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Panama Canal review
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00106
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: November 1952
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00106
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text
ofthe Pama Canal Museum- c
Gift of the Panwna Canal Museum


PANAMAl


CANAL


Vol. 3, No. 4 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, NOVEMBER 7, 1952 5 cents


DYING


DAYS


STARTING


FOR


EMPLOYEES


ASSIGNED


TO


NEW


QUARTERS


ANCON


AND


DIABLO


HEIGHTS


ALL THIS PICTURE proves is that Thanksgiving is just around the corner and that there are some
cute youngsters in the Canal Zone. The cover girl-or is it a boy-is five-year-old Elaine Grace Vestal,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Vestal of Davis Street in Diablo Heights. She says she's a boy-"Can't
you tell by my pants?"


Canal


Sets


New


Records


October


The first five apartments to
be completed by contract this
fiscal year were to be occupied
this week end by the families
to which they were assigned
several weeks ago.
By next spring, probably by April, a
total of 70 U. S.-rate families will have
moved into their new masonry quarters
on the Pacific side, and other families will
be in some of the new homes in Margarita.
The first five apartments to be occupied
were a duplex, located close to the site of
the former Diablo mess hall, and three
cottages nearby. One of these is a revised
version of the Breezeway type, another is
a type 327, which has two bedrooms, and
the third is a type 331, with three.
Notices were sent October 28 to the
four families to whom these houses were
assigned, asking that they occupy their
new quarters not later than November 8.
A second group of the Diablo houses is
to be turned over to the Housing Division
soon and these will probably be occupied
by November 15. All of the new Diablo
houses will probably be occupied by
mid-December.
Application for these 14 units, in 12
houses, were accepted in September. All
of the new Diablo houses have been
assigned. Service of the occupants ranges
from 31 to 13 years. One of the houses
was designated for official assignment.
Applications By November 17
In Ancon, the first of the new quarters
will be completed this month. Applica-
tions will be received until November 17
for 16 of the 56 apartments which are
-- f - * < - -. J- a * &-. f - . *** - r j,& 4-.... j-. #T> L- f>jj. Lj..r 41.j_. j-.





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


21-


ear-Old


Mutual


Benefit


Association


Holds


Unique


Place


In


Canal


Zone


Life


Benefit Association, the


only death benefit group for American
employees in the Canal Zone, is about to
move into a new home.
On December 1 the Association, whose
headquarters have been in Gamboa since
1943, will have offices in one wing of the
Canal Zone Credit Union Building on
Balboa Road.
Its officers hope that the move will be
a permanent one, for almost since its for-
mation in 1931 the Mutual Benefit Asso-
ciation has had a "pillar to post" existence
as far as offices are concerned. Until 1940
it had operated from an office in the base-
ment of the Administration Building at
Balboa Heights; enlargement of the
cafeteria took over this space.
Next stop was the old Ancon Clubhouse
Building in space once occupied by what


was then


the Silver


Then came offices in t
Gamboa followed by
Gamboa Clubhouse ar
Once settled into
Balboa the Mutual B
MBA to practically
about its main busing
their beneficiaries as


Personnel Bureau.
he Property Shed at
other offices in the
d Theater buildings.
its new offices in
benefit Association--
everyone-will go
ess: "To provide to
quickly as possible


after the deaths of the members the sub-
stantial monetary assistance which is all
too frequently necessary at such times."
Long Standing Problem
For a number of years this problem, the
situation in which employees' families
often found themselves at the death of
their main provider, was of major concern
to a group of Canal Zonians.
As J. F. Everett, one of the founders
and a former officer of the MBA, put it
20 years ago:
"When the family of a deceased Gold
employee needed assistance, the hat was


passed;
rather
family,
That
passing
of the
today's


the
than
gove
the
" has
past i
MB


popularity of the employee,
the amount needed by his


rned the an
plan has w
Practically
s evident fr
A members


times as many
MBA counted


the
mem


nount collect
worked and
become a t
om the fact
hip is over
1,250 which
bers in the


Ay*" *^^i^.^

*'' '*A *p i / ?I1^
*'s ' s ^ *''�^is


WALTER W. WHITE will become secretary of the
Mutual Benefit Association this month when he re-
tires after 39 years of service with the Canal organiza-
tion. Now Records Analyst in the Administrative
Branch, he came to the Canal Zone in 1913 to work
for the Commissary Division.
1933, the membership had grown to
1,750; in 1938 there were 2,559 members,
and by January 1947, the MBA had
5,508 members, had paid 444 death bene-
fits, including 15 war casualties and had


on han
The
Zonian
service
action.
death


d a reserve
war casu
s who ha'
and had
Only re
benefit to


e of $248,000.
alties were young Canal
d gone into the military
Died or been killed in
cently the MBA paid a
Sthe family of a young


man killed in Korea.
Four Presidents
Its officers have been as permanent as
its membership. The first president of the
MBA was H. H. Evans, for many years
Assistant Superintendent of the Mechan-


The Mutual


assessments as prescribed.
Originally the MBA
members up to the time
years old; in 1935 the max
admission was reduced
- * -. -^* - * . - 4 * - � - * - *-� > j* ,4 l-l *.. j. /-rf. . -%l *-t


year of its existence.


A n "


rS + 4- n


/ Fi l (i i\ 1 II11-


5.. 26 mpmhnrs- the figure


admitted its
they were 45
dmum age for
to 35 years,
J. ..,' .-


ical Division. He served as MBA presi-
dent until his retirement in April 1943,
and was succeeded by John G. Claybourn,
Superintendent of the Dredging Division.
The next MBA president, who also
served until his retirement in July 1950,
was Vern D. Calloway, Administrative
Assistant to the Municipal Engineer; its
president for the past two years has been
A. C. Medinger, Railroad and Terminals
Director.
With the longest continuous service of
all, although he says he is now retiring
from active MBA work, has been its
secretary, William A. Moore. He has
held that, post for the past 18 years.
Leaving MBA Work
"Judge" Moore was the MBA's first
auditor when the Association was formed.
He was then working as an accountant in
the Chief Examiner's Section. "Judge"
has been his nickname for 45 years but he
says that he can't remember how it
started.
Since his retirement in 1937 he has de-
voted most of his time to MBA work. He
plans to stay on the Isthmus for the time
being, certainly until warmer weather
comes in the United States. Then, pos-
sibly, he may go back to his native state
of South Carolina which he left in 1907 to
come to the Canal Zone.
Membership in the MBA is open to
anyone in good health who is not more
than 35 years old and who is a permanent
U. S.-rate employee of the Company-
Government, and American citizens who
are civilian employees of other depart-
ments of the U. S. Government or directly.
allied interests on the Isthmus. Newly
appointed employees of the Company-
Government are eligible up to 45 years of
age, provided they apply for membership
within six months after their permanent
appointments.
Membership is for life, regardless of
change of residence or employment, and
can be forfeited only upon failure to pay





November 7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Conference Hears

Talk On Housing,

Rents, Hospitals

Questions regarding hospitals, rent,
quarters assignments, and a wide range of
other subjects were raised October 22 at
the latest Governor-Employee Conference.
The matter of hospitals was raised by
John J. Tobin of the Central Labor Union
who asked if anything was being done to
improve this situation on the Atlantic
side. Mr. Tobin was supported in his
inquiry by Jack Rice, representing the
Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council.
William H. Ward of the Gamboa Civic
Council pointed out that for some time
the Company has been buying certain
drugs through the Army, thereby getting
a discount.
"Why can't the Armed Forces get
together with the Administration and
have one hospital on each side," he asked.
"If they can work out something on the
drug angle, why can't they on the
hospital angle?"
Governor Seybold said he realized that
Colon Hospital is obsolescent and that
"something will have to be done about
hospitalization on the Atlantic side." He
added, however, that consolidation of
drug purchases and consolidation of hos-
pitals are not exactly similar. "Hospitals
deal with humans," he said. "Drugs have
to do with bottles."
Representation Asked
E. W. Hatchett, secretary of the
Central Labor Union, appealed to the
Governor for labor representation on the
Company's Board of Directors. He cited
the successful representation of labor on
the Wage Board and added: "I would
like to have someone on the Board of
Directors who represents me. I honestly
think that this would solve half your
problems. Certainly it would scotch
rumors."
Governor Seybold said he thought this
matter one which was beyond "manage-
ment here and one which I'm not capable
of commenting on."
Margaret Rennie, president of the
Pacific Civic Council, asked for a clarifiea-
a * .i . . � .i


Shipwrights,
After Hour


SHIPWRIGHTS from the Industrial Bureau's
Woodshop at Cristobal are a third of the way through
their course in Hull Lines and Tables of Offsets, the
first of four projects which they have planned for
this year. The group, which includes 12 journeymen


PLUMBERS from both sides of the Canal Zone
meet twice a month in Cristobal to work out problems
of their trade. A major consideration of the seminar
which was organized bv Local 606 of the Plumbers'


Plumbers 0
Classes For


organize
Study


and five apprentices, meets for two hours each Mon-
day evening. The night class was formed by the
shipwrights to study some of the technical aspects of
the shipwright and boatbuilder crafts.


(an apprentice), Samuel Garriel, Qeorge Bennet,
Edmond J. Roddy, seated, and standing, James
Young, (an apprentice), William Carson, Milo
Kissam. and Bob Maynard. Out of range of the


r


v, w w w -- -- --





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


Lock


Supervisor


Spends


Prospecting

Andrien M. Bouche, Control House
Supervisor at Pedro Miguel Locks, is a
prospector of a special sort who gives
away his finds.


