<%BANNER%>

DLOC PCANAL



xml version 1.0 standalone yes
Volume_Errors
Errors
PageID P24
ErrorID 3


Panama Canal review
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00200
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: June 1957
Publication Date: 1959
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
sobekcm - UF00097366_00184
System ID: UF00097366:00200
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text



N~AL


ol. 10,
gustt 7





W. E. POTTER, Governor-President -- J. RUFUS HARDY, Editor
JoHN D. McELHENY, Lieutenant Governor = E ELEANOR M9CILHENNY, Assistant Editor
WILL~IAu G. AREY, JR. Offiial Panama Canal Company Puliciation EUNICE RICHARD and WILLIE K. FRIAR
Panama Canal Information Officer Published Monthly At Balboa Heights, C. Z. Editorial Assistants
Printed at the Printing Plant, Mount Hope, Canal Zone
On sale at all Panama Canal Service Centers, Retail Stores, and The Tivoli Guest House for 10, days after publication date at 5 cents each.
Subscriptions, 61 a year; mail and back copies, 10 cents each.
Postal money orders made payable to the Panama Canal Company should be mailed to Editor, The Panama Canal Review, Balboa Heights, C. Z.


SHE 14,000 men and women wvho w\ork For tThe Canal organ-
ization, full- or part-timie, can do more thiings and are the finest
example of a coordinated w\ork force found anywhlere in the world.
Cov'ernlor 11'. E. Potter believes this, strongl\.
He harS consriderable grounds for hris belief. \\'herle else does sulch
a group pilot aInd repair ships, balke bread, teachl school, milk cow\s,
keep aiccounts, build houses and bridges, rake grass. manufacture
electricity, run railroads, heal the sick, or sell shoes-all in the course
of a day's work?
The Governor's faith in the organization he heads is based, too,
on the kpoiwledge of what has happened to the organiation and its
personnel in the past turbulent ten years at the middle of the
twentieth century.
If ever an organization was lifted by its heels and shaken,
trimmed, and generally bedevilled, it was the one which puts
ships through the Panama Canal. Before they fully recovered from
the rush, overcrowding, and confusion of the~ war period, Canal
employees were struck violently and swviftll with reorganization,
incorporation, income taxes, higher rents, and a necessity to adapt
themselves to a changed philosophy of work accomplishment.
The soundness and pliability of the Canal organization in the
face of such changes was fully demonstrates last year when more
and bigger ships wetnt through the -~twatiwa than ever before
-9,718 ocean-going commercial vessels, compared with 5,448 just
t ya aoAbout two-thirds of the employees today have 10 or more years
of service. Most will agree that they are better off novv than when
the fiscal year 1950 began. But, few would want to go through
another ten years like the past.
For lack of a better descriptive term, THIE PANAMA CANAL
REVIEWV has selected "The Turbulent Fifties" for the decade that
ended last June 30. The REVIEW'S new size and format is inaugu-
rated this month with a look at what happened in the past ten years.
In this issue, The RIEVIIEW tells some of the changes in the
organization, in personnel, and working conditions. Later issues will
tell of: living conditions and physical improvements to the waterway
and the Canal Zone landscape.


W'. E. Potter


/


J. S. Seybold


F.K.~Newcomer


2 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW




















































~i. i~k Lels L. Dlonov
LB, M~oore
P., R ohnson Conmun
~lisol ]H. Crook --' H. L. DrmnoV
~I. A. Ferguson Wilson fj. C


TRE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 3


Jar g :


rr


.CoL II.D
McP~lhanyv r,/V


John S. Seybjold


Voi~gel ~

CoL H. M Id ~

Comsptrollers 'p
S1~ Brd nenr b


Lieutenant Governors


CoL H., O. Paxson


Co~ Johni D. ~


rrgCoL SW 4a~ D, Avepryr;d I
Cot-Charile 'srr~ 9 Broo
CrJ Th~omas G,'Faisays
SArsonne~ Dh ttors
:Seiwx Paul
,.%dadrd jA. Dooanfa.
.
See etari


Directors


,Dunlop
L N o~StPeers, Ji,


Capt. Wllgihfus ~ :

Transportattok rii ., ~itt,
A. L. Frather
Edwcard N. Stokes
~.c. l~edinger

Ofvil BFfairs Directorsla~c
Col. Richardson Selee


Engineedog and~ Coastruction
DirectorS

George (f tMiftts .
M: Arpold ~

an~ud Emoployee Service
Direetors


nity Services Directr.:'.~r
an 9ic
%;


111.. .g


7i~lIL q50


\9"3


1 9 58 TU WEa.







~~s 1954 ,.


ce
















IIF TH~ERE; WAS a common denominator for the
Canal organization and its personnel in the fifties,
it was change.
Change characterized the 1950-59 decade as dis-
tinctively in Panama Canal affairs as the business
boom of the twenties, the depression of the thirties,
and the war years of the forties.
TIhe characterization was the more deeply etched
because relatively few changes of a significant na
ture were made in the organization between 1914
and 1949. Th personnel, too, remained stable~. Year
after year the most excitement came with a change
in Governors and the assignment of a new Engineer
of Maintenance, except for the upswee~p and reduc-
tion of force because of World War II.
As a result, employees have become adroit in the
past ten years in meeting newv people or seeing old
friends in new places, and in learning new titles,
new functions, and new organization nomenclature.
Only a fewv refer now in present sterns to the Supply


Department, the Mechanical Division, or the De-
partment of Operations; to the Engineer of Main-
tenance, the Chief Quartermaster, or the Finanlce
Director. Some still say Clubhouses instead of Serv-
ice Centers and only a fewN refer to Retail Stores
instead of Commissaries.
At the beginning of the decade there were 21,338
full time employees. At the end of last month, the
roster had been cut to 12,477 names,
Of the 17 men listed as majoro" officials in the
Governor's annal report for the' fiscal year 1950,
not one remains in service. In a more extended list
'of about 100 officials published that year, only 15
are now with the organiation. Of these only four
staff or division heads held the same jobs at the
beginning of fiscal year 1950.
The organization has undergone a drastic change.
Units and functions have been consolidated, some
have disappeared, and new ones have come into
being.


These men headed the Canal organization in 1950. Only two are still on the job. How many do you recognize? See page 8.


THE 1950'S WERE



YEARS OF CHANGE





THEY' hIEANT'


Beginning of decade





21,338 Employees





1951~~Md

18,735 Employees
$38,585,773

1953 ~~dB


16,392 Employees
$643,3I8,I05




13,873 Employees
$41,179,268


1957~Mb

12,849 Employees
8B43,I42.583




12,477 Employees


TiHE P.\NAMA. CA\N.L Olgalizaltj on on
the Isth-mus w\as slinmmed downl from
21,338 employees at the beginning of
the fiscal year 19J501 to 1"-177 full-time
at the enld o~f thle past fiscal yea.
This hear y pr~uninig w~as necon-
plished while thle main businersj of put-
ting ships thr~oughi the Canal w as 1n-
creasing b! lea.ps and bounds Mlost of
the force redtuctiojn Iesullted fro~m SuICh
basic facrosis as poheyl changes, econlo-
mic "conlitlons, anld the~ 19~55 T~ealt\.
but there wa~s a chippung .I\awa mI mluch
smaller b-its, too.
Few Ilnemrembe today\ thait Iless than
ten yearsi ag~o they spclnt pieces of paipe.
called coupons. in th-e Commli~sal ies and
Clubhouses uistead of cas~h. or that they
received pay \ouchlers cashed onl\ by
the Caunal's TlcaSurer.I. These changes
and many! things lik~e them her~e, there, .
and eve~ryw\here~t m the or~ganization aill
helped brling thle workin-g force dott-n
to its pieetjri level, appiosimately the
same as tha3t inl 1935.
One of the mo~st notable thinlgj abo-ut
the fifties was that th decade mlalked
the end of anl e1.a in thle Cana~l hlistory .
-an era inl which Canal affails had been
guided by a gnerationl of mncl w\ho hnd
helped buLild the wateirway\ anld thlen
stayed on to r~un it. It wras a generation
of unusual cha~ralctelistles It gained for
the operating o~ganilzationr a wolrld-wide
reputation as a we~ll-oile-d machmne.
Until sometime after thle close of
World W\ar II. miost of the kesr positions
-and manyv lesser jobs-werPe held by
n~ien with cons~tructionl day selv \ice. The\
included the Cov\er~nor, Chief Quar~teI-
master, ExecuLtivet SecIretary\. Direc tor of
Personnel, Generlal Mlanager- of thle Pan1-
amna Railroa~d Comnpan! anel mny i~
Others of le-sctr r~ank.
TIhe individuals of this g.ouIP took a
deep, almost p~ossejsi\e pride in the
Canal. Their influe-nce w ~as a1 clonunant l~
factor in its affairs for 35 \eals. Today
onl eight emnployeecs c~an boust of con;-
struction cla\ serv\ic.
The pelsonnel changes of the past
decade wererc most plonoulnced amolg

THE PANA.M CA.\.L. REVIrrw 5


thlose In to:p Icevel Ipositions. This w~as
panlth\ becauISe' of the retirement of
man\n of the oldtuneis and partl! be-
cause of the state of: fur in the organ-
iz.ation dmlingl the war anid later years.
The fhities c~overed the full adrninis-
ti atrcn of one Governor anid three-
iour-thls of thie tea ms of tw.o others. The
qua.'driennialI change of Co\ernor~s is
nnormal, but in the past tenl !ears there
havet beenl fi\e Lieutena~nt ~overnlor~s
four Comlptrollers, and live directors
of the Mlarine. EngineeringR and Con-
jtruction, and Supplyl anld C~or mmunity

The Canal C~omplan\' Boald oJf Di-
rector~s has n-ot beeni untoutlchd b\ per-
sonnel sh-ifts. Thirti-tw\o drlfleent men
haver ier\ed on thle 13-mlan Board since
thle P~lanama Canal Comnpan! came into
be-ing lul! 1. 19511. Onl! three. Gen.
lulian L. Schles. C~en. C~leni E. Edger-
tcnl. and Johni W\. Alartv-n ha\e ser\ed
the entire eight !'earj.
Of` thelc burecau dir~ector-s and staff.
onl\ Paul A. Bentz.. General Counsel,
hias hleld the same ]ob and title through-
ouit th~ fifties~. E. A. Doolan. Personnel
Dllrectojl, w a\S promoted to his present
posfitionl at the time of thie Ireorgani-
zaltion. At the same time H. L. Donoan-,
nlow\ Ci\il Affairs Dihector, became Coml-
mul~nit\ Service Directo.
Other officials w ho hold the same
Icobs today\ they did tenl year.us go ar~e
E. Hl. Blowrder, Jr., assistant EngineecIr-
inig andc Conlshvtrutn Director; F. H.
Leichen. laintelnancee Enguneer; and
R. C. StOck~ham. ChieF of the Locks Di-
\ilcon
Otheis listed In a 19-19-50) directory
of ,Ibouit 1110 officials hiere and inl the
States whoir ar~e still wvork~ing are W\. Ai.
Wh'litma~n. Paul Al Runnestranld, B3. 1.
E:erson. F. H. Baklu\in. F. R. Joluiston,
Peter DeStefa.no?, P. A. W\hite-. R. D.
El, Phiilip S. Thornto~n. anid Wa'lter R.
Linidsay.
There arIe ma n! other s among the key
onhcials of todgi! writh lonig Canal serrv-
ice, mniy! of w\homn we~re promoted to
their plesenlt positions duringg thle fifties.


C H ANGING I ~~


EMPLOYEES AND
EMPLOYMENT COSTS'


FACES


= 500 Employees







reductions in many instances combined
with such factors as extension of the
income tax to the Canal Zone, rent
increases, and rising costs, helped cr-eate
the most serious morale problem in~ the
early fifties of any since malaria and
"yellow jack" sent hundreds home in
the early 1900's.
The feeling of job insecurity, often
engendered by rumor, and rising living
costs brought a wave of resignations
and voluntary retirements from 1951
through 1954. The gross turnover rate
for the fiscal year 1951 wvas 24.35 per-
cent among American employees. The
voluntary turnover rate that year was
18.5 percent, with 805 resignations and
voluntary retirements.


While this peak could be attributed
directly to the imposition of income tax,
the turnover rate by voluntary separa-
tions from the service continued at a
high level for the next few years; it ran
about 11 percent or more each year.
The turnover rate from, all causes in
those three years ranged from 17.9 to
23.7 percent.
wage increases and fringe benefits
since the mid-fifties have largely offset
the out-of-pocket losses suffered earlier
and today, the turnover rate indicates a
much more stable organization.
The gross turnover rate now averages
about 11 percent, well below the over-
all Federal Government gross rate
which runs from 16 to 18 percent.


