Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Creation Date:
May 1952
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )
23584335 ( ALEPH )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
. -


of the Panama Canal Museum

CANAL a


Vol. 2, No. 10 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, MAY 2, 1952 5 cents


GREATEST


SHIFT


OF


HIGH


CANAL


PERSONNEL


SINCE


1907


SLATED


NEXT


FEW


WEEKS


Both Toi

Leave

During


3


Officials


organizationn


This


Month


More personnel changes as
a result of retirements or
changes of assignment will take
place in the immediate future
among top administrative offi-
cers of the Panama Canal
Company and Canal Zone Gov-
ernment than in any similar
period since April 1907. Those


FREQUENT CONFERENCES have been the rule during the past few years for Governor New-
comer and Lieutenant Governor Vogel. The picture above, taken in the Governor's office, is a familiar
pose as the Canal's top executives study problems of far-reaching consequences. No period in the Canal's
history since its opening in 1914 have been fraught with more vexing problems.


Studied


Consideration will be given by the
Board of Directors of the Panama Canal
Company to the removal of one of the
Panama Linn venseais frnm service. as a


Operations Under Study
Operations of the Panama Line have
been under study now for several months.
The sthdv was initiated hv Governor


changes took place when
eral new members of the
mian Canal Commission


office and Col. George
thals was appointed
charge of the construct
Topmost in the long list of'
are to leave the organization


Governor


Newcomer


,


Governor Herbert D. V
be the first time since
Canal organization was f
two highest officials have
ization at the same time.
Thure bureau directors
leave the service within


weeks.
W. Rice,
Dunlop,
Robert Mv


These ar
Health
Finance
1. Peach


nd
ogel
the
orn
lef
are


sev-
Isth-
took
Goe-
take


ion work.
officials who
shortly are
Lieutenant
1. This will
permanent
led that the
t the organ-
.to retire or


the next


e: Maj. Gen. Ge
Director; Willian
Director; and (
er, Marine Direct


few
eorge
nH.
apt.
or.


Panama


Line


Service


With

May !


Two


Board


Of
Ships

Meeting





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 2, 1952


record


Number


Of


Students


Graduating


From


Secondary


Schools


In


Canal


Zone


Caps andc
scholarship
more young
fore.


B
uati
Jun


Sgowns
will bi
Canal


stately symbols of
worn this year by
onians than ever be-


between May 31 when the first grad-
e steps up to receive his diploma, and
o 8 when the last recessional is played,
young men and women will have
nod robes and mortarboards to indi-
c to the world that they have passed
important educational milestone.
'his year's commencement ceremonies
mark more than one "first" or "big-


gest" in local graduations. Here are a
few:
The total number of graduates from the
four high schools and the two junior col-


leges i
larger
La
with 1
tional
gradu
The
uated
The
Junior
at con
the La


1 i


1 t -I


s larger than ever before, an1 iu
than last year;
Boca Occupational High School,
42 seniors, and Silver City Occupa-
High School, with 115, have more
rates than ever before; and
class of 1952 is the first to be grad-
from the La Boca Junior College.


graduation garb of their own manufacture.
For a number of years the Canal Zone


schools rented caps an
establishments which
sort of thing. But the
because of the time an
Several years ago
bought their own cap
small rental fee cha
takes care of the cost
ance on the garment


commence
necessary
When
uated fro
1949, the
own caps
gray pop1
year by


ements,
*


d gowns from States
specialize in that
process was clumsy
d distance involved.
the white schools
)s and gowns. The
urged each student
s of cleaning, insur-
its stored between


and replacements,


he first classes were to
m the local rate high s
students themselves m
and gowns from a fine
in. A few more are m
tailoring and home e


be grad-
chools in
ade their
grade of
ade each
economics


classes, as the number of graduates in-
creases. Diplomas for all the schools are
printed at the Printing Plant at Mount
Hope.
First Graduation In 1911


The number of this


550, is a v
both young
Canal Zone
first two gr
Stevens of
Johnson of
ment exerci
the night of


C,


year's


graduates,


ast difference from the two,
women, who received the first
high school diplomas. The
aduates, Blanche Marguerite
Gorgona and Maria Elise
Gatun, had their commence-
ses at the Gatun Clubhouse
June 30, 1911. The speaker


was Maurice Thatcher.


At that time there were 50 students in
the high school. The main school was
then at Gatun but, (See page 3)


40 upper classmen of the La Boca
College will receive their diplomas
mencement exercises to be held at
Boca theater the morning of May


31. Forty-eight students started with this
class; four have withdrawn and four have
still some courses to complete.
Commencement Schedule
A schedule of the commencement activ-
ities, with the schools listed alphabeti-
cally, showed that baccalaureate and grad-
uation exercises will extend from May 25
through June 8.
BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL, which has a sen-
ior class of 172, will hold its baccalaureate
June 1 at the Diablo Heights Theater.
Commencement exercises will take place
the evening of June 3 at the Balboa
theater.
The CANAL ZONE JUNIOR COLLEGE has
24 students in its graduating class, the
same number as in the first class of 1935.
Both its baccalaureate and commence-
ment ceremonies will be held at the
Diablo Theater, baccalaureate onlJune 1,
and commencement on the morning of
June 3.
CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL will hold both
haroallnuroaat and oradnantinn exercisesfor


GIRLS TAKE HONORS at Cristobal High School in the traditional pattern for local
graduating classes.
The Cristobal honor graduates-who will'receive their'diplomas June2'in the commencement
ceremony at the high school auditorium are, left to right: Ncel McGinn, Martha Graham, Nellie
Holgerson, Elena Lee, Jacqueline Boyle, Yolanda Diez, and Francisco Wong.


. . .
- .. -





May 2,1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Governor


Newcomer


The


Employees


Appears A

Employee


Last


Conference


When I arrived in the Canal Zone in May
1944 we were in the midst of a great war,
both in point of time and in point of geo-
graphical location.


No one who was here during


In his last Governor-Employee confer-
ence before his expected departure from
the Canal Zone, Governor F. K. New-
comer last month:
Attempted to dispel employee apprehen-
sion over coming administrative changes,
discussed civil defense at some length,
commented on the duties of a Comptroller
for the Panama Canal Company, and
touched briefly on a number of other sub-
jects, including housing, the Goethals
Memorial, school bus transportation, and
some health problems.
The first question was introduced by
Rufus Lovelady, President of Lodge 14
of the AFGE, who asked the Governor if
he could predict what the "future por-
tends" and point out that employees have
a "growing sense of apprehension as to


what is going to happen."
The Governor answered


will ever forget the steady
ships and carriers and
and transports, and sup
passed back and forth
through the Canal.


stream
cruiser
ply sh


The work which the men
and women in the Canal
Zone did in those busy
and important days has
been described, and rightly,
as a major contribution
toward the Allied victory.
After the end of the war


was


a lt


t-down in


those days
Sof battle-
s, tankers
ips which


* w *pB ^ il-r ^
* .
-- a
.
^^* -a jtu4- **


that rather indefinable
thing called morale, which
might also be called esprit.
That was true not only
here but in the United


States


that while


some recent developments had been
"completely unexpected as far as we here
are concerned," he was certain that there
was no need for apprehension. He added
that while he has only a casual acquaint-
ance with Brig. Gen. John S. Seybold,
nominated April 16 as the next Governor,
he is certain that the incoming Governor
"will have the interests of the Canal at
heart."
Discussing persistent rumors of a mass
turnover of officials, Governor Newcomer
summarized these- the resignation of the
Finance Director and the retirements of
the Health and Marine directors and
added that these "have nothing to do
with the situation or any reorganization."
Comptroller-Staff Position
The position of Comptroller which is
being established, the Governor said, will
create a staff position in which policies of
auditing and accounting will be made,
while the position of Finance Director
will be that of an operating head. Among
the Comptroller's duties will be evalua-
tion of the Company's physical assets and
formation of procedures by which the
budget can be set up annually.
During a somewhat lengthy general dis-
cussion on civil defense, the Governor


and in other


,If the world


At the same time


it became


necessary


to begin a long-delayed internal realignment
of functions of the Panama Canal. It so
happened that the preliminary steps of this
reorganization came as we were cutting our
force down from the war-end strength of
about 31,000 toward our present force of
some 18,000.
A period of reduction of force is not
easy, either for those required to do the
cutting down or those who are losing their
jobs.
In addition, the shipping slump which
followed the end of the war caused a drop
in our main business, that of putting the
ships through the Canal from one ocean to
another, and in the associated business


Record Number Of Students Graduating
From Secondary Schools In Canal Zone
(Continued from pjge 2) to accommodate a
small number of students on the Pacific
side, a branch high school for the fresh-
man year only had been opened in Ancon
the previous year.
The Gatun school, from which Miss
Stevens and Miss Johnson graduated in


1911, was not the first of the Canal
high schools. During the school


of repair and supply.
working in what was
Mechanical Division we


The C(ongress
that the Conm-


elf-sup-
stipu-
of the
e could


My associates and I
have found that the major-
ity of you have an under-
standing of the problems
with which we have had
to deal in these years of
change. That the transi-


tion hE
smoothly as it has is la
efforts and attitude.


as been made
rgly through y


This has been the most exacting and
the most interesting service of my career
and it is with regret that I must leave it.
I do so, however, with confidence that you
will give my successor your loyal and steady
support. You have a remarkable tradition
behind you and a future with great possi-
bilities ahead of you.
Mrs. Newcomer and I expect to depart
on May 9. Our future plans are uncertain.
One thing which is certain is that many,
many times in the years to come our thoughts
will turn to the Canal Zone and our asso-
ciates and friends of the past eight years.


7-7C


Governor


ing at the foot of the Administration
Building steps not far from the site of
the present Balboa elementary school. A
branch high school with two years of
courses continued to operate in Cristobal.
Meantime the number of graduates was
steadily increasing. There were two grad-
uates in 1911; five in 1912; seven min 1913;
nine in 1914; 11 in 1915; and 16 in 1916.
Mrs. Francis Feeney of Diablo has a
double distinction; she is the only member
a s.* 9- Lm -- -l-iw- - Il l -v ^v - I, r,.<- Lr wvq*


,-


Many
then


of the
called


re terminated


the bulk of those who remained were trans-
ferred to Cristobal. Coincidentally we
faced steadily rising costs.


A
Congr


little less than two years ago the
ess passed the law which created the
Panama Canal Company
and the Canal Zone Gor-


eminent.
stipulated


* pany must be s
porting. It also
lated what share
Company's expense
be borne by tolls.





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 2,


1952


Governor


Officially


After


Names


Rainbow


Vote


City


Residents


Overwhelming


rmr> .
< 4r .


and their young


son, Dickie, plan to sail


on the Panama liner lea
The appointment to the of
ant Governor is made by
subject to approval by
of the Army and no ann
been made as to Colonel V4
Captain Peacher is to
United States Navy at ti
and has received orders
temporary duty in New


. ,++


ving
fice of
'the (
the
ounces
)gel's s
retire
hie end


May 23.
Lieuten-
Governor
Secretary
ment has
successor.
from the
Sof June


to report for
York by June


23. He is to be succeeded as Marine
Director by Capt. Marvin J. West, now


MRS. ALFRED WILLIAMS, who lives in one of the new houses min Silver City, receives her
ballot from Rudolph Ranger, ninth grader in the Silver City Junior High School and member of Troop
12 of the International Boy Scouts. The Scouts handled the distribution and collection of ballots
by which the Atlantic side community voted for an official name for their town.
Mrs. Williams' next-door neighbor, Percy Antonio Samuels, Jrn, 5, looks on with interest as the
Scout explains the purpose of the voting.


The name of Silver City, including
Camp Coiner, will be changed to Rainbow
City.
By an overwhelming majority, resi-
dents of the area chose the most colorful
of six names offered for voting and
Governor Newcomer has issued a circular
officially designating the area Rainbow
City. The change in names was made
an~oobtr 1aif 1


they were distri
national Boy Sc
The voting fo
Zone's largest
sponsored by
REVIEW with


Internation
were distr
collected t
and Sailf.rd


al
ihb


bute
outr
rthe
civil
THE
the


Boy
ited A


d by the five Inter-
Troops.
name of the Canal
an community was
PANAMA CANAL
cooperation of the
Scouts. The votes
.nril 17 and were


he following Friday afternoon
nv mnrninTo'


Chief of the Navigation
Port Captain, Balboa. C
tio Lincoln, who is now on
Francisco as Operations C
Military Sea Transport Ser
assigned to duty with t]
Port Captain in Balboa.
General Rice To R
General Rice, who also
S. . .


Division
captain H
duty in
officerr of
vice, has t
he Canal


etire


is to retire


from active service this year, plans to
leave the Isthmus within about three
months. He expects an assignment to
duty in Washington until his retirement


at the
ment ha
Mr. I


end of
is been
)unlop


October. No
made as to his
plans to retire fi


announce-
successor.
rom Canal


service at the end of May. Since the
Finance Director is a general officer of
the Company his successor must be
elected by the Board of Directors.
Colonel Hesner will retire from the
Canal service early next month and his
successor has not been appointed.


Colonel Jacobs
-.. - n .. ---- .


will complete a three-
,:LA-UiL. rfL-.. : T,,.,-


Greatest Shift Of Top Canal Personnel
Since 1907 Slated In Few Weeks
(Continued from page 1) Brig. Gen.
John S. Seybold has been nominated by
President Truman as Governor and his
appointment, as this edition of THE
CANAL REVIEW went to press, was
awaiting confirmation by the Senate.
Governor and Mrs. Newcomer plan to
leave the Isthmus May 9 since he plans
to attend the next meeting of the Board
of Directors of the Panama Canal Com-
pany scheduled to be held this month in
Washington.
Lieutenant Governor Vogel has been
assigned to duty as Division Engineer
of the Corps of Engineers' Southwest
Division with headquarters in Dallas,
Tex. This division comprises Engineer
Districts in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas,
and New Mexico. He and Mrs. Vogel






May 2,1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


AND


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


OFF


THE


JOB


ACCIDENTS


Safety o
the I'nited
man's life
value than
on the Isth
day when
Chinaman
during the
Railroad."
This pro,
but is the
tion bv the


with the fin
business tha
ally increase
A\s compe
matter of
safety in o0
minimum.
studying wa
still further
the job, cau
"olfT-the-job
It can be


which keeps
unexpected
additional c
or another.
as well as
becoming t
companies t


n the job has progressed far in
States from that day when a
or limb was considered of less
the "off horse" of a team. Here
mus, it is even farther from that
it was said, without reason, "a
was buried under every cross-tie
building of the old Panama


gress
result
hartn


al r
t ace


* about
fe and
working


realization
idents are


easily,
educa-
g man,


by indtistry
expensive, a


ng the costs of production.
tition became keener, it was a
good management to promote
rder to keep these costs to a
Now industry and business are
ys and mans to cut these losses
by reducing time lost from
ised by their employees having
" accidents.
easily seen now that anything
an employee away from his job
y, is a loss of service and an
ost to the employer in one form
This of course, includes sickness
accidents. Therefore, it is also
he practice of the progressive
o provide health education and


periodic inspections, with hospitalization
when needed, for the employee aind his
family.
It might be asked, "Why include an em-
ployee's family in any off-the-job accident
and health preventitive measures?" This is
because it is being realized more and more
that accidents on the job can happen to a
valuable and usually careful employee, when
his mind is concerned with his family and


HONOR ROLL
Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
March


CIVIL


AFFAIRS


BUREAU


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEA
Community Services---------------
Industrial -------------------------
Civil Affairs.--------------------
Engineering and Construction .. .-
Health...... ...........---------------------------
Marine-------------------------
Railrnad and Terminals _ _


R


not oi nlls
to this wo
down in hi
cents loss
Early in
Canal the
value of
family, if i
accomplish
on down
enjoy prol
munity of
Since the
amply pr
largest fa


V
)r
Is


(ork. Even if no
"ed employee ln
production, that


to the comp
the constr
original phi
health for t
the digging o
hed. That a
to this day
)ably better
similar size
health prob
ovided for
ctor which


any.
action
liners
he em[
if the C
attitude
and wt
health
in the
lem ha
here,
keeps


from work can be classified u
of "off-the-job" accidents.
I underr this title accidents
three large subdivisions: Traffi
Other, where "Other" covers
such as recreation, shopping,
ployment. An employee and
considered "on the job" if th


working, and the children
There, their activities are be
and their safety is constant
sidered. The problem then
done to prevent accidents di
when the employee and his
their own.


It is evident that
either going somewhe
of recreation; or just
home while dinner is
is the picture of what
as presented by the
cil. Considering acci(
traffic accidents now
the biggest killer an
dents in the home ta
Among children fn
dental death in the h
40 percent, motor ve


h
re
p


accident
it only
is a doll


occurs
slow-
rs aind


of the Panama


recognize


d the


under the


occur under
c, Home, and
all activities
and self-em-
his family are
te wife is also
re in school.
ng supervi ed
yIv being con-
s what can be
ring the times
family are on


or his
tijoying
ering a


being prei
happens t
National S
dents in all
head the
d crippler
king second
om 1 to 14
ome leads
vehicles 34


other accidents 26 percent. The next
group, 14 to 19 years, is more on the r
experimenting with speed, thus motor
cles become over four times more danger
for them than for the younger group.
because this group can now have the
ily car, they spend less time at home
more time in various violent recreation
home accidents for this group drop to
place.
"Safety education," says the Kansas
Board of Health, "has become by far
greatest health need." The Board rea


movee
vehi-
erous
Also,
fam-
and


State
r our
iches


this coT
Student
1950-51
school c


iclusion
Accide
h In th
children


I a study
Report for
report, dea
the 5 to 19


all causes, are as
caused frim accide
various diseases, ;
Causes.


