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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00115
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: August 1953
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00115
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text
Gift of the Panama Canal Museum

- PANAMA


AL


Vol. 4 No. 1 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, AUGUST 7, 1953 5 cents


"THROW


ME A


QUARTER, MAMA"


Main

As I


Routes


Canal


Gain


Shipping


Has
Between 17


HAITIAN DIVING BOYS in their bumboats full of native goods or fruit are about the first
people a Panama Line passenger sees as his ship nears the Port-au-Prince pier. Canal Photographer
C. S. La Clair took this photograph on a recent vacation trip.


Conversion of the Canal Zone electrical
rnr-,,,-4/ 4.t\ gfl.nTln / rnirr /n�vnt- nil11 h~nan nn


Conversion


60-Cycles


will be ordered at the start of the next
-fioxinnor if +ba unmrLr iS o*nniraroin ;Q


Record


Year


and 33 percent more ship-


ping moved over the three main trade
routes through the Panama Canal last
fiscal year than during the previous year.
This, and an increase of almost 50 per-
cent for the group of smaller, miscellane-
ous routes, accounted principally for the
all-time high in traffic through the Canal
in the fiscal year 1953.
Almost 7,850,000 long tons of cargo
were shipped last year over the trade
route between the east coast of North
America (United States and Canada) and
the Far East, an increase of more than
1,500,000 tons over the figures for the
preceding fiscal year. The gain in net
tonnage for this route was 32.9 percent.
The amount of shipping on the United
States intercoastal route increased last
year 22.3 percent in net vessel tonnage
over the fiscal year 1952, while an increase
of 17.4 percent was shown in the trade
route between the east coast of the
United States and the west coast of
South America. Cargo shipped over the
United States intercoastal route totalled
4,871,000 long tons, an increase of slightly
over 1,500,000 tons or 13.8 percent over
the previous year.
The heavy gain in shipping over the
miscellaneous routes last year, 49.4 per-
cent over 1952, was accounted for chiefly
by increased tanker traffic. This traffic
totaled 4,450,000 net vessel tons last
year, an increase of 89 percent over 1952.
Dry cargo shipments also increased over
the miscellaneous routes by 21.4 percent
with a total of over 4,000,000 net vessel


tons last fiscal ywar.


Plans


Proceeding


For


Zone


Electricity


m
m
I




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7,1953


Panama


Mark


Canal


For


Force


First


Drops


Time


In


Below

Almost


17


14


,000


ears


42000


35000


26000


21000


14000

7000


1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953


The Panama Canal's working force on
the Isthmus in June dropped below the
17,000 mark for full-time employees for
the first time in almost 14 years.
The force report for June showed a
total of 16,317 full-time employees, of
which 3,938 were employed on the
U. S.-rate rolls and 12,379 were on the
local-rate rolls. These figures, for the
U. S.-rate and total force, include 185
school teachers on leave, not indicated
on the accompanying chart.
The force at the end of the past fiscal
year was 1,900 under that of the previous
year, with a cut of 400 in the U. S.-rate
and 1,500 in the local-rate force. The
decrease in employment over the 12-
month period was the heaviest since the
fiscal year 1950 when there was a net loss
of 2,500, resulting primarily from the
closing of the Industrial Bureau shops in


Balbo
other


-3- - - - -A
a and major reductions in several
of the larger Canal units.


The accompanying chart of the force
level graphically indicates the rise and
decline of the Canal force over the past
15-year period when the force was almost
tripled during the early war period over
the peace-time level of 1938.
mi- ...in ". . - I - i .


by the Maintenance Division for
practically all of the new construct
projects were handled by contractors.
Contract Maintenance


addition,


a number


bces,
tion


major


maintenance projects were let on con-
tract. These included exterior painting
and major roof repairs to a large number
of employee quarters.
This change to contract work affected
principally the units in the Engineering
and Construction Bureau.


Another unit


which


employees in
and over 200
employed in i
ously stated
REVIEW, bec


error,


that a


employees we:
trash collection


Safe


the Maintenance Division
in the Health Bureau were
this work. It was errone-
in the July issue of the
ause of a typographical
bout 700 Health Bureau
re engaged in garbage and
n.


Driving


Awards Given


Canal


showed a


decrease in force during the past year
was the Railroad and Terminals Bureau.


This decrease was primarily in dock
workers, with that force being approxi-
mately 500 less at the end of this fiscal


year than one year ago. This decrease
resulted from a drop in the amount of
cargo handled over the piers. The total
cargo handled or transferred over the
piers during the past fiscal year was
approximately 200,000 tons under that
of the previous year, a 15 percent decrease.
Connected Losses
Although the principal reductions were
made min the units mentioned, many
other units showed lesser losses for the


Chauffeurs


Safe driving awards have just been
presented to 253 U. S. and local rate
chauffeurs of the Motor Transportation
Division. All of those to whom the
awards have gone operated official vehi-
cles during the past fiscal year without
any accidents causing personal injury or
property damage.
Ninety-five of the chauffeurs have
continuous service and received certifi-
cates for eight years of accident-free
driving. Many of the 95 have a longer
continuous period of safe driving but
complete accident records were not kept
and the safe driving certificates were
not issued until irrht vaars afro.





August 7, 1953


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Hospital


Insurance,

Discussed


Quarters


July


Plans for hospitalization insurance and
a new method of quarters assignment
were discussed at length in the Governor-
Employee Conference held July 22 in the
Board Room of the Balboa Heights
Administration Building.
In the absence of Governor J. S.
Seybold, who was in Washington attend-
ing the Board of Directors' meeting, the
Acting Governor, Col. H. O. Paxson,
conducted the conference.
He told the employee representatives
that the administration has been working
on plans for some sort of hospitalization
insurance and that progress is being made.
Extension by the Senate-House conferees
on the Civil Functions Bill of so-called
"free hospitalization" for employees until
December 31-this hospitalization had
been removed by the House and restored
by the Senate-gives additional time to
work out a suitable plan, he said.
The Panama Canal Company, Colonel
Paxson said, is not in a position to deal
directly with an insurance company but
can authorize payroll deductions for hos-
pitalization insurance for such an em-
ployee organization as the Canal Zone
Credit Union. Preliminary plans call for
the Company-Government to collect-by
payroll deductions-insurance payments
from employees who sign up for hospital
insurance; these payments will be remit-
ted to the Credit Union which, in turn,
will deal with the insuring company.
The situation is somewhat different, he
told the conferees, in regard to local-rate
emDlove s. The five local-rate credit


unions are Federal organizations and not
in a position to deal with an insurance
company. One way in which this could
be worked out, he said, would be to form
a sort of Mutual Benefit Association which
would be made up of representatives of
the credit unions, lodges, churches, etc.
This organization could deal with the
insurance companies, and to it the Com-
pany-Government could turn over insur-


ance payments
deduction from
the plan.


collect


d by payroll
subscribing to


Group Plan Not Prejudiced
Any such plan, the Acting Governor
- v_- .* ..* *


Assignments


Employee


Conference


Henry L. Donovan, Community Serv-
ices Director, joined the group to outline
for conference consideration the proposal
for a new method of quarters applications.
Since there had been considerable objec-
tion to a proposal that applications be
limited to three choices-by type, street,
or areas-a plan has been developed simi-
lar to the postings of real estate offices in
the United States, he said.
Each Wednesday, on glass-enclosed
bulletin boards placed in all Housing
Offices, Clubhouses, Post Offices, and
Commissaries, Housing Division em-
ployees would post a list of all quarters
which had become vacant for the week
ending the previous day. The posting


would be done by district
in Gamboa would not b
southern district (Pedro
Diablo, Balboa, Ancon) n
ern district quarters be a
northern district (Gatun,
and New Cristobal).


L; i. e., quarters
e posted in the
viguel, Corozal,
or would south-
dvertised in the
Margarita, Old


Each advertised set of quarters would
be described by type of construction
(frame, composite, masonry), house and
apartment number, the number of fam-
ilies in the building, the number of
bedrooms, baths, whether or not the
quarters have a garage, maid's room,
maid's toilet, storeroom, paved basement.
The rent, per week, would be listed.
Available For Inspection
During this advertising period, which
would close six days later, the quarters
would be available for inspection on
application to the district housing office
concerned, and during this same period
applications would be accepted for any of
the quarters advertised.


The number of


Our


applications an


Civil


Defense


Civil defense is based on the principle of
self-protection by the individual, extended
to include mutual self-protection on the part
of groups and communities. It is a way
of protecting all of us and our families,
either in case of an enemy attack or during
natural, peacetime disasters.
Civil defense is the responsibility of all


ployee could file would not be limited.
If he considered several houses equally
desirable, he could apply for them all;
since the purpose of the plan is to have
employees apply only for houses in which
they are definitely interested, there should
not be any large number of such multiple
applications.
The advertising period would close
at noon each Tuesday and assignments for
the quarters advertised during the pre-
vious six days would be made at 1 p. m.
that day to the senior applicant from
point of service-on the list. He would
have until 4:15 p. m., on Thursday of that
same week to accept or decline the assign-
ment. If the senior applicant declined
the assignment, the next employee in line
for the quarters would be assigned, etc.,
until the house is accepted.
Applications would be held until the
apartment is accepted, and then would be
voided. Apartments advertised for four
consecutive weeks with no applications
would then be withheld and used for
immediate assignments.


Penalty Planned


The AFGE, Mr.


Donova


n said, has


already accepted the plan but several
other organizations to which it was sub-
mitted are still to be heard from. Em-
ployee representatives at the July con-
ference appeared not only receptive to
the idea but to endorse it, and insisted
that the acceptance time be cut from the
original proposal of five days.
The conferees discussed what penalty
could be imposed on an employee who
had accepted a house and then declined
it without adequate reason when told the
house was ready for occupancy. All
agreed that a money penalty should not
be imposed but that it would be fair to
bar him from applying for any quarters
for a specified period, possibly two weeks.
George Cassell, Acting Chief, Housing
Division, said that during the previous
week, nine out of 31 (see page 19)


Responsibility


battleground --not peace in the world. We
may not now relax our guard nor cease
our quest."
Since September 1949, when Soviet
Russia exploded her first atomic weapon,
the need for the development and mainte-
nance of an adequate civil defense program
has become as important as a strong


'~ ~ F




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7,1953


When
And


Sea I
Why


Level
The


Visitors to the (Canal Zone almost in-
variably express amazement over four
natural features: the hills; the fact that
Balboa, on the Pacific, is farther east
than Cristobal, on the Atlantic; the rising
of the sun from the Pacific ocean; and the
great difference in the tides in two bodies
of water which are separated by only a
40-mile-wide strip of land.


