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DLOC PCANAL



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Panama Canal review
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00203
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: June 1957
Publication Date: 1959
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
sobekcm - UF00097366_00184
System ID: UF00097366:00203
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text

























ifl
r-

2.
;i


1


~*llll?1?P~:'~~uir"
r~`~U~~ ~~Lr F


___


when the rains came


s. I


t_~~



































































VIE -


It's Novlember


In This Issue











Anniversaries . 17

Around and A~bout ..8

Canal History 14

Canal Trdl~e Tables. .S.2

Ci\il Defense . 141

Cruise Passengers 3

Digital Computers .
Screen Cold .l

Inspectors Training 18

Peo~ple 10
Promotions and Transfers .16

Rain .. 2

Safety 15

Seen From Transiting Ship. 12

Shipping .. 19 2
Weather Telemetering.. 18

forthh Kinowring...


TH~-OSE OF US who usually start feeling slightly wa~terlogged about
this time of year can take heart. After this month there shouldn't be
more than three weeks of that wet, spinlshy stufl. As to the Short-Range
Improvement prospects, a Longf-Range sutudy by the REV.IEll' shows
that1 the rainy licusa~n, which started this yerar wvith a drenching down-
pour in Balboa M~ay 1, usually tapers off in December and stops
entirely about Dlecember 20, a medlian date set by averaging out
some 50 years of weather records. Thus it's 190 days dowrn and 541
to go, as of today.
11'hile a disappointment for Canal operating needs, so far as water-
sherd run-olf and lake levels are concetrnled, thle past six months have
been damp enough for all of us who worry about mildew,. drenched
small fry, and getting back and forth to w;ork without being soaked
in the process.
Meanwhile there are still these few wreeks to suffer through. Novem-
ber is not only the last full month of the rainy season but, by. tradition,
it is the wvettest. Old records showv that each year about this time, wre
are apt to paddle through flooded streets, scrape mud off Junior's
shoes, and have dlifficulty getting the wreekly wrash dry. In a weather
resume and outlook published last October by the Mleteorological and
Hlydrographic Bmranh at Balboa ]Heights, wve wvere told, in true wFeather-
men Innguage, "to expect rainy season conditions during Nov~ember
even though there is a considerable \ariationl of the amount of rain
from year to year." More specifically. raincours and umbrellas wiill
continue to be high style for the rest of this month, wrhen rain is
likely to occur on 22 days at Balboa H-eights and 25 days in Cristobal.


W. E. PinIT:K, Governor-President
JoHN D). MIcEL.nleN\' Lieutenant Govern~r


Pllana


ELEA\NOR hCLHjl-EiNN1' Editor
Eu~iici RICHA\RD and Toss BIT TEL


ll'ILLr~Au G. AREY, JR. Olicial Panama Canal Company Publication Edl1torial A~sjislants
ma. Canal Information Officer Pubhsrhed Monibly Al Balboa Heighis, C. Z.
Prested at the Printing Plantl, Mearnt Hope, CanJl Zone
On sale al all Panama Canal Service Cenlers.. Readl Strres, and The Tn oitl Guen HusUe for to daysi after pubbanIron date at 5 cents each.
Subscripllone, $1 a year: mail and backi copies, 10 cents each.
Postal money orders made payable to the Panama Canal Company should be mzlled to Edua~r. The Panlma Canal Re\ iew, Balboa Heights C Z


2 THE PAAMIA CANAL RE1~










There are long-haul
and short-haul



CRUISE


PASSENGERS



Clan'l:l PASSENGERS at t I 0PRnama Can0
are not restricted to mninana~.iress aboard.
swank liners like the "Caronin'" and 11n-
"Nienw~r Amsterdam." Tlu*1\ are not~ all
bound on pleasurable jaunlts8 arucnd the
world or on luxurious vo~yuags to South
Ame~rica.
Typ~ical of somne of thezc mother cruise
paklSengerS are two glllroup Selectef d llSt.

One was makICingF theI shorteast of nil P~an-
umna Canal c~ruise~s, the Four-minultea ctrrs-
sing: from one bank of thre Canni to thel
other. The, second was homul on? 11 0
tlay! sea voyagel~c to new hlomes mnore llun1


Hlere are (ome crui\e p)UlrenLgers, bh ~llun anI~ d rhortf
haul. Ala~rimu Rodriguez, abuser, of Punumnn C~it) was on
hisi was home fromn the west cide of the Canal with so~me
fine fish. Alr. and Mlrs. Douglas Russ, at right, from Kecnt,
England, were aboard the Captain Cok en route to
Auckland. The three children are Jaime, la and Xnandy.


THE PANM CANAL REVIE









This is a wonderfulrr'r


a sunny dayJ


The big ferry Presidente Porras, above,
is the favorite cruise srhip for hundreds of
srhort-haul pasetngers, like those at right.


half way around the world.
The 3,470,492 powengerc.' s who cros-
sed the Canal by T'hatche~r Fe~rry during
thle past fiscal year do not all qualify
as cause passengers. Far from it. The
cruisers are a special group.
Th~ey are fu~ndlsc, or couples, or boys
and gils who will soon be permanent
couples. They are, occasionally, singe
men, and much le~ss occasionally, singe
women.
They are fussy about their accomn-
moodations. They prefer the double-
docked 15i5-foot diesel electric ferry
Presidente Porrars to the less commo-
dlious President Roosevelt. On pleasant
days, they board the ferry, simply to
ride back and forth. They bring their
lunechecs, their portable radios, and, once
in aI w\ hIh-, their liquid cheer. One man,
the other day, had a plastic bucket for
ice cubes to cool the drinks hec was pour-
ingl for himlself and his friends.
Over 95 out of every hundred of
them are: Panamanians, familes or in-
dividuails from PanIIIuna~ City seeking a
different way to spend a few hours.
The older youngsters hang bulg-eyetd
to the railings, watching the fer gong
in the op~posite direction, the midget
dredge Alandingat aIt work on thebrde
t1.III1 hannel the sip5 which ply in and


out of the Canal. \\'henI they are tired
of looking, they stietch out on the long
wooden benches which line the Porras'
deck and go to sleep.
Mothers nurse their babies as they
ride along, then lay them down on the
benches for a diaper change or a nap.
Fathers sit and smoke, or just sit.
w\hcen the cruise passengers are
hungry they open up their paper bags
and unchon michas and cheese,
bananas and, in season, rosy-cheeked
mangoes.
The wind blows their hair and they
bask in the coolness, many degrees
more comfortable than the courts or
front steps of their Panama City homes.
Sometimes the couples are courting.
They ride back and forh, oblivious to
all around them, holding hands and,
once in a while, exchanging a brief kiss.
The couples are not all Panamanians.
The other day, two of the Porras' Sunday
afternoon cruise passengers were a serv-
icemran and his girl. They were sharing
a bag of apples. She held an apple in
her left hand, he held one in his right.
Their other hands were clasped to-
gether.
TIhe single passengers are a bit harder
to define. ~One recent Sunday, a short-
cruise passenger made six round trips,


stretched o~ut flat ron hi; back on1 :Ie
deck be~nches. A~t fast thec Forrar' <. wv
thought he might be ill: b-ut he In a-
sured them, he was just tired anld I .t
he said, and the ferry was~ a fine pl e
for a nap. So sleep he did. or do.: J.l
more likely, paying not the~ least bit of
attention. to anyone else aboardli
And some cruise passenlgers are It-
and-out tourists, visitors to the ISthl usI
for a few days, possibly. Loaded \ Ith
cameras, they travel across the C.., I1l
and back again, taking pictures.

OCTOBERS OTHER CTuis50 palsslzlign E,
those on the 33-day \o!age, e.r~e
family folks, too, most ojf theml blut
their situation was entirel\ differently
Over a thousand strong, the;!\ wre
aboard the British emigranlt shrp. C~ipl-
tain Cook, en route fromn Englandl to
new homes in New Zea3land. Ulik-lle
the Porras' cruise passengers to ha-l Irnme
in all ages) they were all u~nderl -15,
but the number of child:en! per faih'~i
was as high if not higher than tha.t br~I
the ferry cruisers.
The 1,050 men, womenl anrd children
aboard the Captain Cook on herl tur ent-
fifth, and last, emnigrant trip thrlough th~e
Panama Canal, were as appreciative of
the view as the passengers on thet Flarral

4 THEt PANAM C.4N.4 REVIEW













onr a long~ trip


On her last voyngea as an emingrant rhip, thre
Culptain Cookr enrried I,tV50( passengerst~,
some of whomn appear in the pictures, left.


holt wereI~ suffering much more from the

It Iln't like this in England," said a
rm\~~ ella-lked lass from Surrey, as she
dcllc.ltel\ wiped her dripping forehead.
.111 cf the Capntain Cook's passengers
we n-~ sl-ttlers, and most of the men were
uniltrmnl. l or professionals of one sort or
Illlother~. TIhey were going to New
ZealandII, their travel expenses paid in
full bI, thle New Zealand Government,
under that commonwealth's plan to
bIllng ne~w skills into the ruggedly
beaub~lul( country.
T~hl! came from all over ]England
-bullolk. Surrey, Sussex, the Isle of
Alanl--anld they were going to be scat-
tered all ,I over both of New Zealand's
twoc me or' islands. Jobs were waiting
fu~l .1ll of the men; some said they
hopedL., it opportunities were better in
.mmbetlcr held, to switch after a year or so.
T!Ipual of the Captain Cook's pas-
senlgers were M~r. and Mrs. Arthur
Qugsle, a~nd their two sons, Ffinolo, 2,
and~ Ge~offrey, 3. They came from. the
Islc orf Slan and did not know exactly
wheire they would be sent in New
Zeal1:ma11. Unlike many of the others
aboai~rd,. they had no relatives in New