If this si
safety for
to their el'
a good exa
Reports
>such an ex
the opport
safety in
present a
safety tha
ginning to
Automo
oUs every
provemlent
mobile tal


statement
our chili
dters, whi
mple in
indicate
ample.
unity tc
play, and
far diffe
n shown
show u


of the
the scho
th rates
year ag


Kansas
ol year
among
e group


-: 48 pe
percent
percent


1 be made concerning
i, what is happening
would be setting them
ty?
t they are not setting


I
*r

p
P


in high
nl/ ove


Here
learn
around
-ent pi
above,
their
becomem
h les'
vays a
first


children a
safety in
d the hon
cture in 4
and they
elders.
ling more


correspo
nd with
place as


cause of accidents a few safet
might be helpful.
just plain common ordinary
respect for the rights of others,
way, can do more to prevent tra
than any other one thing we <


have all been r
us have in turi
"highway main
meeting, and y
Whenever we
for the complete
seems TIS occur
behind the steec
maybe we can
les, wanton, a
A gentleman
or excuse hims
a lady in his h


rude tf
building
gets be
revert
crowd
tic or o
sharply
light;
section
you on
living
you do
(Note


) otrner
g. But
hind th
back t
you fro
nI a cur
: in ah
steal t
, fail t
t and n
drayligh
?-ves,


for the


udely
been
ers,"
elding
unco\
e chan
vhen a


s a
whe
e wh
o th
m be
ve; p
lead
he ri
o sig
nany
ts ot


e, they
accident
are be-


the chief
reminders


tesy or
e high-
cidents
o. W'e


treated, and many of
rude to others in our
particularly in passing,
the right-of-way.
ver the reason or cause
ige in personality that
Sman (or woman) gets
heel of an auttomobile,
remedy for this need-


criminal
1 step a
before p\
. He \\
a part
n this s
eel of h
e "darl
hind; pr
)ush yo
of you


l daily slaughter.


of-way
stop s
s just
you.


we kn


ladies-this


Sat
udd
plain
The
cuss


group


en a door,
in front of
push or be
Sa public
entleman"
e seems to
He will
heavy traf-
Sroad; cut
the traffic
an inter-
enly; cuss
n scare the
n what do
him back.
is not ex-


clusively male).


Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Mao-Hours Worked
(Frequency Rale)


family, i,
some sort
round the


pared. This
o them then,
afety Coun-
age groups,
list as being
With acci-
d place.
years, acci-
the list with
percent and


MARCH 1952


i


I
^
I


, w
la


I
I


ow-v-ou


[


I





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 2,


1952


Quarters


For


Biggest,


Smallest


Families


Planned


In


Current


Building


Program


DETAIL PLAN
D _LCALS Y.A

BACHELOR APARTMENTS for the Canal's single men and women employees will be built accord-
ing to new floor plans. The sketch above gives an idea of the apartments which will be built 17 to an
apartment house, as part of the current quarters replacement program.


C^


-- j ^- i f 111111111111111 11 1 1 ^ 11111 1 h i - i ii~i iiiii iiiiii iiin ...* *


projected, would b
ground apartment ]
entrances. Each b
apartments, six to
occupying the spac
the ground floor.
A porch, of the o


e three-story, on-the-
hiouses, with three main
building would have 17
a floor, with a laundry
e of one apartment on
)pen balcony type run-


ing the full width of each


page 8)


U.S.ATE BACH. PMi.
NUMBER OF UNITS 35
AREA OF UMIT 275 *'
TOTAL UAIT AREA 9.,20 *'
SA BVicE AREA s,6o/ *'
TOTAl B) D0 iDEA 13.220 *'


NEW


COMPTROLLER


BACHELOR ROOMS, which are also to be provided in the long range housing program, will have
space for transients, temporary employees or those who do not care for an entire single apartment. This
architect's drawing gives an idea of the outside appearance of one of the rooming houses.


Provisions are being made in the cur-
rent housing program for the largest and


Several years ago a 12-family building
in Diablo Heights was converted to a


a fl -


gram, it is believed that adequate living
space can be provided for those families
who require large quarters.
And The Smallest Households
At the other end of the family scale
are the bachelors who want either small
apartments or single rooms.
The overall program for U. S.-rate
bachelor quarters is presently under
study. Some of the present bachelor
apartment buildings in good condition
will be retained. The new bachelor apart-
ments will be located in the Ancon-Balboa
area and in Margarita.
In addition to these bachelor apart-
ments, the program also includes the con-
struction of a number of bachelor rooming
houses, with some already in existence
and in good condition to be retained.
Many of the existing bachelor quarters,
either apartments or rooms, are consid-
ered to be inadequate and of substandard
design. These are in frame buildings of
temporary construction. A majority of
the new housing for bachelors, in the
U. S.-rate communities, will be of the
apartment type.
A preliminary sketch of a floor plan for
one of these apartments accompanies this
story.
17-Apartment Buildings
t The bachelor apartment buildings, as






May 2, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


PANAMA CANAL


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Printing Plant
Mount Hope, Canal Zone
F. K. NEWCOMER, Governor-President


VOGEL, Lieutenant Governor


E. C. LOMBARD, Executive Secretary
J. RUFus HARDY, Editor
ELEANOR H. MCILHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters containing inquiries, suggestions,
criticisms, or opinions of a general nature
will be welcomed. Those of sufficient interest
will be published but signatures will not be
used unless desired.


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$1.00 a


SINGLE COPIES-5 cents each
On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses,
Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after
publication date.
SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10cents each


BACK COPIES-10O


cents


On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.
Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to the Editor, THE
PANAMA CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights,
C.Z.


COMMUNITY CHEST MEETING

IS SCHEDULED FOR TONIGHT


THE ARCH of a lock control house frames the Voice of America's floating radio transmitter ship as
the vessel makes its way down the Canal to Balboa. The ship, an unusual feature of which was its radio
aerial supported by a baby blimp, remained in local waters for several weeks.


Camp Bierd has been a ghost settlement
since the end of February when the last of
its residents moved to new houses in Silver
City. In the near future, this housing area
will disappear completely. Its 44 remaining
buildings have been sold and will be de-
mlished.
Camp Bierd has housed local rate Canal
and Railroad employees since 1907, when
barracks were built there on the site of an
old magazine which was used to store brick.
Its name, which probably "just grew,
also probably came from \V. G. Bierd, gen-
eral manager for the Panama Railroad in
Colon at the time the original barracks were
built for laborers. Many of the buildings
later were converted to family quarters.


Young Joe which was tied up at Balboa
about two weeks for minor repairs.
The total crew of 22 included scientists
from Belgium, Germany, and France. From
the Canal Zone the Young Joe was to go
to the Perlas Islands for fishing, then back
to Panama before returning to Europe.


Two more large lots of scrap salvaged
by the Canal organization were sold in
April. Three successful bidders bought
one lot of 2,998 net tons of ferrous
scrap at a total purchase price of $81,-
143.39. A lot of 430,742 pounds of non-
ferrous scrap was sold to six other pur-
chasers for $96,004.97. The scrap will
* ..* -4 tTrT -^ A n--A_ t.*.**


OF CURRENT INTEREST


H.D.


.. _ 1




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 2,1952


'A NA MA


Goes


To


A


CANAL


Police


RE VIE W


Pistol


Shoot


The Canal Zone police have one big day
each year. The two Police Balls which are
annual affairs are night-time events, of
(course.
But the big daytime affair is the annual


pistol shoot which is held near the end of
the dry season, the location alternating
between Balboa and Cristobal.
This year the Cristobal police played
host (and impolitely won the first three


prizes) at Police Park near Brazos Brook.
A police photographer got a temporary
press card as a for-the-day representative
of THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW, and took
the pictures which illustrate this story.
Although this year's scores were well
below those of last year, and it may well
be many years before anyone can equal
Peter Proback's perfect score of 200 made
last year, the shooting was still good
enough to give any potential law-breakers
reason to stop and think before they
tangle with the police pistol experts.
Seventy police officers qualified by
making scores of 150 or better in the pre-
liminary firing. Forty-seven of the 70


participated in the shoot.
Tying for first prize


SOME WATCHED, like Maj. Pastor Ramcs, chief of the Colon police, center, and Lt. Col. K. K.
Kolster, Atlantic Sector Provost Marchal, right, who sat with Police District Commander, John M.
Fahnestock min the beautiful bohio, Rancho Ramcs.


were Floyd A.


Robinson, of the Cristobal Station, and
Cristobal License Examiner Paul S. Stew-
art. Their score was 183. Mr. Robinson,
however, was awarded first prize because
his score on the bobbing target was higher
than that of his opponent. Such settle-
ment of tie scores is provided for in the
rules for the shoot.
Close behind them was Grady B. Har-
dison, a winner of two previous shoots.
He turned in a final score of 181. He is
stationed at Margarita.
The range board for the shoot was made
up of Lt. Eugene Shipley, Sgt. Jack F.
Morris, and Policeman Henry DeRaps.
As at all police pistol shoots, the women
folks and small fry turned out by the


dozens.
kept an
men w4
shop.
After
well an
which


SOME WON, like Policeman Floyd A. Robinson who is being congratulated here by Jack Ward,
president of the Cristobal Gun Club. Mr. Ward presented the winner with the .38 S&W revolver. Maj.


Th
ieye
ere o


e women sat and talked and
on the youngsters while their
n the firing range or talking


Sit was all over, everyone ate,
d at length, of some very fine food
had been prepared by the best


cooks on the police force. Hubert W.
Jarman, a former policeman now with the
Industrial Bureau, lent his talent to sup-
ervise the beef barbecue.
Rivalry between the two police districts
is as high when it comes to turning out a
tasty meal as it is on the firing range.
I 4"" n*-ndt 4*i r vm lh I rtb n 4/inb i iil~l S






May 2,


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Employees Are Reminded
To Designate Beneficiary

A reminder that designation of bene-


ficiaries


by Company-Government em-


ployees may save their survivors both
time and money was made recently bv


James


Marshall,


of the Postal,


Customs and Immigration Division. He
is in charge of probate of estates of em-
ployees who die intestate.
An Executive Order provides that upon


the death of an emp


compensation


for all of his accumulated and current
leave shall be paid in a lump sum, upon


the establishment of
provided by law.


According


to an


a valid claim


amendment to


Canal Zone Code, approved August 10,
1949, this payment shall be made first


to the beneficiary,


or beneficiaries,


any, lawfully designated by the employee
under the retirement act applicable to
his service (Civil Service Retirement
Act), or to the estate if the employee


has not designated


a beneficiary.


Forms on which beneficiaries may be
designated are available at the Retire-


ment I
nations


Desk, I
made


personnel


Bureau.


Desig-


to September


1950, are no longer in effect.
Payment to the beneficiary is immedi-


Mr. Marshall


survivor,


through


SPayment
the estate,


necessarily delayed because of the time


needed


for probate.


In addition,


Public Administrator who handles such
estates is required to charge a fee for
his work.


Ten


ears


Ago


April


A lot of


Meats Get
New


meats


werein
The
tr h e
triimni'


Treatment poultry


are prepac


Stora


kaged


now that
before.
ages of


f,


lamnb,


Vyo buuv


(aXeSC


aIssetm-


smaller commissaries
tily lines.
The prepackaging


new machinetry-saws,


ers, conveyor


devices-at the Cold


Omnulissa rv


Prepackaging means this to customers:


1) well-trimmed


trim or waste,
for cooking;
2) cuts that
ni quality and


retail


that need


cuts, with no
"ss preparation


are pretty much the


appearance


day, anil tomorrow and
to the next;


i) savings
tomners who c


out of


a case already


same


yesterday, to-
In one package


cut, trinuned,


weighed, priced, and wrapped; and
4) meats that are handled under the


most sanitary


conditions.


Prepackaged meats (except for


products such


as dried beef,


from the time the-


plant locker
the stores.
Pliofilnm


leave


rooms


has a lot of


a
h


the co


sausage
re frozen
1 storage


give." It


grid-


PIlant of the


was


can be
)r tears.


chosen for the wrappings because it
pushed a long way before it breaks o


These meats


Pork-Pork chops, including loin, rib,


and end cut;


spare


pound rolls; smoked ham butts and
liver; ham hocks; skinless link sat


smoked
steaks;


and unsmoked; ham
pastrami; ham loaf; and


and knuckles.
Beef-Tenderloins;


hamburger


Third Locks and the work on them were


still important 10 years


On April 22


word came from Washington that the Pan
Construction and Materials Corporation
had submitted alow bid of $81,849,376 for
the new locks to be built at Miraflores and
Pedro Miguel.
Ten days earlier, Samuel Rosoff, head
of the Rosoff Panama Construction Com-
pany Inc., said that approximately $7,-
000,000 worth of equipment and a force
of about 3,000 men would be assembled
at Gatun to build the Atlantic side Third


steaks;


sliced driec


minute


slices;
tsages,


minute-
pigs' feet


I beef;
steaks;


liver; and cooked tongue.
Veal-Cutlets and chops, including loin
rib and shoulder; liver; tongue; and heart.
Lamb-Leg; rib; chops, loin and shoul-


Poultry-Chicken
thighs; wings; heart


Some are
ticated.
There's
comnies in
soup, ste\


trick ranges,
The clothes the little men at your house
wear all year round in the trop-
Meant for ics come from the spring and
Little Men summer lines of U. S. manufac-


Car care will be easier with a new No-


commissaries.
in a pall of


vour


ale in the
you put it
the water


chariot


sect ion '


t prepackaged
pliolim pack
ed pork, bee:
. and veal that


Now-


stores


You can try vour


at self-service meat


lima beans and ham; papaya from Costa


Rica;
good
canne
soon


can openers


and regular meat county rs of


IIow come


baked apples: and
Italians would like.


d(


on:


goo{ls


minestrone like


T hey


is possible because itl


re in some


now or are expected


cutters, slicers,


belts and automatic sealing


Mother's Day

For Mother's


givers,


gran


Division at Mount Hope.


dmamnas and


the first


lamour girls should know:


Day, Miss and be sold in tlhe
Mrs. will be in tlhe


60(-gauge


hose to


con emissaries


stores


They are 15 denier nylons-
and that's sheer -in summer shades. They
have more threads that are twisted liner


than the 51-gauge hose in the


That means they'd don
have more stretch and
and look smoother.


stores
iag as


Sl


before.
easily,


Other new wrinkles in h


that are pleated


in shopping minutes for cus-
an now pick their meat right


store.


when


Wh


e, wear better,

ose are nylons
buy them from


go away


a tit that


en you put them on, the
and the hose hug tight for


is made to flatter.


Lace and ruffles and net and nylon will
make mothers want more Mother's Days.


New slips and nightgowns in


of combinations you


have them mixed and matched in the kind


until you buy them in


give


stores


for course
Spring
will want


as gifts and want


stores.


ilf. __ __
graduates and young party girls
to see new teenage formats in the


are now prepackaged:


There are ballerina and long


ribs; bulk pork in one-


dresses.


fluffy and some are slightly sophis-

now an All-Purpose Broth that


a package ready


gravy,


seasoning,


to brew into
or stock.


Myro range and porcelain cleaner


the stores now because custo
it elsewhere told Housewares
it's a whee of a cleaner, espt


mers who used
Section people
ecially for elec-


breasts;


more in the
time of year


turers.
stores


That means there
now than at any o


sections.


1


\,


I!


/






THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 2,


1952


THE


ANAMA


CANAL


HONOR


ROLL


NEXT MIONI)AY mark
C('anal construction work by t
pany's rights and properties
htahijuarters building in Pat
and women x ho came to t 1w
to help on this great project
This honor roll of the ('
past two years. When the rnl


, 4sth anniversary of the beginning of the
united States when the French Canal Com-
e transferred at a simple ceremony at its
C (ity. Of the tens df thousands of men
mus from their homes in the United States
y 53 remain in active service.
enterprise has been cut in half within the
those veterans still in service was published


in the first issue of THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW in May 195(
stained 106 names.
Of the 53 still in service, the pictures of the nine who
service are published in this issue. The complete list of veteran
gives the dates they first began work on the Canal project.
ployees with unbroken service are indicated by capital letters an
*) are hdders of the famous Roosevelt Medal indicating two
of continuous construction service.


0, the


list con-


have unbroken
is shown below
Names of em-
d those marked
er more years


f



' :


1906
*Vincent G, Raymonll-December 16
1907
*Florence E. W\Villiams--March 1
1908


*Esbon S. MacSparran- Jutne
*Charles P. Morgan-October


*J. W\endell Greene-- lMay 5
Andrien Iark" Bouche- July
*John E. Ridge -October 20


I


ttARlRY


*George H. Cassell--January 29
*Raymonud B. \Ward-lJune 13
*Raymond A. Koperski- June 27
*William R. IHowe-July 1
1911
*ERNEST C. COTTON-February 20


KKK1 *K^K -fwS< KK K
*i ***^:. ***^ /'ii.. *.
'" It / *
^ :l '* ^ ':.*..
*a. -B.fa. /


A. COMLEY


ERNEST


C. COTTON


Lea 1
Herbe
*Charl
*GEOI
*Berna
Melvi
*Grego
*Berne


. Dugan-June 6
rt T. Souder-July 15
es Lester--August 18
RGE N. ENGELKE-September
rd \V. Mclntyre-September 28
lie L. Booz-October 2
r Gramlich-October 14
v J. Robinson-October 30


1912
Samuel J. Deavours-March 1
Gustaf R. Holmelin-March 13
*Gilbert B. Owen -March 22
Josephine R. Dennis-April 6
Harland V. Howard-April 22
*Robert W. Hutchings-April 26
*Fred Frank-June 1
George F. Miller-June 28
Alba D). Hutchings-August 19
Thomas J. Breheney- November 1
George C. Orr-December 5
ARTHUR MORGAN -December 16


(GEORGE


IENGELKE


LEON 1. HALLETT


Otto A. Sundquist-January 15
Bernard J. McDaid-February 19
Leonidas H. Morales H.-March 1
ADAM S. MILLER-April 14
David \V. Ellis-June 11
Arthur J. Farrell-June 28
Edward P. W\Valsh-July 1
Otto C. Frick -July 2
Robert I. Barnes-July 3
EMMETT ZEMER-July 10
HARRY A. COMLEY-July 14
Harold P. Bevington- August 16
Eric E. Forsman-November 4
WALTER W. WHITE--November
Bert G. Tydeman-November 22
- * Tr r--* I 1-V 4


a.





