Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Creation Date:
August 1955
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )
23584335 ( ALEPH )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Gift of the Panama CanalMus


77-/-


3l-ii4


PANAMA
i =~-"


CANAL,


Vol 6, No. 1 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, AUGUST 5, 1955 5 cents


BIDS


FOR


CONVERTING


ATLANTIC


SIDE


EQUIPMENT


TO


60


CYCLES


WILL


BE


ADVERTISED


DURING


AUGUST


Most


Younger


Zonians


Look


'Who'


Here!


Will Have Salk Shots
Before Polio Season
More than three-quarters of Canal Zone
children from 5 to 9 years old will be
immunized against polio by two Salk
vaccine inoculations by the time the
"polio season" normally begins on the
Isthmus, according to the estimates of the
Health Bureau.


It is min this age group that paralytic
polio strikes hardest and nearly 30 percent
of all cases occur in children of this age.
The U. S. Public Health Service will
limit vaccination to this age group until
the production of vaccine and testing
under the strict new standards make addi-
tional vaccine available, according to Col.
C. O. Bruce, Health Director.
The estimates on the percentage of
children vaccinated during the past few
weeks were prepared following the free
inoculation program for first and second
grade pupils on July 26-28. Health
officials expected the same percentage of
participation among children in the pay
program which was held this week.
Salk vaccine for the first and second


grade pupils was donated by the National
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. The
program was administered by the Health
Bureau free of charge as a public health
service. Orders for the purchase of vac-
cine were placed by the Canal administra-
tion soon after the announcement that
Salk vaccine had been found to be effective


Contract
Among
Of


Will


The Largest


Power


Project


Specifications are now being prepared
for one of the key contracts in the power
conversion project-the conversion of all
domestic, commercial and industrial
equipment on the Atlantic side from 25-
cycle to 60-cycle frequency.
While exact schedules are not com-
pleted, it is expected that the work will be
advertised for bids the latter part of this
month, for about 60 days, and bids then
opened. This phase of the project
will be divided into two parts, one
covering Company-Government indus-
trial units and the other covering domestic
equipment and Company-Government
service units.


The specifications will provide
four areas will be available for the
tractor or contractors after Januar
and all the remaining areas after
May 15. It is presently expected
the first actual use of 60 cycle by do
tic users will not be until late this


a; t~~~eL~I~P~I -~


that
con-
y 2,
next
that
mes-
fiscal


year.
The first areas to be made available to
the contractor for conversion will be
Margarita townsite, Coco Solo Hospital,
Mindi Dairy, and the Industrial Division.
Locks, Mount Hope Separate
The contract for the conversion of
Canal equipment will cover all frequency
sensitive units on the Atlantic side with
the exception of those at Gatun Locks


kLaPLBI




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW
I *


August 5, 1955


Employee
Lowest Si


turnover, Separation Rate


nce


Start


Of


World


NEW


War


Separations from the service and turnover rates among full time U. S.-rate employ-
ees of the Company-Government were the lowest during the past fiscal year of any
since the beginning of World War II.
Figures compiled by the Personnel Bureau for the fiscal year ended June 30, showed
that the number of voluntary and involuntary separations from the service and the
percentages in both categories were well below comparable statistics since 1950.
The turnover rate was high throughout the war years and immediately afterwards
because of the great expansion and later reduction in force necessitated by abnormal
conditions.
The following tabulation shows the turnover rates for the past five fiscal years:


Fiscal Years


FORCE
SEPARATIONS:
Voluntary .
Involuntary
Total
TURNOVER RATE:
Voluntary..
Involuntary
Total


I951 1952 1953 1954 1955
4,287 4,261 4,233 3,867 3,803


805o
239
1,o44
18.78
5.57
24.35


466
238
704


The lowering of the turnover rate during the past two years is attributed princi-
pally to a stabilization of the force with relatively few force reductions; wage increases
for various groups; free home leave travel; group insurance; and other fringe benefits
which have been provided within the past two years.
The highest turnover rates in the Canal organization for the past five years were
shown in the fiscal years 1951 and 1953. In 1951 the rate was high because of the
large number of voluntary separations from the service which came after income tax
was applied to Government employees in the Canal Zone. Other conditions which
influenced the rate that year included the extensive reorganization. The rate of
involuntary separations that year was the lowest of any in the 1950-55 period with
the exception of last year.
Both the voluntary and involuntary rates were high in the fiscal year 1953. The
voluntary rate was influenced by the threat to the 25 percent differential, increased
rents, and other unsettling conditions. The rate of involuntary separations was


Comptroller


Leaves


This


Month


('OL. CHARLES O.. BRUCE, new Health Director,
took over his duties early last month. He was
photographed at his desk, but he has spent much of
the past four weeks on field trips to the various units
of the Health Bureau. His present post is his first
in 'the C('anal Zone. iHe visited the Isthmus last
January as a member of the group which accom-
panied Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens.


abnormally high b


because


of substantial


force reductions made in some units.
rate of voluntary separations front
Canal service has been increased d
the past 15 years by the employme
married women who leave the s(
when their husbands resign, retire.


assigned elsewhere.
paratively large num
personnel have been
close of the war and
other voluntary sep
resign because of t
their husbands.


n the
luring
nt of
service
r are


c? o -
The wives of a com-
ber of Armed Forces
employed since the
these are listed with
arations when they
he reassignment of


Push-Butto
To Be


in Traffic
Installed


Light
In Balboa


- tI 4


The Canal Zone's first push-button
type traffic light, or "pedestrian actuated
19 Ut f -* *


HEALTH


OFFICER





August 5, 1955


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Intensive Cam

Number,


paign Ur

Quality


ider

Of


Way To

Employee


Increase

Suggestions


NEW


STOCKHOLDER


The opening move in an intensified
campaign to increase the number and
quality of employee suggestions will be
made next week when U. S.-rate em-
ployees receive, with their paychecks,
invitations to take a greater part in the
Incentive Award Program. Employees
on the local-rate rolls will receive similar
invitations with their paychecks the
following week.
The invitations are in the form of


cartoon-illust
They show a
her own ide
change that
a better way.
The payche
innovations
Program. O0
selection of


rated, red-lettered ca
young woman tripping
as and saying: "Can
condition? There mus
Send in your suggest
eck inserts are one of sev
in the Incentive A
their changes include
75 employees, strategic


located in operating units, as
Awards representatives and a n
ardized form which will henc


Incer
ew st


on."
reral
ward
the
ally
itive
and-


eforth be


used by all employees making suggestions.
"A suggestion proposes an improve-
ment in our operations by locating a
problem and recommending a solution,"
according to a member of the Incentive
Awards Committee. "It may change
the way things are done and propose a
new method or a new application of an
old idea. Merely pointing out a difficulty
or shortcoming, without providing an
answer, is not a suggestion. Neither is
a proposal min routine maintenance or
everyday functions, such as repairing
linoleum, keeping aisles clear, cleaning
lights, ordering supplies, etc., unless it
proposes a change in the operations or
the physical facilities."
What To Suggest
The Canal organization, he said, is
especially interested in suggestions for:
Combining materials, methods, opera-
tions, procedures, records, reports;
Devising new applications of old ideas,
new equipment, new machines, new
methods, new processes, new tools;
Eliminating breakage, duplication, fire,
health or accident hazards, operations,
waste, unnecessary work;
Improving employee morale, methods,
procedures, quality of product, safety,
tools and machines, working conditions;
and


sentatives. They will be kept informed
of any new developments in the awards
plan by means of news-letters, which they
will receive at least once a month from
the committee.
How To Do it
The new standardized form will make
submission of suggestions a much easier
process than it has been in the past and
also make the task of reviewing and
studying the suggestions considerably
simpler.
Merely by checking printed squares, an
employee can indicate whether his idea
would simplify work, save material or


time, improve methods or safety or
otherwise better existing conditions.
The new form is perforated; one portion
of it will be torn off and returned to the
suggester promptly as an acknowledg-
ment that his suggestion has been received
and started on the rounds of those who
will study it. Any employee can ask, in
a space set aside for this purpose, that
his name not appear during the review
period, and that the suggestion be num-
bered until a decision is made as to
whether it will be accepted or rejected.


If a Canal


employee's


suggestion is


one


which could be used by other Federal
agencies, it will be sent to the Civil
Service Commission. A Canal employee
may receive from $10 to $5,000 locally
and additional amounts from any other
Federal agency which adopts his idea.
The chance for a good-sized monetary
return, therefore, is much greater than it
has been in the past.
Started In 1946


Employee


Suggestion


Program,


today known as an Incentive Award
Program, has been used by the Canal
organization since 1946. Since the enact-
ment of the new overall Federal Program
last year, there has been a gradual in-
crease in the number of worthwhile
employee suggestions and the intensified
program, now getting under way, should
result in a much larger number of sug-
gestions submitted and approved.
Between last November and June 30,
72 Canal employees had ideas which they
considered good enough to pass on.
Sixteen of these were approved and the
mpn and wnmpn hnhind thn idnan ctivpn


A CHANGE in the top command of the Panama
Canal Company and Canal Zone Government came
late last month when Wilber M.Brucker took office as
Secretary of the Army succeeding Robert T. Stevens.
A native of Saginaw, Mich., and a former Governor
of his home state, Secretary Brucker had been serv-
ing as General Counsel of the Department of Defense.
He is a graduate of the University of Michigan Law
School and has been prominent in legal work and
politics for many years. He served with the Michigan
National Guard on the Mexican Border and later as
an Artillery Lieutenant with the Rainbow Division
in France during the first World War.
approved, from those making $3,800 or
less a year; 11 suggestions were received,
and four approved, from those in the
$3,800-$7,000 wage bracket; and four
suggestions were received, and one
approved, from employees who earned
over $7,000.
The suggestions varied as widely as
the employees who suggested them.
They included, among other things; an
idea for having house plans available in
the commissaries where rugs and furni-
ture were sold; new safety devices for the
locks; a new form for time slips in the
Commissary Division; mechanical im-
provements such as a guard on saws and
the invention of a tool to remove lead
sheath from cables.
Committee In Charge
The Canal's Incentive Awards Program
is in charge of a committee headed by
Henry L. Donovan, Civil Affairs Direc-
tor. Other members are John Hollen,
Chipf nf thn Eveniitivx Plannina Rxiff.





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 5, 1955


BETTER


LEARN


LEFT!


THE SE


STOP!


Most Younger Zopians
Will Have Salk Shots

(Contnueftfror page i) communities by
personnel of the Health Bureau, while
the Army, Navy, and Air Force handled
the vaccinations of their dependents.
Most Children Inoculated
Approximately 1,000 vaccinations were
administered in the free vaccination
program which was limited to children
between 5 and 9 years of age who were in
the first or second grades prior to June
30. The Canal Zone school census dur-
ing the past term shows 2,587 first and
second grade pupils.
In addition to those inoculated on
July 26-28, more than 2,000 had been


vaccinated during the summer vacation
period since all children in this age group
going to the States on vacation were
eligible for inoculations.
The percentage for the eligible children
in the pay group was expected to be
about the same as in the free program.
The number of eligibles in the second
group had been estimated at 2,100 prior
to the inoculations this week.
Those children eligible for Salk vaccine


injections who
during the tim
their injections
of Gorgas and
the dispensaries
upon application
eligibility will
no charge will


to be vaccinated


ies scheduled may receive
at the Outpatient Clinics
Coco Solo Hospitals, or at
ks of the Armed Services,
ion. The same rules of
be required for them and
be made for those eligible


for free vaccinations.


U ~ > -~...


Gatun Locks
To Begin.


a,


Overhaul

January 9


Continue Five Months


A plan adopted about two years ago
for increasing the Canal capacity during
lock-overhaul periods will be used for the
first time during the coming dry season
when work begins on the five-month
overhaul of Gatun Locks.
Following a plan adopted by the Board
of Directors in March 1953, alterations
have been made in the locks so that the
wall culverts and cylindrical valves can
now be overhauled without emptying
either of the lock chambers.
This will permit double culvert oper-
ations when one set of lock chambers is
unwatered and will speed up the time for
filling and emptying the lock chambers
which are in use.
Materials are already on order and the
first employees have been recruited for
the overhaul, which will begin soon after
the first of the year. The tentative start-
ing date is January 9. The overhaul period
will last until about the middle of May.
__ -- ---------1.... 1 1 P1 '1 ji-


RIGHT!


I


w





August 5,


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Check


Totaling


Canal Em


$8,588


ployees


Sent


Uniform


619

Allowances


Police


Chief Retires


A total of $8,588 was paid last month
by the Panama Canal Company-Canal
Zone Government organization in uniform
allowances to cover the first quarter of


the present fiscal year.


In all, 619 em-


and who wear white uniforms are allowed
$30 annually as a uniform allowance.
Guards who are on duty at the Com-
missary Division's Mount Hope plant and
who wear khaki uniforms with sun helmets


ployees who are required to wear uni-
forms in the course of their official duties
received the allowances.
Payment of the uniform allowance was


in accordance with the


so-called Fringe


Benefits Act passed by the United States
Congress last May.
As uniform allowances are to be paid


at the


beginning of each


quarter,


estimated cost to the Canal organization
of these benefits will total somewhat over


$30,000.


Similar


quarterly


payments


will be made min October, January, and
April.
Panama Line Maximum
The largest uniform allowance, on an
annual basis, is that paid to officers on


the Panama Line ships.


They are the


receive $26 a year


as a uniform allowance.


Customs guards and railroad conduc-
tors are allowed $9 a year-their distinc-


tive uniforms are caps -and


terminals


guards have a $7 annual allowance.


Temporary


or substitute


employees


are also entitled to uniform allowances; in
their cases the allowances for each quar-
ter will be paid immediately after the
first day of each quarter in which they
occupy a position for which a uniform
allowance is authorized.
The amounts of the allowances in each
case listed above are based on the esti-
mated annual uniform requirements and
the current price of the uniform required.


Paraiso


MAJ. GEORGE HERMAN,


Chief of the Police


Division, retired the end of July after 42 years with
the Zone force. A large number of his friends
honored him last Saturday night at a farewell party


at the Army-Navy Club.


He and Mrs. Herman are


sailing August 13 on the Panama Line.


visit their daughter in


San Antonio, Tex.,


They will
but have


not yet decided where they will make their home.


only group required to have uniforms for


seasons;


their annual allowance is


$100 a year, the maximum permissible.
Next highest amount is the $65 allowed
annually for the ladies in white-nurses,


dieticians,


and physical


therapists em-


played by the Health Bureau.
Policemen, motorcycle officers and other
officers of the Police Division, together
with the guards at the Gamboa penitent-
iary are close behind the nurses in the
amount of their annual uniform allow-


ances.


They will receive $62 a year. Lock


guards, with their distinctive khaki uni-


forms,


with the black stripe down the


trouser leg, receive $61 a year.
Guards at the Canal Zone police sta-
tions and jails are allowed $48 a year


as a uniform allowance.


Their female


counterparts, the matrons at the Canal
Zone Prison for Women and Juveniles,
will receive $30 for their khakis.
Based on Current Price
Firemen and firemen driver operators
have been allowed $35 a year; the officers


rrrr$


Safety Field Day


' **


*


ll





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


August 5,1955


FOR YOUR INTEREST AND GUIDANCE
-- -- as, I ,


IDENT


PREVENTION


SAFETY FIELD DAY


dry season the
S('ommittee s


Balboa Store-


uggeste


d that


they would like to put on a safety
demonstration at the La Boca Ball Park
and invite all other safety committees
from other divisions to participate.


However


at that time they had just


appointed new committeemen which
delayed things somewhat until the begin-
ning of the rainy season put a damper on
proceedings.
Such was the situation when Cleveland
B. Stevens, safety committee chairman
of the Paraiso Civic Council, called the
Safety Branch and asked if it would be
possible to get some safety films to show
at one of their meetings. The next time
we had a talk the idea had grown into
showing some safe-driving films and put-
ting on a safe-driving demonstration for
the people living in Paraiso. It was only
a step to get these two ideas of the Balboa
Storehouse safety committee and the
Paraiso Civic Council together. The


HONOR ROLL
Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
JUNE
COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU
HEALTH BUREAU
AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR
Supply ...-------------------------
Community Services ..------------
Engineering and Construction .
Health ....-------------------------
Civil Affairs------------------------
Transportation and Terminals ....
Marine .--------------------------

Division Award For
NO DISABLING INJURIES
JUNE
LOCKS DIVISION
HOSPITALIZATION AND CLINICS
MAINTENANCE DIVISION
SERVICEE CENTER DIVISION


Paraiso Civic Council then came up with
the idea that they would sponsor a big
safety field day at Paraiso to be held on
July 23, at Paraiso Ball Park. Thus
good things are born.
Elsewhere in this issue you will find
pictures of the grand event which, if one
overlooked the weather usual at this time
of the year, proved to be a great success.
A number of dignitaries were present and
the program contained many items and
exhibits of unusual interest to people both
in and out of the Canal Zone Govern-
ment-Panama Canal Company.
Since out of the 355 disabling injuries
experienced by the Canal Zone Govern-
ment-Panama Canal Company during
1954, approximately 70 percent were to
local-rate employees; it is very gratifying
to the safety people to find these em-
ployees taking such a personal interest
in their welfare and, what's more, doing
something about it like their "Safety
Field Day." There is no question that
with such safety consciousness and active
interest as was displayed on Saturday,
July 23, the frequency rate for 1955 is
going to be a lot less than it was in 1954.


Many people, in addition to those
safety committees from various divisions,
are thanked for helping the Paraiso Civic
Council and giving their active support
in making this Safety Field Day a suc-
cess. Difficulties always arise in trying
3 to get the proper people lined up to put
2 on a program. Such a difficulty arose
2 when the Safety Field Day Committee
2
l found that it could not get a school band
1 or a local fife-and-drum corps. Someone
0 suggested that the Army might help if
asked. They were, and the 23d Infantry
Division Band put on an impressive flag
raising ceremony, and, of course, no
parade would ever be a success without


JUNE 1955


I I I


a band. The Armed Forces Radio Sta-
tion at Fort Clayton did a splendid job
of putting on a 15-minute interview with
Harold W. Williams and Mrs. Ellis
Fawcett telling all about the program.
Of course the International Boy Scouts
and Girl Scouts were present selling soft
drinks, taking part in the Bicycle Safety
Demonstration, and doing other jobs to
help put it over. Charles Bradley was
good enough to let the Aids to Navigation
have his snakes as a background for their
"first aid for snake bite" demonstration.
Since the day as a whole proved to be
such a success, it is hoped the Paraiso
Civic Council can see their way to have
another "Safety Field Day" next year.


HIGHWAY ZOO


The JACKASS
This is the showoff who risks his
own neck and everybody elseos by
speeding and weaving. Or he may
turn up as the stupid oaf who just
doesn't savvy modern driving. In ici
he is most any driver on thv highway
except you and me!
NATIONAL SAFETY co'Ncj


Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked
(Frequency Rate)


Early
Iu I
use S


ho





August 5,


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS. CANAL ZONE


Shirtsleeve


Conference


Printed by the


Printing Plant


Mount Hope, Canal Zone


S. SEYBOLD, Governor-President


H. W. SCHULL, JR.
Lieutenant-Governor


WILLIAM


G. AREY, JR.


Public Information Officer


J. RUFUS HARDY, Editor
ELEANOR H. MclLHENNY
Assistant Editor


SUBSCRIPTION-$1.00 a


year


SINGLE COPIES-5 cents each


Service


ters, Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days
after publication date.

SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10 cents each


BACK COPIES-10


cents each


On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.


REPRESENTATIVES of the Local Rate Civic Councils meet regularly with Governor Seybold in tie
Board Room of the Administration Building to discuss community problems. At a recent meeting the
Council representatives were introduced to the new Lieutenant Governor, Col. H. W. Schull, Jr.
Left to right around the table are: Beresford Gittens, Rainbow City General Committee; J. J.
Joseph, Rainbow City; H. A. Josephs, Rainbow City; C. D. Atherly, Paraiso; Eric Oakley, Paraiso Gen-
eral Committee; E. L. Fawcett, Paraiso; Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director; Governor Seybold;
Leo B. Harrington, stenotypist; Lieutenant Governor Schull; Norman Johnson, Employee and Labor
Relations Officer; G. L. A. Davis, Rupert Wilson, and Cleveland Roberts, La Boca.


Also attending this meeting


and Rexford Inn


of Santa


but not shown in the photograph were Leon Headley and R. T. Burns
is of the Santa Cruz General Committee.


Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to Editor, THE PANAMA
CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights, C. Z.


APPOINTED


COROZAL


> HEAD
HOSPITAL


A. B. Hendricks,


a Rates Analyst in the


Office of the Comptroller, returned to the
Canal Zone last month after five months of
advance training in Washington, D. C.,
as one of three local participants in the
Fourth Senior Management Intern Program.
During this period, he studied methods
used by the General Accounting Office and
worked out a project with the National
Park Service. He also studied public


administration


and Federal


Government


accounting problems in night classes at the
American University, and worked with the
District of Columbia on personnel problems.
In addition he took part in weekly
seminars held by prominent Government
officials on such subjects as management,
organization and method, human factors
and employees, training problems, person-
nel practices and management accounting
systems. ______
The first U. S.-rate salary checks pre-
pared with the new machinery which makes
payroll procedures and bookkeeping largely


No
August


revocations will be accepted after
31, the Commission emphasized.


After that date normal regulations will
again be in effect. These provide that an
employee who waives the insurance must
wait one year before he can request cover-
age. At that time he must be under 50
years of age and pass a physical examination.
Occupants of Canal Zone quarters were
advised last month that all quarters under
the custody of the Housing Division will
henceforth be serviced by preventive main-
tenance teams. Teams of this sort have
been working in Diablo Heights and Mar-
garita for some time; the plan is now being
extended to all quarters.
Teams will inspect the interior and
exterior of each quarters unit at least twice
each year. The inspection will be per-
formed by a U. S.-rate employee of the
Maintenance Division. Necessary repairs
will be made without the necessity of a
request from the quarters occupant.
In a memorandum to residents of Canal


OF CURRENT INTEREST


On sale at all Panama Canal


~Lfr,


.
. .. .
.
-
.. .




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 5, 1955


cea


ving


The


Services


Zone?

Make


Packing

Moving


And


Almost


]rating

Painless


Crooks had been
lining the provisi
and he knew bef
Rinker that he
pounds of househi
take only such
needed for a hou
had four dozen
they didn't, the


packed
and th


or s
at


hipped
shipmi


given a pamphlet out-
ons of Public Law 600
ore he talked with Mr.
was limited to 8,750
old goods, that he could
possessions as were
sehold-had the Crooks
rocking chairs, which
chairs would not be
I at Company expense-
ent of his automobile


would be his own responsibility.
Packing Parley
Because a REVIEW reporter was tag-
ging along to get this story, Mr. Rinker
combined two sessions with the Crooks
into one and met them at their house to


discuss


ping
Mr. a
come
Divisi
office
which
Along
clipbo


of
nc


he packing and crating and ship-
their possessions. Ordinarily
SMrs. Crooks would first have


to his o
on shop
is hung
Zonians
another


ice in the Maintenance
irea. One wall of the
ith copies of the papers
ho are leaving will need.
wall hangs a series of
Containing the papers


PLANS for packing and moving are discussed by Joseph N. Rinker, Packing and Crating Foreman, with
Mr. and Mrs. Michael I. Crooks of Balboa. The Crooks are leaving the Canal Zone this month.


