.
Despite the multiplicity of services
which the Division provides and the
specialized nature of a number of them,


a rate of efficiency is maintained which
enables the Division to point to a
constant increase in the cargo` tonnage
handled per man-hour, even though
the present tons-per-man-hour already
matches or exceeds that of the world's
largest ports.
And this rate of cargo movement is,
after all, the criterion on which any
judgment of the Divsion s performance
must be based. So, if judgment is re-
quired, the Teminals Division undoub-
tedly would receive, in the terminology
of marine insurance, an A-1 rating.


~;PJ"







































concentrated as much as possible on
preventing accidents. This includes not
only the training referred to above, but
also regular safety inspections of all
units, scoreboards which show how the
various units stand in the safety pro-
gram, meetings with employees on the
job to discuss safety, provision of safety
equipment on such items as the newr
forklift trucks which now come with an
overhead guard, and a recent revision
of all safety regulations.


Teaching supervisors to teach others is an important part of training. The supervisors learn
to: "Prepare the worker,' present the operation, and do the job," so the blackboard says.


train supervisors to teach operating
tasks. For instance: Each time a new
type of container is manufactured or a
new variety of automobile arrives over
the piers, riggings have to be designed
to handle them. The supervisors must
know how to teach, in order to show the
men under them how to operate such
rigging.
Another facet of the training deals
with basic supervision and leadership.
These courses are designed for both
U.S. and Canal Zone rate personnel,
most of the latter classes being taught
in Spanish. In still another part of the
training work, employees are taught
how to dLo their jobs better.
In addition to all of this, there is off-
the-Isthmus training for supervisors.
E. M. O'Brien, Jr., Superintendent of
.the Terminals Division, is now in
the United States taking an American
Management Association course on the
"Theories of Materials Handling," and
several others have visited refineries,
piers, and the Panama Line operations
in New York to learn what is going on
in their special fields.
A future possibility is a connection
with a U.S. Navy school in Oakland,
Calif., which offers a series of courses
which are tied in to pier operations.
In the safety field, operations are


James Barrett, training officer, uses a Red
Cross textbook for his first aid courses.

Ti.l.1NIN AND. SAFETY, although they
are two separate units, go hand in hand
at the Transportation and Terminals
Bureau.
An outstanding example of this is a
new first aid program which has just
been inaugurated by the Bureau. Under
this program, civil defense and in-
dustrial first aid programs have been
integrated.
~The p oram, which was started in
June with the Terminals Division, is
considered a great success so far, and
will be extended to the Bureau's other
two divisions, Railroad and Motor
Transportation, as soon as possible.
The first aid instruction is being
given to such personnel as the dock and
ship gangs on the piers. Later, per-
sonnel from this Division and from
other divisions which have contact with
people and places where first aid might
be necessary will be bracketed into the
program. Eventually, all line supervisors
plus 10 percent of the employees in
operating jobs will be included.
The present course covers 10 hours
of instruction. The first 6 are given on
the job. The employee then volunteers
for the other 4 hours, on his own time.
Training activities are divided into
several major parts.
Job instructor training is designed to


Members of the Tlransportation and Ter-
minals Bureau staff, shown on page? 9, are
dbv: 1, JhnnBur kn,oMnM ager Ragil
road Division; 2, Wallace F. Russon, Safety
Representative; 3, Norman E. Demers,
Assistant to Director; 4, James A. Barrett,
E ployseedDe e opmntg tpieO 5,e tR.Te.
minials Division; 6,Roger W. Adams, Super-
intendent, Motor Transportation Division;
7 Mse Donothy LD Crix, ac ig Scr tar
Everson, Director.


AUGUST 5, 1960


T & T~'s


Training


and


Safety7


91 '''
II
Ili II
ka ra~

p~s~ IB
L.O
:u 5"-L~

~p~
L~j;i;aP ~-









Are

No Longer


IF. A. WOMAN Can't Say something worth
listening to in six minutes, then she
shouldn't be talking, the members of the
Pan-Caribbean Toastmistress Club be-
lieve. The women who have this firm
conviction belong to the first Toast-
mistress Club on the Isthmus, so new
that the chartering ceremony is slated
for September. Its aim is .to teach the
members to talk interestingly, whether
just chit-chat or formal speaking.
The parent organization was founded
in California in -1938 by a group of
women who envied their toastmaster
husbands' ability to speak in public.
Toastmistress International today has
over 800 clubs.
Although Toastmistress International
is known as "an international group of
talking women," that does not include
talking all night. Each part of the club's
program for an evening is carefully


timed, and a meeting cannot last longer
than two hours.
A toastmistress' speech is judged on
content, construction, on how well it
covers the~ topic, and how well the talk
is received. There are penalties for going
over the time limit arid' each formal
speaker is criticized by another member
chosen for that duty on the use of
gestures, clear diction, eye-level,
approach, and continuity of thought.
Membership in the Paix-Caribbean
Toastmistress Club is limited to 30
members so that each member may
receive the best training possible. An
"icebreaker" speech is the first address
by each member and then, under formal
speechcraft, each member gives 12
speeches during the year. Dinner pre-
cedes the meetings, which are held
every second and fourth Wednesday in
the Ferni Room of the Tivoli Guest


House. During dinner various subjects
are discussed extemporaneously under
the heading of Table Topics. And, as an
extra, a souvenir known as the Boner of
the Evening is presented to the person
S.who makes the biggest "boner."
The Company-Governmnent, the Army
and the housewives are represented by
the women who are the first officers
elected by the Canal Zone's Toast-
mistresses. President is Mrs. Rosemary
Reardon of the Panama Canal's Main-
tenance Division. 1Mrs. Anna Barker, a
contractor's employee, is administrative
vice president; Mrs. Ruth Schroeder, an
Army employee, educational vice-pres-
ident; Mrs. Angeline Forester, a Cur-
undu housewife, secretary; M~rs. Kath-
erine H-eadrick of the offce staff of the
Division of Schools, treasurer; and Mrs.
SBeverly Ganser, an Army employee,
sergeant-at-arms.