May 2,1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Governor


Newcomer"


Four- Y


ear


erm


Notable


For


Far


-Reaching


Changes


The tenth Governor of the Canal Zone
will end his four-year tour of duty on
May 19. The past four years have un-
doubtedly been marked with more far-
reaching changes than the term of any
of his predecessors in office.
Barely a month after Governor Francis
Koster Newcomer took the oath of office
on May 20, 1948, the United States
Congress approved an act to incorporate
the Panama Railroad Company under the
Government Corporation Control Act.
This was the beginning of various
legislative and administrative actions
which were climaxed last July 1 when the
Panama Railroad Company and The
Panama Canal operations were consoli-
dated into a Government-owned corpor-
ation-The Panama Canal Company-
and the governmental functions of The
Panama Canal became the Canal Zone
Government.
This consolidation and incorporation,
however, was preceded by an extensive
internal rearrangement of various of
the Canal activities, grouping like opera-
tions together under newly created
Bureaus which replaced the Departments
of earlier days.
This incorporation was in accordance
with a bill which became law September
26, 1950, with the effective date of the
change last July 1. The law created
the Panama Canal Company "for the
purpose of maintaining and operating the
Panama Canal and of conducting busi-
ness operations incident to such main-
tenance and operation and incident to
the civil government of the Canal Zone."
Company Must Sustain ItselfJ
This law required that the Company
be self-sustaining and that it must pay
the net cost of the Canal Zone Govern-
ment, under which were placed civil
governmental functions, including sani-
tation and public health.
The process of converting the compli-
cated financial structure from a system
of government accounting to a system
of corporate accounting is still in progress.
This involves setting up books such as
a private corporation keeps of its profits
and losses rather than the usual govern-
mental system of simnlv accounting for


the Board of Directors. Only one Board
meeting has been held in the Canal Zone.
Quarters Program Started
Aside from the reorganization and
incorporation, the single most important
project during Governor Newcomer's
term has been the inauguration and
development of a long-awaited and much-
needed housing replacement program.
When the program is finally completed
in fiscal year 1956, close to $S0,000,000
will have been spent to replace obsolete
and sub-standard quarters.
Also of major importance was the
return by the President of civilian con-
trol of the Canal Zone.
Other changes, of less importance but
of interest, which have been made during
the Governor's administration follow,
more or less chronologically:
A biweekly pay plan for U. S.-rate
employees was instituted; salaries were
paid by check and pay-roll procedure is
now being mechanized.
A five-day work week was adopted,
by administration action.
Pay rates for local-rate employees
were revised and two blanket increases
given workers on local-rate rolls. Liber-
alized leave regulations for local-rate
employees were approved.
The administration officially discarded
use of the terms "Gold" and "Silver."
Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps
were established at Balboa and Cristobal
High Schools.
The Schools Division opened a Junior
College at La Boca; it will graduate its
first class this month.


The Governor requested and received
authority to establish draft boards in
the Canal Zone.
Cash replaced the long-used coupon
books in all U. S.-rate commissaries.
Congress passed legislation, sponsored
and supported by the Canal administra-
tion, to merge the Canal Zone Retirement
Act with the Civil Service Retirement
Act. A bill to provide for a much im-


proved retirement plan for local-rate
employees was drafted but has not yet
been cleared for introduction into


Congress.


Tax ExtendedTo Zone
Income tax was extended to the
Zone, for U. S.-citizen employees.
administration successfully assist
obtaining repeal of the tax mea
retroactive feature.
The Army transferred to the


Canal
The
ed in


sure's


Canal


two large tracts of land, 300 acres, near
Corozal for the local-rate town of Car-
denas and 100 acres from the post of
Corozal for U. S.-rate housing.
The Third Locks town of Cocoli was
transferred to the Navy.
A small-scale study of Civilian Defense
requirements was started but was aban-
doned last August when Congress cut off
funds for its operation. *
And while all this was going on ship-
ping was increasing steadily to such an
extent that in March of this year a new
all-time record high of 613 ocean-going


commercial vessels of over 300 tons was
reached.
There were personnel changes of im-


portance,


i.,c page 20)


> M


1<





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 2,1952


Work


About


Corozal


250


Area


Family


No material delay is expected in the
Panama ('anal Co(mpany's overall hous-
ing program as a result of the abandon-
ment of the Summit townsite project
and the development of the Corozal area.
The Canal Zone Order revising the
Curundu Military Reservation and trans-
firring the land to the Canal Zone


Government has been


signed


Secretary of the Army. Approximately
100 acres have been transferred.
Plans for the new townsite develop-
ment are being completed in the Engineer-


ing Division and actual work on the
relocation of underground facilities and
other municipal work required has been
started by the Maintenance Division
forces. The latter work will be rushed
to take advantage of favorable weather
before heavy rains begin.
It is planned to have the area ready
for the construction of houses by the
next dry season.
The area to be transferred will provide
space for about 250 U. S.-rate apartments
plus a location for an elementary school.
No other community facilities, such as a
clubhouse or post office, are planned for
the area since it is located near similar
facilities in Diablo Heights and Balboa.
The exact number or type of apart-
ments to be built there will not be deter-
mined until after a complete town layout
has been prepared. Of course, not all of
the 100-odd acres will be readily usable.
The extent of grading required has not
been determined, although it is known
that it will be considerably less than
planned at Summit.


The work at the proposed Summit
townsite is to be abandoned after com-
pletion by the Maintenance Division of
that portion of the main storm sewer on
which work was already underway. This
work was well advanced when the ques-
tion of obtaining land nearer the Pacific
terminal was reopened early last month.
Sales Store To Be Island
The area transferred begins at Diablo
Crossing and includes the section known
as Diablo Terrace as far as the Albrook
Air Force Base boundary. The houses
at Diablo Terrace are to be demolished.


Will


Apartment


Rushed;

ts Planned


Collins says that the village of Corozal
was mentioned before the founding of the
new (and present) city of Panama. The
name means a field or plantation of corozo
palms -those palmtreesbearingoily nuts.
The village was almost certainly a stop
on an old trail between Panama City and
the Interior. In French days, an old road
more direct than the route of the present
Corozal-Panama road linked Corozal with
that section of Panama near the present
Tivoli crossing.
Corozal appears on a Panama Railroad
map dated 1857 but does not appear on
one issued four years earlier.
Although the name is shown on the
1857 railroad map, Corozal apparently
was not a scheduled railroad stop for some


years. A timetable reproduced


(See page


Two more trees of the Canal Zone, the
Malay Apple and the Cuipo, are among
those which even the most non-botani-
cally inclined can learn to identify.
The Malay Apple, Eugenia malaccensis,


is an Asiatic species planted occasionally
in this region. A row of the trees grow
along Amador Road.
The tree itself is one of the most attrac-
tive on the Canal Zone. It is not tall and
has a dense, rounded crown. The large
leaves are oblong-elliptic and shiny.
A distinguishing feature is its bright
crimson-purple flowers which are distinc-
tively beautiful. They are borne in clus-
ters along the branches and are most con-
spicuous when seen from a distance.
As the petals fall they form a colored
carpet on the ground beneath the trees.
The pear-shaped fruit is suffused with
red and its flavor is excellent. In Panama
it is called "marafion de curacao," a not
inappropriate name, since the fruit
strongly suggests, in shape and color, the


Completion Dates Given
On New Balboa Quarters
Construction of the 15 U. S.-rate fam-
ily units on Pyle Street and Morgan
Avenue in Balboa by the Maintenance
Division is now well advanced and the
first of the new houses is to be completed
about the second week in June. The
others are scheduled for completion by
the middle of August.
The houses there are of the composite
type similar to those in San Juan Place
in Ancon. There are 11 buildings in all,
of which four are duplexes.
Residents of Ridge Road in Balboa
Heights who recently received notice to
vacate their quarters for demolition will
be assigned the new houses in Balboa on
a seniority basis along with residents of
the old houses on Empire Street which
also are to be torn down this year. The
Ridge Road residents have been requested
to move by August 15, and those on Em-
pire Street by October 31.


cashew or "marafion."
The technical name of the Cuipo, one
of the mostremarkable trees of this region,
is Cavanillesia platanifolia.
An exceptionally fine specimen grows
at the end of the Red Tank causeway and
many more dot the hillsides of Panama
and the Canal Zone.
They are particularly conspicuous at
this season because of their red flowers.
Cuipo trees are stately, 69 to 100 feet
tall. They have small crowns and thick,
smooth, pale trunks, usually swollen at
the base.
The wood is white or yellowish, coarse,
soft, and extremely light. A cubic foot of
cuipo wood weighs only 6.25 pounds,
while balsa, which is ordinarily considered
one of the lightest of woods, weighs from


six to 22 pounds per cubic foot.
Cuipo wood is sometimes used as a sub-
stitute for balsa and was the material for
several light planes manufactured just
before the end of World War II.


-


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS





May 2,


1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Watch Repairing


Health Bureau's I

William Brown, whose job is Assistant
to the Health Director, is never at a
loss when anyone asks him the time of
d(lay. Usually he is wearing a wrist watch;
more often than not he is carrying a spare
in his watch pocket, and quite frequently
he can check the hour by a tiny wrist
watch produced from his shirt pocket.
Seldom are these the same watches two
davs in succession.
Not that Bill Brown is such a man of
property. The watches which he produces
belong to friends for whom he is doing a
watch repair job. The clocks on which he
also works have, of course, to stay at
home; he couldn't very well carry them
around but he thinks watches should be
worn or carried for a few days, for check-
ing.


When Bill Brown is having budget
trouble -and what administrative assist-
ant these days doesn't- he can forget it
completely in his watch repair hobby.
His center of operations is in a corner
of his bedroom on the second floor of a
big duplex overlooking Albrook Field. In
this corner is a dentist's cabinet with its
many shallow drawers, just right for fine
small tools. On top of the cabinet stands
a battered piggy bank.
Since watch repairing is a hobby, Bill
Brown makes no charge for his work.
But, if friends insist, he will accept a dol-
lar for a job. The dollars go into the
piggy bank ard when enough have been
piled up, Bill Brown buys another mi-
crometer, or some main springs, or a de-


vice to set watch crystals.
He got interested in repairing watches
by necessity. His bride, Ruth, gave him
a wrist watch as a gift not long after they
were married. It was a fine watch in
every respect but one--- it wouldn't run.
The Browns made the rounds of watch
repairmen but no one could fix it. Finally
Bill took the watch to pieces, found a
thread on the hair-spring, removed it and
from then on the watch kept fine time.
Ants Don't Help
Since then he has found some strange
things wrong with non-operating clocks
and watches. A perturbed owner brought
him a fine mantlepiece chime clock which
wouldn't chime. No wonder, Bill Brown
-e- ...... l. *_% I- _- .---- --- -..--. - _ -


Engrossing


ill


Brown


Hobby,

Reports


and hypnotism,'" uas playing at Zone club-
houses. Moving picture shows were becom-
ing increasingly popular. At Gorgona, one
night, 245 people attended the movies and
there was even a special show at one o'clock
in the morning after the night force stopped
work. Coffee and sandwiches were served
after this "owl" show.
Another popular performer of 40 years
ago was Captain Jack Crauford, described
as a "poet scout." He was reciting original
verse and humorous anecdotes around the
clubhouse circuit.


The University Club of the Isthmus of
Panama, 75 percent of whose members
were employees of the Isthmian Canal
Commission and the Panama Railroad,
gave a housewarming at its new clubhouse
near the Panama City sea wall. The
housewarming was a reception, with


WILLIAM BROWN


one occasion.


But his most frequent re-


quests other than the watch repair line
concern diamonds.
Settings for diamonds have a way of
getting bent, and girls with engagement
rings understandably don't want to go
around shedding diamonds. So they
bring their rings to Bill Brown and ask
him to tighten the metal which holds the
jewels in place. Bill does, the girls are
happy and sometimes a dollar goes into
the piggy bank.


Forty


Sears
April


With a few months over two years still
to go before the Canal was to be opened,
Canal planners were looking ahead. In
April, 40 years ago, a committee was
appointed to recommend sites for the per-
manent administrative headquarters and
offices of the Canal and a permanent set-
tlement for Canal employees nearby. The
Canal Record reported that the site of the
office headquarters would be "on Sosa
Hill or some other place nearby."
Ynmn'inva )Jt>ro LnnV; ,Oa -mefno nil n aimi


-ancing.
dancing.


One of the big steamshovels, which did
such yeoman work in excavating the Pan-
ama Canal, was damaged beyond repair late
in April by an unusual fire. The shovel, a
70-tonner numbered 107, was working on
excavation of the channel through what is
now Miraflores Lake. It rested on a "crib"
which was made up of five layers of railroad
ties.
Fire broke out at night in the depths of
the crib. Although the shovel was mostly
metal, the heat of the flames softened the six-
inch solid steel axle connecting the hind
wheels of the truck under the rear end so
that it bent to an angle of about 90 degrees.
The heat was most intense at the rear end
where the cribbing was higher but the babbitt
metal was melted out of every journal box
on the shovel.

Even without this shovel, however, ex-
cavation was moving faster and faster.
On one day the 44 shovels working in the
Pedro Miguel, Culebra, and Empire dis-
tricts excavated 68,505 cubic yards of
material, during a working day of eight
hours. This was a new high record for
daily excavation in the Cut.


Third

To


Ago


Beaux

Take P


Arts


lace


Bal

May


.1






THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


May 2,


1952


ANNIVERSARIES


Kmniployees who obser ed important anni-
\ Tr>ari(s during the month of April are listed
alphabet ically who\v. I'he number of years
iiclu de all ( o r iiinent services with the
(i aiil ol olher a4ecl,(es. Those with conil-


42 Years


Esbon S. MacSparran,
TEfrmI all ] divisionn.


35 Years
Fred J. Bauman, Supervisor, Sheetmetal
Shop, Maintenance I)ivision.
Dr.JesseL.Byrd, Mledical officerr Colon
I Health Office.
Walter C. Fedde. Chemist. Miraflores


Filtration


I'lant.


30 Years


Paul F. Karst, Postmaster, C
Rexford T. Ray, Guard, Alia
25 Years
Joseph B. Baker, Foreman,
)i\isioII.
20 Years


Thomas J. Breheney, Foreman.,
lll I )1 ision.


rundc.i
ic Locks.

1 dredgingg


)Dredg-


Elvira J. Byrne, Nurse, Gorgas Hospital.
Alcide R. Hauser, Policeman, Cristobal.
William R. Henter, Filtration Plant Op-
erator, Maintenance 1)ivision.
Anthony G. Lynn, Plant Supervisor,
Maintenance I)ivision.
Joseph F. Shea, Chauffeur, General Op-
erator and Craneman, Maintenance Dixvt-


SIon.
Roger C. Wri
Machinist, Motor


ght,


Automobile


Iran sportation


e Repair
division .


15 Years


Kelly, Locomotive


Railroad D)ivision.
*Frank McGuinness, Tra
Railroad D)ivision.
*Harvey D. Smith, Carpe
Maintenance Divisioiin.
George O. Tarflinger, Re


\ir ('onditioning M
I)ivision.
*Winton A. Webb
hiut-patient Service.
*William H. Will


Ilnance vision.


echani


C


Engineer,


in I )ispatcher,

enter Foreman,

frigeration and
, Commissary


, Pharmlacist,

, Tilesetter,


(Gotrgas

Mainte -


RETIREMENTS IN APRIL


lEmployees who retired at the end of April,
their birthplace, titles, length of service at
retirement, and their future addressesC are:


Anthony Fernandez, Sp
Marine Bunkering Section;


in:; Foreman.,


years,


months, 1 day; address uncertain.
Floyd W. Forrest, Virginia; Chief, Aids


Navigation l)ivision;


24 \ears 8


8 Frank J. Gerchow, Louiisian;
masler. M iraflores Locks: 39 vears..


montl hs,


Lock-
lmonths


THIS


MONTH'S


(Note. Representatives of organizations
listed below, or of others to be included in
this calendar, are asked to notify the Editor,
PANAMA CANAL REVIEW, by the 20th of each
month of any permanent changes in meet-
ing places, dates, or times.)


MAY
2nd- American Legion
7:30 p. m.
3rd Track Foremen N
& B Shops.
4th-VFW No. 3857. Vet


tobal, 9


a. m.


No. 6, Gamboa,


o. 2741

era ns


Balbloa


5th- Postal Employees No. 23160, Balbo
Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.
VFW No. 727, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m.
VFW No. 3822, Curundu Road, 7:30 p.n
Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Irnio
Church, 7 p. m.
Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.


American Legion


a


1.
I,
l,


No. 3, Gatun,


p. Im.
6th-Machinists No. 811, 13
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Teachers No. 228, Cristobal
3:30 p. nm.
Gamboa Civic Council,
Center, 7:30 p. m.
Gatun Civic Council, Gatu
7:30 1. in.


7th-VFW


I. nm.
9th Blacksmiths, No. 400, with Boiler-
makers 463 and 471, Margarita K. of
C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.
llth -Pipefitters, Margarita Clubhouse,
9:30 p. nm.
Sheetmetal Workers, No. 157, Balboa
Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m.
Plumbers, No. 606, Margarita K. of C.
Hall, 9:30 a. nm.
12th-Machinists, No. 699, Margarita K.
of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.


American Legion,


No. 1, Balboa, 7:30


p. in.
13th-Electrical Workers, No. 397, Wirz
Memorial, Balboa, 7:30 p. m.
VFW, No. 100, Old Boy Scout Building,


May


ngs


From Cristobal


Panama .
Cristobal_
Ancon ....-
Panama -
Cristobal _


Ancon
Panama .
Cristobal _


I A -K -


... .... May 2
May 9
-_May16
May23
.. ... . M ay 30
From New York
_May 7
..- May 14
.....May 21
u OC,. O


alboa Lodge

Sleigh School,

Community

n Clubhouse,


CALENDAR


rt Clayton,

No. 1, Bal-

lboa Lodge

Room, Ad-
n. rm.