Of the four features, the tides have
played a most important part in Isthmian
history although the location of the Isth-
mian canal was determined largely by the
narrow isthmus and lowness of the Conti-
nental Divide in what is now the Canal
Zone.
Old Panama, where mud flats stretch
out to sea for a long distance at low tide,
never had a harbor worthy of the name,
even for ships of its day. Cargo had to be
lightered ashore, just as it is today in
many Central and South American ports.
All important Isthmian ports were on the
Caribbean where the tidal range is much
less than it is in the Pacific.
During the days of the Gold Rush,
ships anchored either far out to sea, off
Panama City, or made their port at the
island of Taboga although there, also,
they could not dock at low tide.
Affected Canal Construction
The variation of the tides in the Carib-
bean and the Pacific caused many heated
arguments among experts in the past and
had considerable influence on the decision
to make the Canal lock type rather than
sea level. During the Isthmian Canal
studies in 1946 and 1947 an elaborate tidal


machine


was


constructed


Not


Tides


Sea
Are


of the 1916-34
the Canal Zone
ent rise in sea
interval of .085
foot at Cristoba


Level

Different


and 1927-45 averages at
stations shows an appar-
level during the 11-year
foot at Balboa and .062
l. Both of these changes


are small, equivalent to 1 inch and 34
inch, respectively.
"As a small rise in mean sea level has
occurred in recent years along both the
Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United
States, the condition is assumed to be
general and of no particular significance
to the Canal Zone area. Whether the


rising trend will continue


min years


come or prove to be of only a temporary
nature remains to be determined by
comparison with future averages."
Sun and Moon Tides
School children learn that tides, which
Webster's dictionary calls the "alternate
rising and falling of the surface of the
ocean are caused by the attraction of the
sun and moon, acting unequally on the
water in different parts of the earth.
Since the moon is closer to the earth than
the sun, the tide-producing force of the
moon is a little more than twice that of


the sun.
When


school


children


come


to the


Tidal Troughs
Oceans, he says, are divided into a
number of such troughs. Balboa is at the
extreme end of one such body; the saw-
horse is off the Mexican coast in the
vicinity of Manzanillo and the opposite
end off lower California. Consequently
the rise and fall of water is great at Balboa
and very slight near Manzanillo.
The Caribbean, on the other hand, sep-
arated as it is from the Atlantic by a
ring of islands, is almost an inland lake
cut off from the oscillating system of the
greater ocean. But the Caribbean and
the Gulf of Mexico make up their own
trough and, being smaller and shallower
than the Atlantic or Pacific, the range of
their tides is much smaller.
Statistics obtained from years of local
observation show that it is possible to
have a tidal range, between high and low
water, of 22.7 feet at Balboa; the extreme
variation possible at Cristobal is only 3.05
feet. Tides at Balboa are regular, with
two highs and two lows a day, approxi-
mately an hour later each succeeding
day. Cristobal tides are irregular.
Lifts at Locks
The matter of tides, of course, had
much to do with the way the Canal was
constructed. The approach channel of
the Canal on the Pacific side is deeper
than the approach to the Atlantic Locks,
to allow for the tidal difference. There


in the fiats


below Miraflores Bridge where tidal
currents were simulated by machine and
their effect on a possible sea-level canal
studied.
Canal files are studded with corres-
pondence from such widely scattered
places as New York, Massachusetts,
Washington, Germany, Mexico, and
England, asking about the tides at the
Canal terminals.
People who ask about the tides fall
generally into two classes: those who
want to know if it is true that there is a
difference in sea level in the Pacific ocean
and the Caribbean sea there is; and
those whose questions have to do with the


...4 -


rnTToAT mT)U/'TTT ArTx',/' O' fI)T T/"I'ITI)T(J , _. ,. ....I, ..... C .. . 1-.. 1 ... L.:.l


..X . ..


1e





August 7


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR


NTER


AND


GUIDANCE


DENT


PREVENTION


Safety Message To Foremen


When something has gone wrong, it is
most necessary to know what it was and
what caused it to go wrong before it can


be corrected.


An accident is a very good


example of something gone wrong-the
man, the material, the machine, or the


method.
otherwise


Somebody or something failed;


the mishap


would not have


occurred.
Since an accident is evidence of some-
thing gone wrong, it follows that you must
get to the bottom of "why" and "how"
to prevent things going wrong again.
There must be a best way for doing this.
Let's just make a list of what we want to
find out and then see how we should go


about it.


It has been shown that the man


is the most important thing on any job.
Buildings, machines, and tools are lesser
things because they have been developed


to help the man


better,


and safer.


produce more faster,


So maybe


we had


better start with the man first.
1. Is this his first accident?
2. If not, how and when did the others
occur ?
3. What could he himself have done to
avoid having this accident?
4. Did he take an unnecessary chance
and bring the accident on him-
self?
5. Has there been a job study made
and a safe efficient way developed
for doing this job?


6. Had he been informed


dangers


involved


tions and drilling
working practices?


HONOR


as to the


with instruc-
as to the safe


ROLL


Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
JUNE


7. Did he follow instructions?


8. Just who


was at fault?


Was it the


injured workman, a fellow worker,
or you, his foreman?
9. Was he "hurried" on this job?
10. What action did you take immedi-


to prevent


a recurrence?


Have you done this?
11. Are other employees also following


same


practice


that caused


this man to have an accident?


12. Was the safe practice,


which had


been taught and inm use, mostly
depending upon the employee
learning and continuing to duck
in time?
A check on layout, material and equip-
ment is less involved. You naturally
want to know:
1. If tools, machines, or equipment
being used were defective or in
need of repair.
2. If adequate working equipment and


safety guards


were


provided.


3. If the necessary protective equip-
ment and safety devices were
available.


4. If


so, were they being used and in
the right way.


5. Was lighting and ventilation ade-
quate.


When


is the best time for


investigate an accident?


It appears to be


as soon after it occurs as you can get to


where it happened.


If you are going to


get the information necessary to prevent
future accidents, and you might as well
not start unless you get the correct and
complete story, you are going to have to:
1. Go to the scene of the accident and


check
volved.


the physical


things


2. Get the full story from the man
who caused the accident.
3. Get the full story from others work-
ing near and with him.


'-'"k henecessarycorrectivemeas


ures


to prevent


a recurrence


before you leave.
5. Make out the report at once while
all facts are fresh in your mind.
6. Get professional advice from your
Safety Inspector.
Whenever you have made up your mind
to minquire as fully into the "whys and
"wherefores" of your accidents as you do
into getting other parts of your job
done-then and then only will you start
getting results in accident prevention, for
you cannot intelligently proceed with
righting something wrong until you have
the correct and complete facts in your
possession.


SAFETY


BOARD


The Canal Zone Government-Panama
Canal Company Safety Board as re-estab-
lished by Executive Regulation No. 32,
which outlines the Safety Program and


Organization, is n
following members:


G. 0.


IKELLAR,


Chairman
L. W. CHAMBER
1)irector
M. F. MILLARD,


C


OW (

Thief,


omposed of


Safety


RS, representing


represent


ting En


and Construction Director


Cmdr. \W.
Industrial


M. VINCENT,
Director


Branch,
Marine
gineering


representing


WV. F. RUSSON, representing Rail


Terminals


1)irector


E. E. TROUT,
Service Directc
E. 0. ZEMER,


Services


representing
)r
representing


Supply


Community


Director


E. L. FARLOW, representing Civil Affairs
Director
J. P. SMITH, representing Health Director
H. D. RAYMOND, representing Comptroller


BUiRNHAM


(


Personnel Director
II. L. ANDERSON, I


Executive


Acting),
Recorder


representing
, representing


Secretary


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
INDUSTRIAL BUREAU


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR
Industrial ..............
Civil Affairs ...-- -----------
Health --------------------


Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked
JUNE 1953 (Frequency Rate)


Civil Affairs Bureau


I


I




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7, 1953


New


Paraisc

As


S


Buildings Ne

school Begins


ar


Completion


Local


Rate


Towns


of the school units. Miss Julette Carring-
ton, formerly principal at Paraiso, will
be teaching principal of the six-classroom
elementary school at Red Tank.
Until the addition to the Rainbow City
elementary school is completed about
the middle of the school year the school-


PART of Paraiso's modern, new school plant is pictured above. Only one room deep, the new
Paraiso school is on-the-ground masonry construction. A feature of the building is the wide awning-
type windows, divided into horizontal panes, each set of which opens like jalousies. Wide vertical
sun vanes provide shade and help in preventing sound from one classroom bothering students in
another.
The main building of the new Paraiso school will house elementary grades. It is connected by a
covered walk-way to a two-room building, also new construction, which will house the kindergarten.
The third building of the group is the remodeled older building, in which will be the junior high
school, with space for a library, music room, shops, and the principal's office in the basement.


