Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Creation Date:
July 1953
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )
23584335 ( ALEPH )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
y/--/ <7


c.

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum
__ PANAMAL


CANAL


Vol. 3, No. 12 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, JULY 3, 1953 5 cents


FUNDAMENTAL


BY


UNDER


PROBLEMS

SECRETARY


OF


CANAL


JOHNSON


BEING


ON


STUDIED


PRESENT


VISIT


Board Chairman Plans


See


Installation


Principal
is In Zone


Problems


mental nature
tion will affect
operations for
the future aren
by Under Se
Army Earl D.
his present vis
Zone.
As Chairman of ti


of such


that
Panm
manw
Sbein
cretar
John!
it to


a funda-
their solu-
ima Canal
y years min
ig studied
y of the
son during
the Canal


he Board of Directors


of the Panama Canal Company the
Under Secretary is one of the key Wash-
ington officials in Canal affairs. His
present trip is his first to the Isthmus and
a busy schedule has been arranged which
will permit his personal inspection of the
major Canal installations in addition to
many conferences for background infor-
mation on a variety of subjects.
The Under Secretary is accompanied
by Mrs. Johnson and their son, Raud E.
Johnson. Other members of his party
are Michael E. Kalettc, consultant to the
Under Secretary; Col. John T. O'Neill
and Lt. Col. Homer H. Bowman, members
of the Under Secretary's personal staff;
and Chief Warrant Officer DeBolt G.
Weyer.


The party arrived
on the Panama liner
welcomed at shipside


Monday
Cristobali
by Gov


afternoon
and were
ernor and




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


July 3,1953


Housing

Of Su


Heads


objects


List


Raised


July


4th


Celebrations


Will


Be


Held


Tomorrow On Both Sides Of Isthmus


At June Conference
Discussion of commissaries, clubhouses,
and housing occupied most of the time of
the June Governor-Employee conference,
with housing-from point of view of time
elapsed-heading the list. Housing mat-
ters which were brought up ranged from


assignments to types.
The June conference,
weather, was one of the
months.
As usual it opened
questions which had
at previous meetings
announcements made b


despite the sultry
liveliest in recent


with answe
been pres
and with
y Governor


rs to
rented
new
Sey-


bold. During this part of the confer-
ence, the Governor told the employee
representatives:
That the "emergency" service sections
at Balboa and Cristobal Commissaries
would be open for the last time on
July 13;


That any changes min the policy of
capital evaluation of houses would be
reviewed first by him and then by the
Board of Directors;
That no decision had yet been reached
on the closing of the Gamboa Clubhouse,
a subject brought up again later during
the conference and discussed more fully;
That a new housing assignment policy
had been established under which a
limited number of one-bedroom, four-
family houses of the 215 type in Diablo
and Margarita will be set aside for assign-
ment by seniority to bachelors; to qualify
for such an assignment, however, a
bachelor must have not less than 15 years
service, he said;
That the American Institute of Laun-
dries, an association to which the Canal
laundry belongs, had made a favorable
report on the type of work being done
locally on washable materials.
James P. Boukalis, of the Machinists,
commented on the recent order requiring
the licensing of all dogs in the Canal Zone
and asked that the Canal Zone criminal


code be amended to provide for punish-
ment of anyone who injured an animal.
Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director,
said that a provision of this sort is under
study in the General Counsel's Office for
inclusion in future revisions of the Code.


FOURTH OF JULY, 1919, brought out decorations like this for the little park in front of the
Balboa Clubhouse.


Flag raising, patriotic and athletic
programs, and fireworks will be the order
of the day tomorrow when the Canal Zone
celebrates the Fourth of July.
On the Pacific side, the Independence
Day activities will be centered in Balboa
as they have been for years. The Atlantic
side celebration will take place in
Margarita.
The Pacific side program will get under


A
*-I1-


way tonmgnh, witn a (
ican Legion Club neal
Both sides of the C
tomorrow's programs
flag raising. That at
at the flag pole near th
the Balboa parade
flag raising in front


house and will be
ren's parade down
For both sides
greatest emphasis


fol
th
of
wi


lance at the Amer-
r Fort Amador.
anal Zone will open
with a parade and
Margarita will end
ie Margarita school;
vill begin with the
of the Balboa Club-
lowed by the child-
e Prado.
Sthe Isthmus, the
ll be laid on activi-


ties for the younger generation-athletic
events, rides on jeeps, kiddie trains (made
up of the little industrial trucks which
ordinarily scurry around the docks), fire


Be


trucks, and, at Margarita, on the Army's
amphibious "Ducks."
There will be a swimming meet at the
Gatun pool at 9:30 a. m., and one at
Balboa at 1:30 p. m.
At 3:30 p. m. there will be patriotic
exercises at the Balboa stadium with Lt.
Gov. Harry 0. Paxson as the day's chief
speaker. This will be followed by a
massed band concert. The band concert
on the Atlantic side will begin at 6 p. m.
and will be held near the Margarita school.
Traditional fireworks displays will end
Fourth of July activities for both sides.
On the Pacific side, Sosa Hill will be the
firing spot, as it has been for a number
of years.
The Margarita fireworks will be set
off from a location near the baseball field.
Both fireworks displays are to start at
7:30 p. m.
Emmett Zemer is chairman of the
Pacific side July 4 celebration; S. Ross
Cunningham heads the Atlantic side
committee.


Careful-Anopheles


Biting


I 1 I.


b


i





July 3, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Basic


Changes


Adopted


Under Secretary


Army


Have


Schedule Here


In Accounting Methods

Of Canal Organization

A revised accounting system designed
to simplify procedures and permit a
ready identification of direct costs for
each activity in the complex Company-
Government operations was adopted
July 1, the beginning of the new fiscal
year.
The new system entails some major
changes in accounting policies and pro-
cedures. Basically it eliminates the
confusing method of applying to indi-
vidual activities indirect charges over
which those concerned with the activities
have, in fact, no control.
The stripping of each function to its
elemental costs, primarily materials and
labor, is expected to increase cost aware-
ness and to provide better accountability
for those responsible for individual
operations.
The revised accounting system is called
"activity accounting" since cost and
revenue data will be accumulated by
activities. An "activity" is defined in a
memorandum to Bureau Directors, on
the new system, as the work or operation
of a single organizational unit relating
to a single function or purpose. Except
for job order work, it represents the
lowest practicable unit for accounting
purposes.
One account will be maintained for each
activity and every item of income or cost
will be carried to and remain in that
particular account. Several activity
accounts will generally be required to
determine unit costs. Where costs are
transferred between activities, the distri-
bution credit will be carried in a separate
account so as to retain the record of the
total costs incurred by an activity.
"Activity Accounting" is not new. This
or similar accounting procedures are
widely used in private enterprise and in
many other U. S. Government agencies.
The system is expected to facilitate
accounting work in the Canal organiza-
tion because of the great variety of
operations and types of services.
The newly adopted system will require
an almost complete recomputation of the
Company's internal rates for transferring
_ _- _.- 1. 1~ - > r~


DEPARTMENT OP THE ARMY
OFFICE OF THE UNO NR SECRETARY
WASHINGTON, O.C.


23 June 1953


Governor John


S. Seybold,


Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Dear Governor Seybold:
In response to inquiries from Congress and other interested
agencies, Secretary of the Ary Robert T. Stevens has directed that
I conduct a thorouO renew of military service and Panma Canal
Coapiany activities, with a view toward making 6uch recommendations
as will reduce any unnecessary costs in the Caribbean area. My
present trip is an integral part of this review process. More-
over, it wl satisfy a lon -standing desire to see the great
engineering marvel, and it winl give me a better understanding
of the many problems affecting the operation and administration
of the Canal Zone.
The role of the Panama Canal In our nation's welfare and its
importance in international affair. are no less today than at any
time in its history. I hope that my present visit will provide me
with a co.prehensin understanding of the many facets of its
operation as well as the personal problems which affect the welfare
of the employees and their famllles who are responsible for its
succeaaful operation.
I would lke to assure all employees that I consider their
personal problem of major importance in the continued efficient
operation of the waterway and its necessary adjuncts.
Sincerely yours,
^7 ~ ** y .
Earl D. Johnson
Under Secret6y of the Army


(Continued fro?
day visit.
construction
time in the
variety of
importance
Foremost
increasing
fiscal police
direct inter


m page ) during his 10-
Except at the close of the
n period, there has been no
Canal's history that such a
questions of far-reaching
has arisen at one time.
among these are plans for
the capacity of the Canal;
es; administrative matters of
est to employees, such as the


study directed by the Senate Appropria-
tions Committee on compensation and
fringe benefits; and the quarters
construction program.
Not only are all of the subjects of major
importance, each one is of such a nature
that a solution at an early date is indi-
cated. Most of these are of an abstract
nature which will require the Board
Chairman to spend much of his time in
conference with officials concerned.
Aside from this Under Secretary
Tn^hncn/n bca y~qt^-/ +nf mnlrn^/ .m n~nwit~onnl


calls for visits to one or more set of Locks;
a trip through Gaillard Cut; and inspec-
tion of new housing areas, terminal
facilities, Clubhouses, Commissaries, Hos-
pitals, and other Canal Zone Government
facilities.
The complete schedule of the Under
Secretary's activities had not been an-
nounced when this edition of THE
CANAL REVIEW went to press, and the
exact dates of his visits to various
installations were still to be set.
Mr. Johnson's service as Chairman of
the Board of Directors of the Panama
Canal Company began two months ago.
He was appointed to the post by Secretary


of the Army
to succeed
resigned as
member of t
The Unde
Hamilton, O0
_. a -


Robert T.
Karl R.
Chairman
;he Board.
r Secretary
hio, and is


* Stevens in April
Bendetsen who
but continued as

y is a native of
a graduate of the




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


July 3, 1953


Canal


Ends


With


Half

Municl]


Century's

al Services


Association


Panama,


Colon


WATER for Panama City was first supplied from this reservoir at Rio Grande not far from the
present Empire rifle range. The lake has been dry for years, hut the tower in the background is still
standing and may identify the location for those who drive on the road to Empire, Culebra and Paja.


Termination of the water management
contract and the agreement by which the
Canal collected garbage in the terminal
cities of Panama and Colon and the
assumption of responsibility for these
services by the Republic of Panama
ended almost 50 years of Canal Zone
association with the Republic's water
and garbage services.
From late 1903 until July 1 of this
year, either in connection with the water
and sewage systems or from funds derived
from the management contract, there were
laid in Panama and Colon 46 miles of
pipe, varying from 6 inches to 16 inches
in diameter, 56 miles of sewer lines and 43
miles of paved streets. In addition

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR


streets were maintained in both terminal
cities.
There was no public water supply in the
city of Panama and only a limited supply
in Colon when the United States took over
the French Canal Company's properties
in May 1904.
One of the articles of the 1903 treaty
provided, among other things, that Pan-
ama grant the United States the right
"to any works of sanitation such as the
collection and disposition of sewage and
the distribution of water in the cities of
Panama and Colon."
The expense of such works was to be
borne by the United States, which was
authorized "to impose and collect water
rates and sewage rates" sufficient to
amortize their cost in a 50-year period.
At the end of this period, these properties
were to revert to Panama.
Water From Rio Grande
Engineers immediately went to work on
the Panama City water system, finally
deciding to supply the city from the head-
waters of the Rio Grande, about 10 miles
..^ &'LU .- ^.. .. ... .. i _.r / -.1 .. i-.....


16-inch pipe, from the Rio Grande to a
million-gallon distributing reservoir in
Ancon, from which it would feed into
Panama by gravity flow. The water sys-
tem was designed to supply a population
of 30,000 people with 60 gallons apiece
daily.
There was some delay in construction
of the Ancon reservoir and pending its
completion the city was supplied by direct
pressure from the Rio Grande pipeline.
Water was turned on in Panama City for
the first time on July 4, 1905.
The Isthmian Canal Commission report
for that year recounts how the Municipal
Council held a special session and adopted
a resolution of thanks to the government
of the Canal Zone. The President, his
cabinet, and Canal Zone officials attended
a special Mass of thanks in the Cathedral
in Panama City.
By the end of 1906, the water system
for the capital was completed, except for
a few house connections. Where these
were still lacking fire hydrants supplied
the populace.
Water For Colon
On the Atlantic side, the story was
somewhat different. In 1904, that part of
Colon which was occupied by officials and
employees of the Panama Railroad and
by foreign consuls was supplied with
water brought by the Railroad Company
through a small iron pipe from a small
reservoir near Mt. Hope. The rest of the
population collected ramin water in iron
tanks.
In 1906 the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission reported a successful solution to
this problem, saying: "Colon and Cris-
tobal now have an abundant supply of
pure and wholesome water from a receiv-
ing reservoir two miles back from Mt.
Hope. This reservoir has a capacity of
508,000,000 gallons. . Street hydrants
have been placed every 700 feet in Colon
to supply the inhabitants with water until
house connections are made."
During the quarter ending June 30,
1906, by which time there were 432 con-
sumers in Panama City, a water rate was
set at $4 silver a quarter. This entitled
the consumer to 10,000 gallons of water
during the quarter; there was a charge
of "40 cents silver" for each additional


1,000 gallons but the

CANAL P


(See page 13)


RINTER





July 3, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


You Have Bad Luck?


Many of us still think accidents just
happen-that they are due mostly to
bad luck. When such a person has an
accident his thinking is usually as follows:
"It was just my hard luck; I have been
pushing my luck too long; I was due to
have one sooner or later." This kind of
thinking is similar to believing that black
cats leave an invisible cloud of bad luck
in their wake from which there is no


escape. Nothing can be farther from the
truth. You can avoid having an accident.
Granted, one or two accidents out of a
hundred may be caused by an "Act of
God," things we are powerless to prevent,
such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and tidal
waves; however, nowadays, it is possible
to protect yourself even against these.
The other 99 accidents can be avoided if
you do something about them in person.
It may not be possible for you to
guarantee your own safety all the time,
because others may do something which
involves you in an accident. Yet, even
these can be avoided with everybody
working together for his own safety.
Think back to some of the accidents
you have seen or heard about. Didn't


HONOR ROLL
Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
MAY
INDUSTRIAL BUREAU


, AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR
Industrial----------------------- 4
Civil Affairs-----------------2
Health- .--------------- .2
Community Services--- .----- 1
Engineering and Construction------ 1
Marine ------------------------
Railroad and Terminals 0------
Supply and Service. -------------- 4


wr A. -- UT^.


someone say that the man was careless;
that he wasn't watching what he was do-
ing? Why sure, that is just what the
usual explanation has been. Someone
did something wrong- he did something
that could have been done better and
more safely. Now what can you do
personally to prevent having an accident?
Take a look at the way you work. A
lot of people work with you and someone
helps you in one way or another. You
know that there must be cooperation and
teamwork to get a job done. Therefore,
teamwork and looking after the other
fellow's safety, as well as your own, will
also prevent accidents. The following
suggestions will give some idea on how
to start:


1. Consider safety as much a part
of your job as knowing how to do the
work.
2. Look for hazards around your job.
3. When you see something that
might cause an accident, stop and fix
it. What if someone else did leave it?
That is no reason for you to walk off
and not make it right. Always bend
down that nail; pick up those tools;
move that pipe out of the way; clean
up that broken glass.
4. If you see something you cannot
fix or have no time to repair, then tell
someone else who can. Let your boss
know of all unsafe conditions and
hazards before starting the job.
5. Be alert every minute while you
are working to protect yourself and
others.
6. When you are doing hazardnius


work,
goggles


r - -^ -- --^-. ^- -. *. .
protect yourself properly with
, safety hat, safety shoes, face


MAY 1953


Industrial Bureau
Engineering and Construction Bureau


On Having Bad Luck


20 30


mask, respirator, or whatever the job
requires.
7. See that everybody working with
you is protected by proper clothing and
safety equipment.
8. Stop whatever you are doing and
set up proper safeguards so no one else
will be hurt as a result of what you are
doing.
9. If you are not sure it is safe for
you to proceed, check with your boss
to learn the safe way.
10. If you, as the boss, are doubtful
call your Safety Inspector.
11. Always find out first how to work
safely. NEVER TAKE A CHANCE.
12. Make yourself a good example for
others. Be enthusiastic for Safety.
Influence others to work safely. Keep
your work area clean and orderly.
13. Go cautiously. Trying to work
too fast and taking short cuts to save
time often results in accidents. Take
a few moments to think how to do the
job safely. A moment of thought may
save hours of delay and days of personal
suffering.
14. Cooperate with those who are
trying to prevent accidents. They are
thinking of your safety.
15. When you are injured, compensa-
tion is a poor substitute for the suffer-
ing, loss of pay, and the jeopardizing of
your family's welfare.
16. If you do have an injury, no
matter how small, protect your life and
limb by getting immediate first aid
and medical treatment.
Safety-mindedness and accident pre-
vention is one part of the job that can be
safely taken home. Let this part of your
job worry you at home and while you are
taking your recreation. Off the job acci-
dent prevention is equally as important to
you and your family as safety on the job
Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked
(Frequency Rale)


I ,^ .....


I




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


July 4, 1953


Doll-Dressing Hoi
Many Children


bby
On


Benefits


The


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS

The Strangler Fig, pictured in the
accompanying photograph, does exactly
what its name implies.
It begins to grow on other trees when
a seed, usually dropped by a bird or in
some other fashion, lodges in a crevice
or at the base of spreading palm leaves.
The fig sends small feeder roots to the
ground and continues to grow.
Over a period of years the roots


increase in number and encircle the entire
trunk of the host plant. As both trees
grow, the fig's roots tighten, until all
circulation to the original tree is cut off
and it dies.
By this time the fig, whose botanical
name is Ficus, is strong enough to support


its own branch


DRESSING DOLLS is a hobby for Mrs. Claude M. Kreger of Gamboa. The Scotcn lassie in the
foreground, the demure Dutch maid on the fence, and the five Panamanian dolls are only a few of the
many she has dressed.