Heads of all major units of the Civil
Affairs Bureau and many of the Health
Bureau are included in this group, as
are F. G. Dunsmoo0r, of the Governor's
Office, and H. I. Perantie, Administra-
tive Branch. Operating unit heads in
this list include R. D. Reece, J. B. Smith,
W H. Esslinger, ]E. B. O'Brien, Jr., R.
W. Adams, WV. A. Van Siclen, Jr.,
Truman H. Hoenke, T. G. Relihan, J.
C. Randall, H. E. May, L. B. Magnuson,
F. H. Baldwin, and J. C. Turer,
While the reorganization of July 1950
did little at the time to disturb the
average employee, subsequent changes
of lesser proportions have affected many
people and their jobs.
These changes with attendant force


Foun CANAL UNITs sustained more than
three-fourths of the loss of nearly 10,000
employees between July 1949 and June
1959. They were the Health Bureau,
Supply and Service Bureau, Mainten-
ance Division, and Industrial Division,
Economic conditions caused the heavy
personnel loss in the Mechanical (In-
dustrial) Division in the early fifties.
This division had been one of the largest
during the war, with a peak force of
4,650 employees. This force was re-
duced to 1,460 by July 1, 1949.
Today, the Industrial Division has
428 employees, over 4,000 less than the
wartime peak and some 1,000 less than
at the beginning of the decade.
The Maintenance Division, consisting
of the former Building and Municipal
Engineering Divisions, dropped from
2,334 to 863 employees in the ten-year
period. The merger of the two divisions
in January 1953 and the subsequent
force reduction was brought about by
the decision to do all major construc-
tion work by contract rather than by
force account.
A big cut in the force wass made at
the time of the merger and the force
was further reduced after the division
completed the Morgan Avenue develop-
ment and quarters construction, the last
major construction project handled by
the division. The Maintenance Division
force was again cut when the water
management contract with the Republic
of Panama was terminated on June 30,
1953.
The Health Bureau was more severely


affected by termination of the water
contract than the Maintenance Division,
since it then employed four U. S. per-
sonnel and 700 non-U. S. citizens to
handle trash and garbage collections in
the Republic.
Two years later the H-ealth offices of
Panama and Colon were closed follow-
ing the signing of the 1955 Treaty which
provided for the assumption of all public
health functions in the t~wo cities by the
Republic of Panama.
Consolidation of the out-patient
clinics and heavy reductions in the san-
itation forces were other factors in the
reduction of the Health Bureau person-
nel, from 3,150 mn July 1949, to its
present level of 1,2125-
Units of the Supply and Community
Service Bureau were most severely af-
fected by commitments in the 1955
Treaty of any in the Canal organization.
During the calendar year 1957, after
the withdrawal of commissary privileges
from non-U. S. citizens living outside
the Zone, the Commissary Division force
was cut by 750 employees and several
of: the major retail stores were closed.
The Service Centers were less severe-
ly hit by this 1955 Treaty commit-
ment. The force had already been pared
down to a minimum in anticipation of
the Treaty implementation. The closing
of the Hotel Tivoli as a commercial
hostelry in 1951 and the transfer of the
Hotel Washington to Panama, both
under agreements with the Republic,
resulted in the reduction from 317


employees ten years ago to only 36 now
on a full-time basis, the severest per-
centage loss of any single unit in the
past ten years.
Another unit of the Supply and Com-
munity Service Bureau, the Storehouse
Branch, has had its personnel cut in
half. This reduction was caused by a
decision in the early fifties to permit
contractors to supply building materials
from outside sources.
Among the divisions directly con-
cerned with the waterway and its main-
tenance, the Dredging Division has had
the biggest percentage loss of any. Ten
years ago the division had 990 em-
ployees. Although the force was aug-
mented in October 1957 by the transfer
of the Aids to Navigation Section from
the Marine Bureau, the total employ-
ment now is only 534. The reduction
was made as various channel and harbor
improvement projects were completed.
While these units have been the most
severely cut in the past decade, the
personnel reductions have not been re-
s~tricted wholly to operational units.
Both the Ofied of the Comlptroller and
the Personnel Bureau have fewer em-
ployees now than ten years ago, the
proportionate outs being substantial.
Ten years ago units now composing the
SOffice of the Comptroller had 367 em-
ployees, as compared with today's roll
of 296 employees. The Personnel Bu-
reau had 102 employees in July 1949,
while there are only 65 employees at
present.

6 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


THEY MEANT



LESS MEN,



































MOST OF THE: significant changes in the Canal organi-
zation, particularly those affecting personnel, took place
during the first half of the fifties.
There have been numerous organizational changes
during thle administration of Governor Potter but most of
these were internal, at the bureau or division level in the
interest of efficiency or to meet changing conditions.
Commitments of the 1955 Treaty and the present major
impovemnent program have altered the work level in
many units.
The era of change dates back to the reorganization of
the Panama Canal and Panama Railroad Company on
July 1, 1950. This was the first major realignment of func-
tions and units since the permanent operating organiza-
tion was established April 1, 1914. All the changes and
alterations since then have been made within that general
framework.
The decade just ended was barely two weeks old when
Secretary of the Army Gordon Gray forwarded a memo-
randum. to President Truman requesting him to issue an
Executive Order covering a sweeping reorganization of
the Canal-Railroad.
His request was based on recommendations of Gov. F.
K. Newcomer who wrote the Secretary that he and other
Governors had felt the need for a general realignment to
meet the requirements of operating conditions and to
eliminate some of the complexities in. the conduct of gov-
ernment business which had arisen since 1914.
The proposed organization had been under study for a
considerable time by the Plans Section (now Executive


Planning Staff) headed by W. Hi. Dunlop. The study had
its inception about four years earlier when Gov. J. C.
Mehaffey told a staff conference that active consideration
should be given the problem as soon as adjustments could
be made from wartime activities,
Among those who took an active part in the study and
the actual realignment were Col. Charles G. Holle,
Engineer of Maintenance, and his successor, Col. Herbert
D. Vogel; F. H. Wang, Executive Secretary; E. A. Erbe,
Executive Assistant to thne Governor; and Arnold Bruck-
ner, Finance Director.
The reorganization plans were temporarily set aside in
August 1949 after Congress requested an overall investi-
gation of Canal-Railroad operations. This study, which
led, two years later, to incorporation of Panama Canal
operations and the present Company-Governent, was
conducted by the Bureau of the Budget. It was an out-
growth of an attempt to raise shipping tolls after the close
of the war.
The reorganization plan, with many refinements of the
original, was finally approved and made public in March
1950. While it caused some misgivings among top officials,
the announcement and the actual implementation in July
aroused little furore among the rank and file employees.
For officials, it meant a major change in responsibilities;
for employees, only a renaming and reshuffling of units
with perhaps a change in bosses.
Prior to the reorganization the Canal-Railroad consisted
of six major units, called departments. These were the
Executive, Operation and MWaintenance, Supply, Finance,


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


CHANT\GI































































These were the men who ran the Panama Canal in May 1950.
Ilhey From left: Capt. J. L. Bird, Superintendent, Mechanical Di-
vision; E.- A. Erbe, Special Assistant to the Governor; Col.
Were Howard Ker, Assistant Engineer of Maintenance; Palul A.
wereBentz, General Counsel; Lt. Gov. H. D. Vogel; E. A. Doolan,
10ps Acting Director of Personnel; Gov. F. K. Newcomer; Ira L.
Wright, Acting Director of Finance; Capt. R. M. Teacher,
in Marine Superintendent; Col. Richardson Selee, Acting Ceneral
Manager, Panama Railroad Company; Maj. Gen. George W*
1 9 50 Rice, Chief Health Ofieer; A. C. Medinger, Superintendent,
Dredging Division; E. C. Lombard, Executive Secretary; L.
B. Moore, Acting Chief Quartermaster.


and Health Departments, and the.Pan-
ama Railroad Company. Within this
framework were spotted the various
staff and administrative units and func-
tions.
These six departments were re-
formed into major units and the unit
nanw of bureau enac dptet uSmal

Also, the staff units were segregated and
their functions were more clearly defin-
ed. No change was made in the New
York and Washington Offices.
Except for internal reorganization,
the Finance and Health Departments
were little affected by the change. The
Panama Railroad Company also under-
went little change except in nomencla-
ture. The name, which had been a mis-
nomer for many years as an operational
unit, was changed to Railroad and
Terminals Bureau. Its functions were
divided into two principal divisions;
the railroad proper became the Railroad
Division, and the Receiving and For-
warding Agency became the Terinals
Division.
T~he most significant changes were
made in the Operation and Mainten-
ance, Executive, and Supply Depart-
ments. The objectives were a better
grouping of functions and facilities; a
lessening of the heavy responsibility of
operations then imposed on the three
department heads; and separation and
delineation of staff, administrative, and
operational fumetions.
The accompanying chart shows the
line-up of the principal units of these
three departments before and after the
change.
The plans for the reorganization were
carefully made with a view to an
organizational structure which would
be better suited to the Company-Gov-
erment, later provided in Public Law
841, nowi called the Reorganization
Act. Accordingly, there was little con-
fusion from an organizational stand-
point when the Reorganization Act
became effective July 1, 1951.
In May 1952 a new Canal adminis-
tration was inaugurated. This, coupled
with the considerable attention given to
,both personnel and organizational mat-
ters by the Board of Directors immedi-
ately after the Panama Canal Company
came into being, resulted in widespread
changes during the fiscal years 1952 and
1953.

8 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


July 1, 1951


BUREAUS
AND DIV'ISIONS
CIViL AFFAIRS
Police
Fire
PScal ICustoms and Immigration (1)
COMMIUNITY SERVICES
Housing
Clubboure (2)
Grounds Mfaintenance Branch
PERSONNEL
Emplod en cn Utilization
W'age and Classi~icain
ENGINEERING ANYD
CONSTRUCTION
Eoierrin g (3)
Building
-Mlunicipal
M~eteorol~ogy and Hydrographic
Bran~h
hfARINE
Navigation
Dm gins
SPLrY~t AND SERVICE
ComnussaryT
Storehouses
Motor Transportation
Panama Cainal Press
Hotels
INiDUSTRIAL
Production
Plant


THE


LINVE -UP


June 30, 1951


D1EPARTMIENTS
AND .DIVISIONS
EXECU!TIE
Police and Fire
Schools
Cii ~irs (1)
Panama Canal Clubboutses 2)
OPERATION AND MtAINTENANCE
Marine *
Mlechaical *
Lr s
OWC Engineering (3)
M~unicipa Engineering
Section of Meteorology and
Stton a Sneys
SUrPPLY
Commissary
District Quartermaster
Storehouse
Building
MotrdD Transportation
Pnarnam Canal Press
Hotels

" Divisions changed to bureau status
( i Dinsi-onrm nam hnged
















hAI.nY IMPORTANT MODIFICATIONs have
been made in the organization since
June 1950. Some of these were to cor-
rect maladjustments or poor alignment
of functions, others were influenced by
changes in policy, work load, or oper-
ating conditions.
During this period several lesser or-
ganizational changes took place. These
included the formation of the Admin-
istrative Branch; abolishment of the
Aeronautics Section after the transfer of
civil aviation activities from the Canal
Zone; to~ Tocumen Airport; and transfer
of the P~ayroll Division from the Execu-
tiir to the Finance Department.
The Payroll Division transfer was one
of a series of changes which culminated
in the establishment of the present Of-
fice of the Comptroller. The offices of
the Collector and Paymaster in the
Executive Department had been merged
earlier to form the Treasurer's Office and
the unit was transferred to the Finance
Department.
The Office of the Comptroller was
established by the Board of Directors
at its January 1952 meeting. Later that
year the Plant Inventory and Appraisal
Staff was organized as a unit of the of-
fice, and in January 1953 the Finance
Department and Office of the Com~ptrol-
ler were merged.
Two major organizational changes
occurred during the Escal year 1952 as
a result of the quarters replacement
program and a change in policy under
which new construction was accom-
plished by contract rather than by the
Canal's own organization. The first was
the establishment of the Contract and
Inspection Division in August 1951.
The second was the merger of the Build-
ing and Municipal Engineering Divi-
sions, two of the oldest Canal units, into
the Maintenance Division.
An important change was made in
1952 in the Canal's offices in the United
States. After a survey by a management
consultant firm employed by the Board;
the Washington Office, oldest of any
Canal unit, was closed as an operations
unit. The procurement functions were
transferred and consolidated in the New
York Offices and the supervision of ac-
counting and personnel work transfer-
red to the Isthmus.


The ~annual Company-Government
report for the fiscal year 1953 listed 15
major operational changes. The prin-
cipal ones were:
The reduction of the Industrial Bu-
reau to division status and its transfer to
the Marine Bureau;
Transfer of the Motor Transportation
Division from the Supply to the Rail-
road and Terminals Bureau and redes-
ignation of that bureau as the Transport-
ation and Terminals Bureau;
Abolishment of the Management Staff
as a unit of the Office of the Comptr~oller
and establishment of the Executive
Planning Staff in the Oflice of the Gov
ernor-President;
Transfer of the Dredging Division
from the Marine Bureau to the Engi-
neering and Construction Bureau, with
the exception of the ferry service which
was made a unit of the Navigation Di-
vision;
Redesignation of the Clubhouse Di-
vision as the Service Center Division;
Establishment of the Panama Canal
Information Offce;
Establishment of Project 13-A Divi-


,sion to supenrise work on Contractor's
Hill; and
An internal reorganization of the
Personnel Bureau.
The most important organizational
change since these of FY 1953 was the
merger of the Supply and Community
Services Bureaus in March 1956i. The
consolidation was a forerunner of the
curtailment of activities and severe
force reductions required after the with-
drawal of commissary-purchase and
free-entry privileges from non-U. S.
citizen employees residing outside the
Canal Zone. This was one of the terms
of the 1955 Treaty.
The Engineering and Construction
Bureau has undergone various organiza-
tional changes during the past four
years, largely as a result of the increased
work load in the major construction and
improvement programs.
Significant changes have been made
in the Health and Civil Affairs Bureaus
because of the consolidation of Canal
Zone H-ospitals and fire fighting services.
Both have also undergone internal re-
organizations since 1950.


Statistical material on the then future Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Govern-
ment was presented to a Special Committee of the Panama Railroad Company Board
of Directors at a meeting here in February 1951. From left: T. Coleman Andrewk,~,i
Edward D. McKim, Maj. Gen. J. L. Schley, Lt. Gen. R. A. Wheeler, Gov. F. K. New-,
comer, W. R. Pfizer, Arnold Brucker, standing, R. E. Maxwell, and Lt. Gov. It D.~
Vogel. Decisions at this meeting determined the Compariy-Governmeiit organization.