11: Wlk-~ll described himself as a

THE PA~NAMA CANAL REVW 5


"painter-decorator." H~e had been tr sing :
to .Ir..ngFe~ his familyls emligrationl for
two years before they wNere finally ac-
cepted. Work had been "quiet" at home,
he said, and emigration seemed far bet-
ter than "stal ing at home and hoping."
\' ~tarl Webe~rl 41,~ came from Mall-
denhall, in Suffolk. H~e was a hairdresser
by profession. With him were his pretty
btlond wife, whose trim m(lljlre-l was a
testament to her hulsbumlll'u skill, and
his two bright-gledc~t sons, H~arry, 12, and
Brian, 10) Ha.rr) was a bit shy with
str.mluens but Brian warmed up under
compliments on his fancy space patrol
bat.
Like many others aboard, the \when I
sigenerationta thfhad a muhbetter opportu-
nity in the Ilammonwealth ,1 than at home.
lin-y( had been considering their move
for a long time; the enthusiastic reports
they received from Mrs. Weber'~ls sister,
in Christlhurch,1 had tipped the scales
in favor of New ~Zealand.
''ll'e think this by far the best thling
for us to do," said Mrs. R. W. Hlill, from
Rumford, Essex. Her husband, 30, is
a painter-decorator, like Mr. Quayle.
The .H~ill4 will go to We~llingIto~n, where
they~ have relatives, and a jb atn.
Looiinlg down the declkoh u;intoward a


red-heuled li-ight-; Ilm-nkl sheo idoalnutif
as her son, Mn~1II ~lsl .ukh-d, "We'I havcr
made our choice. Sometimeos cl habh.-n
don't- unrderstland \'1. 1 W jun gr'Owsl up,)
he can make his choice. Maybe lu* II
want to go back."
In the nine years 1In- Captailn Cook
has been Ilumllingl thoughI~ thle ( .malI
as an cnigl.all ship, shle has clrr~ict
more than 25,thnll) land to New Z~ealand. Ciu- is tllnamed f or
Captain Januso ( ankI fameLd thatash)
navigator who rli-am(,-wdl~ thle Itswason.II
ISlandS, New (.cagel~... Coo~lk and otholr
island R''apI'. at1 one tutnL the si'
master was na~med June s Cook, bth
was not: a dcsccendant of his ship,'s
namecsake.
H-er Octolwr \ay.1age wrrs her lust on a
p).lawenge~. r eise sing for ther coblonits.
Fwmlrl N1.w Ze~aland shre usil EG-say Ironps
to Malay a\1 and (10-0l return to New
Zealand writh other troops. After thtrt
comes the rllon It-ip, b.wk hnom tol Eng.1
land, vial thl l~mllln., C(m..1,II mUlP rPm-
511hl\ thhe boneyard.
What will replace her? Her Ipln wsl
James Muir, who hasr bee aboard for
11 wasl~ does not: know. All be knows
iS thaLI t e nrill miss the ratrlllr runsi
thlrough~ the( C:.m..11, with1) he. thoUSandsX
o~f I~lon-crulise. palS(ll(rSg abIOard







Boolean algebra's
an important part
of traffic control


Melvin B~ierman Eddie B. Goodrich


Robert L: Rankin \'ern Chrirtoph


SOMETIME WITHIlN theC next 30 months, ships approaching
the Canal for transit and those actually making the pas-
sage from ocean to ocean, will be handled by a semi-
automnatic marine traffic control system, the brains of
which probably will be located on. th~e top floor of the
Terminals Building in Balboa.
In. the adoption of this system, the Panama Canal
Company, like~ many business and government concerns
in the United Sitates. will make use of electronic com-
pnt~ers for operations that are routine and repetitive.
In order to make sure that there will be no hnitch in
the operation, plrogramming, and maintenance of the
control eqfuipmenlt ulltimately selected, five young Canal
employees!.l~ are now in the United States taking a course
of technical instruction which includes training in the
fundamentals of pertinent mathematics, formal logic, and
comp~uting devices in general.
The course is being given, with the cooperation of
ClhhsI, and I-lill, the New York engineering firm which
has the contract for the design and installation of the
newy traffic control system.
The employees taking the course are Robert L. Rankin
and Edward H-. Benson, Marine Traffic Controllers,
Mielvin IHiermn.l. Office ]Engineer, Eddie B3. Goodrich,
Electrical Engineer, and Vern Christoph, Admeasurer,
\\'hecn the new system is in full operation approxi-
matelfy]\ 30 months from now, a digital computer control
equipped with a display panel of the entire Canal will


be used to schedule ships through the Canal in the lost
efficient rranner.
The system will begin, operation 24 hours in advi nce
of the arrival of ships at Canal ports when each es~p. .ted
arrival wiill be carded and classified in, accorda~ncr ;it
performance characteristics in relation to Canal Ia era-
tion conditions.
TThis information will be fed into the digitall cocm; a~ter
system which will prepare, in not more than four hI .lrs,
three schedules representing the three best mne thc ,s of
transit through the Canal, both from an econolnle a ,nd-
point and with due regard to the ship owners as \r 11 as
the? Canal Company.
Schedules worked out by the computer will be p unted
out in the dispatcher's office, in the Port Captaini's ..dfices
on both sides of the Isthmus, and at each of thle L.arkj
They may be altered within seconds after introdlc~hon
into the machine by the marine traffic controller olf ill-
formation containing new Canal conditions, ulnexplcted
ship arrivals, or emergencies.
Somne of the factors to which the system will gi\l con-
sideration both for ships desiring to enter the Canall and
those already making the transit are size, cleadr-curt re-
quirements, tug requirements, tandems, speed. maneuv\er-
ability, lock locomotive requirements, special prio~ritiei.
lock ~lanes in service, weather conditions, and many
others.
Economnic evaluation of the several schedules wIill take


6 THE PANAMA CANAL RE1~


a nv
( )Xr








Worth k~nowing .

sors in thle Store~house Ilrunlchl gets under way~\ this
month. ParlticipatingR in the fi\e-weeck training pro-
gr''nn. w laiL.h w~Ill he1 conducted by! Fre~cd N I. Dahl, Trlain

liors inl the( Stllrehousel~~ organtatlioni~l. They w~ill learn
thle techlnilue~s of job instruction so that they~\ wrill be
able to assist in tl..inlingl othes'1 employees'1(.

All buyers for the $1upp1l. Dav\ihionl arEt now I~locatedL on
thle thir floor of IhnhJ(il~hng inl the~ HaIIhouL Industrial
lrea,l ther same halik~ling~ which houses the~ office of the
General Ml~r~S.mag of the Il\wisionl. The only cweptiolna
to the consolidation, which was omnple~ted in mnid-
October, are? the have~I for shoes and the~ head of the(
Cold Stlllage Unit who still remain in their previous
locations.

October wvas a busy month for the Canal Zone Pas~ta~l
D~ivisicln. it was ""statistic.l count month1~1 ") I'*,wry. thrroe
years, in order to determine whast and honw Zo~nians
are ml.nlling~. the~ Postall D~ivisiion counts every piece o~f
outgingI/IF and incoming InI.nI Ilhn ingF one month1(1 In
.ukhtllionl, on the outgonling~ malil, thle postal forcft records
not only the ninnher ofE pieces built also their woightl
and the amnount of postage. As thils issue of TenII
Iyn wl.~ went to press,~ the" resUlts had not been comn-
piled.

Specifications for ~II .lll ensulltionin of four mo1re Panll-
amaR C'anal otlher h~I(hhng~ \.s 1 will b issuld. this monthII1.
Ilals on all fourn projeccts are to be olpcenedt bufuse thec
and of the calctndar yoar, T'he haiktlinlg.. are: Tilcm in
o~ffice of the Supply D~i\.lsion in the Itlhllo.l I~ndustrial
are~a; the Com ~Solo IteralI1 Ston-~, tll* Cristabal 'lrer-
minals Unlilding, and thle Payro,I ll hlding~ In Ancoan.

The annual dlraw~ing forl low license numbers on the(
14160 .Illtellnathil( Iseense4~ plates is scheduled for H.30(
a. m. November 17. The numbers w~ill be drawn fromr
applications for license p~lates received to Ith)at d~ate.
Applications are now being: accepted and t~he plates
will be released on D~ecemnber 1, thle sames date us thle
beginning of the over-thle-counter sales. f lu-~ 19180
license pintes will have blac figures on a light~ yellow
background.
National E~duention 11'L'ek wrill he observed in the: Canal~1
Zonecs schools Non-mgorl~cr 8-14. The theome of thII;
years observance is: Pl~ira i1I an Appraise 1Your
Schools," whlile~ there are to be seiltee o
each day of the week. Dllring the week: parents will
attend tihe annual visitors' days.

A major atftralction at the Tivorli Ilntil Novembernh 14 iS
the eighlteen'thl annual art: Show sponsored by' the
Atlantic and Pacific chapte~rs of flu- Canal Zlone Art
League and by du-l NVational League11( of AerlI~Tcan Pen'I
Women. Ther( show, in cornjunrctlionr w\itlh Nationall Art
11'cerk, inrllclu ri nearly 100I entries.


Edward HI. Benson


into, account such things as lock crew time and overtime,
pilot time and overtime, cost time for each ship, and
lc~omo~tive and crew costs.
whilel e in the Canal, all ship locations wNill be mnonitor-
ed by a "hyperbolic radio" system, similar in some ways
tol th;e famous Decca serial and marine navigation sys-
teml in use in many parts of the world.
Pilorts will be equipped with a radio and advisory
unit incorporated in a single package! which n ill be
smalller and lighter than the portable radio now carried
aboard ships by each pilot. All electronic equipment will
be fully transistorized, lightweight and modern.
The new system is expected to release valuable Marine
Bureau employees for more important jobs, give pilots
better and continuous information at. all times during
their transits, permit optimum use of existing Canal
f acllaties and result in an overall increase in Canal capac-
ity and with few~er delays, and less possibility of acci.
dents in Gaillard Cut and Gatun Lakle.
(B\ the way, the formula in the headline is in Boolean
aIlgebra, which is the science of symbocls and their com.
binations used to describe and represent mathematical
functions accordig to the rules of logic. It will be one
o~f thet courses of instruction being taken in Newv York
by thle five Canal employees,
(It means--if anyone should care except a computer
expert-"everything which does not belong to either X
or Y obviously does not belong to X and does not belong
to Y'.")