He prospects for plants in off
hours and passes them on to
nists, pharmaceutical research la
stories, other scientific institutions,
interested individuals who can prop
or put them to good use.
His plant prospecting has led him


Indiai
yams
make
to gol
sent t
trial
stripe'


n cancer cure and arrow
which might be good to eat
cortisone; wild grapes t
f ball size, the root stock of
o his ancestor's home in F
propagation; and huge re
d orchids little known


pare

For


Time


Beneficial


Plants


-duty
bota-
bora-
or to
agate
to an


poison;
or might
iat grow
which he
rance for
d, white
until he


found them.
For 40 years he has prowled jungles and
llanos from Mexico to Brazil, spying out
thousands of different plants-useful and
otherwise.
His individual finds may or may not
interest scientists, or horticulturists or
laymen but, big, little, showy, or obscure
they always interest the collector.
Native Remedy Plants
Native remedies which might have a
basis in botanical fact are sometimes
important to collectors.
West Indians in Bohio told him some
30 years ago about something called a
"rheumatism root" which they used for
infusions for rheumatism.
The plant from which the home remedy


came was Dios
some Isthmians
others as just
Many years ]
miracle of cortis
of the public,


t sapinoides kn
'cabeza negra"
yams."
, news of the
spread to a lar
research labor


own to
and to


medical
ge part
'ator ies


started experimentation with wild yams


as a possible new source o
Knowing of the scientific
Bouche started his own si
yams. So far he has d
sent to laboratories, five ne
grow on the Isthmus.
He explains that some
have medical possibilities
years to mature. His
course, the hope of research


f the product.
c interest, Mr.
search for wild
discovered and
w species that

which might
take several
hope-and of
ers-is to find
ii A , n ni $F/rn ^


father's
where h
tempted
with their
Another
dewberry
Nicaragu
of this


THOSE MAY LOOK like plain old spuds to you
but they might be a source of cortisone. Inspecting
them is Adrian M. Bouche, Control House Super-
visor at Pedro Miguel Locks, and an off-duty plant
collector. He explains that they are wild yams, pos-
sibly of unknown species, which he finds in local
jungles and sends to pharmaceutical firms for study
as a possible source of cortisone.
Mr. Bouche works with pharmaceutical
firms, botanists, and scientific institutions
on what might be termed a free lance
basis.
Listed As Plant Collector
He is listed as a plant collector by the
Missouri and New York Botanical Gar-
dens, Smith Institute, and the Botanical
Museum of Harvard, for instance.
He attempts to fill any requests they, or
others, send him for plants of a certain
species. Unsolicited finds, if he cannot
identify them himself, are sent to the
expert in a particular field or the institu-
tion he believes would be most .interested
in them. Orchids go to Harvard, ferns
and fungi to Iowa State College or the
National Herbarium in Washington, for
instance.
Thp nlnnt fnlklnr niekprd ln hr Mr


original home in Normandy,
is distant relatives have at-
to propagate it in connection
r own native grapes.
er prize find was a new species of
(Rubus Spp.) which he found in
a in 1921. The individual berries
lant measured 6 inches in
olant measured 6% m4iches in


. -p /
circumference.
Many New Orchids Found


Other virgin territory,
nical work is concerned,
and El Valle netted Mr.
to 20 discoveries in the
and lilies.
Mr. Bouche came to th
he was 9 years old, whei
employed by the Canal,
own Canal service 2 yea


as far as bota-
in Cerro Punto
Bouche some 18
fields of orchids


ie Isthmus when
n his father was
and started his
rs later working


for short periods as a messenger. Since
1912, he has been a regular employee,
except for some short breaks in service.
He served as wireman and machinist for
the Canal before starting the climb of
promotions within the Locks Division up
to his present position as Control House
Supervisor.
The Isthmus and this general part of
the world are rich in its offerings to the
botanist or collector, partly he says, be-
cause few scientists have worked here and
there are few, if any, laymen-collectors.


ROTC


Head


from a drug company in the United
States. He found that two species of the
plant from which the poison was extracted
(Strychnos Spp.) were known to grow in
Panama but he went further and found a
third species unknown even to those best
versed in the plant lore of the Isthmus.
Wild grapes with fruit the size of golf
balls and skins like a potato were first
classified after Mr. Bouche found them
about 20 years ago in the Talamanca
Valley in Costa Rica, where he was
serving at the time as an engineer for a
gold minimmg company.
Although the fruit is inedible, the plant
seemed to him to have possibilities for
use as root stock for edible, but more
fragile grapes, which cannot be cultivated
in many places.
Stock Sent To France
He sent some of the root stock to his






November 7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


ELECTRICAL SAFETY IN THE


HOME


the possibility that


you will have such an opportunity in
near future. Elsewhere in this issue of
REVIEW, there is an article explaining
change in the Company's policy, which


permit you
one blows
apply to mi
older types
construction
In these qt
where the


replace an electric
. This change of
quarters, except s


fuse
police
ome


V
y
of


the
THE
the
will
vhen
will
*the


which have an obsolete
and electrical wiring
arters the electrical pa
fuses are located, will


locked. When a fuse blows, it will be neces-
sary for the tenant to call the district wire-
man to replace it.
What is a fuse? The old overworked


ROLL


Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
September

ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION

BUREAU


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR


YEAR


Community Services. ---..---------
Civil Affairs --.... ............
Industrial _- - - - - - - - -
Engineering and Construction .....
Health...------.....-------------
Marine _ - - - - - - - - - -
Railroad and Terminals .........
Supply and Service. . _

Division Awards For
NO DISABLING INJURIES
September


definition that


a goo<
electric
the ci
are th
in Pai
newer
type,
The o
with
switch
type.
metal
melts,


a fuse is a safety


A fuse


Son
ical


is normally


its f


rcuit should trouble
ree types of fuses y
lama Canal Compa
type quarters may
which opens the cir
Ilder quarters have
the electric range
ies by the meter h
These contain a 1


which con
or blows, w


too heavy beca
plug type fuse
with a new fuse,
to do. The ca
placable metal
replaced only b
In those aum


permitted to cha
usually find the
panel located in


use
ha
wi
rtr


valve


is still


a part of the


unction is to open
e develop. There
,ou will encounter
ny quarters. The
have an automatic
cuit mechanically
a screw plug type,
and some main


having


cartridge
** o


ipletes the circuit, ;
'hen the current becoi
Sof a short circuit.
s to be replaced entix
which you will be permit
idge type fuse has a
se inside, which is to


*
district
where


rge a
fuse
the


basement. Sometimes
have caused will not
distribution panel, an
fuse at the main switch
district wireman to re
When a fuse blows i
is trouble in the electr:
5 appliances connected
using an electric iron,
3, ^ � i �


wirem
you


blown fuse, y
box and distri
kitchen, hallw
the short circus
blow the fuse
d instead blo\
. In this case c


place


pint


break easily when stepped upon. I)ue to
the lack of sufficient baseboard receptacles


in the older type quarters,
installed open wires along the
a temporary receptacle. These
dangerous hazard and sho
installed. Some gadgets also w
connecting of as many as six o
ances and floor lamps on one
was intended for only one or
loading a circuit like this will
if nothing worse happens.


Always keep a couple of 15-
pere fuses, of an approved type,
emergencies. Remember, that a
must be replaced with one of th


you replace
erload the circ
erheating the


it with a
uit, you mn
concealed


larg
ay st
wire


many have
baseboard to
circuits are a
uld not he
ill permit the
r eight appli-
outlet, which
two. Over-
blow a fuse


and
on h
blo
e sa
er o
art a
s. I


words replace a 15-ampere fuse wit
ampere fuse, not a 20-ampere fuse
.C
are marked plainly on the bottom. S
has been written about the hazard of
pennies back of fuse plugs, that
only add that if you had trouble w
fuse blew, it is nothing compared
which you can get into by "pluggi:


20-am-
sand for
wn fuse
me size.
me and
Sfire by
n other
h a 15-
. They
jo much
putting
we can
hen the
to that
ng" the


a coin.


the blown


t indicates


ical


to
for


tuse Diows on the circuit t
3 is connected, the odds a
2 trouble in the cord, or in th
2
to disconnect the faulty
1 replacing the fuse. You c
5 the inconvenience of a
keeping all your appliance
O Inspect your electrical
0 lamps regularly for frayed
which usually are the
trouble. Inspect the at
often for loose wires and
pulling on the wire to disc
extra strain on the chea


system,


that there


or in the


it. If you are
instance, and a
o which the iron
re that there is
te iron, so be sure
appliance before
an save much of
blown fuse by
s in good repair.
appliances and
and worn cords,
source of much
tachment plugs
screws, because
)nnect it puts an
p fragile plastic


Should the fuse you
you have disconnected
ances, this is evidence
in the wiring and e
within the building, in


district
range, w
without
should b
fuses or
with wel
a damp
as to you
if you h
doing so,
the distr
110 volt
body car


replaced blow, after
all suspected appli-
that the trouble is
equipment concealed
which case call the


wireman. Also, if your
ater heater, or your entire
electricity, the district
e called. It is hazardous t


t
t
cC
ir
av
i
ic
s
n


electric
house is
wireman
o change


ouch the inside of the fuse box
hands, or if you are standing on
)ncrete floor. If you are in doubt
ability to change a blown fuse, or
'e doubts as to your safety when
t is better that you get the help of
t wireman. Remember that even
going through a well-grounded
cause severe shock or even more


,*1 rr.... .. .. 1j* FIf I >* ti


* I t


ff 4


rf*l* q " fa' �*,.tln-I.-� r I .qf~" -h I.**w -irj **~ J11i - *r 4* b1 trItr<


haven't,


Have you ever replaced an electrical fuse?


HONOR


f


ow melting-p





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


First


ou


See


And


Then


ou


Don't


When


oure


Watching


Zone


Magicians


Intellectuals are the easiest to fool and
children are the hardest, in the opinion of
some of the Canal employees who are or
were magicilans.
Local sleight-of-hand artists are not
organized; they just get together occasion-
ally to review their tricks and see the
performance of newly-arrived magicians.
Clyde S. LaClair, Official Photographer
for the Canal and formerly a professional
magician, says the fiction that the hand is
quicker then the eye was probably
invented by a magician.
Because the eye is infinitely faster than
even the most dexterous hand, magicians
rely primarily on psychology to give
people the fooling they love.
Children are not easily taken in,
according to the former magician, be-
cause they have not learned the habit of
concentrated attention. The magician's
movements which capture the eye of
sophisticated adults may be lost on
children whose interests flit unschooled
from first one thing to another.
While an adult is concentrating on the
"significant" action experience has taught
him to see, guided through just the right
mental hoops by the manipulating magi-
clan, a child may be watching an ant on
the floor or the "insignificant" movement
which unravels the trick and exposes the
whole carefully-set-up plot.