THE,PAivAMA CANAL REVrIEW


CHANGING CONDITIONS

















resignations poured in by the score.
The voluntary termination rate nearly
doubled.
For Panamanian citizens working in
the Canal Zone, income tax did not
become a reality until the latter part of
the decade. Since ratification of the 1955
Treaty between the United States and
Panama, Panamanian employees have
paid taxes to their country.
Other factors affected employee mo-
rale during the early 1950s.
There were repeated rumors of force
reductions, some of which came true
(see page 6). The long-standing 25
percent pay differential, low rents, and
other so-called fringe benefits were all
threatened.
The rent question became one of im-
mediate urgency. The handwriting ap-





Here's how each $100 in
sa ary grewv fom uy
1949 to now
Salaries based

U.S. rates Locality rates
1949 $100.00 $100.00

1950 101.31 102.13

1951 103.07 110.63

1952 114.47 123.40

1953 121.05 129.78

1954 127.63 134.04

1955 135.53 136.17

1956 140.35 146.80

1957 146.93 161.70

1958 154.82 161.70

1959 163.59 170.21


peaked on the wall in September 1951,
when the Panama Canal Company s
Board of Directors upped rents for non-
employees-shipping agents, etc.-by
100 to 150 percent. Much publicized
statements that rentss for employees
would not be increased at the present
time" failed to reassure the workers.
The Bureau of the Budget had en-
tered the picture nearly two years earlier
with an order that rents should be ~fixed
to recover interest charges on capital
investments. In Septemnber 1952, Karl
R. Bendetsen, Chairman of the Board,
announced "moderate increases" on
Canal Zone rentals. But when the actual
rents were announced, there was public
Outcry that moderatet" hardly meant
the 100 percent increase set for some
quarters.
Public indignation reached such a
stage that, during the latter part of
1952, the Secretary of the Army estab-
lished a "rent panel" to review the
Board's action on rents. Members of the
panel were three disinterested individ-
uals from the United States-Professor
Benjamin Kaplan, of the Harvard Law
School; Dr. Herbert Ashton, Director of
the Transportation, Communications,
and Utilities Division of the Depart-
ment of Commerce; and Orrin A. Bur-
rows, Assistant to the President of the
International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers.
The panel conducted public hearings
at the Tivoli, first of the sort ever held
in the Canal Zone. As a result of the
hearings and the panel's report, Zonians
won a reprieve of six months; the new
and higher rents did not begin until
July instead of January 1953.
In the meantime, the feeling of in-
security was not abating. Late in 1953,
the Board of Directors, on orders from
Congress, retained the management
consultant firm of Booz, Allen & Hamil-
ton, of Chicago, to make "an independ-
ent but comprehensive study of the
problems involved in fixing compensa-
.tion" for its employees in the Canal
zone.
After a survey which took several
weeks, the firm recommended that (1')
the 25 percent differential be retained;
(2) the differential be tax free; (3)

10 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW;


AND wHILE ALL Of these changes were
gomng on, what was happening to the
men and women who made up the work-
ing force of this changing organization?
Plentyl
Although there are fewer of them
now--12,477 today as against 21,338
ten years ago-th~ere is not a single one
who is not earning more money today
than he did ten years ago.
Almost universally they have more
fringe benefits than they had a scant
decade ago. Many of them are working
in more pleasant surroundings and
under more satisfactory, cleaner, and
safer conditions than those of the early
1950's. And without exception, they
can all look forward to greater retire-
ment benefits than they could only a
few years ago.
For the working force of the Canal
organization, the turbulent fifties got off
to a bad start.
The Twentieth Century had just pas-
sed the mid-way mark when United
States citizens learned, to their audible
dismay, that they were subject to in-
come tax. Furthermore, it appeared
almost certain that they were going to
have to pay tax retroactively for the
entire calendar year 1950.
Labor organizations and the newvly-
formed United States Citizens Associa-
tion put up a valiant fight against any
income tax at all. The Canal administra.
tion could not back their all-out fight
but did come strongly to the fore in an
appeal against the retroactive feature.
In a radiogram to washington, Gov.
Francis K. Newcomer voiced his pro-
tests. The General Counsel's Offce
prepared legislation striking out that
part of the tax measure. Col. Herbert
D. Vogel, then Engineer of Mainten-
ance, appealed to an old friend, Rep-
resentative, Daniel A. Reed, ranking
Republican member of the House Ways
and Means Committee.
With everyone pulling together, they
convinced Congress of the unfairness of
the retroactive clause. Zonians ended
up by paying taxes, but not retro-
Income tax, present day Canal of-
ficials believe, was the greatest single
influence on employee turnover in many
years. Within a period of a few weeks,


THEY ALSO MEANT





CHANGES FOR THIE BETTER:





































































ON THE COVER. The art work on this month's cover, the first of its kind ever
used on The Review, was done by Franklin Ben, of the Engineering Division,
in collaboration with Gerald A. Doyle Jr., Chief of the Architectural Branch.


rents be reduced 50 percent on Com-
pany-owned housing; (4) free home
leave travel be provided; and (5) the
status of other fringe benefits should be
retained. The Board of Directors for-
warded the report to Congress, concur-
ring with the first two points and
agreeing in principle with the others.
This was the turning point in employee
morale. Despite the loss of free hospital_
ization, by act of Congress, a few months
later, the Canal's working personnel felt
that their case had been fairly and clear-
ly presented and that some remedy was
in sight.
Since that turning point, the men and
women of the Comlpany-Government
force have received some of the benefits
recommended in the Booz, Allen &
Hamilton report. The 25 percent dif-
ferential is assured in legislation im-
plementing the 1955 Treaty. Home
leave travel is a reality by Congressional
action. Rents for quarters occupied by
United States citizens have been re-
duced slightly.
And, the working force now enjoys a
number of other fringe benefits they did
not have before.
Almost simultaneously with the pas-
sage of the Homne Leave Travel Bill,
Congress enacted two other important
pieces of legislation which affected
Zonians as well as other Federal work-
ers. One of these granted low-cost group
life insurance for all Federal employees.
Another covered such benefits as uni-
form allowances, a new longevity pay
increase scale, additional overtime com-
pensation, and certain survivor benefits.
Close on the heels of these Congres-
sional actions came action by the
employees themselves for another be-
neit--group hospitalization insurance.
Today, more than 10,000 Company-
Government employees are enrolled in
this employee-administered program.
Other advantages have come, too,
during the latter part of these turbulent
~fifties. Injury compensation is improved;
it is now figured on total rather than
base, salary. Retirement payments are
higher. Employees are paying in more
than they once did-6.5 percent of their


salary-but they receive larger retire-
ment checks. TThose retired for disability
also have things better. Recently-en-
acted legislation provides for a miriimum
disability retirement pay of 40 percent
of an employee's salary, regardless of
length of service.
A major change in retirement, of
course, is the inclusion of employees
other than United States citizens under


volvig approximately 5,000 tr~ainees in
some 250 courses per year. These cover
everything from a new and better way
of selling shoes to improved supervisory
techniques.
And in addition, dozens of Compa-
ny-Government employees have taken
specialized training in the United States,
much of this under American Manage-
ment Association sponsored programs.


Robert Van Wagner, facing camera, now head of the Canal Zone Insurance
Board, was a leading figure in the establishment of this new employee fringe benefit.


the retirement program. This became
effective last October under provisions
of the 1955 Treaty.
And there are `other, less tangible be-
nefits, which have come during this past
decade. One of these is a mnuch-aug-
mnented on-the-job training program.
During the past ten years, local training
has risen to a volume of an estimated
quarter-million man-hours a year, in-


There are incentive awards, length-
of-service pins, and other programs
designed to indicate the Company-Gov-
ernment's interest in and appreciation
of its employees.
The turbulent fifties began turbulent-
ly enough. Like the traditional' March,
it began like a lion. As far as the work-
ing force is concerned, it went out more
like a lamb.


TH PANAMA CANAL REVIEW













y*s '
i*i? *

L **~"i*~
;Jr*'(i'~"
r-rrr
rr ("
i- ''"'
i~~" "F'~~
s*


.~ Int ~ Pan

Heathoffce i Paam ad Clo wre loed


No ~ ~ I~i- ote inl t n adsc frracigefe o h
Cana Zoe drin th laterFiftes s te Uite Sttes




















Hathe ~clsin o seseanl scenic Celn ters anojd ti toe n



the shudown~l of hen Industriali Laboratorhii Hfealth seties

iana oi uig the latermia ci ties hav been disconined. And, as

treary provision, a brd Is benting bil t ovser the Canal.a


r;r~i~ '~-*'
::l~rL ~**~L,~S'
;n -**..
I. rr rr r *~Eyr
'~c*~
;~.-1* '~"~ rnq~
X'.'L,*. *:* Yi'~~*~~l~
Tt *



The hiti~s ja\r the end of the Crijtobal Coalille Sto~ion. an .~tlanti~ iide landnla


mla, President Eisenhower signed legislation for the Canal bridge.
The Tivoli Commissary was one of several which were closed.


1_
F'~'

,~iZ~tiilrl
.*,,*11**2' ..
Irr* *t*'r**
.**-I d*
*L*'"*UI~-~ '
*I*r-*I**'
r;* rrrr*l' *'"
~*- 'f"*l;'~ "
~*L**.rrr ~ I
,*_, iia*~ *-' r *r* r.
Ir**"r*~ I."*lr c I1F ~` )**"
*II~~~*~ 1
*II"'
r
*rl~ L***' I
c.* i;*'...*'"' '~ ~..:.?r~;'~
*-~' *r *
i
Pi)
Ii I .*
' y
;*.'.I 1. ~II I I** r 1
;r* C I* r
~ Y' Ir*
;i r-.t rr *r
i,*I*ci* CLYI***' i* I
; *.*.-*I .r *I .*-"':*,*!,.
L*1
:ic' ,*ir \ 4
r x- *~J
.
r. I *-
u*l ,*r*rl r
*''"*":' ~' rn *qu*
**" ,.*ri
-I Li
iF+.*.*rnr J.J,.:!J.Zt ** *.c-i-r:: *;~~-~,*-(.X L;r.i r~.*-+**XII*IY 1 tJid*C~k~~


The Washington was among properties transferred to Panarta.


Paychecks deli\ ered on the iob did s\ana n illh the pa! car. a holdo r r from cort


~"~PEIF"m]~FFIIE~~.i
x.L *;
i,._.. ,~ .. -
*1. (J1)**il *' *
: .....:.. *~
X
*-- *
C r
rr


j


High ligh ts


or' th~e




50 's





























ENACTMENT OF PUBLIC Law 841 of the 81st Congress, now
designated as the Reorganization Act, was one of the most significant
events not only of the Fifties but of the Canal's entire operating history
for it changed the basic concept for operation of the Canal enterprise.
Prior to the effective date of the Act, July 1, 1951, the waterway was
operated and civil government was performed by The Panama Canal,
an independent Government agency. Most of the business-type or
supporting activities were a part of the Panama Railroad Company, a
federal corporation.
The change was made by transferring The Panama Canal opera-
tions to the Panama Railroad Company and changing the name to the
Panama Canal Company, and grouping civil government and public
health functions in the Canal Zone Government.
As provided in the Act, the Company is required to recover all
operating and maintenance costs; pay interest on the net direct invest-
ment of the U. S. Government; and reimburse the Treasury for the net
cost of operation of the Canal Zone Government.
Essentially, this sets the formula for the establishment of tolls rates,
since the Canal Company is required to be self-supporting and its
primary mission is the transit of ships between the two oceans.


ONE OF TRIE highest accolades for finan-
cial management by a Federal agency
came this year to the Company-Govern-
ment -in the annal report of the Joint
Program to Improve Accounting in the
Federal Governtment.
For those who never heard of such
a programL, it was one initiated ten years
ago to establish sound and uniform prin-
ciples of accounting, budgeting, and
reporting for all Federal agencies. The
annual reports are issued jointly by the
Secretary of the Treasury, the Director
of the Bureau of the Budget, and the
Comptroller General of the United
States.

the Pa aa aenall Cmpn' ssna c
management is sound and its accounting
system and fiscal reports fully meet
standards established in the Joint Pro-
gram.
For the Comapany-Government, the
road to this goal has been a rocky one
because of the complete change in fiscal
policies and accounting procedures re-
quired by the incorporation of the Pan-
ama Canal operations July 1, 1951, un-
der the Reorganization Act.
Prior to that time the Panama Canal
was maintained and operated on appro-
priated funds by The Panama Canal, an
independent government agency. Its in-
come from tolls and other sources wras
paid into the United States Treasury as
miscellaneous receipts. The chief preoc-
cupation of accountants, except Pan-
ama Railroad accountants, then was to
keep e pe dite within the amounts
With the incorporation, the financial
Operations were changed so that the
Panama Canal Company could operate
on revenues with the requirement that
it be self-supporting, plus refunding the
net cost of civil government annually
and interest on, the net direct invest-
ment: to the U. S. Treasury.
Since the Reorganization Act essen-
tially represented a fiscal change, the
responsibility for its implementation
rested directly on the shoulders of the
men and women in all Bureaus and Di-
visions who keep the accounts, prepare
the budgets, and report financial results
of the Canal enterprise.
The change required not only dif-
ferent accounting, budgeting, and re-
porting procedures and techniques, but


a reconciliation of sometimes widely
divergent views on the new fiscal poli-
cies and the application of various. re-
quirementss of the Reorganization Act
to Canal operations. In addition, it was
necessary to make a complete appraisal
of the United States investment in the
Panama Canal Company before finan-
cial statements could be considered final
and accurate.
This was done from 1952 to 1956 by
the Plant Inventory and Appraisal Staff,


pr~o\ision aroused the ire of employees
anld \ras a controversiall issue between
the Canal administration and the Gen-
eral Accounting Ofhee for several years.
At the outset the Company opera-
tions, for accounting purposes general-
ly, were separated into Canal, Commer-
cial, and Housing Activities. At the
January 1952 meeting, the Board of Di-
rectors revised and reclassified the Com-
pany activities into Canal, Service, and
Commercial Activities. This perplexing


a unit specially fored for that purpose.
The Director of the Budget gave ap-
proval of the final report and evaluation
of all Company-Goverme~nt properties
during 1957, thus completing one of the
most significant programs of the Office
of the Comptroller in the past ten-year
period.
A thorny problem created by the Re-
organization Act was the provision of
the legislation requiring the net cost
of civil government to be met from tolls
and other revenues on a proportionate
basis. The conflict that arose over the
interpretation and application of this


problem was not finally resolved until
after the Board meeting in September
1952 at which Assistant Secretary of
the Army Karl Bendetsen, then Board
Chairman, submitted a lengthy treatise
on operation of the waterway and the
supporting activities. His paper pro-
vided the rationale on which present-
day fiscal policies of the Company are
Based,
The concept is simple: That the Pan-
ama Canal has a single mission, that of
transiting ships between the Atlantic
and Pac ificOceans; that the Canal enter-
prise as a1 whole must be self-sustaining;
14 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


AND, FINALLY



FISCAL POLICY CHANGES





_


Henry DeVoll readies one of his model planes for a test
flight. This one can do more than 60 miles an hour.