---American Legion, No., Crstobal, 730
American Legion, No. 2, Cristobal, 7:30


p. imi.


18th-CLU-MTC--Margarita Clubhouse,
8:30 a. m.
19th-Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall,
7:30 p. m.


20


21


7, Gatun Ma-

Balboa Lodge

595, Margar-

>a Clubhouse,


1st-VFW, No.
Club, 9 a. inm.


Cristobal


garita K.

st Home,


Building,

Clayton,

lubbouse,


\Veterans

3, Gatun,

I, Margar-


VFW, No. 727, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m.
VFW, No.3822, Curundu Road, 7:30 p.m.
Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Union
Church, 7 p. m.
Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council,


Margarita Clubh
3rd-Gamboa Civic
ity Center, 7:30
Gatun Civic Cout
7:30 p. m.
Machinists, No. 8
7:30 p. m.
Teachers, No. 228,
3:30 p. m.
4th- VFW, 40, Wirzn
l rnont___nre...


house, 7:30 p. m.
SCouncil, Commun-
p. m.
icil, Gatun Clubhouse

11, Balboa Lodge Hall,

Cristobal High School,


Memorial,
M A^A7


:30 p. m.
?* rtvr-i I #


Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion, No. 7, Fo
7:30 p. m.
American Legion Auxiliary,
boa, 7:30 p. m.
14th-Carpenters, No. 913, Ba
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Pacific Civic Council, Board
ministrtion Buildin. 7:30


Electrical Workers, No. 67
sonic Temple, 7:30 p. m.
th-Machinists, No. 811,
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Operating Engineers, No.
ita K. of C. Hall, 7 p. m.
st-AFGE. No. 14. Balbc


7:30 p. m-
Teachers,
7 p. m.
American
Gatun, 7
22nd-Amer


No. 227, Balboa High School,

Legion Auxiliary, No. 3,
:30 p. m.
ican Legion Auxiliary, No.


No. 40, \Wirz Memorial,


*Thomas


6, Gamboa, 7:30 p. m.
26th- Machinists, No. 699, Mar
of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.
VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822 Po
7:30 p. m.
27th-Operating Engineers,
Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. in.
VFW, No. 100, Old Boy Scout
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion, No. 7, Fort
7:30 p. m.
28th-AFGE, No. 88, Margarita C
7:30 p. m.


(


American Legion Auxiliary, No. 2,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
29th-Governor-Employee Conference,
Board Room, Administration Building,
2 p. m.
JUNE


2nd-American Legion, No.
7:30 p. nm.
Postal Employees, No. 231(
ita K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p. Im.


!l


I


iv arc indicated with


Itonitu >er-\


Suplrinlendent,


*


1 ;
2


I


1.


)


0C





May 2,1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


(Continued


rorm page 14)


Canal


Review


3rd


Birthday


Francis E. Conover, from Commissary
Assistant to Supply distribution Assistant,
Contract and Inspection Division.
Constant W. Chase, Jr., from Electrical
Engineer to Chief, Construction and Main-
tenance Branch, Electrical D)ivision.
W. Houlton Esslinger, from Assistant


Chief


Hydrographer


to Chief


Hydrogra-


pher, Engineering Division.
Alvaro Cabal, from Cartographic Survey
Aid, Surveys Branch, to Civil Engineering
Draftsman, Engineering DI)ivision.
Zane Z. Zizz, from Powerhouse Operator
to Powerhouse Operator-Dispatcher, Elec-
trical Division.
HEALTH BUREAU


Marie V.


Weber, from


Nurse,


Gorgas


Hospital, to Chief Nurse, Palo


MARINE BUREAU


Victor L. Sanger,


Victor C. Melant,


from Junior Foreman, Ferry Service, to
Drill Runner, DI)redging Division.
Arthur J. McLean, Arthur J. Logan,
Clive W. Lewis, from pilot-in-training to
probationary pilot, Navigation Division.
Leonard S. Hart, Julius F. Dietz, An-
drew Stohrer, from probationary pilot to
pilot, Navigation Division.
John P. Sterritt, from Stevedore Fore-
man, Terminals Division, to Towboat Mas-
ter, Navigation Division.
Glenn R. McNall, from Guard, Pacific
Locks, to Junior Foreman, Ferry Service.
David W. Ellis, from Tractor-bulldozer


Operator to General
Division.


Operator,


Dredging


Claud M. Kreger, from Junior Foreman
to D[)rill Runner, Dredging Division.
John H. Droste, from Guard, Atlantic
Locks, to Pump Operator, Dredging Division.


Slaughter


S. Sharpensteen, Edward


O. Pike, from drill runner to blaster, Dredg-
ing Division.
Charles S. Joyner, Charles J. Connor,
from Drill Barge Blaster to Drill Barge
Mate, Dredging Division.
Edward H. Halsall, from Clerk, Housing
Division, to Chief, Locks Security Branch,
Locks Division.
Marion S. Herring, from Dipper Dredge
Engineer to Chief Towboat Engineer, Dredg-
ing Division.
Roy J. Wiley, from Wireman, Electrical
Division, to Lock Operator Wireman, Paci-
lic Locks.
William H. Walston, from Foreman to
Mate, Pipeline Suction Dredge, Dredging
Division.
PERSONNEL BUREAU
Mrs. June B. Young, from Clerk-sten-
ographer, Employment and Utilization,
l)ivision, to Secretary, Director's Office.
Mrs. Lots B. Grant, from Clerk-typist,
Personnel Records Division, to Clerk-typist,
Employment and Utilization Division.
Mrs. Zelda B. Glassburn, from Clerk-
typist to Personnel Clerk, Employment and
Utilization Division.
Billy Gene Mauly, from Recreation


Supervisor, Schools Dlivision,
Assistant, Personnel Bureau.


to Personnel


Observed


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW
ing out a birthday candle.


It is now


14 issues and


is blow-


z years


and this is its birthday edition.
With two years of publishing under its
belt, TiHE REVIEW has these words for
its widening public about the other parts
of its public and a review of its own facts
of life.
THE REVIEW was born May 5, 1950,
coming into an organization which was
then without journalistic chick or child.


THE REVIEW'S


sister,


the old


CANAL RECORD, had dwindled away to
shipping statistics, then died early in
World War II, choked by the ban on
publication of such facts and figures.
When THE REVIEW arrived, after about
a year aborning, it was dedicated by
Governor Newcomer, in the first of his


REVIEW messages
better understand
(Canal) problems."


to employees,


And from that time on,


our common

THE REVIEW


has been telling its readers about people,
places, plans, and interests that touch the
Canal and its employees.


Then
change,


in August,
and THE


1951, t
REVIEW


was a


became


a


monthly instead of a quarterly publication
Now 760 Subscribers
When the stories and pictures started
coming out by the month instead of by
quarters, the number of subscriptions
was only about 100.


Operation With Two Panama Line


Ships To Be Considered By Board


(Continued from


page 1)


consulting


This


Issue


By April 1952, the number of sub-
scribers had climbed to 760 people who


were scattered


States


through


in the United


4:3 of the 48


States.,


Costa Rica, Ecuador, Salvador


Honduras,


Puerto


Canada,
Jamaica,


Bolivia,


Canal Zone, and Panama.


Retail sa
houses and
monthly.


at Comnlissaries,


Hotels


THE REVIEW also


colleges,


average


Club-


over 5,000


goes to many librar-


industrial


organizations;


newspaper and magazine representatives;
government agencies in Washington and
elsewhere; Congressmen; shipping com-
panies and their representatives on the
Isthmus, in the United States and other


countries; the Suez Cana


; shipping pub-


locations; port authorities; banking con-


cerns; airlines;
Services; and
consulates.


THE REVIEW'S


branches of the


various


embassie


continuing


Armed
s and


invitation


to readers to write to the editor opinions
and suggestions has provided ideas which
later turned into stories and features in
the publication.


Many


other opinions and


comments


come to the editor in letters which accom-
pany requests for subscriptions. Most
subscription letters contain only favor-
able comment, coming, as they do from


people
their


who express


general


approval


with their


dollars


and desire


more of the same.


Retires


Soon


SerV-


ices for a general study of the Panama
Line operations.
The bids were not accepted and at the


Board's


meeting


committee composed
Vice-President of ti


Daniel E.


Taylor,


here in January


of W.


R. Pfizer,


he Company,


Board member and


President of the West India Fruit and


Steamship Company,


was appointed to


make a study of the Line's operation.


With





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


May 2, 1952


Work In Corozal Area Will Be Rushed;
About 250 Family Apartments Planned


Where Did He Get That Hat?Old-time


Canal Employee s Had


Em For


Years


'onai nud. frm page 12)
History of the Panama
in 1867, shows that th
by the two daily trains o
run from Panama to
Colon) was at Summit,
Panama City.
An old French map, d
"Canal buildings" and
house at Corozal. Ano
November 17, 1899, sho
a railroad station in the
ozal."


Much of the
was once own
grandfather of
and Service Dir
his family say
extended from a
of the Panama
vicinity of the
Corozal. Mr.
Hotel Central
1880, had cattle
land. Some of


ama City
jobs by ti
As rapi
oldtimers
converted
lies were
Corozal.
quarters
July 1 th
Ninety-ei
elor ouar


agriculture alone.
When this area became part of the
Canal Zone, the Schuber estate was even-
tually purchased by a land commission,
although the final adjudication of the
family's claim was not made until 1913
or 1914.
After the United States took over the
French Canal Company in 1904, Corozal
became a residence for many of the men
who worked at the Canal's headquarters
in Panama City. The first ICC "hotel,"
really a large bachelor quarters, was built
at Corozal and the men working in Pan-


went
rain.
dly as


in
Railroad, pr
e first stop
n the north
Aspinwall
10" miles


land in the Corozal area
ed by Henry Schuber,


Moore,
recalls
Schube
present
to the
River
who b


Supply
hearing
r estate
location
general
north of
uilt the


in Panama City about
Sand dairy farms on the
the rest was devoted to


back and forth to their


quarters could be built


recall that some of them were
boxcars-bachelors and fami-
moved from Panama City to
On January 1, 1908, 13 married
at Corozal were occupied; by
Le number had increased to 29.
ght American men were in bach-
ters and 470 laborers in the


European and West Indian messes.


Otis'
tinted
made
bound
(now
from


lated 1886, shows
an old powder-
ther map, dated
ws 24 houses and
"Village of Cor-


Ernest Alphonso Blades, who has been
an Isthmian for almost 47 years, does not


remember just when h
campaign hat.
The hat was a gift
J. H. K. Humphrey
Chief Quartermaster
1941, and it was a good
1941 that the hat chan
Ernest, as all the y
of the oldsters of P
Tank and Paraiso kn
his third Army Stets
gift of Fred DeV. Sil


ring the 1
er, he was
eers here.


9


himself du
serve office
the Engine
Ernest's
him as his
the three
in this sat


ERNEST


An ICC garden of some two-and-a-half
acres supplied the hotel and the towns-
people with fresh vegetables. Fifty street
lights were installed and Corozal had a
volunteer fire company.
First School In 1909
Late that year plans were made for the
first school, a two-room wooden building.
The following year the total population
had increased to 1,116-815 of these in
the labor camps.


A census
population
doubled in
the present
there were
American
1,071 men
others in
areas." Q
had been


uorgona.
Between 1914 and 1920 when, by Exec-
utive Order, Corozal became part of a
military reservation, detachments of En-
gineers, Signal Corps, Quartermaster
Corps, Field Artillery, and Cavalry were
stationed at Corozal at some time or
another.


-


five years, and
ce there of tro
120 soldiers at
employees or
living in labor c
what was descri


also
ops.
Coro
their
amps
ibed


disclosed
In 1914
zal, 1,127
families,
s, and 374
as "rural


larters for some of the families
moved in from Culebra and


A. BLADES


successfully too, his Pedro Miguel friends
say.
Ernest was born in St. Phillips, Barba-
dos, 70 years ago last November 18. He


land as a blacksmith's
out 1905 business was
as scarce. A recruiting
anama Canal organiza-
idos and Ernest signed
hundred other men, to
SZone.
m Barbados, he recalls,
transport which carried
600 other West Indians
cruited for the Canal
because of stops at other
ays.
)n Hotel Tivoli
b, when he landed here


21, 1905, was on the foun-
Hotel Tivoli. After that
the lumber yard and ma-
the Building Division and


then a short stint as a blacksmith's helper
in the Central Division at Empire.
In 1909 he was transferred to the Quar-
termaster's Department and moved back
to Ancon. For four years he worked as a
gardener around the big official quarters
near what is now the Ancon Courthouse.
Then he went to Corozal where he worked
again as a gardener, until Corozal became


Once Was Schuber Land


e got his first Army


from his old boss,
, former Assistant
who retired in June
i many years before
ged hands, or heads.
youngsters and most
'edro Miguel, Red
ow him, is wearing
on now. It was a
l who wore the hat
20's when. as a re-


Lewis B.
sector. He
that the
bout the
stadium
Cardenas
Schuber,


on active duty with


headgear is as much a part of
job of care-of-groundsman, in
communities, a job he has held
me area since 1918. And very


taken in 1914 showed that the
of Corozal had more than


worked on the isl
helper. Along ab
poor and work wa
team from the Pa
tion visited Barba
up, with several
come to the Canal
The voyage fro
was made in a big
between 500 and
who had been re
work. The trip, b
islands, took 10 d
Worked O
Ernest's first jo


on September
dations of the
came work in
chine shop of


J


1







May 2 1952


-.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


STATISTICS


CANAL


TRAFFIC


For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1939.


PACIFIC


ors as the
Isthmus o
Navigati
company


on February 17, 18
the young Victoria
land, and the long
enterprise began.
Its first charter
work concessions o
Republics of the w
tea, with Panama
port.
Together with
Packet Company,
mately connected
of land which tn
the company's be
enterprise.


Passengers werb ta
River by steamers of
which was the Atlanti
continued utip the Chi
arid across the remains
pack mule. The tran
four days and nights a
taking into account n
dental expenses-a far
one-half hour, $1.25 (


today.
Panama soon
portant section


gation Company's
The company pur
which is separated
high water and is c
strip of land at low
Here PSNC establ
drydocks, hospitals,
iron" where ships v


STEAM


oldest steamship company
f Panama go to the P'acific
n Company.
received its Royal charter


40,


three


Became Queenr
era of British s

granted it the
obtained from th
(est coast of Sou
as its northern


the Royal
PSNC ha
with the
ites the Ar
ginninlg as


n to th
Ie Royal
carrier.
res b\ s
r of the I
Isthmian
d cost $1
*als and
rv from t
v train)


developed int
of the Pacific


sphere i
chased I
from Tab
connected
tide.
ished wor
and the


years


after


Sof Eng-
;teamship

right to
e various
th Amner-
termin l


Mail Steam


inti-
neck
si lce
ship


e Chagres
Mail line,
Then they
mall boats
sthmus by
trip took
8, without
other inci-
he one and
journey of


operations.
) Island,
Island at
a narrow


houses
S"grid-
and re-


of the old
other ma-


kshops
famous


vere drydock


paired. There are still remn;
buildings, paddle steamers,
chinery on the island.
In 1866, in order to get a
water for its vessels, PSN(
small area on Taboga Island.
was unique in being the only
cern to have possession of


supply of fresh
C purchased a
The company
steamship con-
island territory


with monarchial rights.
Both PSNC and the Royal Mail Cornm-
pany subscribed capital to the Panama Rail-
road Company in the mid 1850's. Traffic
rapidly increased but the harmony between
railroad and shippers was not to last.
Argument with Railroad
In 1869 the Pacific Steam Navigation
Company complained to the Railroad that
the division of through rates was excessive
on traffic to and from Europe over the

* .; 7- *


*J^ ^.-
q 1- '- -f-- -r


as


A. F.
the Paci


HOWARD, whose
fie Steam Naviyati


years on the Atlantic side
rupted hy the camera in a b
MacDonald, standing, hea
department. Mr. Howard
the Isthmus. Mr. MacDoi
comer to the Isthmus-he
couple of years-compiled
companying history of
Isthmus. __
railroad.
The Railroad's Super
Colonel A. 1. Cent'


to discuss the
PSNC's west c
an agreement
were divided o
Atlantic carrie
and one-third
Directors of
ever, rejected t
Steam Naviga
shops and doc
Callao and est
Europe via thl
Although th
ated by PSNC
increased, the
coast of Sout.
trans-Isthmiar
coastal traffic


years of service
Company inclu


of the Isthmus, was inter-
rusiness talk with Michael
i of the PSNC passenger
is manager for PSNC on
nald, a comparative new-
has been here for only a
the material for the ac-
PSNC activities on the


-inte
er,


ndent at Panama,
went to Callao


question with George Petrie,
oast manager. They reached
whereby the through rates
n a basis of one-third for the
r, one-third for the Railroad,
for the Pacific carrier.
the Railroad Company, how-
his agreement and the Pacific
nation Company removed its
yards from Morro Island to
ablished a fast, direct line to
e Straits of Magellan.
e new direct service inaugur-
Sdid not diminish, but rather


coastal
h Ameri
i route


vices on
it did
I the de


and from Panama f
*f .i"^./
-..:1^
* \'^-
;. /-/, <-^ .
. /< '
. "<


ell away'



:4


NAVIGATION


COMPANY


OLDEST


c('(Ilsieral Iy as the
Europe improve ed.
Income frHmi the
dropped appreciably.


naugura
ts butin


I (
te,


it had become
in the world,
aggregating 12
equal to that
Navy at that
In 1877 I'PS
lishing the 0O
Kingdom to
Half a cent
was opened ti


direct
railr
PSN C


Af the nevc
such an <
the largest
with a to
7,700 tons
of the ei


HERE


service


frout


activities
ever, with
increased
at in 1874
{ company
steamers,


age


Thi tolnnU
tire U united


was


States


expanded further, estab-
t Line from the I'nited
ralia.
later the IPanama Canal
immerce and PSNC was


the first shipping companies
terway..
Move to Cristobal


In 1913
transferred
and later
Building (
Naxvigatio
tobal's "S
Betweci
Iecame on
tomners. \
call the fa
"O" class
the Orbita
two week.


the Ce
which
coffee,
to Eur
The


ntr
ar


the C


I from
)ccupie(
now ki
n Built
teamnsh
1 \V,,rl
e of th
Iany o(
miliar
mail st
which
s, and
al Amie
ri ked ii


cocoa,
ope ani
coast


45 wh
d Salh
ar's of
d the
ubtedl
- trans
In the


service
Canal
y setting
ts by a
meanti


agency business
tatives for such
Company. Holla
Furniiess-Withy
More than 75
which visit the
PSNC. Among


Atlant
Rynda
Ocean


imers as
Nieuwr
narch.


company


] ai
d th
1 ow
ding
ipj I
d \
e P1
if t-
buff


to utilize


's local offices were
a City to Cristobal
Mw Royal Mail Line
Sthe Pacific Steam
the heart of Cris-
"


I and 1I
SCanal's
ving her
els of tht


I
e
e


earners, like the Ord
transited the Can
the small coastal v
rican and Caletero
n Cristobal with
I cotton for trans-s
he United States.
rvice lasted from
coastal steamers,
ere sold. During
the two vessels ea
about twice a mo
g a record for th
ny single craft.
mne PSNC had ent


and had b
lines as Cu
nd-America
Line. and


percent
Canal
these


, PSNC
lest cus-
will re-
popular
ufia and
al every
essels in
service
loads of
hipment

1915 to
A caj utla
their 30
;h trans-
nth, un-
ose days


ere


d the


become represen-
nard Steamship
Line, Port Line,
many others.
the cruise liners
are handled by


are such


the Caronia
. Amsterdam,


s trans-
rela nia,
he new


Losses in World War II


W\Vith the outbreak
P'SNC became joint as
of War Transport and
ber Control. A few
disappeared: the 15,00
pedoed and sunk off
cargo vessel La Paz w
ida, and the MV Lagu
but managed to limp


of World War II,
zents for the Ministry
local agents for Tim-
familiar PSNC hulls
0-ton Oropcsa was tor-
northern Ireland,the
as torpedoed off Flor-
na was also torpedoed
from the Caribbean


,


1


i
f
c


--*


to





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 2,1952


U.S.


