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DLOC PCANAL



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Panama Canal review
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00206
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: June 1957
Publication Date: 1960
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
sobekcm - UF00097366_00184
System ID: UF00097366:00206
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text





































Up froin


downl undberl


.~'~t~u~N~L~,(~;B[~~YI CANAk























































ON OUR COVER
BRIDGE INSPECTOR Louis A. Yogel
comes up from the very bottom of the
caisson form after checking that specifi-
cations have been followed and that
solid rock is the bridge base.


-B A JdBEL


Anniversaries .

Bridge Progress. .

Canal History .

Central Employment Offce

Central Labor Union. .

Comnptroller's Office ..

Heads (the Census) .

Melvin, Air Conditioner .

Promotions and Transfers

Purchases in Panama. .

Red Cross, Fifty Years .

Retirements .

Safety .


.19

.2-3

.17

.17

.8

.9-18

. 6

.6-7

.18

.8

.4

.23

.20

21-24

.7

.5


Shipping .

Tails (a Snake Story) .

Worth Knowing. .


Photographer looking down at an inspector


W. E. POTTER, Governor-President
J nw D McELHENY Li te a t G rn r


on u. I

Panar


EurT.\NonI MIcTLHEN w,. Editor


JITTEL


I~LL~~ga I. YlU7ILL gV~1U \. y r EUmIcE RICHARD Rild Tlor ~
WILLIAM G. AREY, JR. Offcial Panama Canal Company Publication Editorial Assistants
ma Canal Information Officer Published Monthly At Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Printed at the Printing Plant, Mount Hope, Canal Zone
On sale at all Panama Canal Service Centers, Retail Stores, and The Tivoli Guest House for 10 days after publication date at 5 cents each.
Subscriptions, $1 a year; mail and back copies, 10 cents each.
Postal money orders made payable to the Panama Canal Company should be mailed to Editor, The Panama Canal Review, Balboa.Heights, C. Z.


FEBRUARY 5, 1960


In This Irssue


I BRID GE
































Ready to pour concrete.


Retaining wall takes shape.


Looking up.


EAST APPROACH--estimated 60% complete
On the east approach to the new Balboa Bridge, most of
the paying is already done and work is starting on the
last retaining wall on the upper level of the divided strip
on 4th of July Avenue. The approach was planned origi-
nally for a single-level road but soil conditions below
Cable Heights made the change necessary and added
$75,000 to the job costs.


SUBSTRUCTURE-estimated 20% complete
Caisson work is about 25 percent complete on the sub-
structure of the B3alboa Bridge. The caissons, 36 inches in
diameter, may extend as far as 90 feet down. As many as
28 will support the piers which will be located over land,
and are used to connect th~e piers with solid rock. An
estimated 8,000 linear feet of caisson work is scheduled
for the Bridge.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


PRO GRES S






Thre Canal Zilone Chapter
of the Amzerican


RED CROSS

celebrates its
fiftieth annivlersaryl


THE CANAL ZONE is file CTOSSroads of the World--as in May, 1909, the branch had a membership of over 1,300
everyone knows, and not only for shlipping. It is a cross- in 14 towns.
zoads as well for aid and assistance to ther homeless and Its primary purposes were to "provide relief in special
"destitute for a radius of hundreds of miles around. cases of destitution," give "first aid to the injured," and
Dispenser ojf thlis aid andr aIssistanice is threl~FCU Axper an pdle.::grgeral relief w\ork pertaining to disasters."
RHed Cross who~se Cainal Zone Chlapter last snirtb~ilff~..oe 94. Jayifidr 1910, the Canal Zone Branch became
lebate th 50h nniersry f is ouning .. Cr~itarrai pne Chapte-r, one of the first 80 organized by
The Canal Zonie Chapte~r w\as less tha~n fi e iso o~ldr ':)i~5e~dij.Co. Today, th~e A-merican Red Cross has over
when it was calledi uipo~n for its hrjt interna~tidru E~i-diad :;,700 (ch~i~fiers. Thle Canal Zonie charter, which is orna-
of mercy. In nlkla 1910). a devasjtating ea~rthqu~~':l;;~~ hy-tid rneated bi a huge gold seal. was signed by President
waste to the old tow\~n of Cartago in Cozta Ricb:. n4 t~henr. W~iiditi~a~ Howard Taft.
a favorite vacationr land for Canal Zon~ians. A mighjt be ex-pected. thle most dramatic work of the
Minstrel shows weretr organized on the Isthlus iper'' CanaZl. Zoie Chapte~r ca7me during the two great wars.
former lent their talents to benefits to raise fuhids 'for Even before- th~e Unit~ed States had~ entered World W~ar
the Costa Rjicans. Within a few~ days. a c~heck:ir 450i0- ~ 1, thie'hap'ter was prov\iding balndages and other surgical
from the Canal Zone Chiapter was -on itsl:Any~to the s tipplits,.f~or ,the ar~mecdservis-~e. Andsbot as important
United States Charge d Affairre inr t,'righe neighbt-g re--as thle touelr of horize Which the rdmen orf the Canal
public, to supplement funds .From' the rjlt~3idtol. hearcdl Zteas Chapter providedd totly dra(~~ ishou-nded who transit-
quarters of the Red Cross anld- tre' tests aiud blan;k~ets edthile' Clnal en routfe froini Eurpetd~ Atustralia and New
which had been prokidied by, the r$thmianr Canal.CGom- ealand.. .
mission. ; ..-... During lfo~rld:Wa~r II the cliaptetr ~w\ork swelled to a
In the in~terenin~g half centr~m'ehelp j hisflowed from. point~h never bere 're~achedlI ~~la itionrr to the Production
the Canal Zone to flood victims in H-onlduras.e~ar-thgukes Corps, w~hich.ti~irne~d ourt ~'thoutsand of srgical dressings,
sufferers in Ecuader alndPel-t..aud- tioie. after t~ime, to bedia~ckets-. silrge~on s .gowns andl quaiifities of other gar-
those made homeless bv dis-astroth fire.4 in :th Republic ilnets, the' Re~d Crosls.or~ganRideda~n ninaer of other corps
ofPaam. ::. -'-Homue' Nursing, Cadnte~en;,Mo1tor-and thle first Gray
And during twoc world \\ars, Red Cro~ss aid~has spr~ead La~dy group.
out from the Canal Zone to countries e\ven farthert.over- '. Iti'.mid-194-1 the Canteen Corps began to serve coffee
seks~. After the end of World War II, a hundred.Cinala .and douggimuts at thle piers for transiting servicemen and
Zone women, volunteers in t~he Clinal Zone's Chapt~er, a yeasr h~ter set up an elaborate canteen at one of the
received certificates from Britain's Duchess of.GlaKCePSter Alli~rook Field hangars for troops redeployed from Europe
for the thousands of hours they had spent rolffig baid-: tdj th~e Pacific. Thisr service was repeated during the Korean
ilges, linitting sweaters, and makingalll kinds of gdarmerts confict.'
for those whio had felt the full \iolen-ce of th~e' i ar in Tod (b--Ae worulk of' the Canal Zone Chapter is much
Europe. s ess didatatic than in those exciting days. But, 50 years
The Canal Zone Chapter of the American. Bed .~Cross ... tf~ter I~ts organization it still stands ready to "provide relief
was the brainchild of Major, later Lieultenanlt Cdlonrel. in special cAses of destitution, give Birst aid to the injured,
C. A. Devol, Chief Quartermaster of the Isthmian Canal and handle general relief work pertaining to disasters."
Commission for several years. Major Devol had been in-
terested in Red Cross work before he came to the Canal
Zone, and had received a ~presidential citation for his aid
-during a flood in 1908 in Itatt~iesburg, 11is. A few of the local Red Cross activities, past and present appear in
the pictures at the right. Top: Even before the United States enter-
In January, 1909, he issued a ca~ll, through the. 'Caunl red World (War II, Zone- Red Cross volunteers, like Mrs. Earnest
Record," for the establishment of flthe "Canall.Zonet Branch Williamss Mrs. A. B. Forsstrom and Mrs. G. O. Kolle, were making
of the Internationtl, Red Cross," ~and on Jin uar 2Q. the clt at of frts 970im 0 f dh wr. Seodomstop Victsims of
branch was formally organized: by,thenm iSa~s Ippwn.as ,ned by sen\ icemen. Below: Thousands of servicemen, deployed from
a branch, of the American Red Cross. I ocal committees the European theater to the Pacific, had a few hours ashore in Red
wereestblihed n te'CnalZqf~~s:majr "Cross canteens, and, bottom, Mrs. Vi Wolitarski hands regular food
wereestalishd inthe analZoggs maOrIcmunitiest packages to Antonio Knight and Arthur Holder at the Ancon office.


FEBRUARY 5, 1960






Worth, :nowing .

CARNIVAL Will be celebrated this month in Panama.
;Beginning February 27, Momo, the God of Fun and
Frolic, will invade the Isthmus and residents as well
as thousands of visitors will devote the following four
days to dancing and general merriment. This is a
special yearl for Panaman,'s carnival. Since it marks the
50~th anlniv~erjsar of thel official carnival celebration,
started in 1910, it \\ill be called the Golden. Carnival
and plans have been m-ade to make it the most elabo-
rate festival in Panama's history.,

A srx-wEEK: COUrSO for divers, the first to be conducted
by the Canal organization since 1948, will start at the
Dijrmg Sc~hoocl at Gatun the last part of February. Four
hj~" lbling ivers and six diver tenders will make up the
class w\hichl w~ill b~e conducted by William. Badd~ers,
head of the Salvage Depot and Diving School at Gatun.
Applications have been received from a number of'
employees, from whom four will be selected for the
diving classes. After training, two will be assigned to
the Industrial Division and two to the Locks Division.

BRIG. GEN. HERBERT D. VOGEL, Who was the first Lieu-
tenant Governor of The Panama Canal and who is
now Chairman of the Board of the Tennessee Valley
Authority in Knoxville, Tenn., will arrive February
17 aboard the Panama liner Ancon for a short visit to
the Canal Zone.:While he is here he will confer with
Canal offiials on problems pertaining to power capac-
ity of Ithe Panama Canal and the related water problem
and will inspect the new hydrologic reporting system
on, which work was begun recently by the Electro
Dynamics Inc., of California. He will also be the prin-
cipal speaker for Engineers' Week to be celebrated the
last week of February.