Mrs. Margaret B. Kreger of Gamboa
plays with dolls-but only to dress them
in fancy finery and then give them
away. She has dressed hundreds in the
past three years but has only those


shown in the accompanying picture to
show her handiwork.
About 100 of her finely dressed dolls
were given last Christmas to children
in an orphanage in Colon and other poor
children in Panama. Her niece in
Europe has a collection of 80 that Mrs.
Kreger has dressed. Many others have
been sold and the proceeds given to
charitable and community organizations.
Girls State, sponsored by the American
Legion, will benefit this year from the


proceeds from three of her larger dolls.
Mrs. Kreger has been an active member
of the American Legion Auxiliary Post 6
at Gamboa for the past 10 years.
Other doll sales have financed sizable
gifts for food packages and clothing sent
to Czechoslovakia, earthquake victims
in Ecuador and a $100 check last Christ-
mas given to Panama's First Lady as
head of the Panama Red Cross for use
in the purchase of foodstuffs for the
city's poor children.
Dolls dressed by Mrs. Kreger are a
cosmopolitan group. The first one she
made was a blonde Scotch lassie who


engagement at the theater, Mrs. Kreger
grew up all over the world but received
most of her education in French and
English convents and in Germany where
she was taught needlework of all kinds.
From that time on, she made all her
own clothes, including the theatrical
costumes she wore when she followed in
her parent's footsteps, playing in theaters
all over Europe and the United States.
Tailor, Too


Since she


ies. It frequently outlives


and overtops the host tree; sometimes the
host tree disappears entirely, leaving the
giant climber twined around a large,
hollow cylinder.
Many species of the Strangler Fig then
drop aerial roots to the ground. These
form what may be called a new trunk.
They continue spreading, killing any trees
in their way.


married and retired from


the stage in 1927, she has also made all
the clothing worn by her husband, Claude
M. Kreger, Rotary Drill Operator in the
Dredging Division.
Mrs. Kreger studied dolls a long time
before she tried to dress one, inspecting
all that she could find and studying the
costumes of many nations as they were


shown in pictures and books.
The materials that go into the costumes
for the dolls come from many unsus-


pected sources. The "golc
jewelry worn by one of her d
fancy chain belt once worn by
the Gay Nineties era. Gold
beads go into the making of j
pollera dressed dolls. Their
ques" are tiny beads, "pearls,
scales strung on fine wires.


1" pollera
olls was a
a belle of
braid and
ewelry for
"temble-
" and fish
The dolls'


STRANGLER FIGS engulf their hosts. This tree
is one of two in a meadow near Ridge Road, Balboa
Heights. Another fine specimen is in George Green
Park on Madden Road.


It is said that Alexander the Great once
camned under such a tree. which was


Isthmus


I
I


i





July 3,


1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


PANAMA CANAL
I -


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication Third
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE

Printed by the Printing Plant
Mount Hope, Canal Zone


JOHN


S. SEYBOLD, Governor-President


Commendation


H. O. PAXSON,


Lieutenant Governor


J. RUFus HARDY, Editor


ELEANOR H. MClLHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS


Editorial Assistants


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$1.00 a


SINGLE COPIES-5 cents each


On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses,
Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after
publication date.

SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10 centseach


BACK COPIES-10


cents each


On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk, Third Floor,Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.

Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to Editor, THE PANAMA
CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights, C. Z.


THE THIRD COMMENDATION received by Thomas S. Grai
seamanship is presented to the motorboat operator hy C('apt. Horatio
A copy of the letter to Thomas Grant also went to Rafael A. Lest


rescue


for which the commendation was


given.


At the height of the windstorm which struck the Pacific si


the two employees
high winds.


rescued


two Panamanians


from their


cap:


nt for personal bravery and excelle
A. Lincoln, Balboa Port Captain.


ano, seaman


, left, who assisted in the


de of the Isthmus the afternoon of May 27,
sized cayuco which had overturned in the


The Panamanians, residents of Taboga, had clung to their capsized boat for about an hour before they


were picked up in the Canal channel near Flamenco Island.
The motorboat operator and seaman, in the launch M


ackerel,


storm broke to pick up a Panama Canal pilot, also towed to safety


vicinity which


which had been dispatched before the
a Panamanian schooner in the same


was drifting toward the shoals.


On two other occasions the launch operator had been highly commended for similar


seamanship.


In August


1935, he rescued, under trying conditions, 16 crew members and


bravery


passengers


Applications May Be Filed


Between July


13, August 7


off the motorboat B. E. de Obarrio when it sank after a collision with the S. S. Cathwood.


In July 1940, while he was operating the U. S. Cotinga, he sighted and saved from drowning an


ican man and woman who had been in the


Riptide


capsized.


waters


The launch operator on that


Amer-


of the Canal for about four hours after their sailboat


occasion


artificial respiration administered after they were rescued.
"You displayed an utter disregard for your personal


good judgment and expert seamanship.


was credited with


I take pleasure in comn


ance, which is in keeping with the highest standards of


service


saving


their lives by having


and you also exhibited quick thinking,
mending you for this excellent perform-
in the Panama Canal Company," the


Applications


for the 22 houses now


under construction on Empire Street in
Balboa will be accepted by the Housing
Office at Balboa starting July 13 and up


to 4:15 o'clock


in the afternoon


August 7.
It is expected that the 24 apartments
in the development will be available for


occupancy
September.


late in August or early in


Port Captain wrote min his


letter of commendation.


T'he launch operator has been employed as seaman and motorboat operator in the Canal
since 1925.


The small


Balboa
which


service


sec


and Cristobal


have


been


open


tions at the
Commissaries
on Monday


when the rest of the Commissaries are
closed will be discontinued July 13.


The decision


discontinue


special Monday service was made fol-
lowing a suggestion from an employee
representative in the monthly Gover-


assistants


serving


organ


ization


in 20 different Company-
.


Fifty of the vacationing
U. S.-rate positions and t
on local-rate rolls.


The number


considerablyv


lower


there were about


student
than last


are in


remainder


assistants is
year when


100 students employed


during the sumnmar vacation period.


OF CURRENT INTEREST


For Empire Street Houses


t...A


Government units


^


students




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


July 3, 1953


Power


Branch


Keeps


Electricity


Flowing


From


Source


To


Consumer


usually called the Army and asked if a
balloon were loose. Frequently the dis-
patcher's call was the Army's first infor-
mation that a balloon had broken from
its moorings. The trailing cables would
drag across the lines and put them out of
service.


Once
hydrogen


a runaway
from breaks


caught under wires
the Miraflores state
exploded, breaking
window frames, and b
metal door at the 1
station. Herbert F.
ing Chief Dispatcher
night. He recalls
seriously hurt.


balloon,
in both


directly in
tion. The
windows,
)lowing ou
back of t
Paddock,
, was on
that no


leaking
ends,


front of
balloon
twisting
t a heavy
he power
now Act-
duty that
one was


From Power Supply
While handling emergencies like that
of the recent Saturday evening is an


important part of the


MACHINES dwarf men at the Madden hydroelectric station, source of the bulk of Canal Zonselectric
power. Lew Ryan, Madden Chief Operator, in a flowered shirt, talks with Pat Coakley, acting supervisor
for the southern district of the Power Branch. In the background is James Sobers, one of the oilers.


recent Saturday n


flickered in houses all over
side of the Canal Zone.
dimmed, almost went out.
In the Power Dispatcher's
Miraflores Diesel-electric stati
bell rang. At the same time
on his switchboard indicate
disturbance in the normally


of electric power. Simnult
the Gatun hydroelectric sta
instruments showed Operat
William Schuster that the
power system had "lost


light lights
the Pacific
Then they


ice in the
,an alarm
,truments
a major
ooth flow
ously, in
. identical


or-Dispatcher
Canal Zone's
a generating


plant," as electricians say.
At Miraflores, Power Dispatcher John
S. Skinner, Jr., blew a siren; Daniel J.
Sullivan, Diesel engineer on watch, dropped
whatever he was doing and started up
one of the plant's Diesel units, affection-
ately known to the men who work there
as "rock crushers." Mr.Skinnerconnected
this and other units to the electric lines,
as needed, to assure light and power to
the locks and the power system's other


or snakes. A power failure
mean that a sloth has slowly
transmission tower and taken
fatal grasp on a high-voltage
snake may have slithered ac
and put it out of service.
Until the garbage dump at
moved some time ago, a powe
the transmission lines north
usually meant that a buzza
lookout for a tasty morsel in
had chosen the power line for


there
climb
a firm
line.
ross a


may
ed a
and
Or a
line


Gatun was
r failure on
of Gatun
rd, on the
the dump,
a perch.


During the war, barrage balloons were
frequent causes of power failures. If a
line went out the dispatcher on duty


it is no
plants
Power
Their
Zone
power
and h


t by any means
they operate,
Branch of the
main job is to
has a steady
to operate the


power
all.
are all
Electr:
see th
supply
locks,


houses and offices, run


lathes, washing machines, el
typewriters, heat bakery o


people's job,
Vhey, and the
I part of the
ical Division.
at the Canal
y of electric
light streets
refrigerators,
ectric clocks,
vens, stoves,


and dry closets, and do the hundred-
and-one things for which electricity is
essential.
Power in the Canal Zone is generated
by two fluids: Water and oil. Water, in
the principal of the old mill wheel, oper-
ates the generators at Madden and Gatun
hydroelectric plants. Diesel oil, on the
principle of the internal combustion en-
gine, runs the six Diesel generating
stations. The system's main Diesel plant
at Miraflores is manned day and night
for emergencies such as that on the


- ~- ~


r


3d
sm
ne
on


ta
ti





July 3,


1953


1HE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Saturday night we've been talking about.
The other Diesel stations, most of them
built during the war, are used as standbys
and for emergency power supply.
The Madden hydroelectric station is
the system's major power producer.
Water from Madden Lake flows through
great pipes under the station floor,
through turbines which turn the gener-
ators to make electric power and out,
under the station, to the river below the
towering dam.
In the station's spotless long, narrow
main room, where the temperature is at
least 90 degrees all the time, are three
big, flat-topped semi-ovals. These house
the generators themselves. Atop each
housing is a pile of cylindrical shapes,
each smaller than the one beneath like a
set of child's graduated blocks. These are
the "exciters." Each controls the oper-
ations of the one beneath.
"Without these little babies and their
direct current, the big boy (the generator)
below won't produce alternating current,"
Madden Station's Chief, Lew Ryan
explains.
Over Transmission Lines
Madden and Gatun hydroelectric
stations generate current at 6,000 volts,
a volt being a unit of electrical pressure.
Outside the station the voltage is stepped
up by means of transformers to the
44,000 volts at which it is transmitted.
The generators cannot produce current
of such high voltage but it is desirable
for more efficient power flow. Over the
high voltage lines, suspended on their
towers, the electricity is transmitted to
the various substations.
Maintenance of the transmission lines
is a major problem. They are patrolled
twice a month and, in addition, always
the day after a power failure. Some
sections of the lines are patrolled by car,
some by "speeders" on the railroad,
others on foot. Sometimes the towers,


like Nos.
are deep


12 and 13 on the Madden Line.
in the Forest Preserve. To


reach them linemen have to follow paths
through head-high undergrowth.
On these patrols, linemen all too
frequently find that someone has made
off with equipment for its metal value.
Formerly the linemen had been able to
store strings of porcelain insulators-a
four-insulator unit weighs 81 pounds-
at the bases of some of the more isolated
towers and thus avoid hauling them in


CABLE SPLICERS work underground, but do not usually have as much space as this. John C. Francis
works on cables in a double manhole while his helper, Stanford E. Allen, stands ready to assist him.


He is not onl
but he is also op
substation in tim
operator for the
by remote contr
at the Balboa,
substations.
Sometimes, ac(
Dispatcher Herbi
a question and ai
when there is tro


y the power dispatcher
erator of the Miraflores
e of trouble, power plant
Miraflores plant, and,
ol, substation operator
Gamboa, and Summit

:ording to Acting Chief
ert Paddock, he is also
answer man. Invariably
uble and the dispatcher


is in the middle of dealing with it, people
call up to tell him what he already knows,
that their lights are off. This is especi-
ally true if a failure happens during the
peak load periods-8 to 11 a. m. week-
days and early evenings over weekends.
As dispatcher he controls the flow of
power into the various substations, where
it is stepped down by transformers to the
2,200 volts which run through under-
ground cables to the consumers. At the
consumer end, in the little block-like
transformer houses one sees here and
there, the power is again stepped down,


__ a-


this time to the 220 or 110 volts which
is safe for house or office service.
To The User


The amount of
consumes is measi
watt-hour meter if o
Reading and testing
men like Ernest
Kaan who, between


currer
ured by
)ne mus
g meter
Berger
monthly


ings, work in the electric:
repair shop at the Balboa fi
Meter readers, on their r
9,000 watt-hour charges,


troub
chiev
each,
corne
want
high
does


les.
ous
se
red


it each user
Sa meter, a
t be technical.
s is the job of
or Donald
y meter read-
al instrument
eld office.
pounds of their
have their


They are followed by mis-
children with a million questions
t upon by irritable dogs, and
by irritated housewives who


to know why their light bills are so
"when Mrs. Jones across the street
twice as much baking and her bill's


nothing like mine!"
Processing the meter
roll deduction as well
intra-agency billing by
Office requires consider
consumer doesn't pay


* readings for pay-
as for cash and
the Comptroller's
rable time so the
for his light until


about six weeks after the meters are
1~~ T P





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


July 3,


1953


the amount
Canal Zone u
In Tacoma,.


ser $ti.50.
\VWash., the


rates


are lower.


;Electricity for which


pays
which


$2 cost
costs


s $1.70
$>.5, h


a Canal Zone user
and that amount
Cre costs $5.35 in


Tacoma.
ci rrnt I


costss


Zoniin'


But in San Antonio,


which


$159
vs $4.5


h a Canal Zonian pay
and that for which


0


costs


Irons vs.


Most
toasters,


heating
waffle


$10.59.


Lights


units
irons,


irons,


stoves.


heaters-


use more current per hour than a light or
a motor on an electric fan refrigerator,


record


changer, or vacuum cleaner.


1,0()(00)-watt iron consumes 1 kilowatt hour
of electrical energy as against 0.1 of a


kilowatt hour for
each hour of operate


a 100O-watt light, for
ion. However, many


heating appliances have heat-regulating
thermostats which snap the current on


and off


Incidentally,


electricians


heat an iron just to press a blouse. It
takes current to heat that iron. Wait
until there are half a dozen blouses and


do them all at one time.


Don't use an


oven just to bake potatoes; cook a meat


loaf and


a pio at the same time.


hot water faucets make


Leaky


a water heater


work overtime; youngsters opening and
closing refrigerators doors make refriger-
ator motors work extra and electric bills


run up.


Maids are generally less careful


with electric current than their employers,
who have to pay the bills.
People who talk about the "good old


aren't thinking about electricity.


Among the property turned over to the
United States by the French Canal


Company


in 1904


were


10 "electrical


s MACY'S had full-page ads in New York
a papers to tell the world about "Scrabble."
Locally, it might do what the television we
don't have can't to keep the family on the


home front.
Scrabble, that has Macy


crowing,


crossword game with a scoring system that


fits the tastes and talents of both
and old.


Macy's


young


copywriters gamboled through the


usual gimmicks to tell how much fun Scrabble
is. To which the Canal Commissaries could
only add: "We sell it for only $2.50."


new ple


Fruit Pies


mixes


available
series, wi


fruit pies
have made t


come


in cans,


soon in the Commis-


II make the


as easy


job of filling


as the


making of pie


will be blueberry and cherry


both of which have
and stock added to


large enough
pie crust and


sugar,
the frt


e crust
shells.


pie mix,


lemon


to Fill an eight-
will cost about


mne cans are
or nine-inch
38 cents.


NEW NYLON TIES for men will be in the


stores


soon.


They are grenadine


weave-


rough, almost like monk's cloth-and are in
solid colors and small prints. They will cost
about $1.25.


A la


stock of


"Pop Coats" a
/including the
~-including the


cottons-


will bE


maternity


separates that


re now arriving


dresses


are


on order


in the


stores.


\mong the many pretty


new polished and embossed
e white pique Pop Coats"


we trimming


drygoods people


be especially


which


at Mount


wholesale


expect


popular.


INDOOR-OUTDOOR furniture with unusu-
ally pleasing lines, tubular steel construction


that is


as stur


dy as it is light in weight and
seats and backs in tomato or


stores


soon.


and plums can be


season pr
ORLON


progresses.


expected


SWEATERS


the fruit


women,


styles and slipovers, in three- and two-tone
color combinations are expected early in
July. They will cost about $4.


There ar

Yardley
Cosmetics

shaving
powder,
perfume c


re new lines


of Yardley


cos-


metics-new to Yardley's and
new in the Commissaries-for


both men and
are shaving


cream,


and a
:ailed


new p
Flair.


erfume


women
cream,


. There
brushless


after-shower


essence


A KITCHEN SERVANT that will take the
tedium out of a multitude of cooking chores


is the Griscer


all-purpose kitchen cutter that


has been ordered for the Commissaries and


is expected


It has been


soon.


so well advertised and


so well


liked by those who have used it, about the
only thing left to tell Commissary customers is
that locally it will cost about $10 complete
with four cutters.
They are: The chopper that crumbs bread,
chops nuts and vegetables very fine, crushes
ice, prices potatoes; a shredder that shreds
coconut, cheese, lemon or orange rind, car-
rots and other firm vegetables, crumbs crack-
ers, toast, bread, chocolate, cuts nut meats,


eggs,


onions,


etc.; a shoestringer that shoe-


strings vegetables, soup stock, casserole
dishes, cuts fruit and other foods for baking,


preserves,


salads and candies, etc.; and the


slicer (thin) that cuts cabbage, peppers,
onions, cucumbers, radishes, carrots for salads,
etc., reduces green or wax beans to bits and
is fine for potato chips, for instance.


A baby ser
Tables
For
Babies
same server
a versatile


ver,


a table with


seat for the
middle, will
series soon.