Registry


Hold

For


fmin n
I it
f'i.ii r
tt-I 1
Th.
traf!^i
tI,
I)lSV\ 4'
Arll


dt

U>
4


Ships


Top Position

Third Quarter


of I sited States- registry (o)-
aet U Ihe L rte-t nluinlbr of transIpit
third airt er thlie Iical year.
i he ree month-t tirtic ha\e
eh 'a'-rd.


t>, rci nni/ II '([
(In (]l -I ri ,:
urhin reei-t iei
hitii 1h I niti


iplace-, in !re(quency (i
unchanged from the I two
British, Norwegian a d(
*-, in that t States hip. rem

in titr plar'', in both tranits and cargo
carrta& I.bth htiurle for 1r .S-flag lhips
\\'re ll-s I tII tiird (jIuartlr than ii Ih'
I\wo |)re\ in!!s (|i[.irler,, ot Ihi.- lial yeal',
I htrinQ t lh Ilhrre nio1ths of Ja hnury.,
February ani Ma1rch, 494 1". S.-regitered
>,hip?, ratrr\h u 3, 144.4'h) tons ot (uargo,
Irans l'd thlie Canal.
1 )urii thle secoridi (l)Iairttr there \\ere
535 I S.-reigstered vessels, with 3,400,570{
toi< of cargo and in the first qutiarter 53.4
1. S. ship with 3.699,405 tons of cargo).
lritish slhi!ppilg, which carried 2.096,48)
o15s du(rinll the jusat quarter in 340 ve--el.,
W tiulp. In the second quarter there \vwere
207 lriltish \s^Bels anld il t ie first 286.
Norwegian shipping, in third plae
1 Iroughout this liecal x-ear, hadl 222 shins


in the third
175 im the
1 i 11 4e f *
Iered 107 i
second anud
The first
9,220 tons
pst .juartt
transit- l
tWO andt 4
Switzerlandd


quart
first.
n the
101 ini
Irania
of car
r. I
exico


er, 210 in the second
Sondtraili vessels in
third quarter, 115 in
the first.
ll ship this year carrt
go, transited during
1its15 was thte sole Iran
\was second( Itwest \\


nd
the l
ti-
the


Siisd Rica. (irillaii, Pter,,
and \ enezuela were tiedt with


three apiece.


Governor Newcomer Appears At His Last
Employee Conference

('ninned from page 3} of failure to
increase rentals was directed at the mili-
tary services.


In ans
Wagner,
Newcom
already
against
preparat
new Cor


wer to two q
CLU-MTC
er said that,
done at Si
Government
ion, and 2)
ozal housing


a minimum.
Attending


CANAL


questions from Walter
president, Governor
, 1) the cost of work
uimmit was charged
funds, as is all site
that grading at the
site will be held to


the conference


TRANSITS


Commercial vessels
Ocean-going _
*Small -- -
Total, coin
**U. S. (lO ;vernmen
Ocean-going -
*Small .._..
Total coninercial al


were:


Governor, Lieutenant Governor Herbert
D. Vogel, Edward A. Doolan, Personnel
Director, and Forrest G. Dunsmoor, Ex-
ecutive Assistant to the Governor, for the
Administration.
Walter Wagner, E. W. Hatchett, J. J.
Tobin, Carl J. Hoffmeyer, and Owen J.
Corrigan, CLU-MTC; Pat Coakley, a vis-
itor; Margaret Rennie, Russell Hileman,
M. J. Goodin, and Raymond Ralph, Civic
Councils; Daniel P. Kiley, Pacific Locks;
H. J. Chase and Rufus Lovelady, AFGE;
Robert C. Daniel, Railway Conductors;
Andrew Lieberman, Marine Engineers;
James Ahearn, Plumbers; and William S.
McKee, Machinists.


U. S.


GOVERNMENT


Third Quarter-Fiscal Year
1952 1951 1938
Atlantic Pa cif ic
to to I total lotal Total
Pacific \ Atlantic

_ 809 833 1,642 1,370 1,386
208 197 405 264 219
mercial ... 1,017 1.030 2.047 1,634 1,605
t vessels:
S126 96 222...........
71 41 112
nd \. .S. Government 1,214 1,167 2,381


* Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.


** Vessels on which tolls are credited.
ships transited free.


Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated


ine progress which
civil defense plans for
civilian communities
within the near future
the General Committee
Charles W. Hammon
mittee President, said
would be called before t.
The Civic Council


the civil defense
air raid alert the nig
30. At a meeting
at Balboa Heights
agreed to begin a
'fr+nrrnth in c,r-,h ,,ii


pict
ht
the
th(
sur
.t4> l1


Report


Plans


s been made in


ma


the Canal Zone's
will be reported
at a meeting of
of Civic Councils.
id, General Corn-
that the meeting
he middle of May.
became active in
ure following an
of Sunday, March
following Friday
e Council leaders
vey of volunteer
1fiih TP *> Tfrf l ,f T,


TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES
The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:
Third Quarter, Fiscal Year


United States Intercoastal .-- ...---.----
East Coast of U. S. and South America - -
East Coast of 1'. S. and Central America -
East Coast of U. S. and Far East- .-
11. S./Canada East Coast and Australasia__


Europe and W\est Coast of l '. S./Canada
Europe and South America ._
Ptin1irnna ",n A11it rs'jl] i jn


1952
130
434
131
219
51
189
104
107


1951
126
305
--- I<-
101
196
27
192
79
70


1938
264
145
30
142
39
271
134
6.


COMMERCIAL AND


Councils


Civil


Defense


1 1 1


I


I
t





May 2,1952


THEfPANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Traffic


And


olls


Reach


All-time


Peak


The increase in commercial shipping
through the Panama Canal, which began
last September, climaxed during the
end of the last quarter with a new all-
time record for the number of transits,
cargo and Panama Canal net tonnage and
the amount of tolls collected.
The new record was 613 commercial
vessels of over 300 tons, set in March.
Cargo tonnage totaled 3,114,989 tons,
Panama Canal net tonnage was 2,872,628
tons and tolls collected were $2,512,008.70
for the month.
The previous high of 597 commercial
ships of more than 300 tons was set in
January 1929. During that same month
the previous tolls record $2,501,949.64-
was set.
The past quarter began with a slight
drop in shipping from the end of the
previous quarter. In December, 550
commercial vessels were put through the
Canal.
At the beginning of the quarter, Janu-
ary, this figure dropped to 522 and de-
clined still farther to 507 in February.
Tolls were also lower in January and
February than they had been in December
But the figure of 613 set in March and


the record am
entire quarter
monthly was 54
amount of tolls
The number
been over 500C
September but
first time, in MIV
Gran


(


Is, pulled the
b the average


7 and the average monthly
was over $2,234,000.
of commercial transits has
Each month since last
Sent over 600, for the
[arch.
d Totals Is 2,381


In addition to the 1,642 large commer-
cial vessels which transited during the
quarter, there were 405 craft of less than
300 tons, and 334 U. S. Government
vessels, to make a grand total for the
quarter of 2,381.
There was a marked increase in the
amount of oil carried through the Canal
by tankers in the Atlantic-Pacific trade,
the figure this past quarter for this com-
modity being 838,471 tons as compared


to 501,657 tons
the past fiscal
shipments from
Ports were up.
the number twc
concluded with


for the
year.
the At
This
spot in
a total


as against 410,689
quarter and 377,347 fi
quarter of the past fi


or t
sca


third
Coal
lantic
comm
the q
of 58
)r th
he cor
1l yeai
.. S


quarter of
and coke
to Pacific
odity took
quarter just
7,976 tons,
e previous
responding
r.
jS *


HEADQUARTERS of the Pacific Steam Navigation Company are in this handsome three-story
building, with penthouse apartment, directly opposite the Cristobal postoffice. Although the build-
ing's original name, Royal Mail, still appears on the facade, it is officially known as the Pacific Steam
Navigation building.


three months of the third quarter ship-
ments of this commodity totaled 91,682
tons, as against 78,652 tons for the third
quarter of 1951.
As it has been for some time, mostly
because of banana shipments, the largest
number of ships using the canal were on
the trade route between the east coast
of the United States and the west coast
of South America. This number, 434
for the past quarter, was up appreciably


from the two previous quar
The next most frequently;
route was that between Ei
U. S. Canadian west coast.
traffic, 130 ships for the
ended, remained close to
the previous two quarter
This trade, however, is
lower than for 1938.


MONTHLY


ters this year.
y used trade
rope and the
Intercoastal
quarter just
the figure for
rs this year.
considerably


Pacific Steam Navigation is Oldest Here


C(Conltnued from page 17; to t
Zone. They make the riun in 12 dt
These three ships have been s
that PSNC has placed ordfcr for t
vessels of the same type. The a
three will soon be in service.
The Reina del Parifico. coinplet
ted, rejoined the service in 1949 a
a link between the I united Kingdom
Spain, Bermuda, the Bl3ahamas,
Jamaica, the Canal Zone and por
South American west coast.
The present local business act


PSNC
who h,
years.
after t
Hei
men, l
branch
by a k
dian e
with P


COMMERCIAL


at
as
H
he


TRAFFIC AND TOLLS


he Canal
ays.
) popular
three more
additional
ely reit-
nd is now
i, France,
Havana,
ts on the
i lies of


Transits


Month


(Inii thou


sands of dollars)


re handled by Arthur F. Howard,
been in the Canal Zone for over 23
e became manager January 1, 1951
retirement of Alan N. Dodd.
assisted by a group of young English-
of whom have served with some
f the British military service, and
I1 staff of Panamanian and WVest In-
ilovees. Some of these have been
\C for over 40 years.


Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


'~ ~~ <


*' *<." W


-, f


.


f(





20

NEW


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


SUPERINTENDENT


May 2,1952


Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All figures in long tons)
Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1949 columns indicate
relative positions in those years
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC


Commodity


*4t'


-/


EDWARD R. JAPS became Superintendent of
Storehouses April 27, succeeding J. F. Prager, who
retired during the month and is now en route to his
new home in California. Mr. Japs has been with
the Panama Canal organization since 1917 when ne
went to work as a foreman in the Building Division.
He has been with the Division of Storehouses since


Mineral oils .
Coal and coke_
Manufactures of
Phosphates ..
Paper and paper
Machinery .


iron and
products


Automobiles and access
Cement .---.
Tinplate .. .. .. .. .
Soybeans and products.
Sulphur ....
Raw Cotton ..
Sugar a r.. .. .
Chemicals, unclassified
Ammonium compounds
All others


Total ----------------


Third Quarter, Fiscal Year
1952 1951
838,471 501,657 (1)
587,976 377,347 (3)
448,629 388,345 (2)
201,966 128,577 (4)
116,138 79,796 (5)
86,562 61,629 (11)
85,664 73,920 (10)
79,497 67,196 (15)
73,452 44,723 (13)
72,195 120,564 (8)
70,642 49,543 (9)
62,507 87,922 (6)
58,836 43,521 (7)
49,960 31,898 (16)
39,412 23,168 (14)
925,564 828,909
3,797,471 2,908,715

_CIFIC TO ATLANTIC


1938


ta.'
-- -


0' -11'


0i -
I _ _-


2,049,654


Governor Newcomer's Four-Year Term
Notable For Far-Reaching Changes

(Continued from page 11 a few ranking
officials occupy the same positions in
1952 as m 1948. Retirements and
reassignments were responsible for the
change and the creation of new bureaus
brought new officials into office.
Employee Relations Improved
To better employee relations, Governor
Newcomer began monthly "shirtsleeve
conferences" which are just as informal
as their nickname-they are known,
officially, as Governor-Employee Con-
ferences. At these meetings representa-
tives of labor groups and Civic Councils
discuss matters of overall interest.
The Governor has held frequent
round table discussions with labor groups,
in addition to the monthly meetings.
In May 1950 he conferred for several
days with national and local leaders of
the American Federation of Labor.
Another step toward betterment of
employee relations was the institution
of THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW. Its
first issue two years ago announced that
its primary objective was "giving all
employees a better understanding of
problems affecting any considerable
number."


Commodity


Ores, various ........
Lumber ------------
Wheat --------------
Nitrate--- ----------
Canned food products-
Bananas ............
Sugar .. .. .. ..
Metals, various --.--
Refrigerated food prod
cept fresh fruit) --
Mineral oils ..
Iron and steel manufact
Wool ------.-------
Coffee ... .
Copra-- --.-----
Dried fruit----------
All others ---------


Total -


Third Quarter, Fiscal Year


1952
825,352
733,110
583,416
358,579
312.537
183,901
181,890
158,633
156,751
110,043
91,682
78,839
77,565
63,830
61,847
660,538
4,573,793


240,622 (7)
140,269 (8)
128,626 (10)
95,729 (3)
78,652 (14)
63,299 (13)
63,838 (12)
45,670 (11)
22,124 (19)
679,069
4,575,266


542,936
632,901
267,904
530,861
220,124
20,076
299,404
165,473


4,313,123


Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels


Nationality



Brazilian-------
British---------
Chilean--------
Chinese--------
Colombian-----
Costa Rican----
Cuban-- ..-------
Danish--------
lv .- - ,- rt. b


Third Quarter-Fiscal Year


Num-
ber of
transits

340
15


ALL1I


Tons
of cargo

2,096,489
62,259
77,789
31,021
9,217
234,802
J RnnR


Num-
ber of
transits


Tons
of cargo


1,682,785
72,161
18,490
15,927
9,400
177,813
90 A71


Num-
ber of
transits

348~
3


2
56


Tons
of cargo


1,626,62
10,01



161,73




Full Text

PAGE 1

(S
PAGE 2

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2," 1952 Record Number Of Students Graduating From Secondary Schools In Canal Zone Caps and gowns stately symbols of scholarship— will be worn this year by more young Canal Zonians than ever before. Between May 3J when the first graduate steps up to receive his diploma, and June 8 when the last recessional is played, 550 young men and women will have donned robes and mortarboards to indicate to the world that they have passed an important educational milestone. This year's commencement ceremonies will mark more than one "first" or "biggest" in local graduations. Here are a few: The total number of graduates from the four high schools and the two junior colleges is larger than ever before, and 140 larger than last year; La Boca Occupational High School, with 142 seniors, and Silver City Occupational High School, with 115, have more graduates than ever before; and The class of 1952 is the first to be graduated from the La Boca Junior College. The 40 upper classmen of the La Boca Junior College will receive their diplomas at commencement exercises to be held at the La Boca theater the morning of May 31. Forty-eight students started with this class; four have withdrawn and four have still some courses to complete. Commencement Schedule A schedule of the commencement activities, with the schools listed alphabetically, showed that baccalaureate and graduation exercises will extend from May 25 through June 8. Balboa High School, which has a senior class of 172, will hold its baccalaureate June 1 at the Diablo Heights Theater. Commencement exercises will take place the evening of June 3 at the Balboa theater. The Canal Zone Junior College has 24 students in its graduating class, the same number as in the first class of 1935. Both its baccalaureate and commencement ceremonies will be held at the Diablo Theater, baccalaureate onUune 1, and commencement on the morning of June 3. Cristobal High School will hold both baccalaureate and graduation exercises for its 57 seniors in the school auditorium. Baccalaureate will be at 5 o'clock in the afternoon of June 1, commencement at 8 o'clock the following evening. La Boca Occupational High School and La Boca Junior College will hold joint baccalaureate exercises at 10 o'clock in the morning of May 25 at the La Boca Theater. The Junior College commencement will take place on May 31 and the High School commencement on June 1. Both will be held in the La Boca Theater. Silver City OccupationalHighSchool will have baccalaureate services at the Camp Bierd Clubhouse on June 1 and commencement at the same place on June 8. As has been tradition for many years, the graduates will wear caps and gowns of gray rather than the black used for four-year colleges or the white used in some States high schools. Some of the graduates in the local rate schools, if they have ever taken tailoring or home economics, may well be wearing graduation garb of their own manufacture. For a number of years the Canal Zone schools rented caps and gowns from States establishments which specialize in that sort of thing. But the process was clumsy because of the time and distance involved. Several years ago the white schools bought their own caps and gowns. The small rental fee charged each student takes care of the costs of cleaning, insurance on the garments stored between commencements, and replacements, as necessary. When the first classes were to be graduated from the local rate high schools in 1949, the students themselves made their own caps and gowns from a fine grade of gray poplin. A few more are made each year by tailoring and home economics classes, as the number of graduates increases. Diplomas for all the schools are printed at the Printing Plant at Mount Hope. First Graduation In 1911 The number of this year's graduates, 550, is a vast difference from the two, both young women, who received the first Canal Zone high school diplomas. The first two graduates, Blanche Marguerite Stevens of Gorgona and Maria Elise Johnson of Gatun, had their commencement exercises at the Gatun Clubhouse the night of June 30, 1911. The speaker was Maurice Thatcher. At that time there were 50 students in the high school. The main school was then at Gatun but, (See page .?> O G GIRLS TAKE HONORS at Cristobal High School in the traditional pattern for local graduating classes. The Cristobal honor graduates'who wilPreceive their'diplomas June]2"in the commencement ceremony at the high school auditorium are, left to right: Ncel McGinn, Martha Graham, Nellie Holgerson, Elena Lee, Jacqueline Boyle, Yolanda Diez, and Francisco Wong. BOYS OUTNUMBER C.mLS among the honor graduates in Balboa High School's Class of 1952, an unusual occurrence in Canal Zone schools. The honor students will appear at the June .'i commencement exercises with white, instead of gray, tassels on their mortarboards. They are, front row, left to right: Carmen Man, Joyce Chenalloy, Coila Goodin, Edith Beauchamp, Sally Ackerman, Virginia Selby, Joan Baron, Heliana Filos, and Minerva Angulo. Standing, left to right: Michael McNevin, Ramon Paredes, Richard Abbott, Mark Schulz, Irwin Frank, Fred Lee, Hector Miranda, David Mcllhenny, Jan Broderick, William Elton, and Ray Davidson. Two of this year's honor graduates are not in the group above. They are Lambert Baxter, who finished school in February and who is working, and Leo Romero, who also finished in February and is now a student at the University of Texas.