Tw~o D.urnhOurnI- Studeni~tS u1Sed their ChlriStmanS \aca-
t ion to in ter~it lew a c ollege aIlumln ~s- Ernesto de la
Cuardid. Jr., thle Presidecnt off Panamal. Thie students.
Richa~rd 11 right. son of Mlr. aid Mlrs. \\'ells ll'right. of
Balboa. and Robert Strumpf, so~n of Dr. and. lr-s. i.
J.StrumpL. of .1nconn. n ent to thie Presidencia to maike
a tape recording oft th~e President's rema~rkis. Urpon their
return to Halnorer. N. H-.. th~e recording wa~s broadcast
o\er the Dartmocuth radio -station.


I




























Oh, my!


Let's see
ARIRCONDITIONING COmplaintS in the Administration Build- .
ing at Balboa Heights came to an abrupt halt January ,
1, 1960.
No longer do the employees call the engineer in charge
of air conditioning to report that it is too hot, too cold, or
too dry in their particular wing-they now take a quick
tr~ip to the basement to consult Melvin.


Melvin arrived with the New Year to take charge of the
engineer who is in charge of the inspector who checks
the building for the engineer in charge of air conditioning
and, little man though he may be, he delegates authority
so well that he frequently spends nearly a half a day in
one place.
Most of the time he is making policy or taking a double
check on the temperature in th~e Governor's offices but one


HEADS
CANAL ZONIANS will stand up and be
counted in April, just as all residents of
the United States will be. The occasion
will be the census taken every ten years
of those who live in the 50 States and in
the United States territories and posses-
sions overseas.
Technically, the count may be taken
sitting down, and probably will be. The
process of answering the long list of
questions which will be asked by each
of the Canal Zone's 50 or so census
takers will be a somewhat lengthy
business.
: Starting April 1, the census takers will
begin circulating through the Canal
Z'one. They will have had at least two
days of intensive training for the job,
will be citizens of the United States-
this provision is required by the Bureau
of the Census-and will be high school
graduates. Each will have stated that he
will be available for fulltime work
during the three weeks or so that the
taking of the census will require.
All census takers will carry identifica-
tions. They will be armed with long lists


of questions. These will include the
name, age, nationality, education, race,
occupation, and place of birth of every
resident of the Canal Zone. They will
also question Canal Zone residents about
their income, but will omit several ques-
tions to be asked in the continental
United States, such as those concerning
housing, telephones, television sets.
The answers to all questions are to be
strictly confidential. They will be used
for census purposes only and will not
be available to any other United States
Government agency.
In addition to all of his other jobs,
Governor Potter is the census super-
visor of the Canal Zone. He was asked
to take this position by the Director of
the Bureau of the Census. The Canal
Zone is one of the few places where such
a request has been made. In most of the
United States, the census wNill be taken
bythe Bureau itself. Governor Potter
hsdelegated responsibility for the
Iocal census to the Chief of the Execu-
tive Planning Staff.
The 1960O census will include all per-


sons living in the Canal Zone. The direc--
tive of the Bureau of the Census defines
them as "all persons whose usual place
of residence on April 1, 1960, is in the
Canal Zone, This will include military
personnel stationed in the Zone as well
as civilian employees and all other res-
idents of the Zone."
Military personnel living in barracks
will be enumerated by their post com-
manders. All others, including military
personnel living in quarters, will be
questioned by the census takers.
The census takers will be paid on a
"piece rate" basis, i.e. 12 cents a name,
or on a per hour basis when they are
working in rural areas where residents
are scattered.
Zonians, as all others questioned by
census takers, must answer all the ques-
tions they are asked. The law provides
that those who fail to do so may be
punished by a fine of $100 or a jail
sentence of up to 60 days. And those
who falsify their answers face an even
stricter penalty-a fine of $500 or up to
a year s imprisonment.


FEBRUARY .5, 1960


Here's 2Melvin, Assistant Assistant Air-Conditioning Inspector
















































TAILS


;;'.*"
"F1 *j
'`''


1 hil
; .:,!
:' ::?


I J


Gotta huns


anid f\ that


hris o.fficer andl missed hii- co-Hrtte break~. He- pcle- d \\ Ilefu~ll
froim hiis huget- Slas, \n inldml\ orll hou~r- bu~t no, ont- had~t tie
key\. E\legione rre-m.-mbe(- ls th t '\;as [lr daf\ he tllnneld the '

nemperatui Ire so1011 thatr it prued top le lel~~c w th an the ru


down\ I to, the conitrol roocm to Pu~t th'ingS right again.
NI,\ therre a-ire tw key s to the control room-ii. Ihlelt in.
w\ hoe is atll of 3 inchers ta;ll, is the brainchildl olf Claisi C.
D~uffic. rhi, dec~ided \rthen he cpottedl Melr in in a Painama
hlop thai~t the little man was.~ the minsing link; in the ailr-


5fldil, iS ill thie5.inlr- 5puIt d15.1 (Lrcl* ti?1110









nfl~ etd I ir.Illli 5 Il ife .l \c stlll (; ~-

5od 11 n I il th0n \ fc?: IOd la rp SU 1di
LIalllti i TF(1 ~ 'II sII lIS 1 il lio!C 1 1 ..11 011. -

PCnte Plth :1n~hr akin 1 1sbill I~li ii. ~
bisri-n truny litor c no a ar farll \ic JnL

CeT ra P I.1111li C..111 103 l :5tld ls (


thi.11 is clig till s l elth~t nl rl\




lIit Crell- or P.th!r b clu reas d jl John's
;oLc d ~ in a t.i .1th.,ug h.:srC r petlois is
ill-ilme l~~ I1h t cpa t c frsm m r primafrti coe-
Lher he1~ r.- wl ari.:i makni anCllli Mot to
n.Late: "o \Ile iiI'lO "s \fi ng Rhiln)O\ tOA


omilearcrel nsiti sucli .n oid request.
Phase gile mi! thaniks to~ Gme\rno r Pot-
tell (or thle timet jnll help he has g~i\en
me- flamn his \alua~ble time."
Comnplebc. de~tailedl informartionl o~n
thec caii-, handhneiiS fe-edling ~ind taring

hang1 letter \\iith~n himi h\ Mr. \\'hiite-.
Thr lal~ go wlria2 a alsli.nllio boa.L~ \ Ill
edit O-il 1 he foohd suc~h asC Pigeons.)
guinea I"S. on' "mal chilkens. anid
II~icrllia 1 5111.1(t 36* (Eci .t Icd5E 01100
c01811 twol \\eks. he- illrnforme John.
Thesnia~llle s~nlc 1nak .st ainbow\1r:,3he
\?ate. \ril eat small frogs. lizardls. or
mlcl. : ;lid IOl:L11 it? flld I11(r' d l\i' .
1iP hnlld& c3011 \rli thc(I.* Ca 01111)li
})01501131 letterl the' h-lpP! futurec hcelpe-
tologist \wro~te Gmernr~i Pottel: I am
u\riting to, let !cu knot~\\ that I hate
recenedt~ the snakes 10ul sent. The\ are
the~ most hralth\ Il-ok~inC snakers I hate
seen rr~ a long tuln-e I rea;Ills ap~preciate
all that !nu hate doneC for me,. and
I'letlt* @\pft55 "11 tha~n 4 tiJ c-\rt\rlUe
w~ho, helped. together writh lonl, in 'cup-
tuing. er.ating, andt- shiplping thaln."


That doe, ii!








To Panama: $1.5 M~illion In December


PRODUCTOS PLASTIcos, a comparatively non-U.S. citizens on the Company-Gov- to local contractors during the month.
new Panama firm wrhic h fabricates plas- ernm~ent payroll during the two pay This figure, contract offcers said, was
tic bags, probably never thought of itself periods which ended in December. The considerably lower than the amount in
as a maker of mousetraps. But it,is a fine majority of these employees live in the other months as "December was a slow
example of the old adage about the man Republic of Panama and do the major month, contract-wise."
who has a path beaten to the door where part of their purchasing there. A breakdown of the direct official
he makes better mousetraps. Another part of the $1.5 million was purchases in Panama by the Supply Di-
The Panama Canal organization has the $52,108 in three contracts awarded vision during December follows:
recently beeir beating a path to the plant Food Products:
where Productos Plasticos turns out per- a. Meats: Native Beef and Sausage Products. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. $8,471
forate:d or solid plastic polyethylene bags b. Seafood: Fish, Lobster, Shrimp. .. .. .... .. ... .. 4,391
of all sizes and shapes. Twenty different c. Agricultural:
types of these bags are now being pur- Coffee. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. ...... .. . 76
chased by the Company-Government Vegetables and Fruit inseason. .. .. .. ... ... 3,636
organization. They are used to package d. Dairy: Eggs and Milk Products. . .. .... .. .. 13,151
vegetables, and other cold storage items, e. Bakery: Breads and Rolls. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 1,537
baked goods, shirts and other wearing f. Others: Brewers Grain and Blacks trap Molasses. .. .. .. .. .. .. 1,540
apparel, and some of the smaller bags
are used for sandwich wrappers. Beverages: Beers and Soda water. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. 22,876
The plastic containers are only one Tobacco Products..................... ................. ....... 376
example of the wide variety of Pan- Toilet Articles: Mlouthwashes, Lotions, Colognes, Ointments and Pomades 4,067
ama-produced merchandise which is Batteries: "Tasco". .. .. .. .. .. .. ....................... 1,600
bought each month by the Company- Gases, Acetylene, Oxygen, Hydrogen, Cooking. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... 4,579
Government organization, as a boost for Building Materials:
the economy of the Republic. a. Forest Products. ....... .. .. .. .. .. . .. 2,518
A list of the items bought in Panama b. Cement. ........ ................ 6,704
during the month of December alone c. Sand. ......... ................ 676
indicates the variety and dollar value d. Paints, etc. 664
of tesepurhass. Te $2,50 wrth e. Miscellaneous Building Materials. ... .. ... ... .. .. ... .. 733
of produce and the $23,156 which was MiclaeuGodfoReSl:PananCpsSorShtPstad,
spent for such services as machine main- iclaeu od o eSl Pani Cps or ht, s ad,
SBrooms... .. ................... ................... ......... 3,143
tenance, etc., however, make up only Miscellaneous Use Items: Visqueen Bags, Plastic Bags, Uniforms. ... .. 11,772
a small part of the over $1.5 million
which flowed directly from the Canal Total Consumer Goods. .. ...... ...... ... .. .. $92,510
Zone into Panama during December. Services...........-.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 23,156
By far the largest part of this came in
the $1,373,966.21 which was paid to Grand Total.. ... .... . .. .. .. .. .. . $115,666B


Labor Leaders for 1960


OFFICERS for the Canal Zone Central
Labor Union-Metal Trades Council, AFL-
CIO, for 1980 posed recently for the
REVIEW photographer. They are: Front
row, seated, from left: Samuel Roe, Legisla-
tive Representative; S. J. Garriel, Wage and
Grievance Board Member; E. W. Hatchett,
President; J. H. Elliott, Secretary; and T.
P. McGann, Legislative Alternate. In the
second row, standing, are: J. C. Dyer, First
Alternate Wage and Grievance Board
Member; R. L. McCaskey, Representative
of the Air Force; J. J. Belcourt, Trustee;
D. P. Bender, Sergeant-at-Arms; J. S. De?-
frees, Second Alternate Wage and Griev-
ance Board Member; E. H. Womble, First
Vice President; John Steuwe, Representa-
tive of the Army; W. M. O. Fischer, Treas-
urer; and A. J. Waldorf, Trustee. Not pic-
tured are G. M. Huldquist, Second Vice
President; J. Hl. Young, Trustee; and F. A.
Anderson, Member of the Industrial Train-
ing Committee.