, safe,


an adjustable


baby right in the


ingenious


is designed


bit of
needs


years,


it can continue


in service


as a game and play


season


er-lined shoes for men-the kind
that are built for long wear-are
coming to the Commissaries from
England. There will be plain toe


Copper-bottomed,
cooking


stainless
ware, u


some time, is
Commissaries,


coming


led to


because


n 1. I rnro TflO'J


~AJtII md nknnf ~A OR


I .


of power which


as needed.


g,


days"





July 3,


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Penitentiary


Guard


For


42


Brought 'Em Back If They


ears


Escaped


For 42 years Canal Zone convicts have
had to reckon with Sidney King, who is
credited with bringing back mist of the
prisoners who have broken out of Canal
Zone penitentiaries.
There have been 39 attempted escapes
in local penal history but only one convict,
No. 643, got away for good. That was
back in 1913 and things have changed a
lot since then, according to the long-
time guard and clerk who remembers all
the prison breaks.
No. 643 first made an unsuccessful
attempt to break out of the stockade at
Mandingo and was shot by the guard who
stopped him. Placed min the orison


J&


dispensary at Culebra for treatment, he
made a rope out of his hospital sheet,
swung himself two stories down to the
ground and made the one clean getaway
min Canal Zone penal history.
Mr. King recalls that the guard at
the hospital was dismissed for negligence.
Canal Zone police and penal affairs,
he says, "are regulated a lot better
today" and many lessons have been
learned from local police experience, in-
cluding the efficacy of thorough training
for prison personnel.
Only two escapees on Canal Zone con-
vict records- attempted the same thing
twice. Both were recaptured on the
second try by the long-time prison guard,
who, in years past, was ordinarily detailed
to ferret out prisoners who were believed
to have escaped into Panama.
For the past several years he has
served as chief clerk in the office of the
penitentiary at Gamboa.
Sawed Out Of Cell
The most audacious of the prisoners
who escaped, in Mr. King's opinion, was
one who sawed himself out of a dark
cell at Gamboa in 1913, together with his
cellmate. That was not difficult in the
old wooden building that served as the
prison at the time.
The prisoners made it through the
wire of the prison enclosure and were not
missed until the next day when one was
recaptured near Summit. There was no
trace of the other prisoner until about
four days later when he returned to the
penitentiary and left a calling card.
On a movie night at the prison, when


SIDNEY KING
on the police force for about 10 years.
He had gone there from his native Bar-
bados because he wanted to be a police-
man and there were no vacancies on the
force at home. When he came to the
Canal Zone he had the same thing in mind.
He came to the Isthmus in July 1911
and since he couldn't get a job immedi-
ately with the police, he went to work
as an orderly at Ancon Hospital. About
five months later, he was employed at the
Gorgona police station.
There was plenty of activity there in
those days according to the long-time
guard. The machine shops for the Canal
work were located there, there were
many nationalities among the Canal
"diggers" stationed in the town, plenty
of saloons, plenty of business, and plenty
to keep Gorgona's 16-man police force
busy.
In December 1913, he was transferred
to the penitentiary office at Culebra,
where prisoners were taken before they


Dog


Registration


Begin


And


About


Ant


were transferred to a temporary prison
at Mandingo. The prison building at
Culebra had been abandoned in 1911 when
slides on the west bank of Culebra Cut
threatened to break back to the prison.
A road was being built at the time
from Empire to the Panama boundary at
Paja and the temporary prison at Man-
dingo, built of the trees readily available
in the area, was about halfway between
the two points. There were a lot of
prison breaks in those days, Mr. King
recalls, a fact that is not surprising in
view of the facilities.
Moved To Gamboa
In 1913 the prison was moved to its
present location at Gamboa, where prison-
ers were housed in a former messhall
used by European Canal laborers. The
laborers were moved across the Canal to
Matachin and prison personnel moved
into the quarters that were vacated at
Gamboa.
The penitentiary had the most and the
least prisoners in 1913, according to Mr.
King. There were so many-about 200
at one time-that an extensive program
of rehabilitation was instituted by Rich-
ard L. Metcalfe, who was in charge of
civil administration in the Canal Zone
during the last few months of the third
and last Isthmian Canal Commission.
Many prisoners also were pardoned and
the penitentiary population then dropped
to its lowest point, totaling about 40.
Police work has been Mr. King's one
absorbing interest from the time he was
a boy and incidentally provided a hobby
he has followed most of his life. When he
was on the police force in Trinidad, some
of the policemen there made their own
shoes because the ones that were gener-
ally available were not as good looking as
they thought the boots of a policeman
should be.
Mr. King learned shoemaking from
fellow policemen there and has made all
his own shoes since that time. He also
has always made all the shoes worn by
his wife and two sons, many for police
and prison personnel and a large circle
of friends.


-Rabies


Mid-July


am"Qranf-in nf rinrre for liponninr nnnd


Inoculation


Ten


Zone


Towns


vnorPinao fnhA dAn will hn clerks from tho


Will
WI"l


t L




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


July 3,1953


Book


By


Two


NEW


IRON


ORE


TRADE


BOOSTS


CANAL


TRAFFIC


C.

To


Teachers


Be Published


1'robably the greatest thrill in a child's
life is learning to read, according to two
('anal Zone teachers.
But the child doesn't learn to read the
first day as he anticipated; instead, at
first he learns whole words and phrases
but at a later stage the use of letter sounds
is a great aid as he takes his first steps
toward exploring the world of books.


Modern


education


stresses


portance of the phonetic approach to
reading and to that field the two teachers,
Eunice Monroe and Josephine Withers,
have recently made a contribution.
The Gel-Sten Company of Brookfield,
Ill., one of the largest U. S. publishers of
school duplicating materials, has just
bought their book, Beginning Phonics.
It will be available in time for the coming
school year. A second book by Miss
Monroe and Miss Withers has recently
been submitted to the same publisher.
The two Canal Zone teachers developed
their book because they felt there was a
lack of good usable material available in
this field of teaching. Both were first
grade teachers at the time-Miss Withers
will be teaching third grade in Diablo
next year and Miss Monroe is a first
grade teacher.
Comparing notes and exchanging lesson
sheets on their work, they found that
their ideas for the teaching of this phase
of phonics were almost identical The
book developed from these ideas.
Teachers' Evaluation
Before accepting material for publica-
tion, Gel-Sten ordinarily has it evaluated
by key teachers. When they compiled
their manuscript, Miss Monroe and Miss
Withers asked a representative group of
teachers in the Canal Zone schools to give
their evaluation of it. The letters of
these teachers accompanied the finished


manuscript when it went to


the pub-


lishers and, Miss Monroe and Miss
Withers believe, were in great part
responsible for the prompt acceptance of
the book.
An interesting sidelight on Beginning
Phonics is the fact that the pictures for
*. 4 1 1 -


IRON ORE from new mines was loaded aboard this Panama-registered ship in San Juan, Peru. Lamyra
was the first ship to transit the Canal destined for Morrisville, Pa., new U. S. Steel Company port.


Cargo tonnage through the Panama
Canal was increased by 94,300 tons and
tolls by $60,570 in a six-week period as the
result of the recently inaugurated iron
ore trade from Peru to the United States.
From the first of May through June 15,
14 ships transited the Canal, either in
ballast southbound or carrying an aver-
age of slightly over 10,000 tons of the iron
ore northbound. Almost all of the ships
had transited previously in other services.
The ore is coming from new mines near
San Juan, Peru. In its issue of May 4,
Time Magazine described the new
operation:
"At the southern port of San Juan, the
freighter Libertad took aboard the first
10,000 tons of iron ore from Utah Con-
struction Company's new Marcona mine.
Starting work last January, the United
States firm had built a 15-mile road, got
shovels digging at the open pit and
started 60 specially designed 19-ton
trucks hauling ore to dockside. By June,
hematite ore will be leaving for U. S.
East Coast ports at the rate of 2,400,000
tons a year."
First Ship May 16
Th TThrrirnd. a 5 1R4-tnn frr'hvhtnr


the Panamanian flag, two were of Italian
registry, three were registered with Great
Britain and two trips--those of the
Turmoil-were under the Liberian flag.


Atlantic


Side Supervisors


Complete


Training


Course


Twenty-three Atlantic side supervisors
received certificates at "graduation" cere-
monies last month, concluding a 16-week
supervisory training conference series
under the joint supervision of the Term-
inals and Grounds Maintenance Divisions
and the Personnel Bureau.
Several other groups have completed
similar courses which are designed to teach
the supervisors to lead planned con-
ferences, a recent development in solv-
ing numerous business and industrial
problems.
The final meeting of the Atlantic side
supervisors was held in the Red Cross
rooms over the Central Labor Office in
Criftnhaln A E Rnekl giinprintfndnnt





y luJ 4 1 9 5 3


-.i-.


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


NEW


ARRIVAL


Records


Are


Shattered


Fiscal


Year


Canal


Ends


Entire


History


CAPT. E. J. DUNN, USN, became the new
Director of the Industrial Bureau effective June 30.
He came to the Canal Zone from California where he
served as Repair Superintendent at the Long Beach
Naval Shipyard. An engineering duty officer, the
new Industrial Bureau Director has also served at
the New York Naval Shipyard and before that time
had lengthy service at sea. He was born in Farmers-
ville, Tex., and was graduated from the Naval
Academy at Annapolis in 1930.


Long-Range Studies On Canal Investment
Will Set Firm Basis For Fiscal Policies


Coantinued from page 1)


monetary


values,


wage scales, and changes of a varying
nature which might affect the revenues
and operating costs of the Canal.
First Phase Near End
The investment and depreciation study
is being conducted by the Plant Inven-
tory and Appraisal Staff. Other Com-
pany units and personnel will assist in
specialized phases.
The first phase, now being concluded
by the Plant Inventory and Appraisal
Staff, is what might be termed a "quick
inventory" of the physical properties.
Its purpose is to arrive at principal figures,
within a narrow margin of error, and a
quick review of probable service lives of
physical property, which can be used for
an investment and depreciation base.
A report on this phase of the long-range
study is being prepared for consideration
of the Board of Directors in its determi-
nation on the adequacy of present rates
of tolls.
This telescoped phase to provide a
close estimate of the value of the Canal


All existing records in the history of
the Panama Canal for commercial traffic,
tolls, and cargo shipped through the
waterway were broken in the fiscal year
1953 which ended June 30.
Figures on the number of transits by
ocean-going commercial ships and tolls for
any previous year were topped by the end
of May, with June totals still to be added
to complete the 1953 record.
Although figures on the surging traffic
of the past fiscal year were still incomplete
when this edition of THE CANAL REVIEW
went to press, the number of transits had
passed the 7,400 mark, exceeding by
875 the record total set in the previous
fiscal year.


Tolls were expected to climb to
approximately $31,900,000, well above
the former record total of $27,128,893
collected in the boom year of 1929.
The amount of cargo shipped through
the Canal last year was well above any
previous totals for one year. During the
first 11 months of the past fiscal year
more than 32,830,000 long tons had been
moved through the Canal. The former
record for any year was 33,610,509 long
tons which was established in the fiscal
year 1952.
The surge of commercial traffic through
the Canal began during the early part of
the calendar year 1952 and, for the first
time since the Canal was opened to
traffic in 1914, a monthly record of more
Canal Ends Half Century's Association
(Continued from page 4) user's bill was cut
by "10 cents silver per 1,000 gallons,"
if the account was paid within 15 days
of the due date. The rate in Colon was
higher: "$9 silver a quarter for 10,000
gallons," and "90 cents silver" for each
additional 1,000 gallons. Meters were
not installed until the middle of 1907.
Filtration Plants
Filtered water came later. A filtration
plant was opened at Mt. Hope February
23, 1914, and the Miraflores Filtration
Plant went into service March 14, 1915.
On August 1, 1926, Panama and the
United States signed an agreement,
whereby the United States was to do
street cleaning and garbage collections in
Panama and Colon, Panama bearing
FhlraanimirforQ nf thn ont pidnrl Eho (nnil


than 600 transits by large commercial
ships was recorded in March 1952. This
record was to be broken three times
during the following 12-month period.
The record was broken in May 1952
with 622 transits; in October with 673
transits; and again in March of this year
with 678 transits.
Aside from the heavy flow of commer-
cial traffic during the past fiscal year, the
number of Government-owned vessels in
transit was well above that of the previous
year. Tolls credits for these vessels
amounted to $3,481,681 during the first
11 months of the past fiscal year, which
was approximately $800,000 higher than
figures for a comparable period of the
previous fiscal year.
In addition to other new record totals
in shipping last year, the daily average
number of large ships locked through the
Canal was the highest in history. The
daily average number of transits for the
first 11 months was 23.2, for both com-
mercial and Government vessels, as


compared with the previous record of
19.9 transits in the fiscal year 1952.
Although most of the principal trade
routes through the Canal showed gains in
the past year, the heavy traffic was attri-
buted principally to big gains on those
between the east coast of the United
States/Canada and Asia; the United
States intercoastal; and the east coast of
the United States and South America.
manage the water and sewerage systems
and the street paving functions for Pana-
ma's account in Panama City and Colon.
All of Colon was included in the
management contract but only that part
of Panama City between the tip of the
city at French Plaza and the old Tumba
Muerto Road-close to El Panama
Hotel--was in the contract. Panama
itself handled water in the suburban areas.
The Republic's share of the garbage
collection and street cleaning costs was
to be paid from proceeds of the collections
for the water and sewerage accounts.
Early last month, the Maintenance
Division which maintained the streets and
handled the water management contract
had eight U. S.-rate and 73 local-rate
emnlowe e nn this work. The Health


Bureau, which handled garbage and
,,r . TT j .


Busiest


r
t
t
I
*





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


July 3,1953


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


May 15 through June 15


Em
I: In
ferred
listed
prone(


ployees who were promo
between May 15 and
below. Regradings and
lions are not listed.


ted or trans-
June 15 are
within-grade


ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH


George Vieto, from
Passenger Traffic Clerk.
Robert E. Dolan, frc
Overhaul, to File Clerk,


Clerk-Typist


wm Checker,
Record Secti


Locks
on.


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Carl R. Meissner, from Checker, Locks
Overhaul, to Life Guard, I)ivision of
Schools.
Reed E. Hopkins, Jr., from Lock Over-
haul Foreman to Fireman, Fire Division.
Joseph B. Clemmons, Jr., from Estates
Administrator to Assistant Chief and
I)eputy Public Administrator, Customs and


Immigr
Earl
spector
Inspect
Mrs.
Typist,
Branch
Rutt


ation Division.
F. Unruh, from Post Offi
to Assistant Chief and Post
or. Postal Services.


1


Jean A. Violette, from Clerk-
Physical Education and Recreation
to Typist, Schools Division.
C. Crozier, Mrs. Elsie D. Naugh-


ton, from Elementary School Teacher to
Elementary School Principal, Schools Divi-


sion.
John N. Gorham,
ant to Recreation
Education and Recrec
Mrs. Margaret 1
Stenographer, from
to Police Division.


from Student
Assistant, PI
ation Branch.
B. Zeimetz,
Commissary D


Assist-
hysical

Clerk-
ivision


Grady O. Gailey, from Automobile
Serviceman and Heavy Truck DI)river,
Motor Transportation Division, to Fire-
man, Fire Division.
Culver M. Call, from Guard, Atlantic
Locks, to Postal Clerk.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
Donald M. Luke, from Systems Ac-
countant, Cost Accounts Branch to Assist-
ant Chief, Divisional Accounts Branch.
Ralph F. Schnell, from Organization
and Methods Examiner to Analytical


Statisti
Mrs.
Story,
to Typ
Mrs.
Typist,
Typist,
Staff.
Gen
from I


Account
Mrs.
Clerk,
Agents
Mrs.
Cost A
rapher,


cian, Management Staff.
Flor E. Martin, Mrs. Jewell F.
from Clerk-Typist, License Section
ist, Cost Accounts Branch.
Chevillette R. Dougherty, from


Cost
Plan

evieve
Agents


Accounts Branch,
Inventory and


F. Quinn, Accountini
Accounts Branch t


ts Branch.
Eldermae
from Cost


Accounts Branch.
Patricia E. LeBrun, from
accounts Branch. to Clerk-


Claims Branch.


SClerk-
ppraisal

g Clerk,
o Cost

counting
nch to

Typist,
Stenog-


'Time, Leave, and Payroll Clerk, Payroll
Branch.
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU


James G. F.


tion Inspector
Division, to V
Joseph A.
ator-Wireman,
house Operatoi
Robert C.
ator-Wireman,
Electrical Divi
Leo Chest
Overhaul, to


Trimble
Contract
eman. El


Howland,
Pacific L
r, Electrical
Heppner, t
Pacific Lox
sion.
er, from
Filtration


, from Construc-
and Inspection
ectrical Division.
from Lock Oper-
ocks, to Power-
Division.
from Lock Oper-
cks, to Wireman,

Foreman, Lock
Plant Operator,


Maintenance Division.
Mrs. Jessie G. Harris, Clerk-Stenog-
rapher, from Marine Bureau to Maintenance
Division.
Mrs. Neva M. Short, from Clerk-Typist
to Accounting Clerk, Electrical Division.
Mrs. Marian M. Langford, from
Substitute Tleacher, Schools Division, to
Clerk Typist, Electrical Division.


HEALTH BUREAU


Mrs. Ruth H.
Typist, Aids to Na
(Checker), Gorgas
Mrs. Ana L.
Typist, Board of
Dictating Machin
Hospital.


Powell, from Clerk-
vigation, to Storekeeper
Hospital.
Alvarez, from Clerk-
Health Laboratory, to
e Transcriber, Gorgas


INDUSTRIAL BUREAU
John Van der Heyden, from Principal
Foreman, Locks Overhaul, to Shipwright,
Industrial Bureau.
Arthur E. Rizcalla, from Helper, Locks
Overhaul, to Guard, Industrial Bureau.
MARINE BUREAU


Alfred


T. Veit,


from


Engineer to Senior Chief
eer, Dredging Division.
Charles Q. Peters, Jr
Locks Overhaul, to Ferry
Daniel A. Marsican
Locks Overhaul, to Pump
ing Division.
Howard J. Schwart:


Smith, from
tionary Pilot.
Vernon C.
tionary Pilot t
James T.
Locks Overha
Division.
David Vim


Chief Towboat
Towboat Engin-

., from Foreman,
Ramp Operator.
o, from Rigger,
Operator, Dredg-


zman. I


Pilot-in-Training, to


Ben F.
Proba-


Whitehead, from Proba-
o Qualified Pilot.
Campbell, from Helper,
ul, to Signalman, Navigation


lokur,


Ramp


Operator, to Pump Operator, Pipeline
Suction Dredge.
Max J. Karton, from File Clerk, Admin-
istrative Branch, to Guard, Locks Division.
PERSONNEL BUREAU
Tra.. UT . l .yk- r ^- A :^ *. ^-A-


ANNIVERSARIES

Employees who observed important anni-
versaries during the month of June are
listed alphabetically below. The number
of years includes all Government service
with the Canal or other agencies. Those
with continuous service with the Canal are
indicated with (*).
35 YEARS
*Eugene C. Lombard, Executive Secre-
tary.
30 YEARS
*Ulrich W. Hughes, Leader, Electrical
Instrument Repairman, Electrical Division.
Walter E. Zimmerman, Lock Oper-
ator, Atlantic Locks.
25 YEARS
Walter J. Allen, File Supervisor, Admin-
istrative Branch.
Harry B. Friedland, Clerk, Lighthouse
Subdivision.
Elmer J. Hack, Clerk, Administrative
Branch.
Max R. Hart, Safety Inspector, Supply
and Service Bureau.
Edward W. Hatchett, Teacher, Balboa
High School.
*Albert J. Joyce, Wireman, Electrical
Division.
James H. Rheney, Repair Shop Fore-
man, Railroad and Terminals Bureau.
*J. Bartley Smith, Electrical Engineer,
Electrical Division.
Mabel A. Sneider, Operating Room
Nurse, Gorgas Hospital.
Claude W. Wade, Steward, Clubhouse
Division.
20 YEARS
Edwin M. McGinnis, Supervising Esti-
mating Engineer, Engineering Division.
Robert M. Turner, Maintenance Me-
chanic, Maintenance Division.
William S. Walston, Mate, Pipeline
Suction Dredge, Dredging Division.
Leonard Wolford, Marine Traffic Con-
troller, Navigation Division.
15 YEARS
Leland Brooks, Towboat Master, Navi-
gation Division.
Alwyn DeLeon, Claims Examiner, Comp-
troller's Office.
Henry P. Kilcorse, Towboat Master,
Dredging Division.
*William E. LeBrun. Administrative


Assistant,
Morgan
Division.
Jack E
Division.
Irene S
Police Divi


Internal Security Branch.
J. Neabry, Wireman, Electrical


Scott,


. Walling,
sion.