THIE PANAM CANAL REE











-I---AROUOND--














Tu'\ 1(o *rms NOrNT piggy-back loads of tile
have zidpped from Panama Canal ship to
train toth I. Homa Company s ware-
house in Las Cruces (Curundlu),~ the first
time in less than 16 hours and the second
time almost as fast. TIhe ship each time
was the Ancon and the shipments, totallmgt
.3Y tons, bathroom. tile for the Clapehar't
housingi. Thel first shipment, for instance,
arrived at 9 30, p. m. October 1 in Cristobal;
was shipped. aboard the! No. 3 train out of .. g .'
C:,leon at 9:45 a. mn. October 2; unloaded at
Homa wareho use at 1 p. m, onto a truck at BalboIa unloaded a f e w minutes I nter at Curundu storeh. ta lrli\3 il Crse.nl pi~g!bar lod o tie i ho\e




~4P~Y~Service Center
-: COPLETIO~N Of ai ni0(lerized mer<'li In-
diire section at the Balboa Service ( n-
oter last month niow\ pro\ides a se\er. Lay
.,?t~~i w ?eek, Sjtatrs drug-stole~ type" fat 'Ity
IonI Paclfic Sidless.
The mrchanditise iectionl has I -er
Irelocatral to, the r~~igh of the bul,?1 Inlg
entrane. The eltire a~rea n~ow has lu-
orescent lighting. Conllsidel ablc a ldi-
tional space was a;llo prot ided fo:i the

:~~Ef~c! New shehe-sj andl displa\l! cases Illou
roomni for a w.ide aIssortmen~lt of dr ug~s,
cojsmetics, \tationen\ I in~cludlln~ a large
Fd~c,~i c~~-1ZhSI \1rie~t\ of gleetinlg cairds of allI typ..shl
recRd aInd other sales ite-ms. Sis more
States-bulilt phonogra~ph record display
;;i"" Irlcks~ are ojn order anid w\ill be inst.dlled
wh~en the\ anive Future plans call for
th i conditi~ningg of the record a sles
d!I *~n
The office of the Servi;ce Center Mlan-
?'`~"pC-~e~---- ger,. formerrly In one corner of the 6~rst
floor, hns b~een mo\edt to a more centndl
location, for the contemelnce of both
enstomeinls and manager.
The mlerc~handisel section is to be
open se en' dayi, \ra eek. until 10 P. m.


8 TITE PAhirthfA C.-OIU. RE\R






































































TH PANAIMA CANAL REEVE


--- A NDP ABOUT~--


















INrT.:su.cKLING alullibull 1 linli~~ t*l, Prikled
to rednee g1~1I. are belin~ tainld out on the-
roof of I~louse Tll'its n,1 Diabrle ITights. If
snecessful, the! y will t"'vide a rlual~l new
way of roof(~in~ or 1('111ning1 '/.11ne hOUses.r
reduce interior tcempemlraurs and11 ushe1~1 the
cost of nir condit~Ioning. To check thlir. reatd-
.inlgs were taken from a wantll.~ing~ themsoII-
Recording thermometers, read at right by Kenneth Jorgensen, registered temtpera- mntrbfr lili~e\~~~II(II'Iad
tures in H~ouse 5456, Diablo Heights, before and after it was rnooed with aluminum cerbart1 in wr nt na



The Ti~voli
INSTALLATION of a new service desk and
a merchandise section just off the lobby
of The Tivoli, now almost completed,
is the first step in a modernization of
the first floor public rooms of the 53-
year-old hostelry. The renovation, which
is to be a general face-lifting, without
changing the character of th~e famous
old building, is to be completed about
the first of the year.
The lobby floor is to be tiled and the
bell captain's desk will be relocated.,
The bar, opening off the lobby, is also
to have a tile floor, along with a new
ceiling and indirect cove lighting.
The bar itself is to be relocated, so
that the two outside walls can be open- U S I
ed up to provide a view of Ancon ElIl. h94I
Tile panels and decorative plantings
will furher brighten up the room.
The dining room will remain much
as it now is but the wall between the
main roomn and the porch will be remov-
ed. The landscaping on the patio side
will be rearranged so that diners can
look out into the patio.
SPainting and redecoration of the
downstairs rooms is also included in the
renovation.








PEOPLE


BOSSES BEVOLVE arOund Mary N. Orr. She has been secre-
tar to fiv different mnen in the Canar's top supply post
and, in the 19 years she has been with that organization,
has seen the evolution of that position from Chief Quar-
iitermaster to Director, Supply and Communt Service
I' Bureau.
& He~cr firt position in the business world, however, was
at Gorgas H~ospital, completing a cycle. She had been
born there and then in 1937, after graduating from Canal
Zone Junior College, went to work in the Board of Healthl
]Laboratory and X-Ray Clini at Gorgas. ~Aftetr thee years
at the Clinic she ~transferred to the Balboa storehouse,
.- where she was empoyed for 11 years.
Although officially attached to the storehouse, during:
'1950 she spent some months as secretary to L. Wt. Lewis,
Chief Quartermaster. She was permanently transferred
*. -to what is nowv the Supply alnd Community Service,
.. Bureau when L. B. Moore became Supply Director.
After Mr. Moore retired, F. R. Johnson became Sup~ply
& director. In. March 1956, in the merger of the Supply Bu-
reau and the Community Service Bureau, Wilson H.
Mary OrrCrook was named Supply and Community Service Di
Mary Orrrector. He died in June 1957, and in No\ember of tha.i
year L. A. Ferguson, the present Director. wlas appoinited;


Tu.I1. CASE OF the Pe'rlsevering Watermelon at Diablo
He~ighlts, which involved a Point-Four man as a technical Susan Lane:
assistant at one point, has come to a delicious, 23-pound
conclusion, according to Susan Lane, 12%(;-year-old
growerL'1 of the watermelon.
TheI( whole thing started one day when Susan, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. kecith Lane of 5775-A at Diablo H~eights,
was given a slice? from a section. of wratermelon a neighbor
had purchased at one of the Zone's retail stores. Susan
cast the seeds in the yard at her home and, in due course
of time~, a few tiny watermelon vines appeared. Most of
them met w\ithr dire fates, but: one persevering water-:
mnelon vine grew and gre~w. And eventually, despite the
fact that it was the wrong time of year for melons, a little
melon appeared.
]Donald H. Biery, elementary education advisor of t~he
Point-Foulr Mission in Eculador, a friend of 'the family.
who was travelling from Quito, Ecuador, took an interest
in the one-watermeloin patch during a brief stop in the
Canal Zone. Hlle gave Susan valuable information on
watermnelon care;, and on how to prevent th~e watermelon.
from rotting on the vine. Taking his advice, she propped
thle young melon on poles, well away from the wvet soil it
had been resting on. The ripened result was a delicious
23-pound1 watermelon with deep red meat and shiny
blacks sreeds.
This is Sulsan's frst venture as a grower of edible crops.
She says she tried to grow flowers once before, but her
major interest is her butterl collection and she feels
buttetrfly catching_ produces faster results.
Susan is in the 7th grade in Balboa Junior High School.'


10 THE PANVALAL CANAL REVIEn'









I ~~I~_


_ ~_ ~~_


EVEN THUGH there are still a good many shopping dnyvs
before the holidays, the Christmas present problem ha
been solved for the O. A4. Die~tz famllily' of Miargita.
W~lclhen r. D~ietz, who is Superintenmdent of the Cris-
tobal Field Offlee of thec Maintenance Divisio~n, found that
his hobby of metal working had become so fasciating
that the house wais berginning to overflowt with his handi-
wrork, he began gwrinlg it ,iway.\
The other day, he was able toproduce only one sample
in addition to two or three designs on wihhe is cur-
rently working. The sample represented a stylized female
~figure done in aluminum and backed with parafn to
give a three-dimension effect. "The design, had been
mounted on a black background and framed. It made a
handsome wall ornament.
As an engineer, Mr. Dietz found that metal working
or copper and aluminum tooling was right up his alley.
About three years ago he read a book on the subject and
began experimentingi with the unusual art. He makes
his own designs and outs the metal from this drawing.
H-e finds that the wh~ole operation-fromn beginning; to
end-takes from eight to ten hours and that once he has
started on a project, it is difficult to stop.
Although he pooh-poohs the idea that he is an artist,
Mr. D~ietz has no doubt that these pictures will make
good Christmas presents.


D. A. Diev


SOME PEOPLE want to be bookkeepers. Stonel~ people want
to be lawye~rs. Willl~l frdrawlins, ai multilith operator In
the Balboa B3ranch~ of the Printling PhustII, wants (to be
an e~ngineCr. Tha~t's wthy he spends a goo"d many o\' f his
lunch hours l~umched up on the back steps of the A~dmin-
station Bu~ilding, slide rule and calculus book in haund.
Whlen he winds up a day's worklll in thle Prlintlingl PlantI,
he heads for the Univecrhity~ of Pallinsli, where he is in
the second semester of a civil I'ngFinee(r~ing~ course. Thli'r
semester he is carryipg: ca~lcululs, desc~rrpipt ive gametry'
and chemistry, a fairly\ howy1'\ load for anyl~ studentII, mIUCh
less one who has puit mI eight hours on a full-t111' Ihe
before he even starts to study.
If everyvthing goes well, t~he e~mb~ryonic engineerI hopes
to complete his course in five yclli rr s r .so After that,
we'll, he just hopes. that with1 boo~cmin~g Conllstll~ituti in
the Republic he'll have a cha~ncec to put his ('nglineerling~
know-how to work.
H~e wvas born in Colon, 20I years a1go Hlis father, also
W~ilfred, but writhl a middle infliail., "E," worked for thec
Canal organizaltionl on the Athustllic hidel.
H-e is married and lives writhl his wrifc in thec Plarque
Lefe\rre section of Pa;nama; C~ity.
The yorunge~r W\ilfred went to elementary school in
Colon and gradated from the Arte~s y oficil~s Schoo,,l in
Panama as a printer ten year ago. Laltr he earned his
Bachelor's Degree thlrough1 night Institute.
Despite the many years ofT sL)chooling hc hasr beh~linld
himt, he still wants more. If W~ilfre~d Haw\\linas has hris way),
he is going to be a civil engrinee~r.