FEBRUARY 5, 1960










_1_~_1~1_


~P


ONLY SMALL
DIVERSIFIED As


THIS RHRFEAl
() ALMOST AS
fOR THE (


ru~Ctowaru


BY THE COMPTROLL
() FOR TIME AND MAT
FROM THIS BUREAU.

FROM THE EMPLOYEE
iS CENTERED ON THE
WHICH DELIVERS PA


() SOME OF THE MYRIAD AC
1NI~lilat-REl --ARR IGHLHTE


--CI~rr~


Ul~


_ I____I_


AL1


ITS SIZE.


nN T


; FISCAL OR F.


ZYTHING CON-
O WITH THE


-GOVERNMENT.


THE COLLECTION OF TOLS, WHIHAMUTD ATYERT
$46.5 MILLION, IS ONLY A SMALL PART OF THE DUTIES OF


C



O



R/I



P



rL1



R



O



L


l HRV


TTHE OFFICE OF


KEEPS RECORDS ON EVERY PIECE OF TANGIBLE PROPERTY AND
ON SOME INTANGIBLE ASSETS OF THE COMPANY. AND FINALLY.
ANALYZES ANY LEGISLATION WHICH AFFECTS THE FINANCIAL SIDE
OF THE PANAMA CANAL ENTERPRISE.

NO FISCAL CHORE IS~ TOO LARGE OR TOO SMALL FOR THE
BRElRAII TO DEAL WITH. THE BUDGET AND RATES DIVISION: FOR


ANNUAL BUDGET. THE SAME DIVISION


>All anan rnnsumans.


L


ALSO ESTABLISHED SUC~





IT UNITS ARE INFORMED 1


f OF


AI I COMPANY-GOV


E



R


SSTATUS THROUGH REPORTS SUPPLIES
OFFICE AND ARE AIDED IN ACCOUNTING


WELL AS I


VIEW. I


ID MACHINE At


^'I F MP' VEI


i~


ALWAYS ON I


ESS DEnUCTi


i OF THE
'HE FOLLO\I


OF FICE OF TH E


jE OF BUREAUS FIVE 1


i EMPLOYEES FALLS THE RESPON-


2925


.BY PERSONNEL


THE PANAMA CANAL EVEWEP









THIE CLAIMS BRANCH handles every
type of claim for or against the Comn-
pany-Government, from those for eye-
glasses broken in performance of duty
to settlement of: ship ac-
cident cases. During fis-
cal year 1959, 12,745
claims were processed
and paid in the amount
of $1.5 million. The
amounts involved range
from a fewr cents to sev-
eral hundred thousand
dollars. The most com-
mon employee claim is /
for reimbursement of
travel expenses in con- .
nection with home
leave, recruitment and
repatriation, or official
duty. Claims Branch
personnel adjudicate
claims for personal in-
jury, death, freight loss
and damage, property
damage, steamship ac-
cidents, employee travel (recuitments,
repatriations, home leave, official duty,
temporary local duty), shipments of
household goods, motor vehicle acci-





TmIs enour of employees in the Comp-
troller's Office tries to lock all the barn
doors BEFORE the horse disappears.
Their work is preventive ~to a great
extent, because they
check to see that there -
are internal controls op-
erating for the protec-
tion of the Canal's fi- .
nancial interests, and t
recommend such con-
trols when necessary. .,
Another duty of the In-
ternal Audit Branch is
to detect possible fraud
or improper use of
Company -Government
funds or property. Its
work goes far beyond
the proverbial bank ex-
aminer who looks for ir-
regularities in the cash
box. Internal auditors
examine all the ac-
counts of the Company -
and Government. They
also audit financial statements, business
records, inventories, etc. Compliance
with established accounting policies is
checked, as is the settlement of all


dents, employee pay claims, deceased
employees' estates, postal losses and
damages, bonding company claims, and
contract claims. To investigate these
claims means that evi-
dence must be gathered
from many sources. Le-
gal and technical ques-
tions are refene~d to ap-
propriate authorities. In
the case of accident or
injury claims, every-
one-including witnes-
ses, supervisors, medi-
;cal personnel, police au-
thorities, and others in-
volved furnish infor-
mation, facts and opin-
ions which serve asa
basis for final adjudica-
tion of claims within
the Claims Branch. Cer-
tain types of contracts
are reviewed in ad-
vance, such as those
with consultants, or
those having unusual financial provi-
sions. Other contracts are reviewed rou-
tinely to determine that supporting doc-
uments are in accord with the contract.





claims for or against the Canal enter-
prise. All organizational units of the
Company-Government are audited to
determine if they are performing their
authorized functions
and whether the func-
tions are currently nec-
essary. This means that
Internal Audit person-
nel are apt to be seen
anywhere in any opera-
tion of the Canal and at
any time. This is espe-
cially true when they
are making surprise
cash audits of a Com-
pany-Government unit.
The audits made by the
SInternal Audit Branch
cut down on the vol-
ume of work to be done
by the General Ac-
counting Office Staff in
its annual audit in the
Canal Zone. The proce-
dures of the Internal
Audit Branch, which have been approv-
ed by the GAO, are published in a com-
prehensive manual which is updated
constantly to accord with conditions.


CLAIMS BRANCH


Tom Spencer, Claims Examiner, examines
a damaged shipment of batteries with B. C-
HlI ay Ipply icv osionand FladnkOCun-


Robert N. Bowen, Internal Auditor, makes a
procedures study with supervisor Duane M.
Pris. Thye obs srvis th norkb irnd


FEBRUARY 5, 196i0


--GENERAL AUDIT DIVISION~--


INTERNAL AUDIT

BRANCH I

































































THIE SKETCH above refers to the picture
in the center of the next page. Each person
identified by number,
1. John E. Fisher, Chief, Accounting Pol-
icies and Procedures Sta~ff; 2. Joseph C.
Turner, Treasurer; 3. Kathleen M. Mc-
Guigan, Administrative Offieer; 4. Thomas
H-. Scott, Chief Accountant; 5. Ralph K.
Skinner, Staff Assistant to the Comptroller;
6. Robert Lessiack, Acting Chief, Budget
and Rates Division; 7. Leroy B. Magnuson,
Acting Deputy Comptroller; 8. J. Patrick
Conley, Assistant to the Comptroller; 9.
Lawrnce L. Jenrich, General Auditor; 10.
Philip L. Steers, Jr., Comptroller; 11. Bertha
I. Frensley, Secretary.


I


I
S~t!
i.*r~
r*"P
r.
,I


t'.
r


THE COMPTROLLER of the Panama Canal Company, Philip
L. Steers, Jr., is one of three general officers who make
their headquarters in the Canal Zorfe. Above, right, he and
Acting Deputy Comptroller Leroy B. Magnuson inspect
the Cut-widening project with Project Engineer Charles
McG. Brandl.
Top, left, is the Comptroller's right-hand man, Deputy
Comptroller Arthur J. O'Leary, who was vacationing in
the States when this story was written.
At the left is a trio ~from the New York Accounting
Office. From left, they are: William H. Beck, Chief, Gen-
eral Accounting Branch; Winthrop H. Havenor, Assistant
Chief; and, seated, Peter DeStefano, Assistant Comptrol-
ler, New York.


On the next page are, from -left to right,
top row:
Daile D. Keigley, of the Reports and
Analysis Staff, who is discussing a chart
with Hubert Johnson, staff artist.
Elmer B. O~rr and Alice H. Roche, of
the Collection Section of the Agents Ac-
counts Branch,
Some of the personnel working on the
NCR posting machines of the Machine Ac-
counting Section.
Paul J. Coleman, Valuation Engineer of
the Plant Accounting Branch, with James
R. Doran, of the Supply Division's Store-
house Branch, appraising a D-8 tractor.
Arthur J. Wynne, recording expenditures
from the journal vouchers in the General
Ledger and Processing Branch.
H. E. Musselman, supervisor of the pro-
cessing section of the Payroll Section, and
Lucile Baer, payroll clerk, working on bi-
weekly paychecks.
Second row: A. B. Hendricks of the Rates
Branch, answering an inquiry about the
Panama Canal tariffs.
The typing pool of the Accounting Divi-
sion which serves all the branches of the
Division.


William B. Lloyd of the Budget Branch
and Nelson E. Wise, Budget and Projects
Coordinator of the Engineering and Con-
struction Bureau, discussing budget chan-
ges.
Third Row: The end of each month
indr a large group of former Panama Canal
employees, mostly residents of Panama,
picking up their retirement checks at the
Treasury Building in Ancon.
Gregory G. Cartotto of the Claims Branch,
interviewing Engineer Charlie N. Sam-
mons who- was injured recently when his
train was derailed by a landslide. W~aldron
E. Eldridge of the Gorgas Hospital staff,
center.
Lower left: M. B. Huff, Don Parr, and
Leo M. Favrot, of the Accounting Policies
and Procedures Staff, presenting an illus-
trated lecture to supervisors in the field.
Lower right: Gordon Thompson, fore-
man of the Marine Bunkering Section of
the Terminals Division explains gas pump-
ing procedures to Malcolm Wheeler and
Bill Grimes of the Internal Audit Branch,
who are checking to see if there are any
operations where shortages could possible
occur.


THE PANAMA CANAL FLEVIEW


















* f ~;~'t,~F~Ia*II~IC~! :F
*l.ri* Li~i
;;~P~Pi~p-s~$slrr---- ~PJE~; c-. f~


**
* i'l


REPORTS SECTION


COLLECTION SECTION


GENERAL LEDGER SECTION


PAYROLL SECTION


CLAIMS
BRANCH





INTERNAL
AUDIT
BRANCH


'~bC~ 'nlif,


I

C
i
c



i



;t
i


5 ~CI





























These are the machines: that prepare the bi-weekly paychecks issued by the Company-Governent.