THIS TRICK of dropping cards horizontally, well
spaced and spread through mid-air, fascinates the
shop talking-magicians gathered at the home of Frank
H. Lerchen, Maintenance Engineer for the Canal. The
performer is Maj. Greg Carpenter, Public Information
Officer for the Caribbean Command.
The audience of fellow magicians includes (left to


right) Pat Ryan. Safety Engineer for the Air Force;
Col. Craig Smyser, Engineering and Construction
Director for the Canal; Russell T. Wise, Supervising
Safety Inspector for the Canal; and Mr. Lerchen,
The missing magician, not shown in the group, is
Clyde S. LaClair, Official Photographer for the
Canal, who took the picture.


Pupil Stumps Teacher


Frank H. Lerchen, Maintenance Engi-
neer for the Canal, learned his tricks from
his neighbor, Mr. LaClair. Proof of the
student's aptitude, highly touted by the
teacher, came when Mr. Lerchen stumped
the photographer with one of the teacher's
own tricks.
Mr. Lerchen specializes in card tricks.
So does Col. Craig Smyser, Engineering
and Construction Director, a compara-
tively new member of the local magicians'
informal group.
Russell T. Wise, Supervising Safety
Inspector for the Canal, and Pat Ryan,
now an Air Force safety engineer and a
former Canal employee, concentrate on
sleight-of-hand tricks as their magician's
specialty. Both of them formerly gave
shows, primarily for Isthmian audiences.
, . * /"I .. -1 . . . T. -I I* T p.


The traditions established by the
old master magicians, Professor Herman,
Kellar, Houdini, Thurston, and Black-
stone, have recently been revamped to
fit a new age and new staging conditions.
The old masters performed on vaude-
ville stages and used large props primarily
to astound their attentive theater audi-
ences. The masters among magicians
today are frequently night club perform-
ers. They may carry their props in one of
their pockets and must pace their chatter
to livelier and more intimate audiences.
The old patterns for performances
established by the masters were carried


Braniff And Panama Line
d"4 * - M 4 .l . . . - A


on for many years and it was not until
1939 that new creative tricks began to
appear. Now, according to Mr. LaClair,
magic is really ingenious. The current bag
of tricks and principles of entertainment
are new conceptions in the business.
Most good magicians, like other vir-
tuosos, take up their trade in childhood
when their fingers are nimble enough to
learn the tricks that must be contin-
uously practiced for good performances.
Each Has "Trade-mark"
Every magician, amateur or profes-
sional, has his "trade-mark" tricks.
Mr. Ryan's specialty is the silk knot
trick, a classic in the business, but such a
classic, his fellow magicians say, a good
performance proves a real craftsman.
n fbtitfold rS hr1 AF I1r un In, n tniwn





November 7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Omfcal
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
f BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE

Printed by the Printing Plant
Mount Hope, Canal Zone


S. SEYBOw, Governor-President


SUBSCRIPTIONS--$1.00 a year

SINGLE COPIES--5 cents each
On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses,
Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after
publication date.

SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL--10 cents each

BACK COPIES--10 cents each
On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.


RAIN? We haven't seen anything this year. This is what the weather can do when it really tries.
No rainfall this season has been able to even approach the Pacific side record set August 27, 1944, when
this photograph was taken and when 4.78 inches fell in Balboa in one hour.


Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to Editor, THE PANAMA
CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights, C. Z.


Safety


Engineers
r~ *
rn nanppr
LII lIHUUI 0


Hold Monthly


Will


Meeting


A safety meeting will be held each
month for all safety engineers and in-
spectors, it was decided October 14 at a
meeting of the Canal Zone Government-
Panama Canal Safety Board.
Safety inspectors said they have felt
the need of such a meeting for some time
and expressed the opinion that it would
benefit the entire organization by creating
a better means of coordinating the indi-
vidual division safety programs and
accident prevention campaigns.
Such a meeting would also present a
t . .. a ..


Canal Zone Commissaries will be
open next Monday, November 10, as the
regular schedule is shifted to provide
for the Armistice Day holiday on
November 11.
Instead of closing on Monday of next
week, the retail stores will close on
Thursday.
The shift will prevent the commis-
saries from being closed for three days
in succession.


A round dozen of Congressmen, with
their wives, are scheduled to visit the Canal
Zone this month and next. One of the
12, Representative W. K. Van Pelt of
Wisconsin, is a member of the House
Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee
which handles Panama Canal affairs.
Nine of the Congressmen are arriving
November 17 aboard the SS Ancon of the
Panama Line. They are: Representative
E. Ross Adair of Indiana, with Mrs. Adair,
their daughter, Caroline Ann, and son,
Stephen; Representative S. J. Crumpacker,
Jr., also of Indiana, and his wife; Represent-
ative Paul B. Dague of Illinois, and Mrs.
Dague, Representative Frazier Reams, of
Ohio, with his wife; Representative Edward
L. Sittler, Jr., of Pennsylvania, with his
wife, their daughter, Jane, and son, Richard;
Representative and Mrs. Van Pelt; Repre-
sentative Earl Wilson, another Indianian,
with Mrs. Wilson, their daughter, Linda
Sue, and son, Phillip; and Representative
and Mrs. Clement I. Zablocki, of Wisconsin.


Republican party. Representatives Gordon
and Zablocki are Democrats, and Repre-
sentative Reams is an Independent.
For the first time in Canal history,
residents of some Company-Govern-
ment quarters will be permitted to
change electric fuses in their houses,
according to an announcement just
made by the Electrical Division. In the
past householders have had to call an
electrician whenever a fuse has blown.
The change will apply to a majority of
U. S.-rate quarters and to some quar-
ters in the local-rate towns. For better
fire protection and for safety reasons,
however, residents of some of the older
quarters will still have to call for an
electrician when a fuse is blown.
Electric plug fuses of 15- and 20-am-
pere capacity will go on sale today in the
retail commissaries. The entire stock
of some 17,000 fuses which has been
carried by the Division of Storehouses
has been transferred to the Commis-
sary Division and fuses will no longer be
carried as a Storehouse item.
On the Safety Page of this issue of
THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW will be
found hints as to the safety precautions
to be followed when changing fuses.
A master schedule of all foreseeable school
activities for the school year has been set up
in the office of the Director of Physical
Education and Recreation for the Schools
Division.


OF CURRENT INTEREST





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 7, 1952


ears


Ago


October


Politicking and pre-election plans pre-
occupied Canal Zonians 40 years ago in
October.
Local politicians took to the hustings


in Isthmian
1.in t C t% A


Canal


Commission


Club-


Students


SHOWN UNDER THE SHADE of Shakespeare
in the library of the La Boca school are two of the
three scholarship students now attending the La
Boca Junior College. The third, George Hamilton,
is shown at the left.
Eldeka Daniels (left, above) is attending the Col-
lege on a tuition scholarship from St. Peters Church
in La Boca. She is a first year student and is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ethelridge Daniels of
La Boca.


William A. Ellington (right, above) is also starting
college this year on a scholarship awarded him by
Aurora Lodge No. 523, I.B.P.O.E.W. of Rainbow
City. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ellington
of Rainbow City.
George Hamilton's tuition scholarship was an
' award from Club 20 of La Boca, a social club of
teachers in the colored schools. Because he did not
take a full course last year, he is now in his third
year at the College. He lives with his grandfather
Joseph Grant, in Red Tank.


scribed in THE CANAL RECORD and plans
for construction at the Pacific terminal
were approved.


The piers for
were to be about
feet wide with 8
one pier was to b
old French steel
long, was to be
th. fnhnre " for


commercial use at Balboa
dt 1,000 feet long and 200
390-foot slips between. Only
be constructed at first and an
l wharf, about 1,000 feet
retained "for some time in
commercial use.


Scholarship


jobs immediately after high
covered walkways for some scho
matter being included in the 1955
standardization of equipment to
a large inventory of such items as
ing parts; demolition of houses in
Flats, half of which are now to
down in fiscal year 1954 and
mainder the following fiscal year;


tive building
where about
constructed ii
whether any
Armed Force
Canal Zone
Governor ans
Attending
Governor: E.


I


program for Pedro


school;
ols, this
budget;
prevent
plumb-
Balboa
be torn
the re-
a tenta-
Miguel


70 new houses may be
11956; and a question as to
costs of maintaining the
s are attributable to the
Government, which the
wered in the negative.
the meeting were: The
A. Doolan, Personnel Di-


rector; and Forrest G. Dunsmoor, Admin-
istrative Assistant to the Governor; and
the following employee representatives:
William S. McKee. Machinists: Joseph


Conference Hears Talk on
Housing, Rents, and Hospitals
(Continued from page 3) of the Board
of Directors draw no salary from the
Company but that they do receive
expenses for travel and subsistence when
they attend Board meetings.
Also in answer to questions, the Gover-
nor said that he knew nothing of rumors
that employees would be required to buy
their own stoves and garbage cans and
that rents on garages will be increased.
Want Legislation
Rufus Lovelady of the AFGE asked
whether the administration would support
a bill to make tolls carry a portion of
housing expenses, pointing out that "it is
inconceivable that the"basis of toll rates
are what was set years ago when every-
thing else has doubled." The Governor
answered that this question of backing
legislation would have to go to the Board
for decision.
Herschel Gandy, President of AFGE
Lodge No. 14, supported Mr. Lovelady,
adding that employees are "getting less
and less and if we don't make a fight
things will go on and on."
Touched on more briefly were: the
Diablo dump, for which the Governor said
authorities are trying to find an alternate
site; the difference in commercial courses
in U. S.-rate and local-rate high schools,
with the Governor reporting that 67 per-
cent of the U. S.-rate high school grad-
uates go to college while the local-rate
high schools prepare their students for


'* ' ^ ^'~f>


-1 I


Forty
In


-- ... to I. fr :- 1^u s .^/v' .�***ll/ .:* -X /





November


7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Washington

Moved To


Office


B. I. Everson Named


Indiana Ave.