Hank De~Voll has

hobbies by score
One hobby is enough for most people, but not for Henry
(Hank) DeVoll, of Coco Solo. He has so many he is apt to
lose count of them.
He builds scale-model trains, ships, cars, and planes. He
bowls. He plays golf. He makes furniture. He edits the Coco
Solo Civic Council's mimeographed newssheet, the Sand
Flea. And, along with his wife, he manages the Atlantic
Side Teen Club.
His senior interest is the construction of model airplanes,
which he has been doing since he was 13. His first plane
models were powered by rubber bands. The ones he builds
today have gasoline motors and canl fly more than 60 miles
an hour.
Sometimes his plane models hardly repay him for the
hours of work they require. It takes five to ten hours to make
one model plane and it is not at all unusual for a plane to
crash on its first flight. Altogether, he thinks, he must have
built close to four dozen of the plane models.
One model he remembers especially. He named it the
Lazy Wasp because, he says, it "flewY like a drunken wasp."
He never succeeded in controlling this particular model nor
could he find out the reasons for its erratic behavior. It came
to a sad end on its fifth flight. Without warning it dived
straight for the ground and was demolished.
Mr. DeVoll can't remember just when he developed an
interest in miniature trains, but it was sometime after he
began building plane models. For a while trains became his
main spare-time interest and he built a complete model
village around his model railroad.
Mr. DeVoll does his bowling with the Atlantic Side Bowl-
ing Leagues, of which he is president of one and secretary


"I like to work with my hands," says the man of many hobbies
as he displays ships, planes, trains and cars which he has built.

of the other, and his golfing at the Fort Davis course. He is
a skilled bowler, as numerous trophies attest, but he is still
a novice at golf.
His interest in journalism dates back to his Army days
when he was with the Armed Forces Radio Service. He is
not only editor, but publisher as well, of the monthly Sand
Flea. He collects, writes, and edits the majority of the news
items and then cuts the stencils for the mimeograph.
Management of the Teen Club is another recent hobby.
This is a five-night-a-week job but both Mr. and 1Mrs. De
Voll, keenly interested in young people, find it one of the
most interesting of their spare-time pursuits.
The man of many hobbies was born in Sedalia, Mo. H~e
became an Isthmian for the first time during World War II,
when he was stationed at Albrook AFB and was assigned
to the Armed Forces Radio Service. He also served in Korea,
where he saw combat duty. He has been back in the Canal
Zone since February 1955, when he came to work at the
Cristobal Post Office. He now holds the position of Window
Clerk there.


and that gross profits of supporting serv-
ices be contributory.
These principles were not fully ap-
plied to the Company's financial man-
agement for a period of three or four
years. It was not until 1957 that the
Bureau of the Budget approved the
pi-oposed 1958 fiscal year budget with-
out reservation. The General Account-
ing Office gave its approval in 1957 by
the unqualified certification of the Can-


al Company's financial statement, thus
attesting the integrity of the Panama
Canal Company accounts by the Comp-
troller General of the United States.
Periodically, the Board of Directors
has reviewed the Company s finanexal
statements to determine whether the
tolls returns conform with the formula
provided by law, and it has concluded
that no change in tolls is required at thre
present time.


Thus, the turbulence of the fifties
which disturbed the lives and jobs of
Canal employees and shook the organ-
ization framework itself did not. leave
fiscal matters undisturbed. And the av-
erage employee, upset by his own prob-
lems, was all but unaware of some of
the financial storms that blew in the
fifties and died' into gentle breezes as
the decade ended.


THE PANIAMA. CANAL REVIEW


1

d ?r f



























The Canal Zone had another presidential visitor last month when Guatemala's chief
executive, President Miguel Ydigoras Fuentes, (white uniform) made a partial trans-
it of the Canal. He is flanked, above, by Lieutenant Governor John D. McElheny,
right, and Mariano J. Oteiza, Vice Minister of Foreign Relations for Panama, right.

cAA LA

$1 p 1


Defense -

Three employees of the Company-
Government are spending part of their
summer vacations in Civil Defense
work. All three, now in the United
States on leave, have enrolled in special-
ized training courses held this month
and last.
Dr. I. Robert Berger, Chief of the
Out Patient Clinic at Gorgas Hospital.
is attending a class in Mass Casualty
Handling at the Brooke Army Medical
Center in San Antonio, Tex.
James Brigman, of the Engineering
and Construction Bureau, who is Assist-
ant Radiological Officer in the Civil
Defense organization is attending two
courses: a Radiological Defense-Offcer
course at the Civil Defense Staff Col-
lege at Battle Creek, Mich., and Radio-
logical Instrument Maintenance In-
struction at the Off~ice of Civil and De-
fense Mobilization Warehouse at Rock-
wood, Tenn.
Phii L. Dade, Civil Defense Chief,
is attending a class in Radiological Haz-
ards at the Navy station at.Norfolk, Va.
He will be away from the Isthmus for,
about one month.


The second class of the High School
Girls Hospital Aide Training on the
Pacific Side is now under way. Eleven
girls qualified for this course after comp-
pletingg preliminary courses in First Aid,
Home Nursing and lectures.
The girls are: Beverly M. Austin,
Roberta J. Covairt, Mary Fitzgerald,
Sara Jean Fitzgerald, Lottie Handy,
Janice Heilman, Beth Myers, Carolyn
Musselman, Catherine A. Ridge, Jean-
ne L. Vogel, and Joanna Brown. Two
other girls, Joan Payne and Rita Jones,
completed the preliminary courses but
are in the United States on vacation.


VOLUNTER CORPS MEETINGS


ly in favor of additional defenses for the
Panama Canal. Troops should be upped
by 5,800 and more squadrons of planes
sent to the Canal ~Zone, he declared in a
speech at Portland, Oreg.

~10 Years Ago

A 10-year, $70 million housing program
for the Canal Zone was recommended
to the Bureau of the Budget by Gov. F.
K. Newcomer, 10 years ago this month.
The housing, to include only one- and
two-family buildings, would replace out-
moded, termite-riddled quarters, somne
of which dated back to construction
days.


August 1958, was full of news. Officials
from Panama and the Canal Zone dis-


am Cna Cmpaysa Boad hoe2 D
rectors watched tests on the LeTourneau
towing devices at Gatun. Pay raises for
policemen and firefighters were approv-
ed. Conversion of domestic equipment
in Diablo was started August 25. And,
en route to the United States, the Pan-
ama Line's Cristobal put into Norfolk to
avoid a huricane.


The Panama Canal celebrated its twen-
tieth birthday, 25 years ago this month,
vitth 13n upsurge oftraffc; during te
averaged 13.75 per day. Except for a
new 3-cent Goethals Memorial stamp
and "20th Anniversary" postal cachets
there was no special observance of the
anniversary.
The day Adolph Hitler assumed the
presidency of Germany, U. S. Secretary
of War George H. Dern spoke up strong-


Date Town
AUGUST
12 Rainbow City


Place

School


Hour

6:fo p. m..


rs santa cruz senr. center s:oo.av. m.


17 Paraiso
SEPTEMBER


School 7:3o p. m.


2 Margarita serv. center '-ob0 a. m/:

16 THE PANAMA: CANAL ~ WEVIEW~.


)50 Years A go

The spotlight was on Gatun in August,
50 years ago. The first concrete was
poured in the foundation of the center
wall in the upper locks. The last traces
of the old village of Gatun were being
wiped out as the building of Gatun Dam
advanced.
In WVashington, the President approv-
ed a tariff act authorizing a bond issue
of over $290,000,000 for Canal con-
struction. On the same day, the "Urgent
Deficiency Act" authorized the Presi.
dent to enter into contracts necessary to
complete the Canal and its harbors.


~25 Years Ago~ ~ ~One Year Ago (





FIRST AID
CASES
'so 'sa
71 (103)162
2 7
44 40
16 17
20 23
9 9
"3 5

E16 (103)313


New York Operations.. ~..~~(Honor Roll)
Supply &Community Service_ ~ ... .
Health_ ....... ~~~~~~~-
Engineering &r Construction .... ~~~


C. Z. Govt.-Panama Claal Company...


YEAft
TO DA\TE

1(14) 12(28)
4 4
3 4
9 3
9 12
5 12
1 8
(1) 66 (12)70


DISABLING
INJURIES
'se 'sa
0 3
O 0
1 0
2 0
2 2
2 0
3 I
10 6


He


Likes


Birds


While one or two are company, more
than two are a crowd, E. A. Eckhoff, of
the Industrial Division, found to his sor-
row when he started raising budgerigars
in the garage of his home in Margarita.
He loves budgies in large crowds--he
has nearly 80 of them! But the clever
little parakeet-like birds are fond of hu-
mans only when they are alone. Let an-
other budgie loose with him and he~ and
his pal will ignore all others and speak
only to each other.
So Mr. Eckhoff, who started his hobby
of raising budgies because he became so
attached to the one someone gave hia,
finds himself with a .huge cagefull of
colorful birds and not a single personal
friend in the lot*
Interest in their habits, ~their lively
chatter, and the bright and beautiful
color combinations obtained by cross
breeding have more than made up to
Mr. Eckhoff for the loss of his single
bird friend.
In the cages where he keeps most of
the adult birds, Mr. Eckhoff has budg-
erigars ranging in color from pure white,
through yellow, green, and blue to com-
binations of all four.


Budgies have proved to be a fascinating pastime for E. A. Eckhoff of Margarita.


A male budgie really settles down to
become a family man when he takes a
mate, says bird expert Eckhoff. While
mama budgie sits on the eggs, father
feeds her and later feeds both his mate
and the little budgies. He even sits on
the eggs once in a while to give his wife
a rest. After the little birds are two
weeks old, the mother bird is taken from
the cage ~and father continues to take
eare of the young.
Budgies go out of the family nest
when they are quite young. They are
ready to start talking--human talk, that
is-by the time they are about two
and one half monthss old. If they are
trained and kept away from. their fellow
budgies, they will learn words and short
sentences in three months and some very


smart budgies will talk in even less time.
Budgies became popular in the United
States a few years ago but they have
been household pets in Europe for many
years. They were originally imported
from New South Wales in Australia. The
English have a Budgerigar Society which
Mr. Eckhoff joined recently and last
month he imported from England some
unusual birds, violet in color with white
wings.
He hopes that someday he will de-
velop, by cross breeding, a new strain of
his own. With the exception of one
young fellow with a top-knot, most of his
birds so far have followed the usual pat-
tern. The top-knot character may well
be, however, the father of a long line of
new type budgerigars--Panama style.








An~con......................August 12

Cristobal. .................. .August 22
Ancon. ................... ..A-ugust 29
FROMoal NEW........ YORK s 2
Ancon. ................... ..August 49
Critoal ...V ........A gut1
Ancon ................... ...August 21


DA~YS LOST


RECORD

FOR

SL'iTdIYJUTNE


'se

3
22
12
76

161


*sa
(20)35
0
O
0
3
0
11
49


() Locks Overhaul injuries included in total.

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW









PROMOTIONS


TRANSFERS


June 15 through July 15
Mrs. Clara M. Chambers, to Supervisory
Clerical Assistant.
Mathew M. Brown, Jorge A. Barakat,
Bill T. A. Williams, to Deckhands (Boat-
swain).
Locks Division
Darwin ]E. Pope, from Machinist, Rail-
road Division, to Lock Operator Machinist.
PERSONNEL BUREAU

Pro et Planen from Acc d iga Dv so
to Employment and Utilization Division.
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Supply Division
Raimundo Dixon, to Clerk, Office of
eD rrigto aA. Moss, Clerk, from Whole-
sale Section to Hotel Section.-
Jos6 L. Diaz, to Electrical Equipment
Rera -.b D ns, fom a CMek g rvice
Centers, to Sales Section Head, Hotel

SebStiimn uintero, Manuel D. A ulr
,os Q Bsio guilarr enen R
bet noMoBtngo NcnodeTorren e ,ARag C
Nliliez-Alicea, to Scrap Materials Sorter,
Storehouse Branch.
Edgar N. Lawrence, to Baker.
Rudolph Prince, from Clerk, Terminals
Division, to Warehouseman.
CEdkward T. A. Sterrett, to Storekeeping
Mrs. Alice R. Turner, to Sales Checker.
Mrs. Ana M. Fuentes, Alvin L. Cameron,
to Sales Clerks.
Julio C. Bethancourt, Laborer, transfer-
red from Grounds Branch.


ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH
Mrs. Beatrice E. Lee, to Passenger Traf-
fic Officer, Transportation Section.
Fitz H. Howell, Edmund L. Toppin,
Goldbourne M. Jackman, Clerks, from Em-
ployment and Utilization Division to Ad-
ministrative Branch.
CIVEL AFFAIRS BUREAU
William C. Merwin, to Window Clerk,
Postal Division.

miHgPo BMowna s nD visio oo f IScow
Audley M. Webster, to Junior High Prin-
cipal, Latin American Schools.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
James G. Callender, to Clerk-Typist'
Tr srutt J iliams, to Supervisory Ac-
counting Assistant, Accounting Division.
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
EMiye ,SE SI tkn,i Dosisitaont Designing
Maj. Peter Grosz, Jr., from Assistant
Designing Engineer, Engineering Division,
to Construction Management Engineer,
Contract and Inspection Division. d
Alberto McKenzie, to Seaman, Dre going

Dric Lewis, James D. Nikeal, from
1epe Mchinss Rilra dDison t
Hen ral M lpr,s Ma nen nce Divii n, o
Wilfred W. Jones, to Bookkeeping Ma-
chine Operator, Maintenance Division.
HEALTH BUREAU
Dr. Harold P. Adolph, Dr. Robert C.
Hall, Dr. Robert L. Nichols, to Residents,
Gorgas Hospital.
Dorothy E. Hannigan, from Clerk-Ste-
nographer, Electrical Division, to Super-
visory Clerk-Stenographer, Board of Health
Laboratory.
Mrs. Benedict M. Horanyi, from Sub-
stitute Teacher, Division of Schools, to
Dietician, Coco Solo Hospital.
TDorisGCox, Zu rickaiF Straughn, to Clerk-
Mrs Aot sM.0 cClelland, from Sub-
stitute Teacher, Division of Schools, to
Staff Nurse, Coco Solo Hospital.
MARINE BUREAU
Industrial Division
Ralph A. Davy, to Helper Blacksmith.
John E. Borden, Albert A. Ellis, to Ma-
ch nhnO L.Ir, from Machinist, Locks Di-
vision, to Marine Machinist.
En eerW HS ith Thmtas 1. age, to
George R. Williams, Henry McKenzie, to
Toolroom Mechanics (Limited).
Navigation Division
Mrs. Linnea A. Angermuller, to Clerk
(Stenography).
Thomas S. Clark, Jr., Roley J. Wesley, to
Pilot-in-Training.
Mrs. Ruth P. Huldtquist, to Accounting
Clerk.


James Barnett, Heavy Laborer, transfer-
red from Railroad Division.
Hugh G. Davis, from. Tree Trimmer,
Grounds Branch, to Heavy Laborer.
Godfrey G. Smith, to Extractor and
Tumblerman.
Edward Lmndo, from Helper, Motor
Tr n plorta 1o Division dcokHer r-Laborer.
Leslie W. Packer, from Clerk, Hotel
Section, to Service Center Supervisor.
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Motor Transportation Division
S~t 10 r H-addo, froml ilper W dodand
eral Helper.
FFred L. Raybourn, to Lead Automotive
Antonio Downer, to Heavy Truck Driver.
Reginald C. Welling~ton, to Motor Ve-
hiMtea sepa eScott, to Chauffeur.
MScah el Barrios, to Hlelper Automotive
STerminals Division
Augustin Ruiz R., to High Light Truck
Operator.
Adoniram J. Iglesias, to Ship Worker.
OTHER PROMOTIONS
Promotions which did not involve chang-
es in title follow:
Gayle C. Hasemann, Clerk-Stenographer,
Office of Engineering and Construction Di-
Mre r. Rita L. Kelly, Clerk-Typist, Office.
of Electrical Engineer.
William C. Garber, Elementary School
Teacher-Principal, Division of Schools.
Malmoth L. Morris, Clerk, Customs Di-
vision.


nR 1 nR r ?N

Retirement certificates were presented at
the end of July to the following employees
who are listed alphabetically below, to-
gethero nit their bitpla es, eos tionse
addresses:
Robert R. Arnold, Alabama; Electrician,
Electrical Division; 18 years, 8 months, 3
days; future address undecided-

As sisat to C ,ptSolr c0 uers OS3 mn
27 days; Panama.
HdlderottADoyl~ee oashintotx gD11a%
Mount Hope; 30 years, 2 months, 3 days;
San Francisco, Calif.
Blanchard V. Hutchings, Mississippi;
Customs Inspector, Customs Division; 37 *
years, 2 months, 8 days; future address un-
decided.
Capt. Volkert F. G. Jacobos, Germany;
Pilot, Marine Bureau; 20 years, 9 months,
24 days; Panama.
Henry T. McKenzie, Kansas; Plant En-


ineer, Maintenance Division; 18 years, 11
days; future address undecided.
Capt. Jens Nilsen, Norway; Pilot, Navi-
dgation Division; 19 years, 11 months, 28
days; Mlose, Mass.

viso HrGene etiPon ,nT asisi n,S Ee-
trical Division; 34 years, 20 days; St.
Petersburg, Fla.
DRiia n 2Pere,e Panama;mChehcker, Supl
Panama.
H. Doyle Snyder, Illinois; Lead Foreman
Locks Operations, Locks Division; 24
years, 6 months, 29 days; Louisville, Ky.
Mrs. Anita R. Thompson, Ancon; Ac-
counting Clerk, Accounting Division; 12
years, 3 months, 11 days; future address
undecided.
Dwight M. Van Evera, Maryland; Gen-
eral Foreman Automotive Machinist, Mo-
tor Transportation Division; 19 years, 4
months, 20 days; Florida.

18 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


AND





30 YEARS

Administrative Branch
Watkin H. Lindsay
Bindery and Finish Worker
Civil Affairs Bureau
Everett L. Farlow
Administrative Assistant
Katherine I. Clark
Eemelntary cl Secondary

Engineering and Construction
Bureau
Leslie G. Campbell
Engineering Aide, Survey
Claude E. Campbell
Lead Foreman, Public
Works Road Construction
Office of the Governor-President
Paul A. Benrtz
General Counsel
Marine Bureau
Ernest C. Bryan
Boatbuilder or Shipwright Helper
Ee rn eln r.Burton
Robert J. Brady
Guard
Edmund Dantes
Deckhand
Charles M. Inniss
Clerk
Benito E. Sykes
Leader Painter
Adolphus M. Ricketts
Clerk

Supply and Community
Service Bureau
Fernando Rodriguez
Lab orer
Augustine R. Nonon
Meat Cutter

Transportation and Terminals
Bureau
Clyde W. Carew
Clerk


20 YEARS


Health Bureau
John R. Thomson
Supervisory Offces
Services Clerk
Marine Bureau
Oval E. Hardwick
Lead Foreman W~elder
George D. Rowe
Toolmaker
Truman H. Hoenke
Superintendent Pacific Locks
Hugh M. Lmnn
Engrineman
Elton A. Jones
Crater and Packer
Phillip L. Hall
Launch Seaman
Benjamin E. Atkins
Helper Machinist
Frank J. Ginther
Marine Machinist
Vincent S. Belgrave
Launch Operator
ois t'. Schuberg
Carl W. Cettir
Pilot
hln .Dough

Office of the Governor-President
Joseph Bailey
Cleaner
Personnel Bureau
Maxwell T. Smith
Personnel Assistant
Transportation and Terminals
Bureau
Norman E. J. Demers
Administrative Officer
George A. Black, Jr.
Cost Accounts Supervisor
Sylvester L. Morgan
Leader Wharfbuilder
Stanley B. Smith
Helper Carman
Domingo Davis
Guard
C. A. Leslie
Brakema


Engineering and Construction
Bureau
Hubert Johnson
General Hel erri
O legorio Matnez
Clerk

James D. Maloney
Cleaner
Stanley R. Price
Carpenter
Peter A. Warner
Lead Foreman, Public
Works Road Construction
Clifton O. Bailey
Helper Machinist
Cyrus Small
Cleaner
William E. Dyer
Seaman
Dagoberto Illueca
Laborer
Roger M. Howe
Supervisory General Engineer
Alfred Hylton
Pa ilmoth A. Green
Pipefitter (limited)
Norbert H. Marquis
Carpenter
Manuel E. Benitez
Sailmaker



Supply and Conmunui
Service Bureau
Reggie A. John
Sales Section Head
Francis A. Cadogan
Cleaner
Charles H. Blades
Service Station Operator
Lovell L. Ledgister
Kitchen Attendant
R. A. Rodriguez
Gardener
Alfredo Castillo
Meat Cutter


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


ANNIVERSARIES





fiscal year. At the end of the year the
comparison stood: 2,715,749 Iong tons
for fiscal year 1959 and 746,380 long
tons for fiscal year 1958.
The grain shipments, from the west
coast to Europe, 1,731,953 long tons for
fiscal year 1959 compared with 711,149
long tons for the previous fiscal year,
were due largely to crop failures in
Frarice, the breadbasket for Europe.
At the close of the fiscal year, Panama
Canal operations had experienced the
heaviest traffc workload since the Can-
al began putting ships through from
ocean to ocean 45 years ago. This work-
load, which exceeded all expectations,
was handled despite power conversion
work on the locks and an experimental
gate overhaul at Gatun Locks, both of
which restricted traffic to single lane
operation for most of the time since
January.
During the fiscal year, an average of
27.18 ocean-gomng ships transited the
Canal daily; the previous year's daily
average was 25.93 ships.
Coupled with the increasing flow of
commercial traffic has been a steady
number of United States government-
owned vessels. These have held at a
peacetime level since fiscal year 1955;
last year 204 ocean-going Government
vessels made the Canal transit.
Tolls and cargo statistics both reflected
the increasing use of the Panama Canal
by larger ships. During the past fiscal
year a number of large, newly con-
structed ore carriers began transiting
the Canal. Super-sized carriers, princi-
pally carrying ore northbound from Penr
and Chile through the Canal, recorded
the highest number of transits in the
Canal'S history.
Like transits and tolls, the volume of
cargo established a record. Two years
ago, in' fiscal year 1957, commercial
cargo shipments exceeded 50 million
long tons for the first time. Last
year this ~figure dropped 1,565,000 tons
below the 1957 records. But in Escal
year 1959 cargo was again on the rise.
Total cargo moved in both directions
was 52,182,942 long tons; of this,
51,153,096 long tons were carried on
ocean-going commercial craft.

20 THE PANAMA CANAI REVIEW


Four major factors were largely re-
sponsible for the all-time record-break-
ing traffic through the Panama Canal
during the fiscal year which ended last
June 30, Canal of~eials believe. The
fiscal year set records for total transits,
daily averages, cargo, and tolls. (See
shipping tables.)
These four major factors are:
OThe continuing recovery from the
economic recession in the United States.
<')The continuing economic growth of
Japan.
OAn unsually heavy flow of residual
oil, shipped in tankers from the United
States west coast to east ports in the
United States.
OUnusually large shipments of barley
and other grain from the west coast of


the United States and Canada to Eu-
rope.
The economic recovery of the United
States wras reflected in increased ship-
ments, and larger ships, on practically
all trade routes.
The upswing in Japan stimulated a
steady flow of coal, scrap metals, and
phosphates to Japan to supply the needs
of that country's growing industry.
Thle heavy intercoastal shipments of
residual oil from the west coast began
early in the fiscal year, and were begin-
nig to taper off as the year ended. Oil
shipments of this sort are periodic.
During the first six months of the fiscal
year oil shipments moving from Pacific
to Atlantic were more than triple those
of the first six months of the previous


OCEAN-GOING TRANSITS
THROUGH PANAMA CANAL


Jv N

a0 M






400 A


200 s

400 A


o0 S


JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
MONTHs





Cut W~idening




Speed Up


As~ide from breaking all records. Pan-
ama Canlal traffic inl the past si months
has uncrilouibt dlicl haste-ned the da\ wh~len
the- rclk\ chasm of Gailllard Cuit \\ill be
\\idetnerd to, 500 feet 10< its full length to
elimiinate one of the limitations to t~rf-
bc gr'\~''owth the~ future.
A~t its meetCin~g last month, the Board
of' Duetctois authorized anl acceleration
oif the Cut-\t Idlining project Ac~cordin-g-
11 a drilling prog~ramn was immnediatell
Inmaltll d~ orl EmIPire Reach preart';13ory'
to w~ideninS that section. Also. the En-
gin!c-c inlg and Conlstruction Bureau has
preple'Cd new timec schedules anld es-
tirnaters for n iclening the Las C~ascadas
aInd Bns Obispo Reaslhes.
The accompany\ ing photograph-chart
giies a` graphic story of the work w\hich-
has been done, that in progress, w~hat
still hals to: be done, and thelc cost e-sti-
ma~te-s and e~.rica tion required to makle
ther Cuit inlto a two-?lay street for all
but the biggest ships.
If the ExpeniditurePS are au~thorzed b!'
(Congress,. thle entire lob wrill be c~om-
pletted b\ the en-d of Esc~al yetar 1965.
Meanw \hle, the conge~stion caused by
hi-a\! ns i oaLk. CSure \\i11 be gr~eatly a-
leslated b\ late nexst \tear whenl the
\\idenlling of the Parailso-Cuc~arla ch
Reath1 is completed and b! the instal-
latio~n of lightin-g aIlong the Cut and at

Cultebra Reach. the section of' the
Canail niorth of ConlJt(racor Hill. \\aS
11 idenedi on the basis of Fill-inl workI by
the Dredging Division over a period of
about 25 !ears. This Re-ach joins Cu-
catac1(ha Rechcl on the rsou th and Empire
Beach on the nr I~)th. and is eaSil\. iden-
tdia~ble in- the p~ictur~e b! its wridlth.
\\'heni the Alenlitt-Chalpm-an & Scott
Corplor~ationl hnis~hes Its contract for
n\ ideninlg the Paraiso-Culcaracha Heach,
a 500r-fo~ot cha~nnell \?ill be available for
about half ofi the2 eigh~t-mlile Cut.
The nets\ time schedule for wildening~
other Reaches calls for completion o
excavatio~n reql~uiled on Empir~e Reach
b\ the endl of calendar \ear 196.3. Mlost
of this escalastionl \ill be alone the east
banlk of thiis Reach
Excavation along the IEmalining three-
mlile strip~ comlprising Cascaidas and Bas
Obispo Reachej, all1 fro~m the \\`est
B.ank,; cool I be started in hjsal \ear
19362 and completed b! the end of Bscal
lear 1965


PARAISO--CUCARACHA REACH


\


a..


ii '' if;
:~ ~''
i -pi,.;sa8:l...







TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES
The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:
Fiscal Year
Avg. No.
1959 1958 Transits
1951-55
United States IntercoastaL._ _ __-----... -- 642 563 170
East Coast of U. S. and South America... .... ~-.. 2,316 2,252 458
East Coast of U. S. and Central America .. ..-~- 424 523 123
East Coast of U. S. and Far East ..... .------ 1,507 1,469 271
U. S./Canada East Coast and .1ua~r Ed;....a .. 195 174 52
Europe and West Coast of U. S C ud a l... .... 1 1,045 931 182
Europe and South America_._- __ .---. 1,005 947 124
Europe and Australasia.. ....---~--- ----. 383 374 83
All other routes ---~ ---~--- ..... --~----------.. 2,201 1,954 372
Total Traffic ...--- ..---~-~--~ _. .. 9,718 9,187 1,835
MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND T'OLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
(Fiscal years)
Tolls
Month Trnis(In thousands of dollars)
Ave No. Average
1959 1958 Transits 1959 1958 Tolls
1951-55 1951--5
July...-------- -------- _-~ 767 788 557 $3,681 $3,668 $2,432
August. ...---~~-~ .~~-~-~ 777 812 554 3,664 3,599 2,403
September_---- ..---~~ 717 771 570 3,357 3,504 2,431
October_--~.-------.. 806 813 607 3,718 3,680 2,559
November_ -~------~ 773 779 568 .3,628 3,522 2,361
December__-~~- ----~ 793 774 599 ,3,682 3,521 2,545
January______-_----. 826 744 580 3,925 3,376 2,444

ApriL__--~~- ~ -~-~~ 830 7341 608 3,907 3,36i3 2,588
Mlay___. ~----- -------. 897 752 6:9 4,179 3,526 2,672
June.___- --~----------------- 859 710) 599 4,035 3,305 2,528
Totals for fiscal year___ 9,718 9,187 6,562 $45,529 $41,796 $29,969
Canal Commercial Traffi by Nationality of Vessels
Fiscal Year
1959 1958 1951-55
Nationality Num- Tons Num- Tons Average Average
ber of of ber of of number Ton of
transits cargo transits~ cargo transits cargo
Belgian. .. 14 38,423 41 13,222 6 8,086
British 1,234 6,917,049 1,203 7,370,112 1,209 7,376,805
Chilean. .. 90 466,464 89 507 441 60 307,398
Chinese. .. 56 394,730 54 406,575 25 194,403
Colombian 269 372,879 231 330,448 146 167,759
Cuban ... 21 3,280 2 --
Danish ... 347 1,073,297 356 1,112,939 240 904,561
Ecuadorean. 49 56,975 381 46,511 141 91,373
Finnish. .. 21 91,919 30 125,884 3 16,526
French .. 153 609,302 85 443,401 130 575 637
German. .. 1,039 2,954,282 837 2,537,505 192 434,847
Greek. ... 119 1,126,005 116 1,051,394 110 943,600
Honduran. .. 151 123,539 278 298,564 399 514,150
Italian. .. 188 983,862 191 1,109,176 134 712,038
Japanese 800 5,468,228 693 4,629,438 263 1,742,551
Libria 966 8,394,154 898 7,802,371 174 1,083,735
Mexican .. 16 43,105 1 12,149 7 22,086
Netherlands. 369 1,641,972 206 899,738 120 595,178
Nicaraguan .. 71 136,984 81 141,2111 21 19,465
Norwegian 979 4,840,012 956 4,456,990 791 3,221,592
Panamanian. .367 1,488,148 472 2,152,332 436 2,415,123
Peruvian .. 72 301,922 54 226,350 22 46,665
Philippine. .. 25 148,587 23 122,770 24 137,745
Spanish. .. 44 187,235 43 180,709 31 135,113
SUite hStates 1,98 12,187, 2, O3 11,26,3 2,12 13, 1 ,7
All other o.. 40 222,248 23 131,807 90 268,108
Toal .. ,78 51,153,096 917 48,124,809 702 35904,00
*All others: Arabian, 1;. Brazilian, 1; Costa Rican, 7; Dominican Republic, 3; Guatemalan,
13 Irish, 9; Israeli, 6; Korean (South), 2; Swiss, 4; Uruguayan, 1; Venezuelan, 5.


. .IN
I GHING




AN RA I
IAN RA |


Modernization of the Panama Canal~
by the improvement of operating con-
ditions moved a big step forward at the
end of last month with the completion
of one project and the initiation of two.
others.
The power-conversion program for
the Locks machinery was completed at
the end of July, bids were asked for a
lighting system for Gaillard Cut and the
Locks, and a performance contract was
signed for the design and installation of
a modern traffic-control system.
With Canal traffic at a historic peak
this year, Canal officials breathed a sigh
of relief when the power conversion
work on the west chambers of Gatun
Locks was co pleted sli htly ahead of
schedule and the Atlantic Locks were
reopened to two-way traffic.
The Locks- conversion work was the
last major phase of the Power Con-
version project. It has taken' the better
part of this year. Other than a log jam
of ship g in June, the work wias ac-
complished without long delays to ship-
pmng.
The li htin stem for the Locks
and Gaillard Out is one of the short-
range improvement projects authorized
by the Canal's Board of Directors two
ye~als ;rgo. Experiments on various type
of lights to provide for good v.isibrlhty
.indt maximum safety in night operation's
have~been in progress for many months;
Bids are to be opened August 2L.at

22; TI-mPANAMA CANAL REVIEW.








CANAL TRANSITS TOLLS PAYING

I ~Fiscal Year


_ _1~1~1


5,409 5,267 10,676 9,937 8,297

120 84 204 279 667
96 134 230 337 305

216 218 434 616 972


*Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
shipssta teof which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated



Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All Cargo figures in long tons)
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC

FISCAL YEAR


I


.


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC


1959

7,229,081
3,465,944
2,715,749
1,731,953
1,473,874

1,093,093
963,514
956,565
740,219
394,920
377,299
325,479
325,333
4,467,893


FISCAL YEAR


T













Balboa Heights with installation to be
completed a year later.
When completed, the new lighting
system will provide safer operating con-
ditions for all vessels at night and will
permit more flexible transit schedules.
Many of the super-type citrriers now
re uired to make the entire Canal transit
during daylight hours can then transit
at night and two-way traffic will be pos-
sible for most vessels at night. Presently,
no ocean-going ships are permitted to
meet or pass mn Gaillard Cut at night.
The design and installation contract
-for the traffic control system was signed
with the New York firm of Gibbs & Hill '
which previously had completed a feas-
ibility study of this project. The system
is to be fully operative in about two and
a half years.
Digital computers will be used to
schedule ships, and ship locations along
the channel will be monitored by a
hyperbolic radio system, now widely
used in aerial and marine traffic in many
parts of the world. The digital com-
puters can give in a twmnkling the best
transit schedules possible under a given
set of conditions. This capability will
permit transit schedules to be altered at
any time during a day s operations to
meet new or emergency conditions.

Beginning with this issue, shipping sta-
tistics will be shown with the averages
for the five year period, 1951-55, instead
of the F.Y. 1938 figures. This change is
being made to give a better comparative
basis for the growth of Canal traffic in
Sthe post-war period.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 23


Avg. No.
Transits
1951-55

Total


Atlantic
to
Pacific


Pacific
to
Atlantic


Total


Total


9,187
750


Commercial Vessels:
Ocean-going ._ __________
Small* ._ ____________
Total commerciaL _________
U. S. Government vessels:**
Ocean-going ._ ___________
Small*_ ______ _______

Total U. S. Government ... ___
Total commercial and U. S.
Government. ... _______


4,909
500


4,809
458


9,718
958


7,061
1,236


5,625


11,110 1


5,485


10,553


9,269


Commodity


Average!
1951-55
3,838,198
2,514,297
1,674,314
713,733
425,681
53,593
525,470
182,804

384,452
264,151
127,709
374,408
301,542
4,502,372
16,077,453


1958

5,964,000
3,849,000
1,922,000
1.257,000
814,000
,532,000
654,000
482,000
38,00
353,000
354,000
307,000
336,000
283,000
4,834,000
22,843,000


Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt) .
Coal and coke .................
Iron and steel manufactures. .. .. .
Phosphates. .... .... ..
Soybeans. .........
Metal, scrap .. .. .. .. .. .
Sugar .... .. .. .. .
Chemicals, unclassified. .. .. .. ..

O e various ................ .
Paper and paper products .. .. .. .
Cotton, raw. .. ... .. .. ... .. .
Wheat. .. .. .. .. ... ..
Sulphur. .. ... .. .. ... ... .
Automobiles and parts. .... .. .. .
Allothes .. .... .. .
Total. .... ... ... .


6.140,726
3,322,019
1,6i85,230
1,326,728
1,142,463
858,234
629,342
490,330

332,354
327,513
324,952
316,250
290,919
4,410,633
22,445,818


Commodity


3,981,996
3,562,206
969,165
132,480
1,858,229
.1,10, 87
748,782
529,991
1,258,138
575,190
253,692
224,859
195,494
89,935
3,098,391
19,826,597


1958

7,559,607
3,323,354
746,380
711,149
1,985,628
1,68 25
1,082,285
901,777
1,046,050
630,371
308,344
152,832
280,674
225,000
3.973,887


Oevarious.. .. .. .. ... .. .

Petrolexun and products (excludes asphalt) .
Barley. .. .... .. .. .. .. .
Wheat. .........

ugnared food 1 products ... ... .. .
Bananas .
Metals, various .. .. .. ... .. .. .
Nitrate of soda ..
Food products in refrigeration (except fresh
fruit) .... .. ,. .
Coffee. .......... .
Iron and steel manufactures ....
Pulpwood. .........
Oilseeds and products .... ;
All others ......... .
Total. .. ... .. .. .. .


28,707,2781 25,281,508












TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING
VESSELS IN JUNE .
1968 1959
Commercial................ 710 859
U. S. Government.' ..... 14 15
Total. .. .. .. .. . 724 874
TOLLS *
Commrcial. .. .. $3,308,446 $4,039,227
U. S. Government. 42,547 73,888
Total. .. .... $3,350,993 $4,113,115
CARGO (long tons)
Commercial ..... 3,911,049 7-527
U. S. Government. 34,012 96,301
Total. ........ 3,945,061 4,844,568
*Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and small.

Heights from the New York Office.
The .certificate, given for the yea
1958," was awarded by thePulc
Health Service of the Departmnent of
Health, Education and Wel~fare.
,Ihe actual presentation was made to
Governor Potter by Sylvan C. Martin,
Regional Engineer, U. S. Public Health
Service, July 7 while Governor Potter
was in the United States for the quarter-
lymeeting of the Panama Canal Board
ofDirectors. The Public Health Service
Certificate also was given the Panama
Line in 1956 and 1957.

Ship and Master Retire
Capt. J. C. Flach, veteran Rotterdam
Lloyd Line skipper, and his command,
the passenger liner Sibajak, made their
last voyage through the Panama Canal
early in July on their way to the Far
East and retirement. Captain Flach has
reached retirement age after more than
40 years at sea while the3-year-old


Sibafak, after disembarking -878 pas-
sengers in Australia and New Zealand,
will proceed to Hong Kong for scrap-
pmng.
Cana~al ener 1asat voa C. Bou nton
Co pan local a ents for the Rot-
terdam Lloyd Line, presented Captain
Flach with a handsome silver tray in
commemoration of his long and distin-
guished service at sea.
The Sibalak was built in Holland in
1937 and for man! years ran as a pas-
senger liner betw~eenl Holland and In-
donesian ports. During the past five
years, the absp has been rnakmng regular
trips through the Canael can ong un-
migrants from European ports to New
Zealand andi Aul~stjiali.

Japanese Ships Increase
The spectacular increase hi ithe .size
of the Japanese merchant fleet, which,
according to Toky'o Ministry of Trans-
portation figures, has regained 95 per-
cent of pre-war strength, is reflected in
the steady increase in the number of
Japanese ships now using the Panama
Canal. During the past fiscal year there
were 800 ships of Japanese registry
making the Canal transit as compared
with 693 in fiscal year 1958.
In 1938, a representative pre-war
year, when the Japanese merchant ~fleet
was near top strength, 300 Japanese-
.registered ships passed through the
Canal during the 12-month period.
Durling thle war, Japanese merchant traf-
fic was at a standstill as far as the Canal
wvas concerned and remained- so until
1951 when there were 40 Japanese-flag
transits. This number rose to 105 in
1952 and in 1953 traffic surpassed pre-
war figures.


When an unprecedented number of ships, many of them "super-ships," cont~erged on the Canal last month, Catun La8ke looked like thii.


r~ ~4
) .;3~F~f~t~t~5i~. P


-SH i

Best Customer
The Dutch banana carrier Mathilda,
owned by Dammers & Van der Heides,
of Rotterdamn, and operated by the
Parker Banana Company of Tampa,
F'la., was the Canal's most frequent
customer for the fiscal year 1959 which
ended June 30. The ship made 44 trans-
its through the Canal during the past
12 months on her regular run between
Tampa and Ecuadorian ports wee se
loads bananas. This total, according to
Steamship Row experts, was higher than
that achieved by any other ship using
the Canal last year.
The record chalked up by the Mathil.
da was nearly equalled by the banana
carriers Vanda and Electron, each with
43 transits for the 12-mnonth period.
Both the Vanda and Electron are on the
same run as the Mathilda and are op-
erated by the same company.
Last year the Vanda was the Canal's
most frequent custom-er during the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1958. This ship
made 50 trips through the Canal, or
eight more than the Anaqua and Elec-
fron, two other ships chartered by the
Parker Banana Company. The Mathilda'
Vanda, and Electron are all about the
same size and carry from 10,000 to
15,000 stems of bananas to Florida ports
on each voyage. All are represented
here by L. K. Cofer.