Of~cers: Left to right: Angeline Forester, Beverly Ganser, Ruth
Schroeder, Rosemary Reardon, Anna Barkter, Katherine Headrick.


Members: Standing: Ruth Kongable, Ann Lawson, Mary W~ilson,
Mildred Abreu. Seated: Katherine Headrick, the club's treasurer.


THF PATA1MA CANAL REVIEW


These Women


Speechless





Mrs. Winifred Lincoln tries her
Icebreaker Speech to the club.








~_


___ ~


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
W~illiam H. Hele
Inspector
OFFICE OF 1E
COMPTROLL
Elmer B. Orr
SupervisoryAcon
Assistant
MARINE BUREAU
W. E. Williams
Towing Lc tv ptr
Stephen C.Les
Accounting Clerk
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Albert A. Roach
Sales Clerk


ENGINEERING AND CON-
STRUCTION BUREAU
M Villareal
nne Survey Aid


HEALTH BBR AU

Head Nu e


TRA ORATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
C. B. Mcnlvaine
Yard Conductor
Richard T. Conley
Yard Locomotive Conductor


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Arthur Lt. ]Endicott
Finance Branch...


TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Ferdinand L. Ottey
Chauffeur


Murray Klipper .
Construction Representativ~e
Demetrio Z~elaya
Boatman
Alfred Griflith
SEngineering Survey Aid
Harold J. Million
Supervisory Hydraulic
Engineer
Charles R. Corbin
Laborer
Hubert H. Leslie
Leadsman
John Williams
Helper Plumber
EhLas S~nchez
Joseph E. Gray
Seaman

HEALTH B CP~AU
Catherine J. Mthso
Head Nurse

MARINE BU U
Kenneth L. e
A associate u~perviisory
Boartbu
Joseph H. Ku~eter
Shipwright
Sidney Brandford
Clerk
Barton P. Scott
Lock Operator Maciziiist :
Antonio Rob~erts
Foreman
Rayburn L. Brians
Admeasurer
Emilio Vega
Launch Seaman
George W. Porter
Seaman
Henry J. Wallace
Helper Machinist
Ernesto Rodriguez
Helper Lock Operator


ADMINISTRATIVE: BRANCH
Louis J. Poletti
Visa Officer
Thelma E. Watson
Bindery W~orker
CIVEL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Ronald M~. Brome
Police Private
Byron C. Bannister
Laborer Cleaner

OFFICE OF T~HE
COMPTROLLER .
TIhomas E. Spencer
:General Claims Examiner
ENGINEERING AND CON-
STRUCTION BUREAU

Towb ora Frry Master
Ronald A. Faunce
Electrician
Arthur C. H-ubert
H~elper. Machinist
Alberto A. Nicol~s
Laborer
SHilton F. Hirghes
Power Plant Chief
":Clyde Ur. Chaplin
H. highway! Maintenance
Laborer
WVilliam -C. Merchant
Water System Controlman
Robert T. Ge~ddes
Water System Controlman
:John C. Thompson
Lead Foreman
Humberto Torres
Pipelayer
'Josi D. Ortiz
Laborer
Harry J. l'inker
Diesel. Machine Operator
.B. M. Parmntier
Leadelr Boilermaker


Fermin A. Reid
Clerk
Fermin Alegria
Launch Operator
Hubert A. Gray
Laborer
Calvin H. Springer
Clerk
Gregorio Vivas
Boatman
Basil C. Edwards
Seaman
Romiin Mendieta
Launch Operator
PERSONNEL BUTREAU
Mathias Regist

CudL. n
Z aE. Gla r
Pe~rsonnelClk
UPY AND MNT
SERVICE BU FAU
lyO. r d



Alfonso Rodriguez
Laborer
Manuel Gordon
Laborer
James A. Moore
Oiler
Edinardo E. Aizpu
Laborer
Ewart V. Howell
Service Station Operator
Lucy A. Constable
Sales Clerk
May L. Blackwood
Sales Section Head
Denis Debranche
Laborer Cleaner
Eleanor C. Austin
Sales Checker


Pedro A. Castillo-
Laborer
Herm S. Nolan
Waiter
Manuel A. Contreras
Storekeepinig Clerk
Manuel G. Vargas
Milker
Juan F. Corpas
Laborer
Vicente R. Soley
Laborer
Arnold J. Buchanan
Laborer
Cleveland Williams

Jose Jnson
Washman
Errol Kirton
SLaborer Cleaner
Counter Attendant

TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Valdan Bernard
High Lift Truck~ Operator
W~illard O. Robinson
Helper .Electrician
A~lexandkD Fowrler

Hipblito Sanjur
Truck Driver
David S. Brown
General Foreman
Ishmail O. Walker
Chauffeur
Whinston D. Jones
Autornoti he echanic
Reynold A. Licorish
Truck Driver
Michael B. Kelly
High Lift Truck Operator
Ernesto Meneses
Truck Driver


18 AVGUST 5, 1960


ANNIVERSARIES













]EMPLOYEES who were .promoted or
transferred between June 15 and July 15
are listed below. Within-grade promo-
tions and job reclassifications are not
reported.
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
William E. AflFeltranger, to District Detec-
tive, Police Division,
Mrs. Alice M. Leftridge, to Recreation
Leader, Division of Schools.
'Mrs. Margaret Wilson, to Elementary and
Secondary School Teacher, Division of
Schools.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
Janice A. Dreitlein, Clerk-Typist, from
Budget and Rates Division to Account-
ing Diision.
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Edward G. Coyle, from Business Analyst,
Budget and Rates Division, to Budget
Analyst, Office of the Engineering and

G ( ruct o. Iir ctdtor Supervisory Con-
struction JIn pector, Contract and In-
spection Dire Divsion