Margaret F. Wigl
rapher, Comptroller's C


Carman,


Railroad


Clerk-Stenographer,

gin, Clerk-Stenog-
)ffice.


JULY SAILINGS


h


J





July 3, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Premium-Grade Gasoline

Will Go On Sale July 10
Premium-grade gasoline will go on
sale about July 10 in all Canal retail
gasoline stations except those at Gatun
and Pedro Miguel, according to the
Supply and Service Bureau. The high-
test gasoline will retail at two cents
above the present price of motor-grade
gasoline.
A contract for 62,000 barrels-2,604,-
000 gallons-of the premium-grade
gasoline was awarded early last month
to the Texas Company. This is a six-
month supply. The first gasoline pur-
chased under the contract will arive in
Cristobal about July 6, and the tanker
is expected to discharge in Balboa two
days later.
Minor alterations are being made at
the tank farms and service stations for
handling of the high-test gasoline.


Eligibility Card Rules
Changed Effective July 1


The Central Labor Of
day began issuance of elii
to applicants who had no!
U. S. Government agen
tractors since January 1,
The change in regulati
an opportunity to seek
to young people, never
the Canal Zone, and to o
who have not worked
since 1946.
Since May 1951 and
change eligibility cards
only to former employees
after 1946 and to others
qualifications.


ice Wednes-
gibility cards
t served with
cies or con-
1946.
ons provides
employment
employed in
)lder persons
in the Zone


1 until this
were issued
with service
with special


Electrical Division; 33 years, 11 months,
27 days; probably Florida.
Eric E. Forsman, Alabama; Storekeeper,
Terminals Division; 36 years, 11 months, 1
day; Mobile, Ala.
Alfred B. Fox, Missouri; Gauger, Store-
houses Division; 24 years, 9 months, 16
days; Arraijan, Panama.
Harry O. Cranberry, Mississippi; Ad-
ministrative Assistant, Hotel Washington;
24 years, 10 months, 15 days; St. Peter-
burg, Fla.
Leon F. Hallett, Massachusetts; Sup-
ply Requirements Assistant, Storehouses
Division; 39 years, 3 months, 17 days;
Dorchester, Mass.
George F. Herman, Pennsylvania;
Ferry Ramp Operator, Dredging Division;
26 years. 1 month, 26 days; Florida.


Extra-Curricular Recreation Activities

To Be Curtailed Because Of Budget


Some curtailme
and summer and
both adults and c
sary this fiscal year
cut in the School
The cut was ma
was submitted to
Congressional acti
tions Bill, which


it of
week
hildrel
becau
Divisi
e in
Congre
)n on
contain


adu
nd
n v
'se
on
the
*ss
the
ins


Government appropriations,
on this particular sum.
Much study preceded th
make the cut in the recreat
was decided that any cut sh4
in extracurricular rather th
activities.
In order to stay within its
the Division of Schools
eliminate, reduce, or modify
activities which have been t


Adult
Baseball
ing recre
Division
own eq
will no l
be used
the An
groups,
been usi
do so b


lt recreation
activities for
vill be neces-
of a $100,009)
budget.
budget that
last January.
SCivil Func-
Canal Zone
had no effect

e decision to
ion field. It
would be made
an curricular


new budget,
will have to
a number of
traditional.


groups-such as the Twilight
l League--which have been obtain-
eation equipment from the Schools
will now have to supply their
uipment. The Ancon playshed
onger be staffed, although it will
as a rainy-day playground for
con elementary school. Adult
such as square dancers, who have
ng the playshed may continue to
iy arrangement with the school


principal.
The gymnasium at Chagres, local-rate
section of Gatun, and the Chagres play-
ground will be closed. Residents of
Chagres will use the facilities at Rainbow
City, where there are a swimming pool
and some playing fields.
Clerical help and part-time recreation

Housing Heads List of Subjects
Raised at June Conference

(Continue from page 2) look further into
the matter.
The possibility of retaining some
12-family houses as low-rental quarters
was brought up by Rufus Lovelady, of
the AFGE, but the Governor said that
this would not be a solution to the
expressed desire for lower rental houses.
He said considerable thought had gone
into this problem but that as yet no
satisfactory solution had been reached
for a type of house which would be some-


Cut


assistants who have been on duty at
Balboa and Cristobal gymnasiums have
been eliminated. The gymnasiums will
be still available for evening use, but
adults who have been using them as


recreation centers wil
refereeing or coaching
given in some cases.
The retrenchment
school recreation and s;
children. All gymnast
Sunday as at present


1 be without the
; which has been

will affect after-
wimming for school
urns will be closed
plus one week-day


but pools will remain open six days a
week. Directors of Physical Education
should be consulted in the various towns
for schedules of operations.
The Schools Physical Education pro-
gram will not be curtailed; the activities
to be reduced will be after-school and
weekend swimming competitions or school
basketball, volleyball, and similar leagues
which have required the use of school
facilities or supervision.
Part of the planning for the reduced
expenditures extends into next summer
when that portion of the Summer
Recreation Program which is sponsored
by the schools will have to be modified.
This summer's program will continue, as
a whole, without major change.
The curtailment of funds limits the
number of people employed. Reduction
of force notices have already gone out to
39 recreation assistants and clerks in the
Physical Education and Recreation
Branch. Of these, 16 were on the U.S.-
rate, 23 on local-rate rolls-many of them
part-time and WAE employees.


and May a year ago.
said, showed that the
holding the price line.
A study is project
he said, to compare t
operating the Commiss


nose o0
In an
Boukalis
stop in
from the
Director
Haiti lay
basis am
trial peri
extended


d
;he
ar


United States sto
swer to a quest
as to whether th
Haiti had been


I1
0,
d
o


rhe results, he
>mmissaries are

for the future,
fixed costs of
y Division with
)res.
tion from Mr.
.e Panama Line
"satisfactory"


point of view of the
the Governor said
ver was being made
that he thought it


Board of
that the
on a trial
likely the


d of six months or so would be
in order to make a better


3


I




ri16


THELPANAMA CANAL REVIEW


July 3,


I -


W -
W .. m...**-"'



/i


tI
a -SE
N)-y^^^""
@^B-
N)*' -"
O| ^^--^


PICTURES


THE MONTH


IT WAS


elders


worried


IUNE!
about


and while


the 25 percent


differential big things came to the Canal
Zone young people.
Sober-eyed, and a little scared, some
380 of them donned caps and gowns to
receive the diplomas which opened up for


them a new life.


A week or


so later, the


first contingent of students came down a


Panama


Line gangway to spend


vacations from States schools and colleges.


Meantime,


Sunday


drivers


enjoyed


cruising along Balboa's Empire Street,
sidewalk-superintending the new houses,
and hundreds of harried housewives found
the one-night-a-week opening of half a
dozen commissaries helpful and pleasant.
But the subject uppermost in every-
one's mind was the differential -what
Congress had done and what Congress was


going to do.


On June 22, 300 men and


women heard their representatives, Mrs.


Margaret


Rennie


Frances


Longmore, report what they had done in
Washington to help in the fight to keep
the differential.




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E806N47OJ_S1ZWY2 INGEST_TIME 2011-04-25T17:14:12Z PACKAGE UF00097366_00114
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1


PAGE 2

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 3,1953 Housing Heads List Of Subjects Raised At June Conference Discussion of commissaries, clubhouses, and housing occupied most of the time of the June Governor-Employee conference, with housing— from point of view of time elapsed— heading the list. Housing matters which were brought up ranged from assignments to types. The June conference, despite the sultry weather, was one of the liveliest in recent months. As usual it opened with answers to questions which had been presented at previous meetings and with new announcements made by Governor Seybold. During this part of the conference, the Governor told the employee representatives: That the "emergency" service sections at Balboa and Cristobal Commissaries would be open for the last time on July 13; That any changes in the policy of capital evaluation of houses would be reviewed first by him and then by the Board of Directors; That no decision had yet been reached on the closing of the Gamboa Clubhouse, a subject brought up again later during the conference and discussed more fully; That a new housing assignment policy had been established under which a limited number of one-bedroom, fourfamily houses of the 215 type in Diablo and Margarita will be set aside for assignment by seniority to bachelors; to qualify for such an assignment, however, a bachelor must have not less than 15 years service, he said; That the American Institute of Laundries, an association to which the Canal laundry belongs, had made a favorable report on the type of work being done locally on washable materials. James P. Boukalis, of the Machinists, commented on the recent order requiring the licensing of all dogs in the Canal Zone and asked that the Canal Zone criminal code be amended to provide for punishment of anyone who injured an animal. Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director, said that a provision of this sort is under study in the General Counsel's Office for inclusion in future revisions of the Code. Mrs. B. 0. Orton, representing the Gamboa Civic Council, returned to the subject of the Clubhouse there, saying that the Gamboa people considered the proposed closing as unfair. She asked if this unit could not be subsidized by one of the larger clubhouses, Balboa for instance, instead of the Gamboa unit having to be self-supporting. This led to considerable around-thetable talk, during which Robert C. Daniel of the Railroad Conductors, suggested that the clubhouse operation might be turned over to a concessionaire. Governor Seybold said he doubted that this could be worked out but that certainly the possibility of a Clubhouse concessionaire would be considered. Several employee representatives brought up the matter of reduced hours at the swimming pools and the Governor, with the comment that this was part of a necessary retrenchment which would primarily affect the adult recreation program, promised to pagelS) July 4th Celebrations Will Be Held Tomorrow On Both Sides Of Isthmus FOURTH OF JULY, 1919, brought out decorations like this for the little park in front of the Balboa Clubhouse. Flag raisings, patriotic and athletic programs, and fireworks will be the order of the day tomorrow when the Canal Zone celebrates the Fourth of July. On the Pacific side, the Independence Day activities will be centered in Balboa as they have been for years. The Atlantic side celebration will take place in Margarita. The Pacific side program will get under way tonight, with a dance at the American Legion Club near Fort Amador. Both sides of the Canal Zone will open tomorrow's programs with a parade and flag raising. That at Margarita will end at the flag pole near the Margarita school; the Balboa parade will begin with the flag raising in front of the Balboa Clubhouse and will be followed by the children's parade down the Prado. For both sides of the Isthmus, the greatest emphasis will be laid on activities for the younger generation — athletic events, rides on jeeps, kiddie trains (made up of the little industrial trucks which ordinarily scurry around the docks), fire trucks, and, at Margarita, on the Army's amphibious "Ducks." There will be a swimming meet at the Gatun pool at 9:30 a. m., and one at Balboa at 1:30 p. m. At 3:30 p. m. there will be patriotic exercises at the Balboa stadium with Lt. Gov. Harry 0. Paxson as the day's chief speaker. This will be followed by a massed band concert. The band concert on the Atlantic side will begin at 6 p. m. and will be held near the Margarita school. Traditional fireworks displays will end Fourth of July activities for both sides. On the Pacific side, Sosa Hill will be the firing spot, as it has been for a number of years. The Margarita fireworks will be set off from a location near the baseball field. Both fireworks displays are to start at 7:30 p. m. Emmett Zemer is chairman of the Pacific side July 4 celebration; S. Ross Cunningham heads the Atlantic side committee. Be Careful— Anopheles Is Biting The malaria season lasts 12 months of the year on the Isthmus of Panama but the recent increase in the malaria rate among !J) Canal employees emy?) phasizes the fact that this is one of the likeliest times of the year for you to contract this crippling or killing disease. Generally the peaks in the malaria rate here occur during the early months of the rainy season and at the beginning of the dry season. It is during these periods when stagnant water is likely to remain long enough for the Anopheles mosquitoes to breed. This malaria-bearing mosquito is also especially favored at this time of the year by gentle winds which permit it to fly long distances. Health authorities carry on a neverending fight against malaria but they require the help of all residents in the fight. You can best help them and yourself by observing the following commonsense rules, which are published here along with a picture of "Ann," malaria's famous trademark: 1. Stay within screened houses between early dusk and daylight. Avoid such nighttime activities as beach parties, picnics, hunting, fishing, and other outdoor recreation. 2. Be especially careful when visiting anywhere outside of the sanitated areas. 3. If you must be out of doors after dark, use some good insect repellent. 4. Report defective screens and request immediate repair. 5. Report collections of standing water or defective drains to the proper agency responsible for such work. 6. Consult your physician immediately if you or members of your family develop any symptoms of malaria. Remember that early treatment may save your life and will spare you much suffering.

PAGE 3

July 3,1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Basic Changes Adopted In Accounting Methods Of Canal Organization A revised accounting system designed to simplify procedures and permit a ready identification of direct costs for each activity in the complex CompanyGovBrnment operations was adopted July 1, the beginning of the new fiscal year. The new system entails some major changes in accounting policies and procedures. Basically it eliminates the confusing method of applying to individual activities indirect charges over which those concerned with the activities have, in fact, no control. The stripping of each function to its elemental costs, primarily materials and labor, is expected to increase cost awareness and to provide better accountability for those responsible for individual operations. The revised accounting system is called "activity accounting" since cost and revenue data will be accumulated by activities. An "activity" is defined in a memorandum to Bureau Directors, on the new system, as the work or operation of a single organizational unit relating to a single function or purpose. Except for job order work, it represents the lowest practicable unit for accounting purposes. One account will be maintained for each activity and every item of income or cost will be carried to and remain in that particular account. Several activity accounts will generally be required to determine unit costs. Where costs are transferred between activities, the distribution credit will be carried in a separate account so as to retain the record of the total costs incurred by an activity. "Activity Accounting" is not new. This or similar accounting procedures are widely used in private enterprise and in many other U. S. Government agencies. The system is expected to facilitate accounting work in the Canal organization because of the great variety of operations and types of services. The newly adopted system will require an almost complete recomputation of the Company's internal rates for transferring costs between service divisions. This, however, is not expected to result in any material changes in the total cost as far as the ultimate consumer is concerned. The rate recomputation is required since service costs will be reduced at divisional levels by the discontinuance of allocations for general and administrative expenses. When these expenses are added at the end, however, the result will be the same but the charge for general corporate expenses will appear higher because they will be combined into a single element. The plan has been under consideration and study now for several months. The principal features were outlined last December in a memorandum from Lindsley H. Noble, Comptroller, to the various Bureau Directors. Since then, members of the Accounting Systems Staff with the assistance and advice of accountants on loan from the Accounting System Division of the General Accounting Office have been engaged in working out the detailed Under Secretary Of Army To Have Full Schedule Here DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY WASHINGTON. O. C 23 June 1953 Governor John S. Seybold Balboa Heights, C. 2. Dear Governor Seybold: In response to inquiries from Congress and other interested agencieB, Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens has directed that I conduct a thorough review of military service and Panama Canal Company activities, with a viev toward making such recommendations as will reduce any unnecessary coets in the Caribbean area. My present trip is an integral part of this review process. Moreover, it will satisfy a long-standing desire to see the great engineering marvel, and it will give me a better understanding of the many problems affecting the operation and administration of the Canal Zone. The role of the Panama Canal in our nation's welfare and its importance in international affairs are no less today than at any time in its history. I hope that my present visit will provide me with a comprehensive understanding of the many facets of its operation as well as the personal problems which affect the welfare of the employees and their families who are responsible for Its successful operation. I would lilce to assure all employees that I consider their personal problems of major importance in the continued efficient operation of the waterway and its necessary adjuncts. Sincerely yours. Earl Ii. Johnson Under Secretary of the Army (Continued from pag? 1) during his 10day visit. Except at the close of the construction period, there has been no time in the Canal's history that such a variety of questions of far-reaching importance has arisen at one time. Foremost among these are plans for increasing the capacity of the Canal; fiscal policies; administrative matters of direct interest to employees, such as the study directed by the Senate Appropriations Committee on compensation and fringe benefits; and the quarters construction program. Not only are all of the subjects of major importance, each one is of such a nature that a solution at an early date is indicated. Most of these are of an abstract nature which will require the Board Chairman to spend much of his time in conference with officials concerned. Aside from this Under Secretary Johnson has planned to make a personal inspection of all the principal Canal Company installations. His schedule application of the principles and accounting requirements of each Bureau. A detailed description of the procedures and the basic changes involved were contained in another memorandum to Bureau Directors last month from the Comptroller in which July 1 was set as the effective date for the change. In his memorandum, Mr. Noble said that he expects some procedural and operating problems to arise. For this reason he requested that inquiries on general accounting policies and procedures be directed to the Chief of the Accounting Systems Staff; general accounting operations to the Chief Accountant; plant accounting procedures and operations to the Chief of the Plant Inventory and Appraisal Staff; and rate structure and analyses to the Rate Analyst of the Management Staff. calls for visits to one or more set of Locks; a trip through Gaillard Cut; and inspection of new housing areas, terminal facilities, Clubhouses, Commissaries, Hospitals, and other Canal Zone Government facilities. The complete schedule of the Under Secretary's activities had not been announced when this edition of The Canal Review went to press, and the exact dates of his visits to various installations were still to be set. Mr. Johnson's service as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Panama Canal Company began two months ago. He was appointed to the post by Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens in April to succeed Karl R. Bendetsen who resigned as Chairman but continued as member of the Board. The Under Secretary is a native of Hamilton, Ohio, and is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin. In addition to their son who is accompanying them on the present trip, Under Secretary and Mrs. Johnson have two daughters, Susan Lynne and Cynthia Lee. Mr. Johnson had several years of experience in the financial investment field between the time he was graduated from college and the beginning of World War II. He served during most of the war period as a flying officer with the Ferrying Air Transport Command. He was Deputy Commander of the Ferrying Division at the time the war ended and he was discharged to the Reserve Corps with the rank of Colonel. He entered Government service in May 1950 when he was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Army. He was appointed to his present post as Under Secretary of the Army early this year after the change of Administration and his appointment to the Board of Directors of the Panama Canal Company followed a few weeks later.