The Panama Canal Company's Wash-
ington office, established about 1905, was
moved October 20 to its new location on
the seventh floor of 101 Indiana Avenue
in Washington, D. C. The move of the
office from its longtime location was
almost simultaneous with the retirement
of B. F. Burdick, who had headed the
Washington office since 1939.
The new Washington office will be the
headquarters of the Company's Secretary,
W. M. Whitman, and will have a staff
of eight.
Many of its functions have been trans-
ferred within the past months to other
units of the Company. Purchasing opera-
tions are now handled by the Office of the
Vice President in New York; accounting
becomes the function of the Comptroller,
and personnel work now comes under the
Personnel Director.
The Personnel Bureau is maintaining a
small staff in the Washington office, under


Assistant


Director


The appointment of B. I. Everson as
Assistant Railroad and Terminals Direc-
tor was announced late in October.
Mr. Everson was Superintendent of the
Motor Transportation Division from 1947
until his new appointment.
He has been succeeded as Motor Trans-


portation


Division


Superintendent


Roger W. Adams.
Both appointments were effective No-
vember 2.
Both Mr. Everson and Mr. Adams are
graduates of the in-service training course


of the Canal organization,


as well as of


Balboa High School.
Both also hold degrees in Mechanical
Engineering, Mr. Everson from Carnegie
Institute of Technology and Mr. Adams
from Iowa State College.


Shipwrights, Plumbers, Organize
After Hour Classes For Study


(Continued from pageS )
boatbuilder crafts.


shipwright and
Five apprentices and


twelve journeymen meet for a two-hour
session each Monday night.
Although the Industrial Training Coor-
dinator is nominally the instructor, most
of the actual teaching is done by members
of the class.


Four projects have been planned for
the mechanics and the first of them, a
course in Hull Lines and Tables of Offsets
was the project for October, November,
and December.
Members of this class are the following
journeymen: John Van der Heyden,
Alrick L. Nelson, Duncan Laird, Martin
G. Klontz, Charles K. McNiel, Walter D.
Johnston, William Wirtz, Jr., Vincent D.
Ridge, R. C. Casanova, O. P. Strickland,
R. H. Kirkpatrick, and Vincent Canamas,
and the following apprentices, John A.
Pescod, Edward Bringas, Clifton Hay-
ward, Robert Brown, and James Ramsey.
The bringing together of the practical
knowledge of the journeymen and the
theoretical knowledge of the apprentice
school is proving advantageous to all in
the class, but especially to the apprentices.


Look

Who's

Here !


B. F. BURDICK


direction of Otto Helmerichs, form-
of the Central Labor Office here and
e recently a recruiting officer with the
1 Service Commission. Mr. Helme-
s' staff will handle certain recruitment
tions and will also do some wage
stical work as well as maintaining
on with the Civil Service Commission.


RUDOLPH, the record reindeer, is back again this
year, sticking his big, red, bulbous nose into our Christ-


f mas business.
And it isn't too soon to be thinking about Christ-
imas either.
^T _..nl .I_ ..1 r*. .- _.t . 1 .- ..... ... ] .... _ . i- fe /* .


\I


*




' �
StA


morn
Civi
rich
func
stati
liaisi


/




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


Here


Are


The


Canal


Zone


Teams-


BALBOA BULLDOGS have a big squad. Left to right: bottom row: Miller Haynes, (manager) Abdiel Flynn, Tom Davidson, Joe Oliver, Fred Cotton, Ed Benny,
Ray Nickisher, Ronnie Stover, Carl Widell, Cesar Von Chong, Bob Glud, and Danny Gressang; second row: Francis Boyd, Jim Stevens, Jim Fulton, Don Huff, Curtis
Jeffries, Paul Smith, Everett Stacy, Larry Keene, Bill Dawson, Bill Campbell and Dick Lomedico; third row: Tom Grimison (manager), Jim Jones, Tom Jenkins, Miles
Pace, Tom Hale, Louis Charles, Jack Corrigan, Bob Coleson, Frank Smith, Bob Morris, and Jim May. Top row: Bob Presley (manager), Bruce Orvis, Ted Norris,
Kirk Tibbetts, Bill Fulleton, Ronnie McConnell, Andy Wright, and Bruce Quinn (manager).


JUNIOR COLLEGE GREEN DEVILS huddle on the bench just before game
Nickisher, Ralph Huls, Freddy Aleguas, Bob Dolan, Bill Willoughby; top row: Bob
Meissner, Jerry Fox, and Dick Dillman.


time. Left to right they are, bottom row: Didacio Silvera, Jack Tinnin, William
Sievers, Salvador Aleguas, Nick Gorham, Elias Entibe, Johnny Albritton, Carl


a - - - - -a- - -~





November


1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


And


Here


Are


The


Cheerleaders


November is football time and turkey
time in the Canal Zone, just as it is in
most parts of the United States.
This year the high spots of the Canal
Zone's fourth tackle football season come
during the Thanksgiving week end.
Then, Cristobal High School's Eleven
will play the Key West, Fla., high school
team, at Key West, and the team from
Lake Worth, Fla., high school will fly
to the Canal Zone to meet the Balboa
High School team at the Balboa Stadium.
Both games will be played at night;
the date for both is November 28.
Intersectional football was started here
in 1950, the second year that tackle
football had been played in the Canal
;Zone schools.
Miami Played Here
That year Balboa played Miami-
Jackson at Balboa; in 1951 Balboa flew
to Miami for an exchange game and Key
West flew its team to the Canal Zone to


play Cristobal High School.


(An added


attraction last year was a Key West-
Cristobal basketball game, which Cristo-
bal won.)
The local teams have put up valiant
fights but, so far, have been losers in the
football games; this year they hope to
turn the tables and, with 3 years of experi-
ence behind them, come out winners.


G. C. Lockridge,


Director


of the


CHEERLEADERS AREN'T BORN; lots of hard
work and practice gc into the maneuvers which they
execute with such aplomb before crowded stands at
football games. Using Joyce Gardner as a model, co-
captain Marilyn Bevington shows the girls of the


Balboa High School cheering squad how to get that
right toe up. The girls, in their perky red and white
outfits, are, left to right: Judy McCoy, Joyce Collinge,
Marguerite Neal, Marilyn Bevington, Joyce Gardner,
Alice Paxson, Edna Hart, and Ann Gorman.


Physical Education Branch of the Canal
Zone Schools, gives credit for the success
of football locally to two factors: The
public, which has turned out in droves to
attend the school games, and the Student
Associations of Balboa and Cristobal
High Schools and Junior College.
The Student Associations are respon-
sible for all the football bills. They buy
uniforms, pay for the lights and services
of the men who officiate at the games.
Dad's Was Different


25-pound uniforms are a far


cry from the 60-pounders which the
fathers of some of the present players
wore. For one thing, Dad's uniform
was seldom, if ever, laundered during a


football season.


It couldn't be.


Remov-


able foam-rubber pads have replaced the
weighty kapok and reed padding of the
old days and afford just about the same
protection to the players.
2 1I . 1iL . - . .. -1 1


ON RAINY DAYS


a big study hall makes


place for the Junior College cheerleaders to work out.
They have additional inspiration from a series of
Green Devils (for the team) on the blackboard. In


one of their favorite stunts are, bottom, left to right:
Marguerite Flynn, Merry Mallen, Shirley Butler,
Beth Lockridge, and, top, Betty Wilkinson, Mary
Adelia Morley, Shirley Karst, and Marilyn Dupuis.


Today's





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


Year-Old


Whenever anyone
wants music for a con
is likely to think of
Community Band.
Although the band
birthday only last m
made such a name fo


Rainbow

Provides


City (

Music


on the Gold Coast
cert or a parade, he
the Rainbow City
* celebrated its first
onth it has already
hr itself that it gave


a concert for Colon's Alcalde, Jose
Domminador Bazan, when he took office
September 1.
The Rainbow City Band is a younger
relative of the Panama Community Band
which was formed in 1943 when the
Isthmus was expecting a visit from Dr.
Finley Wilson, then Grand Exalted Ruler
of the Improved Benevolent and Pro-
tective Order of Elks of The World.
Last October a group of Atlantic siders
got together and decided that they too
wanted a band. As a result of their desire
45 musicians meet in the study hall of the
Rainbow City High School twice a week
for practice sessions under the baton of


their Organizing Director, Reginald Pres-
cott, who teaches instrumental music in
the two colored high schools.
Membership in the band, according to
its bylaws, is open to anyone interested
in the progress and development of


classical music, although
membership is limited to 50.


the playing


From 40 to 14
At the present time the oldest in the
group is in his late forties. The youngest
is 14, a seventh-grade student. Fifteen of


the players are graduates of t
City High School, 14 are mei
community, 12 are students,
Atlantic side teachers. Seven
members are women.
Some bands have a few stri


ments; the Rain
has no strings.
wind or percussi
on the brasses.
For public a
uniformed in wh
The Rainbow
by Roscoe Ha


he Rainbow
nbers of the
and four are
of the band


nged instru-


bow City Band, however,
All of its instruments are
on, with the accent heavy
appearances, the band is
ite.
City Band is sponsored
inning, Principal of the


community


For


The


Band


Atlantic


Side


Rainbow City High School. Mr. Prescott
is its Organizing Director and its Secretary
is Miss Myrtle Kirkaldy, a teacher, who
is also a saxophonist in the band.
Director Is Well Known
The director is well-known in local
circles. He attended school in Panama
and in May of this year received the
degree of Bachelor of Music, majoring in
composition, from the Extension Division
of the Chicago Conservatory of Music.
Three years ago he won first prize, $100,
in a contest sponsored by the Panama
Carnival Junta to select carnival music.


Two o
sacred
Revern
Christ
Presco
other
of the


'f his most recent compositions
anthems. One is dedicated to
end Mainert Peterson, Recto
Church-by-the-Sea, where
itt sings bass in the choir;
is dedicated to the Acolyte G
same church.


are
the
r of
Mr.
the
uild


He plays eight or nine instruments but
prefers piano, clarinet, saxophone, string
bass, and flute. His oldest son-he is the
father of four children-is in his sec-
ond year at the Panama Conservatory,
studying clarinet.