Death and taxes, they


table. In
and Cratin
Canal's U.
Sooner c
every Can
when he <
stances dec


are mevi-


.e Canal Zone, add Packing
for about 99 percent of the
.-rate employees.
later in the life of almost
employee comes the time
cides, or age and circum-
e for him, to go back to the


United States to live. That this up-
rooting is as painless as it is is due largely
to the efforts of Joseph N. Rinker and the
Packing and Crating Shop of the Main-
tenance Division.


Until Public Law
in August 1946 and
ing up a departing


600 became effective
until the job of pack-
Zonian's belongings


was taken over by the Packing and
Crating Shop soon thereafter, an em-
ployee who was leaving had to scurry
around and make his own arrangements.
He had to scrounge boxes and crates,
borrow a china packer from the nearest
large commissary, arrange for a customs
inspector to came to his quarters while
the packing was going on, fill out the


the end of this month after over 33
years in the Canal Zone. He and Mrs.
Crooks already own a three-bedroom
ranch-type home in Whittier, Calif. They
do not plan to leave here until August
20, the day after Mr. Crooks' last work-
ing day, but they want their furniture
shipped ahead of them so they will be
ready to settle down when they reach
California early next month.
After Mr. Crooks discussed retirement
details with Robert J. Kelley, in the
Personnel Bureau, and transportation
arrangements with James M. Thompson,
in the Transportation Section of the
Administrative Branch, hie was ready to
talk with Mr. Rinker, whose official title
is Foreman Crater and Packer and who
lives, eats, and breathes packing and
crating.
In the Transportation Section, Mr.


of some States-bound Zonian, his pack-
ing and departure dates and his destina-
tion. The other day these clipboards
showed that shipments were in the works
for such widely separated States as


Virginia, Michig
ington.
Surrounded b
Rinker would h
what he and his
packing, would
and would ansv


had.
Croo
boa.
estim
would
and
would


an,


Texas,


and Wash-


y these exhibits Mr.
ave explained to them
crew would do about the
make a "packing date,"
ier any questions they


Later he would have gone to the
ks' quarters on Akee Street in Bal-
There he would make a rough
iate as to whether their belongings
d be within their weight allowance
see if they had any furniture which
d be a special packing problem.


Instead, for THE REVIEW'S benefit, he
sat down with them at home and went
over the procedure with them there. At
the same time he estimated the number
of crates and barrels his men would need
nd decided on a packing date, which in
their case would be August 1.


One-day Process
on +tI+t riyr tim flrnnlo 1


ixmo ra + rl


-




August 5, 1955


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


with household goods, if she cared to.
Pillows and blankets are satisfactory
items for this interior packing but sheets
and linens are too much dead weight, he
said, for the light construction of the
ordinary drawer. Mrs. Crooks was to
keep an itemized list of what went into
each drawer and these would later be
checked by one of the two inspectors,
Frank Turman or James Van Dyke.
No Pre-packing Needed
Actually though, Mr. Rinker said,
there was nothing which Mrs. Crooks
needed to do ahead of packing time. The
packers, like Gabriel Cordoba and And-
res Diaz, whose specialty is packing
china and glassware, work more easily
if such items are left in cupboards or on
shelves. They look the situation over
before they begin, see how much and
what is to be packed, and begin with the
larger and heavier items which go into
one barrel; the lighter and more fragile
things such as crystal and figurines are
packed together in other barrels. Other
packers, like Kenneth Harris and Ashton
Russell, know from years of experience
how many towels, pillow cases, or bed-
spreads fit into standard cartons.
All of the breakable things, Mr. Rinker
said, would be wrapped in newspapers
and packed in shredded paper in the
barrels. Each barrel would be itemized
as to its contents and a copy of the
listing would be given to the Crooks.
Nonbreakable items would be packed in
cardboard cartons which would each
have its separate itemized list. Moth-


balls, brought by the packe
sprinkled into each carton.


rs, would be
These car-


tons would later be packed inside big
wooden vans.
Safe Handling
None of the furniture and the larger
pieces such as lamps and radios would
be packed at the Crooks' house, they
learned. Such furniture would be tag-
ged in duplicate, swaddled in blankets,
and taken to the Packing and Crating
shop. Each item would be listed, to-
gether with a value given by either Mr.
or Mrs. Crooks.
Mrs. Crooks was concerned over the
safe handling of several large oil paintings
but Mr. Rinker assured her that he and
his men were equally concerned that they


CHINA and glassware are wrapped in newspaper and packed into metal barrels, with shredded paper as
wadding. Gabriel Cordoba and Andres Diaz, who have been packers for seven years, are doing the pack-
ing while Joseph N.Rinker, Packing and Crating foreman, looks over some of the things still to be wrapped.


made their long journey in good condi-
tion. Special celotex boxes are available
at the shop for paintings, he said; the
boxed pictures would then be packed into
the large vans.
As each piece of furniture was taken
from the truck at the shop, Mr. Rinker
explained, it would be checked off by one
of the inspectors who would remove, and
put aside, one of the duplicate tags for
further listing on the shipping manifest
and the itemized list, a copy of which
would later accompany the Crooks to
their new home. After all of the Crooks'
household belongings had been assembled
in the shop, Mr. Rinker said, the actual
packing for shipment would begin.
After he left the Akee Street house, Mr.


Rinker,


REVIEW


along, returned to
long building at ti
Maintenance's Div
ure. There the sho
turning salvaged
crates-vans, they
in which household


reporter still tagging
the shop in an airy
he very back of the
ision's fenced enclos-
p gang had been busy
materials into the
are officially called-
goods are eventually


-. a -


packed. Vans like these would be used
later for the Crooks' household goods.


In days gone
an eye to later
used to have th


mahogany bo
crating people
housewives.
departing fur
are made fro
had encased
which electric


ards
e a
Th(
nitu


by some Zonians, with
do-it-yourself projects,
eir furniture crated in
. Today's packing and
re as thrifty as Dutch
e vans into which most
re is eventually packed


m lumber which originally
incoming goods; crates in
ranges had been shipped to


the Canal Zone have been remodeled into
vans and other cases, for instance.
No Termites
Termite-eaten old lumber from demol-
ished quarters is never used in the Pack-
ing and Crating Shop. Special plywood,
made in Panama for the Canal Company,
makes sides for the vans. The shredded
paper with which the barrels and boxes
are packed is cut into ribbons by the
Shop's own shredding machine. The paper
is old newspapers and magazines or clean
waste paper; reams of it comes from the
Administration Building. The metal
drums into which the dishes and glassware
are packed were originally filled with
alcohol or turpentine. They are cleaned.
fitted with new wooden tops and lined
with now nnnmar




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


August 5, 1955


Stars


And


Stripes


Fly


From


112


Staffs


When


Canal


Zone


Celebrates


Holiday


Whenever a presidential proclamation
or an order from the Governor directs
that flags be displayed, or on national
holidays like the Fourth of July, 112
United States flags flutter from poles on
Canal buildings or fly from the staffs on
the Canal's tugs and launches and dredges
and barges.
There are other United States flags in


the Canal
posts and
and court
which fly
buildings (
Tropical
and heavy


the day it is first raised to the top of its
staff. Flags are half-staffed from 7 a. m.
to noon on Memorial Day, May 30; at
noon they are raised to the top of their
standards where they remain until the
end of the day.
Flags in the Canal Zone are flown at
half-staff whenever the President or the
Governor directs; the periods during


Zone, of course-on military
naval stations, and in churches
rooms-but the 112 are those
over Company-Government
nr from marine equipment.


weather
rain taki


with its
s its toll


the average life of one here


nine months when it
and considerably les
marine equipment.
sion of Storehouses
flags from the Gener
tration, the U. S. A
Depot in Philadelpi
manufacturer.


is flown
s than
Each ye
orders


brilliant sun
of the flags;
is not over
from a staff
that on the
ar the Divi-
about 900


al Services Adminis-
rmy Quartermaster
hia or from a flag


$3,000 A Year
They range in size from those which
are a little over a foot long and are used


on the launches to t
fly from most of the
cost of U. S. flags for
something over $3,0I
Most of the flags i
made of cotton bun
flags are a mixture
which lasts longer


;he five-footers which
flagstaffs. The total
local use amounts to
)0 a year.
,n the Canal Zone are
ting, but the smaller
of nylon and wool
here and retains its


colors better than the bunting.
Not all of the 112 flags fly every day.
Generally, most Canal Zone buildings
fly their flags on workdays, school days,
holidays, or special days required by law
or designated by the President or the
Governor. The flag at the Governor's
residence is flown only when he is present
on the Isthmus.
Wherever a flag is attended by a police-
man or a caretaker, as at the Administra-
tion Building, it is flown daily. Hours for
displaying the flag are 7 a. m. to 5 p. m.
Regardless of the day, the flag of the
United States is always flown on the
Canal's marine equipment whenever the
launches and tugs etc. are underway in
Canal waters.


CANAL ZONE POLICEMEN raise and lower the
flags at the Administration Building and in other
public spots like the Balboa circle where this photo-
graph of Policeman Stewart Jaddis was taken.


display they are destroyed privately, as
is done elsewhere. The usual method is
by burning; each agency handles th&
disposal of its own outworn flags.
When the flags in the Canal Zone are to
be half-staffed-a term in flag parlance
preferred to half-masting-or are to be
displayed on some special occasion, the
Chief of the Administrative Branch noti-
fies each Bureau of the Canal organiza-
tion. A Bureau representative in turn
passes on the word to the units which fly
flags. The Marine Bureau, with its
floating equipment, has the largest num-


ber of flags, 49,
Bureau, which
schools, police an
flags. The flags
Building and in
Balboa clubhouse
-1 fl. ** fl *


and the Civil Affairs
includes post offices,
d fire stations, has 28
at the Administration
the circle opposite the
are under the control of
*m **


which
scribe
1954
Pres
flag
Vice
Chief


h flags are
ed in a Pres
, When a
ident of the
is half-staff
President,
f Justice, oi


Shalf-staffed were pre-
;idential Proclamation in
President or Former
United States dies, the
ed for 30 days. For a
Chief Justice, retired
SSpeaker of the House,


the period of half-staffing is 10 days.
Lesser periods are in order for other
officials.
Half-Staff For Zonians
In the Canal Zone flags have been
flown at half-staff when local officials have
died. Among those so honored were
Roy R. Watson, then Chief Quarter-
master, A. W. Goulet, General Manager
of the Commissary Division, and George
W. Green, Municipal Engineer.
In December 1947, Canal Zone flags
were half-staffed between 7:30 and 10
a. m. when the bodies of 15 servicemen
who had been buried here during World
War II were placed aboard ship for return
to their homelands.
The United States flag flew for the
first time over an Isthmian Canal Com-
mission building in May 1904, when the
United States took over the rights and
properties of the French Canal Company.
The building was the ICC headquarters
in Panama City now the Panama
Central Post Office.
When the Canal Zone was delineated
United States flags were supplied to the
alcaldes of the little towns in the Zone.
One early letter, dated June 30, 1904,
instructed the Alcaldes of Gatun and
Gorgona to fly the flag "over the Alcaldia
of your district during office hours of
each day except in bad or storm weather."
Flags for the school building would be
furnished them later, the letter said.
On Holidays Only
Early Zonians apparently were not as
careful of their flags as their present day
successors. In February 1907. Chief


l




August 5, 1955

Visiting


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Oldtimer


Unfamiliar


Af t


Fin
?r L


ids Zo
2ong I


rode on the Panama
first time since 1906 a
thr; ugh the Canpl wh
be-ond the planning s
saw it.
As an engineer with t
Commission from 19
Kenly helped build t
Reservoir which supp
Atlantic side commune
reanent reservoir and
constructed.
During the time he
of the streets were unp
thrs were left over
construction period. I
and the only road from
district ran around t
Hill. Like most oldti


ne

Absence

Railroad for the
nd made a transit
ich was not much
tage when he last
he Isthmian Canal
04 to 1906, Mr.
;he Brazos Brook
lied water to the
cities until the per-
water system was
worked here, most
aved and the quar-
from the French
Balboa was a marsh
Sthe Ancon-Balboa
he side of Ancon
ners, however, Mr.


CANAL ZONE CLERGY
The Rev. Carl D. Christensen has
spent a quarter of a century in missionary
work, the last five and a half years of it
on the Isthmus of Panama.
As president of the Panama Conference
of Seventh Day Adventist Churches, he
is in charge of the work of the approxi-
mately 40 Adventist congregations in the
Canal Zone and Panama. His headquar-
ters, recently moved from Cristobal, are
v .
on Gavilan Road in Balboa, near the
office of the All-America Cables Company.
Born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, he at-
tended college in Minnesota and holds a
Master's Degree in School Administra-


GEORGE T. KENLY; after 50 years, he came back.


After an absence o:
George T. Kenly, who
the Canal's oldest "old
little to remind him of
he visited the Canal
month.


f nearly 50 years,
at 87 is probably
timer," found very
the old days when
Zone briefly last


Accompanied by Edwin Green, a
sprightly youth of 73, he visited the
Hotel Washington, which was new to him,
and the Tivoli Guest House, which was
one old landmark he remembered. He

Packing And Crating Services
Make Moving Almost Painless


(Continued from page 9)
For the average C
packers use four of th
four metal drums; if
some other large obj
vans or their size
Fortunately, Mr. Rin
for nine-foot couches
the Canal Zone.


all-into one van.
anal household the
.e vans and three or
there is a piano or
ect the number of
may be increased.
ker says, the vogue
has not yet reached


As soon as the packers have finished
with each van, Eric George takes over
the banding and stenciling. Then Cecil


Ken 1 recalled that the early days were
rugged but that most people had lots of
fun when they weren't busy building the
Panama Canal. The only real problem
in those days, h" said, was what to do
with all that dirt.
A native of West Virginia, Mr. Kenly
worked with the United States govern-
ment for many years before coming to
the Isthmus in 1904 to help with the
Panama Canal. After leaving here in
1906 he went to California and arrived in
San Francisco just four days before the
historic earthquake and fire which des-
troyed the city and put an end to his
business plans.
He returned to the East Coast and up
to the time of his retirement several years
ago, he was connected with a private
engineering firm in Baltimore, where he
now makes his home.


"satisfied customers" and by the small
amount paid annually in claims for
breakage or damage.
In one 12-month period, for instance,
the belongings of 466 Canal Zonians were
packed and crated by the Maintenance
Division; these household goods were
valued at $1,166,044.95. Only 25 claims,
all of them small, were made during this
period with a total dollar-wise claim of
$522 or .045 percent of the total value.


Until recently Pacd
had two shops, one i
other in Cristobal. N
ration for shipment


king and Crating
n Balboa and the
)w all of the prepa-


and the


shipment


THE REV. CARL D. CHRISTENSEN
tion from the University of Nebraska
He has been in church work almost all o,
his adult life.
He is thoroughly familiar with the
problems of the Latin-American world
and equally at home in English or Span-
ish; the problems and the language he
learned in the 20 years he spent as a
missionary in Argentine, Chile, and Peru.
About 10 years ago he returned to the
United States and for four years, just
before his assignment to the Isthmus, he
taught in an Adventist college in Walla
Walla, Wash.
The Panama Conference is one of the
364 local Conferences and missions of the
Adventist Church. Its president, cur-
rntliv Mr. Christensen. is elected by the




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


August5, 1955


o1


The historic
und ground.


Historic
s Sudden


Rio


Grande


Act


Rio (irande has
his Rio Grande


the shallow river bordering the southern
part uf Texas; it is the Rio Grande
explored 400 years ago by the Spanish in
their search for an overland communica-
tion between Atlantic and Pacific across
the Isthmus of Panama.
The disappearance of the Isthmian Rio
Grande is connected with the work on
Contractors Hill, only a short distance
from the old Rio Grande reservoir which
once supplied water for the entire Pacific
side district between Culebra and Panama
City.


During the Contractors Hill project
the main stream of the river, which drops
precipitously from the old dam to the
spillway near the Cucaracha Signal Sta-


tion, has been partially filled with rock
from Contractors Hill. The river fill is
designed to stabilize the slopes of adja-
cent fills behind Contractors Hill, and has
raised the grade of the river 20 feet or
more for a distance of several hundred feet.
The Rio Grande, however, has not
taken calmly to this man-made innova-
tion and appears to prefer its original bed.
Instead of flowing quietly along in its
new raised channel, it follows the winding
course of its old channel for a few feet out
onto the new fill, then disappears com-
pletely. It goes into no large hole or
cavern but simply disappears into the
ground to re-emerge at the bottom of the
fill through innumerable small crevices in
the rocks.
The Rio Grande of the Isthmus has
been tied in closely with local progress
since the beginning of recorded history.
If the Spaniards had found it more suit-
able for water-borne traffic when they
explored its course in 1527, it would
undoubtedly have been the link between
the Chagres and the Pacific coast, rather
than the Cruces trail.
Three hundred and twenty years later,
surveyors of the Panama Railroad be-
came convinced that construction of a
railroad was possible when they found the
Rio Grande valley stretching from the
..1'* .t .1


QUIET POOL in a wooded glade? Not at all. This
is the spot where the Rio Grande disappears under-
ground beneath a newly-constructed rock fill.


engineers
country
river, es


is not unusual


in limestone


but a man-made disappearing
oeciallv one created uninten-


tionally, isn't commonplace.


Increases


Enrollment in the Canal Zone's Latin
American schools, which was lower by 54
students at the beginning of the present
school year than on the first day of school
a year ago, took a sharp swing upward as
the month progressed.
On July 15, 11 days after the present
school session began, a total of 4,006
students were enrolled in the Latin Amer-
ican schools, in the grades from kinder-
garten through high school. This figure
was an increase of 72 in the ten-day
period and brought the total enrollment
higher by 60 students than the enrollment
in the schools on the similar day of the
preceding school term.
The two largest of the Latin American
elementary schools are Rainbow City and
Paraiso; the former has over 975 students
..* 1 I -C-


Conversion Project Engineer

Gets Full Colonel's Eagles


Edward B. Jennings, Project
or the Power Conversion Proje
pair of silver eagles these days,
little opportunity to wear the
other military men on duty
Canal organization, he spends 9!
of his time in civilian clothes.


Engineer
ct, has a
and very
m. Like
with the


9 percent


*
Consequently, the eagles to which he
became entitled on his promotion July 15
to full colonel in the U. S. Army Corps of
Engineers stay in their box.
Born in Westport, Conn., Colonel
Jennings is a graduate of Carson- org
Institute in Pennsylvania, Syracuse Uni-
versity and the Command and General
Staff School. He holds his master's degree
from the State University of Iowa.
DIuring World War II he served as an
engineer battalion commander in the
New Hebrides, Okinawa and Japan. He
came to the Canal Zone in June 1954,
from Nashville, Tenn., where he was
Assistant District Engineer of the Nash-
ville Engineer District. His first Canal
appointment was as Project Engineer for
the work on Contractors Hill. He was
named Project Engineer for the Power
Conversion Project last April.


Classes


Start


Of


Rainbow City Junior High School has
the largest enrollment of the junior high
schools but La Boca is the larger of the
two Latin American high schools.
According to officials of the schools,
students in the upper grades are adapting
easily to the new system of all-Spanish
instruction. All classes in the Latin
American schools are being taught in
Spanish this year for the first time; Span-
ish-language instruction last year ex-
tended only through grade six. English
is taught as a separate subject. Walter
H. Oliver is in charge of the conversion
into all-Spanish instruction.)
New courses in Spanish language are
being constructed for the school curricu-
lum under the supervision of Alfred E.
Osborne for the elementary schools and
Russell H. Johns for the secondary


e'Cs
Doe


Disappearing


Latin American School Enrollment


After


]


>




August 5, 1955


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Gigantic

On Co


n


Stairsteps

tractors Hill


Now


Nearly


Finished


The finishing touches are being given
to the gigantic stairsteps which have
been carved into Contractors Hill during
the past year. During that time the face
of the hill has completely changed appear-
ance and the danger of a rock fall into
the Canal channel has been removed.
Shovels, trucks, and bulldozers are
presently working on 150-foot level, low-
est of the berms or steps which is just 65
feet above the Canal water lvel. Under
the working schedule, the last of the hard
rock formation will be drilled, blasted,
and removed before the end of this
month.
The work remaining after the last of
the rock is removed will include the
removal of the shale access road down
the slope of Project 13, and the break-up
and removal of a relatively small amount
of rock along the Canal banks which fell
during the blasting operations. This work
is expected to take only a few days for
completion.
Cascadas At Work
While the Tecon Corporation is com-
pleting the work under its contract, the
Dredging Division's dipper dredge Cas-


cadas will be busy removing the last of
Cucaracha formation in Project 13 im-
mediately north of Contractors Hill.
Approximately 250,000 cubic yards of this
project was removed by dry excavation
by the Tecon Corporation under a supple-
mental agreement.
The removal of the knuckle which juts
into the Canal channel at that point will
increase the channel width by 150 feet
and will greatly improve navigation con-
ditions through Gaillard Cut The chan-
nel turns sharply as it passes Gold and
Contractors Hill and much of the useful-
ness of work already done on Project 13
has been nullified by the remaining tip of
Cucaracha formation which juts into
the channel.
Project 13 has been in progress on a
low priority basis by the Dredging Divi-
sion for many years. It provides for the
widening of the entire channel section
known as Culebra Reach to 500 feet.
Approximately one and a half miles of the
i i *i I *1 l 1 ii


WITH school days just around the corner, the
younger fry are learning already that it will be
smart to be smart when taking a geography
lesson from their well groomed teacher. These
two young men, with an eye to durability as
well as style, have chosen genuine Levis from
fthe regular commissary stock. Their shirts are
two of the smart new sports styles being placed
on sale this month.
The young ladies are wearing Cinderella
frocks which are as washable as they are
pretty. Any school girl's wardrobe should
contain several of these as they will be on sale
for about $3.50. The boys are wearing
brown leather loafers made by Roberts, John-
son and Rand, and the girls have on one-strap
slippers made by Trimfoot. Teacher, not to be
outdone by her pupils, is wearing a dress
chosen from the large stock of misses' styles
now carried by the Commissary stores.
Left to right, Sandy Halliday, Gwyneth
Richard, Mrs. M. W. Foscue, Glenn Rhyne,
and Roger Hutchinson.


HIGH marks in fashion will be given these
two teenagers when they wear clothes chosen
from the back-to-school collection being
placed on sale this month by the Commissary
Division. The junior miss has a pastel cotton
dress with a crisp white collar and a Fitted
midriff. It buttons up the back and has a
full skirt.
The high school student on the left chose a
bright yellow short-sleeved sport shirt made
by Campus Sport Shirts; it is one of a number
of handsome styles being stocked by the
Conmmisscry Division for high school and col-
lege students. His trousers are navy gar-
bcrdine which has been specially treated for
spot and crease resistance. He also wears
a pair of brown leather loofeis which have
become so popular with students in all the
grades from one to twelve. The models are:
Barry Davison and Jean Chambers.


S. a n_______________ ---. a n'




.** **


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


August 5, 1955


Employ
ferrcd tIet
listed below
not li sted.


PROMOTIONS


ees \

*\.
etc- V%
xx CCIIot
XXV


viho
Ju
\\Witl


were promoted c
ne 15 andt July


hin


}r trans-
15 are


-grade promotions are


ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH
Louis C. Caldwell, Tabulating Equipment
Operation Supervisor, from Division of
Storehouses to Statistical Tabulating Sec-
tionl.
Alfredo Lombana, Mrs. Helen M. Cicero,
from Tabulating Machine Operator, Pay-
roll Branch to Tabulating Equipment
Operator, Statistical Tabulating Section.
Mrs. Mercedes A. Borrell, from Tabu-
lating Machine Operator. Division of Store-
houses, to Tabulating Equipment Operator,
Statistical Tabulating Section.
George A. Black, Jr., from Tabulation
Planner, Dlivision of Storehouses, to Tabu-
lation Project Planner, Statistical Planning


Section.