PAGE 4

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 3, 1953 Canal Ends Half Century's Association With Municipal Services In Panama, Colon W VTEB for Panama City was first supplied from this reservoir at Rio Grande not far from the present Empire rifle range. The lake has been dry for years, hut the tower in the background is still standing and may identify the location for those who drive on the road to Empire, Culebra and Paja. Termination of the water management contract and the agreement by which the Canal collected garbage in the terminal cities of Panama and Colon and the assumption of responsibility for these services by the Republic of Panama ended almost 50 years of Canal Zone association with the Republic's water and garbage services. From late 1903 until July 1 of this year, either in connection with the water and sewage systems or from funds derived from the management contract, there were laid in Panama and Colon 46 miles of pipe, varying from 6 inches to 16 inches in diameter, 56 miles of sewer lines and 43 miles of paved streets. In addition ASSISTANT DIRECTOR I'M L II. FRIEDMAN has' been appointed W Supply and Service Director. He has been with the Canal organization for the past [2 years, serving until July 1951 in the Storehouse Division, most of the lame as Administrative Assistant, lie was one of two Canal nominees selected to take pari in the second Junior .Management Intern program of the Civil Service ( Jommission. Following completion of that special training in July 1951, he was named Assistant to the Supply and Service Director, the position he has held since that time. He is a gradual, of New York City College and has done graduate work at Harvard University, George Washington University, and the American University. streets were maintained in both terminal cities. There was no public water supply in the city of Panama and only a limited supply in Colon when the United States took over the French Canal Company's properties in May 1904. One of the articles of the 1903 treaty provided, among other things, that Panama grant the United States the right "to any works of sanitation such as the collection and disposition of sewage and the distribution of water in the cities of Panama and Colon." The expense of such works was to be borne by the United States, which was authorized "to impose and collect water rates and sewage rates" sufficient to amortize their cost in a 50-year period. At the end of this period, these properties were to revert to Panama. Water From Rio Grande Engineers immediately went to work on the Panama City water system, finally deciding to supply the city from the headwaters of the Rio Grande, about 10 miles from the southern end of Culebra — now Gaillard Cutwhere the French Panama Canal Company had formed a reservoir by means of a masonry dam. They decided to raise the dam to a height of 212 feet above mean high tide and to conduct water from this reservoir, by a Only Two Will Be Drafted™ In Lowest C. Z. Quota The lowest draft quota — 2— for the Canal Zone since the inception of Selective Service here has been set for July. Selective Service officials said that enough young men have had preinductlon physical examinations so that no one additional will be sent for examination this month. The low Canal Zone draft quota reflects the overall selective service picture. While no word has yet been received on the Canal Zone quota for August, news dispatches from Washington have reported that the overall draft quota for August will be 23,000, the same as July. Ui-inch pipe, from the Rio Grande to a million-gallon distributing reservoir in Ancon, from which it would feed into Panama by gravity flow. The water system was designed to supply a population of 30,000 people with 60 gallons apiece daily. There was some delay in construction of the Ancon reservoir and pending its completion the city was supplied by direct pressure from the Rio Grande pipeline. Water was turned on in Panama City for the first time on July 4, 1905. The Isthmian Canal Commission report for that year recounts how the Municipal Council held a special session and adopted a resolution of thanks to the government of the Canal Zone. The President, his cabinet, and Canal Zone officials attended a special Mass of thanks in the Cathedral in Panama City. By the end of 1906, the water system for the capital was completed, except for a few house connections. Where these were still lacking fire hydrants supplied the populace. Water For Colon On the Atlantic side, the story was somewhat different. In 1904, that part of Colon which was occupied by officials and employees of the Panama Railroad and by foreign consuls was supplied with water brought by the Railroad Company through a small iron pipe from a small reservoir near Mt. Hope. The rest of the population collected rain water in iron tanks. In 1906 the Isthmian Canal Commission reported a successful solution to this problem, saying: "Colon and Cristobal now have an abundant supply of pure and wholesome water from a receiving reservoir two miles back from Mt. Hope. This reservoir has a capacity of 508,000,000 gallons. . Street hydrants have been placed every 700 feet in Colon to supply the inhabitants with water until house connections are made." During the quarter ending June 30, 1906, by which time there were 432 consumers in Panama City, a water rate was set at "$4 silver a quarter." This entitled the consumer to 10,000 gallons of water during the quarter; there was a charge of "40 cents silver" for each additional 1,000 gallons but the (Seepage H) CANAL PRINTER GILBERT H. FUREY became the new Superintendent of the Printing Plant June 7 following the retirement of the former Superintendent, E. C. Cotton. The new Canal Printer had served as Assistant Printer since December 1946. He was employed as Press Foreman at the Panama Canal Press in 1923 after 10 years experience as a printer in his home town of Washington, D. C, where he served for 4 years in the Government Printing Office.

PAGE 5

July 3, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW FOR YOUR INTEREST AND GUIDANCE UML LA '<& CCIDENT PREVENTION 3 On Having Bad Luck Do You Have Bad Luck? Many of us still think accidents just happen — that they are due mostly to bad luck. When such a person has an accident his thinking is usually as follows: "It was just my hard luck; I have been pushing my luck too long; I was due to have one sooner or later." This kind of thinking is similar to believing that black cats leave an invisible cloud of bad luck in their wake from which there is no escape. Nothing can be farther from the truth. You can avoid having an accident. Granted, one or two accidents out of a hundred may be caused by an "Act of God," things we are powerless to prevent, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and tidal waves; however, nowadays, it is possible to protect yourself even against these. The other 99 accidents can be avoided if you do something about them in person. It may not be possible for you to guarantee your own safety all the time, because others may do something which involves you in an accident. Yet, even these can be avoided with everybody working together for his own safety. Think back to some of the accidents you have seen or heard about. Didn't HONOR ROLL Bureau Award For BEST RECORD MAY INDUSTRIAL BUREAU AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Industrial 4 Civil Affairs 2 Health 2 Community Services 1 Engineering and Construction 1 Marine Railroad and Terminals Supply and Service Division Award For NO DISABLING INJURIES MAY NAVIGATION DIVISION ELECTRICAL DIVISION RAILROAD DIVISION MOTOR TRANSPORTATION DIVISION GROUNDS MAINTENANCE DIVISION DIVISION OF SANITATION someone say that the man was careless; that he wasn't watching what he was doing? Why sure, that is just what the usual explanation has been. Someone did something wrong— he did something that could have been done better and more safely. Now what can you do personally to prevent having an accident? Take a look at the way you work. A lot of people work with you and someone helps you in one way or another. You know that there must be cooperation and teamwork to get a job done. Therefore, teamwork and looking after the other fellow's safety, as well as your own, will also prevent accidents. The following suggestions will give some idea on how to start: 1. Consider safety as much a part of your job as knowing how to do the work. 2. Look for hazards around your job. 3. When you see something that might cause an accident, stop and fix it. What if someone else did leave it? That is no reason for you to walk off and not make it right. Always bend down that nail; pick up those tools; move that pipe out of the way; clean up that broken glass. 4. If you see something you cannot fix or have no time to repair, then tell someone else who can. Let your boss know of all unsafe conditions and hazards before starting the job. 5. Be alert every minute while you are working to protect yourself and others. 6. When you are doing hazardous work, protect yourself properly with goggles, safety hat, safety shoes, face mask, respirator, or whatever the job requires. 7. See that everybody working with you is protected by proper clothing and safety equipment. 8. Stop whatever you are doing and set up proper safeguards so no one else will be hurt as a result of what you arc doing. 9. If you are not sure it is safe for you to proceed, check with your boss to learn the safe way. 10. If you, as the boss, are doubtful call your Safety Inspector. 1 1 Always find out first how to work safely. NEVER TAKE A CHANCE. 12. Make yourself a good example for others. Be enthusiastic for Safety. Influence others to work safely. Keep your work area clean and orderly. 13. Go cautiously. Trying to work too fast and taking short cuts to save time often results in accidents. Take a few moments to think how to do the job safely. A moment of thought may save hours of delay and days of personal suffering. 14. Cooperate with those who are trying to prevent accidents. They are thinking of your safety. 15. When you are injured, compensation is a poor substitute for the suffering, loss of pay, and the jeopardizing of your family's welfare. 16. If you do have an injury, no matter how small, protect your life and limb by getting immediate first aid and medical treatment. Safety-mindedness and accident prevention is one part of the job that can be safely taken home. Let this part of your job worry you at home and while you are taking your recreation. Off the job accident prevention is equally as important to you and your family as safety on the job MAY 1953 Industrial Bureau Engineering and Construction Bureau Supply and Service Bureau Health Bureau C. Z. Govt.— Panama Canal Co. (This month) Civil Affairs Bureau Marine Bureau C. Z. Govt.— Panama Canal Co. (Best Year) Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked (Frequency Rale) AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Community Services Bureau Grounds Maintenance 4 D .. , T . n Motor Transportation 4 ^droad and Terminals Bureau Sanitation 4 Dredging 3 Electrical 3 Hospitalization and Clinics 3 Number of Disabling Injuries... __27 Clubhouses 2 Maintenance 2 Railroad 2 rStorehouses 2 Navigation 1 , Commissary I I Amount Worse Than Canal Zone Government — Panama Canal Company Best Year Locks Terminals r : : : : : : : : :::] Accumulative Frequency Rate This Year 20 30 40 Man-Hours Worked 2.775,346 LEGEND _I Amount Better Than Canal Zone Government — Panama Canal Company Best Year

PAGE 6

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 4, 1953 Doll-Dressing Hobby Benefits Many Children On The Isthmus OUR OUT-OF-DOORS DRESSING DOLLS is a hobby for Mrs. Claude M. Kreger of Gamboa. The Scotcn lassie in the foreground, the demure Dutch maid on the fence, and the five Panamanian dolls are only a few of the many she has dressed. Mrs. Margaret B. Kreger of Gamboa plays with dolls — but only to dress them in fancy finery and then give them away. She has dressed hundreds in the past three years but has only those shown in the accompanying picture to show her handiwork. About 100 of her finely dressed dolls were given last Christmas to children in an orphanage in Colon and other poor children in Panama. Her niece in Europe has a collection of 80 that Mrs. Kreger has dressed. Many others have been sold and the proceeds given to charitable and community organizations. Girls State, sponsored by the American Legion, will benefit this year from the proceeds from three of her larger dolls. Mrs. Kreger has been an active member of the American Legion Auxiliary Post 6 at Gamboa for the past 10 years. Other doll sales have financed sizable gifts for food packages and clothing sent to Czechoslovakia, earthquake victims in Ecuador and a $100 check last Christmas given to Panama's First Lady as head of the Panama Red Cross for use in the purchase of foodstuffs for the city's poor children. Dolls dressed by Mrs. Kreger are a cosmopolitan group. The first one she made was a blonde Scotch lassie who wore a kilt, a bonnie feather in her hat, a shawl with a gold buckle, a purse of camel's hair, shoes crocheted in black linen thread with silver buckles crocheted of metallic thread, black chiffon velvet jacket trimmed with gold braid, and lace ruffles for collar and cuffs. Polleras For Panama Then there were others dressed in French, Dutch, and Spanish costumes and costumes of other nationalities but probably the greatest number of her dolls wore Panamanian polleras. Mrs. Kreger has also dressed dolls as sweater girls, brides, Easter paraders, and sophisticates in evening clothes. The fine needlework necessary for the pollera dolls' lacy and ruffled full skirts and other such miniature feminine frills was learned by Mrs. Kreger long before she turned her talents to dressing dolls. Born in the old Theatre Royal in Kidderminster, Worcester, England, while her American parents were filling an engagement at the theater, Mrs. Kreger grew up all over the world but received most of her education in French and English convents and in Germany where she was taught needlework of all kinds. From that time on, she made all her own clothes, including the theatrical costumes she wore when she followed in her parent's footsteps, playing in theaters all over Europe and the United States. Tailor, Too Since she married and retired from the stage in 1927, she has also made all the clothing worn by her husband, Claude M. Kreger, Rotary Drill Operator in the Dredging Division. Mrs. Kreger studied dolls a long time before she tried to dress one, inspecting all that she could find and studying the costumes of many nations as they were shown in pictures and books. The materials that go into the costumes for the dolls come from many unsuspected sources. The "gold" pollera jewelry worn by one of her dolls was a fancy chain belt once worn by a belle of the Gay Nineties era. Gold braid and beads go into the making of jewelry for pollera dressed dolls. Their "tembleques" are tiny beads, "pearls," and fish scales strung on fine wires. The dolls' shoes are crocheted with fine metallic thread. All laces and insertions are imported from Holland, France, England, Belgium, and other countries known for their fine beading and laces. A little Dutch girl among her dolls wears tiny flowered porcelain "wooden" shoes that Mrs. Kreger ran across in a store one day and put away, as she does many such little treasures, for a time she will find a doll to fit them. Mrs. Kreger started work on her hobby in 1951 when her husband was transferred temporarily to the Atlantic side of the Isthmus, leaving her more freedom from household duties. Her next doll project, and her most ambitious, will be a United Nations doll family, which she plans to start as soon as she can find the proper dolls. Most of the dolls that she dresses come from Canada, Spain, Italy, and the United States, but male dolls with blond hair, the kind needed for the European and The Strangler Fig, pictured in the accompanying photograph, does exactly what its name implies. It begins to grow on other trees when a seed, usually dropped by a bird or in some other fashion, lodges in a crevice or at the base of spreading palm leaves. The fig sends small feeder roots to the ground and continues to grow. Over a period of years the loots increase in number and encircle the entire trunk of the host plant. As both trees grow, the fig's roots tighten, until all circulation to the original tree is cut off and it dies. By this time the fig, whose botanical name isFicus, is strong enough to support its own branches. It frequently outlives and overtops the host tree; sometimes the host tree disappears entirely, leaving the giant climber twined around a large, hollow cylinder. Many species of the Strangler Fig then drop aerial roots to the ground. These form what may be called a new trunk. They continue spreading, killing any trees in their way. STRANGLER FIGS engulf their hosts. This tree is one of two in a meadow near Ridge Road, Balboa Heights. Another fine specimen is in George Green Park on Madden Road. It is said that Alexander the Great once camped under such a tree, which was large enough to shelter an army of 7,000 men. About 20 years ago this tree was measured; it was 2,000 feet in circumference and had about 3,000 trunks. The Strangler Fig is one of over 600 species of Ficus. They are scattered throughout the warmer regions of the world. Its best known varieties, internationally, are the edible fig, and the pot plant which is used extensively in the United States and is commonly known as the India Rubber plant. Best known of the local Ficus are the Ficus retusa — the Chinese Banyan trees— which line both sides of Roosevelt Avenue in Balboa from the Railroad station to the commissary. American models in the United Nations group, are difficult to find anywhere, she says. Mrs. Kreger hopes to complete this project in time to present the United Nations dolls to President Eisenhower before the end of his first term of office.

PAGE 7

July 3, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Official Panama Canal Company Publication Published Monthly at BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE Printed by the Printing Plant Mount Hope, Canal Zone John S. Seybold, Governor-President H. 0. Paxson, Lieutenant Governor J. Rufus Hardy, Editor Eleanor H. McIlhenny Oleva Hastings Editorial Assistants SUBSCRIPTIONS— $1.00 a year SINGLE COPIES— S cents each On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses, Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after publication date. SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL— lOcentseach BACK COPIES— lOcentseach On sale when available, from the Vault Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. Postal money orders should be made payable to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company, and mailed to Editor, The Panama Canal Review, Balboa Heights, C. Z. Applications May Be Filed Between July 13, August 7 For Empire Street Houses Applications for the 22 houses now under construction on Empire Street in Balboa will be accepted by the Housing Office at Balboa starting July 13 and up to 4:15 o'clock in the afternoon of August 7. It is expected that the 24 apartments in the development will be available for occupancy late in August or early in September. There are seven types of houses in the area, including two new ones, Types 339 and 333, that have not been built in Canal communities before. Type 339, designed for large families, is a two-story four-bedroom duplex of masonry construction in which all the bedrooms are located on the second floor. There are two of them in the Empire Street area. Type 333, the other new type in the development, is a one-family masonry cottage in which a "modernfold" door separating two bedrooms makes it possible to have either two or three bedrooms. There are seven of these houses. The other types of houses in the area are: One 431, a composite type threebedroom cottage like those in the San Juan area of Ancon; six Type 334, onefamily, two-bedroom masonry "patio house" like those built in the Ancon Boulevard development; three Type 332, one-family, two-bedroom masonry cotOF CURRENT INTEREST Third Commendation THE THIRD COMMENDATION received by Thomas S. Grant for personal bravery and excellent seamanship is presented to the motorboat operator by ('apt. Horatio A. Lincoln, Balboa Port Captain. A copy of the letter to Thomas Grant also went to Rafael A. Lescano, seaman, left, who assisted in the rescue for which the commendation was given. At the height of the windstorm which struck the Pacific side of the Isthmus the afternoon of May 27, the two employees rescued two Panamanians from their capsized cayuco which had overturned in the high winds. The Panamanians, residents of Taboga, had clung to their capsized boat for about an hour before they were picked up in the Canal channel near Flamenco Island. The motorboat operator and seaman, in the launch Mackerel, which had been dispatched before the storm broke to pick up a Panama Canal pilot, also towed to safety a Panamanian schooner in the same vicinity which was drifting toward the shoals. On two other occasions the launch operator had been highly commended for similar bravery and seamanship. In August 1935, he rescued, under trying conditions, 16 crew members and passengers off the motorboat B. E. de Obarrio when it sank after a collision with the S. S. Cathtcood. In July 1940, while he was operating the I. S. Coiinga, he sighted and saved from drowning an American man and woman who had been in the waters of the Canal for about four hours after their sailboat Riptide capsized. The launch operator on that occasion was credited with saving their lives by having artificial respiration administered after they were rescued. "You displayed an utter disregard for your personal safety and you also exhibited quick thinking, good judgment and expert seamanship. I take pleasure in commending you for this excellent performance, which is in keeping with the highest standards of service in the Panama Canal Company," the Port Captain wrote in his letter of commendation. The launch operator has been employed as seaman and motorboat operator in the Canal organization since 1925. The small service sections at the Balboa and Cristobal Commissaries which have been open on Mondays when the rest of the Commissaries are closed will be discontinued July 13. The decision to discontinue the special Monday service was made following a suggestion from an employee representative in the monthly Governor-Employee conference. It was decided to close the special sections because of a continuing increase in the number of items requested particularly those that cannot be considered "emergency" type purchases, and the change in the Panama Line schedule so that the ships arrive on Monday afternoons. assistants serving in 20 different CompanyGovernment units. Fifty of the vacationing students are in U. S.-rate positionand tinremainder are on local-rate rolls. The number ol student assistants is considerably lower than last year when there were about 100 students employed during the summar vacation period. There are 11 students employed in the Canal organization this summer astudent tages, also built in the Ancon Boulevard area; two Type 337, one-family, threebedroom masonry patio type house; and one Type 329, to be assigned to a large family, a one-family, four-bedroom breezeway type house, also built in the Ancon Boulevard development. The following weekly rents have been set for the new houses: Type 431, The first of a series of town meetings in Canal communities to organize a civil defense warden service have been held at Gamboa, Santa Cruz, and Chagres. Others are being scheduled by William G. Dolan, Chief of Civil Defense. As a result of the meetings already held, warden organizations have been set up at Gamboa and Santa Cruz, the first in Canal communities. $20.60; Type 334, $1V-'II; Type 332, $16.35; Type 333, $18.35; Type 337, $22.15; Type 329, $24.45; and Type 339, $22.S0. The Office of the Secretary of the Army announced this month the resignation of Edward D. McKim, insurance executive ill Omaha, as a in ember of the ard of Directors the Panama inal Company, had served on the Board since early in 1951 and had been a member of the Executive Committee since its formation in Sept. 1951.