Panama L.ine Award
For the third consecutive year, the
Panama Canal Company has earned a
United States Government health cer-
tificate for the operation of its passenger
liners Ancon and Cristobal, according to
an announcement received at Balboa


PP I


N\


G~








-~LC


ORGANIZATION-- DIRECTORY

August 7, 1959


F. G. Dunsmoor, Administrative Assistant
and Deputy, Executive Secretary. Room
205 Administration Building. ... .. .. 2-2547


Maj. Harvey C. Jones, Military Assistant. .. 2-1993
Room 205 Administration Building


Secretaries, Rooms 205-207: Mrs. M/argaret M. King, Miss Anita Bauckus, 2-2547, 2-1993, 2-2131, 2-3572


EXECUTIVE PLANNING STAFF
228-30 Administration Building
John D. Hollen, Chief ......... .. 2-2991
Miss Annie F. McDade, Secretary.. ...... 2-2524
T. E. Burrow, Assistant to Chief ...; ... 2-2524
Thatcher A. Clisbee, Capital Program & Budget,
229 Administration Building. .. ... ... .. .. 2-2941
Mrs. Thelma Bull, Shipping & Traffic Statistics,
334 Administration Building. .. .. .. .. .. ... 2-2314
Hugh A. Norris, Economist, 330 Administration Bldg. 2-2926

PANAMA CANAL, COMPANY
OFFICE OF GENERAL, COUNSEL
325-30 Administration Building
Paul A. Bentz, General Counsel. ........ 2-2157
Mrs. Grayce L. Nadeau, Secretary. .. .... 2-2157
David J. Markun, Assistant General Counsel. .. 2-2157
SAFEY BRANCH
332 Administration Building
W. H. Smith, Chief. ........... ..... 2-3726
Mrs. Beatrice B. Lucas, Secretary. .. .. 2-3726
H. H. Shacklett, Safety Engineer. .... .. 2-3726
R. T. Wise, Safety Engineer. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. 2-3726


PANAMA CANAL INFORMATION OFFICE
233-239 Administration Building
William G. Arey, Jr., Panama Canal Information
Officer .............. 2-1880
Mrs. Emelina Frensley, Secretary. .. ... .. 2-1880
Allen Alexander, Assistant to Information Officer .. 2-1880
J. Rufus Hardy, Chief, Press and Publications..... 2-1477
Eleanor H. M~lhenny, Assistant Editor,
The Panama Canal Review. ... ... .. .. .. 2-2611

CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT
INTERNAL SECURITY OFFICE
114 Administration Building
Robert C. Walker, Chief .. .. .. .... .... 2-1420
Ivan D. Hilliard, Assistant Chief .. ... .. .. ... 2-1420
William E. LeBrun, Personnel Security Officer .. .. 2-3100
MAGISTRATE COURTS
Judge Loren B. Hillsinger. .......... .. 3-1514
211 Administration Building, Cristobal
Judge John E. Deming. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. 2-1426
803 Lat Boca Road, Balboa


STOCKHOLDER
Wilber M. Brucker

GENERAL OFFICERS
George H. Roderick, Chairman of the Board
W. E. Potter, President
John D. McElheny, Vice President,
Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Philip L. Steers, Jr., Comptroller,
Balboa Heights, C. Z.
W. M. Whitman, Secretary,
Washington, D. C.


BOARD OF DIRECTORS


John H. Blaffer
Houston, Tex.
Wilber M. Brucker
Secretary of the Army,
Ro Tashinon, D.C.
Manchester, N. H.
apho tla~nd,eOreg.
Maj. Gen. G. E. Edgerton, USA (Ret.)
Washington, D. C.
John W. Martyn
Administrative Asst. to
SSecretary of the Army,
Washington, D. C.


Howard C. Petersen
Philadelphia, Pa.
Gov. WV. E. Potter
Balboa Heights, C. Z.

CrOemaha Nb.
Ogden R. Reid

Georg r. Rd icl
Asst. Secretary of the Army (FM)
Washmngton, D. C.
Maj. Gen. J. L. Schley, USA (Ret.)
Washmngton, D. C.
Ralph A. Tudor
San Francisco, Calif.


OFFICE 'OF TH-E GOVERNOR-PRESIDENT
220 Administration Building, Balboa Heights

GOVERPNOR W. E. POTTER. .................. 2-2131
Miss Mary F. Maguire, Secretary......... ...;........ 2-2779

Lt. Gov. JOHN D. McELHENY. .. .... .. .. .. 2-4117
Mrs. Jean Deerwester, Secretary. .................. .. 2-1449

P. M. Runnestrand, Executive Secretary. ... .. .. 2-2131
Room 207 Administration Building


PANAMA CANAL COMPANY DIRECTORS AND GENERAL OFFICERS





OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER



PIIIP L TEERS Ir. Cromptroller...Li~

J atrc soly st o 1h Com irle 257
Miss Kathleen M. Mc~uigan, Administra-
tive Asst.. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. 2-2511


ACCOUNTING DIVISION
103 Administration Buiding, Balboa Heights

esdhioes nS t. eh Acuntn tand
DIb ile Ke ge y, Repo Section.... 2-51

James R. a cnson, Agents Accounts Branch 2-2544
Donald M. Luke, General Ledger and
Processing Branch .. ... .. ... .. 2-2574
Frank A. Bal lwm, Plant Accounting Br. 2-14 38
Howedo~untzinum Br, 06dn 3 Ancon 2-1332


GENERAL AUDIT DIVISION
100 Administration Buillding, Balboa Heights
Floyd H. Baldwin, Gene ral Auditor .. .. 2-255~
Lwran~ce u.Jnned Itrn~al A undi Br nch 2e7


BUDGET AND RATES DIVISION
100 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
Le Roy B. Manson, Chief.. .... 2-3583
Robert Less ack Budget Branch. ... .. 2-2104
James L. Fulton, Rates and Analysis Branch 2-4 118


ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND
PROCEDURES STAFF
106 Admirustration Building, Balboa Heights
John E. Fisher, Chief ............. ..... 2-2586


TREASURY BRANCH
Bulldmng 287, Ancon
Joseph C. Turner, Treasurer .. .. .. 2-2525




NEW YORK OPEIL4TIONS
21 W~est Street
Peter DeStefano, Assistant Comptroller
aind Administrative Offcer
Capt. wiilliam J. Steffens, chier steamship
Division
Joseph MlcHugh, Chief, Procurement Division
John Cusiek, General Agent, Haiti Onice

W'ASHINCTON OFFICE
425 Thirteenth Street, N. WV.
19. AS. W\hitman, Secretary

I


_ _____


ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION

S318 AdministrationB id~ing,Balboa Heights
Lt. Col. ROBERT D. BROWrN, Jr., 2126

E. i. Bode Jr As .ircor 216
N.C o. ajeBudger and Projects2410
M~elvan Bierman, OfBc eE agineer .. .. 2-1226
hi. F. Malllard, Safety Re qesentative. ... 212
hiss. Faye CM hinton, Amnistrative Ast* 218

ENGINEERING DIVISION

,3413 Administr tion Building, Balboa Hei 91

hi.eSl Stokn Ast. Ds gig Eln ne r.. 2- 88
G. A Doyle, Jr Chief Architectural Br. 2-1818
A. R. Nard, Chief, Cil E gieering Br. 2-2810
L. B. Sartain, Chief 60-Cyl Desig Br. 2-1466
J. R. H ammond, f r., Chie ,Elee-Mech. Br. 2-1720
D. hI. E~g lston, Chief, S ons d 2-1206 an
R. B. Sage r, Chie f, Structural Br. ... .. 2-3063
R B Ely, Chief, Surveys Br.,
Bldg. 911, La Boca .. .. .. .. 2-3286
J. M. Watson, Administrative Asst. .. .. 2-2691

DREDGING DIISION
Gambon
P. A. White, Chief. .. .. .,. ... .. ... 6- 186
G. D. Gregory, Gene~ral Foremaan, Shops.. 6-113
C. S. Howe, Suprintendent, Field Offiee. 6- 181
R. A. Engelke, Administrative Asst. ..... 6- 178

EALECRCLDIVISION
320--30 Adiitration Building, Balboa Heights
it. D. Reece, Ele~ctrical Engineer. .. .. .. 2-1265
C. W. Chae Jr., Asst. Electrical Egi neer
and Chief, lectricid~ Woik 1Brahid::... 2-1265
J. R. Smith, Cief, Power.Branch .... .. 2-1265
H. S. En eflke, Chief, Communications Br.,
378 A ministration Bldg. ......2-2345
T. J. Wilber, Administrative Asst. ....... 2-1265

MAyINTENANCE DIVISION
309 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
F H Lerchen, Maintenance Engineer. .. 2-1269
SJ. Browne,. Su erintendent, Balboa
Field Oifiee, Bldg. 8, Balboa;. -. .. .. 2-2179
O. A. Dietz, Superintendent, Cristabal
Field Offiee, 1726 Canal St., Cristobal.. 3-2151
E. W. Zelnick, Chief, Water and Labora-
tories Br., Miraflores Filtration Plant... 2-1490
Robert Van Wagner, Administrative Asst. 2-1269

CONTRACT AND INSPECTION DIVISION
303 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
H. H. Feeney, Chief. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... 2-1201
W. M. Sergeant, Assistant Chief ......... 2-1201
Ct.rslcN tranl Arjc tn i er.. 277-4185
Assistant ............. 2-1201

BALBOA BRIDGE PROJECT
Building 911, La Boca
E. Bj. Stevens, Resident Engineer.;...... 2-3105
Hubert B. Pryor Chief Inspector..,.... 2-3105
WV. L. Brooks, Administrativet Asst. ...... 2-3105

POWER CONVERSION PROJECT
Building 911, La Boca


MARINE BUREAU
202-210 Administration Building. Balboa Heights
Capt. WILLIAM C. HUGHES, Jr., USN,
Director ............ ........... 2-3344
Mrs. Joan C. Clare, Secretary. .. .. .. .. 2-2186
Walter A. Dryia, Asst. to Marine Director 2-2186
Neil H. Wilo, Director of Admeasure- '
ment, 301 Terminal Bldg., Cristobal. 3-1693
AlvinMA Rank Float 10 qipen In-3175

Charl~eseT. J cks 2, Jr., Adix tistrati e Of-2-16
Kenneth L. Bail Lau ich Inspector.... 2-2186
Lawrence W. Cham;bers, Safety Inspector,
Southern District ... ... .. .. ... -48-217
Daniel H. Rudge, Safety Inspector, .North-
ern District .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. 58-304


PORT CAPTAIN, BALIOA
Third Floor, Te'rminal Building
Capt. James A. Flennke, USNs
Capt. Lm ra G bbott, Asst. Port C /t*i 285
Roscoe M. Collins, Harbormaster .. .. 2-2168
Walter H. Hebert. Chief Admeasure~r. .. 2-8729
Peter N. Riley, Administrative Asst. .. .. 2-2632
Leonard Wolford, Supervisory Marine Traf-
fic Controller .. ... .. .. ... .. .. 2-1261


PORT CAPTAIN, CRISTOBAL
Third Floor, Terminal Building
Capt. Charles S. Hutchings, USN,
Port Captain .. .. .. .. .. ... .. 1-139
Capt. Ernest B. Rainier, Asst. Port Captain 3-2196
Raymond R. Will, Harbormaster. ........ 3-1686
Rufus C. O'Neal, Supervisory Marine Traf.
fic Controller ....................~ 3-2196
Robert G. Peterson, Administrative? Asst. 3-1695


INDUSTRIAL DIVISION
Mount Hope
Capt. Geoffey Thompson, U5N, Chief 3-2392
Burton E. Davis, Plant Engineer. 3-1826
Maurice B. Nickel, Production Engineer 3-2182


LOCKS DIVISION ..
Office of Chief .
Pedro Miguel Locks
Ry C Stockbham, hsief. ..d......... 4- 136
Edward H.Halsall, Chief, Locks Security
Branch ......................... 48-218


Atlantic Branch `
Gatun Locks
William A. Van Sidlen, Jr., Su erintendent 58-201
V. 1. M~cLaughlin, Jr., Chiepf Foreman,
Locks Operations ............ 58-)202
W\ilbert L. Ney, Administrative Asst. ....' 58-204


Pacific Branch
Pedro hi uel Lock


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
264-266 Administration Building,
Balboa Heights


L. A. FERGUSON, Diretor. ... .. ..
Misls Mary N. Orr, Secretary. .....
R. O. Theriault, Asst. Director .....
Mr N.DavisoE. Admi istrativeeOfB ce ..


--Balbjoa
D bloSolo

Gamboa
Margarita
SParaiso
Rainbow Cit)


2-3117
2-3117
2-3773


Retail Store Managers
W. F. Robinson
W.tDn Marq ard

Hi. F CJenner
J. C. Walce s
E. T. Halripe


2-1455
26-860


3-2631
3-2654


COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION
Building 635, Balboa Heights


J. C. Randall, Chief. .. ... . .. .. .
W;.R Sh dsay A iT e st.. .. .
P. B.Bnof Hthns, uildinff~ fSsi..Hucrg.Space Rental. .
H. C. EolSerneenHuig

SW. G. Cotton, Housing Manager, Cristobal
A. I. Bauman, Sufjerintendent, Grounds
Branch .................. ......
V.NC. eeed,D aint. Supervisor, Gonsf
Roy Sharp, Summit Gardens. .. .. ... .