Preston G. Gau, from
chine Operation Superviso
to Tabulating Equipment
visor, Statistical Tabulati
Jacob Plicet, Jr., from
chine Operator Supervisci
to Tabulating Equipment
tical Tabulating Section.


Tabulating Ma-
r, Payroll Branch,
Operation Super-
ng Section.
Tabulating Ma-
, Payroll Branch,
Operator, Statis-


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Paul F. Karst, Jr., from Recreation
Supervisor to Physical Education Teacher,.
Division of Schools.
Mrs. Thelma N. Scott, from Clerk-Typist
to Recreation Assistant, Division of Schools.
Mrs. Marcella G. Green, from Clerk-
Stenographer to Clerical Assistant, Division
of Schools.
Thomas L. Sellers, from Relief Postmaster
to Postmaster, Margarita.
Lealand A. Larrison, from Postmaster,
Margarita, to Relief Postmaster. '
Earl F. Unruh, from Chief, Postal Divi-
sion, to Director of Posts.,
COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU


Mrs. Susan H. Boles,
to Clerk (Typing), Servi
Paul J. Laing, from
Center Division, to Su
trative Assistant, Tivoli


from Clerk-Typist
ce Center Division.


Steward,


Service


pervisory Adr
Guest House.


linis-


OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
Norbert A. Jones, from Supervisory
Accounting Clerk, Methods and Relief
Assignment Staff, to Transportation Rate
Auditing Clerk, Agents Accounts Branch.
Stephen A. Bissell, from Transportation
Rate Auditing Clerk, Agents Accounts
Branch, to Supervisory Accounting Clerk,
Methods and Relief Assignment Staff.
Mrs. Florence M. Pierson, from Account-
mn Clerk to Sunervisorv Accounting Clerk,


in*- -^ .^-**- *-- -~ - -I - ~
Accounting Division.
Helen N. Minor, from Time, Leave, and
Payroll Clerk, to Time, Leave, and Payroll
Supervisor, Payroll Branch.
-^ w .. rf .... yr' _. .


AND


Clerk (Typing),
Electrical Divisio


Communications


Branch'


HEALTH BUREAU
Mrs. Lorna M. Shore, Staff Nurse, from
Gorgas Hospital to Coco Solo Hospital.
Nellie T. Morgan, Clerk-Typist, from
Gorgas Hospital to Board of Health Labor-
atory.
Dr. Roy B. Stewart, Dr. Robert B. White,
from Intern to Resident, Gorgas Hospital.
Dr. Richard S. Ostenso, Dr. Luis A.
Picard-Ami, from Intern, Gorgas Hospital,
to Medical Officer, Pacific Medical Clinics.
Dr. Wallace M. Snyder, from Intern,
Gorgas Hospital, to Medical Officer, Coco
Solo Hospital.
Mrs. Ida M. McDade, from Staff Nurse
to Communicable Disease Nurse, Atlantic
Medical Clinics.
Mrs. May B. Dodson, from Staff Nurse
to Head Nurse, Coco Solo Hospital.
Dr. John W. Gales, from Medical Officer
(Pediatrics) to Medical Officer (Gynecology
and Obstetrics), Coco Solo Hospital.
Dr. William E. Prier, from Medical
Officer to Hospital Resident, Gorgas Hos-
pital.
Mrs. Katherine H. Hall, Staff Nurse from
Coco Solo Hospial to Gorgas Hospital.
Mrs. Dora J. Coleman, from Medical
Technician (General) to Medical Technician
(General-Supervisory), Coco Solo Hospital.
MARINE BUREAU
Charles A. Parks, Emerson A. Cottrell,
from Guard, Atlantic Locks, to Towing
Locomotive Operator, Locks Division (Locks
Overhaul).
Carl H. Schmidt, from Towing Locomo-
tive Operator, Pacific Locks, to Guard,
Locks Security Branch (Atlantic).
SUPPLY BUREAU


Charles P.


Shay, from Assistant to Chief,


Retail Stores to Commissary Supervisor
(Assistant to Chief, Retail Stores Branch),
Commissary Division.
Roy F. Burr, from Clerical Assistant
(Typist), Colon Health Office, to Account-
ing Clerk, Commissary Division,.
Thomas G. Relihan, from Supply Officer
(Drygoods), to Superintendent, General
Products Branch, Commissary Division.
Vincent J. Huber, from Assistant Supply
Officer to Supply Officer (Drygoods), Com-
missary Division.
Robert L. Ranlkin, from Commissary


Supervisor to Assista
(Drygoods). Comnmissar
Elizabeth A. Allen,
Clerk to Clerk-Typist,


nt Supply
y Division.


Officer


from Accounting
Commissary Divi-


s1on.
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Richard M. Conover, from Supervisory
Traffic Clerk to Supervisory Freight Traffic
Clerk (General), Terminals Division.
John W. Manush, Jr., from Supervisory
D-f..nnn.4. r -nr A^ C.1i ni.,i~1 ('ion 1*n1. 4* non ,;c^ t 'ri'TI?


TRANSFERS


years, 2 n
cided.


months,


26 days;


Address unde-


Thomas McNeill, Ireland; Car
Foreman, Pacific Locks; 15 years, 3 m
6 days; Pittsford, Vt.
Ralph N. Stewart, Illinois; Supe
Accounting Clerk, Commissary Di
29 years, 1 month, 27 days; Florida.
Agnes E. Sugrue, Connecticut;:


Health
years,


Nurse, Cola


4 months,


Health Offi
s; Brooklyn,


penter
months,

rvisory
vision;

Public
ce; 25
N.Y.


ANNIVERSARIES


When Emmett Zemer went to work for
the Canal organization on July 10, 1913, he
had no more idea than most men of that
period that he would still be a Canal Zonian
42 years later. He is one of three employ-
ees whose continuous service predates 1914
and one of 13 still working who had con-
struction-day service.
He is now Real Property Assistant in the
office of the Director of the Community
Services Bureau. He began his" Canal


service at the Gorgona


Commissary and


later worked in a number of the retail
commissary stores. He had hotel experi-
ence at the Washington and the Tivoli, but
his longest assignment was the 26 years he
spent in what used to be known as the
District Quartermaster's Office in Balboa.
He has been at Balboa Heights since 1953.
With 42 years of continuous Canal
service he heads this month's list of anni-
versaries.
35 YEARS
Two Canal employees share honors for
35 years of government service completed
last month, although in both cases their
Canal service is not that long. They are
' * rt ** fl fl '-in. -r


June 15 through July 15


w


j


JULY RETIREMENTS

Retirement certificates were presented
the end of July to the following employees
who are listed alphabetically, together with
their birthplaces, titles, length of Canal
service and future addresses:
Lester F. Bailey, Maine; Governmental
Accountant, Industrial Division; 29 years,
10 months, 6 days; Schnectady, N. Y.
Hallie Beavers, North Carolina; Teacher,
Balboa High School; 23 years, 10 months;
North Carolina.
Samuel S. Blackburn, Tennessee; Police-
man, Cristobal District; 35 years, 1 month,
17 days; St. Petersburg, Fla.
Charles H. Fairn-brother, North Dakota;
Layerout Machinist, Industrial Division;
36 years, 10 months, 17 days; Panama,
R.P.
Roger H. Greene, Washington, D. C.;
Claims Examiner, Fiscal Division; 28 years,
8 months, 7 days; Alexandria, Va.
George Herman, Illinois; Chief, Police
Division; 40 years, 2 months, 23 days;
Address uncertain.
Ludwig A. Maurer, New York; Control
House Operator, Pedro Miguel Locks; 28


I
1
[


I





August 5, 1955


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Kuhrt; Washington, D. C., Kurt F. Menzel
and Will R. Price; Michigan, Jerome F.
Evans; Ohio, Philip S. Thornton; Wiscon-
sin, Herbert F. Paddock.
These nine completed 30 years of Govern-
service in July. All but two, Mr. Armistead
and Mr. Thornton, have continuous Canal
service.
Mr. Evans-Jerry to almost everyone-
is manager of the Balboa Commissary; Mr.
Gregory is Chief Foreman of the Dredg-
ing Division's shops; Captain Kuhrt and
Captain Rowe are two of the Atlantic side's
senior pilots; Mr. Menzel is General
Supervisory Medical Technican at the
Board of Health Laboratory; Mr. Paddock
is Chief Dispatcher and also Chief of the
Miraflores Diesel Generation Station; Mr.
Price is head of the bindery section at the
Printing Plant at Mount Hope-his crew
worked on this issue of THE PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW.


EXECUTIVE REGULATION 19


EDITOR S


NOTE:


VI. Travel and Transportation Expenses of Em-
ployees and Their Immediate Families in
Connection With Leave For Returning to


I Place


A revision of Executive


Regulation No. 19, covering travel and
transportation was issued at Balboa Heights
recently. It will be published in install-
ments with the index and first installment


carried


who desire
nation.


in this issue for the benefit of those


to clip and save the entire


CANAL ZONE
PANAMA CAl


OFFICE


Revision


regu-


SEC. 6.6
S-c. 6.7


GOVERNMENT
NAL COMPANY


OF THE GOVERNOR-PRESIDENT

BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z.
Jun.- 24, 1055.


Executive Regulation No. 19


TRAVEL


AND TRANSPORTATION OF EM-


PLOYEES, THEIR FAMILIES, HOUSEHOLD


Mr. Armistead is Leader Molder and
Maintenance Mechanic with the Industrial
Division and Mr. Thornton, who held his
first Canal job when he was a schoolboy,
is General Manager of the Service Center
Division.
25 YEARS
Five of the eight employees who cornm-


pleted
service
record


quarter-century c
July have had


)f Government


an un


with the Canal organization.


broken
They


are:


Richard Conley, a native Zonian, Loco-
motive Engineer with the Railroad Division;
James A. Fraser, Dredging Supervisor with
the Dredging Division; Stephen C. Les-
sard, Accounting Clerk with the Industrial
Division; C. B. McIlvaine, Senior Conductor
with the Railroad Division; and Ellen
Tiernan, a Staff Nurse at Gorgas Hospital.
Other 25-year employees are: Woodford
M. Babbitt, a Rotary Drill Operator with
the Dredging Division-he was born in


Alaska but grew up in


the Canal Zone;


William H. Hele a Contraband Control
Inspector; and Elmer B. Orr, Accounting
Supervisor with the Agents Accounts
Branch. Mr. Hele and Mr. Orr were born
in the Canal Zone.
20 YEARS
The employees who completed 20 years
of Government service in July are split,
half and half, between those with continu-
ous Canal service and those whose service
was broken. Those with unbroken service
are:
John C. Dansby, Carpenter Foreman,
Maintenance Division; George C. Dunlap,
Assistant Project Engineer for the Power
Conversion Project; Herman Hessell, Fire-
man with the Balboa District; Irvin E.
Krapfl, Assistant Relief Marine Bunkering
Foreman with the Terminals Division;
R. H. Masters, Sanitation Inspector, De-
partment of Zone Sanitation; Floyd A.
Robinson. Policeman at the Cristobal


Station; Samuel Roe, Jr., also a police
officer in the Balboa District; Luther B.
Sartain, Jr., Chief of the Electrical-Mechan-
ical Branch of the Engineering Division;
and Herbert H. Tabert, Floating Crane
Master with the Dredging Division.
Those 20-year employees whose Canal


GOODS


AND PERSONAL


EFFECTS


CONTENTS
I. General
c. 1.1 Scope.
c. 1.2 Definitions.
c. 1.3 Travel expense of employees.
c. 1.4 Transportation expenses of employees and
their families.
c. 1.5 Time limits.
c. 1.6 Employees not affected-.
c. 1.7 Determination of transportation lighlits.
II. Transportation of Household Goods and
Personal Effects


Maximum allowance fo
Allowances for packing.


r transportation.


crating,


unpacking


and uncrating.
Allowance for drayage.
Items not allowable and items allowable,
Temporary storage.
Means of shipment.
Origin and destination of shipment.
Use of Government bill of lading.
Use of lift vans.
Preparation of vouchers-
Valuation.
Shipment by American vessels.
Itemization of charges.
Procedure for obtaining shipment of goods
and effects.


Customs inspection on the
Certification of weights.
ments and contents.


disposition


SEC. 2.17 Preparation and
of lading.


Isthmlius.
cubic measure-


ocean bills


Routing and consignment of shipments.
Customs fees.
Reimbursement of expenses not authorized
Billing for expenses.


III. Transfers


Between


Official


Stations


Payment of expenses-
Responsibility for costs.
Designation of official station.


IV. Travel and Transportation Expenses of New
Appointees
SEC. 4.1 Payment of expenses.
SEC. 4.2 Agreement to remain in service-
SEC. 4.3 New appointees; restored veterans not
included.
SEC. 4.4 New appointees; for employees not included
under certain conditions.


SEC. 4.5


New appointees; local employment not
included


SEC. 4.6 Exceptions to general policy.


V. Trav


el and Transportation on Termination
of Employment


Employees and ex-employees


entitled to


travel and transportation allowances.
SEC. 5.2 Employees not entitled to travel and
transportation.
SEC. 5.3 Famtilies, household goods and personal
effects, transportation of.
SEc. 5.4 Prior return of immediate family and of
household goods and personal effects.
SEc. 5.5 Creditable service with other United States
Government agencies for travel and
transportation allowances.


of Residence Bet
Eligibility.
Service period for
Travel allowance.
Limitations.


:ween Tours


of Duty


teachers.


Creditable service with other
Government agencies for
benefits.


Route and mode of
Departure of imm


United States
leave travel


travel.
ediate family


subsequent to departure of employee.
Liability of employee.
Use of Government Transportation R
quests.


Submission
Liability of


compliance


of voucher.


employee


in instances


with terms of new


I non-
agree-


mnent.
VII. Prior Regulations Revoked
SEc. 7.1 Prior regulations revoked.
I. GENERAL
I.1 Scope. The following regulations are pre-
scribed to govern travel of employees and the trans-
portation of their families, household gods and
personal effects on appointment, change of social
station, termination, and leave. In addition to
implementing administrative regulations, these regu-
lations incorporate certain pertinent provisions of the
Administrative Expenses Act of August 2, 1946, 60


Stat. 806 ("Public Law 600"), as amended; Executive
orders promulgated under such Act; regulations of
the Bureau of the Budget issued under authority
delegated by Executive Order 10530, of May 10,
1954, 19 F. R. 2709; and Executive Order 1888 of
February 2, 1914, as amended.
CROSS REFERENCE
For regulations governing the transport
tion of the Remains. Families, and Effects of
Deceased Employees, see Executive Regula-
tion No. 18 of August 18. 1951.


1.2 Definitions.


As used in these regulations:


(a) "Place of actual residence means, in the
case of appointments made in the United States,
the place at which such appointee physically
resided at time of appointment. In the case of
employees who were appointed while on tihe
Isthmus, actual place of residence shall be
deemed to be such appointee's legal residence in


the United States at the time of appointment.
In the case of an appointee who was born on the
Isthmus or who came to the Canal Zone as a
minor, place of actual residence, in the absence


of subsequent acquisition of a legal residence in
the United States, shall be deemed to be the
legal residence of his father in the United States.
(Based on Comptroller General's Decision B/62267
of January 15. 1947. 26 Cornp. Gen. 488)
(b) "Employee" means a full-time employee
of the Panama Canal Company or Canal Zone
Government,
(c) "Immediate family" means any of the
following named members of the employee's
household: Spouse, children, including step-
children and adopted children, unmarried and
under twenty-one years of age or physically or
mentally incapable of supporting themselves
regardless of age, or dependent parents of the


employee
(From section
(d) 0"O
within thi
as define


(but not of the spouse).
1 (d) of Executive Order 9805)


official station
e district in
d in section


from which the emDoI


in" includes any point
which he normally works.
3.3 of these regulations.
vee commutes daily to his


official post of duty.
(From section 8 of Executive Order 9805,
by Executive Order 10196)
(e) "Temporary storage" means


as amended
storage at


point of departure, destination, or way station
for nor more than 61 days. except that not more
than 90 days may ba allowed where an employee
pursuant to section 6.3 of these regulations,
returns for leave prior to serving a new period
of service outside the continental United States
at a different post of duty.
(Based on section 1 (c) of Executive Order 9805. as
amended by Bureau of the Budget Circular A-4
of May 2, 1955)
(f) "United States" means the continental
United States, its territories and possessions,
other than the Canal Zone.
1.3 Travel expenses of employees. Travel expenses
of the employees shall be allowed in accordance with
the Travel Expense Act of 1949 (63 Stat. 166), the
Standardized Government Travel Regulations; and
Psnanam Cannl Conmnanv rpmnilations tinnlementarv


I


are:





16 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


August 5, 1955


Executive Regulation 19
((. n /I om page 1; )


Makes


First


Canal


Transit


; t e pLu ofi mpluynenrt ( Caal Zone l or
I h n to cmp-e a~ctuid residence in the
I Rites ssr 10m;o" other tocatotli within
ihr mntf' tu 1 'i>iy oIr | TSA i(ln in wiclI
-i i i>1 wi u l resil'nce is located; pro-
d{ Kl'i th< Sr<;vri d 1 U[ 11-p t 1rli~tLi expen lse.-
tI ShIA ll not exceed those allowed over a
i-i ,itlkl irloute between the post of duty
a ito ih< Wuit or fliterent pust of duty outside
th cit inentaI rieed States.
;Ha d 1 i -^ (t: 27 (bI o iExecutive Order 9S305, as
vidld by HIrem oUt nthe Budget ('ircuhlair A-4 of
May 2, 1i55
id) (hd ~ riy, expenses incurred prior to the
ip iant' t a travl'I order ;are not reimbursable.
\ A i >d ordkr i' I'ce s;ry for transportatlonl of
t, frai uily anl ious1hold goods regardless of
wtilh-tr r r not the e npl sye was issued a travel
old I ifor tiii self.
ia) The tr vel ofi terminuated employees allows
able uindh these leg IIltions shall be only such
travel as i< mncidenItal to the termination of tih?
.'ripl)loyilent, an I shlii ll commence within a
t CisiI abl2 11li', inot t )exce2,l six months, after
-uch termint itimn. I an e nployee for voluntary
p>r1 m il t<'onsS doe( nt t ike advantage of th?
re pati rtion travel allowable under these regula-
timons within such time limit, then none of the
expclnst of the return of the employee (except
as the proviSiios of Section 5.6 of these regula-
tions may apply), his family, or his household
goods or personal effects, sh ill be payable under
tlihe se regui.tl ai'ns.
(b) All employment, transfer or termination
travel and transportation of an employee's fam-
ily, h ouisehliold go:)d and personal effects, allow-
able under tihes regulations, shall begin within
two yeirs from thie effective date of the em-
ployee's appointment or transfer, or from the
time of a terminated employee s repatriation, as
thie case may be. exclusive of the time spent on
furlough granted: for the duration of active
military, naval, or Coast Guard duty, and, in
snu ar as concerns travel and transportation i
outside the United State.s, exclusive of any
period which shipping restrictions make the
travel and transportation impossible.
(Based on section 5 of Executive Order 9805 and
Comptroller Generals Decision B 79912 of Novem-
her 3, 1948, 28 Comp. Gen. 285)
I.O Emplycet no.t affecti. These regulations shirll
not apply to persons whose pay and allowances are
est iblished by thie Career Compensation Act of 1949)
(63 Stit. S02).
(From section 11 of Executive Order 9805, as amended
by Executive Order 10196)
1 7 Dlcrmination of transpfriatiwn rights. The
members of an employees imnnmed ate family and tlhe
household goods and personal effects to be trans-
ported at Government expense shall be determined
as of the effective date of the transfer or leave travel
order authorizing such transportation or, in case ot
terminal tion, as of the effective date of the termination.

EXECUTIVEREGULATION 51

CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR-PRESIDENT
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z.
June 30, 1955.
Executive Regulation No. 51
REGULATION OF SALE AND USE OF
FIREWORKS
By virtue of tire authority contained in Section
52t of Title 2, of thle Canal Zone Code, as added by
the Act of June 28, s1955 (Public Law 105, 84th
Congress. 1st Session), thie following regulations are
prescribed for the sale and use of fireworks in the
Canal Zone: .
"Sec. 1. The s5le of fireworks in tihe Canal Zone is
prohibited. ,
"Sec. 2. The use or firing of fireworks in the Canal!
Zonw is prohibited, except as hereinafter provided.
"zSec. 3. The term "fireworks" shall mean and
inchlide any comnbustibhl or explosive composition,
.. .. ,. + n rttnfc Ar emnhirat imn (if salystanc'll.- or


THREE Panama Canal pilots were aboard the 28,790-ton SS Orsova when she made her maiden transit
of the Panama Canal last month. The Orsova is 723 feet overall and has a beam of 90.65 feet; this gave
her a clearance of less than 10 feet on each side in the lock chambers. Ten towing locomotives took her
through the locks. The Orsova was en route from Sydney, Australia, to London with 992 passengers.


Adantic Side Equipment Conversion
Contract Among Largest Of Power Projects

(Contitnue from page 1) ventilating fans,
450 pieces of hobby-shop equipment, and


260 pieces o
The cast
will be met
funds. In
ment, the o
individual p
to 60-cycle


f miscellaneous equipment.


of
by
the
wn
>iec
fre


accept a cash


tr
fo
po
BE
pa
is
us


actor equal t
r converting 1
licy, which h
)ard of Dire
ny, will gove
in op3ratino
ed regularly 1


converting all equipment
Power Conversion Project
case of household equip-
er may choose to have an
e of equipment converted
iquency or at his option
settlement from the Con-
Lo the contract bid-price
the unit in question. This


Las
cta
rn

by


been approved by the
ors of the Canal Corn-
on all equipment which
condition and is being
the owner.