Years


Ago


Ten
In


A tax bill "imposing the greatest
revenue burden in history upon the people
of the United States" was signed 10 years
ago in October by former President
Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Canal Zonians breathed a sigh of relief
when they found it did not apply to them.
The provision that would have required
Canal Zone residents to pay income tax
was excluded by a Senate and House
Conference Committee responsible for the
final form of the legislation.
Santa Claus in the Canal Zone, not quite
a wartime casualty, had his beard singed by
shipping problems and shortages that beset
the Commissary Division.
The announcement that there would be no
toys in the Commissaries also included the
warning that shortages would also mean less
fancy, more practical holiday gifts and
feasts, no tinsel or gilt on Christmas wrap-
pings and no big Christmas trees.
A new Quarantine Area at Corozal to


replace the Quarantine Area at F
Amador, which was to be transferred
the Navy by the Canal, was started
years ago in October.
"Several dozen" families of Ca:
employees had received notice early in
month that they would have to m
from their quarters in the Quarant


area of Balboa so that it coul
over by the Navy. "The
Area," a newspaper account s
long been among the choicest
sections in the Canal Zone. I
families living there have ma


nal
the
o)ve
me


d be taken
Quarantine
stated, "has
residential
Most of the
iy years of


service with the Canal organization and
many are in the real 'old-timer' class."


Rusty


an ist
gether
States
Amon
ment
towed
banks


floating and excavating equipment used by
the Americans.


gathered to-
the United
war effort.
ed for ship-
long since
the Canal
dl as later


- -I-


October


ALL LOCAL-RATE WORKERS TO
BE PAID BY BANK CHECK
All local-rate employees of the
Company-Government who are paid
bi-weekly will receive their pay by
bank check before the end of this
month.
Checks will be issued to about half
of the local-rate workers this coming
week; the remainder will receive
their first checks the week of Novem-
ber 23.
New, rectangular shaped plastic
laminated photo badges which local-
rate workers must have to cash their
checks are being issued to those who
do not have photo badges.
All U. S.-rate employees have been
paid by check since last July.


of the French effort to build


hmian canal were being
for salvage to be sent to
as part of the all-out
g the scrap metal prepare
were old French dredges,
to shallow water along


and abandoned,


as we


J.


m






November


1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS

Of all the shrubs commonly used in
this area for landscape work, it is difficult
to name one of local origin. The three
most common of the numerous varieties
that have been introduced to the


Isthmus are the Hibiscus,


Croton, and


Bougainvillea.
The common Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-


sinensis)


is grown


everywhere


in the


tropics but the origin of its numerous
varieties may be traced to China. It is


sometimes called
India because


d "shoeflower plant" in
the petals, which turn


black when they are crushed, are used
there for shoe blacking. Chinese women
use the flowers to dye their hair and eye
brows. The flower-buds are also often
eaten, either fresh or pickled.
The hibiscus flowers are either single
or double and of a great variety of colors.
In Panama the plant is called "papo."
The "Chinese Rose," "Blushing Hibis-


or "Miexicali


Rose,"


(H. muta-


bilis) has been introduced recently to this
area by J. S. Skinner, Power Dispat-
cher at the Miraflores Substation of the
Electrical Division, an ardent and pains-
taking horticulturist. The large flowers,
which are either single or double, are white
when they open in the morning and grad-
ually turn pink as the day progresses.
The cultivated hibiscus is closely re-


to the well known


roselle


"Jamaica sorrel" (H. sabdariffa) which is
grown in large quantities in Panama for
the juicy calyces (outer, usually green,
portion of a flower) used for making cool
drinks as well as jam and jelly.


"THIS IS IT, please Santa," young Valerie Spencer
tells the white-whiskered old gentleman in the red
suit. There wasn't much doubt, when Valerie got
into the Commissary Division's Balboa toy display,
that it was a bicycle which had caught her eye and


There's


a story


behind the


(also called Cornell Loaf or


Hi-Protein


Triple-Rich, in


the United States) bread now sold in the
Commissaries on Tuesdays and Fridays. It


is a story that


is considered revolutionary in


the field of nutrition.


The bread
Bread is
Like Meat


was developed at Cornell Uni-


versity as a
requested


Result of a study
bv Governor


Dewey to improve the diet
- --- -


in New


ot patients
State mental hospitals.


The formula for high-nutritional value


was developed


as the result of


bread which


heart. She did remember to tell Santa that big sister
Janice wanted a basket for her bike and that a doll
was exactly what her pal, Elvia, wanted. Valerie and
Janice live with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie
M. Spencer, on Ridge Road in Balboa Heights.


Cooks and


carvers


For Holiday
Cooks and Carvers


well as good
taste better.


cooks


and connoisseurs who
are interested in fine


fowls


giving
that go'
can make


feasts


Thanks-


know


od looks as
a good bird


To improve turkeys' looks and the temper
of cooks, the Commissaries have tinned


roast


racks, that cradle


a bird as he browns


for the feast and keep him looking the
a fine unfeathered friend should look.


The roast racks measure


and cost about 50


11


cents.


way
iches


the research project headed by Clive M.
McCay, was made freely available to bakers
and individuals and was quickly adopted by
many state institutions and bakery concerns.
The Commissary Division acquired the
open formula, by which the Hi-Protein


bread
direct:


is baked at Mount Hope, simply by
ng a request to Professor McCay,


whn. with the heln of his wsfe has cent not


The gleam of a handsome carving set
, , t I I


a holiday table and


a carvin


that really cuts reflects a happy


g
c


high-
knife
arver.


Three-piece sterling sets in the Commis-
saries now have Sheffield steel blades that


cut. The sterling handles
wear resistant because of


are tarnish and


a special


process


used only by Wolfenden, manufacturers of


carving sets to


finish sterling flatwear.


p-


�-






THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


NOVEMBER


9th-Pipefitters,
9:30 a. inm.


Margarita


Clubhouse,


Sheetmetal Workers No. 157, Balboa
Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m.
Plumbers No. 606, K. of C. Hall, Mar-
ganrita, 9:30 a. m-.
10th-Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall,
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post No. 1, Legion
Home, 7:30 p. m.
11th-Armistice Day.
Pipefitters, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30
p. Il.


Electrical
Memorial
American
Clayton,
VFW Post
Building,
American


Workers No. 397,
Building, 7:30 p. m.
Legion Post No. 7,
7:30 p. m.
No. 100, Old Boy
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
Legion Auxiliary N


Balboa Legion Home, 7:30 p.
12th-Carpenters and Joiners
Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m
Pacific Civic Council, Boar
Administration Building, 7:30(
14th-Blacksmiths No. 400 an
makers No. 463 and 471,
Hall, Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
16th-CLU-MTC, Margarita C
8:30 a. m.
17th-Electrical Workers No.
sonic Temple, Gatun, 7:30 p.
Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge t


p. m.
18th-Operating
K. of C. Hall,
Machinists No.
7:30 p. m.in.
19th-AFGE No.
7:30 p. m.


Scouts
ro. 1,


m.
No. 91


I.
d Room,
)p. m.
d Boiler-
K. of C.


lubh
677,
m.
Hall,


Engineers No. 595,
Margarita, 7 p. m.
811, Balboa Lodge Hall,
14, Balboa Clubhouse.,


American Legion Auxiliary Ur
Legion Home, Gatun, 7:30 p. m.
20th-American Legion Auxiliary
6, Gamboa Legion Hall, 7:30 p.
24th-Machinists No. 699, K. of C
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822 Home


p. Im.
25th-Marine Engineers, G
Club.
Operating Engineers, No.
Hall, Balboa, 7 p. m.


Unit
it.
. Hall,


;amboa


595, Lodge


VFW Post No. 100, Old Boy
Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post No. 7,
Clayton, 7:30 p. m.
26th-AFGE No. 88, Margarita Club


Scout
Fort

house,


7:30 p. m.
Governor-Employee Conference, 2
p. m., Board Room, Administration
Building, Balboa Heights.


American Legion Auxiliary Unit 2,
Legion Home, Old Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
27th-Thanksgiving Day.
DECEMBER


1st-Postal Employees
Hall, Margarita, 7:30
Pedro Miguel Civic
Church, 7 p. m.
Cristobal-Margarita
Margarita Clubhouse
VFW Post No. 727, F
p. m.
VFW Post No. 3822,
7:30 p. m.


23160,


p. m.
Council,


Civic
, 7:30 p.
ort Clay
Curun


2d-Meatcutters and Butchers,
Officers Home, 7:30 p. m.
Teachers No. 288, Cristob
School Auditorium, 3:30 p. m.
Gamboa Civic Council, Co
Center, 7:30 p. m.
Gatun Civic Council, Gatu
house, 7:30 p. m.
Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lo
7:30 p. m.
3d-VFW Post No. 40, Wirz I
Building, 7:30 p. m.
Isthmian Nurses' Associatiot
Canal Zone (First Annual
tion), Army-Navy Club, 1-9 p
4th-Carpenters and Joiners
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p.
5th-American Legion Post No.
boa Legion Home, 7:30 p. nm.


November


K. of


Union


Council,
Sm.
'ton, 7:30
iu Road,


No. 121,
al High
immunity


InI


Club-


dge Hall,
Memorial

n of the
Conven-
). Im.
No. 667,


Gam-


Sailings


From Cristobal


Panama
Cristobal
Ancon -
Panama
Cristobal


Cristobal _
Ancon .
Panama
Cristobal


Ancon


-November


-November 14
_November 21
_ November 28
.December 5

From New York
-N -November 5
__ _November 12
....November 19


. November
SDecember


RO _ . t -I - .Se A T. E . S


THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR


with contain
indicated w

Carl G.
Navigation


nous service with the Canal are
ith (*).


35 years
Breitenbach, Dock
Division.


Foreman,


30 years


Max C. Conover,


Carpenter


Foreman,


Maintenance Division.
William H. Keller, Assistant Superin-
tendent, Pacific Locks.
George M. Pervin, Clerk, License Section.
Clarendon Sealy, Stockman, Commis-
sary D)ivision.
John S. Skinner, Jr., Power Dis-
patcher, Electrical Division.
*Lenora Smith, Principal, Elementary
School, Cristobal.
Agnes E. Sugrue, Public Health Nurse,
Health Office, Colon.
Leonard B. Wilson, Operator, Utility and
Tractor-Bulldozer, Maintenance Division


Katherine I


Teacher, Bal
Albert J.
trial Bureau.
*Howard
man, Teleph
trical Divisio
Leslie R.
ant, License
Stella I.
Hospital.