Rafael Z. Villalta, to Helper Core Drill
Operator.
Ivan G. Sealey, to Chauffeur.
Lloyd M. Kent, to Towboat or Ferry
Master.
.John M. Waters, to Salvage Towboat
Master
Santiago L6pez P., to Floating Plant Oiler.
Ivan Temple, to Leader Seaman.
William C. Jordan, to Small Tug Master.
Electrical Division
Mrs. Jeanne S. Garcia, to Clerk-Typist.
RuperedSF.F Am te d,c c Elctronic Me-
chanic.
John K. Daily, from Lock Operator (Elec-
trician), Lo~cks Division, to Electronic
Mechanic.
John M. Sanders, from Lock Operator
(E1 trician), .Locks Division, to Elec-
Maintenance Division
Andr~s Diaz, Pastor Marcelino, to Refrig-
eration and Air Coinditioning Mechanic
Helper.
Lewis A. Taber, to Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Mechanic.
Mrs. Edith M. Villanueva, Mrs. Anna L.
Beckley, Luther F. La Motte, Mrs. Jamice
Scott, to Accounting Technician.
HEALTH BUREAU
Eduardo J. -Matladen, to Medical Biology
Technician, Division of Veterinary Med-
icmne.
Jeso st D.i oenoat Metdrcal Tehc[ -
Coco Solo Hospital
Isidore Marquez, to Storekeeping Clerk.
Arcadio S~nchez, to Nursing Assistant.
Corozal Hospital
Mlrs.~ Mildred Mallahan, to Secretary.
Garfield' U. Turner, to Meat Cutter.
Kenneth Ottey, Babington M. Thomas, to
Utility W~orker.

'THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW .19


~Gorgas Hospital
Mrs. Adele M. Major,' to Medical Clerk,

Iv ugNg, to Medical Clerk (Stenog-
raphy). _
Dr. R. Paul Gaines, to Medical Officer.
Dr. Robert G. Franz, Dr. William S. Ho-
skinson, to Hospital Resident.
Mrs. Elenor V. S. Edwards, Clerk-Typist,
transferred from Division of Schools.
Lydia E. Smith, to Clerk-Typist.
Palo Seco
Josb I. Vald~s, to Cook.
MARINE BUREAU
Industrial Division
Cleveland A. Moran, Berrold H. Hurdle,
to Toolroom Attendant.
Robert W. Bailey, to Sheetmetal Worker.
William Powell, from Laborer, Mainte-
nance Division, to Helper Machinist.
Abraham Corpus, from Heavy Laborer,
Supply Division, to Helper Shipw~right.
George H. Neal, to Instrument Repairman.
Locks Division
Geo ge H. Scoggin, to Tour Leader-Inter-
Sibpert. N. Griffith, Claudio E. Wedder-
burn, Leopold H. Small, to Helper Lock
Hubert E. Brown, Joseph A. Semper, to
TTruck Driver.
Eliott F. Brathwaite, to Toolroom At-
tendant.
Navigation Division
Joseph R. McLean, to Clerk
Robert S. Mate, Charles R. Dade, to Pilot-
in-Training.
Joseph A..Haylock, to Launch Seaman.
Ewart D. Drayton, to Launch Operator.
Mrs. Mary G. Urey, from. Clerk-Typist, In-
dustrial Division, to Clerk (Stenography).
SUPPLY AND COMMUllNITY SERVICE
BUREAU
James D. Raymond, Lionel E. McLean, to
Leader Cemetery Worker, Community
Services Division.
Supply Division
Retail Stores Branch
Franklin M. Reece, to Meat Cutter.
Joscelyn H. Evering, to Clerk-
Cecil D. Gooding, to Retail Store Super"
visor.
Eumece E. DI-ayton, toHeav dLaborer'

Jm W. ille t urvsy Clerk
mpesrt A. Might eouk Dier. *
Service Center Branch
Helen C. Cabey, to Sales Clerk.
Genaro Valdks, Norman A. Marshall, Frank
H. Ryce, Herm6genes Planes, to Kitchen
Attendant.
Viola Beach, to Sales Checker.
Storehouse Branch
Ci fton Jdn, C1eS@T~ypst, transferred

Tombs Alfonso, to Scrap Materials Sorter.
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
James A. Barrett, from Cargo Claims Assist-
ant, Terminals Division, to Employee
Development Officer, Office of Director.


Motor Transportation Division
James Melvin, from Laborer, Retail Store

Jos ahc Tmins n,k Dom hauffeur, Main-
tenance Division, to Truck Driver.
Joseph N. Cox, to Automotive Mechanic.
Chester J. F. Rhoden, to Sign Painter.
Milton H. Wright, to Electrician.
Frederick A. Jordan, to Stockman.
Luis A. Salazar, to Helper Tire Rebuilder.
Railroad Division
Christopher M.' King, from Laborer, Divi-
sion of Schools, to H~eavy Laborer.
Terminals Division
Herman J. Thomas, Frank L. McIntosh,
Rodman Nliilez, Dalton R. Ferdinand, to
High Lift Truck Operator.
Rafael Guerrero R., to Leader, Ship Cargo
Operations.
Charles A. Hyams, to Lead Foreman, Dock
Cargo Operations.
Martin Amador, to Guard.
Alfonso Fern~ndez, Benjamin Norman, Al-
fonso Carrido, to Ship Worker.
Urville W. Wlallace, to Timekeeper (Typ-