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May 2,1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Governor Newcomer Appears At His Last Employee Conference In his last Governor-Employee conference before his expected departure from the Canal Zone, Governor F. K. Newcomer last month: Attempted to dispel employee apprehension over coming administrative changes, discussed civil defense at some length, commented on the duties of a Comptroller for the Panama Canal Company, and touched briefly on a number of other subjects, including housing, the Goethals Memorial, school bus transportation, and some health problems. The first question was introduced by Rufus Lovelady, President of Lodge 14 of the AFGE, who asked the Governor if he could predict what the "future portends" and point out that employees have a "growing sense of apprehension as to what is going to happen." The Governor answered that while some recent developments had been "completely unexpected as far as we here are concerned," he was certain that there was no need for apprehension. He added that while he has only a casual acquaintance with Brig. Gen. John S. Seybold, nominated April 16 as the next Governor, he is certain that the incoming Governor "will have the interests of the Canal at heart." Discussing persistent rumors of a mass turnover of officials, Governor Newcomer summarized these -the resignation of the Finance Director and the retirements of the Health and Marine directors— and added that these "have nothing to do with the situation or any reorganization." Comptroller -Staff Position The position of Comptroller which is being established, the Governor said, will create a staff position in which policies of auditing and accounting will be made, while the position of Finance Director will be that of an operating head. Among the Comptroller's duties will be evaluation of the Company's physical assets and formation of procedures by which the budget can be set up annually. During a somewhat lengthy general discussion on civil defense, the Governor cautioned against undue alarm over a situation which might possibly never occur here — certainly not as the opening blow of a war. He advocated training in first aid and said that some planning for relief after a disaster of any sort would not be wasted effort. The Governor said that he had discussed the situation with the chief of the Caribbean Command, Major General McBride. In addition, Governor Newcomer said, about 100 Company-Government employees have had training in the Army's Disaster Control schools. The major effect on the housing program of the House cut in the next fiscvl year's budget, the Governor explained, would be to prevent longer term contracts but sufficient funds remain to permit the completion of all housing which could actually be built during the coming fiscal year. There is a possibility that Senate action may restore some of this cut. The Governor also commented that a recent Congressional criticism (See page is> To The Employees . When 1 arrived in the Canal Zone in May 1944 we were in the midst of a great war, both in point of time and in point of geographical location. No one who was here during those days will ever forget the steady stream of battleships and carriers and cruisers, tankers and transports, and supply ships which passed back and forth through the Canal. The work which the men and women in the Canal Zone did in those busy and important days has been described, and rightly, as a major contribution toward the Allied victory. After the end of the war there was a let-down in that rather indefinable thing called morale, which might also be called esprit. That was true not only here but in the United States and in other parts of the world At the same time it became necessary to begin a long-delayed internal realignment of functions of the Panama Canal. It so happened that the preliminary steps of this reorganization came as we were cutting our force down from the war-end strength of about 31,000 toward our present force of some 18,000. A period of reduction of force is not easy, either for those required to do the cutting down or those who are losing their jobs. In addition, the shipping slump which followed the end of the war caused a drop in our main business, that of putting the ships through the Canal from one ocean to another, and in the associated business of repair and supply. Many of the men working in what was then called the Mechanical Division were terminated and the bulk of those who remained were transferred to Cristobal. Coincidcntally we faced steadily rising costs. A little less than two years ago the Congress passed the law ivhich created the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government. The Congress stipulated that the Company must be self-supporting. It also stipulated what share of the l %. Company's expense cnnld be borne by tolls. My associates and I have found that the majority of you have an understanding of the problems with which we have had to deal in these years of change. That the transition has been made as smoothly as it has is largely through your efforts and attitude. This has been the most exacting and the most interesting service of my career and it is with regret that I must leave it. I do so, however, with confidence that you will give my successor your loyal and steady support. You have a remarkable tradition behind you and a future with great possibilities ahead of you. Mrs. Newcomer and I expect to depart on May 9. Our future plans arc uncertain. One thing which is certain is that many, many times in the years to come our thoughts will turn to the Canal Zone and our associates and friends of the past eight years. 7-7C. Governor Record Number Of Students Graduating From Secondary Schools In Canal Zone (Continued from page -' ) to accommodate a small number of students on the Pacific side, a branch high school for the freshman year only had been opened in Ancon the previous year. The Gatun school, from which Miss Stevens and Miss Johnson graduated in 1911, was not the first of the Canal Zone high schools. During the school year 1908-09, a three-year high school had been established at Culebra and a twoyear course at Cristobal. The total high school enrollment that year was 25. In April this year there were 1,541 students in the four Canal Zone senior high schools. In 1910-11 there was the high school at Gatun, with a full four-year course, and the one-year branch at Ancon, but this picture changed two years later when the main high school was moved to Ancon, with branch high schools operating at Empire and Gatun. In February 1914 the branch high school at Empire was consolidated with Ancon, at Ancon, and the third-year students at Gatun and Cristobal were also transferred to the Ancon school. This Ancon building, according to A. C. Medinger, one of its former pupils, was a wooden structure on old Reservoir Hill. When the school year opened October 1, 1914, the main Canal Zone high school was moved to Balboa, to a wooden building at the foot of the Administration Building steps not far from the site of the present Balboa elementary school. A branch high school with two years of courses continued to operate in Cristobal. Meantime the number of graduates was steadily increasing. There were two graduates in 1911; five in 1912; seven in 1913; nine in 1914; 11 in 1915; and 16 in 1916. Mrs. Francis Feeney of Diablo has a double distinction; she is the only member of the class of 1913 still on the Isthmus and she is the first local high school graduate to have a child who is also a Canal Zone high school graduate. Her son finished his high school course here in 1933. She took the first part of her high school course at Gatun; most of the last year at Ancon. Commencement exercises that year were held at the Empire Clubhouse. Five of those who received their Canal Zone diplomas in Panama are still here: J. A. Fraser of Gamboa, Paul Warner of Balboa and L.B.Moore of Balboa Heights, all members of the class of 1915, Mrs. Gabrielle Butler Dawson of Diablo and Mrs. Elizabeth Carrington of Panama, of the class of 1916. Some other students of the earlier days of the Canal Zone schools who are still living here include Mrs. Dorothy Hamlin of Balboa, Mrs. George Engelke of Cristobal, Mrs. Nelson Magner of Margarita, Lyle Womack of Gamboa, Mrs. Dorothea McNall of Diablo, George Winquist of Panama, and Mr. Medinger.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2, 1952 Governor Officially Names Rainbow City After Overwhelming Vote Of Residents Greatest Shift Of Top Canal Personnel Since 1907 Slated In Few Weeks MRS. ALFRED WILLIAMS, who lives in one of the new houses in Silver City, receives her ballot from Rudolph Ranger, ninth grader in the Silver City Junior High School and member of Troop 12 of the International Boy Scouts. The Scouts handled the distribution and collection of ballots by which the Atlantic side community voted for an official name for their town. Mrs. Williams' next-door neighbor, Percy Antonio Samuels, Jr., 5, looks on nit]i interest as the Scout explains the purpose of the voting. The name of Silver City, including ('amp Coiner, will be changed to Rainbow City. By an overwhelming majority, residents of the area chose the most colorful of six names offered for voting and Governor Newcomer has issued a circular officially designating the area Rainbow City. The change in names was made effective May 1. The public poll on the selection of a name was the first ever held in the Canal Zone and met with great appeal to the residents. As expressed in the official report of the Tally Committee to the Governor: "The voting fever was high and the entire townsite on the evening of the 17th had the pleasant air of a country election." The official count, as reported by Judge E. I. P. Tatelman, Chairman of the Tally Committee, was: Rainbow City, 771; Silver City, 256; Granada, 74; Manzanillo, 72;' Folks City, 55; and Mindi, 7. Sixteen ballots were incorrectly marked or otherwise made invalid. Election Very Popular Few popular elections ever reach the proportions of returns as did the Silver City-Rainbow City-Camp Coiner voting. Of the total of approximately 1,280 ballots distributed to those with quarters' assignments there, all but 30 were returned Nearly one-third of the ballots were marked and returned the same afternoon they were distributed by the five International Boy Scout Troops. The voting for the name of the Canal Zone's largest civilian community was sponsored by The Panama Canal Review with the cooperation of the International Boy Scouts. The votes were distributed April 17 and were collected the following Friday afternoon and Saturday morning. The distribution and collection of ballots was handled under the direction of William Jump, President of the Internabional Boy Scout Council in the Canal Zone, who also served as a member of the Tally Committee. The five scout troops and Scoutmasters from Silver City and Camp Coiner participating were: Troop 1, David Stanley; Troop 2, Charles Lucas; Troop 4, Daniel T. Foster; Troop 12, Romeo G. Miller, who also serves as District Commissioner; and Troop 13, V. A. Laing. Approximately 200 Boy Scout members of these five troops helped in the distribution and collection. The Governor authorized the popular vote on the name of the town after residents nicknamed that part of Silver City being built as "Rainbow City" because of the various colors of the houses. The other four names shown on the ballots were selected for the following reasons: Mindi and Folks City, for the two small rivers in that area; Manzanillo, for the {Continued from page 1) Brig. Gen. John S. Seybold has been nominated by President Truman as Governor and his appointment, as this edition of The Canal Review went to press, was awaiting confirmation by the Senate. Governor and Mrs. Newcomer plan to leave the Isthmus May 9 since he plans to attend the next meeting of the Board of Directors of the Panama Canal Company scheduled to be held this month in Washington. Lieutenant Governor Vogel has been assigned to duty as Division Engineer of the Corps of Engineers' Southwest Division with headquarters in Dallas, Tex. This division comprises Engineer Districts in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and New Mexico. He and Mrs. Vogel and their young son, Dickie, plan to sail on the Panama liner leaving May 23. The appointment to the office of Lieutenant Governor is made by the Governor subject to approval by the Secretary of the Army and no announcement has been made as to Colonel Vogel's successor. Captain Peacher is to retire from the United States Navy at the end of June and has received orders to report for temporary duty in New York by June 23. He is to be succeeded as Marine Director by Capt. Marvin J. West, now Chief of the Navigation Division and Port Captain, Balboa. Captain Horatio Lincoln, who is now on duty in San Francisco as Operations Officer of the Military Sea Transport Service, has been assigned to duty with the Canal as Port Captain in Balboa. General Rice To Retire General Rice, who also is to retire from active service this year, plans to leave the Isthmus within about three months. He expects an assignment to duty in Washington until his retirement at the end of October. No announcement has been made as to his successor. Mr. Dunlop plans to retire from Canal service at the end of May. Since the Finance Director is a general officer of the Company his successor must be elected by the Board of Directors. Colonel Hesner will retire from the Canal service early next month and his successor has not been appointed. Colonel Jacobs will complete a threeyear assignment with the Canal in July. He is to be succeeded by Lt. Col. W. W. Smith, Jr. but the date of arrival of the new Military Assistant is not known. He has been on the Staff and Faculty of the Engineer School at Fort Belvoir, Va. Mr. Williamson has submitted his resignation effective at the end of June. He plans to return to the United States to accept a position with another Government agency. He is to be succeeded by Robert C. Walker, who has been employed in the Intelligence Office of the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project at Albuquerque, N. Mex. Mr. Walker is expected to arrive next Monday on the Cristobal to assume his new duties. island on which Cristobal-Colon is built; and Granada, which was the former name of Colombia. Silver City, which was built during the early 1920's, was never officially named, while Camp Coiner was so named while occupied by the Army Engineers during the past war.

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May 2,1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW FOR YOUR INTEREST AND GUIDANCE l WML UL !£ CCIDENT PREVENTION OFF THE JOB ACCIDENTS Safety on the job has progressed far in the United States from that day when a man's life or limb was considered of less value than the "off horse" of a team. Here <>n the Isthmus, it is even farther from that day when it was said, without reason, "a Chinaman was buried under every cross-tie (luring the building of the old Panama Railroad." This progress has not come about easily, but is the result of much strife and education by the hard way for the working man, with the final realization by industry and business that accidents are expensive, actually increasing the costs of production. As competition became keener, it was a matter of good management to promote safety in order to keep these costs to a minimum. Now industry and business are studying ways and mans to cut these losses still further by reducing time lost from the job, caused by their employees having "off-the-job" accidents. It can be easily seen now that anything which keeps an employee away from his job unexpectedly, is a loss of service and an additional cost to the employer in one form or another. This of course, includes sickness as well as accidents. Therefore, it is also becoming the practice of the progressive companies to provide health education and periodic inspections, with hospitalization when needed, for the employee and his family. It might be asked, "Why include an employee's family in any off-the-job accident and health preventative measures?" This is because it is being realized more and more that accidents on the job can happen to a valuable and usually careful employee, when hi-, mind is concerned with his family and HONOR ROLL Bureau Award For BEST RECORD March CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Community Services 2 I ndustrial 1 Civil Affairs Engineering and Construction q Health --Marine Railroad and Terminals „ Supply and Service q Division Awards For NO DISABLING INJURIES March CLUBHOUSE DIVISION ELECTRICAL DIVISION DIVISION OF SANITATION MOTOR TRANSPORTATION DIVISION AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Clubhouses 2 Electrical 2 Grounds Maintenance 2 Motor Transportation. 2 Storehouses 2 Navigation 1 Sanitation 1 Commissary Dredging _. Hospitalization and Clinics Locks Maintenance Railroad -. • Terminals .not on his work. Even if no accident occurs to this worried employee but only a slowdown in his production, that is a dollars and cents loss to the company. Early in the construction of the Panama Canal the original planners recognized the value of health for the employee and his family, if the digging of the Canal was to be accomplished. That attitude has continued on down to this day and we as employees enjoy probably better health than any community of similar size in the United States. Since the health problem has already been amply provided for here, then the next largest factor which keeps an employee from work can be classified under the title of "off-the-job" accidents. Under this title accidents occur under three large subdivisions: Traffic, Home, and Other, where "Other" covers all activities such as recreation, shopping, and self-employment. An employee and his family are considered "on the job" if the wife is also working, and the children are in school. There, their activities are being supervised and their safety is constantly being considered. The problem then is what can be done to prevent accidents during the times when the employee and his family are on their own. It is evident that he, or his family, is either going somewhere; enjoying some sort of recreation; or just puttering around the home while dinner is being prepared. This is the picture of what happens to them then, as presented by the National Safety Council. Considering accidents in all age groups, traffic accidents now head the list as being the biggest killer and crippler, with accidents in the home taking second place. Among children from 1 to 14 years, accidental death in the home leads the list with 40 percent, motor vehicles 34 percent, and other accidents 26 percent. The next age group, 14 to 19 years, is more on the move experimenting with speed, thus motor vehicles become over four times more dangerous for them than for the younger group. Also, because this group can now have the family car, they spend less time at home and more time in various violent recreations, so home accidents for this group drop to last place. "Safety education," says the Kansas State Board of Health, "has become by far our greatest health need." The Board reaches this conclusion in a study of the Kansas Student Accident Report for the school year 1950-51. In that report, death rates among school children in the 5 to 19 year age group from all causes, are as follows; 4,s percent were caused from accidents, 29 percent were from various diseases, and 23 percent from other causes. If this statement can be made concerning safety for our children, what is happening to their elders, who should be setting them a good example in safety.' Reports indicate that they are not setting such an example. Where children are given the opportunity to learn safety in driving, safety in play, and around the home, they present a far different picture in accident safety than shown above, and they are beginning to show up their elders. Automobiles are becoming more numerous every day. With less corresponding improvement in highways and with the automobile taking over first place as the chief cause of accidents a few safety reminders might be helpful. Just plain common ordinary courtesy or respect for the rights of others, on the highway, can do more to prevent traffic accidents than any other one thing we can do. We have all been rudely treated, and many of us have in turn been rude to others in our "highway manners," particularly in passing, meeting, and yielding the right-of-way. Whenever we uncover the reason or cause for the complete change in personality that seems to occur when a man (or woman) gets behind the steering wheel of an automobile, maybe we can find a remedy for this needless, wanton, and criminal daily slaughter. A gentleman will step aside, open a door, or excuse himself before passing in front of a lady in his home. He will not push or be rude to others at a party or in a public building. But when this same "gentleman" gets behind the wheel of his car, he seems to revert back to the "dark ages." He will crowd you from behind; pass in heavy traffic or on a curve; push you off the road; cut sharply in ahead of you; beat the traffic light; steal the right-of-way at an intersection, fail to signal, stop suddenly; cuss you out and many times just plain scare the living daylights out of you. Then what do you do? — yes, we know — you cuss him back. (Note for the ladies — this group is not exclusively male). MARCH 1952 Civil Affairs Bureau Supply and Service Bureau Health Bureau Industrial Bureau Marine Bureau Panama Canal Co. C. Z. Gov't (This month) Panama Canal Co.-C. Z.Gov't (Best Year) Engineering and Construction Bureau Panama Canal Co.-C. Z. Gov'l(1952 to Date) Community Services Bureau Railroad and Terminals Bureau Number of Disabling Injuries 43 Disabling Injuries per 1,090,000 Man-Hours Worked (Frequency Rate) Man-Hours Worked ',034,347 LEGEND 3 Amount Better Than Panama Canal Company— Canal Zone Government Best Year Amount Worse Than Panama Canal Company— Canal Zone Government Bert Year