.PAYROLL SECTION
DURING THE PAST fiScal year, the Pay-
roll Section deducted $5,530,000 from
the wages of the Panama Canal's em-
ployees for such miscellaneous items as
rent, hospital bills, milk bills, time pay-
ments, contributions to the United
Fund, savings bonds, electric current
and a number of other things.
Then to do a good job of it,
the Payroll Section deducted another
$6i,732,000 from these earnings for
statutory deductions like income tax, re-
tirement, and social security. The de-
ductions amounted to about 25 per cent
of the $47.5 million gross payroll.
Keeping track of the 1,306,000 de-
ductions and 415,000 paychecks should
be enough for anybody, but the em-
ployees of the Payroll Section did a lot
more than that. For example, they main-
tained the records on individual earn-
ings, rates of' pay, leave and retirement.
They issued monthly and yearly em-
ployee identification cards and provid-
ed addressagraph service for other units
of the Comptroller's Office. This amnount-
ed to more than 170 impressions per
employee for the year.
Many employees have three or four
rates of pay, and a few have as many as
six. This is because of differing rates for
day and night work, and additional pay
assignments for diving, handling explo-
sives, and jobs known as "dirty work."
And, finally, the Payroll Section is-
sued W-2 withholding forms to all
American citizen employees who pay in-
come tax in the Canal Zone the same as
in the United States.


:


Machine Operator Theodore Jemmott
processes data on the IBM machines.


FEBRUARY 5, 1960


ACCOUNTING


MACHINE ACCOUNTING
LOCATED IN the basement of the Admin-
stration Building is some of the elec-
trical punch-card "hardware" that in-
trigues most laymen. This is the IBM
equipment used in the Machine Ac-
counting Section.
These machines process, sort, check,
edit and compile data with great rapidi.
ty. Many jobs once handled manually
are now done by these machines to save
time and personnel.
The biggest job done for the Canal
organization on the IBM machines is
the merchandise accounting for the Sup-
ply Division. The! unit maintains a run-
ning inventory and control of merchan-
dise by individual retail stores, service
centers and the wholesale unit, and up-
dates balances daily for the Storehouse
Branch on 37,000 stock items. The cards
on which the data is punched are used
to print out reports at high speed to
keep) the bosses in every unit up to date
on their operations.
Every item of the thousands of pieces
of property owned by the Company-
Government is recorded on a card.
The machines also reconcile money
Orders as well as controlling and balan-
cing them. Plans are currently under
way to reconcile paychecks by electrical
hardware in the not too distant future.
This will require special checks, which
are now on order.
In addition to their 'other jobs, the
personnel of the Machine Accounting
Section maintain up-to-date statistics on
ships transits, and on tonnage by com-
modities.





DIVISION a

PLANT ACCOUNTING BRANCH r

THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING at Balboa Heights, not including improvements,
cost $1,390,019.79. Its life expectancy is 75 years. It is depreciated at the rate of ;;
$18,533.60 per year. This sort of thing is the business of the Plant Accounting Branch
which keeps track of everything owned by the Company-Government. It is this unit
which has placed the little metal tags on every piece of furniture in the office ivhere
you work. At the right, Frank J. Reilly, plant accountant, and Gerard J.e Welch,
evaluation engineer, study the blueprints of a new building to be addto plant -
accounts.



AGENTS ACCOUNTS BRANCH

ALTHOUGH MOST of the transactions of the Comptroller's Office are carried on during
office hours, one of these two men, S. Ross Cunningham or Ralph E. Harvey of the
Steamship Section of the Agents Accounts Branch, is on call at all times to answer
two questions about each ship awaiting transit.
One question is: "How much are the estimated tolls?" The other: "Has the agent
for this ship paid or guaranteed the payment of the tolls?" Until these questions are
answered, the ship cannot transit. During fiscal year 1959, the 11,110 transiting
ships paid tolls totalling $46.5 million.
This particular job is only one of many for the Agents Accounts Branch which also
pays all the bills and handles all the accounts receivable for the Canal organization.




REPORTS AND ANALYSIS STAFF


FREQUEiNTLY. FININcL-L QUE5jTIONS aljbpi abid, l-qiuie ieseaull It is oi-i of thle
funllctllons oif thie Rep~olts aind A~nalysi- staff to- pio?! de staitistical infonrm~tioni to
answe:tr thelse qucstlons~ Thc aIccoJunl~rtats oni th~is jtatt \la rf!. all statemenrlts of financial
operationS and conldltionis andl dc\ilop be~-tter meacns of pit -e nting Enaniai-eil infoaimai-
tion in the s -pol t- \r bich IIoi to) ofiesals aIt all le\ els Th,-I sta~ffs famnihaiti. w~ith these
statements enables~ theim to alnal ze lesu~lts ofI an\ sinle~t operatio- n A~t thei lighlt a'e
Johinni! \'aucihesl and C,11l Pa aki. sy stemsl acloun~tanr~tj.





GENERAL LEDGER AND PROCESSING BRANCH -

ALL OFr THlE Cl~mplicated work done by the Accounting Division requires a starting
polint. This star tillg point is the General Ledger and Processing Branch, the "nerve
cen~ltil" w\hlile financial transactions are prepared for entry in the "books."
Hele i--t lers .Ile mnade to the 4,000 activities accounts which are used in the basic
Cor-ml'any!-CJoverrement accounting system. Here, also, are prepared the financial re-
6 ~ponlts toJ 'l Ic~rle ls a management, including the Panama Canal Company's Board of
\ Due c~tors.
A~t the. left. Robe~lt L. Coffey, Donald J. Bowen, Branch Chief, Gilberto Young and
Jack It. Devr\rec .le studying a new form to be used in inventory control, another
~,~i;6~F~s~P 'resPon!Siblit\ of this4 Branch.


THE PANAMA CANTAL REVIEW








Fl TREASURY BRANCH
IF YOU HAVE trouble keeping one checking account balanced, think of the Treasurer
of the Panama Canal Company. He has seven checking accounts, on which he issues
more than 40,000 checks each month.
J. E. Steiner, shown in the picture at the left, is validating the payroll checks at
the rate of 3,300 per hour with a check-signing machine while Ruth J. Bain is making
out checks which are issued directly from the Treasurer's Office.
The Treasury Branch also keeps account of all postage stock, blank savings bonds,
Blank checks and railroad and other tickets, and operates a Safety Deposit Vault in
the Administration Building. And, should you lose the combination to your office
safe, call the Treasurer. He keeps track of those, too.





BUGE BRANCH ~ Alf

THE ORIGINAL eStimates of 45 Company-Government budget offcers for the 1961
budget wound up in a 212-page justification after the estimates were reviewed by
the Governor, Company Directors, and the Bureau of the Budget. All proposed
expenditures of the Company-Government are included in the budget.
At the right, Ralph R. Grassau- and John R. Gough of the Budget Branch are
preparing the budget for binding in book form. After Congressional Appropriation
Committee use, this will be condensed to nine pages in the Federal Budget.
Budget Branch personnel always think in terms of three budget years--the current
one and two years ahead. And while they were developing the 1961 budget they ;
were assisting in control of 1959 and 1960 budget allotments.



~~. RATES BRANCH

THE RATES BRANCH of the Comptroller's Office is responsible for determining the
amount to be charged for services which the Panama Canal Company furnishes to
its many customers, including shipping, government agencies and others. Included
are rates for medical services, rentals, transportation, utilities, stevedoring, tugs and
launches, tuition, and many other miscellaneous services.
These rates or tariffs are revised periodically, as new equipment or services become
available.
In the picture at the left, Elmer J. Nordstrom is making a check at the Balboa piers
to determine the rate which should be charged for stevedoring. T~he final rate will
cover the actual cost of the service performed.




;--ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES STAFF 181-' 2si

\\lIfRnE THERE IS mionie to alccuint for. cin t f~iciet Illethod of cnrol~tO is establijhed.
'Thile Is anI .accounltlng procedui~re for e\ei\ accounting job..- A partial list ofi the 3
;Itti\ aItls of this~ Iiprltanlt stalff of thet Comlptol.ler')S OfficeC w~Ould orange fr~om recomi-
mendaltionss for bl-tter cashi reIst~tels to impro\ed mieth~ods of mieteri ieaidrng. Th-is
staff aljo controlr aIccountlng folrms. such as ~ those for payloll deduc tion~s. retail stoic e
chalge sipj. e-tc. At the right are Necllir S. Holgersoni andl julian Al. Mlountatn of the
.Acco~untring Poliiess and P~roedules Staf~ wlthI PRubert Samnuelj and A~shton C. Phil-
Ports. mac hine operlatcoss .t the Corps Hospiltal accoun~tinig offiie.


FEBRUARY 5, 1960





Successful first year ends for the

CANAL ZONE CENTRAL EMPLOYMENT OFFICE


tral Employmnent O~flice's job was the
establishment of registers of eligibles
from which job applicants might be
selected. For the past year appointments
have been made from these registers,
Examinations are open continuously
for a wide variety of jobs. These ex-
aminations are scheduled on the basis
of anticipated personnel needs. Some of
the examinations are of the assembled
type, and some are reviews and ratings
of the applicants' educational, training,
and work experience records.
When job vacancies occur, the em-
ployees will be selected from among ap-
plicants who already have Civil Service
or Canal Zone Merit System status, or
from those who make the highest grades
on examinations.
Qualification standards for several
hundred jobs, ranging alphabetically
from "accountant" to "woodworking
machine repairman," had to be written.
The standards then were approved by
the Canal Zone Civilian Policy Co-
ordinating Board, which is composed of
representatives of the Company-Gov-
ernment organization, the Army, Navy,
Air Force, and the Caribbean Command.