*Julia


25 years
. Clark,


boa.
Deutsch,


Machinist,


S. Engelke, General
ones, Southern District


n.
Evans, Admin
Section.
Frampton,


Guenzi,


istrati
Clerk


Elementary


ve


School
Indus-
Fore-
, Elec-
Assist-


, Gorgas
Teacher,


Balboa.
Walter L. Gorman, Painter Foreman,
Pacific Locks.


William E. Hughes, Police S
*Rosalie Jones, Elementary


ergeant.
Teacher,


Cristobal.
Edith I. Nason, Clerk, Gorgas Hospital.
Eugene E. Orvis, Jr., Machinist, Indus-
trial Bureau.
Gilbert B. Owen, Carpenter Foreman,
Maintenance Division.
15 years
Harold L. Anderson, Administrative
Assistant, Administrative Branch.
James F. Campbell, Customs Inspector.
Eula Joe Ewing, Cashier, Commissary


Division.
*Rita G. Gribbons,
Hospital.
Adolph Kapinos, Police
John L. McDermott, Su
Dam, Atlantic Locks.
Laura C. McLintock,
Maintenance Division.


Nurse, Gorgas

Sergeant.
pervisor, Gatun
Clerk Typist,


Charles A. Mockus, Postal Clerk.
Eugene S. Shipley, Police Lieutenant.
Robert C. Sievers, Jr., Bakery Manager,
Commissary Division.


ANNIVERSARIES


Employees who observed important anni-
versaries during the month of October are
listed alphabetically below. The number
of years includes all Government service
with the Canal or other agencies. Those


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


1,





November 7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Training to Probationary Pilot, Navigation
Division.
Howard B. Harrison, from Machinist,
Industrial Bureau, to Fleet Machinist,
Dredging Division.
Edward J. Shepherd, from Security
Guard to Guard Supervisor, Pacific Locks.
Frederick E. Knox, from Carpenter
Foreman, Railroad Division, to Carpenter
Foreman, Dredging Division.
Walter W. Carlson, from Drill Runner
to Drill Barge Blaster, Dredging Division.
Nils W. Jonson, from Lock Operator
Wireman to Lock Operator Wireman
Leader, Pacific Locks.
Slaughter H. Sharpensteen, from
Drill Barge Blaster to Drill Barge Mate,
Dredging Division.
Charles J. Connor, from Drill Barge
Mate to Drill Barge Master, Dredging
Division.
Charles D. Wood, from Traffic Clerk,
Terminals Division, to Security Guard,
Pacific Locks.
Nickolai L. Olson, from Security Guard
to Guard Supervisor, Atlantic Locks.
Charles G. Morency, from Mate to
Operator Pipehline Suction Dredge, Dredg-
ing Division.
Luther G. Bradshaw, from Towboat
Master, Ferry Service, to Pilot-in-Training,
Navigation Division.
Grant O. Jeakins, Jr., from Wireman,
Electrical Division, to Lock Operator Wire-
man, Pacific Locks.
PERSONNEL BUREAU
Mrs. Charlotte S. Cagley, from Clerk-
Typist, Community Services Bureau, to
Clerk-Typist, Employment and Utilization
Division.
RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU
Augustus C. Medinger, from Deputy
Director, Marine Bureau, to Director, Rail-
road and Terminals Bureau.
Edward N. Stokes, from Director, Rail-
road and Terminals Bureau, to Superinten-
dent, Railroad Division.
Donald C. Parker, from Cribtender
Foreman to Steam Engineer and Crib-
tender Foreman, Terminals Division.
Francis E. Reardon, from File Clerk,
Administrative Branch, to Time and Leave
Supervisor, Terminals Division.
Mrs. Patricia A. Appel, from Clerk-
Typist to Accounting Clerk, Terminals
Division.
SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU .
Mrs. Mary E. Evans, from Accounting
Clerk to Clerk, Commissary Division.


Employees who retired at the end of
October, their birthplaces, titles, length of
service at retirement, and their future
addresses are:
Frederick C. Atkinson, Louisiana; Shop
Superintendent, Dredging Division; 24
years and 10 months; Hot Springs, Ark.
Fred J. Bauman, New York; Supervisor,


Mount


Hope
Era


An imaginary pair of scissors last Fri-
day slashed an equally imaginary 54
ribbons of papers, each two-and-three
quarter-inches wide, which stretched
between Cristobal and New York.
The paper ribbons represent the total
length of all of the commissary coupons
which have been printed at the Printing
Plant at Mount Hope since January 1920.
They were snipped off neatly on October
31 when the Plant went out of the coupon
printing business.
The ribbons are the figments of the
imagination of E. C. Cotton, Printer, and
one of the senior employees in the Canal
organization from point of service. As
he watched his coupon printing business
draw to a close with the gradual conver-
sion of commissary retail stores to the
cash system of buying, Mr. Cotton com-
piled as fascinating a set of statistics as
ever is likely to be produced here.
Since January 1920, when a big rotary
press, especially built in Boston for The
Panama Canal, began to turn out com-
missary coupons, the Plant printed
53,680,000 commissary books, worth a
total of $382,100,000.
Would Stretch 106,938 Miles
Placed end to end the coupons in these
books would stretch 106,938 miles and
have 126 feet of coupons left over. That
is equivalent to the 54 ribbons of paper
stretching between Cristobal and New
York.
Or, if you prefer, Mr. Cotton says, it
could be one piece of paper, 11 feet and
3 inches wide, between New York and
Cristobal.
He even went so far as to break the
number of commissary books down by
denominations, so:
5,736,000 bcoks of the $2.50 local-rate
type, worth $14,340,000 and with their
coupons stretching 4,526 miles and 3,198
feet;
17,456,000 books of the $5 local-rate
denomination, worth $87,280,000 and
with coupons stretching 14,514 miles and


2,133 feet;
5,473,000 books of
denomination, worth
coupons stretching
2,880 feet;
4,432,000 books of
denomination, worth


Printing Plant Ends
Of Commrissary Books


more common back in 1905 when the
Isthmian Canal Commission decided to
use them in local stores than they were
last Friday when the last book paid for
someone's groceries. In 1905 they were
common currency in many lumber camps
or in railroad and mining company towns.
Started In 1905
Their use was authorized in the Canal
Zone, according to the report of the
Isthmian Canal Commission for the year
ending December 1, 1905, after a confer-
ence held by the I. C. C. Chairman, the
Chief Engineer and the Governor. When
they decided to open retail commissaries
"along the line," they also agreed that
"among other things the sale of goods
for cash was prohibited and a system of
coupons devised which can be secured
only from the timekeepers and in limited
amounts."
The first books were printed by the
Tower Manufacturing and Novelty Com-
pany of New York and by Byron S.
Adams of Washington, D. C. From 1908
until 1915 the Allison Coupon Company
of Indianapolis was the printer, with the
exception of 1910, when the order went
to the National Ticket Company.
Early Books Different
Early commissary books were far dif-
ferent from those which have just gone
out of local fashion. They were good for
only 60 days; they contained blocks of
coupons of various denominations (in
various colors); the coupons were not
perforated but had to be cut off by hand.
To further complicate matters, there
were I. C. C. and Panama Railroad books
and a third kind, good only in the hotels.
It was not until 1912 that a uniform book
was adopted and it was three years later,
after considerable argument pro and con,
that books of the "mileage" type were
ordered. These were revolutionary; they
not only contained a running strip of
paper but each coupon was perforated for
easy tearing off.
This same year, 1915, A. P. E. Doyle,
then the Canal Printer, suggested that
his press could print the coupons, but he
was overruled by H. A. A. Smith, Auditor,
who wrote: "In view of the circumstances
surrounding the use of commissary books,
T Ar111 .-J 4r- r\ .. . Ii n. nn 41,


the $7.50 local-rate
$41,040,000, with
12,954 miles and

the $10 local-rate
$44.320.000. with


RETIREMENTS

IN OCTOBER





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


Small


Boat


Fans


Learn


About


Piloting


Power


Squadron


Course


OFFICERS AND PAST OFFICERS of the
Canal Zone Pacific Squadron of the United States
Power Squadrons get together to check up on their
commander, Francis F. Hargy, who is instructing
a class of 82 on the art of piloting small craft. Left
to right are: Brodie Burnham, Past Squadron
Down at the Canal Zone Junior College


these Wednesday
have been bitten
learning formally
has nothing to do
or the Marquis of
Although a goo
something about


evenings, 82 people who
by the "boat bug" are
that boxing a compass
with cardboard cartons
Queensberry.
d many of them knew
compasses before, or


they wouldn't be attending a class in
piloting and small-boat handling, they


are painstakingly
of the compass in
what Webster's 1
"box the compass
It also means,
according to W
complete turn or


"learning the 13 points
their order," which is
)ig dictionary says to
' means.
figuratively and again
ebster, "to make a
reversal." That will


come later, in actual practice,
82 who are enrolled in the Uni


Power Squa
tice some of
from Franci
the Canal Zo
This year'
rltniv 0bn/1it 1


dr


on's


course put


when the
ted States
into prac-


the theory they are learning
s F. Hargy, Commander of
mne Pacific Squadron.
s piloting course, which will