PAGE 8

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 3,1953 Power Branch Keeps Electricity Flowing From Source To Consumer usually called the Army and asked if a balloon were loose. Frequently the dispatcher's call was the Army's first information that a balloon had broken from its moorings. The trailing cables would drag across the lines and put them out of service. Once a runaway balloon, leaking hydrogen from breaks in both ends, caught under wires directly in front of the Miraflores station. The balk on exploded, breaking windows, twisting window frames, and blowing out a heavy metal door at the back of the power station. Herbert F. Paddock, now Acting Chief Dispatcher, was on duty that night. He recalls that no one was seriously hurt. From Power Supply While handling emergencies like that of the recent Saturday evening is an important part of the power people's job, it is not by any means all. They, and the plants they operate, are all part of the Power Branch of the Electrical Division. Their main job is to see that the Canal Zone has a steady supply of electric power to operate the locks, light streets and houses and offices, run refrigerators, lathes, washing machines, electric clocks, typewriters, heat bakery ovens, stows, and dry closets, and do the hundredand-one things for which electricity is essential. Power in the Canal Zone is generated by two fluids: Water and oil. Water, in the principal of the old mill wheel, operates the generators at Madden and Gatun hydroelectric plants. Diesel oil, on the principle of the internal combustion engine, runs the six Diesel generating stations. The system's main Diesel plant at Miraflores is manned day and night for emergencies such as that on the MACHINES dwarf men at the Madden hydroelectric station, source of the bulk of Canal Zone, electric jpower. Lew Ryan. Madden Chief Operator, in a flowered shirt, talks with Pat Coakley, acting supervisor for the southern district of the Power Branch. In the background is James Sobers, one of the oilers. One recent Saturday night lights flickered in houses all over the Pacific side of the Canal Zone. Then they dimmed, almost went out. In the Power Dispatcher's office in the Miraflores Diesel-electric station, an alarm bell rang. At the same time instruments on his switchboard indicated a major disturbance in the normally smooth flow of electric power. Simultaneously, in the Gatun hydroelectric station, identical instruments showed Operator-Dispatcher William Schuster that the Canal Zone's power system had "lost a generating plant," as electricians say. At Miraflores, Power Dispatcher John S. Skinner, Jr., blew a siren; Daniel J. Sullivan, Diesel engineer on watch, dropped whatever he was doing and started up one of the plant's Diesel units, affectionately known to the men who work there as "rock crushers." Mr.Skinnerconnected this and other units to the electric lines, as needed, to assure light and power to the locks and the power system's other customers. At Gatun, Mr. Schuster performed the necessary operations which enabled his plant to pick up additional load. All over the Pacific side, the lights stopped flickering, slowly gained power and in a matter of seconds were back to full brilliance. Later the dispatchers learned that something, probably lightning, had knocked out both of the 44,000-volt lines which come from the Madden hydroelectric plant and join the trans-Isthmian 44,000-volt line at Summit. The next day a line crew checked the Madden lines and found them undamaged. Lightning, Birds Or Animals At this time of year power failures on the lines anywhere usually mean lightning, but there may be other causes— children's kites caught on a high wire, for instance. The section of the transmission line between Gamboa and Fort Davis is a favorite playground for animals, birds, or snakes. A power failure there may mean that a sloth has slowly climbed a transmission tower and taken a firm and fatal grasp on a high-voltage line. Or a snake may have slithered across a line and put it out of service. Until the garbage dump at Gatun was moved some time ago, a power failure on the transmission lines north of Gatun usually meant that a buzzard, on the lookout for a tasty morsel in the dump, had chosen the power line for a perch. During the war, barrage balloons were frequent causes of power failures. If a line went out the dispatcher on duty POWEE DISPATCHERS seldom cluster in threes but they did for The Review photographer.* Talking on the telephone is Frank Mauldin while Herbert F. Paddock, Acting Chief Dispatcher, center, discusses electrical matters with Pat Coakley, who is presently acting supervisor for the Branch's southern district hut whose regular job is Chief Power Dispatcher. Mr. Paddock's usual work is Chief Operator at the Gatun hydroelectric station.

PAGE 9

July 3,1953 1HE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Saturday night we've been talking about. The other Diesel stations, most of them built during the war, are used as standbys and for emergency power supply. The Madden hydroelectric station is the system's major power producer. Water from Madden Lake flows through great pipes under the station floor, through turbines which turn the generators to make electric power and out, under the station, to the river below the towering dam. In the station's spotless long, narrow main room, where the temperature is at least 90 degrees all the time, are three big, flat-topped semi-ovals. These house the generators themselves. Atop each housing is a pile of cylindrical shapes, each smaller than the one beneath like a set of child's graduated blocks. These are the "exciters." Each controls the operations of the one beneath. "Without these little babies and their direct current, the big boy (the generator) below won't produce alternating current," Madden Station's Chief, Lew Ryan explains. Over Transmission Lines Madden and Gatun hydroelectric stations generate current at 6,000 volts, a volt being a unit of electrical pressure. Outside the station the voltage is stepped up by means of transformers to the 44,000 volts at which it is transmitted. The generators cannot produce current of such high voltage but it is desirable for more efficient power flow. Over the high voltage lines, suspended on their towers, the electricity is transmitted to the various substations. Maintenance of the transmission lines is a major problem. They are patrolled twice a month and, in addition, always the day after a power failure. Some sections of the lines are patrolled by car, some by "speeders" on the railroad, others on foot. Sometimes the towers, like Nos. 12 and 13 on the Madden Line. are deep in the Forest Preserve. To reach them linemen have to follow paths through head-high undergrowth. On these patrols, linemen all too frequently find that someone has made off with equipment for its metal value. Formerly the linemen had been able to store strings of porcelain insulators — a four-insulator unit weighs 81 pounds — at the bases of some of the more isolated towers and thus avoid hauling them in each time there was need of replacement. But recently these reserve strings have been found smashed, for the slight bit of bronze the insulators contain. Ground wires down the sides of the towers have been cut and removed; not long ago a long section of deenergized 11,000-volt line was stolen. Through Nerve Center If the power system can be described anatomically, the generating plants are the heart, the transmission lines and underground cables the veins and arteries, and the office of the chief power dispatcher the nerve center. From his desk, which happens to be in the Miraflores Diesel station, he has the power system, quite literally, at his fingertips. Red and green lights on a panelled board tell him what is "live," what is deenergized. He knows, and is prepared to do something about it, when there is a failure on a power line anywhere. CABLE SPLICERS work underground, but do not usually have as much space as this. John C. Francis works on cables in a double manhole while his helper, Stanford E. Allen, stands readv to assist him. He is not only the power dispatcher but he is also operator of the Miraflores substation in time of trouble, power plant operator for the Miraflores plant, and, by remote control, substation operator at the Balboa, Gamboa, and Summit substations. Sometimes, according to Acting Chief Dispatcher Herbert Paddock, he is also a question and answer man. Invariably when there is trouble and the dispatcher is in the middle of dealing with it, people call up to tell him what he already knows, that their lights are off. This is especially true if a failure happens during the peak load periods— 8 to 11 a. m. weekdays and early evenings over weekends. As dispatcher he controls the flow of power into the various substations, where it is stepped down by transformers to the 2,200 volts which run through underground cables to the consumers. At the consumer end, in the little block-like transformer houses one sees here and there, the power is again stepped down, METER. READING is part of the job of Carl .1. Mellander, an apprentice wireman for the Electrical Division. Here he records current consumption at a Diablo house. this time to the 220 or 110 volts which is safe for house or office service. To The User The amount of current 'each user consumes is measured by a meter, a watt-hour meter if one must be technical. Reading and testing meters is the job of men like Ernest Berger or Donald Kaan who, between monthly meter readings, work in the electrical instrument repair shop at the Balboa field office. Meter readers, on their rounds of their 9,000 watt-hour charges, have their troubles. They are followed by mischievous children with a million questions each, set upon by irritable dogs, and cornered by irritated housewives who want to know why their light bills are so high "when Mrs. Jones across the streetdoes twice as much baking and her bill's nothing like mine!" Processing the meter readings for payroll deduction as well as for cash and intra-agency billing by the Comptroller's Office requires considerable time so the consumer doesn't pay for his light until about six weeks after the meters are read. For instance, charges for current used between February 15 and March 15 this year did not appear on deduction slips until May 4. By that time most consumers had forgotten just what they had used electricity for during the 30-day period covered by the bill. A change was made recently in billing procedure and deduction slips now show the period in which the current was used. "Electric current to 7-15" will mean that the current was used between June 15 and July 15. The rate is two cents for the first 150 kilowatt hours each month and one cent a kilowatt hour for the next 99,850 kilowatt hours. Local electric rates compare favorably with those in the United States. The 1952 issue of the Federal Power Commission's report on power rates in cities of more than 2,500 population shows that in Cleveland, Ohio, electricity which would cost a Canal Zone customer $2 costs a Cleveland customer $3.35; the Cleveland customer would pay $10.48 for

PAGE 10

10 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 3, 1953 mount of power which costs the Canal Zone user $6.50. In Tacoma, Wash., the rates are lower. ricity for which a Canal Zone user pays $2 costs $1.70 and that amount which costs $6.50 here costs $5.35 in Tacoma. But in San Antonio, Tex., current for which a Canal Zonian pays $2 costs $3.59 and that for which a Zonian pays $6.50 costs $10.59. Irons vs. Lights Most heating units irons, stoves, toasters, wattle irons, water heatersuse more current per hour than a light or a motor on an electric fan, refrigerator, record changer, or vacuum cleaner. A l.iii in-watt iron consumes 1 kilowatt hour of electrical energy as against 0.1 of a kilowatt hour for a 100-watt light, for each hour of operation. However, many heating appliances have heat-regulating thermostats which snap the current on and off as needed. Incidentally, electricians say, don't heat an iron just to press a blouse. It takes current to heat that iron.. Wait until there are half a dozen blouses and do them all at one time. Don't use an oven just to bake potatoes; cook a meat loaf and a pie at the same time. Leaky hot water faucets make a water heater work overtime; youngsters opening and closing refrigerators doors make refrigerator motors work extra and electric bills run up. Maids are generally less careful with electric current than their employers, who have to pay the bills. People who talk about the "good old days" aren't thinking about electricity. Among the property turned over to the United States by the French Canal Company in 1904 were 10 "electrical machines," book valued at about $13,000. And historians recount that French forces worked in Culebra Cut at night under electric lights. But electricity for domestic consumption was something else. In 1905, the only Commission buildings which were electrically lighted were the hospital, the administration building, and a few quarters at Ancon along with some quarters in Colon and Cristobal. Electricity And Kerosene People whose houses had electricity paid 75 cents a month apiece for the first 10 lights and 50 cents for each additional light. Those who had no electricity were furnished kerosene free. This led to protests of discrimination and one letter in the old files asserts: "If electrical employees have to pay for their light, kerosene employees ought to pay, too." After lengthy discussion when some methods of electrical charges were considered and discarded, the Commission decided, toward the end of 1906, that all buildings should be furnished light, water, and fuel without charge. In 1910 considerable excitement was roused when a neglected electric iron started a lire in Gatun. The damage was slight but the incident sparked off 'since this is an electrical story) an investigation that disclosed that 57 electric irons, as well as some toasters, chafing dishes, percolators, etc., were being used on the current which was intended for lighting only. An official estimate showed that the use of these unauthorized appliances was costing the Commission $103.26 a month! On March 1, 1910, Colonel Goethals ssued a circular that the electric current MACY'S had full-page ads in New York papers to tell the world about "Scrabble." Locally, it might do what the television we don't have can't to keep the family on the home front. Scrabble, that ha; Macy's crowing, is a crossword game with a scoring system that fits the tastes and talents of both young and old. Macy's copywriters gamboled through the usual gimmicks to tell how much fun Scrabble is. To which the Canal Commissaries could only add: "We sell it for only $2.50." Two new pie mixes that come in cans, available soon in the CommisFruit Pies saries, will make the job of filling fruit pies as easy as ihe pie crust mixes have made the making of pie shells. There will be blueberry and cherry pie mix, both of which have sugar, lemon juice, salt, and stock added to the fruit. The cans are large enough to fill an eightor nine-inch pie crust and will cost about 38 cents. NEW NYLON TIES for men will be in the stores soon. They are grenadine weave rough, almost like monk's cloth and are in solid colors and small prints. They will cost about $1.25. A large stock of maternity dresses and separates that are on order "Pop Coats" are now arriving in the stores. Among the many pretty styles — including the new polished and embossed cottons — will be white pique "Pop Coats" with "jewel trimming, which wholesale drygoods people at Mount Hope expect to be especially popular. INDOOR-OUTDOOR furniture with unusually pleasing lines, tubular steel construction that is as sturdy as it is light in weight and appearance, seats and backs in tomato or emerald green fibre with steel wire reenforcement core in each strand, will be in the stores soon. It is comfortable and will be sold at comfortable prices well below comparable lines. There will be dinette tables with chairs to match; two-arm lounges and two-arm pull-ups; left and right chairs and armless fillers for sectional combinations; end tables; lamp, or corner tables; cocktail tables; and outdoor loungers. Prices will range from about $18.50 for single pieces to $69.50 for the dinette set. Fully leather-lined shoes for men — the kind cl that are built for long wear — are bhoes For Men coming to the Commissaries from England. There will be plain toe and straight tip styles in black and brown and, because of the favorable exchange rate, they will cost about $6.25. LEMONADE CONCENTRATE, in frozen form, which was unavailable for a short time, is now back in the stores to stay. Fruits from the United States will be coming into the stores now and for the Fresh Fruit next few months, when they are in season up north. Cherries, plums, cantaloupes, and watermelons are available, on order, or enroute. Nectarines and plums can be expected later as the fruit season progresses. ORLON SWEATERS for women, shrug styles and slipovers, in threeand two-tone color combinations are expected early in July. They will cost about $4. There are new lines of Yardley cosmetics — new to Yardley's and Yardley new in the Commissaries — for Cosmetics both men and women. There are shaving cream, brushless shaving cream, oath oil, after-shower powder, and a new perfume and essence of perfume called "Flair." A KITCHEN SERVANT that will take the tedium out of a multitude of cooking chores is the Griscer all-purpose kitchen cutter that has been ordered for the Commissaries and is expected soon. It has been so well advertised and so well liked by those who have used it, about the only thing left to tell Commissary customers is that locally it will cost about $10 complete with four cutters. They are: The chopper that crumbs bread, chops nuts and vegetables very fine, crushes ice, rices ootatoes; a shredder that shreds coconut, cheese, lemon or orange rind, carrots and other firm vegetables, crumbs crackers, toast, bread, chocolate, cuts nut meats, eggs, onions, etc.; a shoestringer that shoestrings vegetables, soup stock, casserole dishes, cuts fruit and other foods for baking, preserves, salads and candies, etc.; and the slicer (thin) that cuts cabbage, peppers, onions, cucumbers, radishes, carrots for salads, etc., reduces green or wax beans to bits and is fine for potato chips, for instance. A baby server, a table with an adjustable T i| seat for the baby right_in the les For Babies middle, will be in the Commissaries soon. Also available will be an attachment that makes the same server do service for baby's bath. It is a versatile, safe, and ingenious bit of equipment that is designed to fit the needs of a baby from early infancy to about three years, after which it can continue in service as a game and play table. BLACK TAFFETA RAINCOATS, expected soon, will be the fanciest rainy season attire seen so far in the Commissaries. They will cost about $1 1 Copper-bottomed, stainless steel Revere cooking ware, unavailable for Copper some time, is coming back to the Bottoms Commissaries, probably early in July. Included in the lot will be mixing bowls with handles for matched hanging. "WITWHIP" was given top honors in a ten-page review of kitchen tools in LIFE Magazine as the first really new development in the line of beaters since the conventional egg beater came into existence in 1 860. The new device is operated with one hand, whips at the very bottom of a container, and, for example, will whip one spoonful of cream in a tiny teacup, quickly and without spraying the surroundings. It will be in the Commissaries soon and will cost about $1.85 was furnished for lighting only and could not be used for power, heating, or cooking. Those who owned electrical appliances could continue to use them only on the condition that they pay for the current consumed, and no other employee was to buy electrical appliances. Practically all the electrically-equipped householders immediately said they would discontinue the use of their appliances. Today there are approximately 4,400 electric ranges and water heaters in Canal quarters and a large but unknown number of refrigerators, washing machines, fans, radios, and other equipmentThe amount of electric power generated in 1952 was three and one-half times thatgenerated in 1922. All of which means that the increased electrical load in employees quarters, plus the additional load for the various Canal and Armed Forces facilities, has resulted in the use of 350 percent more electricity than was being used 30 years ago. Which means, in the long run, more and more work for the people of the Power Branch.