OTHER PROMOTIONS
PROMOTIONS which did not involve
changes in title follow:
Martin T. Dreiss, Jr., Graduate Intern, Of-
fice of Engineering- and Construction
Director.
Hugh A. Norris, Economtist, Executive
Planning Staff.
Eric A. Edwards, Cook, Corozal Hospital.
Norman E. J. Demers, Assistant to Tran-
sportation and Terminals Director.
Benjamin A. Darden, Chief, Police Di-
vision.
William F. O'Sullivan, Translator, Admin-
istrative Branch.
Horace B. Headley, Clarence W. Ward,
Canton E. feorge,CBerr sfordaDte nio
Division.
Thomas W. Carter, Marine Traffic Con-
troller, Navigation Division.
Clyde W. Carew, Accounting Clerk, Ter-
minals Division.
Mrs loLie iE1. Griffon, Secretary, Coco
Mrs. Gladys B. Baldwin, Secretary, Gorgas
Hospital.
Raymond N. Shaw, Civil Engineer, En-
gineering Division.
Robert S. H-err, Administrative Aide to
Director of Posts.
Evelyn J. Samuels, Sales Clerk, iRetail Store
Branch.
Joseph A. Bialkowski, Admeasurer, Naviga-
tion Division.
Doris G. Sealy, Myrtle B. Bryant, L~ilia I.
Hurley, Clerk;i Retail Store Branc;h.
Mrs. Ilene C. de Brown, Emilio F. Dixon,
Clerk-Typist, Division of Schools.
Charles H. Arlington, Rupert E. Ifill,

Glenn WibrC iief Fry or Towboat
Engineer, Dredging Division.
Aida I. Morales, Clerk-Typist, Community
Services Division.
Norma A. Stamp, Lina Davis, Mlargaret
Mussa, Clerk-Tyist, Retail Store Branch.
Alice E. Byers, Clerk-Typist, Supply' Di-
vision.


-----P ROMLOTI ONS AN-D TRA NSFERS --

/une~ 15 through July 75










"We are serving as a placement
agency for the teenagers," Mr. Hughes
said. "All we need now, as suggested by
Mr. Dean, is the opportunity to place
more of our registrants. We know these
youngsters can perform valuable serv-
ices--and believe employers will be
giving them valuable opportunities by
requesting those services. All we need
is a chance to prove it, so give Mr. Dean
a call if you need some help."



RET IR EMEN TS
RETIREMENT certificates were presented
at the end of July to the employees
listed alphabetically below, together
with their birthplaces, positions, years
of Canal service, and their future
addresses :
AgestinLAn onie,y nthmbaH blerda s
Panama.
Adrien M. Bouche, Mt. Carbon, W. Va.;
Control House Operator, Pacific Locks;
44 years, 3 months, 23 days; Staunton,
Va.
Mark Z. Brandon, Jr. Brandon, Fla.; Gen-
eral Foreman, Mail Handling Unit, Post-
al Division; 29 years, 6 months, 12 days;
MisranKth'arin I. Clark, Cooley, N.J.;
Teacher, Division of Schools;. 30 years,
4 months, 16 days; Long Island.
Capt. Peter W. Duncan, Dillard, N.C.;
Pit Na ig tion Divis o; F2 years, 11
Raymond S. Euper, New Orleans, La.;
Towboat Ferry Engineer; 34 years, 5
months, 2, days; New Orleans, La.
Ca 1 is exri Panama; De~techive,2 P lice
Panama.
Julius F. Hatchett, Knoxville, Ga.; Lock-
master, Pacific Locks; 31 years, 5
Gmonths,07 Lays; Mglo 1Alto,oCias i n.;
Teacher, Division of Schools; 31 years,
10 days; Iowa and Florida.
Floyd R. McDermitt, Point Pleasant, W.
Vears 20mots r2 Atant; est V rin a0
Sgt. Jack F. Morris, Morristown, Tenn.;
Police Sergeant, Police Division; 25
years, 1 month, 7 days; Lutz, Fla.
Clifford V. Russell Gloversville, N.Y.; Ad-
mn sra~v mon@,cr,1 m roal Hsital,
William M. Sergeant, Havana, Cuba; Con-
tract Officer, Contract and Inspection
Div~ision;d28 years, 1 month, 25 days;
Albertect Shockey, Waynesboro, Pa.;
Mechanical Supervisor, Pacific Locks;
31 years, 4 months, 25 days; W~ayne-
g boroS'al ado, Colombia; Helper Locks
Operator, Locks Division; 42 years, 10
months, 16 days; Panama.
Neil H.' Wilson, Chandlers Valley, Pa.;
Director of Admeasurement, Marine Bu-
:r omzla. years, .7 months, 13 days;


CIVL DEFENSE
NEWS


A FOOD CONCENTRATE just placed on
sale at all Canal Zone retail stores is a
simple answer to the problem of food
storage for Civil Defense.
Known, as MPF (multi-purpose food),
this concentrate is packed in 4V2-pOund
tins and can remain on the shelves
indefinitely without deteriorating.
Even though this product has been
distributed as an emergency food in
more than 100 countries of ~the world
and has been accepted and well-doc-
umented as a proved concentrated food,
a local test was arranged through the
cooperation of John D. Hollen, Chief of
the Executive Planning Staff, and Miss
Melinda Marshall, an employee of the
same organization.
Mr. Hollen, who is Chief of Opera-
tions in the Canal Zone Civil Defense
organization, and Miss Marshall lived
for five days, Monday through Friday,
on nothing but six ounces of MPF
daily, plus the necessary Vitamin C,
which is nussmng from this .product.
They obtained th~e Vitamin C through
grapefruit, orange juice, and other extrus
fruit drinks.
When questioned after the test, nei-
ther complained of having experienced
any unpleasant side effects. Both ad-


NEED R Swiming instructor, bab sitter,
boathand, temporary offce: h l, or
someone to read for a shut-in? A it
takes is a call to Operation Teener Task,
a project of Post 3822, Veterans of
Foreign Wlars.
In the belief that many Canal Zone
teenagers would like to have summer
vacation jobs, Post officials opened Op-
eration Teener Task soon after school
closed this spring.
In a 10-day registration period from
June 7 to 17, a total of 60 boys and 18
girls applied for employment listing
with the Post. They offered to sell skills
and abilities ranging from babysitting
service to special tutoring in a variety of
subjects from Spanish to mathematics.
Donald L. Hughes is chairman of the
committee in charge of the program. He
urges anyone wanting temporary help to
call the teenage administrator of the
project, Joseph Dean, at Curundu 3228.
Mr. Dean, who was graduated from
Balboa High School this spring, is on
duty from 2 to 6 p~m., T~uesday through


Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p~m. On
Saturday.
At present, Mr. Dean receives an
average of four calls per day from po-
tential employers and would like to
triple or quadruple that number. He
reports that teenagers registered with
the project have a wide variety of skills.
On at least one occasion, when a woman
requested a swimming instructor, Mr.
Dean located a registrant who was
qualified for the job, although the youth
had not listed that skill in filling out his
application.
One applicant, a girl who likes to
read aloud, is seeking the task of reading
to shut-ins. So far there has been no
request for her services. She is not alone,
however: Many of the other 15 to
19-year-olds have had no offers of em-
ploym~ent, either.
Mr. Hughes, whose regular job is
Employee Utilization Representative in
the Army's Civilian Personnel Office,
points out that the rate of pay is s~et
between employee and employer.


mitted they felt a loss of energy by the
fifth day, but said they had no head-
aches or other physical ailments com-
monly associated with lack of adequate
nutrition.
Mr. Hollen reported he lost eight
pounds during the five days, but was
pleased rather than displeased about
that, Miss Marshall lost two pounds.
Members of Mr. Hollen's staff were
asked whether or not they had noticed
any changes in his level of activity
during the week, and specifically wheth-
er he had been irritable or difficult
to "live with" during the test. They said
they had noticed no increased irri-
tability, thus indicating that MPF was
fulf~~iwe:l;ingthenutiioa role for which
it wasdeeod.
MPF was stocked by the Retail Store
Branch at the request of P. L. Dade,
Civil Defense Chief. He recommends
that one can of MPF and a supply of
Vitamin C tablets be stored in the home
for each member of the family.
This will provide an assurance of
adequate nutritional protection during
periods of emergency, Mr.- Dade said.
He also recommends that a can be
stored in the family car. Each can of
MPF contains sufficient concentrate to
sustain one individual for 12 days. At
the present price of $S1.75 per can, the
daily cost is less than 15 cerits a day-
a low price to pay for adequate nutri-
tion when and if an emergency should
disrupt the normal food suppl!.


Aucust 5, 1960O


OPERATION TEENER TASK




































































DISABLING
INJ URI ES
'60 '59
9 10
69 68


1


25 Years: Ago
CANAL DEFENSCs and the construction
of a road across the Isthmus were being
discussed both in the Canal Zone and
in Washington 25 years ago this month.
Ilt was estimated that the trans-
Isthmian highway, 18 miles of which
would be hacked out of virgin jungle,
would cost about $2,500,000.
Canal transits were declining in 1935.
Canal authorities reported that there
had been a steady drop in the Canal's
ship traffic during the past five months,
with Julyr traffic and tolls off 10 percent
and 9 percent respectively.
At th8 end of thfe month, Washing-
ton announced that President Franklin
D. Roosevelt would visit the Isthmus
during October on his way back to the
East Coast from California.
10 Years Ago
A HOUSING PROGRAM for the Canal
Zone, to replace most of the older
Canal Zone quarters, got underway 10
years ago when Congress approved a
$2,500,000 appropriation. The money
was to be used to- start a long-term
housing program in the Canal Zone.
Income taxes moved closer to Canal
organization employees as the U.S.


senate killed a- move to keep the canal
Zone tax-exempt. JTanuar~y 1, 1951, was
set as the effective date for the new
income tax law which was to apply to
the Canal Zone.
As the Korean War moved into an
active phase, Canal Zone authorities
announced that nothing stood in the
way of employee reservists who wished
to sign up for active duty. Panama
oflFered all-out aid in the fight and 494
Panamanians volunteered for Uniteid
Nations service in Korea.

One Year Ago
THE PANAMA CANAL celebrated its 45th
birthday a year ago this month. Be-
twceen August 15, 1914, when the
SS Ancon made the first official ocean-
to-ocean passage, and the Canal's an-
niversary, nearly 300,000 ships had
transited the waterway.
On the construction front, bids were
opened on new towing locomotives for
the locks and on a project to provide
better lighting for both Locks and Cut
so that ships could transit faster. On
the personnel front, the Canal Zone
Board of Appeals held its first meeting,
working out procedure to be followed
for appeals.


THERE IS a legendary crea-
ture called the Goofus Bird
which travels under a va-
riety of names and lives
most everywhere. Among
other attributes, this bird is
famed for its abili~tybcwr.Ti :to fly

movement, with eyes
straight toward where it
came from, is said to be due
to the bird's weird desire
to see where it has been rather than
where it is going.
Naturally, this peculiar behavior re-
sults in frequent collisions between the
bird's tail feathers and objects it can't
see because of its reverse locomotion.
Unfortunately, this bird's peculiar
habit apparently is contagious. In fact,
among Canal Zone drivers it reached
what ~doctors might refer to as an epi-
demic stage back in 1958, when 63 ac-
cidents involving official cars occurred
while the car was moving backward.
Since then, the incide-nce has been
declining, but it still is high. During the
year ending in June, some 38 accidents
--almost one-third of all accidents in-
volving official motor vehicles- Oc-
curred while the vehicles were moving
backward.
In the great majority of these acci-
dents, in which the vehicles collided


with lampposts, fire hydrants, other
stationary objects, and other vehicles,
the drivers were other than regular
chauffeus
Backing from a spot in a parking lot
or driveway needn't be a' bone-jarring
and expensive experience if we keep
watching where we're going.
When backing out of a parking lot
spot or out of a driveway the very first
order of business, of course, is to have
the motor running and the car ready to
back. While looking to the back and


sides to make sure all is clear and
keeping a lookout in the direction of
movement, back out slowly.
It obviously is a good practice to back
straight out whenever possible and con-
centrate on what's going on to the rear,
which, after all is the direction of
movement.
There's no denying that swiveling the
neck in order to constantly see to the
back and sides puts a strain on the neck,
but it takes it off the pocketbook and
the nerves.