Under the watchful eyes of their 160
teachers, some 4,300 boys and girls from
the Canal Zone's colored communities
trooped into their classrooms last Mon-
day morning in the 14 schools which make
up the local-rate school system.
The exact number of students will not
be known for several days, until figures
from all the schools are checked, but an
opening day estimate indicated that the
number would be well above the 4,156
who were registered the first school day
of 1952.
Boys and girls at Paraiso were especi-
ally interested in their modern new school
which will be ready for occupancy within
a short time, and grade-school students
at Rainbow City were eagerly waiting
completion of the addition to their school,
now expected about the end of the first
semester.
The outstanding change in the Canal
Zone colored schools this year is the
coming transfer from Red Tank to Paraiso


of the Junior High School for the Paraisc-
Red Tank area and the expansion of the
Paraiso school plant by the addition of a
new 12-classroom elementary building, a
two-room kindergarten building, and a


remodeled


basement


area under


former elementary school building.
Junior High In Remodeled School
The elementary grades will occupy the
new buildings when they are completed in
about a month and the remodeled building
will be reserved for Junior High School
use. Classrooms will fill the upstairs
area and a library, home economics labor-
atory, woodworking shop, clinic, music
room and the principal's office will be
in the new basement area.
The transfer to Paraiso of the Junior
High School will bring a shift in school
principals. Ellis L. Fawcett, formerly
principal of the Red Tank elementary
and junior high schools, has been trans-
ferred to Paraiso where he will be in charge


housing problem there continues to be
acute. Present plans call for 16 classes
to share eight classrooms until the new
addition is finished. The addition will
provide space for eight elementary school
classes.
Summer Institute
During the past summer approximately
160 teachers from the colored schools
attended the annual month-long Summer
Institute at La Boca and Rainbow City.
The staff of the Summer Institute is made
up of teachers from Balboa High School
and the Canal Zone Junior College.
The work of this summer's Institute
was largely revision of the curriculum in
the elementary, junior, and senior high
schools. In the summer of 1952 the
students at the Institute made "working
copies" of 37 courses; these were studied,
in the light of classroom use, during the
past school year and 26 of the 37 were
put into working shape this summer.
During the Institute, elementary teach-
ers took the Workshop in Arithmetic and
had a choice of a course in Children's
Literature or a methods course in the
teaching of Spanish.
Teachers from the secondary schools
studied Evaluation of Secondary Schools
and one of five electives: Workshops in
Mathematics, English, Spanish, Social
Studies, and Industrial Arts.
Social Studies
In the elementary schools, a new social
studies handbook is in use this year.
These tentative courses of study which
are the joint product of Canal Zone
elementary school teachers are organized
around six themes for the different grade
levels. The themes progress from the
immediate, for the youngest child, to the
distant, such as world problems, for the
older children.
Kindergarteners and pupils in grade
one, for instance, will study "Home and
School." Second graders widen their
horizon with a study of the community
in which they live. By (See page 12)


They


Head


Canal Zone Schools


.- / - * :


f





August 7,1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Official


Two


Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE

Printed by the Printing Plant
Mount Hope, Canal Zone


of


Kind


S. SEYBOLD, Governor-President


H. O. PAXSON, Lieutenant Governor


J. RUFUs HARDY, Editor

ELEANOR H. McILKENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$1.00


SINGLE COPIES-5


a year


cents each


On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses,
Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after
publication date.

SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10 cents each


cents each


On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.

Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to Editor, THE PANAMA
CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights, C. Z.


Railroad And Terminals Head


Will End Lengthy


Service


A BROTHER ACT, for a fact, is that of Canal Zone Fire Sergeants James V. and Frank J. Bart-
lett. James, the elder by five years, is at the wheel of the fire engine.
Born in Wisconsin, they were both employed as probationary firemen here on August 12, 1942,
promoted to firemen on November 10, 1942, and again promoted, this time to sergeants, on July 5
this year.


Sergeant James is on duty at the Gamboa Fire
Miguel.


Station;


Sergeant


Frank is stationed at Pedro


David W. Massingham of San Rafael,
Calif., has been appointed Assistant
Manager of Hotels for the Panama
Canal Company; he will be in direct
charge of the Hotel Washington.
Born in Melbourne, Australia, where
his American parents were living, he
attended school in California and has
spent most of his adult life in Califor-
nia. For the past 15 years he has been
enoa~ed in restaurant or cafeteria


I F U - /


work and has had considerable experi-
ence in industrial cafeterias such as
those of the Kaiser Shipyards in Rich-
mond, and the Kaiser Cement Plant
at Permanente, Calif.
From 1946 until 1949, when he opened


Canal Zone team in action.
be narrated and will be shi
Clubhouses to promote dih


ow


This film will
n in all Zone


,aster prepared-


ness.

Automobile tires now may be pur-
chased unmounted from Section K of
the Balboa Storehouse, the Cristobal
Storehouse or mounted on wheels at
the Motor Transportation Division on
either side of the Isthmus.
Tires formerly were required to be
mounted on wheels at a cost of 35
cents each, by the Motor Transporta-
tion Division.
Some of the tires now available for
4 �* . . ---t-


OF CURRENT INTEREST


BACK COPIES-10




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7, 1953


Cars,

All


Drivers,


Are


Dogs,


Licensed


Vendors

By Canal


And Pe

License


ddlers-

Section


Black and orange will be the colo
1954, take it from Leslie tR. Evans,
of the Canal's License Section.
As long ago as March Mr. Evans,
his top boss, Col. Richardson Selee,
Affairs Director, and Colonel S
right-hand man, E. IL. Farlow, agreed
black letters on an orange backgr


rs for
Chief
with
Civil
elee's
1 that
"ound


would be a good combination for private
automobile licenses for 1954.
There was no particular reason for
their choice, Mr. Evans said. Black and
orange is an easily-read combination, had
not been used for some time, and could
not be confused with the black-and-white
of official plates.
The license plates are to arrive by


September 1. By mid-November, the
License Section will be accepting applica-
tions for them and at the end of the year
all Canal Zone-licensed cars will have


the plates in place


or else.


Selecting license plates and issuing
them is an important part of the License
Section's work, but it is not all, by any


means.


Licenses And Licenses


At its offices on the ground floor of the
Civil Affairs Building on Gaillard High-
way, one can get a license establishing
ownership of a vehicle and the right to
drive, transfer, or junk it; a vehicle
record card, which is the first step toward
allowing a U. S. employee living in
Panama to buy gasoline in the Canal
Zone; a license-if the applicant is a
welfare or fraternal organization-to vend
food or drink; or a peddler's license which
gives an individual the right to sell such


things as fruits, v
drinks in Canal Zot
month the License
duty: The licensing
which make the Can
Issuing licenses wl
the ownership or
vehicles is a major
of Mr. Evans and
women who make
Extra help is hired


vegetables, and
ne towns. Just
Section had a
Sof the 3,000
al Zone their h
which have to do


soft
last
new
dogs
ome.
with


operation of motor
part of the business
the five men and
up his regular staff.
for the annual rush


period but the addition of two new valid-
ating cash registers last year cut this
need in half. On December 31, 1952's
peak day, more than 700 customers were


LICENSE PLATES from all over
mural decorations for the License Secti
license plate from Wyoming.

the "Z" series - the section at An
has a record of a majority of
owned by such people. This is i
by the vehicle record cards.
To buy gasoline in the Canal
owner of a Panama-licensed ca
have a special card, which he


by presenting his Panama car registra-
tion, his operator's license, and his
authority card. So far this year, the
License Section has on file 3,132 of these
vehicle record cards.
Lotteries And Lines


sequence


in which


automobile


license plates have been issued has been
determined, in the past, in several ways.
Mr. Evans recalls that when the License
Office was on the third floor of the Admin-
istration Building, the waiting line of
applicants sometimes stretched the length
of the hallway, and down the stairs to
the front entrance.


the United States and old Canal Zone licenses are appropriate
on. Mrs. Mary Hollowell hands George Pervin a sample 1953


Lcon still For operators of passenger cars, official
the cars cars, industrial trucks, commercial vehi-
provided cles, motorcycles, etc. Since 1950 there
have been only two categories: Roughly
Zone an people who drive for fun and people who
ar must make their living by driving, although
obtains separate tests are given operators of


motorcycles and motorscooters by the
two police examiners.
People visiting the Isthmus with their
cars may drive for 90 days with U. S.
license plates and drivers' licenses, if
they do not intend to remain here. Those


expecting to make their home here must
get both Canal Zone car and operator's
licenses within 15 days.
Character References
Drivers' licenses have been required in
the Canal Zone since 1911. Those old-
time drivers, provided they satisfied an
examining board as to their knowledge
of "gasoline and electrical motors and





August 7, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


cream, if they want the latter. Some 24
such groups are licensed each year.


No Sandwiches


Peddlers' licenses are issued to an aver-
age of 21 people a month for a period not
exceeding six months. Peddlers must
have physical examinations and a police
check. Most of them handle native
fruits and vegetables. Applications for
licenses to sell fresh fish, meats or meat
products of any kind, sandwiches or
cooked foods of all kinds are uniformly
disapproved, for strict health and sanitary
reasons.
Peddlers are licensed without cost
unless they wish to sell ice cream or soft
drinks, or both. In such case a peddler
pays $2 a month, and if he sells tobacco
an additional $2 monthly.
Occasionally a peddler is licensed, as
one was recently, to sell such things as
pocketbooks, baskets, and other native
straw products. The $2 monthly fee
applies here, also.
The License Section is a direct descend-
ent of the old Revenue Department of
construction days. The Isthmian Canal
Commission had established a system of
licensing coaches and carriages in 1910
but, as the motor population increased,
Canal authorities began to worry about
road upkeep. If motorists wanted to use
the highways, they should pay for the
privilege, the Commission felt.
$150 For A License !
The first fees were eyebrow raising:
$150 a year for commercial vehicles of
any sort, $25 for cars "operated for
pleasure," and $10 for motorcycles.
The first automobile license issued in
the Canal Zone went to Natalio Ehrman
of Panama, on December 3, 1910. Unfor-
tunately, old records do not show the
make of his car. The first license to a
Canal Zone resident was No. 5, issued a
week later to a "Capt. C. Nixon of
Cristobal." Oldtimers believe this was
Capt. Courtland Nixon, Depot Quarter-
master at Mount Hope.
In 1916 the fee for licensing personal
automobiles was reduced to the present
$5, and motorcycle licenses dropped to
the present $2. Owners of commercial
vehicles who today pay between $13.50
and $16, paid from $20 to $40.
From the Administration Building,


Good


Can


Community
Reduce Fly


Flies are everybody's business, first,
because they are a potential health men-
ace to every member of a community
and, second, because everyone is respon-
sible for the kind of good community
housekeeping that keeps them from
breeding.
Flies, like a lot of other potential
problems, are best nipped in the bud. It
is easier to prevent them from breeding
in the first place than it is to get rid of
them after they are grown.
DDT used to work like an atom bomb
on the adult fly population. It doesn't
work so miraculously any more; flies are
getting used to it.


Furthermore, flies are mobile.