A YEAR AGO last month, the doors of the
Canal Zone Central Employment Office
in Ancon were officially opened for the
first time. Located in one of the Person-
nel Bureau Buildings in Ancon, in space
formerly occupied by the Panama Canal
Central Labor ~Office, its establishment
marked the discontinuance of the Cen-
tral Labor Offiee and the abolishment of
the eligibility cards which for more than
20 years were a unique feature of the
Canal Zone employment systems.
Today the handpicked men and
women who make up the staff of this
office, which is headed by Otto W. Hel-
merichs, can look back on a year's work,
well done. In the little over twelve
months since the staff was assembled
from the Panama Canal's personnel of-
fice, and from the personnel offices of
other government agencies in the Canal
Zone, they have, among other things:
Announced examinations for approxi-
mately 300 separate jobs, which have
resulted in the establishment of 80 regis-
ters of eligibles;
Converted into the Canal Zone Merit
System (which is roughly comparable
to United States Civil Service) over


11,000 employees on the Company-Gov-
ernment rolls, and over 5,000 employees
from other United States government
agencies.
The Central Employment Office is
the operating agency of the Canal Zone
Civilian Policy Coordinating Board, an
inter-agency organization.
It is a clearing house for all job open-
ings in the Canal Zone.
One of the most important phases of
its work during the past year has been
the conversion to the Canal Zone Merit
System of the men and women in the
Canal organization. When the office was
opened last January, only those em-
ployees who held United States Civil
Service status were automatically con-
verted to the Merit System. There were
910 Company-Government employees
on the rolls at the time who held per-
manent Civil Service status and who
werea converted automatically. The re-
mainder of the force had to be handled
individually.
This meant that files had to be search-
ed, individuals interviewed, and data
assembled.
Another important phase of the Cen-


50 Years Ago
blEnIRERS OF- .1 BOARD Of OfficerS who
wrere to d.c-idr on what fortifications
\ioulld be nlrccssary for the Panama
Cajnal wetle Ippr..lrlted by the Secretary
of \\ar 5r: .s itac ago this month. The
Bord:~l. \r hic h Iincluded both Army and
Na<\ otheeFirrs. was.1 scheduled to visit the
Cana!l Zoneir for, arl on-the-spot inspec-
tionll bellow n-nAhln a decision.
The1r Canail Zl..we was losing a land-
mralk. ailrcar.ig old 50 years ago. Bids
ac~ri asked for thze demolition of the
griat hrorrel abovle Balboa Road, the
Folkc Dlengkr. bu~ilt in 1885 for, but
nlevelr oc~cuprird~ by, the Director of the
Frenrch Canaicl Colapany. Th'e big build_

Fn1110 i,%tll~lhato pta, a ,l rras-ka
for Colom~ibianr soldiers, and finally as a
qua~l~irtorine ,taltlriofor theGanal Zone.
2 ears Ago
C.IN.u. Zowr.F re thieil prylt ktlbooksl 25 years ago this
month aIs PI.jlesidt Roosevelt signed 'a


measure restoring full government sal-
aries. At the same time A. W. Goulet,
General M~anager of the Commissary
Division, predicted that commissary
prices would soar as a result of a rise in
the price of food in the United States.
Pork loin, for instance, which was sel.
ling here for about 13 cents per pound,
would probably go as high as 30 cents.
Because of the devaluation of the
dollar as a result of the abandonment
of the gold standard, Panama asked that
the-Canal annuity be paid in gold coin
or its equivalent in cheapened paer arid
returned the U. S. annuity check
A bill was sent to Congress toward the
end of the month which would establish
e uni orm syaF of maurn tnt f
Panama Cn l

10 Years A go
REORGANIZATION of the administration
of the Panama Canal was of main in-
terest 10 years ago as Presider;t Truman
sent to Congress alegislative program


which would authorize the transfer of
all functions of the operation and main-
tenance of the Canal and any related
business operation to the Panama Rail-
road Company, and changed the name
of that company to the Panama Canal
Company.
As a result of an executive order is-
sued by President Truman authorizing
the Governor to determine the internal
organization of the Panama Canal, Col.
Herbert D. Vogel, formerly Engineer of
Maintenance, was appointed the first
Lieutenant Governor of The Panama
Canal.
One 1Year A go
FEBRUARY 1959, w~as a busy month.
Cnalstraffie et adshort-livned record o
awarded for the $7 million Cut widen-
ing project and for the approximately
$1 million job of constructing the east
approach to the new high level bridge.
In compliance with treaty provisions, a.
basic wage scale became effective Feb-
ruary 22.


THE P.as ist.\ C.11TAL REVIEW


~ CANALrZ



H-IS`TORY








PROMOTIlONS


TRANSFERS


December 15 through january 15
Manuel A. Moreno, Guillermo Palacios,
Justino Rodriguez M., to Cement Fin-
isher.
George B, Babb, Laborer, from Supply Di-
vision, to Maintenance Division.
John W.isAcker, to Leader Maintenance
HEALTH BUREAU
Arturo A. Ellis, Nursing Assistant, Gorgas
Hospital, to Division of Preventive Med-
icine and Quarantine.
Ivan L. Janniere, from Admitting Service
Attendant, Gorgas Hospital, to Hospital
Attendant, Corozal Hospital.
Gorges Hospital
Mrs. Erna J. Irby, Mrs. Thelma H. Barrett,
Staff Nurse, Coco Solo Hospital, to
Gorgas Hospital.
Roy R. Clarke, from Shipment Clerk, Rail-
road Division, to Clerk.
Rein R. Parris, from. Waiter, Supply Divi-
sion Hotel Section, to Chauffeur.
John G. Rusnak, froin Sales Clerk, Supply
Division, to Laborer Cleaner.
Leroy Johnson, from Kitchen Attendant,
..Supply Division. to Laborer Cleaner.
MARINE BUREAU
Roly b. tiVesley, Thomas S. Clark, Jr., to
Th odore E. Brown, Justin J. Bonanno, to
David M. Kennedy, Edward J. Hughes,
Robert W. -Haff, Jr., Edward S. Mack
John F. Stoll, to Pilot-in-Training. '
Hugh S. Abednego, Edward Lindo, Wilfred
West, Manuel D. GBlvez, James E. Po-
mare, Napoleon Jones, to Launch Sea- :
man.
William E. Austin, Herbert E. Lynton,
;'i~askiff'E. ~Phithp~s, Reginald N. Small,
K nnet A. hAnthn ,o alstead C. Hodgson,
\\illiam E. Grant, Ira A. Taylor, Gran-
Isam, to Deckhand Boatswain,
Chanan Singh, from Dock Worker, Ter-
minals Division, to Deckhand, Naviga-
tion Division. .
Hector Ferni diez fomecL order,N Ma
tiort Division.
Industrial Division
Lionel Joseph, to Machine Operator.
R dofp R. Be~altty srm.Clerk, sutppaly -
vision
Benjamin Y. Denny, to Fireman.
H-oR rdrL. Clarke, Jr., to General Foreman
Sidney J. Tivey, to Painter.
Marcelino F. Gournet, Lenard A. Archbold,
Victor Hardy, Joseph E. Best, Frank A.
Shepherd, to Crarie flookman.
Locks Division
Robert J. Byrne, to Tour Leader Inter.
preter.
Reed E. Hopkins, Jr., from Firefighter, Fire
Division, to Towing Locomotive Op.
"erator.
Mrs. Elizabeth G. Washburn, Clerk-Dictat-
ing Machine Transcriber, Employment
and Utilization Division, to Office of the
Chief.


EMIPLOYEES who were promoted or
transferred between December 15 and
January 15 are listed blw. Wtin-
grade promotions and job reclassifica-
tions are not reported.
ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH
Joh aB Coffey, to Superintendent, Printing
CIVEL AFFAIRS BUiREAU 1
Paul L. Evans, to Customs Inspector.
Junie N. Scott, from Bookkeeping Machine
Operator, Payroll Branch, to Firefighter.
Division of Schools
Miss Elvira Jordan, to Junior Iligh Teacher,
and Visiting Teacher, Latin American
Schools.
Mrs. Emily R. Conklin, to Elementary and
Secondary School Teacher.
Herman R. Blackman, Laborer, Supply Di-
vision, to Laborer Cleaner.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
General Audit Division
Lawrence L. Jenrich, to General Auditor*
Albert M. Jenkins, to Chief, Internal Audit

Wila 1 Joyce, to Auditor, Internal Audit
Bac.Accounting Division
Mrs. Stella R. Alderton, to Stenograiphic
and Typing Unit Supervisor.
Edward J. Lucas, from Auditor, General
Audit Division, to Accountant.
Mrs. Myrtle M. Jones, Clerk-Typist, Supply
Division, to Accounting Division,
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR-
PRESIDENT
Mrs. Eleanor H. McIlhenny, to Publica-
tions Editor, Panama Canal Information
Office.
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUC-
TION BUREAU
Engineering Division
Wesley H. Townsend, to Supervisory Gen-
eral Engineer.
Domingo Marcelino, to Maint nance an.k
Mrs. Eucaris E. Carranza, from Cr-
Typist, Community Services Division, to
Varitypist.Deg iv

Guillermo E. Iri arren,isfrnm OLaborer
Cleaner, Electrical Division, to Oier.
Edilberto M. Solis, from Laborer, Locks

Jerea A. Gr n, CreilFairclough, Ira G.
Barber, to Rope and Wire~ Cable Work r
Howard Tettenburn, Pipefitter, from Ra l
road Division, to Dredging Division.
Electrical Division
Wade Huffman, Jr., to Central Offce Re-
pairman.
Miss Sara E. Ayala R., to Clerk (Typing).
Paul R. Furr, to Chief, Power Plant (Hydro-
Gatun)-
Maintenance Division
Euclid C. Jordan, William P. Escoffery,
. Laborer, from Supply Division to Main-
tenance Division.
Goldburn P. Maynard, to Supervisory Clerk.


Di6genes Torres G., Isidro S~nchez, Adria-
no Navalo, Marco Lee, from Dock Work-
er, Terminals Division, to Laborer.
Luciano Villarreal, Laborer, from Commu-
nity Services Division, to Locks Division,
PERSONNEL BUREAU
Miss Marcela C. de la Guardia, to Clerk-
.Dcatn Macixh to hcrier, Employ-
Edmund L. Toppin, to File Clerk.
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Leon S. Will, to Milk Products Plant Man-
ager, Supply Division.
Miss Mavis I. Bushell, Miss Myrtle D. New-
man, Miss Germaine I. Punnett, Miss
Alice M. James, Curtis B. Parnther, to
Clerk-Typist.
Filomeno Pascual, Laborer, from Gorgas
`Hospital to Community Services Divi-
sion.
Antonio Cedeiio, Laborer, from Commu-
nity Services Division to Supply Division.
Mlanuel Bernal, Juan A. V. Platero, Carlos
McFarlane, to Meat Packager.
Howard Harriot, Edward M. Phillips, Jr.,
Mitso Sssh L.Ha kis, to Food Service

Rupr s. Knht, from High Lift Truck
Operator, Terminals Division, to Labor-
er, Supply Division.
Cuth~bert C. Butcher, Ivan R. Evering, to
Stock Control Clerk.
.James E. Jones, Howard E. Bryant, to
Warehouseman,. .
Lionel A. McDonald, to Flame Scrap
Cutter.
Brau IS etiParker, to Waiter Captain,
George F. Earle, to High Lift Truck
Operator.
Godfrey A. Martin, to Meat Cutter Assist-
Bat.
Jose F. Butler, to Laborer.
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Motor Transportation Division
Freeland R. Hollowwell, from Motorcycle
Private, Police Division, to Automotive
Machinist.
Gu levoRias,AE'ric )A. Brow ,a Cril A.
William K. Marks, to Leader Electrician.
Earl Smith, Laborer, Supply' Division, to
Auto otiv Eq uipment Ske pieman.