Commander; Charles R. Bowen, Lieutenant Com-
mander of the local Squadron; B. J. Brown,
Secretary; Harry H. Corn, Treasurer; William H.
Clark, the local Squadron's only qualified Junior
Navigator, who is teaching a class in Advanced Pilot-
ing, and Mr. Hargy.
examination and are accepted for mem-
bership. Even then, the women will rate
only as Women Associates.
The Power Squadron apparently has
never heard of the Canal Zone's own
Peggy Powell, who is about as much of a
small-boat mariner as her husband, Kim.
But regardless of this, the women receive


only certificates of recognition
tion of the course.
Fifteen local women have re
certificates from the Canal Z
Squadron since 1949, and ha'
mitted as Associates. Six o
still living on the Isthmus.
The highest grade a men
Power Squadron may have
Navigator. The Army accept


on comple-
ceived such
one Power
ve been ad-
f them are

iber of the
is that of
ts this "N"


in lieu of a college degree for its Reserve
Officers Corps. No Canal Zone Pacific
Squadron member has received this rating.
One Rated "JN"
One member, William H. Clark, who
was instrumental in organizing the local
11 1 1 1 1 I n *fl


charts and piloting, and manners and
customs on shipboard.
"Power" Squadron is something of a
misnomer. Its members are not neces-
sarily power boat owners; in fact they
need not be owners of any craft, even a
rowboat, although 15 of the Squadron
members have their own boats.
USPS Is 35 Years Old
Formed 35 years ago as an association
of yachtsmen and others interested in
boating, the United States Power Squad-
ron is a non-profit group incorporated
under the laws of the District of Columbia.
The aim of its 15,000 members, divided
among some 120 local Squadrons, is to
establish a. high standard of skill in the
handling and navigation of small boats.
Most of the local Squadron members
have limited their small boat cruising to
the Atlantic and Pacific waters adjacent
to Panama. The Squadron Commander,
Mr. Hargy, has been to more distant
places. Early this year he was a member
of the crew on a 60-foot auxiliary ketch
on a voyage to Tahiti via the Galapagos
and Marquesas Islands.
The Squadron's Lieutenant Command-
er. Charles R. Bowen. has also been


to Tahiti
Colombia
Squadron
aficionado,


I


and not long ago sailed to
on a schooner. B. J. Brown,
Secretary, is a small boat
but does not have his own


boat. He is completing the Junior Navi-
gator's course and sometime in the future
has hopes of a seven-seas cruise.
Harry H. Corn, Treasurer, has made
several yacht trips, at least one of them
up the west coast to California.
Past Squadron Commander, L. B.
Burnham, sailed his own ketch, Siesta,
from Houston to the Zone several years
ago, assisted by Panama Canal pilot
Clinton Baverstock, as skipper, and W. E.
Pearson, a Power Squadron member and
past Commander of the Balboa Yacht
Club, the Squadron's "home port."
Membership Increases
Membership in the Canal Zone Pacific
Squadron has increased in three years
from the original 15 charter members to a
total of 27 at present.
Since the local Squadron received its
charter in 1949, there have been five
Piloting classes, two Seamanship classes,
one Advanced Piloting class, and one
7 * "[T * . 1


F


d





November


7,1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


UNITED


FRUIT


COMPANY


GOOD


CANAL


CUSTOMER


A Dominican Friar, who introduced ba-
nanas into the New World 436 years ago
and who later became Bishop of Panama,
Undoubtedly had a great deal to do with the
fact that the United Fruit Company is one
of the Panama Canal's best customers.
The Friar was Fra Tombs de Berlanga
who imported banana plants into Santo
Domingo in 1516. In his honor the United
Fruit named one of their crack ships Fra
Berlanga, a regular visitor to Canal waters.
From January through September of this
year, 588 of the white ships which fly the
house flag of the United Fruit Company
transited the Canal; the total commercial
traffic for ships of 300 tons and over during
this same period was 5,136.
In September, the United Fruit Com-
pany's transiting ships totalled 77. Of these,
37 were northbound. Figuring on an aver-
age of 50,000 stems of bananas for each
fruit carrier, this meant that in September
alone some 1,850,000 stems of bananas
were carried from ocean to ocean, enough
to provide a good many banana splits.
Southbound United Fruit Company ships
carry no bananas. Unless they have aboard
some company freight they transit in bal-
last. The bananas which go through the
Canal come from the West Coasts of South
and Central America-from Ecuador, Pan-
ama, and Costa Rica-and consequently are
carried only on northbound ships.
United Fruit, Canal Are
Contemporaries


WITH A CAPACITY which
78,000 stems of bananas, the SS
the United Fruit Company ships
class. She is named for a town


will accommodate Limon, Costa Rica, and bears the same name as one
Parismina is one of of the then-new 5,000-tonners which began to operate
of the Fra Berlanga into the Canal Zone in 1908. The modern Parismina
in the province of runs between New York and the U. S. West Coast.


The United Fruit Company and the
Panama Canal are almost contemporaries
and their development was closely inter-
woven. In 1899, the year the United Fruit
Company was formed, and five years before
American forces began work on the Canal,
the Fruit Company put up its first hospital.
This was at Nances Bay, a few miles from
Bocas del Toro in eastern Panama, on a
banana plantation which had been started
by railroad builder Minor Keith.
In 1903, the Fruit Company opened a
major division at Almirante, planting
20,000 acres in bananas.
According to Charles Morrow Wilson's
Empire in Green and Gold: "Banana ships
had carried most of the earlier cargoes of


Canal supplies. Quite obvious
the advantages were mutual.
had always been assured of


sly, however,
Fruit ships
northbound


cargo from the banana countries. But now
the Big Ditch was providing hundreds of
thousands of tons of southbound cargoes of
steel, cement, timber, glass, machinery, and


other


construction


materials,


food, clothes, drugs, and general
dise for its thousands of workers."
In its issue of September 11, 1


as well


merchan-
907, THE


PANAMA CANAL RECORD reports: "The
United Fruit Company dispatches a steamer
from New Orleans for Colon every Saturday,
due to arrive the following Thursday.
Sailings by this line from Colon to New
Orleans every Tuesday."
These vessels were probably the Preston,
Harry T. Inge, and theEllis, for on July 22,
1908, THE CANAL RECORD reported that
these three ships would be replaced by three
new 5,000 ton craft, Cartago, Parismina, and
Heredia. The Cartago went into service in
August, 1908, and was described by THE
CANAL RECORD as "the first United Fruit


ship of the modern fleet to enter the port
of Colon."
Owned Two-Story Building In 1911


Panama City office. He
Fruit's General Agent i
During Mr. O'Hearn's assi
Cristobal agency became
Division and the loading
nanas for New Orleans
was begun.


is now United
in Washington.
gnment here the
the Cristobal
of Panama ba-
and New York


Succeeding Mr. O'Hearn in 1926 was
Paul E. West, who was transferred to the
Colombia Division in 1932. His successor
was Fletcher Hatch, who remained here
until Mr. O'Hearn's return to Cristobal in
1933. George S. Bennett took over in 1939.
"Bill" Adams Is Local Chief
The present General Agent is William E.
Adams, who counts Glasgow, Ky., as his
home town, although he has lived here for
33 years. He had worked for United Fruit
in New York for about 18 months before he
came here in 1919 as a chief checker in the
Cristobal office. He was made General
Agent in June 1951, succeeding the late


Mr. Bennett.


As Assistant General Agent, Anthony F.
Raymond is Mr. Adams' right hand man.
He is almost a native Isthmian-he came
here with his parents in 1906-and has
been with United Fruit for 30 years, all on


STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC
For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1939.


*


I


-
. - .





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November 7, 1952


United Fruit Co.-Good Canal Customer


TRAFFIC


MOVEMENT


OVER


MAIN


TRADE


ROUTES


The following table shows
net tons or over) segregated in


the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300
to eight main trade routes:


United


States


ntercoasta


East Coast of U. S. and South America _


East Coast

East Coast

U. S./Canac


of U. S. and Central America_.

of U. S. and Far East .. ..

la East Coast and Anstralasia_


Europe and West Coast of U. S./Canada


Europe and South America

Europe and Australasia _


All other ro


utes _


Total Traffic


First Qu

1953

137

399

94

237

50

185

89

88

398

1,677


carter, Fiscal


130


118

193

58

178

88

89


Year

1938


349

97

19

217

49

194

137


300


1,469


JOHN GORIN is almost as well known on the
Pacific side as the United Fruit Company with which
he has been associated for the past 29 years. Kentucky
born, he has just been made an "Ambassador of
Good Will" for the State of Louisiana.
(Continued from page 17) to the many it
now operates through the Canal or into
Cristobal. About November 10 the brand-
new MV Leon will enter the feeder service


between
Central
Cristob
The
the MV
vice in
tions foi
unselect
sailings
Here
United
its total
mercial


SCristobal and
America. This
al to Cristobal.
2,800 ton Leon a
Lempa, which e
December, will
r six passengers.
ed, will be added
from Cristobal.
are some of the


the West Coast of
s will be 21 days,

nd her sister ship,
enters the same ser-
have accommoda-
A third ship, as yet
d to provide weekly


services


which the


Fruit Company operates, to make
a little over 11 percent of the corn-
shipping for the first nine months of


tins year:
New York to Seattle, weekly,
seven 7,000 gross ton ships of
Berlanga class.
Mobile to Los Angeles, weekly,
nine vessels of the Ulua class,
5,075 tons.
New Orleans to Esmeraldas.,
weekly by the 5,900 ton Musa
sister ship, Platano.
Baltimore to Guayaquil, weekly
Toltec and the Maya.
New York to Puerto Armuelles,


round trip made
(named in memory
Sam Zemurrary, J
Casablanca) and t
Berlanga class. Al
transiting services
for 12 passengers.


with the
the Fra

with the
grossing

Ecuador,
and her

, with the

a 13-day


weekly by the Junior
of Army Air Force Maj.
r., who was killed near
he San Jose of the Fra
l of these ships in the
have accommodations


MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


Month


July ....

August

September be

October

November ------------

December

January_

February

March_

April ..... . .