2-3395

2-2126
2-3395
3-2148
2-1801
3-2373
4-198


Service Center Branch
Building 28, Industrial Area, Balboa
P. S. Thornton, Superintendent. .... 2-1872
C. Wouston/RAsst. Murintendent. ..4 a 2-2668
A. Houton, Rstaurat Manger, Blo
Service Center ............2-1517
S. B.t naly bCahie Mtortion Pi ture..... -68


Service

B lba Heights
Cristobal
Coco Solo
D~iablo
Gamboa


Luncheonette
Paraiso
Rainbow City
Santa Cruz
Tivoli Guest House


Center Managers

Mrs.LM. W. Keller
Mrs. G. H. Colburn
P. J. Bauman
M. E. W lker
J Mfre~dmWhite
G. J. Marceau
R. T. Stewart
C. C. Kittens
J. U. Robinson
J~. H~,. Sa


3-1281
36-292
2-21 4
3-14
3-1939
2-1636
4-554
3-1337
6-148
1-2111


SUPPLY DIVISION
Building 28, Industrial Area, Balboa
J. J. Barton, General Manager. .. .. .. .. 2-3744
R. E. Cox, Executive Asst. .. .. .. 2-3183
Nd iisrtive eSec~tio d .Ok.. ...., 2-2668
H. E. Turner, Chief, Procurement Section 2-2777
G. S. McCullough, Chief, Buildings and
.,Equi ment Section, Building 42-F,
Diab o Road ..................,.. 2-3427

Retail Store Branch
Building 28, Industrial Area, Balboil
T. G. Relihan, Superintendent. .. .. ... 2-2961
B. J. Elich, Merchandise Promotion
Manager ..;......... 2-2961
J. F. Manning, Supply Oflicekr, I/y
Storage ......... 3-2615
W. C. Bain, Supply Offieer, Refrigerated
Products ...2-4324
C. P. Shay, Supervisor, Retail Stores...... 2-2668
P. H. Dowell Manager, Mlindi Dairy Farm 3-1912
J. F. Burgoon, Mlanager, Ancon Laundry.. 2-2171


Storehouse Branch
Building 28, Industrial Area, Balboa
H. E. May, Superintendent. ... ... .. .. 5-27155
J. O. DesLondes, Administrative Officer .. 2-8155
J. L. H. Demers, Chief, Warehousing,
Scrp and Salvage Section .. .... f-538 I
V. F. Kefrd, Manager, Furniture Pools. 2-3087
W.11. A1k, StorekeeperNorthern District,
jBldg. 5088, Shops Are~a, Mt. Hope.. .. 3-1258


TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Second Floor, Termninal Building, Cristobal


PERSONNEL BUREAU
DIRECTOR'S OFFICE
243 Administration Building, Balboa Heights
EDWARD A. DOOLAN, Director.2-2610 2-2561
Mrs. Loraaine C. Loga, Secretary. ... ... 2-2561
Daniel J. Paolucci, Assistant to Director 2-2625
Mrs. M. E. Murphy, Salary and Wage
Analyst 2-3660
MsBN.1get Ofier ,31..,.... 2-1077
Lorome tO Bunam, Emp oy e -2901 '


EMPLOYMENT AND UTRLIZATION
DIIVISION
Building 366, Ancon
Gordon M. Frick, Chief .. .. .. .. 2-1423 2-3057
Employee Utilization Technicians 2-3618 2-3449
John H. Terry, Chief, Records
Branch .. .. .. .. ,. 2-2647 2-3013
Mrs. Elsa Baile Administrative Unit.... 2-1820
Robert D. Kel y, Retirement and Insur-
Cristoal Ofie ......... ..312


WAGE AND CLASSIFICATION
DIVISION
Building 366, Ancon
John F. Oster Chief ......... 2-3614
Position Cla sfers . .. .. ... .2-1676 2-2597
Clerical Section .. ..2-1676 2-2597 2-3614





CENTRAL EMLPLOYMlENT OFFICE
Building 363, Ancon
Otto W. Helmerichs, Chief .. .. .. .. .. .. 2-2143
Examining ( Certification Branch.. .. ... "-2143
Chief Sultalbdilit Branch .. .. .. ... .. 2-2596
Chief Cnrtabrl Branch. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3-1228


CANAL ZONE CIVE[L4N PERSONNEL
POLICY COORDINATING BOARD
Building 363, Ancon
Executlve Secretary ......... --1817





ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH
244 Administration Buildins
Blboa Height

Hi. I. Perantie, Chief and Agency Records ggy
H.OL Aderica, Ceneral Se/~icrs Secti a. 2-3192
A. H-. Esans. Commun~icatlons and Records
Section, Room 14I, Basement, Administra-
tion Building .......... ... 2-1528
W~. D. Hardie, Records Mlanagement
Section ........... .... 2-1529
Ceorge V'ieto, Transportation Section. .. 2-2182
D. F. Mlead, Agenc) Records Center,
Bldg. 441-B, Balboa ............ 2-3788
E. D) r, Sup rnce dnt, Printing Plant,3187
C. Hi. Sanford, Pnnting Plant, Balboa
Branch, Room B-1, Basement, Admin-
lstration Buldmn .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2-3564
CB-l, BaseOet Adlin~itratiopnh Bdgoom 2-2838


B, I. EVERSON, Director............., 3-1904
Mrs. Wilma D. Crump, Secretary... 3-1241
N. E, Demers, Asst. to Director. .. .. .. .. 3-1241
W. F. Russon, Bureau Safety blepresenta-
tive, Bldg. 1019-X, Cristoa Pier Area 3-1433


TERMINALS DIVISION
First Floor, Terminal Building, Cristobal
E. B. O'Brien, Jr., Superintendent. ...... 3-1665
R. M. Wikingstad, Asst. Superintendent. 3-1615
.G. A, Jones, Jr., Administrative Asst. .... 3-1622
C. E. Eawing, Asst. to Superantendent,
W.iera e8B lba .... ise....... 2-1619
~Bunkering Sec., Building?059, 317 -86
Mr. Hope ..... ......3-553-88
G. H. Thompson, Plant Foreman, Marine
Bn ering Sc., Building 12 0,211 -71


RAILROAD DIVISION
Second Floor, Terminal Building, Cristabel
R. E Pikha, Maage 3-511

D. R. Bravton, Gen. Yardmaster, Colon-
Cristo al, 5020Boliva Highway... 3-2506
Train Dispace' fi~ee, 08 vo\ar 3-8
R. C. D~anifeTY dmaste Balb~oa, Bld 33 2-24110
B. Dorfman, Local Agent, 349 Avenida B,
Panam ..-3264.... ... -5
E. de la Osaa, special A snt ..... 28-3-3408

MOTOR TRANSPORTATION DIVISION
Building 0625-A, Gaillard' Highw~ay, A9non
R. W. Adams, Superantendent. .... 2-1302
P. R. Kuyoth, Chief, Southern District.... 2-1302
Leo J. Krziza, Administrative Asst. .. 2-1302
J. H.MJoyne Chief, Northern District, 3-57


SELECTIV'E SERVICE
STATE HEADQUARTERS-
CANAL ZONE
209 Administration Building, Balboa Heights


F. G. Dunsmoor, State Director......... 2-349e
Mlrs. Carol lc~Amis, Secretar. ..... 2-349E
H. I. Perantie, Deputy State Director,
J.Bar AS inlstratin nBuildingl arj... 2-277k
No 1, Building 911, La Boca.. .. .. 2-4471
Bruce G. Sanders, Jr., Chainnan,
LoalBord No. 2, Terminal Building,3-


Truman H., Hoenke, Superintendent ......
delimtBlack,. Maintenance Superinten-
Thomas J. if 101; Jr; Chief 'Fore nan
Locks Operations, Miraflores.....;..
Ceorge At. Low~e, Administrative Asst. ..
Loc 00 aios, FPedro hl man ..


48-213
48-315
48-315
48-213
48-214


J BartleyBSmith,A .rjec En i r ...
Victor D. Young, Chief Inspector........
J. Douglas Lord, Administrative Asst. ....


2 8 7
2-1491


MIETEOROLOGICAL AND HYDRO-
GRAPHIC BRANCH
280 Administration Building, Balboa Heights


n. ~ ~srlO~r, emrr ~nr ~ L
T. C.Hn, Cst. Ceof Hy r~pher. 2- ol SUPPLEMENT


I)~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~c U ~1- l L^ r-~l- 0Ln


August 7, 1959


PANAMA CANAL COMPANY.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW





CIVEL AFFAIRS BUREAU
205 Civil Affairs Building, Gaillard Highway


HEALTH BUREAU
265, 267, 269, 271, 272, 273, 276, 277, and 279
Administration Building, Balboa Heights
Colonel THOMAS G. FAISON, Director., 2-3206
Miss Martha R. Podbielski, Secretary 2-3206
William Brown, Asst. to Director.. .. .. 2-1417
Lt. Col. Harvey E. Meagher, Asst. to Di-
rector .. .. ... ... .. .. .. .. .. 2-1740
R. A. Sylvestre, Administrative Asst. .... 2-1417
Mrs. Marcia Van Horne, Administrative
Assistant ................... .... 2-1417
DIVISION OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
AND QUARANTINE
Dr. Eric R. Osterberg, Chief .. .. .. .. 2-1416
DIVISION OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
Dr. ~Robert G. Matheney, Chief .. ... .. 2-1416
DIVISION OF SANITATION
John P. Smith, Jr., Chief ..... .. .. .. 2-3616


HENRY L. DONOVAN, Director.. .. .. .
Mrs. Virginia K. Roberts, Secretary..
James Marsh~all, Assistant to Director. ..
E. L. Farlow, Administrative Assistant. ..


2-1682
2-1663
2-1532
2-1663


CUSTOMS DIVISION
J. B. Clemmons, Jr., Chief, 101 Terminal
Building, Balboa ... .. ....... 2-2628
B. E. Lowande, Chief Inspector, Balboa,
101 Terminal Building, Balboa. ... 2-2628
B. G. Sanders, Jr., Chief Inspector, Crist-
obal, 200 Administration Building>
Cristobal ....................... 3-2139

FIRE DIVISION
102 Civil Affairs Building, Gaillard Highway
W. G. Dolan, Chief ... ... .. .... 2-2101
F. A. Mohl, Administrative Assistant. ... 2-2101

POLICE DIVISION
Maj'. B. A. Darden, Chief, 201 Civil Affairs
Building ................. ....... 2-3400
C.1pt Caddis Wall, Commander, Balboa
District, Balboa Police Station. .. .. 2-1277
Capt. E. S. Shipley, Commander, Cristobal
District, Cristobal Police Station. .. .. 3-2111
Gapt Wt. H. M ny ,a Warde~n, C. Z. Peni 18
C. L. Koontz, Administrative Assistant,
901 Civil Affairs Building.. .... 2-2560


HOSPITALS AND CLINICS
SGORGAS H-OSPITAL
Colonel Clark B. Meador, Director. .. ..
Assistant Director ................... .
Robert L. Thompson, Administrative Asst.
Information .........................
Chiefs of Service, Gorgas Hospital
Dr. I. Roberts Berger, Outpatient. .. ...
Dr. Lewis E. Fontaine, Dental. .. .. .. .
Dr. Daniel Hirschl, Pediatrics .. .. .. ..
Lt. Col. J. C. Kennedy, Neuropsychiatry. .
Lt. Col. Carl M. Lineback, Ear, Nose, and
Throat . . . .
Dr. Harold Mondragon, Laboratory ... .
Dr. Robert H. Rupp, Ophthalmology. .. .
Dr. Evganie P. Shirokov, Surgical .. ..
Di-. Frank P. Smith, Acting Medical. .. ..
Dr. Irving J. Strumpf, Obstetrics and
Gynecology ......... .
Dr. Myron J. Szczukowski, Radiology....
Dr. Rodolfo V. Young, Chest.. .. .. .. ..


2-65433
2-6430
2-6440
2-6436

2-6454
2-3765
2-6437
2-6380

2-6453
2-6442
2-6453
2-6363
2-6444

2-6456
2-6449
2-65332


2-3106

2-3106
2-2454
3-2133


POSTAL DIVISION
Earl F. Unruh, Director of Posts, 105 Civil
Affairs Building .. .. .. ......
Robert S. Herr, Administrative Aide,
105 Civil Affairs Building.. ... .. .
Arthur T. Cotton, Postmaster, Balboa. .. .
Frank G. Farrell, Postmaster, Cristobal. .


DIVISION OF SCHOOLS
106 Civil Affairs Building
Sigurd E. Esser, Superintendent. .. .. .. 2-3311
R. W. Collinge, Asst. Superitndent. .. 2-1379
Chare nd tDubbs, Assistant to Superin-2139

G. C. Lockridge, Su erviorPhyi Eu-
cation and Athletics. .. ... .. .. 2-2905
A. H. Byrd, Administrative Assistant. .. 2-1897

CIVEL DEFENSE UNIT
Philip L. Dade, Chief, 208 Civil Affairs
Building ........, ... 2-4169

CANAL ZONE LIBRARY-MUSEUM
Mrs. Eleanor D. Burnham, Librarian-Cu-
rator, Civil Affairs Building ... 2-4326

LICENSE SECTION
J. W. Hare, Chief, 111 Civil Affairs Bldg. 2'-2816
Michael IZombory, Asst. Chief, 111 Civil
Affairs Building .. ... .. .. .. .. .. 2-2563


District Physician
Dr. David Senzer, Gamboa.. .. .. .. ... 6- 161


COCO SOLO HOSPITAL
Lt. Col. Ralph E. Conant, Superintendent.
Dr. Robert L. Koenig, Medical Director..
David C. McIlhenny, Administrative OfI~cer
Information .........................


36-617
3-1211
36-742
3-1211


Chiefs of Services, Coco Solo Hospital
Telephone 3-1211
Dr. George W. Bland, Obstetrics and
Gynecology .... .. .. .. .. Ext. 3 and 19
Dr. W~illard F. French, Dental. .. .. ... Ext. 60
Dr. Oren C. Irion, Medical.. .. .. .. .. Ext. 13
Capt. Ronald E. Moore, Outpatient..... Ext. 56
Dr. Harry Wresterberg, Surgical:. .. Ext. 24 and 50
Corozal Hospital
Lt. Col. Arthur L. Hessin, Superintendent 2-1568
Palo Seco Leljrosarium
Dr. Ezra IHurwitz, Superintendent.. .. 274-3234


CANAL ZONE GOVERNMrENT