CASES


'


,60
242
1507


'59


223
1392


THE PANAM~A CANAL REVIEW


50O Years Ago
WORKL WAS started 50 years ago this
month on the first trestle for the Colon
Harbor breakwater. The trestle was to
extend 11,000 feet from Toro point to
the entrance of the Canal and was to
serve as a rnmway from which rocks
could' be dumped to form the break-
water proper.
A contract to build a new ladder
dredge for the Pacific Division was
awarded to William Simons 4.r Co. of
Renf~rewo, Scotland, on a low bid of
$339,240. The dre ge was to be de-
livered to Balboa 365 daslater, making
the trip fromt Scotland through the
Straits of Magellan under its own power.
The job of forging the anchor for the
fender chains to. guard the great lock
gates was allocated to the Gorgona
shops. The anchors are frames of struc-
tural steel imbedded in the concrete of
the lock walls. Each anchor weighs nine
tons.


Safety mn Reverse


ACC IDENTS
Fon

THE MONTH
AND ,

THE YEAR


JUNE

ALL UNITs
YEAR TO DATE








TRAFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIIN TRAUDE ROUTES
The following table shows the numer of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:
Fiscal Year
Avg. No.
1960 1959 Transits


Ean eo sofUt S rano t o lAmerica. .. .. .. 2,836 2, 68 1,6 7
East Coast of U. S. and Central America .. .. .. 465 424 508
East Coast of U. S. and Far East . .. ... 1,843 1,507 1,028
U. S./Canada ]East Coast and Australasia. .... 216 195 204
Europe and W~est Coast of U. S./Canada. ... 1,053 1,045 702
Europe and South America. . .. .. .. 1,031 1,005 474
Europe and Australasia .. .. . ... .. .. 362 383 341
All other routes . .. .. .. .. .. . 2,363 -1 2,201 1,432
Total traffic .. .. ... ... .. 10,795 9,718 7,062

MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
(Fiscal years)
Tolls
Transits (In thousands of dollars)
Month
1960 1959 s -1960 1959 6e
18oss6s 1osses
July .. . .. . 888, 767- 557 $4,219 $3,681 $2,432
A~ugust .. . .. 888 777 554 4,1-11 3,664 2,403
September.. . .. 823 717 570 3,828 3,357 2,431
October 853 806 607 3,820 3,718 2,559
November. .... 886 773 568 4,124 3,628 2,361
December. .... 893 793 599 4,420 3,682 2,545
January. .. .. . .. 902 826 580 4,146 3,925 2,444
February ... .. 926 791 559 4,417 3,653 2,349
March. .. . ... 978- 882 632 4,633 4,100 2,657 .
April. . .. .. .. 903 830 608 4,203 3,907 2,588
May .. .. .. .. .. 974 897 1 629 4,710 14,179 2,672
June. .. .. .. .. 881 859 599 4,309 4,035 2,528

Totals for Fiscal Year. 10,795 9,718 7,062 $50,840 $45,529 $29,969

CANAL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC BYi NATIONALITY


Fiscal Year
1959


4



Grancolomnbiana Additions
TWO OF THE lateSt additions to the Flota
Mercante Grancolombiana, S.A., were
to start service on the West Coast of
South America run in July and August,
according to Wilford & McKay, the
line's agents here. The first to arrive was
the Ciudad de Pereira, a modern cargo
ship built in Europe, which made her
first Canal transit July 26. The Ciudad
de 'Armenia, the second in a series of
four n~ew shps bebmg built fr Ithe line,
Europe. Both will be placed immedi-
ately on a New York to South America
service.

New Lykes Vessel
THE. JAMEs LYKES, one of the first of a
fleet of 52 replacement cargo vessels
now being built for the .Lykes Bros.
Steamship Co., will make her return trip
through the Canal August 24, after com-
pleting her maiden voyage to the Far
East from U.S. Gulf ports. The new
cargo liner was built in Pascagoula,
Miss., by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp.,
which has a contract to build a num-
ber of the new Lykes replacement
freighters. On her trip to the Far ]Ea~st,
the James Lykes called at West Coast
ports, Manila, Hong Kong, and Yoko-
hama. Panama Agencies represents the
line here.

More Israeli Ships
THE UNITED FRUIT Co. has been ap-
pointed agent for the Israeli-flag vessels
of the Zim Israel Navigation Co., which
will start a new run this fall between
Haifa and the West Coast of the United
States. The announcement was made
recently following a visit here of Mor-
dechai Chovers, General Freight Man-
ager for the line in New York. According
to present plans, the line will route at
least four of its Haifa-U.S. Gulf ru
vessels through the Panama Canal. and
up the West Coast to Los Angeles, San
Francisco, and possibly Seattle. This
service pro aby wilstart wit te
5,000-ton deadweight freighter .Natan-
ya, which now is being constructed.
The Tsefat and Lakhish, two other
vessels owned by this company, have
been making regular trips through the
Canal from- Ecuador during the past
year as banana carriers on charter to a
fruit company operating in Miaini.
These were handled .locally by L. :K.
Cofer.


1960


I


1951-55
Average Average
number tons- of
transits cargo
1,209 7,376,805
60 307,398

240 904,561
141 91,373
130 575,637
192 434,847
110 943,600
399 514,150
1 14,532
134 712,038
263 1,742,551
174 1,083,735
120 595,178
21 19,465
791 3,221,592
436 2,415,123
2 1 774
31 135,113
186 754,127
2,122 13,215,379


7,062. 35,904,050


Nationality


British .. ..
Chilean. ..