Wilfred Rawlins


THE PIUANAMA CANA REI 11













TR ANSITIN~G SHIP


i":
:I

T*!
t
t *'
;-,


1 `*-

~a-: L.
~ '"'"*.r


I *I


of a ship as it makes the Canal transit.
They -want a comprehensive view of
what goes ori as a ship is raised by the
great flights of locks, moves 1troll
throughi~l narrow Gaillard Cut, crosses
the wide expanse of Gatun Lake, is low-
ered through three more Locks, and
moves toward the open sea as the transit
is completed.
One day recently, six of these in-
Iluiing visitors, two women and four
men, embarked on one of the Canal's
frequent customers for a close-up look


at the waterway. They boarded a P~iln-
ama Canal launch at the Balboa te a -
minal. A few minutes later they vliCk
their way up aI clanling!~ gangip\\. l t.l thi
deck of the 8,347-ton blr;igt-p?; m..ugeL~C
. m.:1. Santa Isabel. A little .....cl iiglt
hours lolt.-: they left the ship in Cu tobal and the Santa Isabel headed flll
N~ew York.

On these pages, you see the Canal!. 1
as it looked to them from the dec k of
the O'-I-b .. t vessel.


THOUSANDS OF. TOURISTs visit the Pan-
ama Canal each year. Many have their
first glimpse of the operations of this
engmneermng .. ...~1..1 of the world from
the visitors' cmands~l at Miraflores or
Gatun Locks, or from Miraflores Blidge ~
Others- who leave their ships at Cris-
tobal or Balboa first see the Canal proper
from the \1 inc~l. .. ~-F .a Panama Railroad
coach on the overland trip from ocean
to ocean.
Hut many others are satisfied only
to see the Panama Canal from the decks


The men who heave the lines which cojnnct shlip to shore work from, rowboats. They are justifiably proud of their precision.


Miraflores Bridge must swing wide for every trans~itine~ ship.


"cr"d:;~~;r-*u-.*.~w.r~~


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x,l c,

ouch to touch. Five ihip, \~elr ill sicllt at the Gatun Locks entrance.


C:ristobal looms to starboard as the ship completes her transit.


I


'.-J)PlrP~nn'i lu';rrc._~-!-t:*""*mw~j~4
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** a
1" '": f,*"t~'jf 1 i'C~ZJ;






















S;O Y earrJser A~g -
Paunselh( or the. labor force in the? Ca-
narl Zone was halted 50 years ago this
month when Prleside~nt W~ilhaml H~oward
Taft issued an Ew~nth eli Order balnning
the recruitment of anyone woring for
the Isthmian Canal Commission, the
Panama Railroad, or any contractor in
the C:r.mal Zone.
November, 1.909, was the rainiest
month of anUi ever recorded in the nar-
rowest part of: the Canal. The north, end
of the CutC sasp flooded for a week. Slides
in the Culbhra area moved 100,000
cubic' yuars of rock and earth towoard
the pris1m and canrit ed ~awa thre old
main line of the rarilroad. Othecr than
that to thl rarilroad! lIne, the damage teas

At Gatun Locks, excavation was
about two-thirds completed and the ex-
cavation for the: twin locks at Pedro
Migue~l was virtually done. At both sets
of locks concrete; was being poured at
one site while excavation wias being
completed at anot~her~.


2 5 Y ears A go
A concussion was pointed by Cov-
ernor Julian L. Schley to study the es-
tablishment of a new Canal Zone town-
site on the Atlantic side 25 years ago
this month. Margarita was mentioned
as a possible site for the nlew~ housing
area. Although there wiere- rumors to
the contrary, the Governor said there
was no intention of abandoning New
Cristobal.
Panama firms, meanwhile began shar-
ing Panama Canal construction work as
for the first time contracts for 30 new
Canal Zone buildings were awarded to
three Panama building companies.
Panamna legislators were considering
the establishment of a free port in
Colon, an idea which had the backing
of President H~armodio Arias.
10 Years Ago
TH-E CANAL administration announced
10 years ago this month that the Balboa
shops would be closed and that before
the end of the fiscal year there would be
a 40 percent reduction in the shop force.


Governor Francis K. Newcomer s' ted
that the outlook was good for thle
$70,000,000 Canal housing progrom a~ t
start in 195j0. In Washingtoni, a re~tire
ment bill for local-rate Canal eml.li rees
was considered and a Hlouse of rep-
resentatives subcommittee made loan,
to come to the Isthmus to make a~c on-
the-spot study of the sea-level Clanal
proposal.
Joseph Sachs, International Repr ~sen
tative of the United Public W~or~k, a of
America, started a nine-month tera In
Camboa Penitentiary after his con-
viction on a charge of criminal 111 1 of
Canal Zone District Attorney Dniel
McGrath,
n~e Year Ago
HIGHLIGHT OF NOVember 1958, we:, the
Canal Zone's observance of the Ihe-
odore Roosevelt Centennial. Mel:bers
of the Roosevelt family, scores of E ,ose
velt medal holders, other local old
timers, and officials from the U sited
States and from Panama were on hland
for the week-long celebration.


Ilierrr areIF Civil D~efense Information
Booklet for employees, andc the Comn-
pup /Covernment Disaster Relief Plan
are at present undeirgo~(ingl revision. The
information booklet which was distrib-
uted to all ienp~loyees, and routinely
issued to every new employee, has been
out-dated. It was one of the first docu-
ments signed by Governor W. E. Potter
when he arrived to start. his term in the
Canal Zone and was approved in Nov-
ember, 1956
The self-protection booklet covered
such topics as Iwrnming signals'"--hat
they are, and the proper action to take
on hearing them; shelters; the effects
of nuclear weaponsllh fallout; and other
sub~jects. A dletachable? back page con-


A description of the overall I'am-
pany/Government Civil :Defense Pro
gram and a list of iCpols and Dr~n'ts"
completes the little volume.
When published?'opies wvill be Ilnade
available to all employees.
The Disarste~r Relief Plan, whichi has
beeii in effect since Novbmber 19'/", is
also being revised, brought into line w\ith
the latest ideas of disaster planning,; and
somewhat expanded.

VOLUNTEER CORPS MEETINGS


training a description of the warning
signals was included in this booklet.
The new issue will bring all this in-
formation up to date in light of the
ever-changing concept of the effects of
nuclear weapons. It will describe in
greater detail what action individuals
should take to save themselves under
varying circumstances.
Also in detail is a list of suggested
stockpiles of essentials to prepare for
an emergency, and an index on infor-
mative publications available from the
O~ftee of Civil and Defense Mobiliza-
tion thogh the local Civil Defense
offce. Also covered in much more detail
is a description of a radioactive fallout
and the steps necessary for protection
against its effects.


oate Town
NOVEMBER
zz RainbowCity
:I2 Margarita
l2 santa cuz
16 Paraiso


School
Theater
serv. center
School


6:30 p. m
9:.oo. ..
s:co p. ..
T:3o p. m.


14 TH PANAMA CANAL F~REV


-~-Civil Q~Defense--








THIE: SAFET]~Y ZONE


___~ ~II


Notice To0 Readers

Bound copies of volumes 8 and 9 (August 1957, TIME nrEVIEW iD its present size. Light binders of hourd
through July 1959) are now available on, special order and Linson cloth, in light blue only, are $2 per set.
for a limted period. The 24 issues will be bound to- Hetavier binders of boar an fabrikoid, in dare blue
gether in fabrikoid, with a gold stamp on the cover only, are: $2.5i0 per set.
similar to previous bound copies. The price is $12.5i0 Ordrs addrssed to the Editor. T111 PANMA CANA
per book. The covers are available in red, black or REVIEw, should be accmpaie by a posta money
green, order or local check, payable to the: T&raurer Pan-
Also available on, order are temporary binders for ama Canal Company.


(This is the second of a two-part series
on small boat safety.)
SSmoot Portage
TO COAST SECURELY along waves of con-
crete and asphalt you should also:
SUse a hitch safety chain, whc is
required by law.
~pGet out often and check your hitch
and bolt tie-downs.
SLoosen the tie-downs to reduce
strain on your boat if you park for
Slong time
irMake sure your trailer is insured,
along with the boat and motor.
You're Off
iO NAVIGATE TH highway without scut-
-!ng your rig-remnember:
r If you decide to pass--make sure
there are no on-coming cars, then
ein mwie iif bao tou ied ra-
On the inside mirror.
i Be alert for landlubber pedestrians
and jay walkers who might see your
car, but bang into the side of your
trailer.
) When stopping, give your-
self plenty of space. You've got a
trailer and boat to stop too. Travel
slower than usual, practice braking
at different speeds.
-r Give clear signals if blinker lights
are hidden by boat.
>0v coN'T NEED a bottle of chamagne
> launch your outboard, just a keen
u-se of direction and preferably a guide


standing at the rear of the trailer to call
out instructions.
B~CKI~NG-CGo slow. Back into the
I~llllaucinl site at a right angle. If you
want the rear of the tradesl to go ligh~,
steer left, if left, steer right.
TRACTION--If the site is natural or un-
improved pick a sloping spot hard
enough to give your tires a lot of trac-
tion. If you're on sand or mud, better
traction can sometimes be parined by
deflating the tires slightly\. Illnt remem-
ber to put air back inl the? tires.
BOATS AWVAY--Three steps into the
water:
1. Remove the rear tie-downs when
a few feet from the water's edg~.
2. Tilt the motor up and unlock tle
bow winch, but keep the boat
snubbed tight.
3. Back up until the tr..uler' wheels
are an inch or two in the water,
set your hand brake, put the car


in gear, give~ 11k- boat firm push
downl the smIles1.