If they


are any place in a community, they can


be all over the place. An adul
travel several miles to find his
of filthy environment and fro
possibly, into the food you eat.
The biography of a house
begin like this. One little hou


t fly will
own kind
m there,

ly might
sefly, for


instance, might have been born, together
with 99 to 149 brothers and sisters, in a
nice little nest of mouldy mashed potatoes
down in an overlooked cranny in a garbage
can.
Mama Fly, with fine feminine instinct,
may have flown from miles away to find
this fine home for her brood. Of course,
she might just as well have picked any

where it was located for many years, the
License Section, then a Bureau of the old
Executive Department, moved to the old
Balboa police station, opposite the present
Balboa school. The location was good
but it had some drawbacks. For instance
one day two not ordinarily timid clerks
took to their desk tops when a large and
dignified iguana paid an office call.
The License Section, under its present
organization, came into being in April


1946, following the war. It
then as now, by Mr. Evans,
Wisconsin, who came to the
in 1936 to work with the
Affairs Division. All of his
the Canal has been with


was headed
a native of
Canal Zone
then Civil
service with
the License


Section in its present or former forms


Housekeeping
Population


one of


a number of


places,


of them repulsive to tender human
sensibilities.
She could have stopped to lay her eggs
in a cozy thick blanket of damp commer-
cial fertilizer around a firecracker bush;
a rotting remnant of cabbage slaw slopped
around a garbage can; a nice mouldy
mess of garbage disposed of as trash and
put on a trash dump; manure in a riding
stable; a rotting potato-or any other
kind of fermenting organic matter.
A housefly lives a very fast life, growing
from egg to full-fledged adult in eight to
20 days. In Isthmian warmth and
dampness, the life cycle is short.
The eggs that Mama Fly lays in mash-
ed potatoes or elsewhere hatch in eight
to 30 hours into larvae or maggots.
The hungry little maggots have a
mashed potato diet (our little flies from
the garbage can) for 5 to 14 days, then
they migrate to drier material and turn
into dark brown nupas that look like


1 1
little seeds.
Then in three to ten days (the
fasts during this period) a grown-
emerges, to go around spreading
for the 30 days of his adult life.
Flies are nasty little creatures.


pupa
up fly
germs

o one


likes them very much, but some of the
grade school health lessons about the
germs they carry can stand repetition.
The deposits flies leave on the things
they touch may contain millions of dis-
ease germs. They are at least suspect
in transmitting bacillary and amoebic
dysentery, cholera, typhoid fever, tuber-
culosis and other "filth diseases." The
virus of poliomyelitis has been recovered
from flies.
There are simple things that everyone
can do to help keep flies from breeding-
the only really effective way to keep them
out of a community:
1. Report to the Division of Sanitation
any conditions you see that may induce
fly breeding. The Pacific side number is
2-2463. On the Atlantic side, call 3-2576.
A great deal of time is lost trying to
track down breeding places after flies
are on the wing.
2. Report to the Grounds Maintenance
Division any holes in garbage cans,
missing covers, or any accumulation of
garbage left in or dribbled around the




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7


1953


Payne


Handle


Wardlaw


Fif th


of


And


W. Andrews


Canal


Ship


&


Co.


Traffic


Suppose you're an exporter andI have a
cargo of wool to be sent from New'Zealamnd
to England; possibly) you're shipping
sugar from C(uba to Japan; or you might


be concerned with
Pacific Northwest


lumber


from the
East Coast


U. S. port.
Perhaps you're a potential passenger
from the Canal Zone to England or
Australia or Curacao or Brazil.
Could be you're a ship owner whose


vessel


has gotten


into trouble


in the


Caribbean and needs:a tow into port by a
Merritt (Chapman salvage tug; or your
ship may have damaged a propeller or
been in some mishap which should be
reported to its insurance underwriters.
Your ship might catch fire, like one


recently which was carrying fish meal
through the Canal to South Africa. Much
of it had to be discharged onto the
Cristobal docks so it could cool, the holds
had to be entered and the smouldering
fire completely controlled.
There was another ship fire, too, not
long ago. in which underwriters were


on t
interested.


Fire broke


out in a ship


which was carrying phosphorus from
Japan, in tin cans. Canal Zone firemen
wet the cargo down but it re-ignited as
soon as the phosphorous dried out. The
dissolved phosphorous got onto cargo'nets
and onto the decks. Men walking through
it tracked it onto the dock where it could
be ignited just like the matchheads it was
eventually to become.
Andrews, Payne & Wardlaw
In any of these cases and a great many
others, it would be quite likely that
you'd be dealing with W. Andrews & Co.
or Payne and Wardlaw, either as shipping
agents or in their capacity as Lloyd's
agents.
Because they are headed by the same
man, big, bo)ming-voiced Capt. Clifford
Payne, many people confuse the two


agencies.


But


actually they


are as


separate as any other two agencies.
Reporters covering the waterfront in-
variably have trouble at first straight-
ening out the difference between the two
and more than one has had to be re-
m nfhdp( rpnptn r11 v th n t Pa vn 1 nd


K^~r


('APT. CLIFFORD PAYNE

Japan, the Netherlands, Greece, the Re-
public of China, Denmark, Sweden,
Honduras and Germany.
The cargoes were as varied as the
ships which carried them. A cargo of
fish meal went through the Canal from
South Africa to San Francisco. There
was bulk wheat from the Pacific North-
west and soya, several loads of it, from
United States East Coast or Gulf ports
to Japan.
The P. & T. Voyager, transiting on
May 10, carried fireworks from a Penn-
sylvania port to the State of Washington,
presumably to help some one celebrate
the Fourth of July. Other ships carried
steel girders, automobiles, machinery,
coal, oil, cotton, phosphates, and dozens
of other items, in quantities large and
small.
Queen's Ships


In addition to handling commercial
traffic, Andrews acts as agents for the
British consul for all British and Com-
monwealth Navy ships. The firm will
handle the 15,900-ton Gothic when she
transits the Canal late in November,
carrying the Queen of England to
Australia. Regardless of what festivities
are prepared ashore, the Canal transit of
the liner is expected to be routine.
.___-- . . - 4 * * � 1I


happen at halfway ports.
If deck cargo on a lumber ship is going
to shift, it usually shifts between the
Pacific Northwest, from which most of it
originates, and the Canal Zone. More
than one such ship has had to tie up in
the Canal Zone to have its lumber cargo
restowed, to correct a dangerous list.
Parts break, and if there are no re-
placements aboard or they cannot be
made locally, the agents usually have to
radio to the United States to have a new
part sent to the Isthmus by plane.
War Days
War days had nothing to do with the
halfway point, but they brought all sorts
of problems. Boarding officers remember
the days when Cristobal harbor was full
of convoys of big gray ships, all without
identification and all much alike.
The only way an agent could find his
ship was to cruise among them by
launch, calling to each ship as he passed
it. When he had boarded one of his
vessels he would mark an X on the gang-
plank so that he wouldn't repeat his
efforts.
Provisioning ships of the varied nation-
alities the two agencies handle presents
some problems but not as many as might
be expected. Most ships provision staples
in their home ports and take on only
perishable items here.
But there are times when live goats
have to be provided as food for Hindu
seamen on some of the ships, or beef has
to be slaughtered in accordance with the
religious rites of other crewmen. Once
one of the agencies rounded up a dozen
goats, on the hoof, and presented them
en masse to a transiting ship so the cook
could take his pick. Goats used to be
easily available in La Boca, but they
have disappeared and a request for
goats now usually means that some one
has to make a trip to the Interior.


Operate Here


Most of the shipping agencies here
are branch offices of parent companies
established elsewhere, but Payne and
Wardlaw and W. Andrews operate only
at the Canal.
[ ^k^^*tI -- yj rT- a^ nty r-llIfHn f w^ y\ cv n^ a^ a


_ _





August 7, 1953


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Forty


ears
July


Ago


Municipal Engineering Division forces
began clearing the site for Miraflores
Pump Station No. 1, one of the first steps
in the construction of the water works for
the southern end of the Canal.
It was planned that water would be
taken from the Caimitillo arm of Mira-
flores Lake, pumped to the purification
plant "to be located on the top of the
Miraflores Hill immediately above the
Miraflores spillway," and from there, by


gravity flow, to a pump st
where electric pumps wou
mains leading to Panama.


ation at Ancon
ld force it into


Paraiso was selected as headquarters for
all dredging operations for the Canal. A
plan approved by the Chairman and Chief
Engineer 40 years ago in July provided
that repair work on dredges then made at
shops at both ends of the Canal would also
be centralized in shops at Paraiso after
water was turned into Culebra Cut.

Construction work was started on the
permanent electrical transmission line


TYPICAL of the ships handled by W. Andrews & Co. is this 624-foot Norwegian tanker, Dalfimn,


shown in Pedro Miguel locks.


She was en route


old, as were all young colonial boys, to
boarding school in England. Colonial
girls stayed in India until they were 12.
He went to sea when he was 17 years
old. The first ship on which he sailed
was the Sierra Blanca, one of a fleet of 12
fine clippers which ran between Liverpool
and Rangoon. Captain Payne got his
master's license under sail at the end of a
harrowing trip aboard another clipper
called the Oread. The story of that trip
would fill a book; its highlights were a
shipwreck off the Peruvian coast, a 30-
mile trek by burro across the Peruvian
desert, and the discovery, in an isolated
Peruvian town, of a schoolmate, when an


interpreter was needed.
When the Oread was finally aban
Captain Payne joined the Pacific
Navigation Company, serving with
from 1899 until 1910. His last
command was the Taboga which


Panama's
* -. i- : *


done,
Steam
PSNC
PSNC
ran in


coastwise service with its
J. L4 * *1** flt.. .ih 2k*


from San Pedro to Bergen with a load of fuel oil.
W. Andrews & Co. is much older than
Payne & Wardlaw. It was founded
during the 1890's by William Thomas
Andrews who represented the West India
Mail Company in Colon. The original
offices of the agency were in the Fort
DeLesseps area, in an old wooden
building which was demolished during the
1920's when the Army wanted room for
expansion.
When Mr. Andrews returned to Eng-
land about 1920, he left his business in
Captain Payne's charge and on his death
in 1926, he bequeathed the good will of
the firm to his old friend and associate.
Agency Managers
At the present time the operation of


the organizations is
managership of Per
was with the White
pool before joining
1925. His office 1
Cristobal.


under the general
owne Francey, who
Star Line in Liver-
Captain Payne in
is now located in


across the Isthmus. The system, de-
scribed in the Canal Record as "simple
and straightforward," provided for the
transmission of electrical energy from "a
source of generation at Gatun" to load
centers at Miraflores, Balboa, and Cris-
tobal. The transmission line, which was
to parallel the Panama Railroad right-
of-way, was to run from Cristobal to
Balboa, permitting distribution of energy
both ways from Gatun.