Michael A. Shan, Lloyd B. Joseph, to Ac-
counting Clerk.
Terminals Division
Thomas W. Drohan, from Guard, Locks.
Security Branch, Marine .Bureau, to.
Supervisory Cargo Assistant.
Amariz Camarena, Wilfred Drumonds, .to
Carpenter.
Adriano Aguilar, Santiago Borbua, to High
Lift Truck Operator.
Oscar Aguilar, to Laborer.
Irl R. Sanders, Jr., to General Foreman
Dock Maintenance.
(See page 22);


FEBRUARY 5, 196(1


AND





(


__


ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH
Vivian E. Johnson
~Clerk
OFFICE OF THE COMP-
TROLLER
Gertrude M. AL~illoy
Voucher Exammner
Clarence W. Ward
Clerk
ENGINEERING AND CON-
STRUCTION BUREAU
Alfred Myers
Warehouseman
Gerald J. Jerome
Leader Laborer
Cyril A. Warren
Launch Operator
Priestly L. Alleyne
Leader Seaman
Pascual Villegas
Seaman


James A. Green
Seaman
H~untley S. Phillips
Leader Sandblaster
John P. Montgomery
Watchman
HEALTH BUREAU '
Ebenezer A. James
Motor Vehicle Dispate
MARINE BUREAU
A. R. Morrison ,
Cleik
Teobaldo L. Archbold
Leader Seaman
Carlos A. Barreto
Leader Laborer
Guillermo Caballero
Helper Lock Operator
Byron D. Eastman
Clerk
N. R. Salamanca
Leader Laborer


Reginald L. Worrell
Asphalt or Cement Worker
Harry B. Clark
Clerk
Stanley A. Donalds
Toolroom Attendant
Joseph Clarke
Helper Machinist
DvdA. Branford
erMillman
LY ND COMMUNITY
S VICE BUREAU
aB. Gordon

James P. Forbes
High Lift Truck Operator
Herbert E. Atherton
Leader Laundry Worker
Iris Af. McNeil
Laundry Checker
Buenaventura Gaona
Cattle Attendant


Edgard 1E. Dra~yton
Stockman
Ivan V. Butler
Leader Laborer
Clifford I,. Green
Leader Laborer
Martin L. Richarls.
Chief Pantryman
John S. Lyons
Clerk Checker
H ANS O 1A1ION AND
Clerk
TERMINALS BUREAU
Arthur E. Richards
Truck Driver
Joseph A. Richards
Chauffeur
Ivan A. Hyacinth
Clerk
Ivanhoe A. Wilson
Water Service Clerk


OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR-
PRESID~ENT
Forrest G. Dunsmoor
Administrative Assistant to
Governor-President and
Deputy Executive Secretary
CIVEL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Elsie Z. Halliwell
Elementary and Secondary
School Teacher
ENGINEERING AND CON-
STRUCTION BUREAU
E. M. Browder, Jr.
Assistant Director
Samuel H. Blenman
Meteorological Aid
Carlos Nufiez '
Leader Seaman
Nathaniel A. Adams .
Leader Laborer
Clayton E. Clarke

Thpe erm ydro
andie c
Luis Fier

Fernando n

Randolph ey
Roofer
HEALTH BUREAU
Winifred W. Gray
Hospital Attendimt
Samuel A. Hoyte
Hospital Attendant
Harry A. Dunn
Supervisory Medical
Technologist
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Eanuel O. Moore

Concepci6n Cabrera
Milker
G. Leroy Cockburn
Clerk
Agnes D. Sherewood
Seamstress
TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Carlos Diaz
Clerk Checker
THE PANAMA bANAL REVIEW


OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR- Rupert V. Arthur
PRESIDENT Leader Laborer Highway
Sherman C. Brooks Mitnne
Constable George H1. Wade
Oiler
ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH John N. Prince
Jerry W. Detamore Helper Electrician
Forms Development Control W~ibur B.Fall
Management Analyst Welder
Francisco Penalosa
CIVEL AFFAIRS BUREAU Laborer
Mildred A. McMahon Vivian E. Wilson

Eloo PTe chereodr JosB D or~n
Mildred S. Rowe Helper Electrician
Substitute Teacher Eugenio D. C. Jones
Alberta Tonge Helper Electrician
Bathhouse Attendant Abner, E. Smart
Fred E. Perra Laborer
Detective Sergeant Joseph M. Watson
Rexford R. Inniss Supervisory Administrative
Clerk Serie A sstn
Samuel R. Prince Cecil A. G lesitat

OFFIC e THE COMP- P lelpGarFa RoeSder
TROLLER Navg it-
Harry E. Musselman nn n
Time, Le:ave and Payroll And!er~son aci
SupervisorGera pe
Alice M. Stewart Edward
ClerkLan an
Wentworth E. Ennis Burnett Garero
Bookke~eping Machine Op- Rock Crushing Plant
erator Operator
Leslie M. Spencer Thomas McGowan
Accountant Laborer
ENGINEERING AND CON- Alfred A. Bonnick
STRUCION BREAUClerk
STRUTIO BUEAU Sherman A. Hammond
Auswal H. Edward .Public Works General
Engineering Survey Aid Foreman
Thomas J. Dee arcos Reinaz

Wife r. ectnrica Oc avi Ea Benitez
Lioe rE. Fardin IOlr
Leader Crater and Packer HEALTH BUREAU
Rupert A. Phillips Allen T. H-amlin
Painter Clerk
Frank F. Chase Aston C. Philpotts
Painter Clerk
Edostido Andrades Winston O. Thomas
Palancaman Nursing Assistant
giv e.E e ynure i Gu Illermo L. Dixon
Julian F. Scott Ivan S. Johnson
Helper Electrician Warehouseman


Carmelo Torrente
Pest Control Laborer
Clarence Wedderburn
Chauffeur
James A. Braid
Supervisory Dental Technician
Allan A. Spencer
Pest Control Leader Laborer
Joslin J. Soares
Laborer
Louise E. Griffon
Secretary
MARINE BUREAU
Mary L. Peterson
Head Nurse, Emergency
Room
Aurelio Yeaza
Helper Office Machine
Repairman
JosephT. Mconald
Alfred E. Ferdinand

JameE Phillips
Charles A. Hand
Chief Engineer, Towboat or
Ferry
Edward B. Callomn
Clerk
Ralph G. Small
Carpenter
Zephaniah C. Rowe
Leader Seaman
Archibald A. Jardine
Clerk
George L. Brown
Helper Pipefitter
Leslie Dixon
Helper Machinist
Claude A. Smith
Launch Operator
Ne esi oRodriguez

Vincent D. Ridge
Ch ef F remain Shipwright and
Ei Del Raster
Elgio Te io
Helper Lock Operator
Beresford A. Boyce
Helper Rigger
Mari rGriffith
George R. Williams
Toolroom Attendant
(See page 20)


ANNIVERSARIES








SAFETY


Groping around in the dark Lvhether
it's on the job or at home could result
in a personal black out-it could even be
a permanent onel Use a light. You'll get
the job done, whatever it is, quicker
and safer.


__ __


THIE ACCOMPANYING picture could be
that of a pilot in the dark falling down
the 14 steps of a ladder to a ship's bridge
-or it could be that of a Canal seaman
falling down a lower deck elevator well
on a blacked-out aircraft carrier, which
recently transited the Canal on the way
to a scrap yard (both accidents actually ;
happened in December)-or it could be
that of a housewife groping around in a
blacked-out bedroom on the floor of
which Junior has left a softball, a bat


and a pair of skates.

Falls kill more than 20,000 Amer-
icans each year. Falls in public places,
account for about 3,800 deaths while
'about 5,000 are killed by falls on the
j6j:b.In case you are one of .those who
thinks that once you get through the
front door at home you're as safe as
money in the bank, hold your hat! Mor~e
than 1l1,00)0 fatal falls happened in
bedrooms.


FIRST AI D DISABLI NG
CASES INJURIES
,59 '58 '59 '58
252 180 13 8
2,795 4,018 160 121


Manuel D. Jiminez
Oiler
Benjamin U. Oglivie .
Oiler
Edwin F. Baptiste
Helper Rigger
Kenneth E. Eversley .
Helper Fipefitter
Efrain A. Spaing
: Painter
Alfred C. Goodridge .
Maintenanceman
Bolivar Gordon
Helper Lock Operator ~
Vivian E. Bonus
Helper Lock Operator
Adolphus J. Cole
Helper Machinist -
M. Juan Gonzitlez
Clerk
Albert A. Stewart
Seaman
Felipe Roman
Painter
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Jos6 C. Prado
Laborer
Reginald B. Smith
LTrc oDrier
Laborer
Nicanor Torres
Laborer
Ena M. Elliott
Counter Attendant


Anniversaries 20 Years
(Continued from page 18)
Jos6 Matias Ramos
Laborer
Edna Small Joseph
Clerk
Winston M. Haye
Leader Warehouseman
Paul H. Anklete
Clerk
Ashton A. Brooks
Laborer
Jorge E. Evers
Laborer .
George Chambers
Truck Driver
Gabriel Mendoza
Laborer
E. E. McAllister
Retail Store Sales Checker
Albertha L. Martin
Retail Store Sales Checker
Alberto P. McClaren
Warehouseman
Verona Grant
Sales Clerk
Arthur B. Boyd
Washman
Marcelino Martinez
Laborer
George W. Anderson
Stockman
TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Alfred J. Laird
Helper Locomotive Engineer
Fblix ]R. Inocente
Laborer


Kenneth L. Reid
Clerk
Cyril J. Myers
Chauffeur'
A. Pablo Reyes
Painter
William W. Campbell
Clerk Checker
Leonard A. Roberts
Laborer
Nathan N. Mosley
Chauffeur
McDonald Sealey
Clerk
Andreas Nicolaisen
Liquid Fuels Dispatcher
Victor P. Baque
Brakeman
Julio Dixon
Truck Driver
Sidney Crawford
Maintenanceman
Canute S. Cockburn
SClerk
Ferdinand E. Wynter
Clerk Checker
W~orden E. French
Lead Foreman Fuel
Operations
Claudio Gil
ETracok abiorer
Laborer
Richard Davy
Laborer
William J. Douglas
Brakeman