PAGE 11

July 3,1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 11 Penitentiary Guard For 42 Years Brought 'Em Back If They Escaped For 42 years Canal Zone convicts have had to reckon with Sidney King, who is credited with bringing back most of the prisoners who have broken out of Canal Zone penitentiaries. There have been 39 attempted escapes in local penal history but only one convict, No. 643, got away for good. That was back in 1913 and things have changed a lot since then, according to the longtime guard and clerk who remembers all the prison breaks. No. 643 first made an unsuccessful attempt to break out of the stockade at Mandingo and was shot by the guard who stopped him. Placed in the prison dispensary at Culebra for treatment, he made a rope out of his hospital sheet, swung himself two stories down to the ground and made the one clean getaway in Canal Zone penal history. Mr. King recalls that the guard at the hospital was dismissed for negligence. Canal Zone police and penal affairs, he says, "are regulated a lot better today" and many lessons have been learned from local police experience, including the efficacy of thorough training for prison personnel. Only two escapees on Canal Zone convict records attempted the same thing twice. Both were recaptured on the second try by the long-time prison guard, who, in years past, was ordinarily detailed to ferret out prisoners who were believed to have escaped into Panama. For the past several years he has served as chief clerk in the office of the penitentiary at Gamboa. Sawed Out Of Cell The most audacious of the prisoners who escaped, in Mr. King's opinion, was one who sawed himself out of a dark cell at Gamboa in 1913, together with his cellmate. That was not difficult in the old wooden building that served as the prison at the time. The prisoners made it through the wire of the prison enclosure and were not missed until the next day when one was recaptured near Summit. There was no trace of the other prisoner until about four days later when he returned to the penitentiary and left a calling card. On a movie night at the prison, when most of the prison personnel were on duty watching the prisoners as they watched the moving pictures, one of the guards returned to his quarters to find that he had been robbed. About $600 in cash, a watch, and some jewelry were missing. The timing of the burglary on a movie night convinced police that it was the escaped convict who had come to call. Mr. King was detailed to go into Panama to see if the missing prisoner could be found there. He combed the town for several days and finally caught sight of the fugitive at the Panama Railroad station just as he was getting ready to board a train for the Atlantic side. When he was caught he still had $500 and the watch and a ticket to Cuba on a boat that was sailing within a few hours from Cristobal. Detective In Trinidad Mr. King came to the Isthmus from Trinidad where he had been a detective i SIDNEY KING on the police force for about 10 years. He had gone there from his native Barbados because he wanted to be a policeman and there were no vacancies on the force at home. When he came to the Canal Zone he had the same thing in mind. He came to the Isthmus in July 1911 and since he couldn't get a job immediately with the police, he went to work as an orderly at Ancon Hospital. About five months later, he was employed at the Gorgona police station. There was plenty of activity there in those days according to the long-time guard. The machine shops for the Canal work were located there, there were many nationalities among the Canal "diggers" stationed in the town, plenty of saloons, plenty of business, and plenty to keep Gorgona's 16-man police force busy. In December 1913, he was transferred to the penitentiary office at Culebra, where prisoners were taken before they were transferred to a temporary prison at Mandingo. The prison building at Culebra had been abandoned in 191 1 when slides on the west bank of Culebra Cut threatened to break back to the prison. A road was being built at the time from Empire to the Panama boundary at Paja and the temporary prison at Mandingo, built of the trees readily available in the area, was about halfway between the two points. There were a lot of prison breaks in those days, Mr. King recalls, a fact that is not surprising in view of the facilities. Moved To Gamboa In 1913 the prison was moved to its present location at Gamboa, where prisoners were housed in a former messhall used by European Canal laborers. The laborers were moved across the Canal to Matachin and prison personnel moved into the quarters that were vacated at Gamboa. The penitentiary had the most and the least prisoners in 1913, according to Mr. King. There were so many— about 200 at one time — that an extensive program of rehabilitation was instituted by Richard L. Metcalfe, who was in charge of civil administration in the Canal Zone during the last few months of the third and last Isthmian Canal Commission. Many prisoners also were pardoned and the penitentiary population then dropped to its lowest point, totaling about 40. Police work has been Mr. King's one absorbing interest from the time he was a boy and incidentally provided a hobby he has followed most of his life. When he was on the police force in Trinidad, some of the policemen there made their own shoes because the ones that were generally available were not as good looking as they thought the boots of a policeman should be. Mr. King learned shoemaking from fellow policemen there and has made all his own shoes since that time. He also has always made all the shoes worn by his wife and two sons, many for police and prison personnel and a large circle of friends. Dog Registration And Will Begin About Mid Rabies Inoculation July In Ten Zone Towns Registration of dogs for licensing and the mandatory vaccination of the animals against rabies will begin about the middle of July in 10 central locations in the Canal Zone The exact dates when vaccinating and registering teams will be in the various locations will be announced within a short time. As present plans now stand, the teams will work one day in each of the following towns: Old Cristobal, Rainbow City, Margarita, Gatun, and Chagres on the Atlantic side; Balboa (which will also serve residents of Ancon and Diablo Heights), Gamboa, La Boca, Paraiso, and Pedro Miguel on the Pacific side. Dog owners will register their pets, have them vaccinated against rabies and pay the $2 license fee at the same time. A recent Executive Regulation issued by Gov. J. S. Seybold requires that all dogs in the Canal Zone have the antirabies inoculation and be licensed by August 1. Working with the veterinarian who will vaccinate the dogs will be clerks from the License Section who will fill out the necessary forms and issue the dog tags. The tags, of brass with black letters, and the anti-rabies vaccine were ordered some time ago from the United States and will arrive here shortly. The tags are numbered from 1 through 4,000. After the initial registration period, dog owners may have their pets vaccinated against rabies at the Corozal kennels on the Pacific side or at the Humane Society kennels at Brazos Brook on the Atlantic side. Pacific siders will then take their dogs' vaccination certificates to the License Section in the Civil Affairs Building where the licenses will be issued. Atlantic siders will mail their certificates to the License Section as they do for automobile license plates and the dog license tags will be returned by mail. Dog licenses will be valid from August 1 of this year to July 31, 1954, and will be renewed annually. Unlicensed animals will be impounded.

PAGE 12

12 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 3,1953 Book By Two C. Z. Teachers To Be Published Probably the greatest thrill in a child's life is learning to read, according to two Canal Zone teachers. But the child doesn't learn to read the first day as he anticipated; instead, at first he learns whole words and phrases but at a later stage the use of letter sounds is a great aid as he takes his first steps toward exploring the world of books. Modern education stresses the importance of the phonetic approach to reading and to that field the two teachers, Eunice Monroe and Josephine Withers, have recently made a contribution. The Gel-Sten Company of Brookfield, III., one of the largest U. S. publishers of school duplicating materials, has just bought their book, Beginning Phonics. It will be available in time for the coming school year. A second book by Miss Monroe and Miss Withers has recently been submitted to the same publisher. The two Canal Zone teachers developed their book because they felt there was a lack of good usable material available in this field of teaching. Both were first grade teachers at the time—Miss Withers will be teaching third grade in Diablo next year and Miss Monroe is a first grade teacher. Comparing notes and exchanging lesson sheets on their work, they found that their ideas for the teaching of this phase of phonics were almost identical The book developed from these ideas. Teachers' Evaluation Before accepting material for publication, Gel-Sten ordinarily has it evaluated by key teachers. When they compiled their manuscript, Miss Monroe and Miss Withers asked a representative group of teachers in the Canal Zone schools to give their evaluation of it. The letters of these teachers accompanied the finished manuscript when it went to the publishers and, Miss Monroe and Miss Withers believe, were in great part responsible for the prompt acceptance of the book. An interesting sidelight on Beginning Phonics is the fact that the pictures for the original manuscript were prepared by Michael McNevin, who is Miss Withers' nephew. He was graduated from Balboa High School a year ago and has just completed his first year at the University of New Mexico. The illustrations play an important part in the book. Michael's pictures will not appear in the finished volume, however, since Gel-Sten has its own artists. Miss Monroe, who was born in Colorado but now considers California her home, is a graduate of the Colorado State College of Education at Greeley. She taught in Colorado Schools before coming here in 1944. While on leave during the 1949-50 school year she taught first grade in Bellflower, Calif. Miss Withers, Virginia-born, attended Tulane University and is a graduate of the Pestalozzi-Froebel Teachers' College in Chicago. She taught kindergarten in Tampa, Fla. Before coming to the Canal Zone schools in 1945 she had her own private nursery school in Chicago. NEW IRON ORE TRADE BOOSTS CANAL TRAFFIC IRON ORE from new mines was loaded aboard this Panama-registered ship in San Juan, Peru. Lamyru was the first ship to transit the Canal destined for Morrisville, Pa., new U. S. Steel Company port. Cargo tonnage through the Panama Canal was increased by 94,300 tons and tolls by $60,570 in a six-week period as the result of the recently inaugurated iron ore trade from Peru to the United States. From the first of May through June 15, 14 ships transited the Canal, either in ballast southbound or carrying an average of slightly over 10,000 tons of the iron ore northbound. Almost all of the ships had transited previously in other services. The ore is coming from new mines near San Juan, Peru. In its issue of May 4, Time Magazine described the new operation: "At the southern port of San Juan, the freighter Libertad took aboard the first 10,000 tons of iron ore from Utah Construction Company's new Marcona mine. Starting work last January, the United States firm had built a 15-mile road, got shovels digging at the open pit and started 60 specially designed 19-ton trucks hauling ore to dockside. By June, hematite ore will be leaving for U. S. East Coast ports at the rate of 2,400,000 tons a year." First Ship May 16 The Libertad, a 5,184-ton freighter operated for the Orion Shipping Company and registered under Panama, was northbound through the Canal May 16. She carried 10,850 tons of iron ore and was headed for Baltimore. Since May 16, eight other ships have transited northbound carrying loads of iron ore. Four were en route to Mobile, Ala., two to Philadelphia, and two to Morrisville, Pa., the new United States Steel Company port. The ore carriers in the 6-week period were: the Vassalis, San Roque, Giovanni Amendola, Maria Parodi, Maria de Larringa, Lamyra, Turmoil, and St. Helena. Turmoil, which is of Liberian registry, and San Roque, Panamanian-registered, have made round trips for the ore trade between May 1 and June 15. Southbound between May 30 and June 1 5 were the Challenger, Andre, and Kingsmownt, all destined for San Juan to load ore. Of the 14 transits, seven ships were under the Panamanian flag, two were of Italian registry, three were registered with Great Britain and two trips— those of the Turmoil — were under the Liberian flag. Atlantic Side Supervisors Complete Training Course Twenty-three Atlantic side supervisors received certificates at "graduation" ceremonies last month, concluding a 16-week supervisory training conference series under the joint supervision of the Terminals and Grounds Maintenance Divisions and the Personnel Bureau. Several other groups have completed similar courses which are designed to teach the supervisors to lead planned conferences, a recent development in solving numerous business and industrial problems. The final meeting of the Atlantic side supervisors was held in the Red Cross rooms over the Central Labor Office in Cristobal. A. E. Beck, Superintendent of the Terminals Division, spoke briefly. The certificates, together with covering memoranda for the employees' files and group photographs, were distributed by E. B. O'Brien, Assistant Superintendent. Conferees receiving certificates were: R. D. Armstrong, James A. Brooks, Harry Cain, Joseph Corrigan, Norman E. J. Demers, W. J. Dockery, Gerald R. Fruth, John W. B. Hall, George W. Jones, Jr., John H. Leach, J. H. Michaud, Leonidas H. Morales H., Ray Perkins, Joseph Reardon, Wallace F. Russon, Maxwell S. Sanders, Edward C. Stroop, Peter A. Tortorici, E. B. Turner, Randolph Wikinstad, and Harry Witt, all of the Terminals Division; Gene E. Clinchard and Virgil C. Reed of the Grounds Maintenance Division. Brodie Burnham, Assistant Training Officer in the Personnel Bureau who served as leader of the conference series, acted as master of ceremonies. Coffee and doughnuts rounded out the program.

PAGE 13

July 4, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 13 NEW ARRIVAL CAPT. E. J. DUNN, USN, became the new Director of the Industrial Bureau effective June 30. He came to the Canal Zone from California where he served as Repair Superintendent at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. An engineering duty officer, the new Industrial Bureau Director has also served at the New York Naval Shipyard and before that time had lengthy service at sea. He was born in Farmersville, Tex., and was graduated from the Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1930. Long-Range Studies On Canal Investment Will Set Firm Basis For Fiscal Policies All Records Are Shattered As Canal Ends Busiest Fiscal Year In Its Entire History {Continued from page i) monetary values, wage scales, and changes of a varying nature which might affect the revenues and operating costs of the Canal. First Phase Near End The investment and depreciation study is being conducted by the Plant Inventory and Appraisal Staff. Other Company units and porsonnel will assist in specialized phases. The first phase, now being concluded by the Plant Inventory and Appraisal Staff, is what might be termed a "quick inventory" of the physical properties. Its purpose is to arrive at principal figures, within a narrow margin of error, and a quick review of probable service lives of physical property, which can be used for an investment and depreciation base. A report on this phase of the long-range study is being prepared for consideration of the Board of Directors in its determination on the adequacy of present rates of tolls. This telescoped phase to provide a close estimate of the value of the Canal and its allied facilities together with its accrued depreciation to date is to be followed by a detailed inventory, cost analysis, and depreciation studies. Aside from the objective of providing a broad foundation for the Government's fiscal policies in operating the Panama Canal, the long-range study will also provide a comprehensive and adequate plant accounting system that should make unnecessary any studies of this nature in the future. It is expected that the plant appraisal program will extend over a period of two to three years. Consultants Engaged The consultant services of two of the leading firms in their fields have been engaged to assist in the study and to provide expert and unbiased opinions on its various developments. Ebasco Services, Inc., of New York, has been engaged to furnish engineering consulting services in connection with the establishment of estimated service lives of the major plant and equipment and All existing records in the history of the Panama Canal for commercial traffic, tolls, and cargo shipped through the waterway were broken in the fiscal year 1953 which ended June 30. Figures on the number of transits by ocean-going commercial ships and tolls for any previous year were topped by the end of May, with June totals still to be added to complete the 1953 record. Although figures on the surging traffic of the past fiscal year were still incomplete when this edition of The Canal Review went to press, the number of transits had passed the 7,400 mark, exceeding by 875 the record total set in the previous fiscal year. Tolls were expected to climb to approximately $31,900,000, well above the former record total of $27,128,893 collected in the boom year of 1929. The amount of cargo shipped through the Canal last year was well above any previous totals for one year. During the first 11 months of the past fiscal year more than 32,830,000 long tons had been moved through the Canal. The former record for any year was 33,610,509 long tons which was established in the fiscal year 1952. The surge of commercial traffic through the Canal began during the early part of the calendar year 1952 and, for the first time since the Canal was opened to traffic in 1914, a monthly record of more than 600 transits by large commercial ships was recorded in March 1952. This record was to be broken three times during the following 12-month period. The record was broken in May 1952 with 622 transits; in October with 673 transits; and again in March of this year with 678 transits. Aside from the heavy flow of commercial traffic during the past fiscal year, the number of Government^owned vessels in transit was well above that of the previous year. Tolls credits for these vessels "amounted to $3,481,681 during the first 11 months of the past fiscal year, which was approximately $800,000 higher than figures for a comparable period of the previous fiscal year. In addition to other new record totals in shipping last year, the daily average number of large ships locked through the Canal was the highest in history. The daily average number of transits for the first 11 months was 23.2, for both commercial and Government vessels, as compared with the previous record of 19.9 transits in the fiscal year 1952. Although most of the principal trade routes through the Canal showed gains in the past year, the heavy traffic was attributed principally to big gains on those between the east coast of the United States/Canada and Asia; the United States intercoastal; and the east coast of the United States and South America. Canal Ends Half Century's Association (Continued from page 4) User's bill was Cut by "10 cents silver per 1,000 gallons," if the account was paid within 15 days of the due date. The rate in Colon was higher: "$9 silver a quarter for 10,000 gallons," and "90 cents silver" for each additional 1,000 gallons. Meters were not installed until the middle of 1907. Filtration Plants Filtered water came later. A filtration plant was opened at Mt. Hope February 23, 1914, and the Miraflores Filtration Plant went into service March 14, 1915. On August 1, 1926, Panama and the United States signed an agreement, whereby the United States was to do street cleaning and garbage collections in Panama and Colon, Panama bearing three-quarters of the cost and the Canal Zone the remaining quarter. On May 28, 1942, the United States and Panama entered into what is known as a "General Relations Agreement," and under a provision of this the United States, on January 1, 1946, transferred the water and sewage systems to the Republic of Panama. At this date the unamortized value of water and sewerage systems and pavements in the Republic of Panama was $669,226.38. Management Contract On this same day, Panama and The Panama Canal signed a management contract under which the Canal agreed to manage the water and sewerage systems and the street paving functions for Panama's account in Panama City and Colon. All of Colon was included in the management contract but only that part of Panama City between the tip of the city at French Plaza and the old Tumba Muerto Road— close to El Panama Hotel— was in the contract. Panama itself handled water in the suburban areas. The Republic's share of the garbage collection and street cleaning costs was to be paid from proceeds of the collections for the water and sewerage accounts. Early last month, the Maintenance Division which maintained the streets and handled the water management contract had eight U. S.-rate and 73 local-rate employees on this work. The Health Bureau, which handled garbage and trash collection, employed four U. S.-rate men and about 700 local-rate employees on this part of their work. The new arrangement, which went into effect this week, does not affect the New Cristobal-Colon Beach and Fort DeLesseps area, since the 1946 transfer specifically provides that the United States has full responsibility, without cost to Panama, of maintaining and operating water and sewerage systems in these U. S.occupied areas, as well as maintaining, cleaning and keeping in repair all streets and pavements and collecting all garbage in these sections. possibly other advisory services. The services of Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery, Certified Public Accountants, of New York, have also been obtained to provide advisory and consulting services on the knotty accounting and financial problems. In addition to these, the Department of Commerce is providing assistance in preparing estimates on future Canal traffic trends and economic aspects which affect world shipping. A representative of the Department's maritime division spent a week here late in May to collect statistical data on Canal traffic. This will be augmented by information obtainable from Government sources in Washington and sources elsewhere.