Applications were received for the rent
of Panama Railroad lots Nos. 1 and 2
on the waterfront at Cristobal. The United
Fruit Company planned to build an office
on one, the Canal Record stated, and th,
Hamburg-American Line proposed to erect
a two-story building on the other.


The last of the three sluices through the
ogee of Gatun Spillway Dam was closed
and Gatun Lake started its final rise to
its permanent level. A schedule was
announced for the transfer of permanent
buildings and the Canal shops from the
town of Gorgona, one of the sites to be
inundated as the lake stretched out to
assume its final form.


JL





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7, 1953


Money
He


Hundreds


Brought
Counted


thousands


Him


To


For


Panama;
36 Year


it


dollars


passed through the hands of Edward
Howell in the 47 years he worked for the
Canal before he left the organization at
the end of July. Hie had been a clerk
and money counter in the Treasurer's
Office at Cristobal for 36 of those years.
Unlike most amateur money handlers
and self appointed financiers, the long-
time clerk believes that he has made very
few mistakes.
"If I had made many," he explained
realistically during the last month of


probably


wouldn't


still be


around."
His supervisors use such terms as
"accurate, honest, responsible, and de-
pendable" to explain the employee and
the caliber of his work.
He frequently found around the office
money a caller dropped from a billfold,
perhaps, in the process of cashing a
check. Once he discovered $50 neatly
hidden beneath a blotter near the cashier's


cage.


In that case, the cashier remem-


bered having paid someone that amount
during the day and, with a little detective
work, found the rightful owner.
Cashiers in the Canal organization also
have had reason for gratitude to the long
time money counter. The bags of money
that they send to the Treasurer's office
sometimes contain a few penmnies or a
few dollars more or less than they have
accounted for. Of course, that's Mr.
Howell's job-to catch and rectify such
errors.
Like Apples on a Tree
It was money that attracted Mr.
Howell to the Canal Zone when he first
came in 1906. He heard the stuff was
"growing on the trees like apples" and
came to see for himself. He was a
bellhop in the Marine Hotel at home in
Hastings, Barbados, when he made the
great decision.
He assumes he missed the money trees;
the main things he remembers seeing when
he got to the Isthmus were mudholes and
mosquitoes "so big that when they stuck
you, you saw blood."
He first lived in a tent city labor
camp, Otro Lado, on the "other side" of
the Canal from Paraiso. He started to
work digging holes, first for tower con-
,*- .... �;.' ... �. n , T) rn^.]_ -1_ J -I . . .


I
qc


Treasurer's offic
Treasurer's office


;e. Someone there became


acquainted with the janitor and when
the office needed a money counter, he was
given the job that he held for the next
36 years.


EDWARD HOWELL


the foreman and the foreman liked liquor
and paid the water boy from his pocket to
bring Scotch as well as water on his
rounds.
On Sunday the men in the labor
camps shared their "bathroom with
alligators, making use of the Rio Grande
River for baths and weekly laundry.
The old timer also recalls that in
those early days the laborers were given
lodging checks after a day's work in the
Canal. If they didn't work, they didn't
get a check and couldn't sleep in the
camps. If they weren't in camps, they
were picked up by the police and were
provided their night's lodging in jail.
Clearances Unnecessary
In 1907, he quit his water-carrying
job and decided to try working on the
other side of the Isthmus. " 'Clearances'
for jobs weren't necessary then," he says.
"No one checked up on you."


New Paraiso Buildings Near Completion
As School Begins In Local Rate Towns


(Continued from page 6) grade three the
students have advanced enough to be
interested in the problems of simple com-
munities, and fourth graders will learn
something of the problems of complex


communities like the Canal Zon
By fifth grade they go fart
and study "Panama and the
Hemisphere," and sixth gra
devote their attention to The
Canal and the World.
Only a few changes have b
in the teaching staff for th
schools. Gilberto Perez, who
known in local musical circles,
instrumental music this year at
junior and senior high schools.
Prescott, who in past years
his time between the two
high schools, will teach at Rain
this year.


Le.
her afield
Western
ders will
Panama

een made
e colored
is well-
will teach
La Boca
Reginald
divided
colored
bow City


-.A- IX ; a.


On the Atlantic side, he went to work
for a Health Department sanitary in-
spector. The inspector condemned old
rotten buildings min the town and his
helper pulled them down and burned
them.
That work wasn't easy either, and one
Saturday when his bones ached he stayed
home to rest up for Monday. He rested,
but had no job when he returned to work.
So he went to work for somebody else,
this time the District Quartermaster at
Cristobal and served as janitor and night
watchman at the old Lincoln House from
1914 to 1917. Working on so-called
"scavenger gangs," which cleaned Canal
offices and quarters, he also did some of
the cleaning work at the Cristobal





August 7, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Veteran Employee
42 Years With P

When Enrique de la Ossa entered the
service of the Panama Railroad on July
12, 1911, he was assistant freight clerk in
the Receiving and Forwarding Agency at
the French pier in La Boca (now Balboa).
Now, after 42 busy years in many
positions of trust and responsibility, he
has been assigned to still another new
job. Effective this month he became
Special Agent for the Panama Railroad.
In this new post his long and thorough
knowledge of the Railroad's relations
with business activities in Panama can
be of great value.
Mr. de la Ossa's service was commended
in a recent letter from A. C. Medinger,
Railroad and Terminals Director, when


he said:
"Effective August 1, 1953, yo
appointed to the position ol
Agent for the Railroad Divisi
position has been authorized
President in recognition of your
loyal service to the Railroad.
tion of Special Agent is also
important one and while the d
not so arduous, it is expected
knowledge of local conditions an
freight operations will be of spe
to the Railroad Division.
"Please accept my congratul
your having completed 42 years
on July 12th, and of course,
satisfaction we get out of a


Restrictions


'u will be
f Special
on. This
by the
long and
The posi-
a very
duties are
that your
d railroad
cial value


nations on
of service
the best
life-long


Completes


anama


Railroad


father later became Supreme Court
Justice, a post which he held until his
death in 1936. In his honor Panama
City named one of its busiest streets,
J. F. de la Ossa Avenue, which most
people know as "Automobile Row."
Although he was very young, the
younger de la Ossa fought for his coun-
try's independence. Then, with Panama
safely a sovereign nation he was sent to
complete his education in the United
States where he quickly had to learn a
language he had never spoken before.


After finishing h
in order to have


commercial acti
Panama Consul
and then for tw
he returned to
entered the serv
road. He had ti
opportunities to
turned down all


is school
a practice
cities, he
ate in
o export
the Isth
ice of th
hen, and
work el


offers,


ng in 191
al know
worked


08, and
edge of
at the


lew York
firms. In
imus where
e Panama
has since, r
sewhere bu


City
1911
e he
Rail-
many
it he


to continue his


railroad service.
Gold Over the Piers


ENRIQUE DE LA OSSA

careeristhe knowledge of a job well done.


Old Isthmian
Enrique de la Ossa'
known in the history
of Panama. Born in
February 23, 1888, he
Dr. Manuel Amador, w
ama's first president, a
de la Ossa, Alcalde o


Commutation


Family
s family is w
of the Repul
Panama City
is the nephew
ho became P
nd son of J.
rf Panama. t


Of Leave


In his first
was closely in
of tons of cargoc
Balboa each m
America or thi
ment across tl
some time he w
for gold or oth
came in cargo.
Day after d
cargo moveme
and forwardin
neared complex
tons of freight
railroad; the
was well above
Shipments fro
weighed those


job as way-bill clerk, he
touch with the thousands
Which were discharged in
)nth from South or Central
e Far East for transship-
he Isthmus by rail. For
as specie clerk, responsible
er precious material which

lay, he took part in the
nts on the pier, receiving
g freight as the Canal
tion. In 1911, 1,871,076
t crossed the Isthmus by


fol
fe
m
so


lowing year
the two m
the Pacifi
uthbound.


* the figure
million mark.
c side out-


Will Become

Restrictions on the amount of leave
which Canal employees can commute to
cash on leaving the service become effec-
tive after the last day of this month.
The new rule on commutation of leave
was contained in legislation passed by
Congress at this session amending the
general leave laws applicable to all
Federal Government employees.


The new legislation does
method of accruing leave n
of leave which may be
The restrictions on leave


not affect the
or the amount
accumulated.
commutation


Effective


September


will have earned 540 hours but only 324
hours may be commuted to cash. In
both instances, leave earned above the
amount which may be commuted can be
taken by Mr. A. before leavingthe service.
Mr. B., a U. S.-rate employee, was
employed January 1, 1950, and had 720
hours of accrued leave at the beginning
of this year. If he leaves the service at
the end of October of this year, he may
take leave earned since last January but
it may not be commuted on leaving the
service.


The year after the Canal was opened,
slides blocked it completely for several
months. Shipowners hastily arranged for
a transfer of bottoms; cargo which had
been destined for transit through the
Canal was transshipped by rail and
reloaded into ships on the other side of
the Isthmus. Pier and shipping facilities
were strained.
Moved to Pier 18


When Pier 18 was opened,
1916, Mr. de la Ossa's office
ferred there and in 1922 he
cargo clerk in charge of the
job also involved boarding
agency work for all lines for
If... - . .. n* .. 1. Tj-�h^j As rv rh a f r, a an n


on April 1,
was trans-
was made
piers. His
and doing
which the


l





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


August 7,1953


AUGUST SAILINGS

From Cristobal
Panama .. .. ...-. . .. . . August 7
Cristobal . --......... .-� . August 14
Ancon - _August 21
Panama .. ... . .........August 28

From New York
Cristobal .. . ... August 4
Ancon . ..... . . August 11
Panama ..... - ............ August 18
Cristobal ... . .. .... . . .. August 25

(Northbound, the ships are in Haiti from
7 a. m. to noon Sunday; southbound, the
Haiti stop is Saturday from 7 a. m. to
4 p. m.)


Employees who ob:
versaries during the
alphabetically below
includes all Govern
Canal or other agen
tinuous service with
with (*).


)served important anni-
month of July are listed
. The number of years
merit service with the
cies. Those with con-
the Canal are indicated


45 YEARS
Joseph C. Hannigan, Lockmaster, At-
lantic Locks,.


*Enrique de
Panama City,
Bureau.