SpeeiCcations
The Outboard )Boating: Club of Amer-
ica, compose~d of lealdingR oulboalrdt man-
ufactrers, has de-veloped Islltandrds
for design and manufctur of boat
trarilers. Trailer builders have agreedl to
te~st their products for up to so1 pecrcent
moret than their rtcommencded capacity
and document ther test w~ith an nllildnVil
to the Industr grup. Look for thle ()BC
weright ratingf WhenI havying a boat
Iraliler. Folr fuI.Jrthe infornllintions writesI
Ontboard BalrringR Club, of Amelricll, 307

Thle Slociety of Aulomativev 1-.nineeilrs
has pub~lishecd reco~nunendetd plrracircs
for pn'Ssenger ear trailer couplllings~. ForO
mftorat~ion write to l)r TeSocriety of
Automotive Engineecrs. Inc(. -185i Lrxing-
ton Ave., New~ Yorlk 17, N. 1Y.


-ACC IDIENUTS -
Fon
THE MONTH
AND
TH'IE: YEARZ

SErPTEMB3ER

ALL UNITS
YEAR TO DATE


Y S
)ST

202
14.906


FIRST AID
CASES
'Ise 'sa
187r 183
2,029 3,461


THEn PHAMA CANAL REIE


BOAT TRAILERS


How To Get _From Yard To Wcater


DISABLING DA
INJUfRIES LO
'se9 *sa *ge
9 10 214
96 95 9,114









PROMOTIONS


Mariela G. Quircis, to Clerk-Tyist, Ter.
minals Division.

Ae uning Cl rk, TC m als Di @son
OTHER PROMOTIONS
PaoMorrows which did not involve
changes of title follow:
Mr. Elvira L. Byrne, M/rs. Irene A.
Ladrach, Nurse Supervisor, Gorgas Hos-
pital.
W~hitfield E. Riley, Clerk, Maiintl. Inc
Division.
Dr. Charles Hi. Glines, Medical C. be~r~
Gorgas Hospital.
Carlos A. Gill, M~ximo Solano, Hiook-
keeping Machine Operator, Accora:ting
Division.
Mrs. Marian L. Hall, Statistical Drafts-
man, Executive Planning Staff.
Dr. HIelen T. Klevickis, Medical( < lrcr,
Coco Solo Hospital.
Mrs. Rita G. Gribbons, Assistant Dir sector
of Nursing, Gorgas Hospital.
Beatrice H. Simomis, Director of Mur.
RchG rd n Bug n, Auditor, C neral

George Kellman, Clerk, Grounds h Inllh
Community Services Division,
Josci E. Corco, Auditor, General ..udit
Division.




RETIREMENTS

RtE te ed of Ocob t the fl lo\\ i rm


years of Canal service, and their Itur
addresses:
Henry Baker, Barbados; Locker \ailm
Attendant, Division of Schools; 39 ea-rs
6 months, 27 days; Rio Abajo, R
Floyd H. Baldwin, Kentucky: ucper-
visory Auditor, Office of the Compoo~ller.
22 years, 9 months, 20 days; Carnal ; .,ne
Charles F. Bertoncini, Panama. 5 Irrey-
ing and Cartographic Engineer. Enulnc~r-
ing Division; 32 years, 2 months. 15 dayl.
Panama R. P.
Jobn B. Cyrus, Grenada; Leader L~abor-
er, Electrical Division; 33 yare, 3 nllant~.
2 days; Colon, R. P.
John Flemming, St. Kitts; Labor.-r. Ter-
minals Division; 37 years, 5 month.i. lit
days; Colon, R. P.
Edgar Gordon, Jamaica; W\atihman,
Terminals Division; 18 years, 11 mnthlb
3da Pnama Geav Ba.rbados; Help~er Car-
man, Railroad Division; 40 years, S months,
29 days; Colon, R. P.
Thermutus Louise Hamilton. Jamaica.
Clerk, Supply Division; 42 years, I month,
I day; Colon, R. P. (See page- 53)

18 THE PANAMA CAN.4. RE\'


September 15 through October 15
MARIN BUREAU
Charles hi. Swvisher, from Pipefitter, In-
Justrsllal Dilslclon, to General Foreman,
N.IviUation, Dlvlsion..
Clement C. Bell, to Launch Operator,
11'illiam A. Violette, to Admeasurer
N~1 udsiion Division. '
Arthur R. Barter, to Typist, Navigation
Division.
James N. Thompson, to Boatman, Locks
Division.
Jos6 L. Pefia, Arcadio Buendia S., C~sar
C. Linero, Antonio N. Hudson, Jos6 M/.
Amaya, Ezrah E. Cargill, to Lock Operator
Hel er, Locks Division.
Andre hmaRomermn, from Doc Worker, Ter- h~tohr
Ininals Division, to Laborer, Locks Di-
vision,
Juan H-errera P., Pantalecin de Hoyos,
Ivan Downerj Ormond Green, Alfonso
Baldwmn, John A. Grenald, Ervin W. White,
from Cargo Clerk, Terminals D~ivision, to
Laborer, Locks Division.
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICE

Byron S. Barriteau, to Telephone Op-
erator, Sup ly Division.
Raymond P. Laverty Jr., from Graduate
Intern, Office of Director, to Assistant Sup-
ply Officer, Supply Division.
Clifford Henry, from. Laborer, Main-
tenance Division, to Crater and Packer,
Ho re BCao a, to Truck Driver, Supply
Division.
IH isd n.Mootoo, to Clerk-Typist, Sup-


nita Sries o 'me on
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Kenneth A. Thompson, to Leader Auto-
motive Machimist, Motor Transportation
DRis h F. Rowland, to Truck Driver,
Motor Trasportation Division.
William J. McKeown, to Leader Liquid
Fuels Wharfman, Terminals Division.
Joseph R. Alexander, to Cargo Clerk,
Terminals Division.
Eduardo A. Soto, Rafael Mendoza P.,
Edward S. W. Mendez, to Cargo Clerk,
Railroad Division.
Luis A. Martinez, to Supervisory Clerk
Railroad Division. '
Archibald WY. Lecky, to Rail Freight
Traffic Clerk, Railroad Division.
Roy R. Clarke, Felix A. Dogue, Leslie
A. Hope, to Shipment Clerk, Railroad Di-

vas 3ino CI k, RilrH d Dov siotoSor-
Leopold ]E. Welch, K~enneth R. Vaz, to
Supervisory Cargo Clerk, Terminals Di-
vision.
Hlarmond L. Cockburn, to Supervisory
Checker Clerk, Terminals Division.


Il*.msel~rviaes wvho were promnote~d or
trainsferred betwveen September I5 and
October I'i are listed be~low. Wi'thln-
gr.ukl promotions and job ~eclassifica.
Unics are not reported.
ADMIlNISTR'I.4T'IVE BRANCII
E~lr icL. Parnther, to Clerk-ypisit, Print-
IngPui III1
Mrs. Manric Af. Heorblin, from Personnel

sion, to P',l.-wrlss r T'raffic Clerrk, Transpor-
tatrion Section.
Cl'I\IL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Hlarold F". Egger, from Fircfighter, Fire
DaIonllll, to Customs CuarJ, Custom-, Di-
vi-tlithl M. Jones, Yvonne A. Crooks, to
Ih nII-.II.Ir School Tes.IIIT. iseLatin Amer-
Lean Schools
Mrs. ]Flor E. Martin, to Clerk (Typing)
I)l~~l of School *
Lsland A. Larrison, to Relief Super-
visor. Postal Du nI~IIn.
toI ( ltr Malmlney, toCrrectional Deten-
OFFICEI(1 OF THEII C:OMPTROLLER
Ralph K. Skinner, to Stalf Assistant to
theu Comptroller.
I:NGINIIERING; AND) CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Maintenance Dlivision
Cladstaon B., G rdn tod Clc k -~iT i
to nretrelerk W ad r Bie t c
ifonr a, Aexisi, to Work Order C ek.

Cartdo ,, nune toCretr
Public \\lrks Ro0 s Construction.
Murphy B. Alexander, to Lead ]Foreman,
Public \\nlrk'

Charles S. Kerrr, to Helper Machinist,
E~lletimIl D~ivision
D~r iV, nclnfh to Accounting Assistant,
H~arold G. W~alkes, to Clerk-Typist
Dredgling! Division. '
Geolrge: W. We'~rri. to Ceneral Foreman
LPh-cirlm ;nI. Electrical Division.
IlEA9LTH~ BUREAU
Rudolph T. Wa'rd, fr~om Cleaner, Sup-
pl\ Onasion,11 to1 EueInmatolll11 r, Division of
Ann E. 'Kollnglan to C~le~rk-~iTyp Coco
Solo Hospital.
D~r. Robert A. Chapman, to Medical
Olficer. Co~rpsl Hospital.
Elvinn W.' Lansiquot, to Clerk, Gorgas

He5. tlMarra aMo gasT ir,alto Medical
Mrs. Naomi A. W~olf, from Library As-
sistuall, Division of Schools, to Librarian,
G~orgas H~ospital.
Allan A. Spenlcer. to Leader Extermi-
nator, Division of Sanitation.


AND


TRANSFERS










------ANNIVERSARIES


_ ~ __3 _1 __1_1~1 ~ 1 ~e


CIVEL AFAIRS BUREAU
Frances G. Clary
Elementary and Secondary
School Teacher
Almoda Robinson
Guard


MARINE BUREAU
C. S. MlcCormack
Towboat or Ferry Master


SUPPY AND C:OMMUllNI' TY
PeEr ('(I Alcars Al

Itupestl H. Foster
L~cauldr usr.ll p Muserllis .\,nt.