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2, 1952 Quarters For Biggest, Smallest Families Planned In Current Building Program gram, it is believed that adequate living space can be provided for those families who require large quarters. And The Smallest Households At the other end of the family scale are the bachelors who want either small apartments or single rooms. The overall program for U. S.-rate bachelor quarters is presently under study. Some of the present bachelor apartment buildings in good condition will be retained. The new bachelor apartments will be located in the Ancon-Balboa area and in Margarita. In addition to these bachelor apartments, the program also includes the construction of a number of bachelor rooming houses, with some already in existence and in good condition to be retained. Many of the existing bachelor quarters, either apartments or rooms, are considered to be inadequate and of substandard design. These are in frame buildings of temporary construction. A majority of the new housing for bachelors, in the U. S.-rate communities, will be of the apartment type. A preliminary sketch of a floor plan for one of these apartments accompanies this story. 17-Apartment Buildings 5 The bachelor apartment buildings, as projected, would be three-story, on-theground apartment houses, with three main entrances. Each building would have 17 apartments, six to a floor, with a laundry occupying the space of one apartment on the ground floor. A porch, of the open balcony type Tuning the full width of each (See page 8) DETAIL PI AN BACHELOR APARTMENTS for the Canal's single men and women employees will be built according to new floor plans. The sketch above gives an idea of the apartments which will be built 17 to an apartment house, as part of the current quarters replacement program. US.Wt BACH. PMS. AttA Of UUIT 275 ' TOTAL UUIT ABEA 3.620 *' scbvics tee* a.eo/ ' TOTtl HI DO APBA IZ.220 *' NEW COMPTROLLER BACHELOR ROOMS, which are also to be provided in the long range housing program, will have space for transients, temporary employees or those who do not care for an entire single apartment. This architect's drawing gives an idea cf the outside appearance of one of the rooming houses. Provisions are being made in the current housing program for the largest and smallest of Canal Zone households. Since the average local family consists of 3.1 members in the U. S. rate towns, and 3.8 members in the local rate communities (people who keep statistics of this sort take fractional people as a matter of course), the majority of the new houses are planned for families of average size. But households with a greater number of children have not been forgotten in the long range planning and neither have the bachelors — men or women— who want small apartments or individual rooms. For Big Families To accommodate the larger than average families, 10 percent of U. S.-rate quarters will have four bedrooms per unit, and 15 percent of the housing to be built in local-rate communities will be of the fourbedroom type. Housing for large families in the Canal Zone is not a new problem. Even before the present housing program was started several projects were considered to provide such facilities. Several years ago a 12-family building in Diablo Heights was converted to a three-family house by combining four apartments into each of the three new units. A large living room was created on the first floor by removing partitions, and the two ground floor kitchens in each new unit were combined into one. On the second floor, kitchen equipment was removed. Partition walls were soundproofed The experiment was not considered a success and has not been repeated. The center apartment, made from the former four central apartments, was less desirable than those on the two ends. The building was of the temporary construction type and expensive to maintain. More recently, plans were studied for converting some of the type 215 (one bedroom, four-family) houses in Cocoli. A duplex house with three bedrooms in each unit was to have been made from a former four-apartment house. This plan was abandoned as uneconomical. Now, however, with the number of four bedroom quarters in the new housing proLIXDSLEY H. NOBLE, above, has been appointed to the recently-created position of Comptroller of the Panama Canal Company. His acceptance of the position is dependent upon release by the Atomic Energy Commission of which he is now Comptroller. Mr. and Mrs. Noble visited the Isthmus for a few days last month, and he is expected to return early this month. Mr. Noble, a native of Brooklyn, N. Y., has served as Comptroller of the AEC for the past five years. Prior to this employment, he had served about three years as Director of the Services, Accounting and Audits Division of the Office of Price Administration. He is a graduate of the Walton School of Commerce, of Chicago, in accounting, law, and economics. Mr. Noble is a member of several national accounting associations.

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May 2, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW J5.J>M-1 Official Panama Canal Company Publication Published Monthly at BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE Printed by the Printing Plant Mount Hope, Canal Zone F. K. Newcomer, Governor-President H. D. Vogel, Lieutenant Governor E. C. Lombard, Executive Secretary J. Rufus Hardy, Editor Eleanor H. McIlhenny Oleva Hastings Editorial Assistants LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters containing inquiries, suggestions, criticisms, or opinions of a general nature will be welcomed. Those of sufficient interest will be published but signatures will not be used unless desired. To Subscribers Please notify us promptly of any change in your mailing o ddress. Post offices everywhere have prepared postal card forms for notices of changes of address. COMMUNITY CHEST MEETING IS SCHEDULED FOR TONIGHT A meeting of the general membership of the Canal Zone Community Chest is scheduled for 7 o'clock this evening at the Balboa YMCA-USO. Membership in the Chest is acquired by anyone who has contributed to the campaign for funds, by volunteer workers, and by representatives of participating agencies. At the meeting tonight, a board of 12 directors will be elected. Together with six members appointed by the General Committee of Civic Councils and three by the armed forces headquarters, they will administer the affairs of the Chest. This directorate was one of the provisions in a reorganization of Chest administration which was approved recently by the five Canal Zone Civic Councils. Since 1948 the Councils have managed the Community Chest under an executive committee arrangement. Officers of the organization will be a chairman, two vice chairmen, a secretary and a treasurer. OF CURRENT INTEREST SUBSCRIPTIONS— $1.00 a year SINGLE COPIES— 5 cents each On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses, Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after publication date. SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL— 10 cents each BACK COPIES— 10 cents Each On sale when available, from the Vault Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. Postal money orders should be made payable to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company, and mailed to the Editor, The Panama Canal Review, Balboa Heights, C. Z. THE ARCH of a lock control house frames the Voice of America's floating radio transmitter ship as the vessel makes its way down the Canal to Balboa. The ship, an unusual feature of which was its radio aerial supported by a baby blimp, remained in local waters for several weeks. Camp Bierd has been a ghost settlement since the end of February when the last of its residents moved to new houses in Silver City. In the near future, this housing area will disappear completely. Its 44 remaining buildings have been sold and will be demolished. Camp Bierd has housed local rate Canal and Railroad employees since 1907, when barracks were built there on the site of an old magazine which was used to store brick. Its name, which probably "just grew," also probably came from W. G. Bierd, general manager for the Panama Railroad in Colon at the time the original barracks were built for laborers. Many of the buildings later were converted to family quarters. Young Joe which was tied up at Balboa about two weeks for minor repairs. The total crew of 22 included scientists from Belgium, Germany, and France. From the Canal Zone the Young Joe was to go to the Perlas Islands for fishing, then back to Panama before returning to Europe. A new two-cent postal card was placed on sale in Canal Zone postoffices May 1. The cards are regular United States two-cent postal cards overprinted "Canal Zone." Two more large lots of scrap salvaged by the Canal organization were sold in April. Three successful bidders bought one lot of 2,998j net tons of ferrous scrap at a total purchase price of $81,143.39. A lot of 430,742 pounds of nonferrous scrap was sold to six other purchasers for $96,004.97. The scrap will be delivered in the United States for allocation by the National Production Authority. Four United States Representatives visited on the Isthmus during April. They were Representatives J. J. Murphy, Democrat of New York, a member of the Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee; Chester B. McMullen, Democrat of Florida; Winston L. Prouty, Republican of Vermont ; and Brent Spence, Democrat of Kentucky. A boom tourist season on the Isthmus was reflected in monthly reports on sightseeing trips through Gaillard Cut for local travel agencies on Dredging Division equipment. There were 1,888 tourists on the trips in February and 1,549 in March, the first and second highest numbers recorded in Dredging Division reports. For the first nine months of the fiscal year, the total was within 460 of the figures for the previous heaviest tourist year, in 1949. State Headquarters for Selective Service in the Canal Zone has announced that nine young men will be inducted into the Army from this area in May. These inductions will bring to 33 the number inducted since Selective Service machinery was set up in the Canal Zone. There were nine inductees in the first group in January, nine in March, and six in April. The former King Leopold III of Belgium and his wife, the Princess de Rethy, transited the Canal on April 8 on the yacht A new Chief Quarantine Officer is scheduled to arrive for duty in the Health Bureau July 1. He is Dr. Walter G. Nelson, who is now Medical Director for the United States Public Health Service at the American Embassy in Paris. On July 2, 1904, the first vessel was entered and cleared by the Customs authorities of the Canal Zone.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2, 1952 PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Goes To A Police Pistol Shoot The Canal Zone police have one big day each year. The two Police Balls which arc annual affairs are night-time events, of course. But the big daytime affair is the annual pistol shoot which is held near the end of the dry season, the location alternating between Balboa and Cristobal. This year the Cristobal police played host (and impolitely won the first three **Mfc* 1 1 3 *jr-*~^. ; B SI (ME WATCHED, like Maj. Pastor Ramcs, chief of the Colon police, center, and Lt. Col. K. K. Kolster, Atlantic Sector Provost Marchal, right, who sat with Police District Commander, John M. Fahnestock in the beautiful bohio, Rancho Ramcs. SOME WON", like Policeman Floyd A. Robinson who is being congratulated here by Jack Ward, president of the Cristobal Gun Club. Mr. Ward presented the winner with the .38 S&W revolver. Maj. George Herman, at the microphone, and Capt. Rodger W. Griffith, on Mr. Ward's right, watch the presentation. BUT EVERYBODY ATE — like the people here who are going down the "chow line" to sample (and then come back for more) barbecued baby beef which had been cooked all night in an open pit, baked beans, scalloped potatoes, cole slaw, and individual loaves of French bread. prizes) at Police Park near Brazos Brook. A police photographer got a temporary press card as a for-the-day representative of The Panama Canal Review, and took the pictures which illustrate this story. Although this year's scores were well below those of last year, and it may well be many years before anyone can equal Peter Probaek's perfect score of 200 made last year, the shooting was still good enough to give any potential law-breakers reason to stop and think before they tangle with the police pistol experts. Seventy police officers qualified by making scores of 150 or better in the preliminary firing. Forty-seven of the 70 participated in the shoot. Tying for first prize were Floyd A. Robinson, of the Cristobal Station, and Cristobal License Examiner Paul S. Stewart, Their score was 183. Mr. Robinson, however, was awarded first prize because his score on the bobbing target was higher than that of his opponent. Such settlement of tie scores is provided for in the rules for the shoot. Close behind them was Grady B. Hardison, a winner of two previous shoots. He turned in a final score of 181. He is stationed at Margarita. The range board for the shoot was made up of Lt. Eugene Shipley, Sgt. Jack F. Morris, and Policeman Henry DeRaps. As at all police pistol shoots, the women folks and small fry turned out by the dozens. The women sat and talked and kept an eye on the youngsters while their men were on the firing range or talking shop. After it was all over, everyone ate, well and at length, of some very fine food which had been prepared by the best cooks on the police force. Hubert W. Jarman, a former policeman now with the Industrial Bureau, lent his talent to supervise the beef barbecue. Rivalry between the two police districts is as high when it comes to turning out a tasty meal as it is on the firing range. It's pretty much of a toss-up which of the contests the guests enjoy more. Bachelor, Large Family Quarters {Continued from page 6) living room, would project from the front of each unit. The bachelor rooms in the U. S.-rate towns are planned for transient use (when an employee is transferred for a very short period from one side of the Isthmus to another, for instance) and for employment surges, such as at lock overhaul periods, when a large number of employees are added to the force for temporary work. Local Rate Bachelors Bachelor rooms will also be provided in the local rate towns. The bachelor room buildings for localrate employees would be three-story, masonry, on-the-ground structures with 1 1 rooms to each floor. Each room would have a lavatory and cooking facilities. Toilets and showers would be centrally located and serve an entire floor.

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May 2,1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Employees Are Reminded To Designate Beneficiary A reminder that designation of beneficiaries by Company-Government employees may save their survivors both time and money was made recently by James Marshall, Chief of the Postal, Customs and Immigration Division. He is in charge of probate of estates of employees who die intestate. An Executive Order provides that upon the death of an employee compensation for all of his accumulated and current leave shall be paid in a lump sum, upon the establishment of a valid claim, as provided by law. According to an amendment to the Canal Zone Code, approved August 10, 1949, this payment shall be made first to the beneficiary, or beneficiaries, if any, lawfully designated by the employee under the retirement act applicable to his service (Civil Service Retirement Act), or to the estate if the employee has not designated a beneficiary. Forms on which beneficiaries may be designated are available at the Retirement Desk, Personnel Bureau. Designations made prior to September 1, 1950, are no longer in effect. Payment to the beneficiary is immediate, Mr. Marshall said. Payment to the survivor, through the estate, is necessarily delayed because of the time needed fcr probate. In addition, the Public Administrator who handles such estates is required to charge a fee for his work. Ten Years Ago In April Third Locks and the work on them were still important 10 years ago. On April 22 word came from Washington that the Pan Construction and Materials Corporation had submitted a low bid of $81 ,849,376 for the new locks to be built at Miraflores and Pedro Miguel. Ten days earlier, Samuel Rosoff, head of the Rosoff Panama Construction Company Inc., said that approximately $7,000,000 worth of equipment and a force of about 3,000 men would be assembled at Gatun to build the Atlantic side Third Locks. The Rosoff Company held a $45,705,000 contract for the Gatun Locks construction. On April 16, it was announced officially that 1 1 new fire stations and SO trailer pump houses were to be added to existing facilities. Eighty Atlantic side women completed a canteen course and training in mass feeding in case of disaster. Enemy aliens, 519 of them, who had been interned at the camp in the Balboa quarantine area, reached the United States. They were Japanese and Germans, a few Italians and central Europeans, with the Japanese in the majority. Of the whole group, 105 were children. The aliens had been taken from Balboa to Cristobal, with the windows on the Canal side of their railroad cars carefully covered with blinds. A lot of meats are prepackaged now that weren't prepackaged before. Meats Get The pliofilm packages of New trimmed pork, beef, lamb, Treatment poultry, and veal that you buy at self-service meat cases at large stores and regular meat counters of smaller commissaries now come off assembly lines. The prepackaging is possible because of new machinery — saws, cutters, slicers, grinders, conveyor belts and automatic sealing devices — at the Cold Storage Plant of the Commissary Division at Mount Hope. Prepackaging means this to customers: 1) well-trimmed retail cuts, with no trim or waste, that need less preparation for cooking; 2) cuts that are pretty much the same in quality and appearance yesterday, today, and tomorrow and from one package to the next; 3) savings in shopping minutes for customers who can now pick their meat right out of a case already cut, trimmed, weighed, priced, and wrapped; and 4) meats that are handled under the most sanitary conditions. Prepackaged meats (except for sausage products such as dried beef, etc.) are frozen from the time they leave the cold storage plant locker rooms until you buy them in the stores. Pliofilm has a lot of "give." It was chosen for the wrappings because it can be pushed a long way before it breaks or tears. These meats are now prepackaged: Pork — Pork chops, including loin, rib, and end cut; spare ribs; bulk pork in onepound rolls: smoked ham butts and slices; liver; ham hocks; skinless link sausages, smoked and unsmoked; ham minutesteaks; pastrami; ham loaf; and pigs' feet and knuckles. Beef — Tenderloins; sliced dried beef; hamburger steaks; beef minute steaks; liver; and cooked tongue. Veal — Cutlets and chops, including loin rib and shoulder; liver; tongue; and heart. Lamb — Leg; rib; chops, loin and shoulder. Poultry — Chicken breasts; legs and thighs; wings; hearts; and chicken loaf. Now you can try your can openers on: lima beans and ham; papaya from Costa Rica; baked apples; and minestrone like good Italians would like. They're in some canned goods sections now or are expected soon. Mother's Day givers, grandmamas and glamour girls should know: For Mother's The first 60-gauge hose to Day, Miss and be sold in the commissaries Mrs. will be in the stores soon. They are 15 denier nylons — and that's sheer — in summer shades. They have more threads that are twisted finer than the 51-gauge hose in the stores before. That means they'd don't snag as easily, have more stretch and give, wear better, and look smoother. Other new wrinkles in hose are nylons that are pleated — when you buy them from the store. When you put them on, the pleats go away and the hose hug tight for a fit that is made to flatter. Lace and ruffles and net and nylon will make mothers want more Mother's Days. New slips and nightgowns in the stores have them mixed and matched in the kind of combinations you give as gifts and want for yourself. Spring graduates and young party girls will want to see new teenage formals in the stores. There are ballerina and long dresses. Some are fluffy and some are slightly sophisticated. There's now an All-Purpose Broth that comes in a package ready to brew into soup, stew, gravy, seasoning, or stock. Myro range and porcelain cleaner is in the stores now because customers who used it elsewhere told Housewares Section people it's a whee of a cleaner, especially for electric ranges. The clothes the little men at your house wear all year round in the tropMeant for ics come from the spring and Little Men summer lines of U. S. manufacturers. That means there are more in the stores now than at any other time of vear. Car care will be easier with a new NoHose Carwash on sale in the New Care commissaries. When you put it for Cars in a pail of water, the water turns to foam. You douse the foam on your chariot and forget the chore of a chamois. Venetian blinds that have lived too long for their fixtures can be given New Bloom a new bloom of youth with for Blinds laddertape, cords, tilters, holddown brackets, pulley shafts, bead chains, cord locks, and head-rail installation brackets in commissary housewares sections. Curbs, pedestrian crosswalks, trees, poles, and similar objects near Canal Zone streets were getting a coat of black arid white painted stripes. MANY MEATS now come off this cold assembly line in the Cold Storage Plant of the Commissary I* Division at Mount Hope. In this picture, pork chops, newly chopped and trimmed, go down the con^ veyor belt to be wrapped for delivery to retail stores.