PAGE 14

14 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 3,1953 PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS ANNIVERSARIES May 15 through June 15 Employees who were promoted or transferred between May 15 and June IS are listed below. Regradings and within-grade promotions are not listed. ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH George Vieto, from Clerk-Typist to Passenger Traffic Clerk. Robert E. Dolan, from Checker, Locks Overhaul, to File Clerk, Record Section. CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Carl R. Meissner, from Checker, Locks Overhaul, to Life Guard, Division of Schools. Reed E. Hopkins, Jr., from Lock Overhaul Foreman to Fireman, Fire Division. Joseph B. Clemmons, Jr., from Estates Administrator to Assistant Chief and Deputy Public Administrator, Customs and Immigration Division. Earl F. Unruh, from Post Office Inspector to Assistant Chief and Post Office Inspector, Postal Services. Mrs. Jean A. Violette, from ClerkTypist, Physical Education and Recreation Branch, to Typist, Schools Division. Ruth C. Crozier, Mrs. Elsie D. Naughton, from Elementary School Teacher to Elementary School Principal, Schools Division. John N. Gorham, from Student Assistant to Recreation Assistant, Physical Education and Recreation Branch. Mrs. Margaret B. Zeimetz, ClerkStenographer, from Commissary Division to Police Division. Grady O. Gailey, from Automobile Serviceman and Heavy Truck Driver, Motor Transportation Division, to Fireman, Fire Division. Culver M. Call, from Guard, Atlantic Locks, to Postal Clerk. OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER Donald M. Luke, from Systems Accountant, Cost Accounts Branch to Assistant Chief, Divisional Accounts Branch. Ralph F. Schnell, from Organization and Methods Examiner to Analytical Statistician, Management Staff. Mrs. Flor E. Martin, Mrs. Jewell F. Story, from Clerk-Typist, License Section to Typist, Cost Accounts Branch. Mrs. Chevillette R. Dougherty, from Typist, Cost Accounts Branch, to ClerkTypist, Plant Inventory and Appraisal Staff. Genevieve F. Quinn, Accounting Clerk, from Agents Accounts Branch to Cost Accounts Branch. Mrs. Eldermae A. Duff, Accounting Clerk, from Cost Accounts Branch to Agents Accounts Branch. Mrs. Patricia E. LeBrun, from Typist, Cost Accounts Branch, to Clerk-Stenographer, Claims Branch. Patricia G. Neckar, from Clerk-Typist, Division of Storehouses, to Typist, Cost Accounts Branch. Mrs. Evelyn R. Reynolds, from Typist, Cost Accounts Branch, to Clerk-Typist, Payroll Branch. Mrs. Elizabeth Sudron, from Payroll Clerk, Payroll Branch, to Claims Examiner, Claims Branch. Mrs. Dema M. McCord, Card Punch Operator, from Tabulating Machine Branch to Payroll Branch. Edward H. Appin, from Clerk-Typist to 'Tabulating Machine Operator, Payroll Branch. Joyce T. Clarke, from Card Punch Operator to 'Time, Leave and Payroll Clerk, Payroll Branch. Mrs. Ida H. Fuller, from Payroll Clerk to Time, Leave, and Payroll Clerk, Payroll Branch. Mrs. Daisy M Tettenburn, from ClerkTypist to Time, Leave, and Payroll Clerk, Payroll Branch. Mrs. Mary E. Becker, from Payroll Supervisor to Accounting Clerk, Payroll Branch. John H. Morales, from Payroll Clerk to Supervisory Accountant, Payroll Branch. Helen N. Minor, from Payroll Clerk to Time, Leave, and Payroll Clerk, Payroll Branch. ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU James G. F. Trimble, from Construction Inspector, Contract and Inspection Division, to W'ireman, Electrical Division. Joseph A. Howland, from Lock Operator-Wireman, Pacific Locks, to Powerhouse Operator, Electrical Division. Robert C. Heppner, from Lock Operator-Wireman, Pacific Locks, to Wireman, Electrical Division. Leo Chester, from Foreman, Lock Overhaul, to Filtration Plant Operator, Maintenance Division. Mrs. Jessie G. Harris, Clerk-Stenographer, from Marine Bureau to Maintenance Division. Mrs. Neva M. Short, from Clerk-Typist to Accounting Clerk, Electrical Division. Mrs. Marian M. Langford, from Substitute Teacher, Schools Division, to Clerk Typist, Electrical Division. HEALTH BUREAU Mrs. Ruth H. Powell, from ClerkTypist, Aids to Navigation, to Storekeeper (Checker), Gorgas Hospital. Mrs. Ana L. Alvarez, from ClerkTypist, Board of Health Laboratory, to Dictating Machine Transcriber, Gorgas Hospital. INDUSTRIAL BUREAU John Van der Heyden, from Principal Foreman, Locks Overhaul, to Shipwright, Industrial Bureau. Arthur E. Rizcalla, from Helper, Locks Overhaul, to Guard, Industrial Bureau. MARINE BUREAU Alfred T. Veit, from Chief Tovvboat Engineer to Senior Chief Tovvboat Engineer, Dredging Division. Charles Q. Peters, Jr., from Foreman, Locks Overhaul, to Ferry Ramp Operator. Daniel A. Marsicano, from Rigger, Locks Overhaul, to Pump Operator, Dredging Division. Howard J. Schwartzman, Ben F. Smith, from Pilot-in-Training, to Probationary Pilot. Vernon C. Whitehead, from Probationary Pilot to Qualified Pilot. James T. Campbell, from Helper, Locks Overhaul, to Signalman, Navigation Division. David Vinokur, from Ferry Ramp Operator, to Pump Operator, Pipeline Suction Dredge. Max J. Karton, from File Clerk, Administrative Branch, to Guard, Locks Division. PERSONNEL BUREAU John H. Terry, from Appointment Clerk, to Supervisory Personnel Assistant, Personnel Records Division. Helen L. Dudak, from Appointment Clerk to Supervisory Appointment Clerk, Personnel Records Division. Mrs. Kathyleen R. Miller, from Personnel Clerk-Typist to Supervisory Appointment Clerk, Personnel Records Division. Mrs. Dorothy K. Gadberry, ClerkTypist, from Division of Storehouses, to Personnel Records Division. RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU Edward S. Weil, from Foreman, Locks Overhaul, to Gauger and Cribtender Foreman, Terminals Division. SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU Harold R. Bodell, from Steam Locomotive Crane Operator, Pacific Locks Overhaul, to Storekeeper (Shipping), Commissary Division. Charles Hair, from Signalman, Navigation Division, to Commissary Assistant. Ralph N. Stewart, from Storekeeper to Supervisory Accounting Clerk, Commissary I )ivision. Gilbert H. Furey, from Assistant Printer to Superintendent of Printing, Printing Plant. Employees who observed important anniversaries during the month of June are listed alphabetically below. The number of years includes all Government service with the Canal or other agencies. Those with continuous service with the Canal are indicated with (*). 35 YEARS *Eugene C. Lombard, Executive Secretary. iO YEARS *Ulrich W. Hughes, Leader, Electrical Instrument Repairman, Electrical Division. Walter E. Zimmerman, Lock Operator, Atlantic Locks. 25 YEARS Walter J. Allen, File Supervisor, Administrative Branch. Harry B. Friedland, Clerk, Lighthouse Subdivision. Elmer J. Hack, Clerk, Administrative Branch. Max R. Hart, Safety Inspector, Supply and Service Bureau. Edward W. Hatchett, Teacher, Balboa High School. *Albert J. Joyce, Wireman, Electrical Division. James H. Rheney, Repair Shop Foreman, Railroad and Terminals Bureau. *J. Bartley Smith, Electrical Engineer, Electrical Division. Mabel A. Sneider, Operating Room Nurse, Gorgas Hospital. Claude W. Wade, Steward, Clubhouse Division. 20 YEARS Edwin M. McGinnis, Supervising Estimating Engineer, Engineering Division. Robert M. Turner, Maintenance Mechanic, Maintenance Division. William S. Walston, Mate, Pipeline Suction Dredge, Dredging Division. Leonard Wolford, Marine Traffic Controller, Navigation Division. 15 YEARS Leland Brooks, Tovvboat Master, Navigation Division. Alwyn DeLeon, Claims Examiner, Comptroller's Office. Henry P. Kilcorse, Tovvboat Master, Dredging Division. *William E. LeBrun, Administrative Assistant, Internal Security Branch. Morgan J. Neabry, W'ireman, Electrical Division. Jack E. Scott, Carman, Railroad Division. Irene S. Walling, Clerk-Stenographer, Police Division. Margaret F. Wiggin, Clerk-Stenographer, Comptroller's Office. JULY SAILINGS From Cristobal Cristobal July 3 Ancon July 10 Panama July 17 Cristobal July 24 A neon July 3 1 From New York I' mi a ma July 7 Cristobal July 14 Ancon July 21 Panama July 28 (Northbound, the ships are in Haiti from 7 a. m. to noon Sunday; southbound, the Haiti stop is Saturday from 7 a. m. to 4 p. m.) RETIREMENTS IN JUNE Retirement certificates were presented the end of June to the following employees who are listed alphabetically, together with their birthplace, titles, length of service and future addresses: Ernest C. Cotton, Ohio; Superintendent, Printing Plant; 42 years, 3 months, 11 days; Address uncertain. Mai L. Dodson, Delaware; Foreman,

PAGE 15

July 3,1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15 Premium-Grade Gasoline Will Go On S ale July 10 Premium-grade gasoline will go on sale about July 10 in all Canal retail gasoline stations except those at Gatun and Pedro Miguel, according to the Supply and Service Bureau. The hightest gasoline will retail at two cents above the present price of motor-grade gasoline. A contract for 62,000 barrels 2,604, 000 gallons— of the premium-grade gasoline was awarded early last month to the Texas Company. This is a sixmonth supply. The first gasoline purchased under the contract will arive in Cristobal about July 6, and the tanker is expected to discharge in Balboa two days later. Minor alterations are being made at the tank farms and service stations for handling of the high-test gasoline. Extra-Curricular Recreation Activities To Be Curtailed Because Of Budget Cut Eligibility Card Rules Changed Effective July 1 The Central Labor Office Wednesday began issuance of eligibility cards to applicants who had not served with U. S. Government agencies or contractors since January 1, 1946. The change in regulations provides an opportunity to seek employment to young people, never employed in the Canal Zone, and to older persons who have not worked in the Zone since 1946. Since May 1951 and until this change eligibility cards were issued only to former employees with service after 1946 and to others with special qualifications. Electrical Division; ii years, 11 months, 27 days; probably Florida. Eric E. Forsman, Alabama; Storekeeper, Terminals Division; 36 years, 11 months, 1 day; Mobile, Ala. Alfred B. Fox, Missouri; Gauger, Storehouses Division; 24 years, 9 months, 16 days; Arraijan, Panama. Harry O. Granberry, Mississippi; Administrative Assistant, Hotel Washington; 24 years, 10 months, IS days; St. Peterburg, Fla. Leon F. Hallett, Massachusetts; Supply Requirements Assistant, Storehouses Division; 39 years, 3 months, 17 days; Dorchester, Mass. George F. Herman, Pennsylvania; Ferry Ramp Operator, Dredging Division; 26 years, 1 month, 26 days; Florida. Frederick B. Hill, South Carolina; Policeman, Cristobal; 29 years, 8 months, 13 days; Lake City, South Carolina, for present. Charles S. Hollander, New York; Administrative Assistant, Maintenance Division; 24 years, 11 months, 11 days; Jacksonville, Fla. John J. Kennedy, New York; Foreman. Maintenance Division; 13 years, 3 months, 24 days; Vermont. Robert H. McCoy, Pennsylvania; Clerk, Payroll Branch; 21 years, 10 months, 25 days; Danville, Pa. Dr. Herbert L. Phillips, Alabama; District Physician, Pedro Miguel; 24 years, 5 days; Memphis, Term. Mrs. Ethel M. Pitman, Pennsylvania; Dictating Machine Transcriber, Gorgas Hospital; 4 years, 5 months, 6 days; Mobile, Ala. August T. Schmidt, New York, Administrative Assistant, Supply and Service Bureau; 29 years, 9 months, 16 days; North Carolina. John W. Towery, Kentucky, Claims Examiner, Fiscal Division; 28 years, 6 months, 25 days; California. Bert G. Tydeman, Tennessee; Control House Operator, Gatun; 27 years, 5 months, 20 days; Allentown, Pa. Some curtailment of adult recreation and summer and weekend activities for both adults and children will be necessary this fiscal year because of a $100,00!) cut in the School Division budget. The cut was made in the budget that was submitted to Congress last January. Congressional action on the Civil Functions Bill, which contains Canal Zone Government appropriations, had no effect on this particular sum. Much study preceded the decision to make the cut in the recreation field. It was decided that any cut should be made in extracurricular rather than curricular activities. In order to stay within its new budget, the Division of Schools will have to eliminate, reduce, or modify a number of activities which have been traditional. Adult groups— such as the Twilight Baseball League — which have been obtaining recreation equipment from the Schools Division will now have to supply their own equipment. The Ancon playshed will no longer be staffed, although it will be used as a rainy-day playground for the Ancon elementary school. Adult groups, such as square dancers, who have been using the playshed may continue to do so by arrangement with the school principal. The gymnasium at Chagres, local-rate section of Gatun, and the Chagres playground will be closed. Residents of Chagres will use the facilities at Rainbow City, where there are a swimming pool and some playing fields. Clerical help and part-time recreation assistants who have been on duty at Balboa and Cristobal gymnasiums have been eliminated. The gymnasiums will be still available for evening use, but adults who have been using them as recreation centers will be without the refereeing or coaching which has been given in some cases. The retrenchment will • affect afterschool recreation and swimming for school children. All gymnasiums will be closed Sundays as at present plus one week-day but pools will remain open six days a week. Directors of Physical Education should be consulted in the various towns for schedules of operations. The Schools Physical Education program will not be curtailed; the activities to be reduced will be after-school and weekend swimming competitions or school basketball, volleyball, and similar leagues which have required the use of school facilities or supervision. Part of the planning for the reduced expenditures extends into next summer when that portion of the Summer Recreation Program which is sponsored by the schools will have to be modified. This summer's program will continue, as a whole, without major change. The curtailment of funds limits the number of people employed. Reduction of force notices have already gone out to 39 recreation assistants and clerks in the Physical Education and Recreation Branch. Of these, 16 were on the U.S.rate, 23 on local-rate rolls — many of them part-time and WAE employees. Housing Heads List of Subjects Raised at June Conference {Continued from page 2) look further into the matter. The possibility of retaining some 12-family houses as low-rental quarters was brought up by Rufus Lovelady, of the AFGE, but the Governor said that this would not be a solution to the expressed desire for lower rental houses. He said considerable thought had gone into this problem but that as yet no satisfactory solution had been reached for a type of house which would be somewhere between the 12-family accomodations and houses such as those being built at Corozal. He said he believed that employees would not be happy in what he called "quasi houses," and pointed out that in the United States people tend to seek neighborhoods of their economic levels but that there are no such neighborhoods here. The whole matter of low-cost housing, he said, is still in the talking stage. Sam Roe of the Pacific Civic Council raised the question of the method of quarters assignments, which is still under study, and Carl Nix of the Gatun council reported— as another representative had during the May conference — that employees with long service were taking low-cost houses, leaving higher-rent houses the only ones available for new employees with lower salaries. The Governor reported that he had made a personal, after-hour check on commissary prices, as of May this year and May a year ago. The results, he said, showed that the commissaries are holding the price line. A study is projected for the future, he said, to compare the fixed costs of operating the Commissary Division with those of United States stores. In answer to a question from Mr. Boukalis as to whether the Panama Line stop in Haiti had been "satisfactory" from the point of view of the Board of Directors, the Governor said that the Haiti layover was being made on a trial basis and that he thought it likely the trial period of six months or so would be extended in order to make a better appraisal of the situation. Mr. Lovelady asked about the program for Under Secretary of the Army Earl Johnson and whether he would be available to meet with employee groups. Governor Seybold said he was certain any statements submitted by employee groups would be acceptable to the Under Secretary but that he did not know the schedule at that time, ncr what time, if any, would be available for conferences. Attending the conference were: The Governor, Mr. Doolan and Norman Johnson, Employee Relations officer, for the administration; and for the employees: Sherman Brooks, Mrs. Orton, Carl Nix, and Sam Roe, Jr., for the Civic Councils; Walter Wagner, E. J. Husted, Mr. Lovelady, Carl F. Maedl, Mr. Boukalis, John R. Townsend, Sam Garriel, Central Labor Union and affiliates; H. C. Simpson, 'Marine Engineers; Mr. Daniel, Conductors; Fred H. Hodges, Railroad Engineers; and R. F. Hesch, Pacific Locks Employees,

PAGE 16

n6 THE1PANAMA CANAL REVIEW July 3,1953 ooPICTURES OF THE MONTH IT WAS JUNE! and while their elders worried about the 25 percent differential big things came to the Canal Zone young people. Sober-eyed, and a little scared, some 380 of them donned caps and gowns to receive the diplomas which opened up for them a new life. A week or so later, the first contingent of students came down a Panama Line gangway to spend their vacations from States schools and colleges. Meantime, Sunday drivers enjoyed cruising along Balboa's Empire Street, sidewalk-superintending the new houses, and hundreds of harried housewives found the one-night-a-week opening of half a dozen commissaries helpful and pleasant. But the subject uppermost in everyone's mind was the differential— what Congress had done and what Congress was going to do. On June 22, 300 men and women heard their representatives, Mrs. Margaret Rennie and Mrs. Frances Longmore, report what they had done in Washington to help in the fight to keep the differential.