TIth~nilN.LS BUREAU
Cecil B. Hlonwn
Servie M(.man.~ Attenldant


HEALTH BUrREAU
K. A. Brathwaite
Photographic Aid
Jose I. Valdez
Laborer


ADMINISTRATIVE: BRA\NCII
Hiarold I. Perantie
Chief and Agency Records
Officer
Lionel D. Best
Multilith Operator
CIVLL AFFAIRS BUREAU

Cs emm Dny sio Chief
Edward S. Greaves
Swimming Pool Operator
OFFICE: OF TH-E COMP-
TROLLER
Hroward H. Sprague
Supervisory Auditor
'luch W. Cassibry
Business Analyst
ira N. C. Read
Plant Accounting Assistant
Elmer J. Nordstrom
Business Analyst
ENGINEERING AND CON-
STRUCTION BUREAU
Robert R. 1McCoy
JoElectrica uCperator-Foreman
Engineering Aid
Arnold L. Brown
Pipelayer
EaCI Wk. Worrell
Robert L. Robinson
Joiner Lead Foreman
Fernando Robinson
Maintenanceman
Cleveland J. Trowers
Maintenanceman
Louis H. Charles
Painter Letad Foreman
Henry Bradfield
\\ arehouseman
Walter G. Nicholls
Plumber's Helper
Goldburn P. Maynard
Clerk
Javan E. Smith
Stockman
Carlyle S. Babb
Clerk

THTE PANAMKA CANAL REIW


Jos6! M~ndez
Carpenter
James F. Ahearn
Quarters Maintenance Lead
Foreman
Kelvin S. Barnett
Waztchman
E~ulalio Arias
Laborer
McD. Brathwait 4cie


Luciano Ca pell
Electrician Helper
James HI. L. Thomas
Pa lo Cotez
Manchinist He -'
A. Gabino 110 ale"
General He-I
Kenneth Hlaughton
Leader Seaman
Rudolph A. Rcad
Clerk
Edwin NI S n
Phillip H.Kig
Chauffeur

CII ao cS aman
Manuel 1Moreno
Painter
Harold G. Walkes
Clerk
HIEALTH- BUREAU
Victor Knight
Clerk
R. Jos6 Ortega
Pharmacy Helper
Ardenon C. Franklin
Laundry Chelcker
Raymond G. Bush
Sanitation Inspector
MARINE BUREAU
Marcelino F. Gournet
nlacer H~elper
Kasper G. Alleyne
Boilermaker Helper
Angel M. Sgnchez
Boatman


Joseph E;. Best
HRigger Helper
Marcell Aldegon

George ES. Love
Machinist
Beniamin L. Thlomas
Pilot
\'l irilio Fblnchez

Ge rge L, Smith
Georg T. ]Fi zgerald

Aubrey R. Sealey
Launch Operator
Joseph M. La IrHeler
aCehallos

R enrl A.P re

man~n E.DC t
Launch Op.-r. lr
-taiumo $me


Cu aia,

Alfrd E,. Cabey
Lock O erator Heolp~r
Emmett O. K~iernan
Lock Operations Lead

JesirsF VIlg
Signalman
SUIPPLY AND) COMMUNITY
SERVICE HURI'AU
Cuthbrer C. Butcher
C~lirk

Kitchn Attendant
Edward WV. Howell
C~lerk
Idalia V. Lane
P.It rLa ccar
juan Magn n

Henry M., Catherwod
Card
Clarence C. Bailey
Baker


Juan Mullll

Laborur

n':11MIN.11.. S 1t11Ml*..40
T~odul, r ,~w

Rodaifo Z. \Wilron
Pabbl Ikinwnmi

Cornett II. Hartley
Clerk
FrdI\IIIIII( Ha hol: hlinist[


Leonard A. Saunllders

Iru L Dive



Albert Elliolt
Chaullourr


Ashlatnd M. Anthony
Braksmrna




Leowis Cnilender
Irutck I)m.\ I
Abraham Morales
Laubrerc
Lnorenzo Detratrin

Mariao Guzmmn

Ge~orge L~u> n
'Truck 1)rluar
Faustino Garrido
xa~rer
L~ouis B. M~c~lull
Supervisory( :.1rgor Assstanst
kanuri in M. rant














































I


The weather station at Chico is deep in the jungle, 15 river miles from Madden D: rn.


position digital encoder and frequent y-
shift transmitter which will relay rain dl1
and river height information on requ :st
from the headquarters of the Metec 0o-
logical and Hydrographic Branch at
Balboa Heights.
Similar changes will be made at or 7r
remote stations located at strategic p I-
tions throughout the watersheds, o ly
five of which now have communicat;-n
facilities.


.Iids on this new system are now
being solicited by the Panama Canal
Comp.any and will be opened Novemb-
berr 16 at Balboa Heights. In October,
WV. Hi. E~isshngerl the Canal's Chief
H~ydrographer, attended a pre-bidding
conference on the project in New York
City with Gibbs and Hill, designers of
the? equipment,
Insteadl of the equipment shown here,
Chico will be furished with a shaft-


Inspectors go back to school

members of various ]Engineering and
Construction units of the Canal Organ-
ization and by three concrete and paint-
ing experts from the United States.
They are A. H. Custaferro, Super-
vising Engineer in the D~esign Section
of the Structural and Railway Bureau
of the Portland Cement Association,
H. M/c~innis, Quality Concrete Short
Course Coordinator of the Portland
Cement Association; and G. G. Sward
former Director of the Scientific Section'
of the National Paint, Varnish and Lac-
quer Association. '
Other subjects being covered in the
inspector-training program and the ex-
perts who will lecture are: Safety, by
M. F. Mlillard~, Safety Representative


RIEFRE SHERS:

PANAMA CANAL, COMPANY construction
inspectors have gone back to school.
Some 23 of them, plus representatives
from the U. S. Army and Navy and, the
Republic of Panama's D~epartment of
PuI'lic \\'mksh, are atten mng classes
which will give~ themn a gcener l review
of a number of sub~jeccts re~lating to the
work in which they are e~n azg d'
The( IIIogmmlli the first of it ind ever
sponsonedl b, the Canal organization,
wans opened ~ormally this week by Gov-
eror WT. E. Potter mn the Training Cen-
ter on Corozo Street in Balboa. TIhe
opening ceremony was followed by a
lecture on Plans and Specifications by
M. S. Slorkin. Assistant De~signinig En- .
gineer. '
Thle lectures are hering givecn by the


of the Engineering and Constrou an
Bureau; tile and other fmnishes, b\ G;.
A. Doyle, Chief of the A~rchitectl..al
Branch; earthwork, by R. E Alc L. es
of the Engineering Divisionl; welding~,
by W. B. Fall, Welder, Mumiterlnanc
Division; plumbing, by N. Litt in, of
the ]Engineering Division, e~lec~tralc
work, by F`. H-. Smith, Electr~ical Super-
visor; roofing, by G. A. Walls. Ge~neral~
Foreman, Maintenance Divis~ion; Jnd
lumer, by H. D. Smith, Buildmgp Superr-
visor in the Maintenance Di\ision.
The course wil be completed Dre cm-
ber 18 with the presentation of certif-
icates to the students by Lt. Col R D.
Brown, Jr., Engineering and Construc-
tion Director.

18 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


'WEATHIERM[EN

at work


INTREPID ExPLORsans who ventured up
r.agingl rivers in native? boats have
nothj~ing on the Pilnamal~ Canal's we~ather-
men, who for years have been makhing!
periodic trips up the Chlagrls H~is r in
ear~ nemI (Ihn in~ ~the height of the rainy
808800,.
Such.) stations as Chlill,, shown in theL
nea( Irnpl~llling~ picture, are visited at
rcgulllrl intervals by Hydrographic emn-
playees who make the trip ~fr~omT Madden
]Dam, partly by launch and the rest of
the way in a wooden cayuco manned
by a couple of husky Panamanian
palancamen.
Chlicol is 10 unles~~ from Madden Dam
as the crow flies but it is 15 miles by
river, or two hours in a launch plus one
hour in a cayuco.
I-llinjlpllu-lt inspected at C~hlco are the
atillingF well (shown in the center of the!
I'hotogr aphl) which records the hIg(lhth
0r 1( she rives an a graph, and a ga~uging
car which swings over the flooded river
on a cable. Flam11 the car a current mneter
is lowered to measure the speed and
depth of the water.
Much of this picturesqule but tedious
part of the hytl~r~ druguphrs' job will be a
thingl of the past: as soon as a new r
telemetering system is installed, proba-
bly by the end of the next dry season.












































~ _L II _rr~ __..1_...111_1_.~-I _..1_~


APPROXIMATELY ONE MILLION TONs of
heavy fuel and diesel oils should move
through the Panama Canal during the
present fiscal year, according to a report
prepared by John D. Hollen, Chief of
the Executive Planning Staff, following
conferences with oil producers and ship-
pers in California.
The shipments, which will be slightly
less than those during fiscal year 1959,
will be intercoastal, originating in Cal-
ifornia and destined for the United
States East Coast.
Heavy surpluses of fuel oils have built
urp periodically on the West Coast. This
is due to an unbalanced production
situation in California, where there is a
Ieavy demand for gasoline and a low
!.emand for oil for heating and thermal
Power.
One year ago, shippers said, there
vas an inventory of approximately 44
,nillion barrels of fuel oil on the West
I:oast. Today this inventory is down to
27 Million barrels. Oil companies nor-
mally try to maintain a balance of 20
million. barrels on hand.
This means that within the pre-
ent year, probably during the winter
inonths, seven million barrels-one mil-
iion tons-may be shipped to the East
Coast via the Panama Canal.
Efforts are being made to increase
gasoline output and reduce heavy pro-
dlucts production at most of the W~est
Coast refineries. It appears, however,
that there will still be a growing surplus
of residual oils-the heavy fuel and
dliesel oils-which wIould mean fairly
regular continuing intercoastal shi~p-
ments of a million or more tons each
year.
Crude oil movements from Venezuela
to California were off slightly this year,
but doubled after mandatory controls,
Federal restriction of imports, went into
effect last May. Oil companies state that
although first quarter shipments have
been heavy, they may drop off during
the last three months of the calendar
year. They should continue, however,
to be at least 20 percent above 1959
levels throughout the fiscal year.
Gasoline movements, priarily from
the Gulf area to California, increased