No technical difficulties are foreseen by
Canal engineers planning the project
although a maze of intricate work sched-


New


Division


Chief


1 v.v, V T~


ules must be developed and coordinated
to prevent undue delays. These sched-
ules will be set up by the contractor with


the concurrence of
Engineering and
The conversion
simplified by the i
mission facilities
areas in the Canal
cases, duplicate e


Col. Hugh M. Arnold,
Construction Director.
work will be greatly
fact that double trans-
are available to most
Zone. And, in many
equipment is available


for Company-Government service units.
This equipment can be converted for
60-cycle use in advance and can be
placed in operation when 60-cycle cur-
rent is available.
Domestic Conversion
In the case of domestic equipment, the
conversion will proceed in small groups
of quarters fed by the same transformer.
The householder will be notified in
advance of the date when the change will
be made from 25-cycle to 60-cycle current
and all frequency sensitive equipment will
be disconnected just prior to the switch-
over. Conversion of such essential equip-
ment as refrigerators will be completed
g rn.nidlv na nnsiqihln n-owivr an.rp


"' """ "~r:; -~RP"I" ~, i ri"rfx~"~




August 5, 1955


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


COMMERCIAL

TOTAL T


SHIPPING


RANSITS


SETS


BELOW


RECORD


FOR


PREVIOUS


CANAL;


YEARS'


FIGURES


Commercial shipping lacked only three
transit of reaching the 8,000-mark for
ocean-going vessels during the past fiscal


year, a new record in the Can
ating history for this class of tra


Most


Frequent


User


all's oper-
ffic.


of


Canal


Traffic last year by U. S. Government
shipping through the Canal was far below
that of the previous years, with the result
that transits by ships of all categories fell
below the totals of either the two pre-
vious years. Transits last year totaled
9,760 for vessels of all classes, while the
totals for each of the fiscal years 1953
and 1954 exceeded 10,000.
There were 296 transits by ocean-going
Government ships last year, as compared
with 800 the previous year. The 7,997
transits by ocean-going commercial ves-
sels was over 200 above in the previous
fiscal year, which also was a record.
Cargo tonnage last year was at an
all-time high with 40,646,301 tons, approx-
imately 550,000 tons more than the total
for the fiscal year 1954 when a new
record was established.
Tolls for the past fiscal year amounted
to $35,136,529 of which $1,217,536 was
for the Government ships in transit. The
tolls declined from the record of $37,191,-
106 in the previous fiscal year, even
though tolls on commercial shipping were
slightly higher in 1955 than in 1954.
The decline in the amount of Govern-
ment shipping began soon after the cessa-
tion of hostilities in Korea and continued
throughout the past fiscal year.
New Monthly Record


The amount


of commercial


traffic


through the Canal remained high through-
out the year, there being only two months
when there were less than 640 transits by
ocean-going vessels. A new monthly
record in number of ocean-going transits
was set last March with 709 transits. A
monthly record in amount of tolls was
set in May with $3,072,000, this being
the only time in the Canal's 46 years of
onnratinu history that tolls on commer-


MOST FREQUENT Canal visitor during the fiscal year which ended June 30 was the 3,946-ton refrig-
erated ship above, the Brazilian Reefer. She made 55 Canal transits in the 12-month period on her run
between the United States East Coast and banana ports in Ecuador, carrying between 1,000 and 1,500
tons of bananas on each northbound trip. She is of Danish registry; her master for most of the year has
been Captain H. J. Moeller. Continental Shipping Company is her agents.
Second most frequent Canal visitor was another banana carrier, the 1,250-ton Honduran ship Vanda.
She made 48 Canal transits in fiscal year 1955, carrying an average of 350 tons of fruit on each northbound
trip. The Vanda's master is Captain Harold Rasmussen; her agents, W. Andrews & Co.
MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


Month


July -
August .-
September
\ _. L .-


Transits


640
652
660
A02


638
640
612
.C1


1938
457
505
444
i.Ai


(In thot
1955
$2.646
2,752
2,756
) Qa l


Tolls
sands of doll


1954
$2,817
2,778
2,591
I re


STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC
For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1939.


1938
$2,030
2,195
1,936
1 OC1


I


I


,




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


August 5, 1955


Italian


Line


Ship


Visits


To


Isthmus


Predated


Construction


Of


Panama


Canal


The Italian Line which has had offices
in the Canal Zone since 1916 for its
passenger-freight trade between the Med-
iterranean and the west coast of South
and North America makes current use of
the Panama Canal with three passenger
ships and five freighters which make
some 53 transits a year.


The three


America-Pacific
famous Italian
men whose met
chosen to hone
traveled in the
dimare, who ex
and Amerigo
probably the b
since his name
world and he
voyages in the


* ..

' tl


passenger ships on the South


run bear the names of


navigators.


no
)r
0
pl
Ve
est


The three


ry the Italian Line has
are Marco Polo, who
rient, Antoniotto Uso-
ored the African Area,
spucci. The latter is
t known to Americans


oN
WI/:n-^ /-._,_


f was given to the new
made several exploration
Western Hemisphere a


few years after Columbus.
The three ships belong to a series of


six buil
Societa
world t
Panam;
opened
They
design,
swimmi
Although
luxury
Line or
routes,
lar amo


t by the Italian Line ("ITALIA"
di Navigazione, Cenca) for its
rade, much of which has used the
a Canal since the time it was
to traffic in 1914.


n
h
1
t
)n


are
with
gpo
i no
mnern
the
hey


attractive ships of n
comfortable state
ols, bars, and movie lo
t comparable with t
s operated by the
North- and South-A
are nevertheless very


modern
rooms,
)unges.
he big
Italian
tlantic
popu-


ig travelers on the west coast of


South America.


Pre-War Days


During the years before
II, the Italian Line was
tomer of the Panama C,
which grew steadily from
brought from 40 to 60
freight ships through th
year from Mediterranean


e World War
a steady cus-
anal. A trade
1921 to 1939
passenger and
e Canal each
ports en route


to the west coast of South America and
the Pacific coast of the United States and
Canada. In addition there were a num-
ber of cruise vessels which visited Canal
waters but did not transit, and several
other Italian flag ships which were repre-
sented here by the Italian Line. In
fiscal year 1939 for instance, 59 Italian
ships used the Canal, and carried 179,468
tons of cargo. That year alone. Italian


DR. R. C. PERNIGOTTI, Manager of the Italian
Line in Cristobal, came to the Isthmus in 1926,


routes but both having Colon


as their


terminal points.
Therefore present services of the com-
pany from the Mediterranean to Carib-
bean area up to and beyond the Panama
Canal go back many years.
When the Panama Canal opened for
business, the Italian Line began service
to the west coast of South America with
three passenger ships. In 1915 the
line obtained a lot on the water front in
Cristobal for the construction of a two-
story office building which would also
serve as quarters for the manager. The
building was constructed in 1916. The
first manager to move into the building
was Manfredo Pincherli, a well-known
resident of Panama who had lived on the
Isthmus during the construction days.
His assistant was the late O. Heilbron,


equally
When
manage:
Italian
Canal.
in THE


well known.
SMr. Pincherli took
r of the new office, v
ships were using the
According to statistics
PANAMA CANAL RECORD,


over as
ery few
Panama
shown
only 40


Italian ships made the Canal transit
between 1915 and 1921.
From that time on, however, business
increased and by the end of 1921 two
Italian shipping companies had estab-
lished regular service between Genoa and
Valparaiso. They were the Navigazione
Italiara a Vapore (La Veloce), and the
Navigazione Generale Italiana.
La Veloce Line started its service with


a steamer sailing about
This was an extension th:
of the service which had
for a number of years
and Caribbean ports by w
Barcelona, and Teneriff
line put a freight ship


every


45 days


every 60 days.
rough the Canal
been operating
between Italian
ay of Marseilles,
e. The second
over this trade
and started a


passenger service.
Italian ships began operating from
Europe to the west coast of the United
States and Canada in 1925 with the
SS Piave of the Navigazione Libera
Triestina. This company put new 10,-


000-ton
among
which
shipping
The
the we;
20's an


motor ships
them the MS Le
became well-k
g circles.
South American
st coast service
d 30's with the


on this service,
me and MS Fella,
nown min Canal


service as well as
grew in the late
addition of the


MS Orazio and the MS Virgilio, two pas-
senger freight vessels of 11,700 tons


which traveled regularly
Canal to Valparaiso up to


through
941.


Pacific Coast Service


In 19
senger 1
freighter
coast sei
Cunard
tioned
Californi
largest
between
coast up
In 19
and the
into onl


30
rin
*s
"viS
'VI(
lin
an
.a,


and 1931 several large
rs were added to the
ready on the Pacific
e. They included the to
r Albania which was rect
a renamed California.
a 12,000-ton ship, was


vessel to be placed in service
Europe and the Pacific west
to that time.
32 the South America service
west coast service were merged
i one company (See page 19)


, --- .


I5


i ,,.




August 5, 1955


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


SHIPS AND SHIPPING
Transits by Ocean-Going Vessels
In June
1955 1954
Commercial. 653 660
U. S. Government.. 31 40
Total ...... 684 700
Tolls*
Commercial. .... $2,811,652 $2,769,789
U. S. Government.. 149,631 144,608
Total ..-... $2,961,283 $2,914,397
*Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and small.
Tuna boats, long a familiar sight in
Balboa Harbor, have become regular
transit customers of the Canal during
recent months following the opening of a
new tuna cannery at Ponce on the south
coast of Puerto Rico. About 2,500 tons
of tuna have been shipped through the
Canal to the new cannery since the first
of this year. Most of the sleek, white
fishing craft formerly made the long haul
to California with their catch. The run
to Puerto Rico is made in about half the
time required for the trip to California.

Italian Line Ship Visits To Isthmus
Predated Construction Of Panama Canal
(Continued from page 18) called the Societa
Italia Flotte Riunite.
Almost all the fine fleet of ships was
lost during World War II. The Italian
Line offices in Cristobal were closed and
regular shipping business was not resumed
until 1947 when the MS Sebastiana Caboto
arrived from Genoa en route to Valparaiso
with passengers and freight.
At present only one of the pre-war
ships, the SS Conte Biancamano, is in the
Caribbean service. This vessel is well-
known locally since it was held in Cris-
tobal harbor for several months at the
beginning of the war and was later taken
over as a troop transport by the U. S.
Government. At present it operates
between Genoa and La Guayra, Vene-
zuela, during part of the year, and from
Genoa to New York the rest of the time.
Three Volcanoes


In
the S
other
Canal
nean
They
Tritot
Th


addition to the three new ships on
south American run, there are five
Italian Line ships which transit the
I on regular runs from Mediterra-
ports to the Pacific west coast.
are the Vesuvio, Etna, Stromboli,
te, and Nereide.
e Andrea Doria, one of a group of


new Italian Line ships built since the
war for the New York trade, visited
Cristobal last year on a cruise.


CANAL TRANSITS
__COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT

IFiscal Year


Commercial vessels:
Ocean-going --..............
*Small..-......-..

Total commercial .-........
**U. S. Government vessels, ocean-
going--------.--------..
*Small -.. . --

Total commercial and U. S.
Government


Atlantic
to
Pacific

4,002
575
4,577

168
89

4,834


Pacific
to
Atlantic

3,995
574
4,569

128
229

4.926


Total


7,997
1,149
9,146

296
318

9.760


*Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
**Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.
TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES
The following table shows the cargo shipments in thousands of long tons segregated
into eight main trade routes:


1954

Total


7,784
1,222

S9,006

800
339

10.145


1938

Total


5,524
931
6,455

441



6,896


United States Intercoastal .................
East Coast of U. S. and South America .
West Indies and West Coast 1V. S./Canada...
East Coast of U. S./Canada and Far East... -
U. S./Canada East Coast and Australasia- -.-
Europe and West Coast of U. S./Canada----
Europe and South America-- .. ...- -... ...
Europe and Australasia .----------- .- ...-----.....
All other routes--. .. -. . . .. ... ....
Total Traffic -... ... .


I Fiscal Year


1955
5,978
5,971

1,186
8,393
1,274
5,094
2,527
2,328
7,895
40.646


1954
5,017

6,673
501

8,975
1,306

4,379
2,037

2,303

7,904
39,095


1938
6,395
2,652
669
4,912
992
4,237
2,974

1,251
3,304
27,386


Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels


Fiscal Years
1954


Nationality


Argentine --
Belgian ....
Brazilian .......
British_
Chilean ..._ ..
Chinese ..
Colombian ...
Costa Rican -.
Cuban---------
Danish ---.
Ecuadorean .
Estonian .


Finnish _
French_.. -


1955
Num- T
ber of Tons
transits of cargo

15 8,908
10 35,191
1,145 6,897,789
60 323,734
38 289,543
198 261,249
31 212,055


)9
132


014.334
79,164


44,750
585.123


Num-
ber of
transit
1
10


275
106

2
136


Tons
of cargo
7,555
12,733

7,726,640
429,245
130,112
240,640
259,137


14,828
582,989


1938
Num-
ber of Tons
transits of cargo


1,281
9
2

2
223


I .


5


SVI *U


~


I


,


,




c: : I p -. *


Shipment

Reach

In Pi


A1 -TiI


ast


Fii


Cargo

mne High

scal Yea


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


lr


The amount of cargo shipped through
the Panama Canal during the fiscal year
1955, ended June 30, exceeded by more
than one-and-a-half million tons the
record set in the previous year.
Heavy shipments of oil through the
Canal from the Pacific accounted for the
increase since fluctuations in the amount
of other commodities were generally of
a minor nature. The amount of mineral
oil shipped from the Atlantic to the
Pacific last year was slightly under the
previous year's figures, but oil shipped
from the Pacific to the Atlantic increased
by approximately 1,650,000 tons.
The major increase in the tanker trade
from the Pacific to the Atlantic was
attributed to heavy shipments of fuel and
diesel oil on the United States Intercoastal
route and from United States ports to the
West Indies. These amounted to 1,250,-
000 tons.
Coal and coke being moved through
the Canal to Japan continued at a high
level during the past year, although ship-
ments were 500,000 tons under the pre-
vious year's figures. This trade has been
one of the significant factors in Canal
traffic since the close of the war.


Pacific-Atlantic Up
The increase in commodity shipments
last year was entirely in the Pacific-to-
Atlantic movement. The amount of
commodities shipped from the Atlantic
to the Pacific, totaling 18,419,000 tons,
was slightly under the total of the
previous year. The comparative figures
min the Pacific to Atlantic trade were
20,892,000 in 1954, and 22,227,000 tons
last year.
In addition to the big increase in oil
shipments, gains were shown in the
Pacific-to-Atlantic trade in lumber, ni-


trate,
pulp,
comm
than
ments
produ
coffee


bananas, metals, barley, wood
and copra. Among the principal
odities, however, these were more
overbalanced by decreased ship-
of ore, wheat, sugar, canned food
cts, refrigerated food products,
, and raw cotton, although none of


August 5, 1955


Port Captains-Arriving and Departing


a -
*-

O--

S-
Io



%I -
Cab -
a


CAPT. ANTHONY ROESSLER (pronounced Ressler), new Balboa Port Captain, started the orientation
tour of his new domain in the Marine Traffic Comptroller's Office at Balboa where a magnetic map board
shows the location of all transiting ships. Capt. Horatio Lincoln, outgoing Port Captain, is explaining that
the numbered, white tag shows that the ship which was No. 4 on the day's northbound schedule was
then in Miraflores Lake.
Captain Roessler arrived July 13 from command of the fleet oil tanker Ashtabula. In addition to his
duties at Captain of the Port of Balboa he is a member of the Board of Local Inspectors and a member of the
Board of Admeasurement.


Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All figures in thousands of long tons)
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC
Fiscal Year
Commodity
1955 1954 1938

Mineral oils .. . ... 4,305 4,486 907
Coal and coke.. ... .... 3,274 3,374 137
Manufactures of iron and steel- ----- 1,792 1,843 1,859
Phosphates ..-----..- -----------1,043 813 328
Soybeans and products ---.... --- ------- 557 577 3
Sugar .. ..... .... ......- ---520 497 57
Sulphur -- ----- -------- 463 417 297
Paper and paper products-- ..---.. .. 377 368 423
Cement- --- ----- --------------- 300 283 154
Ammonium compounds .. .. 295 184 71
Machinery .... .... 285 289 168
Automobiles and parts 268 242 208
Chemicals, unclassified ..... ------ 233 192 109
Raw cotton .... ..... .... 226 255 142
Wheat --.-.....-...----------.....--. -216 138 10
All others.. .-.. . .... ... .. .......... ... 4.265 3;820 3,653
Total ........ ... .- 18,419 18,458 9- - 676
'Total 18,419 18,458 9,676


j




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PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canal Muse l^i^H) Vol 6, No. 1 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, AUGUST 5, 1955 5 cents BIDS FOR CONVERTING ATLANTIC SIDE EQUIPMENT TO 60 CYCLES WILL BE ADVERTISED DURING AUGUST Most Younger Zonians Will Have Salk Shots Bef ore Pol io Season More than three-quarters of Canal Zone children from 5 to 9 years old will be immunized against polio by two Salk vaccine inoculations by the time the "polio season" normally begins on the Isthmus, according to the estimates of the Health Bureau. It is in this age group that paralytic polio strikes hardest and nearly 30 percent of all cases occur in children of this age. The U. S. Public Health Service will limit vaccination to this age group until the production of vaccine and testing under the strict new standards make additional vaccine available, according to Col. C. 0. Bruce, Health Director. The estimates on the percentage of children vaccinated during the past few weeks were prepared following the free inoculation program for first and second grade pupils on July 26-28. Health officials expected the same percentage of participation among children in the pay program which was held this week. Salk vaccine for the first and second grade pupils was donated by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. The program was administered by the Health Bureau free of charge as a public health service. Orders for the purchase of vaccine were placed by the Canal administration soon after the announcement that Salk vaccine had been found to be effective against polio and a sufficient supply was received for the inoculation of all eligible children under the pay program. More Vaccine Later Governor Seybold has announced that efforts will be continued to obtain additional supplies as the vaccine is retested and released for use by the United States Public Health Service. As this is received it will be released for use by other age groups. The charge of $1.50 is made for each injection given by the Health Bureau to dependents of Company-Government employees and employees of other U. S. Government agencies. A $3.50 charge is made for each injection of U. S. citizen residents who are not sponsored by the Company-Government or other U. S. Government agencies. The inoculation of the young children in the pay group this week was conducted along the same general lines as the previous week when the free vaccinations were administered. The process was simplified by the acceptance of payments when the Look Who's Here! Contract Will Be Among The Largest Of Power Project DAVY CROCKETT. Canal Zone style., wasn't born on a mountain top in Tennessee, but his daddy. Policeman Frank Tester, was. That makes the coonskin cap legitimate. The real Davy didn't have a pipa to suck on, but he'd have liked it if he'd had one, especially after he'd killed him his ba'r at the age of three. That's what our Davy, Frank Tester, Jr., thinks, anyway. vaccinations were given. It is presently planned to have children of both groups inoculated at the same time when the second injections are administered. These schedules will be announced later this month but it is expected that the second injections will be given during the last week in August. Under this schedule children will have the maximum immunity possible with two injections by the middle of September. The greatest number of polio cases usually occur on the Isthmus after this time of the year. The anti-polio inoculation program was conducted in the civilian (See page i) Specifications are now being prepared for one of the key contracts in the power conversion project-the conversion of all domestic, commercial and industrial equipment on the Atlantic side from 25cycle to 60-cycle frequency. While exact schedules are not completed, it is expected that the work will be advertised for bids the latter part of this month, for about 60 days, and bids then opened. This phase of the project will be divided into two parts, one covering Company-Government industrial units and the other covering domestic equipment and Company-Government service units. The specifications will provide that four areas will be available for the contractor or contractors after January 2, and all the remaining areas after next May 15. It is presently expected that the first actual use of 60 cycle by domestic users will not be until late this fiscal year. The first areas to be made available to the contractor for conversion will be Margarita townsite, Coco Solo Hospital, Mindi Dairy, and the Industrial Division. Locks, Mount Hope Separate The contract for the conversion of Canal equipment will cover all frequency sensitive units on the Atlantic side with the exception of those at Gatun Locks and the Filtration and Pumping Plants at Mount Hope which will be converted under separate contracts. The industrial units to be grouped together under this contract will include the Industrial Division, Oil Handling Plant, Maintenance Division shops, Motor Transportation Division shops, Commissary Division equipment at Mount Hope, the Printing Plant, and Cristobal Piers. The contract or contracts for the equipment conversion on the Atlantic side will be among the largest awarded in the Power Conversion Project. It is estimated that the cost will be in the $l-to $2-million class. The complexity of the task is indicated by the number of pieces of domesticequipment to be converted. The survey recently completed on the Atlantic side revealed that there are 8,100 frequency sensitive units in use in homes. They include 1,900 refrigerators, 1,200 fans, 2,000 clocks, 715 washing machines, dryers and mangles, 725 record players, 50 blowers, diffusers and (See page 16)

PAGE 2

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 Employee Turnover, Separation Rate Lowest Since Start Of World War II Separations from the service and turnover rates among full time U. S.-rate employees of the Company-Government were the lowest during the past fiscal year of any since the beginning of World War II. Figures compiled by the Personnel Bureau for the fiscal year ended June 30, showed that the number of voluntary and involuntary separations from the service and the percentages in both categories were well below comparable statistics since 1950. The turnover rate was high throughout the war years and immediately afterwards because of the great expansion and later reduction in force necessitated by abnormal conditions. The following tabulation shows the turnover rates for the past five fiscal years: Fiscal Years FORCE SEPARATIONS: Voluntary Involuntary Total TURNOVER RATE: Voluntary Involuntary Total NEW HEALTH OFFICER 1951 1952 1953 1954 I9S5 4,287 4,261 4,233 3,867 3,803 805 239 466 238 520 482 437 254 348 1S8 1,044 704 1,002 691 506 18.78 5-57 10.94 5-58 12.28 n-39 11.29 6-57 915 4-15 24-35 16.52 23.67 17.86 13-30 The lowering of the turnover rate during the past two years is attributed principally to a stabilization of the force with relatively few force reductions; wage increases for various groups; free home leave travel; group insurance; and other fringe benefits which have been provided within the past two years. The highest turnover rates in the Canal organization for the past five years were shown in the fiscal years 1951 and 1953. In 1951 the rate was high because of the large number of voluntary separations from the service which came after income tax was applied to Government employees in the Canal Zone. Other conditions which influenced the rate that year included the extensive reorganization. The rate of involuntary separations that year was the lowest of any in the 1950-55 period with the exception of last year. Both the voluntary and involuntary rates were high in the fiscal year 1953. The voluntary rate was influenced by the threat to the 25 percent differential, increased rents, and other unsettling conditions. The rate of involuntary separations was Comptroller Leaves This Month Mr. and Mrs. Lindsley Noble at their home at Balboa Heights The Canal Zone will lose two of its well known and popular residents this month when Mr. and Mis. Lindsley H. Noble leave for Washington, I). ('. He has accepted a re-ruth created key position in the Post Office Department to which he will report early in September. Mr. Noble submitted his resignation as Comptroller of the Panama Canal Company in June and it was accepted at the July meeting of the Board of Directors. A statement praising Mr. Noble for his work during the difficult reorganization period of the past three years was issued by Governor Seybold upon the acceptance of Mr. Noble's resignation. Both he and Mrs. Noble have taken a prominent part in the community and social life of the Isthmus since he joined the Canal organization in May 1052. He had many years of tup U. S. Government accounting work before he be-ame Comptroller. He was the first to fill the office of Comptroller after the reorganization in 1951 under Public Law 841. As a general officer of the Company, his successor will be elected by the Board of Directors and a committee was appointed at the July meeting to recommend an appointee. COL. CHARLES 0. BRUCE, new Health Director, took over his duties early last month. He was photographed at his desk, but he has spent much of the past four weeks on field trips to the various units of the Health Bureau. His present post is his first in thiCanal Zone. He visited the Isthmus last January as a member of the group which accompanied Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens. abnormally high because of substantial force reductions made in some units. The rate of voluntary separations from the Canal service has been increased during the past 15 years by the employment of married women who leave the service when their husbands resign, retire, or are assigned elsewhere. The wives of a comparatively large number of Armed Forces personnel have been employed since the close of the war and these are listed with other voluntary separations when they resign because of the reassignment of their husbands. Push-Button Traffic Light To Be Installed In Balboa The Canal Zone's first push-button type traffic light, or "pedestrian actuated traffic signal" as it is known officially, is to be installed soon on Balboa Road between the Housewares Section and the Mens Wear and Shoe Section of the Balboa Commissary Annex. Although this type of traffic light, which can be operated manually by the pedestrian himself, is well-known in the United States, this will be the first of its type to be installed on the Isthmus. Post-mounted signals with the standard red, yellow, and green lights will be installed pointing up and down Balboa Road. A "walk" signal for pedestrians, one on each side of the street, will point across Balboa Road. In order to stop traffic and cross the street, a pedestrian must push the automatic button control and wait until the walk signal comes on. Bids for the furnishing and installing of the two traffic signal lights and other miscellaneous work are now being advertised. They will be opened the morning of August 10 in the Balboa Heights Administration Building.