Danish . .
Ecuadorean .
French. . .
Cernma. . .
Greek .
Honduran. .
Israeli .. .
(talian . .
Japanese . .
Liberian . .
Netherlands. .
Nicaraguan .
Norwegian .
Panamanian. .
F "iig n. .
Spa h, ..
Swedish. . .
United States .
Veeuln .
Al Otes
.-Total* *


Num-
ber of
transits
1,295
107
2 9
447
62
167
1,296
273
204
62
194
820
997
416
77
1,167
255

34
278
2,089
1 0
10,795


Tons
of
cargo
7,898,569
614,137

1,400,563
96,419
794,021
3,529,409
2,731,478
217,186
11,166
1,226,258
5,145,575
8,482,238
2,007,283
113,108
7,401,146
1,129,247

128,149
1,513,815
13,232,922
39 ,6
59,258,219;


Num-
ber of
transits
1,234
90
2 9
347
49
153
1,039
119
151
6
188
800
966
369
71
979
367

44
233
1,985
10
9,718


Tons
of
cargo
6,917,049
466,464

103,297
609,302
2,954,282
1,126,005
123,539
17,708
983,862
5,468,228
8,394,154
1,641,972
136,984
: 4,840,012
1,488,148

187,235
880,560
12,187,935
381, 3
51,153,096


AvoUST 5, 196~0







CANAL TRA~NSITS COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT

Fiscal Year
Avg. No.
1960 1959 Transits
1951-65
Atlantic Pacific Toa Ttl Ttl
Pacific Atlantic
Commercial Vessels:
Ocean-going_ _- __-_ ..-- 5,579 5,216 10,795 9,718 7,061
Small*_ .___-___-__-_ 432 401 833 958 1,236
Total comnmercial--,- __--. ,1 ,1 168 i,7 8,297
U. S. Government vessels:**
Ocean-going .. .. ...-___---. 109 73 182 204 667
Small* __ _ _____ _ .._ 100 130 230 230 305


Total commercial and U. S.
Government__ _....----- 6,220 5,820 12,040 11,110 9,269
*Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
**Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES SHIPPED THROUGH THE: CANAL
Pacific to. Atlantic
(All cargo figures in long tons)
Fiscal Year
Commodity 1960195 A

Ores, various . .. ... 9,552,611 7,229,081 3,981,996
Lumber .. .. .. 3,571,685 3,465,944 3,562,206
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt). .2,728,889 2,715,749 969,165
Barley. . .. ... .. .. .. ... 1,977,621 1,731,953 132,480
Bananas .. 1,234,237 1,093,093 748,782
Sugar . ...... .... 1,208,845 1,311,584 1,137,168
Wh~eat. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. 1,191,780 1,473,874 1,858,229
Canned food products . .. . . 1,103,000 1,134,778 1,210,878
Metals, various .. .. . .. .. 987,443 956,811* 529,991
Nitrate of soda. .. 894,038 956,565 1,258,138
Food products in refrigeration (except fresh;
fruit) .. 796,386 740,219 575,190
Iron and steel manufactures. . .. . 451,953 377,299 224,859
Fertilizers unclassified ... . .. 435,274 207,717 12,953
Pulwoo 408,210 325,479 19,9
Coffee.d . . . . . . 406,439 394,920 2369
All others .. . ... 4,735,967 4,592,212 3,175,376
Total .. .. .. .. .. 31,684,378 28,707,278 19,826,597

Atlantic to Pacific


Fiscal Year


Italian West Coast Service
A NEW SERVICE was begun in July be-
tween Naples, Italy, and the Pacific
West Coast by two ships of the Italian
flag d'Amico Societa de Navigazione
per Anzioni. The first vessel to make
the new run was the Cesare d'Amico,
an 8,834-gross-ton cargo ship, which
arrived at Cristobal July 31. This and
the Paolo d'Amico will make the voyage
between Naples and Vancouver, British
Columbia, by way of Marseilles, La
Guaira, Panama Canal, Los Angeles,
San Francisco, Portland, and Seattle.
Space is provided on the ships for 12
passengers. Agents here are Andrews
& Co.

Orient Line. Visitors
TWO BIG Orienit & Pacific Line passenger
vessels carrying more than 1,000 pas-
sengers each will call .at Canal ports
during August and September. They are
the Orsova, due August 13, and .the
Iberia, a Pacific & Orient Steam Naviga-
tiori Co. ship due September 5 for her
first transit through the Panama Canal.
Both are due from London and both will
dock at Cristobal and Balboa
After leaving Balboa the Orsova and
Iberia .will sail for the United States
West Coast.- The Orsoua, a 28,790-ton
sh p, made her last trip thro gh the
Canal northbound July 2 of this year.
She is scheduled for a Far East cruise
from the West Coast and then will re-
turn to her run between En land and
Australia, by way of Suez. The 29,614-
gross ton Iberia will make a round-trip
from the West Coast to Australia, via
Honolulu. Norton, Lilly are agents.

New Superships
FmRsT transits through the Panama Canal
were made in July by two more ocean-
going giants. They were the Achilles, a
United States flag super-tanker, which
arrived at Cristobal July 19, with a full
load of oil and the Ore Saturn, latest ad-
dition to the National Bulk Carriers
fleet, which arrived July 21 on her
maiden voyage from Japan, where she
was built.
The 712-foot Achilles, owned by the
Newport Tankers Corp., was built in
Newport News in 1960 and was under
charter to the Military Sea Transport.
The Ojre Saturn is a 751-foot vessel
which will ply between Puerto Ordaz,
Venezplela, and Philadelphia with iron
ore. Panama Agencies act for the ship
here-


Commodity


1959

6,140,726
3,322,019
858,234
1,685,230
1,326,728
1,164,303.
379,358
629,342
327,513
490,330
316,250

324,952
266,786
4,590,774


3,838,198
2,514,297
53,593
le713,7331

106,507
525,470
264,151
182,804
374,408

127,709
281,062
4,309,532
16,077,453


1960

7,308,024
4,704,207
2,209,664
1,713,770
1,501,967
1,244,545
734,888
612,893
538,308
536,101
421,851

296,452
288,687
4,750,873


Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt).
Coal and coke ............
Metal, scrap
Iron and steel m nufactures. .. .. .
Phosphates. ......
Soybeans. . .....
Ores, various .. ....
Sugar .. .....
Cotton, raw ......
Chemicals, unclassified. ...
Sulphur . . . . . . .
er eaperdnppeprodcts . . .
Wheat. .. .. .. .
Machinery..... ..
All others ......