42 YEARS
la Ossa,
Railroad


Local Agent,
and Terminals


41 YEARS
George H. Cassell, Housing
Balboa.


*Emmett
Community


40 YEARS
Zemer, Safety


Bureau.


Services


Manager,

Inspector,


35 YEARS


Hans P. Pedersen, Foremat
Repair Station, Dredging Division
30 YEARS
H. Conrad Dodson, Supervi
counting Clerk, Comptroller's Offi
Frank W. Hohmann, Cash Ac
Clerk, Comptroller's Office.
John R. McLavy, Chemist,
Bureau.
Alan S. Wallace, Pilot.


.1, I
1. 1

sing
:e.
tcou


nting


Health


25 YEARS
John M. Fahnestock, Captain of Police,


Cristobal District.
Beatrice S. Gardner,
Teacher, Balboa.
Frances M. Griggel, Su
(Drygoods), Commissary Di
George A. Halloran,
Foreman, Maintenance Divi
Russel J. Jones, Chief,
Branch.


High
ipply A
vision.
Heavy
sion.
Cost A


School

assistant

Labor

accounts


Georoe O. Lee. Instructor. Ir. College.


Employees who were promoted or trans-
ferred between June 15 and July 15 are
listed below. Regradings and within-grade
promotions are not listed.
ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH
Mrs. Beatrice E. Lee, from Records
Administrator, Records Section, to Passen-
ger Traffic Clerk, Transportation Section.
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Billy W. Cole, from Property and Supply
Clerk,Commissary Division,to Postal Clerk.
Mrs. Eileen M. O'Brien, from Substi-
tute Teacher to Physical Education Teacher.
Earl R. Hatten, from Policeman to
Fireman.
Richard B. Hoard, from Guard, Atlantic


Locks, to F
Donald
Personnel 1R
Carletor
Kenneth
from Firem
Chester


ire
H.
,eci
iF.
T.
an
W


man.
Boland, from File Clerk,
words Division, to Postal Clerk.
SHallett, Frank J. Bartlett,
Daly, James V. Bartlett,
to Fire Sergeant.
. Pearson, from Fireman to


Policeman.
Jay L. Pittington, from Guard, Pacific
Locks, to Policeman.
Sigurd E. Esser, from Director, Second-
ary Education, to Director of Schools.
Roger W. Collinge, from Director, Ele-
mentary Education, to Assistant Superin-
tendent and Director of Elementary
Education.
Charles A. Dubbs, from Training Officer,
Personnel Bureau, to Director, Secondary
Education, Schools Division.
COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU
Mrs. Annie R. Rathgeber, from Clerk-
Stenographer, Clubhouse Division, to Clerk-
Typist, Office of Director.
Beauford J. Hartley, General Operator,
from Division of Sanitation to Grounds
Maintenance Division.
OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER


Mrs. Marion E. Troup,
Leave, and Payroll Clerk, t
Clerk, Payroll Branch.
John W. D. Collins, from
Pacific Locks Overhaul, to
Cost Analyst, Plant Inventory
al Staff.
Richard M. Coy, from
Clerk, Electrical Division, to
Internal Audit Staff.


from Time,
o Retirement

Timekeeper,
Construction
and Apprais-

Accounting
Accountant,


ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Frank H. Robinson, from Policeman


Enginee
graphic
John
Operator
Electric
David
Engineer
Branch,
Division


ring
Bra.
W
r to
al Di
V.
r, Mi
to
*.


Aid, Meteorological and Hydro-
ich.
. Short, from Powerhouse
Senior Powerhouse Operator,
vision.
Kennedy, from Hydraulic
eteorological and Hydrographic
Civil Engineer, Maintenance


Robert Van Wagner, Administrati
Assistant, from Maintenance Division
Office of Maintenance Engineer.
n . - w . r n t .


Dr. John L. Winkler, Dr. Robert V.
Balfour, Dr. Ernest O. Svenson, from
Intern to Medical Officer, Pacific Medical
Clinics.
Col. Merrill C. Davenport, from Medi-
cal Officer to Chief, Medical Service,
Gorgas Hospital.
Donald N. Zeese, from Superintendent,
Street Cleaning and Refuse Collection, Di-
vision of Sanitation, to Medical Equipment
Repairman, Ambulance Service.
INDUSTRIAL BUREAU
David A. Hope, from Student Assistant,
Dredging Division, to Apprentice Welder,
Industrial Bureau.
MARINE BUREAU
George E. Riley, Jr., from Signalman
to Supervisory Signalman, Navigation
Division.
Kenneth L. Bailey, from Dock Fore-
man to Shipbuilding Inspector, Navigation
Division.
William T. O'Connor, from Super-
visory Signalman to Dock Foreman, Navi-
gation Division.
John M. Klasovsky, from Lock Operator
Leader Wireman to Control House Oper-
ator, Atlantic Locks.
Merrill T. Webster, from Lock Oper-
ator Wireman to Lock Operator Leader
Wireman, Atlantic Locks.
Ralph W. Henderson, Joseph Quintal,
from Machinist, Locks Overhaul, to Lock
Operator Machinist, Pacific Locks.
James P. Johnson, Norman R.
Hutchinson, from Pilot-in-Training, to
Probationary Pilot, Navigation Division.
Henning J. Spilling, from Stevedore
Foreman, Terminals Division, to Towboat
Master, Navigation Division.
James A. Schofield, from Machinist,
Industrial Bureau, to Lock Operator Ma-
chinist, Atlantic Locks.
Eugene White, from Gauger and Crib-
tender Foreman, Terminals Division, to
Signalman, Navigation Division.
Everette N. Clouse, Combination Weld-
er, from Maintenance Division to Dredging
Division.
William E. Johnson, from Third Assist-
ant Marine Engineer, U. S. Taboga, to Chief
Towboat Engineer, Navigation Division.
Anthony J. Catanearo, Machinist,
from Industrial Bureau to Dredging Divi-
sion.
Harvey B. Trower, Towboat Master,
from Dredging Division to Ferry Service.
John A. Taylor, from Maintenance
Mechanic, Colon Hospital, to Guard,
Atlantic Locks.
RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU
Edward H. Bensen, from Junior High
School Teacher, Schools Division, to
Gauger and Cribtender Foreman, Terminals
Division.
Henry C. Freeman, from Public Works
Foreman, Maintenance Division, to Steve-
nri-o wrnrrman nt'orminI nivicjinn


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


June 15 through July 15


ANNIVERSARIES





August 7, 1953


Security


Check


Require


THE PANAMA


sensitive

12-18


Positions

Months T


CANAL REVIEW


Complete


Ten


Captain


ears
1 July


George


Herman


Ago


was named


The security review check of all employ-
ees of the Canal organization, now being
conducted by the Internal Security
Branch, is a normal, routine check of all
employees of the U. S. Federal Govern-
ment. It is not a "witch hunt" or
something new and menacing.
It is required by a recent Executive
Order, establishing security requirements
for government employees, and setting up
"sensitive" positions in the Federal serv-
ice. A "full-field investigation," which
means that a thorough check is made of
sources furnishing background on the


employee's activity
every employee o'
position.
The order, date
numbered 10450, is
from government
all persons not su
employment. This


es, must be made of
ccupying a sensitive

d last April 27 and
designed to weed out
positions everywhere
iited for government
would affect not only


those who might traffic with or be sym-
pathetic to an unfriendly nation but also
those who for such reasons as mental or
moral instability are poor security risks.
Between 12 and 18 months will be
required to complete the investigation of
occupants of "sensitive" positions in the
Canal organization, according to word
from the Internal Security Branch which
is handling the Company-Government's
Security Program.
"Sensitive" positions, generally defined,
are whose whose occupants:
1. May have access to security informa-
tion classified as "confidential," "secret,"
or "top secret," or
2. May have the opportunity to commit
acts which directly or indirectly could
have an adverse effect on national
security.
The local action is in accord with that
taken in all government organizations,
in the United States or overseas, and is
required by Executive Order No. 10450.
The somewhat complicated forms which
employees in positions considered as
"sensitive" are now filling out are similar
to those used in the other government
agencies.
A sheet of instructions accompanies
each form and personnel of the Internal
Security Branch stand ready to assist
tmnlnvsR hvb answrinf snTecial aiuestions


days, through the Chief, Internal Secur-
ity Branch, statements and affidavits
refuting the charges on which the suspen-
sion is based. These statements will be


reviewed and
position of the
the Governor,
1. Restore t
duty; in such
compensated f
2. Transfer


a rec
case
who
he si
case


ommendation for dis-
will be submitted to
may then:
ispended employee to
the employee will be


or the period of suspension.
the employee to another


position within the Company-Govern-
ment.
3. Terminate the employment of the
suspended individual.
In addition to the foregoing protection,
which is guaranteed to all Company-
Government employees, United States
citizens, who have completed the proba-
tionary period in permanent or indefinite
appointments, are entitled to:
1. A written statement of charges.
2. An opportunity to answer charges.
3. A hearing before an impartial board.
4. A review by the Governor of the
board's findings.


WELL DRESSED BABIES no longer wear
only pink or blue. Dame Fashion has decreed
and the clothing industry has deferred to
baby clothes of maize and mint or almost any
other light color that appeals to mothers.
Following the little fashion lead, the
Commissaries have new infants' dress and
slip sets trimmed in maize and mint and
colored gripper diaper pants and shirts
of yellow.
"Redi-Tea," expected in the stores in August,
will eliminate the boiling, steep-
Tall ing, cooling and sugaring involved
and in serving iced tea. It is a liquid
Cool to which you add only water to
make this cooling drink. An eight-
ounce bottle, White Rose brand, will cost
about 23 cents. The directions say use two
or more teaspoonsful to make a glass of iced
tea of the desired strength."
"NYLAST," also expected this month, is a
new "shampoo" for nylon hose which the
.nan.. Cnr4f..ra tn.,m will i.10; wofi, falfl


Assistant Chief of the Police and Fire
Division. The new Police Chief A. O.
Meyer, named a month before, was given
the rank of Major.

A new regulation was placed in effect
providing that persons employed by The
Panama Canal in the United States for
service on the Isthmus would be required


agree to rem
reimburse


in in service for
he organization


a full year
for travel


expenses.