PAGE 3

August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REViEW Intensive Campaign Under Way To Increase Number, Quality Of Employee Suggestions NEW STOCKHOLDER The opening move in an intensified campaign to increase the number and quality of employee suggestions will be made next week when U. S.-rate employees receive, with their paychecks, invitations to take a greater part in the Incentive Award Program. Employees on the local-rate rolls will receive similar invitations with their paychecks the following week. The invitations are in the form of cartoon-illustrated, red-lettered cards. They show a young woman tripping over her own ideas and saying: "Can you change that condition? There must be a better way. Send in your suggestion." The paycheck inserts are one of several innovations in the Incentive Award Program. Other changes include the selection of 75 employees, strategically located in operating units, as Incentive Awards representatives and a new standardized form which will henceforth be used by all employees making suggestions. "A suggestion proposes an improvement in our operations by locating a problem and recommending a solution," according to a member of the Incentive Awards Committee. "It may change the way things are done and propose a new method or a new application of an old idea. Merely pointing out a difficulty or shortcoming, without providing an answer, is not a suggestion. Neither is a proposal in routine maintenance or everyday functions, such as repairing linoleum, keeping aisles clear, cleaning lights, ordering supplies, etc., unless it proposes a change in the operations or the physical facilities." What To Suggest The Canal organization, he said, is especially interested in suggestions for: Combining materials, methods, operations, procedures, records, reports; Devising new applications of old ideas, new equipment, new machines, new methods, new processes, new tools; Eliminating breakage, duplication, fire, health or accident hazards, operations, waste, unnecessary work; Improving employee morale, methods, procedures, quality of product, safety, tools and machines, working conditions; and Saving manpower, material, money, space, and time. Information such as this and other news of the Incentive Award Program will be brought to the Canal employees through the 75 Incentive Awards repreBalboa Heights Board Room Air Conditioning Started Shirtsleeve conferees and others who meet frequently in the Board Room of the Balboa Heights Administration Building may soon find coats necessary. Air conditioning of the Board Room was started this week by the Panama Sheet Metal Works which holds the contract for the project. The work is scheduled for completion by the latter part of this month. It involves installation of a 10-ton, 25-cycle unit and acoustical treatment of the ceiling. Similar work was completed recently for the Governor's suite on the second floor of the Building. sentatives. They will be kept informed of any new developments in the awards plan by means of news-letters, which they will receive at least once a month from the committee. How To Do it The new standardized form will make submission of suggestions a much easier process than it has been in the past and also make the task of reviewing and studying the suggestions considerably simpler. Merely by checking printed squares, an employee can indicate whether his idea would simplify work, save material or time, improve methods or safety or otherwise better existing conditions. The new form is perforated; one portion of it will be torn off and returned to the suggester promptly as an acknowledgment that his suggestion has been received and started on the rounds of those who will study it. Any employee can ask, in a space set aside for this purpose, that his name not appear during the review period, and that the suggestion be numbered until a decision is made as to whether it will be accepted or rejected. If a Canal employee's suggestion is one which could be used by other Federal agencies, it will be sent to the Civil Service Commission. A Canal employee may receive from $10 to $5,000 locally and additional amounts from any other Federal agency which adopts his idea. The chance for a good-sized monetary return, therefore, is much greater than it has been in the past. Started In 1946 An Employee Suggestion Program, today known as an Incentive Award Program, has been used by the Canal organization since 1946. Since the enactment of the new overall Federal Program last year, there has been a gradual increase in the number of worthwhile employee suggestions and the intensified program, now getting under way, should result in a much larger number of suggestions submitted and approved. Between last November and June 30, 72 Canal employees had ideas which they considered good enough to pass on. Sixteen of these were approved and the men and women behind the ideas given cash awards which totaled $365. Seventeen other suggestions were still being studied when the fiscal year ended. Of the 16 men and women who got cash-in-hand for their ideas, eight won $10, five between $10 and $50, and two, more than $50. The tangible savings to the Canal organization, when suggestions concerned problems where a monetary benefit could be figured, amounted to $5,010. From All Grades Like all of those who are reading this story, the employees who submitted suggestions came from all grades in the Canal organization. Twenty-six suggestions were received, and five approved, from employees in a rating of GS-6 or below; 19 suggestions were received, and two approved, from employees from grades 7 through 1 1 ; and three suggestions were received, and one approved, from employees in GS-12 or above. As far as the hourly employees were concerned, 10 suggestions were received, and three A CHANGE in the top command of the Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government came late last month when Wilber M. Brucker took office as Secretary of the Army succeeding Robert T. Stevens. A native of Saginaw, Mich., and a former Governor of his heme state, Secretary Brucker had been serving as General Counsel of the Department of Defense. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan Law School and has been prominent in legal work and politics for many years. He served with the Michigan National Guard on the Mexican Border and later as an Artillery Lieutenant with the Rainbow Division in France during the first World War. approved, from those making $3,800 or less a year; 11 suggestions were received, and four approved, from those in the $3,800-$7,000 wage bracket; and four suggestions were received, and one approved, from employees who earned over $7,000. The suggestions varied as widely as the employees who suggested them. They included, among other things; an idea for having house plans available in the commissaries where rugs and furniture were sold; new safety devices for the locks; a new form for time slips in the Commissary Division; mechanical improvements such as a guard on saws and the invention of a tool to remove lead sheath from cables. Committee In Charge The Canal's Incentive Awards Program is in charge of a committee headed by Henry L. Donovan, Civil Affairs Director. Other members are John Hollen, Chief of the Executive Planning Staff; Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director; and J. Bartley Smith, head of the Electrical Division. Leonard M. Brockman of the Personnel Bureau is its Executive Secretary. Acceleration of the local Incentive Awards Program is in line with President Eisenhower's strong support of the overall Federal program, which was strengthened by the law *passed last year. This increased both the scope of the program and the monetary rewards which the idea man or woman could receive. So, if any employee has an idea for combining, devising, eliminating, improving, and saving any of the things mentioned earlier in this story, he or she should: Run, not walk, to the nearest supply of suggestion blanks, put his ideas down on paper and send the form to: Chairman, Incentive Awards Committee, Balboa Heights. Anything from $10 up to many thousands might be his reward.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 BETTER LEARN THESE RIGHT! LEFT! STOP! Most Younger Zonians Will Have Salk Shols (Contlnueifrom page l) communities by personnel of the Health Bureau, while the Army, Navy, and Air Force handled the vaccinations of their dependents. Most Children Inoculated Approximately 1,000 vaccinations were administered in the free vaccination program which was limited to children between 5 and 9 years of age who were in the first or second grades prior to June 30. The Canal Zone school census during the past term shows 2,587 first and second grade pupils. In addition to those inoculated on July 26-28, more than 2,000 had been vaccinated during the summer vacation period since all children in this age group going to the States on vacation were eligible for inoculations. The percentage for the eligible children in the pay group was expected to be about the same as in the free program. The number of eligibles in the second group had been estimated at 2,100 prior to the inoculations this week. Those children eligible for Salk vaccine injections who failed to be vaccinated during the times scheduled may receive their injections at the Outpatient Clinics of Gorgas and Coco Solo Hospitals, or at the dispensaries of the Armed Services, upon application. The same rules of eligibility will be required for them and no charge will be made for those eligible for free vaccinations. BRAVE as a lion was Phyllis Ruth Warner, six-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Warner of Balboa when she got her Salk polio vaccine shot at the Balboa gymansium last week. The inoculation is being given by Miss Jeriline Patrick of Gorgas Hospital with the assistance of Miss Frances Thompson and Miss Frances Brandl, student volunteers. Gatun Locks Overhaul To Begin January 9, Continue Five Months A plan adopted about two years ago for increasing the Canal capacity during lock-overhaul periods will be used for the first time during the coming dry season when work begins on the five-month overhaul of Gatun Locks. Following a plan adopted by the Board of Directors in March 1953, alterations have been made in the locks so that the wall culverts and cylindrical valves can now be overhauled without emptying either of the lock chambers. This will permit double culvert operations when one set of lock chambers is unwatered and will speed up the time for filling and emptying the lock chambers which are in use. Materials are already on order and the first employees have been recruited for the overhaul, which will begin soon after the first of the year. The tentative starting date is January 9. The overhaul period will last until about the middle of May. During the overhaul, eight of the mitre gate leaves will be unhinged and repaired and rehabilitation work will be done on all underwater parts. During the last overhaul at Gatun, in the dry season of 1951, four mitre gate leaves were unhinged and lifted from their pickle-steel pintles by hydraulic jacks. Each gate leaf weighs about 700 tons. The eight leaves to be ovei hauled this year are divided, four and four, between the two sides of the locks. An additional force of 678 temporary employees will be needed during the coming overhaul. Of these, 128 will be U. S.-rate employees, primarily skilled craftsmen and towing locomotive operators. Some of the latter have already been employed and are in training. In addition to the 128 temporary U. S.-rate workers, the Locks Division will borrow the services of a few engineers, nurses, and similar personnel from other Canal units. The remaining 550 employees to be hired for the locks overhaul will be localrate personnel.

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August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Check Totaling $8,588 Sent To 619 Canal Employees As Uniform Allowances Police Chief Retires A total of $8,588 was paid last month by the Panama Canal Company-Canal Zone Government organization in uniform allowances to cover the first quarter of the present fiscal year. In all, 619 employees who are required to wear uniforms in the course of their official duties received the allowances. Payment of the uniform allowance was in accordance with the so-called Fringe Benefits Act passed by the United States Congress last May. As uniform allowances are to be paid at the beginning of each quarter, the estimated cost to the Canal organization of these benefits will total somewhat over $30,000. Similar quarterly payments will be made in October, January, and April. Panama Line Maximum The largest uniform allowance, on. an annual basis, is that paid to officers on the Panama Line ships. They are the only group required to have uniforms for two seasons; their annual allowance is $100 a year, the maximum permissible. Next highest amount is the $65 allowed annually for the ladies in white— nurses, dieticians, and physical therapists employed by the Health Bureau. Policemen, motorcyle officers and other officers of the Police Division, together with the guards at the Gamboa penitentiary are close behind the nurses in the amount of their annual uniform allowances. They will receive $62 a year. Lock guards, with their distinctive khaki uniforms, with the black stripe down the trouser leg, receive $61 a year. Guards at the Canal Zone police stations and jails are allowed $48 a year as a uniform allowance. Their female counterparts, the matrons at the Canal Zone Prison for Women and Juveniles, will receive $30 for their khakis. Based on Current Price Firemen and firemen driver operators have been allowed $35 a year; the officers of the Fire Division receive $1 more, bringing their total to $36. The women who are employed as stewards in the Service Center Division Coffee Prices Will Drop In Commissaries Soon Retail prices of roasted and ground coffee will be reduced by the Commissary Division sometime this month. The price drop is the result of lower prices to be paid for the latest purchase of bulk green coffees and will be made after the new lower-priced green coffees are available for use in blending. The exact amount of the price reduction is not known; it will be announced as soon as possible. Commissary prices fluctuate with world prices but are frequently reflected here several months late. and who wear white uniforms are allowed $30 annually as a uniform allowance. Guards who are on duty at the Commissary Division's Mount Hope plant and who wear khaki uniforms with sun helmets receive $26 a year as a uniform allowance. Customs guards and railroad conductors are allowed $9 a year — their distinctive uniforms are caps — and terminals guards have a $7 annual allowance. Temporary or substitute employees are also entitled to uniform allowances; in their cases the allowances for each quarter will be paid immediately after the first day of each quarter in which they occupy a position for which a uniform allowance is authorized. The amounts of the allowances in each case listed above are based on the estimated annual uniform requirements and the current price of the uniform required. MAJ. GEORGE HERMAN, Chief of the Police Division, retired the end of July after 42 years with the Zone force. A large number of his frends honored him last Saturday night at a farewell party at the Army-Navy Club. He and Mrs. Herman are sailing August 13 on the Panama Line. They will visit their daughter in Ran Antonio, Tex., but have not yet decided where they will make their home. Paraiso Safety Field Day SAFETY AT HOME, at work, and at play was the keynote of the big Safety Field Day held all day Saturday, July 23, at Paraiso. The novel idea in emphasizing safety on a community basis was developed under the sponsorship of the Safety Committee of the Paraiso Civic Council. Active participation by all the major Canal organization units aided in making the demonstration an outstanding success. The program opened at 9 o'clock in the morning with exercises at the ballpark. The big storehouse building used by the Locks Division was used for displays which were thronged much of the day. Upper left: Fire Division personnel demonstrate to a group of interested spectators the proper resuscitation methods. Cpper right: Use of a fresh-air mask was demonstrated as a part of the Maintenance Division's display. The mask is used when working near toxic fumes. Lower: Capt. Frank A. Munroe, Jr., Marine Director, is at the microphone addressing the large audience in and near the ballpark grandstand. Civic Council officials, representatives from various Canal bureaus and divisions, and others who participated are seated on the speaker's platform.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 FOR YOUR INTERESTED GUIDANCE IN^AjCCIDENT PREVENTION SAFETY FIELD DAY Early last dry season the Balboa Storehouse Safety Committee suggested that they would like to put on a safety demonstration at the La Boca Ball Park and invite all other safety committees from other divisions to participate. However at that time they had just appointed new committeemen which delayed things somewhat until the beginning of the rainy season put a damper on proceedings. Such was the situation when Cleveland B. Stevens, safety committee chairman of the Paraiso Civic Council, called the Safety Branch and asked if it would be possible to get some safety films to show at one of their meetings. The next time we had a talk the idea had grown into showing some safe-driving films and putting on a safe-driving demonstration for the people living in Paraiso. It was only a step to get these two ideas of the Balboa Storehouse safety committee and the Paraiso Civic Council together. The HONOR ROLL Bureau Award For BEST RECORD JUNE COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU HEALTH BUREAU AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Supply 3 Community Services Engineering and Construction 2 Health 2 Civil Affairs Transportation and Terminals... 1 Marine Division Award For NO DISABLING INJURIES JUNE LOCKS DIVISION HOSPITALIZATION AND CLINICS MAINTENANCE DIVISION SERVICE CENTER DIVISION INDUSTRIAL DIVISION GROUNDS MAINTENANCE DIVISION MOTOR TRANSPORTATION DIVISION RAILROAD DIVISION STOREHOUSES DIVISION HOUSING DIVISION AIDS TO NAVIGATION SANITATION DIVISION AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Aids to Navigation. 5 Housing 5 M ain tenance 5 Sanitation — 5 Electrical 4 Industrial 4 Motor Transportation 4 Railroad 4 Storehouses 4 Dredging 3 Grounds Maintenance 3 Service Center -... 3 Commissary 2 Hospitalization and Clinics 2 Locks 1 Terminals 1 Navigation Paraiso Civic Council then came up with the idea that they would sponsor a big safety field day at Paraiso to be held on July 23, at Paraiso Ball Park. Thus good things are born. Elsewhere in this issue you will find pictures of the grand event which, if one overlooked the weather usual at this time of the year, proved to be a great success. A number of dignitaries were present and the program contained many items and exhibits of unusual interest to people both in and out of the Canal Zone Government-Panama Canal Company. Since out of the 355 disabling injuries experienced by the Canal Zone Government-Panama Canal Company during 1954, approximately 70 percent were to local-rate employees; it is very gratifying to the safety people to find these employees taking such a personal interest in their welfare and, what's more, doing something about it like their "Safety Field Day." There is no question that with such safety consciousness and active interest as was displayed on Saturday, July 23, the frequency rate for 1955 is going to be a lot less than it was in 1954. Many people, in addition to those safety committees from various divisions, are thanked for helping the Paraiso Civic Council and giving their active suppoit in making this Safety Field Day a success. Difficulties always arise in trying to get the proper people lined up to put on a program. Such a difficulty arose when the Safety Field Day Committee found that it could not get a school band or a local fife-and-drum corps. Someone suggested that the Army might help if asked. They were, and the 23d Infantry Division Band put on an impressive flag raising ceremony, and, of course, no parade would ever be a success without a band. The Armed Forces Radio Station at Fort Clayton did a splendid job of putting on a 15-minute interview with Harold W. Williams and Mrs. Ellis Fawcett telling all about the program. Of course the International Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts were present selling soft drinks, taking part in the Bicycle Safety Demonstration, and doing other jobs to help put it over. Charles Bradley was good enough to let the Aids to Navigation have his snakes as a background for their "first aid for snake bite" demonstration. Since the day as a whole proved to be such a success, it is hoped the Paraiso Civic Council can see their way to have another "Safety Field Day" next year. HIGHWAY ZOO The JACKASS This is the showolf who risks his own neck and everybody else* by speeding and weaving. O' he may turn up as the stupid oaf who jus/ doesn't savvy modern driving. In Ico he is most any driver on thv highway except you and me! NATIONAL SAHIY CO'/NCfl Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked (Frequency Rate! JUNE 1955 Community Services Bureau Health Bureau Supply Bureau C. Z. Govt.-Panama Canal Co. I This Month I Marine Bureau Engineering and Construction Bureau C. Z.Govl.-Panama Canal Co.( Last 3-Year Av.l Transportation and Terminals Bureau Civil Affairs Bureau 20 30 40 50 Number of Disabling Injuries 16 Man-Hours Worked 2,251,554 LEGEND I I Am lunt Better Than Canal Zone Government — Panama Canal Company Last 3-Year Average I I Amount Worse Than Canal Zone Government — Panama Canal Company Last 3Year Average F: : ::::v^ Accumulative Frequency Rate This Y'ear

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August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Official Panama Canal Company Publication Published Monthly at BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE OF CURRENT INTEREST Printed by the Printing Plant Mount Hope, Canal Zone John S. Seybold, Governor-President H. W. Schull, Jr. Lieutenant-Governor William G. Arey, Jr. Public Information Officer J. Rufus Hardy, Editor Eleanor H. McIlhenny Assistant Editor SUBSCRIPTION— $1.00 a year SINGLE COPIES— 5 cents each On sale at all Panama Canal Service Centers, Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after publication date. SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL— 10 cents each BACK COPIES— 10 cents each On sale when available, from the Vault Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. Postal money orders should be made payable to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company, and mailed to Editor, The Panama Canal Review, Balboa Heights, C. Z. APPOINTED TO HEAD COROZAL HOSPITAL LT. COL. CHARLES H. WIGGINS, above, will become superintendent of Corozal Hospital next week following the departure of Lt. Col. Richard F. Mulholland. Lt. Col. Mulholland has been assigned to duty at the U. S. Army Hospital at Camp Gordon, Ga. Lt. Col. Wiggins arrived in the Canal Zone last month from Chanute Air Force Base in Illinois. He is a native of Mississippi and a graduate of the University of Mississippi. He took his medical work at Tulane University. He is now on duty at Gorgas Hospital and will continue as psychiatrist there, in addition to his duties at Corozal. Shirtsleeve Conference REPRESENTATIVES of the Local Rate Civic Councils meet regularly with Governor Seybold in tl e Board Room of the Administration Building to discuss community problems. At a recent meeting the Council representatives were introduced to the new Lieutenant Governor, Col. H. W. Schull, Jr. Left to right around the table are: Beresford Gittens, Rainbow City General Committee; J. J. Joseph, Rainbow City; H. A. Josephs, Rainbow City; C. D. Atherly, Paraiso; Eric Oakley, Paraiso General Committee; E. L. Fawcett, Paraiso; Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director; Governor Seybold; Leo B. Harrington, stenotypist; Lieutenant Governor Schull; Norman Johnson, Employee and Labor Relations Officer; G. L. A. Davis. Rupert Wilson, and Cleveland Roberts. La Boca. Also attending this meeting but not shown in the photograph were Leon Headley and R. T. Burns of Santa Cruz, and Rexford Innis of the Santa Cruz General Committee. A. B. Hendricks, a Rates Analyst in the Office of the Comptroller, returned to the Canal Zone last month after five months of advance training in Washington. D. C, as one of three local participants in the Fourth Senior Management Intern Program. During this period, he studied methods used by the General Accounting Office and worked out a project with the National Park Service. He also studied public administration and Federal Government accounting problems in night classes at the American University, and worked with the District of Columbia on personnel problems. In addition he took part in weekly seminars held by prominent Government officials on such subjects as management, organization and method, human factors and employees, training problems, personnel practices and management accounting systems. The first U. S.-rate salary checks prepared with the new machinery which makes payroll procedures and bookkeeping largely automatic were issued July 25. Stubs of the new checks contain information on hours worked, basic pay and additional compensation, deductions, net pay, and earnings for the fiscal year to the date of the check. Local-rate biweekly employees have been receiving their pay checks prepared under the new procedure since May. The newtype checks have been used for employees paid weekly and to disability relief annuitants since the first part of February. Checks which are sent, at the employee's request, directly to Canal Zone banks are forwarded with the stubs attached; the bank then forwards the stub to the employee along with the usual deposit notice. Employees of the Canal Zone Govern•ment and Panama Canal Company who waived their rights last year to coverage under the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance program, will have the rest of this month to reconsider their decisions and take out insurance. The Civil Service Commission is giving employees who now want the insurance a second chance, since it appears that they had insufficient information about the program and its benefits when they decided against accepting the insurance last year. No revocations will be accepted after August 31, the Commission emphasized. After that date normal regulations will again be in effect. These provide that an employee who waives the insurance must wait one year before he can request coverage. At that time he must be under 50 years of age and pass a physical examination. Occupants of Canal Zone quarters were advised last month that all quarters under the custody of the Housing Division will henceforth be serviced by preventive maintenance teams. Teams of this sort have been working in Diablo Heights and Margarita for some time; the plan is now being extended to all quarters. Teams will inspect the interior and exterior of each quarters unit at least twice each year. The inspection will be performed by a U. S.-rate employee of the Maintenance Division. Necessary repairs will be made without the necessity of a request from the quarters occupant. In a memorandum to residents of Canal Zone quarters, the Chief of the Housing Division asked cooperation in reporting the need for any repairs and in making thenquarters accessible to the inspector and repair crew. If residents discover a situation which needs correction between inspection visits — termite activity, especially — they are asked to call the housing managers, either at Balboa or Cristobal. Electrical or plumbing emergencies are to be reported directly to the Maintenance and Electrical Divisions. The mechanical tabulation of statistical data of the Canal organization was centralized last month in a new unit: The Statistical Tabulating Section of the Administrative Branch. The new section will prepare personnel statistics and reports, figures on shipping and cargo, statistics on postal money orders and postal savings certificates; and will maintain the stock records and accounting statistics of the storehouses. The new unit, which has seven U. S.-rate and 10 local-rate employees, is under the supervision of Louis C. Caldwell. He has been in charge of the stock record and accounting tabulation work of the Storehouse Division. Headquarters for the unit is on the second floor of the Storehouse Division headquarters.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 Leaving The Zone? Packing And Crating Services Make Moving Almost Painless PLANS for packing and moving are discussed by Joseph N. Rinker, Packing and Crating Foreman, with Mr. and Mrs. Michael I. Crooks of Balboa. The Crooks are leaving the Canal Zone this month. Death and taxes, they say, are inevitable. In the Canal Zone, add Packing and Crating, for about 99 percent of the Canal's U. S.-rate employees. Sooner or later in the life of almost every Canal employee comes the time when he d?cides, or age and circumstances decide for him, to go back to the United States to live. That this uprooting is as painless as it is is due largely to the efforts of Joseph N. Rinker and the Packing and Crating Shop of the Maintenance Division. Until Public Law 60'J became effective in August 1946 and until the job of packing up a departing Zonian's belongings was taken over by the Packing and Crating Shop soon thereafter, an employee who was leaving had to scurry around and make his own arrangements. Pie had to scrounge boxes and crates, borrow a china packer from the nearest large commissary, arrange for a customs inspector to came to his quarters while the packing was going on, fill out the multitude of forms needed for ocean freight, sometimes hire a freight broker at a port of entry and, finally, pay the freight charges on his household effects from the Canal Zone to his new front door. As a result, few Zonians possessed more than their silver, china, linens and a few pieces of furniture. When they were reestablished in the United States, they had to start again almost from scratch. Different Today Today, things are different. An employee's belongings are packed at his Zone quarters, shipped to his new home in the United States, and uncrated and unpacked for him (within a certain period of time). He is soon settled again, with almost no cost to himself, surrounded by his familiar things delivered in as good condition as when he last saw them. Let's follow one wellknown Zonian through this process. Michael I. Crooks, of the Transportation Division's Ancjn Corral, is retiring the end of this month after over 33 years in the Canal Zone. He and Mrs. Crooks already own a three-bedroom ranch-type home in Whittier, Calif. They do not plan to leave here until August 20, the day after Mr. Crooks' last working day, but they want their furniture shipped ahead of them so they will be ready to settle down when they reach California early next month. After Mr. Crooks discussed retirement details with Robert J. Kelley, in the Personnel Bureau, and transportation arrangements with James M. Thompson, in the Transportation Section of the Administrative Branch, he was ready to talk with Mr. Rinker, whose official title is Foreman Crater and Packer and who lives, eats, and breathes packing and crating. In the Transportation Section, Mr. SHREDDED PAPER for packing is produced by this machine at the Packing and ( 'rating Shop. Eric Small in on the platform and Jeff Danvers at the bin into which the ribboned paper Sows. At the left, U. Rios is weighing a package of the shreds. Crooks had been given a pamphlet outlining the provisions of Public Law 690 and he knew before he talked with Mr. Rinker that he was limited to 8,750 pounds of household goods, that he could take only such possessions as were needed for a household— had the Crooks had four dozen rocking chairs, which they didn't, the chairs would not be packed or shipped at Company expense — and that shipment of his automobile would be his own responsibility. Packing Parley Because a Review reporter was tagging along to get this story, Mr. Rinker cDmbined two sessions with the Crooks into one arc! met them at their house to discuss the packing and crating and shipping of their possessions. Ordinarily Mr. ard Mrs. Crooks would first have come to his office in the Maintenance Division shop area. One wall of the office is hung with copies of the papers which Zonians who are leaving will need. Along another wall hangs a series of clipboards, each containing the papers of some States-bound Zonian, his packing and departure dates and his destination. The other day these clipboards showed that shipments were in the works for such widely separated States as Virginia, Michigan, Texas, and Washington. Surrounded by these exhibits Mr. Rinker would have explained to them what he and his crew would do about the packing, would make a "packing date," and would answer any questions they had. Later he would have gone to the Crooks' quarters on Akee Street in Balboa. There he would make a rough estimate as to whether their belongings would be within their weight allowance and see if they had any furniture which would be a special packing problem. Instead, for The Review's benefit, he sat down with them at home and went over the procedure with them there. At the same time he estimated the number of crates and barrels his men would need and decided on a packing date, which in their case would be August 1. One-day Process On that day, the Crooks were tcld, a packing crew of about five local-rate men, together with a U. S.-rate packing supervisor who is a deputy customs inspector, would be ready to go to woik about 7:30 a. ro. Unless some unforeseen problem developed, the packers would be finished in the quarters that afternoon. Not all Canal families want their packing done as far ahead of their departure as the Crooks do, Mr. Rinker said. Families with small children usually prefer to stay in their Zone homes until the last possible minute. They figute that they can stay with relatives in the United States until they have a place of their own and do not want the children's routine upset any earlier than necessaiy. The Crooks, however, preferred to do their camping out on this end, with furniture borrowed from the Housing Division. As he went through the Crooks' house, Mr. Rinker told Mrs. Crooks that she might pack drawers of dressers and chests