2Pr .. : FEBRUARY .5,~ 1960


"LET THERE BE LIGHT"


ACC I DEN TS



THE MONTHS

AND

TH#E YEAR


DECEMBER

ALL UNITS
YEAR TO DATE





WITH THE EXCEPTION of ship traffic,
all Canal records were broken during
the second quarter of fiscal year 196i0,
official figures compiled at Balboa
Heights revealed last month.
The amount of cargo carried through
-the Canal, the size of the ships making
the transit from ocean to ocean, and the
tolls paid to the Panama Canal Com-
pany during that period all reached the
highest figures in Canal history.
The apparent paradox of less ships
but more cargo was attributed to the
increase in the size of the ships passing
through the waterway during the three-
~month period. Super ships such as the
Sinclair Company's Petrolore and the
'San Juan Merchant, which transited
during this period, were among the
largest cargo vessels ever to use the Pan-
d1rha Canal.
'lThe average tolls of the 2,613 com-
merc~ial ships which transited the Canal
\rncl $4,949, the highest in Canal
hiistoi y.
A-lthough the size of the cargo ships
uring the Canal has been increasing
dulrlrg the past few years, this growth
\\ is more noticeable recently because
oi thea large number of ore carriers be-
tweencl the west coast of South America
andt United States east coast ports.
Larlge iron ore shipments, which in
December alone reached a total of
5015.t000 long tons, are the result of the
Iircenlt steel strike which prevented the
rnalor U. S. steel companies from build-
ing~ uip their usual winter stock piles of
ort. Since ice- has: closed the shipping
arterlies through the Great Lakes, iron
ore mlust now be brought up from the
Souith American mines in larger quan-

Carlgo figures for the second three
moc.nths of the fiscal' year also revealed
an nrlcrease in the number of banana
shll'ments through the Canal, with ba-
nana cargo reaching a record monthly
ar en alge of 100,000 long tons.
The development of the Ecuadorian
banlana plantations in recent years, the
absence of an appreciable number of


destructive wind storms and an increas-
ed demand from the European market
for bananas account in part for the big
movement of bananas. Although a major
part of this fruit is on its way to the
United States, many tons are now ship-
ped directly to European ports. During
L~the past ten years, bariana shipments
through the Canal have increased from
481,000 to 1,093,000 long tons per year.
Unless some unforeseen factor occurs,
shipping experts predict that banana
shipments should continue to be an im-
portant cargo carried through the Canal
during the rest of the fiscal year.
While iron ore and bananas are on
the upsurge, the movement of heavy
fuel and diesel oils from, the West to the
East coast of the United States decreas-
ed slightly following several months of
heavy activity. This drop marked the
close of a period during which the sur-


plus of residual oil stocks on the West
Coast was shipped to the east.
Crude oil movement from Venezue-
lan oil fields to the U. S. West Coast
may also drop during coiingS mionlths as
a result of the Federal restriction on oil
imports and the recent ruling which
puts Canadian crude oil on the. U. S.
domestic market without a quota.
Wheat shipments from the U. S. West
Coast to European ports were down to
their lowest level in many years during
the second quarter period and no im-
mnediate increase was foreseen by ship-
pers.
Sugar was off slightly so far as Pan-
amaa Canal shipping figures were con-
cerned although sugar shipments, as
usual, moved north and south, part go-
ing from Cuba to Japan arid part from
H-awaii and the Philippines to the U. S.
East Coast.


OCEAN-GOING TRANSITS
THROUGH PANAMA CANAL


1ooo
N
u
900 M
E






600N



I
so


I I I I I I I I I I I I1.
JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JA\N FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
MoNTHs


TurE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW






CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT

Second Quarter, Fiscal Year
Avg. No.
1960 1959 Transits
19st-ss
Atlantic Pacific Ttl Ttl Ttl

Pacific Atlantic
Commercial Vessels:
gOe nging_ -,----- _--~ 140 1,3 2, 21 2, 72 1,7
Small*_~-------~-------------_ ------ 10 21 2
Total commerciaL .. ..____~ 1,517 1,330 2,847 2,599 2,041
U. S. Government vessels ** -
Ocean-going...___~----_-~ 29 .. 2 14 43' 52 148
Small*__- ---- ,--- -.-. _. 27~ 26 53 71 71
Total U. S. Government ... ._ 56 ..40 96 123 219

Total commercial and U. S. '
Government.. ... ._____. 1,573 1,370 2,943 ~2,722 2,260
*Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
**Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to- July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.



PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES SHIPPED THROUGH THE CANAL

Pacifice to Atlaintic

(All cargo fiures in long tons)
SSecond Quarter, Fiscal Year
Commodity 16199 Average
1951-55
Ores, various .. .. .. .. ... 2,350,6581 1,827,319 1,033,433
Lumber .. ........... 672,451 874,585 880,696
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt). 620,637 435,198 149,132
Barley. ..... 570,779 447,757 23,873
Bananas ...........:.. 301,809 265,696 199,495
Canned foodl products 282,351 300,176 327,338
Metals, various .. ........ 226,370 271,009 184,663
WVheat. ..... ... 218,276 322,682 439,626
Nitrate of soda. 214,165 268,897 327,635
Sugar ..210,201 324,167 205,431
Food p~roducts' in refriuitgeration (except fresh 17:5 6,4 2,6

Fertilizers unclassifled 1. 124,558 49,043 3,244
Iron and steel manufactures. 100,371 100,954 47,896
Coffee. ....... 96,374 97,241 55,757
Pulpwood and products .94,293 89,094 46,525
All others .......... 1,;114,105 1,136,724 739,978
Total. .. . .1 7,371,450 6,972,691 '4,790,382

A4tlantic to Pacific

ISecond Quarter, Fiscal Year


SAILINGS
FROM CRISTOBAL,
Ancon.. .. .. ... .. .. ..February 3
Cristobal.. ... .. ... .. February 13
Anconz. ... ... .. ... .February 20
FROM NTEWl YORK
Cristobal ..............February 5
Aincon. ..... February 11I
Cristobal.. ... .. .. .. February 24



Promotions dnd Transfers
(Continued from ~page '18)
Juan A. Loaiza, Laborer Cleaner, from Di-
vision of Schools, to Terminals Division.
Arcadio Castillo, Oscar Castrellon, Efria-
nos Rivera, to Ship Worker,
OTHER PROMOTIONS
PROMOTIONs which did not involve
changes of title follow:
Harry C. Egolf, Housing Project Manager,
Community Services Division.
Mrs. Gloria E. Aponte, Staff Nurse, Coco
Solo H~ospital.
Mrs. Cordellia B. Hall, Clerk-Typist, Ac-
counting Division.
Joseph A. Bialkcowski, Admeasurer, Naviga-
Robr on D s ngelke, Supervisory Admin-
istrative Services Assistant, Dredging Di-
vision.
Robert D. Donaldson, Jr. Edward H.
Allen, Mechanical Engineer, Engineer-
ing Division.
.Wayne H. Nellis, Electrical Engineer, En-
gineering Division.
Thomas G. Toda, Graduate Intern Sanitary
Engineer, Engineering and Construction
Bureau.
Ishmael Bailey, Reuben S. Cohen, Guard,
Police Division.
Bramwell N. Lewis, Laborer, Division of
Schools.
Miss Ninfa R. Ponce, Clerk-Tyrpist, Canal
Zone Employment Office.
Howard B. Harrison, Lead Foreman,

Alforedg g iv ioG orge A. Grant, Albert
Kelly, Edwin E. Dorsett, Ephraim C.
Johnson, Vernon B. Smikle, Louis Ge-
late, Timekeeper, Locks Division.
Arthur W. Davis, Carpenter, Electrical Di-
V1s10H.
Louis Brownie, Laborer, Supply Division.
Rudesindo Espinosa, E. G. Braithwaite,
Harold F. Mandeville, Rupert Jordan,
Ferdinand A. Thompson, Telephone In-
strument Repairman, Electrical Divi-
sion.
Other T. Brownlee, Lead Foreman, Main-
tenance Division.
Rafael Jovane, Timekeeper, Terminals Di-
vision.
Henry Clayton, Rodolf Courtney, Painter,
Industrial Division.
Samuel D. Toppin, Cyril V. Atherton,
Leader Maintenanceman, Navigation Di-
vision.
.Kenneth Wade, Clerk, Navigation Division.
Vivian M. Stewart, Helper Machinist, In-
dustrial Division.
Miss Edna N. Arjona, Clerk-Typist, Offce
of General Manager, Supply Division.
Alvin H. Hassock, Phillip W~Silliams, Clerk,
Locks Division..


I I


Commodity


Average
1951-55
901,706
594,946
14,645
128,551
415,441
: 181,170
70,788
133,683
44,132
97,333
17,259
S89,389
26,711
S68,824
1,222,163
4,006,741


1960


1959


1.928,383
976,592
696,803
340,767
327,614
307,422
152,014
131,812
122,682
109,398
106,688
105,377
881994
84,546
84,421
1,195,762


1,484,554
821,163
46,539
327,183
388,693
289,397
83,566
111,514
119,400
86,475
14,777
79,516
78,984
64,084
66,129
1,240,666


Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt).
Coal and coke ............
Metal, scrap ... _
Soybeans .
Iron and steel manufactures. ..
Phosphates. ......
Cotton, raw .. .. ....
Sugar ....
Chemicals, unclassified.
Paper and paper products. ....
Ores, various .. ....
Sulphur .. .....
Wheat .
Automobiles and parts. ...
Bauxite. .......
All others .
Total . .. .


6,759,275 5,302,640


FEBRUARY 5, 196j0









RE TIR EMEN TS

RET1REMENT CertifiC~teS were presented
at the end of January to the following
employees who are listed alphabetically
below, together with their birthplaces,
positions, years of Canal service, and
their future addresses:

Dionisio Arrocha, Gatun, C. Z.; Laborer,
Community Services Division; 15 years,
1 month, 3 days; Colon, R. P.
Roget Belmont, Martinique; Laborer, Com-
munity Services Division; 33 years, 9
months, 26 days; San Miguel, R. P.
BisT armiknaBsFin,isama ca, Doc kWo er,

Li or oa O.Caite ueblo Nuevo, R. P.;
Laborer, Community Services Division;
15 years, 8 months, 7 days; Chilibre, R.P.
Montague E. Carter, Barbados; Clerk,
Housing Branch, Community Services
Division; 43 years, 8 months, 7 days;
Panama, R. P.
Charles E. Creary, Jamaica; Laborer Clean-
er, Supply Division; 42 years, 7 months,
13 days; will remain on Isthmus.
Thomas Daley, Montserrat; Helper Liquid
Fuels Wharfmnan, Terminals Division; 12
years, I day; Colon, R. P.