The new Canal Zone Air Terminal


formally
the new
southbou
building
month ea
delayed
condition


was


opened. The first plane to use
airport was a Panagra airliner,
nd for Lima. The terminal
had been completed about a
Lrlier but the opening had been
because of faults in the air
ing system.


W. M. Whitman, Attorney in the General
Counsel's Office, was named Assistant
General Counsel of The Panama Canal and
Assistant Counsel for the Panama Rail-
road Company on the Isthmus.


A SEVEN-MINUTE fluffy frosting mix is one
of the new kitchen time and labor savers
coming to the Commissaries this month. A
six-ounce package will cost about 30 cents.


A new
New
Furniture
GOOD
spikes are


shipment of Heywood-Wa
furniture, of Monticello
and maple, is now in the
GOLF OVERSHOES witi
now in the stores. They cost


AFicionados of I
will
Pizza new
Pies pack
and
A 129-ounce
50 cents.


talian food-and who isn
be glad to know there
pizza mix. It comes
age that includes the s
is expected during Au
package will cost a


kefield
cherry
stores.
h steel
$4.75.


t?-
is a
in a
auce
gust.
about


"WHITE SHOULDERS" perfume and co-
logne will be in the stores in August.


Car pens


for babies, new in the stores, can
hk ipcAr, Aither nc the ticii hnhv


Will





_16__________________THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW___________August 7,1953

STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC
For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1939.

1929 1952 1953 1929 1952 1953 1929 1952 1953
^ <. ^ -/ -> ^-
r- ^ -^ r v
r- ^ -J -i ^ {-
v TOLLS A -�
r CREDITS .
^ r. 1466 ^ , . . I---S--^-^1
,i ^ ^-,-,--, 7 -11 A- . U^/U^^UrWil ~1 ^ T ^ ~t
--< ::^ ^^J. ^; 7 ^LS1 ^
F-' -Tvii 1 r- ifii"'*'^>""� '* * ***-*4^T.**i'"TT . i i n < �- *W L-l-ii-) ->
TDLLS^ v X'-X^-S^^^ i1 ', *'� ', ] ' CREDITS s/
r'DrruTc: CvvX^OvQvQs^ i i' ' ' f i 1 -i ^ ^ncL'iio
s/ r^^t-^TS X<<'^^^ i i .1 < ' i i ^ t55?603B
t->rt"i ? V l'XK>006<^^ I I 1 I 'r1 ^1^^-w^'L/tJO
'si ^ '' ^ � . ^8sMMtL^% ; *',''' ', I'; *; * ''*', ' I t T r \, *
, -^ ^ v r ^ ^ ^COMMERCIAL]; 1^; ;1;';.1.1!'^ c -i � ^ >\


-------------, ICOMMERCIAL^ '^It^'^1^ '^P^??^'^^^ ^ I 'i'1','111'''' \ \''', r -TOLLS 7 ' !1^1^ ^1^ ^


^^^^^^ ^y;^^^^^':^?:^?; ^! f ^ \\'11''11 '*'*\ '^J^S^:^ \ ', '11- '1 ^^y^^. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^

IsM^M^ ^; |; '*; |;;;;;;;; SR^i?�^ ; I ^t^i^ ; !;:;:;;; ; ^;;; ^
^^sN^ ^^i^^^; ^f^ ^M ; ^ ^N^^ :;:;;^;::;:;;;!
^ N^ ;;;;; ; ;;;:; ?^ ^ ^ ; ; S^ N^ ;;;; ; ;:;;:;;;
i?;^ ^ ;;;:; ; ;;;;;;; m ^ ^ ; : ^-a^^m ;:;; ; ;;;;;;;
I ^*.*-*.***.**^ ::-.Y.'; .;. *. \ M - :.'.'; -; :^:? :::<:::*::*:: * ; ' ^ ^^ y ^ ': *;;;;'; ; *;'; *;;';
OCEAN-GOING .OCEAN-GOING- OCEAN-GOING. OCEAN-GOING .OCEAN-GOING' 'OCEAN-GOING S^A AN-) *: SlulAl'l' Aun :* ,^r 3-11
COMMERC AL ^COMMEROAL:, ; %M^CAL^ CC.M>. ERCIAL ^MMEy.lAL;: ; ,COMM .RCAU OCEAN^^NG [o^ - SSSa 'OC^ A^G
^ ::/.\".\<-':-.-.:-:.^ i1 * 1' *:''.' i * *t -C ^*.*.*ly-:^-'-:?.-.-/.* i *:''''.' ' * *' I 1 COMMERCIAL .'COMMERCIAL ; , 'COMMERCIAL'
*.*;.:*.*;;.-:::.*****.*.*; ' * *'*'.' " *ff *%\^*.:*"*^^^^^^^^ *'-'>' 1 1 1 '1/ 1 ! i ****.*.*.*:.*,*:;;:::*..-.* i'^ '-fl.1W >'W
i�� g^;;s| *�� ^^^il IMBI mm
e2li9 -;^6524^;; ;;^;7- 0^f� 27^ 666 :.:36'.674.302-; t 36.678 ^ ij; ; 27.28.893 ;t26:995'772 ^3 917 55''
*.^.*.*.***W :-^::-. *'.l l * 0 I l I I :'*;*:.*:.**:*.;**.*:**.*. S^'^a^ ;;;;;;; ^^{f *:^ M^ : ^^^^f ^ ^ ^ ;^;;;; \--,\ *:

.'*'"***''>';! *'*'-'*'%',".'- 1 < I ' l ' \ i i ' i ' *//.'*'-'" *';^^""^ ^'. ' I ' l ' ' i i ' ' >'-'^ *,'-'*'*'*'.'," 'i.'-"';''"' i i i ' i 1 ' ' i i i
^^ KUff ^^;;;;;::;: --I ^ ^;;:; lillB ^^^^








TRANSIT P. C. TONNAGE TOLLS COLLECTED
LARGE COMMERCIAL

Trancit Tnllc Tnnni�ra MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
i ransn_ i ons, i onnage ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
Comparisons Tell Story By fiscal years
A nDAPUTn ciTnov ^f u,,. ,,^�,,��� s , -





August 7,1953


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


CANAL'S


BANNER


YEAR


EXCEEDS


FORECASTS


MADE


BY


SEVERAL


WELL-KNOWN


ANALYSTS


No soothsayer ever had a more trouble-
some time with his predictions than the
many experts for the past half century in
forecasting Panama Canal traffic for any
appreciable period.
Because of the extreme fluctuations in
the number of ships moving through the
Canal as reflected by world changes of


an economic
long-range tr
unpredictable.
however, sine


r


o0
aff
e


political
1 1


nature,
11


ic trends are all our
The past fiscal year,
the number of transits


and total net tonnage figures far exceeded
former records, was a banner one for all
forecasters except the most optimistic.
The accompanying chart above shows
the prediction of Dr. Roland L. Kramer
in 1947 on Canal transits for the last half
of this century. Dr. Kramer, Professor
of Commerce and Transportation at the
Wharton School of Finance and Com-
merce of the University of Pennsylvania,
was employed as a traffic consultant for
the Isthmian Canal Studies of 1947.
Kramer Estimated Low
As indicated on the chart, the number
of ocean-going commercial transits and
total transits both exceeded his predic-
tions for the first time. In making his
estimate of future traffic trends, Dr.
Kramer added 7.4 percent to cover the
factor of through or partial transits for
Panama Canal equipment. Since the
lines indicating traffic from 1947 through
1953 show actual transits, his prediction
on total traffic for the past year was well
under the actual number.
The first of many forecasts of Panama
Canal traffic was made about 50 years
ago for the first Isthmian Canal Com-
mission by Dr. Emory R. Johnson, also
Professor of Transportation and Com-
merce at the University of Pennsylvania.
His estimate was contained in reports
prepared on the industrial and commercial
value of a canal.
His second forecast, and one which
was remarkably accurate, was prepared
shortly before the Canal was opened in
1914 while serving as Special Commis-
sioner on Panama Canal Traffic and
Tolls.
Slip? A Factnr


.* ,. * f t ^-
FIS AL 4 . .
'40 40 �. 6Q
FISCAL YEAR


Net tonnage, commercial
vessels over 300 tons, fiscal
year 1953 ..
Net tonnage, tolls credit ves-
sels, 1953_
Total net tonnage, fiscal year
1953 (
C. S. Ridley (1923) . _ _


Harry


Burgess


and R


. A.


Wheeler (1929) ...
Sydney B. Williamson (1929-
31) . .
Grover G. Huebner (1936)
Roland L. Kramer (1947) .


36,500,000
6,500,000
43,000,000
41,200,000
50,000,000
51,900,000
37,500,000
36,600,000


The forecast made by General Ridley,
former Panama Canal Governor, was
made while serving as Assistant Engineer
of Maintenance. His estimate was based
on 1924 figures projected to 1925 which
failed to materialize and therefore his


forecast is somewhat higher than it
would have been had he used the actual
1925 traffic figures.
The estimates prepared by Governor
Burgess and General Wheeler when the
latter was serving as Assistant Engineer
of Maintenance were based primarily on
a review of traffic statistics for both Suez
and Panama Canals. The figures used
were based on measurement rules in effect
prior to 1938 and therefore the total
figure of 50,000,000 net tons is somewhat
higher than if the estimate were trans-
1 - .1 . . . 1 - -- -


the Officer-in-Charge of the 1929-31
Nicaraguan Canal Survey. It was based
on the interrelation of world shipping,
Panama Canal traffic, and Suez Canal
traffic over the years 1890 to 1930,
inclusive.
Dr. Huebner, another Professor of Com-
merce and Transportation at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, prepared his estimate
while employed by a special committee
to report on Canal tolls and rules of


measurement. It was baf
of Suez traffic from 187(
Panama Canal general
figures from 1923 to 1936.


sed on tonnage
0 to 1935 and


tonnage


When Sea Level Is Not Sea Level
And Why The Tides Are Different

(Continued from page 4) gates. The tidal
lock would be on a channel by-pass; oper-
ated much as are the present locks, it
would have a chamber 200 feet wide and
1,500 feet long.
In the normal operation of the tidal
regulation structures, the navigable pass
would be open when the Pacific tides are
near mean sea level, and during these
periods traffic would be routed through
the pass.
During tidal stages which would pro-
duce channel currents over the limited





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7, 1953


Governor

Fron


Receives

i Panama


Letter

Landlords


TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE


ROUTES


The following table shows the cargo shipments in thousands of long tons, of com-
minercial vessels (300 net tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:


High praise for the efficiency of the
personnel connected with the water man-


agement contrn
trash collection
publicly express
prietors Assoc
management c
the Maintenan
bage and trasi
Health Bureau


t(
ii
se
ia
or
ce
h


t and the garbage and
n Panama City has been
d bv the Panama Pro-
tion. Both the water
tract administered by
Division and the gar-
collection work of the
in Panama and Colon


terminated at the end of June.
Appreciation for the manner in which
the work was done was expressed in a
letter to Governor Seybold from Carlos
A. Patterson, Secretary of the Panama
Proprietors Association, who said in part:
"The Panama Association of Pro-
prietors, in the name of all the land-
lords in Panama, is pleased to
acknowledge publicly in writing the
sincere appreciation felt toward the
heads and personnel of the Water
Office and the Garbage Collection


Department,
fully and effic
"The high
beats in eve
moves us to
ledgment and
to all Canal Z


who
iently
spirit
ry Pa
make
,ina
one re


worked so faith-
Suntil June 30.
of justice which
namanian breast
public acknow-
very special way,
sident citizens, of


the just recognition of the work of


these services as perfo
American personnel for
of Panama over a lo
years."