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August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW with household goods, if she cared to. Pillows and blankets are satisfactory items for this interior packing but sheets and linens are too much dead weight, he said, for the light construction of the ordinary drawer. Mrs. Crooks was to keep an itemized list of what went into each drawer and these would later be checked by one of the two inspectors, Frank Tuiman or James Van Dyke. No Pre-packing Needed Actually though, Mr. Rinker said, there was nothing which Mrs. Crooks needed to do ahead of packing time. The packers, like Gabriel Cordoba and Andres Diaz, whose specialty is packing china and glassware, work more easily if such items are left in cupboards or on shelves. They look the situation over before they begin, see how much and what is to be packed, and begin with the larger and heavier items which go into one barrel; the lighter and more fragile things such as crystal and figurines are packed together in other barrels. Other packers, like Kenneth Harris and Ashton Russell, know from years of experience how many towels, pillow cases, or bedspreads fit into standard cartons. All of the breakable things, Mr. Rinker said, would be wrapped in newspapers and packed in shredded paper in the barrels. Each barrel would be itemized as to its contents and a copy of the listing would be given to the Crooks. Nonbreakable items would be packed in cardboard cartons which would each have its separate itemized list. Mothballs, brought by the packers, would be sprinkled into each carton. These cartons would later be packed inside big wooden vans. Safe Handling None of the furniture and the larger pieces such as lamps and radioes would be packed at the Crooks' house, they learned. Such furniture would be tagged in duplicate, swaddled in blankets, and taken to the Packing and Crating shop. Each item would be listed, together with a value given by either Mr. or Mrs. Crooks. Mrs. Crooks was concerned over the safe handling of several large oil paintings but Mr. Rinker assured her that he and his men were equally concerned that they CHINA and glassware are wrapped in newspaper and packed into metal barrels, with shredded paper as wadding. Gabriel Cordoba and Andres Diaz, who have been packers for seven years, are doing the packing while Joseph N. Rinker, Packing and Crating foreman, looks over some of the things still to be wrapped. made their long journey in good condition. Special celotex boxes are available at the shop for paintings, he said; the boxed pictures would then be packed into the large vans. As each piece of furniture was taken from the truck at the shop, Mr. Rinker explained, it would be checked off by one of the inspectors who would remove, and put aside, one of the duplicate tags for further listing on the shipping manifest and the itemized list, a copy of which would later accompany the Crooks to their new home. After all of the Crooks' household belongings had been assembled in the shop, Mr. Rinker said, the actual packing for shipment would begin. After he left the Akee Street house, Mr. Rinker, Review reporter still tagging along, returned to the shop in an airy long building at the very back of the Maintenance's Division's fenced enclosure. There the shop gang had been busy turning salvaged materials into the crates— vans, they are officially called — in which household goods are eventually VANS like this one measure only six by four by eight feet but one of them will hold furniture for a bedroom. Oscar Roberts is putting the top on the van. Top and van alike are made from salvaged material; new sides are made from a plywood specially-manufactured in Panama for the vans. packed. Vans like these would be used later for the Crooks' household goods. In days gone by some Zonians, with an eye to later do-it-yourself projects, used to have their furniture crated in mahogany boards. Today's packing and crating people are as thrifty as Dutch housewives. The vans into which most departing furniture is eventually packed are made from lumber which originally had encased incoming goods; crates in which electric ranges had been shipped to the Canal Zone have been remodeled into vans and other cases, for instance. No Termites Termite-eaten old lumber from demolished quarters is never used in the Packing and Crating Shop. Special plywood, made in Panama for the Canal Company, makes sides for the vans. The shredded paper with which the barrels and boxes are packed is cut into ribbons by the Shop's own shredding machine. The paper is old newspapers and magazines or clean waste paper; reams of it comes from the Administration Building. The metal drums into which the dishes and glassware are packed were originally filled with alcohol or turpentine. They are cleaned, fitted with new wooden tops and lined with new paper. Once a family's furniture is assembled at the shop and listed, the packers go to work. Each piece of furniture is wrapped individually in a heavy fibrous paper before it is stowed into the vans. Like items are packed together and the crevasses filled with small items and the smaller boxes and cartons. The van is than packed with as much shredded paper as necessary to fill empty spaces and provide cushioning. This compact packing is important, Mr. Rinker says, because ocean freight rates can be as high as 70 cents a cubic foot. Much In Little Space Each van, which measures six by four by eight feet, holds an amazing amount of furniture, when properly packed as Wilford Jones and Pastor Marcelino do the job. They have been storing furniture away for a good many years and have no difficulty at all in fitting an average bedroom suite— twin beds, springs, mattresses, chests and (See page n)

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10 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 Stars And Stripes Fly From 112 Staffs When Canal Zone Celebrates A Holiday Whenever a presidential proclamation or an order from the Governor directs that flags be displayed, or on national holidays like the Fourth of July, 112 United States flags flutter from poles on Canal buildings or fly from the staffs on the Canal's tugs and launches and dredges and barges. There are other United States flags in the Canal Zone, of course — on military posts and naval stations, and in churches and courtrooms— but the 112 are those which fly over Company-Government buildings or from marine equipment. Tropical weather with its brilliant sun and heavy rain takes its toll of the flags; the average life of one here is not over nine months when it is flown from a staff and considerably less than that on the marine equipment. Each year the Division of Storehouses orders about 900 flags from the General Services Administration, the U. S. Army Quartermaster Depot in Philadelphia or from a flag manufacturer. $3,000 A Year They range in size from those which are a little over a foot long and are used on the launches to the five-footers which fly from most of the flagstaff's. The total cost of U. S. flags for local use amounts to something over $3,000 a year. Most of the flags in the Canal Zone are made of cotton bunting, but the smaller flags are a mixture of nylon and wool which lasts longer here and retains its colors better than the bunting. Not all of the 112 flags fly every day. Generally, most Canal Zone buildings fly their flags on workdays, school days, holidays, or special days required by law or designated by the President or the Governor. The flag at the Governor's residence is flown only when he is present on the Isthmus. Wherever a flag is attended by a policeman or a caretaker, as at the Administration Building, it is flown daily. Hours for displaying the flag are 7 a. m. to 5 p. m. Regardless of the day, the flag of the United States is always flown on the Canal's marine equipment whenever the launches and tugs etc. aie underway in Canal waters. Extra For Holidays According to regulations for the display and care of the flag which were issued last November by Governor J. S. Seybold, the flag should be flown from at least one public building in each community on holidays and days required by law or designated by the President or Governor. If there are facilities for flying more than one flag from the building, extra flags should be flown on such days. If a holiday falls on Sunday and the following day is observed as a holiday, as July 4 was in 1954, the flag is flown both Sunday and Monday. Canal Zone regulations for the treatment of the flag are, of course, those in effect everywhere. No flag or pennant or any other object or emblem is ever placed above it or at its right if two flags are flown at the same level. The flag must never touch the ground' nor must it be allowed to trail in water. When United States flags in the Canal Zone are no longer in fit condition for CANAL ZONE POLICEMEN raise and tower the flags at the Administration Building and in other public spots like the Balboa circle where this photograph of Policeman Stewart Jaddis was taken. display they are destroyed privately, as is done elsewhere. The usual method is by burning; each agency handles the disposal of its own outworn flags. When the flags in the Canal Zone are to be half-staffed — a term in flag parlance preferred to half-masting — or are to be displayed on some special occasion, the Chief of the Administrative Branch notifies each Bureau of the Canal organization. A Bureau representative in turn passes on the word to the units which fly flags. The Marine Bureau, with its floating equipment, has the largest number of flags, 49, and the Civil Affairs Bureau, which includes post offices, schools, police and fire stations, has 28 flags. The flags at the Administration Building and in the circle opposite the Balboa clubhouse are under the control of the Civil Affairs Bureau whose police officers raise and lower them daily When a flag is flown upside down, it is a signal of distress. Once or twice in the Canal's history a flag has been accidently raised in the upside down position, a record which can be considered excellent in view of the number of flags and flag staffs in the Canal Zone. A flag which is to be half-staffed is first hoisted to the peak of the staff and then lowered slowly to half staff. Before a half-staffed flag is lowered at the end of One historic flag is known to few Canal Zonians. A United States flag which once flew from the Su. preme Court Building in Washington, now hangs in a frame in the office of the Superintendent of the Terminals Division in Cristohal. The flag was awarded in 1945 to Panama Railroad employees for their outstanding purchase of U. S. War Bonds during the Fourth War Loan Drive. the day it is first raised to the top of its staff. Flags are half-staffed from 7 a. m. to noon on Memorial Day, May 30; at noon they are raised to the top of their standards where they remain until the end of the day. Flags in the Canal Zone are flown at half-staff whenever the President or the Governor directs; the periods during which flags are half-staffed were prescribed in a Presidential Proclamation in 1954. When a President or Former President of the United States dies, the flag is half-staffed for 30 days. For a Vice President, Chief Justice, retired Chief Justice, or Speaker of the House, the period of half-staffing is 10 days. Lesser periods are in order for other officials. Half-Staff For Zonians In the Canal Zone flags have been flown at half-staff when local officials have died. Among those so honored were Roy R. Watson, then Chief Quartermaster, A. W. Goulet, General Manager of the Commissary Division, and George W. Green, Municipal Engineer. In December 1947, Canal Zone flags were half-staffed between 7:30 and 10 a. m. when the bodies of 15 servicemen who had been buried here during World War II were placed aboard ship for return to their homelands. The United States flag flew for the first time over an Isthmian Canal Commission building in May 1904, when the United States took over the rights and properties of the French Canal Company. The building was the ICC headquarters in Panama City now the Panama Central Post Office. When the Canal Zone was delineated United States flags were supplied to the alcaldes of the little towns in the Zone. One early letter, dated June 30, 1904, instructed the Alcaldes of Gatun and Gorgona to fly the flag "over the Alcaldia of your district during office hours of each day except in bad or storm weather." Flags for the school building would be furnished them later, the letter said. On Holidays Only Early Zonians apparently were not as careful of their flags as their present day successors. In February 1907, Chief Engineer John F. Stevens complained to his Executive Secretary, H. D. Reed, that flags were frequently left flying all night and were not properly cared for. Col. George W. Goethals encountered a similar situation and in August 1907 ordered that flags would not be flown "on Commission buildings except on public holidays or when authorized by proper officials on special occasions." Canal files indicate that it was not until 1917 that the United States flag was displayed daily in the Canal Zone. In June of that year Governor Chester Harding laid out regulations for displaying the flag and authorized that it "may properly be flown daily, if desired, from buildings in the Canal Zone." Today the raising and lowering of the flag begins or ends the day for several Canal Zone schools. At Balboa and Cristobal High Schools, cadets from the Junior ROTC units perform this duty and at other schools a formal flag raising is a daily event.

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August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL RZVIEW 11 Visiting Oldtimer Finds Zone Unfamiliar After Long Absence CANAL ZONE CLERGY GEORGE T. KENLY; after 50 years, he came back. After an absence of nearly 50 years, George T. Kenly, who at 87 is probably the Canal's oldest "oldtimer," found very little to remind him of the old days when he visited the Canal Zone briefly last month. Accompanied by Edwin Green, a sprightly youth of 73, he visited the Hotel Washington, which was new to him, and the Tivoli Guest House, which was one old landmark he remembered. He r. de on the Panama Railroad for the first time since 1906 and made a transit thr. ugh the Carnl which was not much beyond the planning stage when he last saw it. As an engineer with the Isthmian Canal Commission from 1904 to 1906, Mr. Kenly helped build the Brazos Brook Reservoir which supplied water to the Atlantic side communities until the permanent reservoir and water system was constructed. During the time he worked here, most of the streets were unpaved and the quart rs were left over from the French construction period. Balboa was a marsh and the only road from the Ancon-Balboa district ran around the side of Ancon Hill. Like most oldtimers, however, Mr. Kenl; recalled that the early days were rugged but that most people had lots of fun when they weren't busy building the Panama Canal. The only real problem in those days, he said, was what to do with all that diit. A native of West Virginia, Mr. Kenly worked with the LTnited States government for many years before coming to the Isthmus in 1904 to help with the Panama Canal. After leaving here in 1906 he went to California and arrived in San Francisco just four days before the historic earthquake and fire which destroyed the city and put an end to his business plans. He returned to the East Coast and up to the time of his tetirement several years ago, he was connected with a private engineering firm in Baltimore, where he now makes his home. Packing And Craling Services Make Moving Almost Painless (Continue! from page 9) all into one van. For the average Canal household the packers use four of the vans and three or four metal drums; if there is a piano or some other large object the number of vans or their size may be increased. Fortunately, Mr. Rinker says, the vogue for nine-foot couches has not yet reached the Canal Zone. As soon as the packers have finished with each van, Eric George takes over the banding and stenciling. Then Cecil Callender, head clerk in the shop who has been following the process from the beginning, begins the lengthy and necessary documentation. He gives each head of the house, like Mr. Crooks, a complete list of everything packed, fills out the customs declarations and helps Mr. Rinker explain how a family which is returning by one port while the furniture is being shipped to another — as is the case of Mr. and Mrs. Crooks — list their household goods on the customs declaration they will make when they enter the United States. Unless a family's goods exceed the weight allowance, in which case they pay freight on the extra weight, the only fee charged is $1 for certification of the customs declaration. Few Claims Mr. Rinker and his crew are justifiably proud of the job they have done. Their efficiency is amply attested by the scores of letters they receive each year from "satisfied customers" and by the small amount paid annually in claims for breakage or damage. In one 12-month period, for instance, the belongings of 466 Canal Zonians were packed and crated by the Maintenance Division; these household goods were valued at $1,166,044.95. Only 25 claims, all of them small, were made during this period with a total dollar-wise claim of $522 or .045 percent of the total value. Until recently Packing and Crating had two shops, one in Balboa and the other in Cristobal. Now all of the preparation for shipment and the shipment itself is done from Balboa; one reason for this, Mr. Rinker says, is that the transports which carry the goods routed via New Orleans load in Balboa and the freight rate via the Panama Line, on which shipments are made to the East Coast, is the same from Balboa or Cristobal. Other Customers In addition to packing and crating for Canal employees, Mr. Rinker's crew of two U. S.-rate and 32 local-rate employees does similar work for the United States Embassy and for the Canal Zone "orphans" Civil Aeronautics, Internal Revenue, etc. They also run a storage service where household goods may remain until the by-then ex-Zonian has his new address — no storage is charged for two months and shipment is free up to two years from the time of his departure — and an unpacking and uncrating service for new arrivals. But none of them, from Mr. Rinker The Rev. Carl D. Christensen has spent a quarter of a century in missionary work, the last five and a half years of it on the Isthmus of Panama. As president of the Panama Conference of Seventh Day Adventist Churches, he is in charge of the work of the approximately 40 Adventist congregations in the Canal Zone and Panama. His headquarters, recently moved from Cristobal, are on Gavilan Road in Balboa, near the office of the All-America Cables Company. Born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, he attended college in Minnesota and holds a Master's Degree in School AdministraTHE REV. t'ARL D. CHRISTEXSEX tion from the University of Nebraska He has been in church work almost all o. his adult life. He is thoroughly familiar with the problems of the Latin-American world and equally at home in English or Spanish; the problems and the language he learned in the 20 years he spent as a missionary in Argentine, Chile, and Peru. About 10 years ago he returned to the United States and for four years, just before his assignment to the Isthmus, he taught in an Adventist college in Walla Walla, Wash. The Panama Conference is one of the 364 local Conferences and missions of the Adventist Church. Its president, currently Mr. Christensen, is elected by the member churches every two years. He is serving his third term in this office. Mr. Christensen is married; his wife has worked with him throughout his missionary career. Their only son is a missionary in Bolivia. Two daughters live in the LTnited States; one is a graduate nurse in Washington, D. C, and the other is married and lives in Los Angeles. Mr. Christensen has little time for hobbies, he told The Review. When he has a spare moment or two he enjoys working with carpenter tools but time is so scarce that all of his projects are necessarily small ones. down, feel that these services bring them in as close touch with people as does their primary purpose in life. "After all," Joe Rinker says, "It's pretty hard for people like the Crooks to leave when they've been here a good many years. Anything we can do to heli) them is little enough."

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12 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 Zone* s Historic Rio Grande Does Sudden Disappearing Act The historic Rio Grande has gone und srground. This Rio Grande isn't hallow river bordering the southern part of Texas; it is the Rio Grande explored 400 years ago by the Spanish in their search for an overland communication between Atlantic and Pacific across the Isthmus of Panama. The disappearance of the Isthmian Rio Grande is connected with the work on Contractors Hill, only a short distance from the old Rio Grande reservoir which once supplied water for the entire Pacific side district between Culebra and Panama City. During the Contractors Hill project the main stream of the river, which drops precipitously from the old dam to the spillway near the Cucaracha Signal Station, has been partially filled with rock from Contractors Hill. The river fill is designed to stabilize the slopes of adjacent fills behind Contractors Hill, and has raised the grade of the river 20 feet or more for a distance of several hundred feet. The Rio Grande, however, has not taken calmly to this man-made innovation and appears to prefer its original bed. Instead of flowing quietly along in its new raised channel, it follows the winding course of its old channel for a few feet out onto the new fill, then disappears completely. It goes into no large hole or cavern but simply disappears into the ground to re-emerge at the bottom of the fill through innumerable small crevices in the rocks. The Rio Grande of the Isthmus has been tied in closely with local progress since the beginning of recorded history. If the Spaniards had found it more suitable for water-borne traffic when they explored its course in 1527, it would undoubtedly have been the link between the Chagres and the Pacific coast, rather than the Cruces trail. Three hundred and twenty years later, surveyors of the Panama Railroad became convinced that construction of a railroad was possible when they found the Rio Grande valley stretching from the continental divide down the Pacific watershed. The first tracks of the railroad followed the river vallev to Panama City. Later the French Canal Company laid out their canal along the route of the Rio Grande. Their plans for a lock-type canal called for the Rio Grande to be dammed near the Pacific end of the Canal. Later, during the early construction period, the Rio Grande was dammed into a great reservoir, with a capacity of 362 million gallons of water, to supply the entire Pacific side of the Canal Zone and Panama City. Before the Canal was completed, the reservoir's capacity had been increased by a third. The Rio Grande has not always been a well-behaved river. In November 1909, flood waters on the river ate away sections of the Canal banks near Corozal where the Rio Grande crossed the Canal prism. A disappearing river, according to QUIET POOL in a wooded glade? Not at all. This is the spot where the Rio Grande disappears underground beneath a newly-constructed rock fill. engineers, is not unusual in limestone country but a man-made disappearing river, especially one created unintentionally, isn't commonplace. Conversion Project Engineer Gets Full Colonel's Eagles Edward B. Jennings, Project Engineer or the Power Conversion Project, has a pair of silver eagles these days, and very little opportunity to wear them. Like other military men on duty with the Canal organization, he spends 99 percent of his time in civilian clothes. Consequently, the eagles to which he became entitled on his promotion July 15 to full colonel in the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers stay in their box. Born in Westport, Conn., Colonel Jennings is a graduate of Carson-Lorg Institute in Pennsylvania, Syracuse Lniversity and the Command and General Staff School. Ke holds his master's degree from the State University of Iowa. During World War II he served as an engineer battalion commander in the New Hebrides, Okinawa and Japan. He came to the Canal Zone in June 1954, from Nashville, Tenn., where he was Assistant District Engineer of the Nashville Engineer District. His first Canal appointment was as Project Engineer for the work on Contractors Hill. He was named Project Engineer for the Power Conversion Project last April. Latin American School Enrollment Increases After Start Of Classes Enrollment in the Canal Zone's Latin American schools, which was lower by 54 students at the beginning of the present school year than on the first day of school a year ago, took a sharp swing upward as the month progressed. On July 15, 11 days after the present school session began, a total of 4,006 students were enrolled in the Latin American schools, in the grades from kindergarten through high school. This figure was an increase of 72 in the ten-day period and brought the total enrollment higher by 60 students than the enrollment in the schools on the similar day of the preceding school term. The two largest of the Latin American elementary schools are Rainbow City and Paraiso; the former has over 975 students and the latter approximately 525. Rainbow City Junior High School has the largest enrollment of the junior high schools but La Boca is the larger of the two Latin American high schools. According to officials of the schools, students in the upper grades are adapting easily to the new system of all-Spanish instruction. All classes in the Latin American schools are being taught in Spanish this year for the first time; Spanish-language instruction last year extended only through grade six. English is taught as a separate subject. Walter H. Oliver is in charge of the conversion into all-Spanish instruction. $ New courses in Spanish language are being constructed for the school curriculum under the supervision of Alfred E. Osborne for the elementary schools and Russell H. Johns for the secondary schools. TWO WELL-KNOWN Canal Zone teachers were promoted this year to the principalships of the two high schools in the Latin American Schools system. Owen J. Shirley, left, is principal of the Rainbow City High School and Robert H. Beecher is principal of the high school at La Boca.