during the past fiscal year from 441,000
to 9116,000 tons, and these shipments
have continued hligh throughout the
summer, the Execulthe Plannlingl S(.ff
report said. This increase seems to be
the result of a gasoline surplus in the
Culf area, coupled with low tanker rates
which permit independent companies
to ship gasoline to California ;lighlth
below the West Coast refinery prices.
Tanker movements should remain
fairly constant throughout the winter
months until the fuel oil movement is
finished and will probably dr opl slighly l
before thle end of the fiscal year, the
report adds. From that level, the Pa. II
ama Canar's normal growth rate on oil
shipments should apply, unless some
other unforeseen factor appears.
In the same report, an increased
movement of iron ore thmughl~l the I)nI-
ama Canal is predicted. Ore movements
may possibly make up for the slight
decrease in oil movements throughout


t-he remainder of the year.
Peruvian are production facilit~ies
havea been increased and thec steel com-

imports toadd ro hesrsIn 1C kple,wh. rIil h


from Latbrador will probably b~e tra~ns-
ferrred to the hunthI) Americanl run when
the freeze?-up comes in the? north, which
would indicate heavy are shipenots~
thinghl~l the winlter months.
Meanwh~rlile,. .Ihbough~l the eff~eets of
the prot~rneted steel strike wrarl belginl-
ninlg to be reflected inl Canni tllnflie .e
the first quarter of 111- fiscal year I.h atL1
tlodlic was at a record first quarter level.
to ne mrlked itllndintio of the effceels
of the steel strike was t~he drop in shrip-
ments of iron and steel manufaukctures
(l1ou11h the C:1m..lI. Shlipnu asll of this

were thle lowest for an1y month1(I rllnc


OCEAN-GOING TRANSITS
THR6UOH PANAMA CANAL


1000N


eco N
uC


soo


LK0


YoNfusI


THE PANM GANAL REVIE




























































































20 -THE PANMhIA C.0,0r. Rs~E1E








GREEN GOLD



(This is the first of a series of stories which will appear from
time to time on some of the commodities which are shipped
thoughlll the Canal.)
BANANAS, the "green gold" of Central and South Amer-
ica, and of the Isthmus of Panama, represent one of the
fastest growing of any of the hundreds of commodities
which transit the Canal yearly. Shipments of bananas 3
during the past fiscal year were almost exactly ii times
those of just 20 years ago.
The bananas come from many places-P]tanama, Costa
Rica and Ecuador. They go principally to thie U~nite~d
States and Europe, where Germany is a major consumer.
Bananas are Panama's major export item, although
Ecuador currently leads the world in their production.
The highly perishable "Chiqjuita banana," a name
devised by the United Fruit Company whose pictures
Asnarl~t( this story, is as coddled as any single item of
Carnal cargo. .c
liananas are not cut until the ship which is to carry ,
the~m nears port. Mules, tractors and trucks bring the ;
fruiit from the plantations to central collecting stations
nglI the plantation railroads. Stem by stem they are
b ~rg for dipping. Washed free of insects and dirt, each
si li is dressed in a protective covering and stacked on
er, in a slatted box car lined with banana leaves.
unitedd Fruit loads its ships at night from a steady.
of banana-laden cars. Specially devised loading
p? carries the sterns from the docks to the holds.
eventually, the bananas find their way into banana
s .is, banana flour, banana ice-cream, banana bread,
a_ are simply eaten as they are, just as the family in the
p ur"'e at the right is doing.


TH PANAMA CANAL REVIEWP







CANAL TRANSITS -- COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT

First Quarter, Fiscal Year
Avg. No.
1960 1959 Transits
1951-55
Atlantic Pacific
to to Total Total Total
Pacific Atlantic
Commercial Vessels:
Ocean-going... .---------- 1,320 1,279 2,599 2,261 1,680
Small*__ ..... -------- ..... -- 92 95 187 214 304
Total commercial_- ______ 1,41 1,7 ,8 ,7 ,
U. S. Government vessels:**
Ocean-going -_. .----- 27 15 42 47 201
Small* __ .- ..----- 25 37 62 58 89
Total U. S. Government ___~. .. 52 52. 104 105 290
Total commercial and U. S.
Government _________--.~ I... ( 1.6 1.! ,0 ,5.9 1."4
*Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement: tons..,
**Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.



PRINCIPAL COMIMODITrIES SHIPPED THROUGH THE CANAL
Pacific to Atlantic
(A1F:Cargo figures in long tons)
First Qfiarter, Fiscal Year
Commodity 16199 Average
1951-55
Ores, various. ... 2,027,3911 1,613,345 987,567
Petroleum and products excludess asphalt). .853,594 683,367 339,598
Lumber .679,224 720,111 798,109

Canned foodi products 331,094 317,113 309,830
Bananas .. 1 284,391, 273,303 155,958
Metals, various .236,623 219,747 175,110
Nitrate of soda. 209,843 186,106 250,093
Food products in refrigeration (except fresh
fruit) .192,776 159,594 142,823
Wheat. 192,129 184,226 473,208
Iron and steel m'anuf actulres. 121,049 52,024 39,171
Cof ee. ... .. .. .. .. .. 191 2557 92666
Pulpwood .85,074 57,166 44,248
All others ... .1,015,230 924,559 581,037
Total .. .. .. ... .1 7,314,822 6.295,291 4,869,790

Atliantic to Pacific


Commodity


First Quarter, Fiscal Year
1960 1959 A~vea5

.1,641,630 1,533,041 709,710
.11,052,9071 : 797,547 539,013
609,987 52,038 10,321
.355,501 406,500 376,917
348,529 323,428 156,591
.258,151 250;436 43,705
178174 238,491 99,311
.152,811 87,282 53,676
.146,315 115,871 45,236
IM5,86 16,10 9
90,096 90,444 90,900
.78,671 71,847 12,834
76,900 100,504 49,017
.76,631 59,125 66,627
1,15,43. 1,058,492 1,209,482
.6,398,869 5,387,459 i 3,632,900


Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt).
Coal and coke........ .
Scrap Metals .. .
Iron and steel manufactures. ..
Phosphates. .
Soybeans. . . . .
Sugar .
Ores, various. .... .
Chemicals, unclassified. .. ..
Su phur .. .
Paper and paper products. .. .. ..
Cotton, raw ... ... .
Wheat .
Automobiles and parts. ... .
All others ... .. .
Total . . . .


FIVE BABY FLATTOPS, believed to be the
first sizable fighting ships of the United
States Navy to be sold as scrap to Japan
since the outbreak of World War II,
began arriving in Cristobal last week
from New York en route to Japan as
dead tows.
Two of the overaged, demilitarized
and decommissioned warships arrived
October 30, two more this week, and
the fifth is due here later in the month.
All in service in the Altlantic during
the later days of W~orld War II, the ves-
sels are the Manila Bay, the Natoma
Bay, the Mission Bay, Guadalcanal, an~d
the White Plains. All average 10,000
deadweight tons and are 512 feet in
length. The Mission Bay and GuadEl-
canal were under tow of the Elbe,
newest unit of the world-wide fleet of
e.Smi an IdB Cmpny of Rotteadaml.
rived in towr of the Smit Company tirg
Clyde while the White Plains will con~e
later, brought by the tug costzee. il
are being docked at Cristobal prior to
being towed through the Canal by Parl-
ama Canal tugs. Fernie and Compally
are acting as agents for the ships he e.,
The five flattops were sold as scr.-p
last April to the Hug Neu Corporation
of New York for a reported pr-ice of'
$140,767 each. The tow from New Yor:k
to Japan is expected to take approxi-
mately 75 days.
Of the five, the Guadlalcanal a perrs
to have had the most noteworthy wIar
record. In addition to bearing the nam-e
of one of the bloodiest battlegrounds of
the war in the Pacific, she has a combat
distinction of her own. In 1944, she
took part in the capture of the f 4t
enemy warship taken by the U. S. Navy
on the high seas since 1815. Thel p~l; i.
the German submarine U'-505.s.:s
boarded northeast of the Colpe- 1ca~l
Islands.
The Smit tug Elbe, which if mu~\ Iag
the Gucadalcanal and the Mlijsion B',;,.
created a sensation when she ma i\i~l ed n
New York last month, accoJdmg to- thle
New York Times. This tul7, anld heir
older sister, Clyde, are exce ded in -.I.T
only by the com an 's -I.200)-brnln-
power Zwoarte Zee, the biggest on thi
oceans.
The Elbe is twice as power-tu! w~id
nearly twice as long as the lar~gest of
the New York harbor tugs. She crriies
a crew of 26. In addition, she prov\ides~
extra berths for occasional tra~elle~rs.
such as the 163 "shipriders" brough~lt
from Rotterdam to man the tw~o car-
riers on the trip to Japan.

22 THE PANAMA CANAL REVII'W









SAILNGS
FROM CRISTOBAL
Ancon................November 7
Cristobal. .. ... ... .November 18
Ancon. .. .. .. .. .. .. November 25
FROM NEW YORK
Cristobal. .. .. .. .. .. .November 10
Ancon .. .. .. .. .. .. .. November 17
Cristohal. .... .. .. .November 27


RETIREMENTS
(Continu~ed fromt page: 19)
Mrs. Inez L. Irving, Jamaica; Sales
Checker, Supply Division; 17 years, 6
months, 7 days; Jamaica.
Tereso Julio T., Canal Zone; Cleaner,
Electrical Division; 18 years, 7 months, 15
days; Colon, R. P.
W~illiam Jump, Colombia; Supervisory
Timekeeper, Industrial Division; 54 years,
7 months, 7 dlays; Panama, R. P.
Fred W. Lawrence, Washington; Sani.
tary Engineer, Maintenance Division; 15
years, 7 months, 5 days; future address
undecided.
Carmen M. Melendez, Ptanama; Wlash-
man, Supply Division; 44 years, 3 months,
21 days; Panama, R. P.
Cyril O. Minerve, Crenada; Sales See-
tion Head, Supply Division; 36 years, 6
months, 1 day; Fanama, R. P.
Albert R. Minor, Pennsylvania; Ac-
countingf Assistant, Office of the Comp-
troller; 17 years, 1 month, 24 days; New
Orleans, La.
Louis L. Moolchan, Trinidad; Mail
Clerk, Administrative Branch; 45 years, 4
months; Arraijan, R. '.
Joseph Norville, Barbados; Track Labor-
er, Railroad Division; 31 years, 93 months,
27 days; Colon, R. P.
Louis Parfait, Martinique; Library As-
sistant, Canal Zone Library; 35 years, 3
months, 12 days; Panama, R. P.
W~illiam John Park, New York; Police
Private, Cristabal Police Division; 10 years'
3 months; remaining on the Isthmus.
Eldon L. Phelan, Oregon; Police Private,
Police Division; 21 years, 6 months, 12
days; will remain on Isthmus.
Cyril A. Plummer, Jamaica; Laborer,
Supply Division; 33 years, 8 months, 2
days; Colon, R. P.
Harry J. Quinlan, Michigan; Associate
Supervisory Boiler Inspector, Industrial
Division; 18 years, 6 months, 14 days;
Kansas City, Mo.
Mrs. W~ilma A. Siler, Louisiana; Clerk,
Office of M~ana~ger, Supply Division; 19
years, 4 months, 3 dlays; New Orleans, La.
Thomas Smith, Jamaica; H~ih Lift Truck
Operator, Supply Division; 25 years, 9
months, 16 days; Colon R. P.
Theophilus C. Tavares, Jamaica; Head
Janitor, Division of Schools; 32 years, 16
days; St. Andrew, Jamnaica.
Simon B. Thomas, Jamaica; High1 Lift
Truck Operator, Supply Division; 32 years,
5 months, 18 days; Colon, R. P.
Paul D). Thompson, l e.... .. Police
Sergeant, Police Division; 29 years, 1
month, 14 days; Pompano Beach, Fla.