- 'ati Doad J a mD i 9Ia oer C m5

Earl A. Dyer, Washington, D. C.; Print-
ing Plant Superintendent; 21 years, 9
months, 19 days; San Fernando Valley,
Calif-
Hilario Hern~ndez, San Juan de Pequenes,
R. P.; Boatman, Dredging Division; 22
years, 7 months, 5 days; Panama, R. P.
Mateo Jaramillo G., Natit, R. P., Deck-
hand Boatswain, Navigation Division; 39
Lu ars, m nths, 13 da s; Pa ,Fr, R. P
man Cleaner, Community Services Divi-
sion; 43 years, 28 days; Colon, R. P.
Hfelen E. King, Greensburg, Pa.; Nurse
Supervisor, Health Bureau; 30 years, 2
months, 19 days; St. Petersburg, Fla.
los6 N. M~rquez, Arraijin, R. P.; Industrial
Tractor Operator, Community Services
Division; 34 years, 10 months, 27 days;
Panama, R. P.
john J. McCalla, Spanish Town, Jamaica;
Sales Section Head, Supply Division; 30
years, 4 months, I day; Kingston,
Jamaica.
Jacinto de los Rios, Pueblo Nue~vo, R. P.;
Laborer, Community Services Division;
14 years, 10 months, 5 days; Panama,
R. P.
Ernesto Rodriguez B., Panami; Laborer,
Community Services Division; 31 years,
6 months, 2 days; Panama, R. P.
Manuel Ruiz, Chitre, R. P.; Laborer, Com-
mut 2S~e vce PD vsin;R.3 years, 1
Juli~n Saldaila G., Calobre, R. P.; Laborer
Commuhrdty9 dervicesaDivision; Pl9 years,

Hinginio Salazar, Colon, R. P.; Laborer,
Atlantic Branch, Locks Division; 39
years, 11 months; Colon, R. P.
Clevelimd B. Wilson, Gatun, C. Z.; Truck
Driver, Motor Transportation Division;
27 years, 3 months, 28 days; Panama,
R. P.


MONTHLY COMMERCIAL' TRAFFIC AND T'OLLS
'Vessels of 300 toris net or over
(Fiscal years)


CANAL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC BY NATIONALITY

( Second Quarter, Fiscal Year


.


Nationality



British & Can.
Chilean. ..
Chinese .
Colombian ..
Cuban .. .
Danish. .
Ecuadorean .
French. ...
German .
Greek ....
Honduran. .
Israel. .
Italian .. .

Netherlands .
N caragaan .
Pna aian .

Spanish. .
Swedish .
United States .
All other. .
Total. .


~


TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TIRADE ROUTES
The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:


Second Quarter, Fiscal Year
Avg. No.
1960 1959 Transits
___1951-55
136 139 162
710 594 427
102 94 143
450 345 257
53 47 55
262 259 160
261 245 116
86 93 80
572 556 374

2,632 2,372 1,774


United States Intercoastal ...... .
East Coast of U. S. and South America. .
East Coast of U. S. and Central America ..
East Coast of U. S.-and Far East .....
U. S./Canada East Coast and Australasia. .
Europe and West Coast of U. S./Canada. ..
Europe and South America. .. ..
Europe and Australasia .........
All other routes .............

Total traffic .


Tolls
(In thousandsof dollars)


Transits


Month


Average
1959 Tolls
usi]-5s
$3,681 $2,432
3,664 2,403
3,357 2,431
3,718 2,559


3,907 2,588

4,179 2,672
4,035 2,528


$21,729 $21,730
$45,529 $29,969


Avg. No.
Transits
1951-55
557
554
570
607


608
599


1959

767
777
717
806




830
897
859


1960

$4,219
4,111
3,828
3,820
440


July. .. .. .. .. 888
August .. .. .. 888
September .. .. ... 823
October .. .. 853



FMeraryh .
April . . .
M ay. . . .
June . . .
Totals for first 6 mnh
of fiscal year . 5,231
Totals for ~fiscal year. .


4,633 3,455
9,718 7,062


$24,522


1960
Tons
of
cargo
2,034,341
135,607
86,219
88,624
1,208
360,389
27,605
135,920
858,440
462,209
64,071
1,899
278,313

537,259

1,7 6, 2

44,071
342,983
2,849,691
165,147
14,130,725


1959 1951-55
Num- Tons Average Average
her of of number tons of
transits cargo transits cargo
311 1,713,382 301 1,874,647
26 137,352 11 66,740
12 86,163 6 3,3
71 99,796 38 4,2
10 1,324
85 284,753 58 213,240
9 13,794 36 24,934
41 149,622 33 147,569
236 624,935 44 92,509
23 198,621 26 219,932
31 53,039 96 120,854

38 195,550 36 185,937

86 464,503 32 151,485

22 1,0 2,27 196 44
95 3 434 115 60,1

18 73,029 8 40,812
52 216,988 43 175,551
476 2,707,494 539 3,225,627
35 118,603 36 134,312
2,372 12,275,331 1,774 8,797,124


Num-
ber of
transits
337
25
15
66
7
107
15
36
323
50
53
11
44

104
2


11
866
489
48
2,632


r










r








I


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW























*Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and small.
interest on both sides of the Isthmus.
In addition to the Alndes and the
Nienlw Amsterdam, vessels making spe-
cial winter visits to -the Ceanal ur Feb-
ruary are the'Einpress' of England, Stella
Polaris and Ariadne, all due Fe~bruary 7;
the Italia of the Home Line and the Yiar-
mouth from Miami on February 8; the
Bremen ori February 14; the Hanseatic
and Ocean Monarch on February 16;
the Mauretania, February 17; the
Homeric and Statendam on February
18; the Ar~iadne, on her second trip, on
February 27 and the Empress of Eng-
land, due February 28, also on her sec-
ond trip for thei nionth.
Barley for Poland
A FULL BULK CARGo of barley destined
for Poland -was brought through the ~
Panamaa Canal January 28 aboard the
supertanker Pe~nn Challenger, the new-
est of four big tankers built in (San Fran-
cisco by the Bethlehem-San Francisco
Shipyard for the Penn Shipping Com-
pany of New York. Making hei- maiden
voyage from. Portland, Oregon, the new


$10,500,000 vessel loaded barley instead
~of petroleum products for hei* inaugural
trip. The tanker is' 6651 feet long writh a
90-foot beam and a de th :of 4~ 5Feet.
liemean carry .5(,,549e brrels1o p tro-
At the Canal, where she is represented
byPayne and ~Wardlaw, she was dock-
edat Cristobal to take on bunkers.
Barge Overhaul
.THREE TEN-TON. bulkheads, manufac-
tured by ~the Industrial Division ~in Cris-
tobal, were. eing fitted mnto a~ 1,000-
'yard Dredging Division barg~e last
month at the Industrial Division docks
;where the barge was undergoing its
regular 'fouir-year overhaul. The old
.bulkheads, which had rusted out, ijvere
being replaced by, the new ones, each
lifted into- place by a 35-ton dirydock
crane. The barge, one of 14 belonging
to the Dredging.Division, is use~d thi the
Canal for hauhng, dredged material-
1,000 yard at a clip.
New Job
THE INDUSTRIAL DIVISION, which h can
and does tack~lle alrriost any type .of job,
is now engaged in ~the manufacturer of
24 rising stem gate vralves whch will be
used in 1961 as re-plaLrcmets during the
regular looks overhaul .at Gatun. The
material for all 24 valves was assembled
here early this year and work on the pro-
-ject was started in April. At present
seven of the valves are nearing coniple-
tion in the Boiler and Shipfitter Shop in
Cristobal. These, the first: rising stem
gate valves to be manufactured on the
Isthmus, wiUl replace valves which have
been in use at Catun since the Locks
were built.


TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING
VESSELS IN DECEMBER
1968
Commercial. . . .... 7)3
U. S. Government. .. .. 18
Total. ... .. .. 811


TOLLS "
Commercial. ....$3,683,959
U. S.Government. 93,.141
TotatAR ..3,777, 100
CR (long tos)
Commercial. .. .. '4,107,949
U. S. Government. 90,590
Total.. ... 4,197,639


$4,422,807
83,538
$4,506,345
5,249, 477
82,755
5,332,232


1Whenever there are tourists around-and there were
plenty~ of them last month and a good many more coming.
this month, as we reported albove-cameras are always in
great evidence. Here a visiting hutterbug from the cruise
ship Empress of England snaps pictures of iome: fellow
passengers. A little later one of the~ gifs tool; photographs.
A camera addict can easily have' a~Iel,8d day watching the
equipment carried by the visitors. ,It ranges from simple
box cameras to the most complicated imported models.


~ 'EjBARURY 5, 19680


S HII PP I


N\


G~


Scientists on Schooner
THE GRACEFUL auxiliary schooner, Mary
Tyson, which wyas a familiar sight at the
Cristobal Yacht Club for many months
las ear, has bedn recodto ned c ~ t
Cristobal sometime this month writ a
group of young scientists on board who
are on their way around the world on a
scientific expedition. The vessel, no~w
named the Collegiate Rebel, was to sail
from Tampa harbor February 2 wit W.
H. Stuart, a Washmngton State graduate
and six other students on board.
Master of the ship is George H. Con-
no~lly of Grand Cayman, an oldtime
windjamnmer skipper who will command
the green crew on the world circling ex-
pedition. After leaving the Canal, the
schooner will start off across the Pacific
for the Caroline Islands where it will be
joined by Dr. Harvey A. Miller, assist
ant professor of botariy at Miami Uni-
versity. The Collegiate Rebel was built
in the 1920's and as the Mary Tyson has
been around the world several times,
.Cruise Month
FEBRUrARY probably is the peak cruise
month on the Isthmus with visits ex-
pected from. in least 12 well-known
cruise vessels between February 3, when
the Royal Mail's air-conditioned Andes
arrived -on a special Caribbean cruise
from Southampton, England, and Feb-
ruary 29, when the Nieuw Amsterdam
of the Holland American Line will dock
here. Carryinig an average of from 300
to 400 passengers each, all the ships are
on Caribbean cruises and will stop over
at Cristobal, several hours while pas-
sengersl shop and visit local points of