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August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 13 Gigantic Stairsteps On Contractors Hill Now Nearly Finished The finishing touches are being given to tie gigantic stairsteps which have been carved into Contractors Hill during the past year. During that time the face of the hill has completely changed appearance and the danger of a rock fall into the Canal channel has been removed. Shovels, trucks, and bulldozers are presently working on 150-foot level, lowest of the berms or steps which is just 65 feet above the Canal water 1 svel. Under the working schedule, the last of the hard rock formation will be drilled, blasted, and removed before the end of this month. The work remaining after the last of the rock is removed will include the removal of the shale access road down the slope of Project 13, and the break-up and removal of a relatively small amount of rock along the Canal banks which fell during the blasting operations. This work is expected to take only a few days for completion. Cascadas At Work While the Tecon Corporation is completing the work under its contract, the Dredging Division's dipper dredge Cascadas will be busy removing the last of Cucaracha formation in Project 13 immediately north of Contractors Hill. Approximately 250,000 cubic yards of this project was removed by dry excavation by the Tecon Corporation under a supplemental agreement. The removal of the knuckle which juts into the Canal channel at that point will increase the channel width by 150 feet and will greatly improve navigation conditions through Gaillard Cut The channel turns sharply as it prsse? Gold and Contractors Hill and much of the usefulness of work already done on Project 13 has been nullified by the remaining tip of Cucaracha formation which juts into the channel. Project 13 has been in progress on a low priority basis by the Dredging Division for many yesrs. It provides for the widening of the entire channel section known as Culebra Reach to 500 feet. Approximately one and a half miles of the channel has been widened with only the small ssction remaining. By Contract And Canal The dipper dredge Cascadas was moved to the site early in July and will continue the work until the project is completed. The work on Project 13 was suspended soon after the big crack across the face of Contractors Hill was found to be endangering the Canal because of the possibility of inducing a rockfall. The contract with Tecon was extended to include the dry excavation of the remaining material in Project 13 since the additional work could be done as a part of the main contract more advantageously and economically than as a separate projact. In addition to the 250,000 cubic yards removed under the contract amendment, about 187,000 cubic yards of material will be removed by wet excavation to complete the project and widen the Canal channel to the required depth. WITH school days just around the corner, the younger fry are learning already that it will be smart to be smart when taking a geography lesson from their well groomed teacher. These two young men, with an eye to durability as well as style, have chosen genuine Levis from t'le regular commissary stock. Their shirts are two of the smart new sports styles being placed on sale this month. The young ladies are wearing Cinderella frocks which are as washable as they are pretty. Any school girl's wardrobe should contain several of these as they will be on sale for about $3.50. The boys are wearing brown leather loafers made by Roberts, Johnson and Rand, and the girls have on one-strap slippers made by Trimfoot. Teacher, not to be outdone by her pupils, is wearing a dress cliosen from the large stock of misses' styles now carried by the Commissary stores. Left to right, Sandy Holliday, Gwyneth Richard, Mrs. M. W. Foscue, Glenn Rhyne, and Roger Hutchinson. HIGH marks in fashion will be given these two teencgers when they wear clothes chosen from the back-to-school collection being pieced on sale this month by the Commissary Division. The junior miss has a pastel cotton dress with a crisp white collar and a fitted midriff. It buttons up the back and has a full skirt. The high school student on the left chose a bright yellow short-sleeved sport shirt made by Campus Spoit Shirts,it is one of a number of handsome styles being stocked by the Commissary Division for high school and college students. His trousers are ncvy garbcrdine which has been specially treated for spot and crease resistance. He also wears a pair of brown leather locfeis which have become so populcr with students in all the grades from one to twelve. The models are: Barry Davison and Jean Chambers. WHAT teacher wouldn't be proud of this group of students who will soon return to classes with their back-to-school clothes problems solved by the Commissary Division? All of the clothes, including the shoes worn by both the grade-school and high-school student models, were selected from the new shipment to go on sale this month ct Balboa and Cristobal. The young miss on the right is wearing a candy striped polished cotton frock which washes like a dream and has a special dirt resistant quality which should go over big with the mothers of the grade-school set. The other 1 0-year-old has a sun dress which comes with a separate jacket. Models for this picture are: Mrs. M. W. Foscue, Roger Hutchinson, Sandy Halliday, Barry Davison, Jean Chambers, Gwyneth Richard.

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14 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS JULY RETIREMENTS June 15 through July 15 Empl were promoted or transen June 15 and July 15 are low. Within-grade promotions are not listed. ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH Louis C. Caldwell, Tabulating Equipment Operation Supervisor, from Division of S to ,Statistii al Tabulating Section. Alfredo Lombana, Mrs. Helen M. Cicero, from Tabulating Machine Operator, Payroll Branch, to Tabulating Equipment Operator, Statistical Tabulating Section. Mrs. Mercedes A. Borrell, from Tabulating Machine Operator. Division of Storehouses, to Tabulating Equipment Operator, Statistical Tabulating Section. George A. Black, Jr., from Tabulation Planner, Division of Storehouses, to Tabulation Project Planner, Statistical Planning Sex tion. Preston G. Gau, from Tabulating Machine Operation Supervisor, Payroll Branch, to Tabulating Equipment Operation Super\ isor, Statistical Tabulating Section. Jacob Plicet, Jr., from Tabulating Machine Operator Supervisor, Payroll Branch, to Tabulating Equipment Operator, Statistical Tabulating Section. CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Paul F. Karst, Jr., from Recreation Supervisor to Physical Education Teacher. Division of Schools. Mrs. Thelma N. Scott, from Clerk-Typist to Recreation Assistant, Division of Schools. Mrs. Marcella G. Green, from ClerkStenographer to Clerical Assistant, Division ol Schools. Thomas L. Sellers, from Relief Postmaster to Postmaster, Margarita. Lealand A. Larrison, from Postmaster, Margarita, to Relief Postmaster. Earl F. Unruh, from Chief, Postal Division, to Director of Posts. COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU Mrs. Susan H. Boles, from Clerk-Typi-t to Clerk (Typing), Service Center DivisionPaul J. Laing, from Steward, Service tenter Division, to Supervisory Administrative Assistant, Tivoli Guest House. OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER Norbert A. Jones, from Supervisory Accounting Clerk, Methods and Relief Assignment Staff, to Transportation Rate Auditing Clerk, Agents Accounts Branch. Stephen A. Bissell, from Transportation Kate Auditing Clerk, Agents Accounts Branch, to Supervisory Accounting Clerk, Methods and Relief Assignment Staff. Mrs. Florence M. Pierson, from Accounting Clerk to Supervisory Accounting Clerk, Accounting Division. Helen N. Minor, from Time, Leave, and Payroll Clerk, to Time, Leave, and Payroll Supervisor, Payroll Branch. Stuart Wallace, from Claims Examiner, Fiscal Division, to Budget Analyst, Budget Branch. Gregory G. Cartotto, from Supervisory Accountant, Accounting Division, to Claims Examiner, Fiscal Division. Walter B. Wolberg, from Time, Leave. and Payroll Supervisor, Payroll Branch, to Supervisory Accountant, Accounting Division. Mrs. Eva M. Grassau, from Accountant in rime. Leave, and Payroll Clerk, Payroll Branch. ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU William R. Carlin, Jr., from Apprentice iblesplicer, Electrical Division. George D. Gregory, from General Foreman to Chief Foreman, Dredging Division Sho] James M. Hunter, from Small Tug Operator to Towboal Master, Dredging Division. Henry T. Carpenter, from Hospital Maintenance Lead Foreman to Building Maintenance General Foreman, Maintenance 1 >i vision. Harvey W. Sauter, from Assistant Supervisor Sheet metal Work to Lead Foreman, ital Maintenance, Maintenance Division. Mrs. Miriam H. Hawvichorst, from Supervisory Clerk (Typist) to Supervisors Clerk (Typing), Communications Branch' Electrical Division. HEALTH BUREAU Mrs. Lorna M. Shore, Staff Nurse, from Gorgas Hospital to Coco Solo Hospital. Nellie T. Morgan, Clerk-Typist, from Gorgas Hospital to Board of Health Laboratory Dr. Roy B. Stewart, Dr. Robert B. White, from Intern to Resident, Gorgas Hospital. Dr. Richard S. Ostenso, Dr. Luis A. Picard-Ami, from Intern, Gorgas Hospital, to Medical Officer, Pacific Medical Clinics. Dr. Wallace M. Snyder, from Intern. (.org. is Hospital, to Medical Officer, Coco Solo Hospital. Mrs. Ida M. McDade, from Staff Nurse to Communicable Disease Nurse, Atlantic Medical Clinics. Mrs. May B. Dodson, from Staff Nurse to Head Nurse, Coco Solo Hospital. Dr. John W. Gales, from Medical Officer (Pediatrics) to Medical Officer (Gynecology and Obstetrics). Coco Solo Hospital. Dr. William E. Prier, from Medical Officer to Hospital Resident, Gorgas Hospital. Mrs. Katherine H. Hall, Staff Nurse from Coco Solo Hospital to Gorgas Hospital. Mrs. Dora J. Coleman, from Medical Technician (General) to Medical Technician (General-Supervisory), Coco Solo Hospital. MARINE BUREAU Charles A. Parks, Emerson A. Cottrell, from Guard, Atlantic Locks, to Towing Locomotive Operator, Locks Division ( Locks Overhaul). Carl H. Schmidt, from Towing Locomotive Operator, Pacific Locks, to Guard, Locks Security Branch (Atlantic). SUPPLY BUREAU Charles P. Shay, from Assistant to Chief, Retail Stores to Commissary Supervisor (Assistant to Chief, Retail Stores Branch), Commissary Division. Roy F. Burr, from Clerical Assistant (Typist), Colon Health Office, to Accounting Clerk, Commissary Division. Thomas G. Relihan, from Supply Officer (Drygoods), to Superintendent, General Products Branch, Commissary Division. Vincent J. Huber, from Assistant Supply Officer to Supply Officer (Drygoods), Commissary Division. Robert L. Rankin, from Commissary Supervisor to Assistant Supply Officer (Drygoods), Commissary Division. Elizabeth A. Allen, lrom Accounting Clerk to Clerk-Typist, Commissary Division. TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS BUREAU Richard M. Conover, from Supervisory Traffic Clerk to Supervisory Freight Traffic Clerk (General), Terminals Division. John W. Manush, Jr., from Supervisor) Property and Supply Clerk to Supervisory Cargo Clerk, Terminals Division. Paul P. Desormeau, Victor T. McGarry James A. Brooks, Sidney Smithson, William B. Huff, Merlin B. Yocum, from Supervisory St i irekeeper (Checker) to Supervisory Cargo Checker, Terminals Division. James H. Munden, from SupervisorsStorekeeper ( Checker) to Supervisory Transportation Assistant, Terminals Division. Gerald D. Stroop, from Guard to Supervisory Cargo Checker, Terminals Division. Retirement certificates were presented the end of July to the following employees who are listed alphabetically, together with their birthplaces, titles, length of Canal service and future addresses: Lester F. Bailey, Maine; Governmental Accountant, Industrial Division; 29 years, 10 months, 6 days; Schnectady, N. V. Hallie Beavers, North Carolina; Teacher, Balboa High School; 23 years, 10 months; North Carolina. Samuel S. Blackburn, Tennessee; Policeman, Cristobal District; 35 years, 1 month. 17 days; St. Petersburg, Fla. Charles H. Fairbrother, North Dakota; Layerout Machinist, Industrial Division; 36 vears, 10 months, 17 days; Panama, R. P. Roger H. Greene, Washington, D. C.j Claims Examiner, Fiscal Division; 28 years, 8 months, 7 days; Alexandria, Va. George Herman, Illinois; Chief, Police Division; 40 years, 2 months, 23 days; Address uncertain. Ludwig A. Maurer, New York; Control House Operator, Pedro Miguel Locks; 28 years, 2 months, 26 days; Address undecided. Thomas McNeill, Ireland; Carpenter Foreman, Pacific Locks; 15 years, 3 months, 6 days; Pittsford, Yt. Ralph N. Stewart, Illinois; Supervisory Accounting Clerk, Commissary Division; 29 years, 1 month, 27 days; Florida. Agnes E. Sugrue, Connecticut; Public Health Nurse, Colon Health Office; 25 vears, 4 months, 13 davs; Brooklyn, N. Y. AUGUST SAILINGS From Cristobal Cristobal August 6 I'n in: ma August 13 Ancon August 20 Cristobal August 27 From New York l'a uama August 4 Ancon.. . August 11 Cristobal August 18 I 'a mi ma August 25 (Southbound the Haiti stop is from 7 a. m. to 4 p. m. Monday; northbound ships are also in Port-au-Prince Monday, from about 1 to 6 p. m.) ANNIVERSARIES When Emmett Zemer went to work for the Canal organization on July 10, 1913, he had no more idea than most men of that period that he would still be a Canal Zonian 42 years later. He is one of three employees whose continuous service predates 1914 and one of 13 still working who had construction-day service. He is now Real Property Assistant in the office of the Director of the Community Services Bureau. He began his Canal service at the Gorgona Commissary and later worked in a number of the retail commissary stores. He had hotel experience at the Washington and the Tivoli, but his longest assignment was the 26 years he spent in what used to be known as the District Quartermaster's Office in Balboa. He has been at Balboa Heights since 1953. With 42 years of continuous Canal service he heads this month's list of anniversaries. 35 YEARS Two Canal employees share honors for 35 years of government service completed last month, although in both cases their Canal service is not that long. They are Arthur L. Endicott, Postmaster at Fort Clayton, and Warren Pitman, Supervisory Rates Analyst in the Office of the Comptroller. Mr. Endicott, a native of Oregon and a onetime Gunner's Mate in the U. S. Navy. was working in the San Diego, Calif., post office when he decided he'd like a change of scene. In an unusual exchange of jobs a Zone post office worker transferred to San Diego and Mr. Endicott came to the Canal Zone. He has been assigned to several post offices and has been postmaster at Fort Clayton since 1952. Mr. Pitman was born in San Francisco. Like many Zone employees he first saw the Isthmus as a serviceman, liked it and stayed. His first Canal Zone job had to do with Panama Railroad accounts; he has been in accounting and rates work ever since. Just before he joined the Canal organization he spent almost three months with the Tacna-Arica Plebiscitary Commission in Arica, Chile, when the United States was mediating a boundary dispute between Chile and Peru. 30 YEARS Zonians come from all over the United States. Look at the birthplaces of this month's 30-year men: Virginia, Roy F. Armistead and Howarth V. Rowe; New York, George D. Gregory and Walter H.

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August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15 Kuhrt; Washington, D. C, Kurt F. Menzel and Will R. Price; Michigan, Jerome F. Evans; Ohio, Philip S. Thornton; Wisconsin, Herbert F. Paddock. These nine completed 30 years of Governservice in July. All but two, Mr. Armistead and Mr. Thornton, have continuous Canal service. Mr. Evans — Jerry to almost everyone — is manager of the Balboa Commissary; Mr. Gregory is Chief Foreman of the Dredging Division's shops; Captain Kuhrt and Captain Rovve are two of the Atlantic side's senior pilots; Mr. Menzel is General Supervisory Medical Technican at the Board of Health Laboratory; Mr. Paddock is Chief Dispatcher and also Chief of the Mirallores Diesel Generation Station; Mr. Price is head of the bindery section at the Printing Plant at Mount Hope — his crew worked on this issue of The Panama Canal Review. Mr. Armistead is Leader Molder and Maintenance Mechanic with the Industrial Division and Mr. Thornton, who held his first Canal job when he was a schoolboy, is General Manager of the Service Center Division. 25 YEARS Five of the eight employees who completed a quarter-century of Government service in July have had an unbroken record with the Canal organization. They are: Richard Conley, a native Zonian, Locomotive Engineer with the Railroad Division; James A. Fraser, Dredging Supervisor with the Dredging Division; Stephen C. Lessard, Accounting Clerk with the Industrial Division; C. B. Mcllvaine, Senior Conductor with the Railroad Division; and Ellen Tiernan, a Staff Nurse at Gorgas Hospital. Other 25-year employees are: Woodford M. Babbitt, a Rotary Drill Operator with the Dredging Division — he was born in Alaska but grew up in the Canal Zone; William H. Hele a Contraband Control Inspector; and Elmer B. Orr, Accounting Supervisor with the Agents Accounts Branch. Mr. Hele and Mr. Orr were born in the Canal Zone. 20 YEARS The employees who completed 20 years of Government service in July are split, half and half, between those with continuous Canal service and those whose service was broken. Those with unbroken service are: John C. Dansby, Carpenter Foreman, Maintenance Division; George C. Dunlap, Assistant Project Engineer for the Power Conversion Project; Herman Hessell, Fireman with the Balboa District; Irvin E. Krapfl, Assistant Relief Marine Bunkering Foreman with the Terminals Division; R. H. Masters, Sanitation Inspector, Department of Zone Sanitation; Floyd A. Robinson, Policeman at the Cristobal Station; Samuel Roe, Jr., also a police officer in the Balboa District; Luther B. Sartain, Jr., Chief of the Electrical-Mechanical Branch of the Engineering Division; and Herbert H. Tabert, Floating Crane Master with the Dredging Division. Those 20-year employees whose Canal service is not continuous are: Ross Aldrich, Lineman Foreman, Electrical Division; Richard R. Brown, Merhanical-Refrigeration Engineer, Commissary Division; Richard W. Coy, Accountant, Internal Audit Staff; Bernard Dorfman, Supervisory Freight Traffic Officer, Panama Local Agency; Robert H. Miller, Assistant Manager, Cristobal Housing Office; Paul W. Mohl, General Operator, Maintenance Division; Henry Perry, Policeman at Balboa; Aloys C. Sandusky, Pharmacist, Pacific Medical Clinics; and Ray W. Wheeler, Fire Lieutenant at Gatun. 15 YEARS Twenty-five employees completed 15 years of Government service in July. Those with continuous Canal service are: Kenneth L. Bailey, Launch Inspector, Marine Bureau; Rayburn L. Brians, Admeasurer, Navigation Division; David L. Brown, Principal Stevedore Foreman, Terminals Division ; Ronald A. Faunce, Wireman, Electrical Division; Robert T. Geddes, Filtration Plant Operator and TractorBulldozer Operator, Maintenance Division; Robert W. Lawyer, Policeman. Balboa District; Herbert N. Libbey, Engineering Draftsman, Engineering Division; Harry J. Linker, Diesel Operator Machinist, Electrical Division; Murray Klipper, Wireman, EXECUTIVE REGULATION 19 Editor's Note: A revision of Executive Regulation No. 19, covering travel and transportation was issued at Balboa Heights recently. It will be published in installments with the index and first installment carried in this issue for the benefit of those who desire to clip and save the entire regulation. CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR-PRESIDENT Revision 1 Balboa Heights, C. Z. June 24, Ii i \ tion of the Remains, Families, and Effects of Deceased Employees, see Executive Regulation No. 18 of August 18, 1951. 1.2 Drfiiiitions. As used in these regulations: (a) "Place of actual residence" means, in the case of appointments made in the United SLates, the place at which such appointee physically resided at time of appointment. In the case of employees who were appointed while on the Isthmus, actual place of residence shall be deemed to be such appointee's legal residence in the United States at the time of appointment. In the case of an appointee who was born on the Isthmus or who came to the Canal Zone as a minor, place of actual residence, in the absence of subsequent acquisition of a legal residence in the United States, shall be deemed to be the legal residence of his father in the United States. (Based on Comptroller General's Decision B/62267 of January 15. 1947. 26 Comp. Gen. 488) (b) "Employee" means a full-time employee of the Panama Canal Company or Canal Zone Government. (c) "Immediate family" means any of the following named members of the employee's household: Spouse, children, including stepchildren and adopted children, unmarried and under twenty-one years of age or physically or mentally incapable of supporting themselves regardless of age, or dependent parents of the employee (but not of the spouse). (From section 1 (d) of Executive Order 9805) (d) "Official station" includes any point within the district in which he normally works, as defined in section 3.3 of these regulations, from which the employee commutes daily to his official post of duty. (From section 8 of Executive Order 9805, as amended by Executive Order 10196) (e) "Temporary storage" means storage at point of departure, destination, or way station for nor more than 60 days, except that not more than 90 days may be allowed where an employee pursuant to section 6.3 of these regulations, returns for leave prior to serving a new period of service outside the continental United States at a different post of duty. (Based on section 1 (c) of Executive Order 9805, as amended by Bureau of the Budget Circular A-4 of May 2. 1955) (f) "United States" means the continental United States, its territories and possessions, other than the Canal Zone. 1.3 Travel expenses of employees. Travel expenses of the employees shall be allowed in accordance with the Travel Expense Act of 1945 (63 Stat. 166). the Standardized Government Travel Regulations.and Panama Canal Company regulations supplementary thereto and in accordance with travel orders issued in each cas?. (Based on section 2 of Executive Order 9805, as amended by Executive Order 10969) 1.4 Transportation expenses of employees and their families. The transportation of the employee and his immediate family, if any, hereunder shall be subject to the provisions of the Standardized Government Travel Regulations which relate to transportation, including mileage, and shall be in accordance with Sect on 4 of Travel Expense Act of 1949, and Panama Canal Company regulations supplementary thereto, whether (a) in the case of transfer, such transportation originates at the employee's last official station or at some other point, or partially at both, and the point of destination is the new official station or some other point selected by the employee; or (b) in the case of new appointments, such transportation originates at the employee's actual residence in the United States at the time of his appointment or at some other point, or partially at both, and whether in the case of terminations the point of destination is such actual residence of the employee at time of apointment or some other point selected by the employee; provided, however, That the cost to the Government shall not exceed the cost of transportation by a usually traveled route between the last official station and the new official station, or between the Canal Zone or Haiti and the employee's actual residence in the United States at the time of appointment, as the case may be. (Based on sections 2 and 3 of Executive Order 9805. as amended by Executive Orders 10069 and 10196. respectively) (c) In the case of leave, such transportation (See page 16)