TRAFFIC MOVEMENT~ OVER. MAINV TR~AD)E ]ROUTES
The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:


First Quarter, Fiscal Year


Avg. No.
Transits
19st-ss
178
387
113
239
49
167
111
83
353

1,6580


1959

153
485
103
350
48
206
278
88
550

2,261


1960

183
644
95
464
57
234
243
75
604

2,599


United. States Intercoastal .
East Coast of U. S. and South America.
East Coast of U. S. and Central America .
East Coast of U. S. and Far East .
U. S./Canada East Coast and Australasia.
Europe and West Coast of U. S./Canada.
Europe and South America.
Europe and Australasia .
All other routes .

Total traffic . .. .


MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND 'OILLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
(Fiscal years)


Tolls
(In thousands of


Transits


dollars)
Average
Touls

$2,432
2,403
2,431
2,559
2,361
2,545
2,444
239

2,588
2,672
2,528



$29,g96


Month


Avg. No.
Transits
3ssues
557
554
570
607
568
599
580
59

608
629
599



6,562


1960

888
888
823









2,599


1959

767
777
717
806
773
793
826
71

830
897
859

2,261
9,718


196i0

$4,219
4,111
3,828









$12,158


1959

$3,681
3,664
3,357
3,718
3,628
3,682
3,925
3 65

3,907
4,179
4,035

$10,702
$45,529


July. . . .
August. . . .
Septe mbler . . .
October . . .
November ......---
December .........
January . .
lhrl~ary .
Apr-il . . .
May.
June . . .
Totals for first 3 mon isa ya thl

Totals for fiscal year. .


CANVAL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC BY NATIONALITY


First Quarter, Fiscal Year


59
Tons
of
cargo
1,563,127
100,732
109,604
93,770
258,711
6,323
144,428
595,809
184,515
2183
1,259,631
1,735,802
321,298
39,899
1,054,504
470,786
61,129

3,021,926
154,044
11,682,750


19:


1951-55
Average Average
number tons of
transits cargo
286 1,753,044
15 67,567
3 28,206
35 40,056
60 220,751
34 20,882
31 129,938
38 85,956
28 221,195

57 367,978
31 189,420
28 131,769
4) 3,288
189 723,252
96 548,900
5 13,392
49 1583
538 3,364,851
22 94,672
1,680 8,502,690


Nationality



British ..
Chilean. .
Chinese ..
Colombian .
Danish. .
Ecuadorean .
French. .
German ..
Greek ...
He duran. .


Netherlands .

Panamanian .
Peruvian .


All other .
Total. .


Num-
ber of
transits
278
24
10
72
96
17
38
291
53

207
251
104
21
275
64
15

540
61
2,599


Tons
of
cargo
1,744,958
150,058
62,098
112,055
292,519
26,915
184,905
713,304
490,208


1,320,707
2,090,137
349,749
26,926
1,550,273
242,235
62,317


3,423,474
139,870
13,713,691


Num-
ber of
transits
268
20
18
66
85
9
34
220
20

184
212
76
20
237
95
17

496
35
2,261


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW

























CARGO (long tons)
Commercial. .. .. 3,496,070 4,335,716
.U.S. Covernent. 117,425 18,351
Total. .. .. .. 3,613,495 4,354,067
*Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and small,


York yards as they arrived on the final
leg of their round-the-world run. The
conversion job involved the installation
of self-trimming, longitudinal bulkheads
ad took about tdvo weeks, a cording to

for the Isbrantsen Company.
Research Ship
TERUYO MARU, 811 eXperimental research
fisheries ship, owned by the Fishery


TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING
VESSELS IN SEPTEMBER


Agency of the Japanese Govermenill
will arrive at Balboa November "' fis n.
the South Pacific on hei- way to thr: C:.l-
ribbean for research purposes. Thel sh~ip
which is making her first trip to th.l~
Canal, will transit northbound Noi e\cn..
ber 9 with four research en~gineer~s ..t
the Japanese government on boar.lc.
After leaving Cristobal, the Telop..~
Maru will visit the fishing groundscl ..8
Panama, Trinidad, and Puerto Rlcco and~
return to. Cristobal December 25i 51.
will come through the Canal sour ~i .
bound December 31 and sail forl th~
fishing grounds off Samoa, and AuLsti
lia, before returning to Japan Ma achl :
N~ew Custom(t ;
THE NEW JAPhAeN E Calgdodsis Sll

Shinnihon Line fleet, was south-b~ul I
through the Canal October 28 on- ti
second half of her maiden voyage- he~~
JapmanttooN ew ok S tGl poilts a:c

dpeadw gf 1 nts, iss le tidavesse ie
her class to join the line's express roure
from Japan to the U. S. East Coast.
The ship, built by the Hitachi Shiip-
building and Engineering Company,
has six cargo holds, refrigerated coim-
partments, -tanks for bulk~ liqulids4. I .
rooms, and strong rooms for \alul ~'i
cargo. There are accom~odaltlons I
ten passengers and the public Ioomsj .
air-conditioned. The United Fruit CIr. .
pany acts as agent for the Shmuthl ~
Line at Canal ports.
New\ l ac.4t
ONE OF THE SLEEKEST VISitlOIS to r I'
Panama Canal in October \\.s the; bll. rI.
new auxiliary ketch Surltana which ,r-
rived in Balboa October 23 Ilnam Nc -
port Beach, Calif. en roultr to, Ca. -.l
gena, Colombia. The 15-grosl ton. !.;chlt.
owned by Thomas P. Jac kson,-~ of 1:. -
gota, Colombia, made the tr hip Ir.rni
California after only one stop ait Aur-
pulco, Mexico. On board weri-e he~
owner and two crew mem~bels.
Built- of plywood and fiberglalss. the
Sultana is 40 feet Ipng aInd \r\s c(.*0-
structed in Newport, Callif. b\ ther
Ackerman Boatworks. Her ausiliar\ I;n-
gine is a Mercedes Benz Die-sel. The~
vessel made the Canal transilt thle last
week in October and after a br~ief stop
in Cristobal for stores saile-d for C;II-
tagena which will be her new\\ homle
port.

24 .THE PANAIfIA CAN.4L RE\.11Elt


1958
717
19
736


Commercial.............. .
U.S. Government. .....



Commercial. .. .. $3,360,346
U.S. Government. 102,902
Total. .. .. .. $3,463,248


$3,830,969
32,252
$3,863,221


#019 Port Captain


Captain Axton P. Jones, above, took over
his new duties last month as Cristobal's
Port Captain. He came to the Isthmus
from command of the tanker "Ashtabula."


SH 1PP I


N\


G"


Swiss Ship
ALTH~OUGH SWITZERLAND iS a land lock-
ed nation, it has a small well-developed
merchant fleet of approximately 22
ships, several of which pass through the
Panama Canal at infrequent intervals.
The latest to come here was the General
Gulisan, a freighter capable of carrying
13,000 metric tons of cargo. Under
charter to thse Marchessini Far East
Lines, she made the Canal transit north-
bound from the Far East to U. S. East
Coast ports on October 12.
Registered at Basle, the inland port
of Switzerland on the Rhine River, the
General Gulisan can never call at her
home port. Basle is the terminal for
n thmn lare eha cony ofu sarg s

material from ports of Antwerp, Am-
sterdamn, and Rotterdam.
The General Gulisan was built in
Yugoslavia in' 1957 and is represented
in the Canal Zone by Payne and Ward-
law.
Old Friend
TH-E SWEDISH ore carrier Svealand which
made nearly 150 trips through the Pan-
amna Canal between 1925 and 1949,
returned for another visit recently.
Veteran Canal employees, who remem-
bered the ore carrier when she was one
of the Canal's super customers, wel-
comed their old friend when she went
south en route from Amsterdam to
Chile and upon her return late in Sep-
tember with a cargo of 21,600 tons of
iron ore bound -for Amsterdam.
The Suealand, built in 1925, is owned
by Dan-Axel Brostrom of Sweden and
has a gross tonnage of 15,598 and a
length of 571 feet, which is small pota-
toes compared to the super-carriers
now making regular trips through the
Canal. C. B. Fentoni and Comlpany rep-
resent the ship here.
Rice Carriers
THE FLYING CLIPPER, One of the eight
Isbrantsen Company Inc. round-the-
world ships whch have been refitted so
that each can carry 2,500 tons of bulk
rice from the West Coast of the United
States to Puerto Rico, arrived in Balboa
October 18 on her way to Puerto Rico
and U. S. East Coast ports. This ship
was followed November 4 by the Flying
Hawk, and the Flying Endeavor is due
here November 14.
The ships were refitted recently at
the Bethle~hem Steel Company's New