Totl. . .. ... . .1 27,573,841 1 22,445,818 ,


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW











































_ _


SlowmFcAN1r increases in two of the
major trade routes which flow through
the Panama Canal were outstanding
features of the na;terway~'sl ) traffic dliring
the past fiscal year, ac'cordiing to data
c~ompilrd' by the Executive- Planning
Staff. ''
The two trade routes were that be-
tween the: Un ited States east coast and
Asia and that connecting the United
States east coast writhi the wrest coast of
South Amneric~a. Both were due, in large
part, to increased demands for raw
materials in the consignlee areas.
Cargo movements between the United
States and Asia have been increasing r
steadily for the past few years but the
past fiscal y)ear showed e\en greater
demands for coal and scrap iron because
of the. economic expansion of Japan.
.This past fiscal year cargo moving on
this trade route was approximately a.
third higher than that during fiscal
year 1959.
While cargo shipments -in- the run
between the east coast of the United
States and the west coast of South
America' have also been at a high level
for several years, they were app~roxi-
Inately a quarter more than that of the
revioixs Fiucal yeal:. The inicrease is at-
ibtdpl inclpally o h steady flow
of iron orelfrom South .America to
Unite'dStates ports.
Irorfo(re r~eser-\es i n the trn Ited' States
are being depleted to such anr extent
that steel manufatucturer hi the TiVlited
Statesare seeking foreign sourlces; new\
developments in- Peru and. Chile- are
sulppl!ing much of this dc-lemand -Iron
olre is also moving through thieCarial in '
increased quan ti ties from Sou th mer i a
to Europe--although this, of course, is
not reflected in the United States east
coast-South America trade route.
While ~the change has not- been as
marked, or at significant aS the:twoc re-
porte'd above, Canal statistics also show-
agrowith in trode bet\~eeni 'Europe and
the wviest coast of South America. In,
addition to iron ore, a major commodity
in this trade iis now~ fishmneal from .Peru.
Accordingi to a recent !item in; the
.NeL Y'ork Times.'.fishmeal shipments
have been growing ste~adili since 1950jC,
and hate a lreadv esceleded fore~casts~. In
;1948,1:necordingg to the Times,$ W\est
Gerainy was importing $300,000 worth
of fishmneal and imports to Great Britain
Sfor the same year totalled approximately
$3 million. By 1957, these figures had
increased: to .$20 million- for West Cer-


I PP I
TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING
VESSELS IN JUNE

Commercial.:...........,, ...859. 881
U.S. Government. . . . .. .: 15 14
Total...-'. .:.....874 895
TOLLS *
Commercial:. .. .$4,039,227 $4,312,238
. U.S. Goverrimeiit. .~ 73,888~ 49,970
Total.. ..$4,113,115 $4,362,208
SCARGO (long tons)
:Commnerciail. . ... 4,750,255 5,-193,872
U.S. 'Goverinment. 96,301- '55,706
Total. .... 4,846,556 5,249,578
*Includes tolls on all veussel, ocean-going and small .

many and $2-1 million for Great Britain.
Once widely used as fertilizer, the
fishmeal is now an essential ingredient
of poultry feed. It is also used, although
to a lesser extent, in processed food for
pigs, cattle, and household pets such as
dogs and cats. It has now become Peru s
ranking export, surpassing sugar which
held top place for many years.
As has been the case in every year of
the Canal's history~except 1957, cargo
i mov'erhi~etS fr~om Pacifi to Atlantic were
heavie~r than~ those_ moving in the op-
posite direction. .Statisticians attribute
this to th-e fact that raw materials, which
are bulky\, rnovl\e `north th~roxigh the
.Canal. F'inished' prodluc~ts, which are
smaller, move south. During the past


fjsc~al y;ear such finished cargo as; iron
and steel mlanufac~tured goods wIas still
lowr compared to shipments of earlier
years, although? there was some sign of
a recovery~ flom the steel strike and
recession of th past~twro years wh~lic~h
had cut dow\n ma~nufacturing.
: One important commnodity in the.
northbound movement, wheat, showed
the low\\est ear~go tonnage in manyeas
Much of the wheat once s~hippedrs
through thie Panama Canal is now
Inot inlg through the St. Lawrence Sea-
way and, Europe has recently h~ad the
beest graizr years of -the past decade or
more.
A number of the flags transiting the
Canal showed marked increases in the
past fiscal ) ersl. Although the total w\as
comjnparatli\ely small, 62 transits for the
IL em. Issacl ShiPS showed the' largest
percentage- increase-close to 1,00)0 per-
cent. Korean shipping, also small nu-
mlericall\, shlow ed a tremendous pe~r-
centage increaise-o\er 3 00 pe-r~cent.
Creek shippmglr, writh an~ increase of 15-1
vessels From l-the fire\ ious year rep-
ie tsn ting almost a 130 percent rise, and
Danrsh shipping, with 'a little o\er 301
percent, war~s also increased markerdiv.
Othier nationalities show ing: significant
riumer icajl if not pel ceritage gains w\ere:
Br~itish, Chilean, Ecuadorea'n, C~el man.
Liberla~n, No.rweSian. and United States.
Dec reases, both lnimerical anld per-
cerntage, w\ere- recorde-d for Belgianl
Costa Rlcan, Finnrish. andl Panamanuarn
ships.


OCEAN GOING.TRANSITS'
THROUGH PANAMA CANAL


MONTHS


AucusTr 5, 1960


SH


N\


G~




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