PAGE 16

16 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 Executive Regulation 19 Makes First Canal Transit lie pla e eraploj men! < ana] Zone oi em] lence in the al ion within tli C couni or possession In which m Lted; pro ti in p it I al i m exp i d ho& allowed ,-. ele i route bei ween the posl ol dutj idence and rel urn to thi erent p >sl oi dutj "inside 1 i oi i & utive Order 9S05, as | i,. i bj Bureau ol Uie Budget Cir< ulai \ \ oJ : Ordinarilj expenses [ncurred prior to the travel ordei are not reimbursable. n i li y fox transp irtal ion ol hi ius ;hold goods regard le whethei oi not thi employee was issued a travel foi himself. 1.5 Time limits. : ei Niii.it e l empli >j a I [i >u able 1 1 in In these regilations shall be onlj mch travel as is incidental to the termination of the employment, ani shall commence within a reasonable t^me, no( I i exceed six months, after n h termination. If an employee lor voluntary ,,,.!, ,1 i,wons doe n il tike advantage of the repati i ition travel allowable under these regulatvithin such time limit, then none of the ,,, :, ol the return of the employee (except as the provisions oi Section 5.6 of these regula tions may apply), his family, or his household goods oi pers inal effects, shall be payable under these regul itions. i[,i All employment, transfer or termination travel and transportation of an employee's family, household goods and personal effects, allow,M, under these regulations, shall begin within two years from the effective date of the employee's appointment or transfer, or from the time of a terminated employee's repatriation, as the case may be, exclusive of the time spent on furlough grante 1 for the duration of active military, naval, or Coast Guard duty, and, in so far as concerns travel and transportation cult side the United States, exclusive of any period which shipping restrictions make the travel and transportation impossible. ], ,| .,,, ction 5 ol Executive Order 9805 and i omptrollei General's 1 >ecision B 79912 of November 3, 1948, 28 ( omp. Gen. 285) 1.6 Employees not affected. These regulations shall n ,. appb to t"'!ns whose pay and allowances are ei iblished by the Career Compensation Act of 1949 (61 St Lt. 802) Prom secti >n 11 of Executive Order 9805. as amended by Executive Order 10196) 1.7 Determination of transportation rights. The members ol an employee's immediate family and the old goods and personal effects to be transported at Government expense shall be determined as of the effective date ol the transfer or leave travel order authorizing such transportation or, in case of as of the effective date of the termination. EXECUTIVE REGULATION 51 CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR-PRESIDENT Balboa Heights, C. Z. June 30, 1955. Executive Regulation No. 51 REGULATION OF SALE AND USE OF FIREWORKS i: virtue ol the authority contained in Section 521 of Title 2, of the Canal Zone Code, as added by ,h, \, i ol tune 28, 1955 (Public Law 105. 84th i ongress 1st Session), the following regulations are \, I Foi the s lie and us ol fireworks in the Canal Zone: -,., i rhe sale oi fireworks in the ( inal Zone is prohibited. "Sec. 2. The use or tiring ol fireworks in the < anal prohibited, except as hereinafter provided. 3 The term "firew irks!' shall mean and include any combustible or explosive compo o] i >ubst; i combination ol subst mces, oi ,,!,, i prep ired foi the purp is; ol pro lui ing a visible "i audible effect by combustion, explosion defiigration or detonation, and shall include blank cartridges, toj pistol I >\ cannons, toy canes, oi toj guns in whii h expl isive ire used, i he I pe ol uliiI inn *fire underneath to propel imi firecrackers, torpedoes, skyrockets, Roman candle: Daygo I I sparklers, "r othei fireworks ol like construction and any firea irks containing any expl oh e oi flamm ible i omp inn I, oi anj tablets oi ol iei device i ling any expl isit e substam e ex:ept thai the term "fireworks" shall not include toj sunor other device's in u hi 1 1 papei i aps conl lining not more ih in an average of twents five hundredths [0.25) ol a grain ol explosive composition per cap. the sale in I u which shall b permitted at all times "Sec. 4. The Civil Affairs Directoi may issue permits foi supervised public display; ol fireworks by responsible organizations ol gro uof individual-. Co be held al such times and pla and undei such condition! as in his opinion shall not _b hazardous to pers property. Similar public displays on military reservations shall bs permissible when properlj authorized by the appropriate military ,nll h iritics. "Sec. 5. Nothing in this regulation slull be true I to prohibit the use of fireworks by transporlais foi signal pui pos oi i lumin ition, oi oi m ink carl Ig or a show or t heatei oi ;n ,1 or ceremonial p trpo3es in athletics oi sports, oi use bj military organizations. "Sec. 6. As provide! in Section 522 of Title 2 of h< I inal / I !ode, violations of these regul itions bj i lui' Ol not more than S100 or b\30 days imprisonment in iail or both. Phi regulations prescribed herein shall become effective si\t> d lys from the date of issu im e of this Executive Regulation J. S. SfcYBOLD Governor of the Canal Zo u Panama I
PAGE 17

August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 17 For the purpose of the fiscal year 1938 STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time Cana than 1, statistics for those for 1939. COMMERCIAL SHIPPING SETS RECORD FOR CANAL; TOTAL TRANSITS BELOW PREVIOUS YEARS' FIGURES Commercial shipping lacked only three transits of reaching the 8,000-mark for ocean-going vessels during the past fiscal year, a new record in the Canal's operating history for this class of traffic. Traffic last year by U. S. Government shipping through the Canal was far below that of the previous years, with the result that transits by ships of all categories fell below the totals of either the two previous years. Transits last year totaled 9,760 for vessels of all classes, while the totals for each of the fiscal years 1953 and 1954 exceeded 10,000. There were 296 transits by ocean-going Government ships last year, as compared with 800 the previous year. The 7,997 transits by ocean-going commercial vessels was over 200 above in the previous fiscal year, which also was a record. Cargo tonnage last year was at an all-time high with 40,646,301 tons, approximately 550,000 tons more than the total for the fiscal year 1954 when a newrecord was established. Tolls for the past fiscal year amounted to $35,136,529 of which $1,217,536 was for the Government ships in transit. The tolls declined from the record of $37,191,106 in the previous fiscal year, even though tolls on commercial shipping were slightly higher in 1955 than in 1954. The decline in the amount of Government shipping began soon after the cessation of hostilities in Korea and continued throughout the past fiscal year. New Monthly Record The amount of commercial traffic through the Canal remained high throughout the year, there being only two months when there were less than 640 transits by ocean-going vessels. A new monthly record in number of ocean-going transits was set last March with 709 transits. A monthly record in amount of tolls was set in May with $3,072,000, this being the only time in the Canal's 46 years of operating history that tolls on commercial vessels exceeded three million dollars in one month. Increased traffic was reported on five of the eight main trade routes through the Canal last year over previous year's figures. Major increases were noted on the United States Intercoastal route and on the trade route between the West Indies and the west coast of the United States and Canada. Heavy shipments of oil to the West Indies were largely responsible for the increased traffic over the west coast of the United States, Canada, and West Indies route. The amount of cargo moved over this route more than doubled within the year. There were 5,978,000 tons of cargo shipped on the United States Intercoastal route last year. This traffic has been well below the pre-war level since the close of World II and has been exceeded for the past two years by traffic over the routes between the east coast of the United States and South America, Most Frequent User Of Canal -MOST FREQUENT Canal visitor during the fiscal year which ended June 30 was the 3,946-ton refrigerated ship above, the Brazilian Reefer. She made 55 Canal transits in the 12-month period on her run between the United States East Coast and banana ports in Ecuador, carrying between 1,000 and 1,500 tons of bananas on each northbound trip. She is of Danish registry; her master for most of the year has been Captain H. J. Moeller. Continental Shipping Company is her agents. Second most frequent Canal visitor was another banana carrier, the 1,250-ton Honduran ship Vanda. She made 4S Canal transits in fiscal year 1955, carrying an average of 350 tons of fruit on each northbound trip. The Vanda's master is Captain Harold Rasmussen; her agents, W. Andrews & Co. MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS Vessels of 300 tons net or over By fiscal years Month Transits Tolls (In thousands of dollars) 1955 1954 1938 1955 1954 1938 July 640 638 457 $2,646 $2,817 $2,030 652 640 505 2,752 2,778 2,195 660 612 444 2,756 2,591 1,936 683 654 461 2,831 2,755 1,981 636 676 636 435 2,630 2,668 2,963 1,893 December. ... 690 439 2,853 1 845 January 668 626 444 2,832 2,726 1,838 February _•_ 637 592 436 506 487 2.721 2,491 1,787 March 700 693 3,014 2,938 2,934 2, OK, \pril 685 654 2,838 1 ,961 May 698 653 7,997 689 660 7.7SJ 465 445 5,524 3,072 2,804 $33,849 2,923 2,764 1,887 1,801 Totals for fiscal year_ 833,248 $23,170 and east coast of the United States, Canada and the Far East. The amount of shipping from the east coast of the United States and Canada was under that of the previous year, with the result that the trade routes to the Far East and South America showed a decline. The third trade route with less shipping last year was that between Australasia and the east coast of the United States and Canada. The cargo moved through the Canal over trade routes serving Europe increased last year, with the largest gain being shown on those to South America and to the west coast of the United States and Canada.

PAGE 18

18 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 Italian Line Ship Visits To Isthmus Predated Construction Of Panama Canal The Italian Line which has had offices in the Canal Zone since 1916 for its passenger-freight trade between the Mediterranean and the west coast of South and North America makes current use of the Panama Canal with three passenger ships and five freighters which make some 53 transits a year. The three passenger ships on the South America-Pacific run bear the names of famous Italian navigators. The three men whose memory the Italian Line has chosen to honor are Marco Polo, who traveled in the Orient, Antoniotto Usodimare, who explored the African Area, and Amerigo Vespucci. The latter is probably the best known to Americans since his name was given to the new world and he made several exploration voyages in the Western Hemisphere a few years after Columbus. The three ships belong to a series of six built by the Italian Line ("ITALIA" Societa di Navigazione, Cenca) for its world trade, much of which has used the Panama Canal since the time it was opened to traffic in 1914. They are attractive ships of modern design, with comfortable staterooms, swimming pools, bars, and movie lounges. Although not comparable with the big luxury liners operated by the Italian Line on the Northand South-Atlantic routes, they are nevertheless very popular among travelers on the west coast of South America. Pre-War Days During the years before World War II, the Italian Line was a steady customer of the Panama Canal. A trade which grew steadily from 1921 to 1939 brought from 40 to 60 passenger and freight ships through the Canal each year from Mediterranean ports en route to the west coast of South America and the Pacific coast of the United States and Canada. In addition there were a number of cruise vessels which visited Canal waters but did not transit, and several other Italian flag ships which were represented here by the Italian Line. In fiscal year 1939 for instance, 59 Italian ships used the Canal, and carried 179,468 tons of cargo. That year alone, Italian ships paid $298,816 in tolls. Traffic dropped to 46 ships the year Italy entered the Second World War and then disappeared entirely following Pearl Harbor. The Italia Societa di Navigazione, commonly known as the Italian Line, belongs to a group of shipping companies called FINMARE, which includes Italia, Lloyd Triestino, Adriatica, and Tirrenia. All these companies are represented on the Isthmus by the Italian Line. Called At Colon In 1894 The company, through a merger that took place in 1932, absorbed the services previously operated by Navigazione Generale Italiana — which in turn had years before succeeded its affiliated company La Veloce— and by Navigazione Libera Triestina. The Caribbean service was first established in 1894 by La Veloce with sailings from Genoa on the 1st and the 15th of each month, following two different DR. R. C. PKHNIGOTTI, Manager of the Italian Line in Cristobal, came to the isthmus in 1920. routes but both having Colon as their terminal points. Therefore present services of the company from the Mediterranean to Caribbean area up to and beyond the Panama Canal go back many years. When the Panama Canal opened for business, the Italian Line began service to the west coast of South America with three passenger ships. In 1915 the line obtained a lot on the water front in Cristobal for the construction of a twostory office building which would also serve as quarters for the manager. The building was constructed in 1916. The first manager to move into the building was Manfredo Pincherli, a well-known resident of Panama who had lived on the Isthmus during the construction days. His assistant was the late 0. Heilbron, equally well known. When Mr. Pincherli took over as manager of the new office, very few Italian ships were using the Panama Canal. According to statistics shown in The Panama Canal Record, only 40 Italian ships made the Canal transit between 1915 and 1921. From that time on, however, business increased and by the end of 1921 two Italian shipping companies had established regular service between Genoa and Valparaiso. They were the Navigazione Italiara a Vapore (La Veloce), and the Navigazione Generale Italiana. La Veloce Line started its sen ice with a steamer sailing about every 60 days. This was an extension through the Canal of the service which had been operating for a number of years between Italian and Caribbean ports by way of Marseilles, Barcelona, and Teneriffe. The second line put a freight ship over this trade route every 45 days and started a passenger service. Italian ships began operating from Europe to the west coast of the United States and Canada in 1925 with the SS Piave of the Navigazione Libera Triestina. This company put new 10,000-ton motor ships on this service, among them the MS Leme and MS Fella, which became well-known in Canal shipping circles. The South American service as well as the west coast service grew in the late 20's and 30's with the addition of the MS Orazio and the MS Virgilio, two passenger freight vessels of 11,700 tons which traveled regularly through the Canal to Valparaiso up to 1941. Pacific Coast Service In 1930 and 1931 several large passenger liners were added to the five freighters already on the Pacific west coast service. They included the former Cunard liner Albania which was reconditioned and renamed California. The California, a 12,000-ton ship, was the largest vessel to be placed in service between Europe and the Pacific west coast up to that time. In 1932 the South America service and the west coast service were merged into only one company {See page iv) THE OFFICES of the Italian Line were built in Cristobal in 19111 The upper floor is used as quarters by the manager and his family.

PAGE 19

August 5, 1955 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 19 SHIPS AND SH IPPING Transits by Ocean-Going Vessels In June 1955 IV 54 Commercial 653 660 U. S. Government.. 31 40 Total ~~ 684 700 Tolls* Commercial $2,811,652 $2,769,789 U. S. Government.. 149,631 144,608 Total ... $2,961,283 $2,914,397 'Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and small. Tuna boats, long a familiar sight in Balboa Harbor, have become regular transit customers of the Canal during recent months following the opening of a new tuna cannery at Ponce on the south coast of Puerto Rico. About 2,500 tons of tuna have been shipped through the Canal to the new cannery since the first of this year. Most of the sleek, white fishing craft formerly made the long haul to California with their catch. The run to Puerto Rico is made in about half the time required for the trip to California. Italian Line Ship Visits To Isthmus Predated Construction Of Panama Canal {Continued from page IS) called the Societa Italia Flotte Riunite. Almost all the fine fleet of ships was lost during World War II. The Italian Line offices in Cristobal were closed and regular shipping business was not resumed until 1947 when the MS Sebastiana Caboto arrived from Genoa en route to Valparaiso with passengers and freight. At present only one of the pre-war ships, the SS Conte Biancamano, is in the Caribbean service. This vessel is wellknown locally since it was held in Cristobal harbor for several months at the beginning of the war and was later taken over as a troop transport by the U. S. Government. At present it operates between Genoa and La Guayra, Venezuela, during part of the year, and from Genoa to New York the rest of the time. Three Volcanoes In addition to the three new ships on the South American run, there are five other Italian Line ships which transit the Canal on regular runs from Mediterranean ports to the Pacific west coast. They are the Vesuvio, Etna, Stromboli, Tritone, and Nereide. The Andrea Doria, one of a group of new Italian Line ships built since the war for the New York trade, visited Cristobal last year on a cruise. The present manager of the Italian Line in Cristobal is Dr. Rosmino C. Pernigotti. He served under both Mr. Pincherli and Dr. Giovanni Bruni who was Italian Consul and Italian Line agent in Cristobal from 1932 until 1941 and who is now Managing Director of the Adriatica Line in Venice, Italy. Dr. Pernigotti first arrived on the Isthmus in 1926 to work for the Italian Line. Except for the war years and a few years after the last war, he has been here ever since. He is assisted in Cristobal by a staff of nine, two of whom, Capt. A Zerega, Freight Traffic Manager, and L. Ippolito, Passenger Agent, are Italians from the home office in Genoa. S. Ferro of the Accounting Office has been with the company 14 years and except for Dr. Pernigotti, has the longest service in the local office. The Italian Line is represented in Panama by the firm of R. Alfaro Borgianni wiih offices in the Exposition Grounds. CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT Fiscal Year 1955 1954 1938 Atlantic to Pacific 4,002 Pacific to Atlantic Total Total Total Commercial vessels: Ocean-going 3.995 7,997 7,784 5,524 Small 575 574 1,149 1,222 931 Total commercial 4,577 4,569 9,146 9,006 6,455 **U. S. Government vessels, oceangoing. 168 128 296 800 441 Small 89 229 318 339 Total commercial and U. S. Government . .... 4,834 4,926 9,760 10,145 6,896 "Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons. **Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated ships transited free. TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES '1 he following table shows the cargo shipments in thousands of long tons segregated into eight main trade routes: Fiscal Year 1955 1954 1938 United States Intercoastal. 5,978 5,017 6,395 5,971 6,673 2,652 West Indies and West Coast U. S./Canada 1,186 501 669 East Coast of U. S./Canada and Far East... 8,393 8,975 4,912 U. S./Canada East Coast and Australasia 1,274 1,306 992 Europe and West Coast of U. S./Canada 5,094 4.379 4,237 Europe and South America 2,527 2,037 2,974 Europe and Australasia.. .. 2,328 2,303 1,251 All other routes 7,895 7,904 3,304 Total Traffic 40,646 39,095 27,386 Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels Fiscal Years 1955 1954 1938 Nationality Number of transits Tons of cargo Number of transits Tons of cargo Number of transits Tons of cargo Argentine 1 15 10 1,145 60 38 198 31 1 10 7,555 12,733 Belgian 8,908 35,191 6.897,789 ^ 734 289,543 261,249 212,055 Brazilian British 1,265 78 19 205 40 7.726,640 429,245 130,112 240,640 259,137 1,281 9 2 6,417,016 28,787 13,113 Colombian. .. Costa Rican 2 223 323 57 9 132 375 121 428 1,014,334 79.164 44,750 585,123 1 ,002,372 1,013,875 384,890 275 106 2 136 323 146 347 935,878 92,932 14,828 582,989 708,338 1,246,534 493 260 865,235 Ecuadorean 2 1 105 357 94 22 5 4,695 4,021 567,288 1.518,593 525,351 8,478 24,411 Honduran 3 5 211 387 8 17,593 43,710 1,159,700 2,481,494 25,125 I srael 3 160 464 4 28,950 907,359 3,103.396 13,551 52 300 153,417 1,877,502 Japanese Korean (South) _ 3 4,900 Liberian.. .. 384 6 2,637,568 19,499 224 2 1 130 25 831 611 25 27 1,416,303 2,577 14,401 684,932 26,469 3,484,070 3,666.133 54,907 154,356 Mexican... .. Moroccan .. Netherlands Nicaraguan.. 139 50 904 551 18 17 1 M 207 5 4 2,102 2 736,668 60,509 4,162,091 2,712,127 49,702 88,056 3,478 132.264 829,519 37.235 9,250 12,949,146 3,016 285 749, C42 Norwegian Panamanian Peruvian. Philippine. Soviet 667 182 5 3 5 2 119 3,433,571 415,561 7,151 8,441 10,419 15.280 763,049 Spanish Swedish Swiss 41 230 11 171.304 818,911 92.845 Turkish United States Uruguay 2,056 11,867,848 1,780 9,892,619 Venezuelan 4 14 3.971 73,413 Yugoslavian 1 7,997 9,940 40,646,301 3 31.586 Total 7,784 39,095,067 5,524 27,385,924

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20 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW August 5, 1955 Shipments Of Cargo Reach Ail-Time High In Past Fiscal Year Port CaptainsArriving and Departing a The amount of cargo shipped through the Panama Canal during the fiscal year 1955, ended June 30, exceeded by more than one-and-a-half million tons the record set in the previous year. Heavy shipments of oil through the Canal from the Pacific accounted for the increase since fluctuations in the amount of other commodities were generally of a minor nature. The amount of mineral oil shipped from the Atlantic to the Pacific last year was slightly under the previous year's figures, but oil shipped from the Pacific to the Atlantic increased by approximately 1,650,000 tons. The major increase in the tanker trade from the Pacific to the Atlantic was attributed to heavy shipments of fuel and diesel oil on the United States Intercoastal route and from United States ports to the West Indies. These amounted to 1,250,000 tons. Coal and coke being moved through the Canal to Japan continued at a high level during the past year, although shipments were 500,000 tons under the previous year's figures. This trade has been one of the significant factors in Canal traffic since the close of the war. Pacific-Atlantic Up The increase in commodity shipments last year was entirely in the Pacific-toAtlantic movement. The amount of commodities shipped from the Atlantic to the Pacific, totaling 18,419,000 tons, was slightly under the total of the previous year. The comparative figures in the Pacific to Atlantic trade were 20,892,000 in 1954, and 22,227,000 tons last year. In addition to the big increase in oil shipments, gains were shown in the Pacific-to-Atlantic trade in lumber, nitrate, bananas, metals, barley, wood pulp, and copra. Among the principal commodities, however, these were more than overbalanced by decreased shipments of ore, wheat, sugar, canned food products, refrigerated food products, coffee, and raw cotton, although none of these except wheat declined appreciably in tonnage. Flags Of 35 Nations Approximately one-third of the cargo shipped through the Canal last fiscal year was moved in vessels flying the United States flag. An increase was shown over the previous year both in the number of U. S. flag vessels and the amount of cargo transported. Ships flying the British flag and the amount of cargo carried declined slightly last year from the previous year, although this group was the second largest composing the Canal traffic. The flags of 35 different nations were in the stream of Canal traffic last year, with Norwegian being third in number; Panamanian, fourth; and Japanese, fifth. Other nations with 100 or more ships in transit during the year were: Honduras, Liberia, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Colombia, Italy, Netherlands, France, and Greece. Nations showing considerable increases this year in ships transits of the Canal CAPT. ANTHONY ROESSLER (pronounced Ressler), new Balboa Port Captain, started the orientation tour of his new domain in the Marine Traffic Comptroller's Office at Balboa where a magnetic map board shows the location of all transiting ships, ('apt. Horatio Lincoln, outgoing Port Captain, is explaining that the numbered, white tag shows that the ship which was No. 4 on the day's northbound schedule was then in Miraflores Lake. Captain Roessler arrived July 13 from command of the fleet oil tanker Ashtabula. In addition to his duties at Captain of the Port of Balboa he is a member of the Board of Local Inspectors and a member of the Board of Admeasurement. Principal commodities shipped through the Canal (All figures in thousands of long tons) ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC Commodity Mineral oils. Coal and coke Manufactures of iron and steel Phosphates. Soybeans and productSugar Sulphur. Paper and paper products.. CementAmmonium compounds. Machinery. Automobiles and parts Chemicals, unclassified ... Raw cotton Wheat .Ml others total Fiscal Year 1955 4,305 3.274 1.792 1 043 557 520 463 377 300 295 285 268 233 226 216 1.265 18.419 1954 4,486 3,374 1,843 813 577 497 417 368 283 184 289 242 192 255 138 3.820 18.458 1938 907 137 1.859 328 3 57 297 423 154 71 168 208 109 142 10 3 653 9,676 PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC Commodity Fiscal Year 1955 1954 1938 1,087 3.747 1 .981 1,387 1,281 1.271 1,221 939 789 551 387 349 280 245 236 3.476 22,227 5,053 3,716 338 2,158 1.404 1.187 1.226 752 663 597 32 235 288 2.U 238 2.432 2,127 2.851 2,875 Wheat 706 1,487 Nitrate 1 ,401 Canned food products 991 53 698 Refrigerated food products (except fresh fruit) Barley 335 237 314 Coffee 175 164 127 All others 3.270 Total 20,892 17,583 were the United States, Denmark, Germany, Honduras, Japan, Liberia and Norway. A few nations showed decreases in the number of transiting ships in the past fiscal year. These included Great Britain, Ecuador, Panama, and Sweden. Ten Brazilian vessels were Canal customers during fiscal 1955, the first show of the flag here for some time.


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