)rmed by the
' the Republic
ng period of


Plans Proceeding For Conversion
Of Zone Electricity To 60-Cycle;
(Cnmtinued from page 1) proponents of thE
60-cycle idea obtained medical opinion
that the 25-cycle current would produce
eye strain, while 25-cycle advocates
held that excessive reading, by any
frequency, would be detrimental to
eyesight.
The question arose again at the time
Madden hydroelectric station was buili
in the early 1930's, and serious thought
has again been given to the matter since
about 1950.

Main Routes Gain As Canal
Shipping Has Record Yeari


FISCAL


United States
East Coast of
East Coast of
East Coast of


I ltercoastal
I". S. and South Am
I'. S. and Central .\
1". S., Canada, and


I. S/Canada East Coast and Aus


Europe and \Vest Coast of U.


Europe andI


S.C


jerica -
nerica
Far East.
tralasia
anlada -


South Anerica - -


Europe and Australasia
All other routes...


Total Traffic - -


1953
4,871
5,176
552
7,848
1,456
4,036
1,491
2,137
8,528
36,095


YEAR


S 1952
4,279
5,098
528
6,283
1,634

5,970
1,706
2,478
33 ,o-1
5,635
33,611


1938
6,395
2,652
46
4,912
992
4,237
2,974
1,251
3,927
27,386


Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels
Fiscal Years
1953 1952 1938
N a tito nality~ r----~ -,"* - "----"" " -v------
tt li Numrn- N um- Num-
her of Tonw of her of |Tons of her of Tons of
transit cargo transit- cargo transit cargo
Argentine ...----- I 3 13,670 2 18,507 .. .... .. .


Belgian.. .
Brazilian
British
Chilean ....
Chinese .
Colombian - -
Costa Rican
Cuban-.. .
I)anish
Ectadorean1 - -
Estonian -
Korean (South)
Finnish ..
French ........
German ....
Greek .....
Guatemalan --
Hoinluran -
Hungarian l-
Icelandic
Irish . . .
Iranian ...
Italian ..
Japanese -
Latvian
Liberian
Mexican
Moroccan.....
Netherland ...
Nicaraguan -
Norwegian
Panamanian- -
Peruvian_ -
Philippine - -
Port uguese


S
t
t
I
1


r


(Continued from page I) previous year.
Both dry cargo tonnage and tanker


1~ .AC>tl^
59
144
9
206
152
2
141
230
92
2
400

28
1 1
141
320 {


77-I


10,300


7.877,279
322.415
291,480
144,654
57,651


6
7,967
209
211
115
36


21.181
9.700
677,501
2,113,273


7
559
105
814
3
575


.319
,866
,541
,855
,389
.370
,960
,104

,680
,073
.632
,420
,152
,457
A *


740
13,164
9,220
462,451
696,794
337,271
19,916


2


,())
3


285
667
182
5
3


6.41
2
1


4,021
67,288
18,593
25,351


8,478
24,411


153,417
1,877,502
4,900


--.


s





August 7, 1953


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Hospital Insurance, Quarters Assignments
Discussed At July Employee Conference


(Continued from page 3} assignments in Ba
boa had been so declined.
Other subjects brought up in th
conference were:


A change in
schedules from tha
Balboa pool will
and other pools sixb
Discontinuance
dump and inaugu


the swim
t originally a
be opened si
days weekly
of the Diabl
ration of a r


ling
nnou
even
' *


lo
.e


the hills behind Red Tank;
The expected demolition of all 1
Red Tank by Christmas, 1953
Proposed transfer to Margarit
antic side drivers' license e:
ho is a police officer and whose
uld give Margarita a more pers
rvice than it has at present a
nation (This proposal was object
veral Atlantic side conferees,


being studied further);


rubbish
w dump

mildings

a of the
examiner,
presence
onalized
is a call
ed to by
and is


Service Credit
A renewed request that part-time or
"Silver Roll" service be credited toward
U. S.-rate housing assignments; and an
estimate that 100 to 150 employees would
be affected by this change; the Personnel
Director will undertake a study;
Quarters maintenance, to be reported


They


Moved


A series of changes in Canal office
assignments which began early in May
is now nearing completion. The prin-
cipal changes and new office locations
are summarized as follows:
The Treasurer's Office, Claims
Branch and Agency Accounts Branch,
all of the Comptroller's Office, have
moved to Building 5142 in Diablo
Heights.
The Supply and Service Director's
Office is now in Rooms 262-270 while
the Comptroller and his immediate
staff, as well as the Accounting Systems
Staff, now occupy all offices on the
second floor of the west wing of the
Administration Building. The Man-
agement Staff of the Comptroller's
Office has moved to Room 112.
The Locks Division headquarters are
now located at Pedro Miguel Locks.
The Wage and Classification Division
has moved to Room 102 of the Admin-
istration Building with other Personnel
Bureau units.
The Internal Security Branch has
moved to the former Treasurer's office
on the first floor. The rooms vacated
by this office on the third floor of the
Administration Building are now occu-
pied by the Community Services
Director. The Real Estate Unit has
been transferred from Diablo Heights
to the third floor of the Administration
Building. The Survey Branch is now
located in the former Diablo Heights
Fire Station.


Here


nissarrv


Assistant, Anconl 32 years. 3


� - ,
months, 10 days; Lutz, Fla.
Ross H. Hollowell, Ohio; Estimator and
Planner, Industrial Bureau; 34 years, 2
months, 16 days; Hendersonville, N. C
Robert W. Hutchings, Mississippi;
Assistant Auto Repair Foreman, Motor
Transportation Division; 30 years, 8 months,
1 day; San Jose, Calif.
Vard A. Kerruish, Missouri; Steward,
Clubhouse D)ivision; 22 years, 10 months,
24 days; St. Petersburg, Fla.
Godfrey B. Pacetti, Florida; Fleet
Machinist, IDredging Division; 23 years,
5 months, 13 days; Panama.
Norman E. Rocker, Nebraska; Admin-
istrative Assistant, Office of Engineering
and Construction Di)rector; 34 years, 6
months, 27 days; California.
Irl R. Sanders, Kentucky; Control
House Operator, Atlantic Locks; 25 years,
8 months, 12 days; Glasgow, Ky.
William C. Smith, Kentucky; Control
House Supervisor, Atlantic Locks; 30
years, 2 months, 22 days; Miami, Fla.
Frank Turman, Connecticut; Plumb-
ing Inspector, Contract and Inspection
Division; 12 years, 10 months, 9 days;
Lorain, Ohio.


at August
Reducti
service at
contempla


conference:


on of hours and coo
the Gamboa Clubho
ted instead of closing


ked food
use, now
the club-


house as originally proposed; this will be
discussed further by the Lieutenant
Governor with a delegation from Gamboa;
Parking at the Balboa post office,
where the number of parking spaces was
recently curtailed; accidents in this area
have dropped sharply; the administration
feels return to angle parking would be a
step backward;
Anniversary Stickers
A protest that residents of New Cris-
tobal have to buy Panamanian 50th
anniversary stickers before their cars can
be given the required semi-annual inspec-
tion; the Lieutenant Governor as matter
of priority is investigating legality and
possible relief;
New regulations on commutation of
leave pay when an employee resigns or
retires (covered elsewhere in this issue);
And a general round-table discussion,
with a hKip avnhlnlntl3rn h1,r ?rxlnrMn P0v


Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All figures in thousands of long tons)
Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1952 columns indicate
relative positions in those years
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC
Fiscal Year
Commodity - --------....


Mineral oils -
Coal and coke-
Manufactures of
Sugar ..._...
Soy beans and p
Phosphates -
Sulphur_
Paper and paper
Cement....
Blarley ...
Machinery_ -
Automobiles _
Rice -
Tinplate
Raw cotton _
All others _


iron and
products.


steel - -


products


1


3,
*7 ? IfA


1 t in


1938
907 (3).
137 (15)
1,859 (1)
57 (31)
328 (6)
297 (7)
423 (5)
154 (11)
( )
168 (10)


238 (8)
142 (13)
4,771
i ~ ~ #i C/ Ck


Where


RETIREMENTS IN JULY

Retirement certificates were presented
the end of July to the following employees
who are listed alphabetically, together with
their birthplaces, titles, length of service
and future addresses:
Mrs. Mary L. Clements, Ohio; Com-


in


in

At
wh
CO.
ser
st
se'


t





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


August 7,


1953


PICTURES


OF


THE


MONTH


C -


1 **.K:
*.n :,
I. '


JULY


brought


a number


"firsts" to the Canal Zone-first occasions
or first visits.


Shirley


Million,


Governor


of Girls'


State, said goodbye


to Acting Governor


H. O. Paxson just before she left on her
first visit to Girls' Nation in Washington.
Hundreds of midshipmen, on summer
cruises from Annapolis or Naval ROTC
units in States colleges, made their first
trips to the Panama Canal locks.
Under Secretary of the Army Earl D.
Johnson, new chairman of the Panama
Canal Company, took his first look at the
controls which operate the locks, and
Pete, pet of the piers, was first in line
when dog licensing and inoculation of


Canal


dogs against rabies began


new