Mav_


ne
Totals
fiscal


for first 3 months of
year 1953 -


Transits


1953

529

533

615









----- -- -


1,677


1952 1938

463 457

490 505

516 444

544 461

502 435

550 439

522 444

507 436


1,


613 506

601 487

622 465

594 445

469 1.406


(In tho
1953

$2,343

2,288

2,636


Tolls
usands of dollars)


$1,981

2,103


2,230
2,053

2,347

2,121

2,082

2,512

2,423

2,481

1.982


$7,267


$6,273


1938

$2,030

2,195

1,936

1,981

1,893

1,845

1,838

1,787

2,016

1,961

1,887

1,801

$6,161


Some Ships Don't Transit
Touching at Cristobal, but not transiting,
e several other United Fruit Company
ssels. In the first nine months this year
.....- - K -- . ---^ ... . . . I.h ^- I C ,* ... . .. *- �~ t' . -� l f * , < * ,l**�*- -


a. i-


arn
ve
I.1


I






November


7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


.TOLLS AND TRAFFIC UP IN 1953

Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels
-i-~iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiii.........;.;;.;;..;..;.*. .;.*.*. ;*;. ***i i***.**. ...-.;;..;J~l~*.lllll~lllllllllllllllllll^ :l~~l^ ^^l-ll^-~l^ -- l -- -- - -- -- -- -- ^ -- --- --- - - ^ 1111111111111111111 --- - -- --^ -- ^ -* * - > ^-- -ri- ^ -^- --- - - ^ .ii~i^-i-ii~i~~i- ^


Nationality


Britishb ... .
Chilean .......
Chinese .....
Colombian ..
Costa Rican _
Danish.......
Ecuadorean- -
Esthouian .....
Finnish .....
French ... .
German .....
Greek ........
Honduran ....
Hungarian- -.-
Icelandic- ....
Iran...
Irish . . . .
Itaiian . . .
Japanese ._
Liberian ..
Mexican------
Netherlands_.-
Nicaraguan-.
Norwegian - - -
Panamanian _
Peruvian....
Philippine ..
Portuguese ..
Spanish ...
Swedish ...
Swiss-_ - � -
SWISS .. . . .
United States_
Venezuelan _.
Yugoslavian_ -
Total


Fi
1953
Num-
ber of Tolns
transits of cargo
*miiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 11--.. - --- ____ _ -^^^.............--- - - .-
320 1,972,741
12 55,860
7 57,644
40 41,032
1 76
51 225,155
36 18,704

32 116,133
24 46,854
17 150,133
106 146,381

1 9,oo00
9 10,224
27 128,840
58 389,491
20 166,137
14 9,230
25 136,287
3 1,621
220 770,402
97 494,078
10 24,816
6 38,043
43 8,565
45 182,602
2 10,139
491 2,818,831
10 18,014

1,677 8,047,733


rst Quarter of Fiscal Years


1952
Num-
her of Tons
transits of cargo
286 1,967,618
12 50,668
1 8,626
22 22,081
2 10,002
53 239.836
39 24,498
1i 5,480
27 100,086
2 1.583
19 170,236
101 133,431
1 312

19 85,596-
13 71,345
29 78,076
2 17,916
24 121,681
-- 175 676,649
56 307,063
1 -------
7 44,043
1 9,511
8 43,245
31 189.436
1 5,771
534 3,669,405
2 3,334

1,469 8,057,528


1938
Num-
ber of Tons
transits of cargo
292 1,667,795
2 10,096
2 13.113

55 254,567

24, 695
28 146,788
91 450,641
31 181,941
9 2,926
2 11,176


13 06,39,933
75 522,490
-"60 -""-217,168

1i55" 855,770
54 155,169


""2 " "" 1 5 , 2 8 0
31 206,645
495 2,860,814
2 1,953
5 23,151
1,406 7,642,111


Principal commodities shipped through Canal
(All figures in long tons)
Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1952 columns indicate
relative positions in those years
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC


Commodity


Mineral oils .....---. .
Coal and coke ....
Manufactures of iron and
Sugar
Sulphur .. . . .. .
Machinery
W heat .. . . . . .
Barley ------------.-.-
Phosphates ......
Automobiles and parts _
Raw Cotton . .. .
Soybeans and products


First Quarter-Fiscal Years


754
417
408
108
97
78
12
212
89
49
52


QUARTER


On the basis of net vessel tonnage, tolls
for ocean-going commercial traffic for the
first quarter of the present fiscal year
were 17 percent higher than for the cor-
responding period in fiscal year 1952,
according to statistics compiled by the
Management Division.
The actual number of transits, 1,677
for the first quarter of this fiscal year, was
11 percent higher than the number, 1,469,
for the first quarter of fiscal year 1952,
and about 12 percent over the figures for
the first quarter of 1938.
Traffic on the trade route between the
East Coast of the United States and Asia
showed the heaviest tonnage over the
main trade channels, with a 27 percent
gain over the first quarter of the past
fiscal year.
Intercoastal shipping increased slightly
over the previous fiscal year but was still
only a little over one-third of the traffic


during the first quarter of 1938.
increases are recorded in the


between Europe an
West Coast and
America, via the Ca
Two Trade
The only losses
routes were between
United States and
Central America. do


Other
traffic


d the United States
Europe to South
nal.
Routes Lose
in the major trade
the East Coast of the
the West Coast of
wn 18.7 percent from


a similar period last year, but still con-
siderably higher than in 1938, and that
between the East Coast of the United
States and Australasia, off 14 percent
from last year, but still slightly higher
than in a similar period in 1938.
Commercial traffic through the Panama
Canal was featured by new high records
in September for net tonnage-Panama
Canal measurement-and tolls.
In September, tolls amounted to
$2,635,989.46; the previous record,
$2,512,008.70 was set in March of this
year. Net tonnage, Canal measurement,
was 3,029,335 in September; the previous
high, 2,872,628, was also set last March.
Cargo carried from Atlantic to Pacific
was 6 percent higher during the first
quarter of this fiscal year than for the
corresponding period last year; the ton-
nage this year was 3,700,720, as compared
with 3,444,963 last year.
Oil - No. 1 Commodity
ff: ,..i.. 1 ^1 ^.:..* . . ., -^ .. a t 1V. I


FIRST


'-'


, , ,


; _- - � ,


J �-* �-


_ ,






THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November


7, 1952


21-Year-Old Mutual Benefit Association


(Continued from


page 2)


CANAL


into a reserve


and $1 is for operating expenses.
In addition to the President, Mr.
Medinger, who is serving his second one-
year term, the MBA officers are: Roy C.
Stockham, Superintendent of the Locks
Division, First Vice President; Thomas
K. Kelley, Administrative Assistant to
the Director, Industrial Bureau, Second
Vice President; Mr. Moore, Secretary;
and Edward B. Webster, Property and
Supply Assistant, Supply and Fiscal
Department at the Naval Station,
Rodman, Treasurer.

Tolls And Traffic Up In 1953 First Quarter

(Continued from page 19) cargo for the
first three months of this fiscal year is off
265,552 tons from the first quarter of 1952.
Ore Shipments Down
No. 1 commodity in the Pacific-Atlantic
flow this past quarter was lumber which


was i
1952.
second
a litt
during
drop
during


TRANSIT-COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT


First Quarter-Fiscal Year


Commercial vessels:
Ocean-going_ _ _-
*Small . .


Total comm


**U. S.


Government ves


Ocean-going . .
*Small ..........
Total commercial and U


*Vessels
* *Vessels
)s transit


n second place in the first quarter of
Ore shipments dropped into the
d place this past quarter, being only


le
kg
w
g


over half of the tonnage ca
the first quarter of 1952.
'as attributed to the steel s
the summer in the United St


On the Pacific-Atlantic trade
were shown in canned food
sugar, metals, bananas, dried fr


incr4
prod
it, C(


rried
This
trike
ates.
eases
ucts,
)ffee,


and fresh fruit.
Decreases, from the corresponding
quarter in 1952 fiscal year, were recorded
in lumber, ores, wheat, nitrate, refriger-
ated food products, mineral oils, iron, and
steel manufactures.
U. S. Is Leading Shipper
With 491 commercial vessels transiting


during the first quart'
the United States he
shipper. In second
flag ships, 320 for
Norwegian-registered
place, and Honduran
Unusual transits
were nine made by Ii
by vessels of Swiss r
an Iran-flag vessel.


running between Ne


er of this fiscal year,
ld the lead as main
place were British-
the quarter, while


ships were in third
in fourth.
during the quarter
rish-flag vessels, two
egistry, and one by
The Irish ships are
w York and Buena-


ventura carrying general cargo under
charter to the Coldemar Line.
During the first quarter of the present
fiscal year 4,962 more tons of cargo were
hnndld and t-rnnsfprrod at Canal Zonn


received .
forwarded ..


Transfer cargo received ...
Total incoming cargo handled
Rehandled cargo ..
Transfer cargo forwarded
Total cargo handled and trans-
ferred .-.-------------


ercial ------
sels:


S. Government.
* S. Government.,


Atlantic
to
Pacific

812
163
975

136
46
1,157


Pacific
to
Atlantic

865
161
1,026


70
60
1,156


Total


1,677
324
2,001


206
106
2,313


under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951,
d free.
CARGO HANDLED OVER PIERS
(In short tons)


First Quarter-Fiscal


Cristobal
73,823
9,689
83,822
167,334
2,909
100,085


270,328


Moving Days Starlting For Employees Assigned
To New Quarters In Ancon, Diablo Heights


(Continued from page 1) houses will be
assigned before they are completed.
In case anyone receiving an assignment
should decline it, the house will be reas-
signed to the next senior applicant as of
November 17. This will continue until
all assignments in this group have been
accepted.
Advised In Advance
Each of the prospective tenants will
be advised in advance of the anticipated
A.- .f , o ieononnan air +ha TT-miinor Tlivi-


Balboa
35,778
23,795
2,507
62,080
193
2,392

64,665


Year 1953


Total


109,601
33,484
86,329
229,414
3,102
102,477

334.993


1952

Total


1,469
301
1,770


198
85
2,053


1938

Total


1,406
211
1,617


0>==== o
Ias



*^h^"E,,...... .A
2-
, -o
*-

- - -
-y -===


Government-operated


Average
quarter,
1952


All piers
106,478
39,721
89,973
236,172
3,245
90,612


330,029


Average
quarter,
1938
All piers


87,968
9,388
138,386
235,742
1,584
136,127

373,453


United Fruit Co.-Good Canal Customer

(Continued from page 18) ships and 275
men were lost during the war. At least two
of these ships were well-known to the Isth-
mus: The SS Sixaola which was torpedoed
by a U-boat only a few hours out of Cris-
tobal, and the Tela, lost the next day in the
Yucatan channel.
The Tela's survivors were picked up by
another ship which was torpedoed the fol-
lowing night. Crews of both of these Fruit
Company ships were brought to the Canal
Zone and the United Fruit staff had to
scurry around to provide them with clothing
and other essential items.
The war days, of those days, are over
today. With the great surge of post-war
building United Fruit on its way to the most


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