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10 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2, 1952 The Panama Canal Honor Roll NEXT MONDAY marks the 48th anniversary of the beginning of the Canal construction work by the United States when the French Canal Company's rights and properties were transferred at a simple ceremony at its liters building in Panama City. Of the tens cf thousands of men and women who came to (he Isthmus from their homes in the United States to help on this great project only 53 remain in active service. This honor roll of the Canal enterprise has been cut in half within the past two years. \\ hen the roll of those veterans still in service was published in the first issue of The Panama Canal Review in May 1950, the list contained 106 names. Of the 53 still in service, the pictures of the nine who have unbroken service are published in this issue. The complete list of veterans shown below gives the dates they first began work on the Canal project. Names of employees with unbroken service are indicated by capital letters and those marked (*) are holders of the famous Roosevelt Medal indicating two cr more years of continuous construction service. 1IAKRY A. COMLEY CHOUGH N. ENGELKE JAMES G. MAGULRE ,/190( "Vincent < '. Raymond — December 16 1907 "Florence E. Williams — March I 1908 *Esbon S. MacSparran — June 22 "Charles P. Morgan — October 2n 1909 *J. Wendell Greene— May 5 Andrien Marie Bouche — Julv 2 "John E. Ridge— October 20 1910 *George H. Cassell — Januarj 29 "Raymond B. Ward — June 13 "Raymond A. Koperski — June 27 "William R. Howe— July 1 1911 "ERNEST C. COTTON— February 20 Lea K. Dugan — June 6 Herbert T. Souder — July 15 "Charles Lester — August 18 "GEORGE N. ENGELKE— September 5 "Bernard W. Mclntyre — September 28 Melville L. Booz — October 2 "Gregor Gramlich — October 14 "Berney J. Robinson — October 30 1912 Samuel J. Deavours — March 1 Gustaf R. Hoi melin— March 13 "Gilbert B. Owen— March 22 Josephine R. Dennis — April 6 Harland V. Howard — April 22 "Robert W. Hutchings— April 26 "Fred Frank — June 1 George F. Miller — June 28 Alba D. Hutchings — August 19 Thomas J. Breheney — November 1 George C. Orr — December 5 ARTHUR MORGAN— December 16 1913 Otto A. Sundquist — January 15 Bernard J. McDaid — February 19 Leonidas H. Morales H. — March 1 ADAM S. MILLER— April 14 David W. Ellis— June 11 Arthur 1. Farrell— June 28 Edward P. Walsh— July 1 Otto C. Frick— July 2 Robert I. Barnes — Julv 3 EMMETT ZEMER— July 10 HARRY A. COMLEY— July 14 Harold P. Bevington — August 16 Eric E. Forsman — November 4 WALTER W. WHITE— November 18 Bert G. Tydeman — November 22 Mai LeRoy Dodson — December 10 William V. Brugge — December 17 1914 JAMES G. MAGUIRE— January 20 LEON F. HALLETT— February 14 Clarendon Sealy — March 6 Samuel L. Souder — March 24 LEON F. HALLETT ADAM S. MILLER ARTHUR MORGAN (^ ,*>* |HH \ ••• > i •"^fc.w. WALTER W. WHITE EMMETT ZEMER

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May 2,1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 11 Governor Newcomer's FourYear Term Notable For Far-Reaching Changes The tenth Governor of the Canal Zone will end his four-year tour of duty on May 19. The past four years have undoubtedly been marked with more farreaching changes than the term of any of his predecessors in office. Barely a month after Governor Francis Kosier Newcomer took the oath of office on May 20, 1948, the United States Congress approved an act to incorporate the Panama Railroad Company under the Government Corporation Control Act. This was the beginning of various legislative and administrative actions which were climaxed last July 1 when the Panama Railroad Company and The Panama Canal operations were consolidated into a Government-owned corporation — The Panama Canal Company— and the governmental functions of The Panama Canal became the Canal Zone Government. This consolidation and incorporation, however, was preceded by an extensive internal rearrangement of various of the Canal activities, grouping like operations together under newly created Bureaus which replaced the Departments of earlier days. This incorporation was in accordance with a bill which became law September 26, 1950, with the effective date of the change last July 1. The law created the Panama Canal Company "for the purpose of maintaining and operating the Panama Canal and of conducting business operations incident to such maintenance and operation and incident to the civil government of the Canal Zone." Company Must Sustain Itselfi This law required that the Company be self-sustaining and that it must pay the net cost of the Canal Zone Government, under which were placed civil governmental functions, including sanitation and public health. The process of converting the complicated financial structure from a system of government accounting to a system of corporate accounting is still in progress. This involves setting up books such as a private corporation keeps of its profits and losses rather than the usual governmental system of simply accounting for appropriated funds. Aside from its technical aspects, the formation of the Panama Canal Company has brought other changes. The 13-man Board of Directors, all appointees of the Stockholder (the Secretary of the Army), is playing a much greater part than ever before in the affairs of the Panama Canal. General Newcomer as Governor has been President of the Company and his official title is President-Governor. Chairman of the Board is the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Karl R. Ben detsen. Former" Governors have made only a few official trips to the United States during their terms of office. Most of these were to appear before Appropriation Committees or to attend Bureau of the Budget hearings. During the past four years, Governor Newcomer has made 19 round-trips to Washington or New York, not only to attend Budget and Congressional hearings but also to be present at the frequent meetings of the Board of Directors. Only one Board meeting has been held in the Canal Zone. Quarters Program Started Aside from the reorganization and incorporation, the single most important project during Governor Newcomer's term has been the inauguration and development of a long-awaited and muchneeded housing replacement program. When the program is finally completed in fiscal year 1956, close to $80,000,000 will have been spent to replace obsolete and sub-standard quarters. Also of major importance was the return by the President of civilian control of the Canal ZoDe. Other changes, of less importance but of interest, which have been made during the Governor's administration follow, more or less chronologically : A biweekly pay plan for U. S.-rate employees was instituted; salaries were paid by check and pay-roll procedure is now being mechanized. A five-day work week was adopted, by administration action. Pay rates for local-rate employees were revised and two blanket increases given workers on local-rate rolls. Liberalized leave regulations for local-rate employees were approved. The administration officially discarded use of the terms "Gold" and '"Silver." Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps were established at Balboa and Cristobal High Schools. The Schools Division opened a Junior College at La Boca; it will graduate its first class this month. The Governor requested and received authority to establish draft boards in the Canal Zone. Cash replaced the long-used coupon books in all U. S.-rate commissaries. Congress passed legislation, sponsored and supported by the Canal administration, to merge the Canal Zone Retirement Act with the Civil Service Retirement Act. A bill to provide for a much improved retirement plan for local-rate employees was drafted but has not yet been cleared for introduction into Congress. Tax Extended/To Zone Income tax was extended to the Canal Zone, for U. S.-citizen employees. The administration successfully assisted in obtaining repeal of the tax measure's retroactive feature. The Army transferred to the Canal two large tracts of land, 300 acres, near Corozal for the local-rate town of Cardenas and 100 acres from the post of Corozal for U. S.-rate housing. The Third Locks town of Cocoli was transferred to the Navy. A small-scale study of Civilian Defense requirements was started but was abandoned last August when Congress cut off funds for its operation. And while all this was going on shipping was increasing steadily to such an extent that in March of this year a new all-time record high of 613 ocean-going commercial vessels of over 300 tons was reached. There were personnel changes of importance, too. Only we 20) ONE OF THE BEST pictures ever taken of tbe Governor and Mrs. Newcomer is that, above, which was made September 29, 1949. The day marked the Governor's retirement from active duty with the Army after more than 40 years of military service. The Governor left immediately after the military retirement ceremony, at the Balbca Heights railroad station, on one cf the many business trips he has had to make to Washington during his term of office.

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12 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2, 1952 Work In Corozal Area Will Be Rushed; Com P |eti M on D J e ™ f ii or a r i i m i On New Balboa Quarters About z5U family Apartments Planned No material delay is expected in the Panama Canal Company's overall housing program as a result of the abandonment of the Summit townsite project and the development of the Corozal area. The Canal Zone Order revising the Curundu Military Reservation and transferrin!,' the land to the Canal Zone Government has been signed by the Secretary of the Army. Approximately 100 acres have been transferred. Plans for the new townsite development are being completed in the Engineering Division and actual work on the relocation of underground facilities and other municipal work required has been started by the Maintenance Division forces. The latter work will be rushed to take advantage of favorable weather before heavy rains begin. It is planned to have the area ready for the construction of houses by the next dry season. The area to be transferred will provide space for about 250 U. S.-rate apartments plus a location for an elementary school. No other community facilities, such as a clubhouse or post office, are planned for the area since it is located near similar facilities in Diablo Heights and Balboa. The exact number or type of apartments to be built there will not be determined until after a complete town layout has been prepared. Of course, not all of the 100-odd acres will be readily usable. The extent of grading required has not been determined, although it is known that it will be considerably less than planned at Summit. The work at the proposed Summit townsite is to be abandoned after completion by the Maintenance Division of that portion of the main storm sewer on which work was already underway. This work was well advanced when the question of obtaining land nearer the Pacific terminal was reopened early last month. Sales Store To Be Island The area transferred begins at Diablo Crossing and includes the section known as Diablo Terrace as far as the Albrook Air Force Base boundary. The houses at Diablo Terrace are to be demolished. The area extends from the Albrook boundary to the old barracks road one block south of the main entrance to Corozal. The extreme northern boundary is the back entrance road to the post on which Corozal Theater is located and generally follows the ridgeline back to the Albrook boundary. Several buildings in the area are not included. These include the Army sales store and warehouse, the Army power plant, Corozal Theater, Finance Office, and Chapel. The frame houses of Diablo Terrace are to be demolished and the Panama Canal Company will construct 26 sets of family quarters of a size comparable to those being transferred at sites to be determined by Army authorities. The old houses will be kept in use until the new quarters are built. The area for the new townsite development is a part of the Corozal Army Reservation and is a part of the site of one of the earliest Canal Zone settlements. In his Guidebook of Panama and the Canal Zone, published in 1912, John 0. Collins says that the village of Corozal was mentioned before the founding of the new (and present) city of Panama. The name means a field or plantation of corozo palms -those palm trees bearing oily nuts. The village was almost certainly a stop on an old trail between Panama City and the Interior. In French days, an old road more direct than the route of the present Corozal-Panama road linked Corozal with that section of Panama near the present Tivoli crossing. Corozal appears on a Panama Railroad map dated 1S57 but does not appear on one issued four years earlier. Although the name is shown on the 1857 railroad map, Corozal apparently was not a scheduled railroad stop for some years. A timetable reproduced [See page 16 1 Construction of the 15 U. S.-rate family units on Pyle Street and Morgan Avenue in Balboa by the Maintenance Division is now well advanced and the first of the new houses is to be completed about the second week in June. The others are scheduled for completion by the middle of August. The houses there are of the composite type similar to those in San Juan Place in Ancon. There are 11 buildings in all, of which four are duplexes. Residents of Ridge Road in Balboa Heights who recently received notice to vacate their quarters for demolition will be assigned the new houses in Balboa on a seniority basis along with residents of the old houses on Empire Street which also are to be torn down this year. The Ridge Road residents have been requested to move by August 15, and those on Empire Street by October 31. OUR OUT-OF-DOORS Two more trees of the Canal Zone, the Malay Apple and the Cuipe, are among those which even the most non-botanically inclined can learn to identify. The Malay Apple, Eugenia malaccensis, is an Asiatic species planted occasionally in this region. A row of the trees grow along Amador Road. The tree itself is one of the most attractive on the Canal Zone. It is not tall and has a dense, rounded crown. The large leaves are oblong-elliptic and shiny. A distinguishing feature is its bright crimson-purple flowers which are distinctively beautiful. They are borne in clusters along the branches and are most conspicuous when seen from a distance. As the petals fall they form a colored carpet on the ground beneath the trees. The pear-shaped fruit is suffused with red and its flavor is excellent. In Panama it is called "marafion de curacao," a not inappropriate name, since the fruit strongly suggests, in shape and color, the cashew or "maraiion." The technical name of the Cuipo, one of the most remarkable trees of this region, is Cavanilhsia piatanifolia. An exceptionally fine specimen grows at the end of the Red Tank causeway and many more dot the hillsides of Panama and the Canal Zone. They are particularly conspicuous at this season because of their red flowers. Cuipo trees are stately, 60 to 100 feet tall. They have small crowns and thick, smooth, pale trunks, usually swollen at the base. The wood is white or yellowish, coarse, soft, and extremely light. A cubic foot of cuipo wood weighs only 6.25 pounds, while balsa, which is ordinarily considered one of the lightest of woods, weighs from six to 22 pounds per cubic foot. Cuipo wood is sometimes used as a substitute for balsa and was the material for several light planes manufactured just before the end of World War II. LITTLE GIRLS and Malay apples belong together, even if the little girls' mothers deplore the black stain 'which the juicy fruit is apt to leave on a pretty dress. When the trees are bearing, Janice Scott, 8, of Amador Road, takes to a stepladder to gather a feast. Young Janice is a third generation Zonian.

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May 2, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 13 Watch Repairing Engrossing Hobby, Health Bureau's Bill Brown Reports William Brown, whose job is Assistant to the Health Director, is never at a loss when anyone asks him the time of day. Usually he is wearing a wrist watch; more often than not he is carrying a spare in his watch pocket, and quite frequently he can check the hour by a tiny wrist watch produced from his shirt pocket. Seldom are these the same watches two days in succession. Not that Bill Brown is such a man of property. The watches which he produces belong to friends for whom he is doing a watch repair job. The clocks on which he also works have, of course, to stay at home; he couldn't very well carry them around but he thinks watches should be worn or carried for a few days, for checking.^ When Bill Brown is having budget trouble and what administrative assistant these days doesn't— he can forget it completely in his watch repair hobby. His center of operations is in a corner of his bedroom on the second floor of a big duplex overlooking Albrook Field. In this corner is a dentist's cabinet with its many shallow drawers, just right for fine small tools. On top of the cabinet stands a battered piggy bank. Since watch repairing is a hobby, Bill Brown makes no charge for his work. But, if friends insist, he will accept a dollar for a job. The dollars go into the piggy bank and when enough have been piled up, Bill Brown buys another micrometer, or some main springs, or a device to set watch crystals. He got interested in repairing watches by necessity. His bride, Ruth, gave him a wrist watch as a gift not long after they were married. It was a fine watch in every respect but one— it wouldn't run. The Browns made the rounds of watch repairmen but no one could fix it. Finally Bill took the watch to pieces, found a thread on the hair-spring, removed it and from then on the watch kept fine time. Ants Don't Help Since then he has found some strange things wrong with non-operating clocks and watches. A perturbed owner brought him a fine mantlepiece chime clock which wouldn't chime. No wonder, Bill Brown found; it had an ants' nest inside. Some watches have been overcome by humidity and are rusted; others just need cleaning and not too seldom Bill Brown finds that all a watch or clock needs is a good winding. In a year, he figures, he works on at least 100 watches or clocks. Sometimes, when people leave or move, they give him an accumulation of old watches or jewelry from which he can cannibalize parts. He has repaired a number of old wall pendulum clocks which have been surveyed and sold for junk. Usually these can be put into usable condition, although it often takes longer to get the face off than itdoesto repair the clock. (Although Bill Brown has often worked on these surveyed clocks, he has never bought one for himself. ) Because he has a fine collection of precision instruments, as well as a lot of patience, Bill Brown is called on sometimes to go a little out of his hobby field. He has cemented loose cameos and intaglios into pieces of jewelry on more than WILLIAM BROWN" one occasion. But his most frequent requests other than the watch repair line concern diamonds. Settings for diamonds have a way of getting bent, and girls with engagement rings understandablv don't want to go around shedding diamonds. So they bring their rings to Bill Brown and ask him to tighten the metal which holds the jewels in place. Bill does, the girls are happy and sometimes a dollar goes into the piggy bank. Forty Years Ago In April With a few months over two years still to go before the Canal was to be opened, Canal planners were looking ahead. In April, 40 years ago, a committee was appointed to recommend sites for the permanent administrative headquarters and offices of the Canal and a permanent settlement for Canal employees nearby. The Canal Record reported that the site of the office headquarters would be "on Sosa Hill or some other place nearby." Zonians were having almost as hot a time as they had Ifi years later. The warmest weather of record on the Canal Zone since the American forces arrived occurred during April. At Ancon, on April 7, the thermometer registered 97 degrees, and 10 days later the temperature at Culehra went to 96 degrees. Previous hiyhs were 96.2 degrees at Ancon on March 7, and 94 degrees at Culehra on April 15, 1909. The survey of the approaches to the Pacific entrance of the Canal, by the Coast and Geodetic Survey, was complete. The survey steamer Patterson, which arrived from Alaska January 15, finished its work about the middle of the month. The wire drag party wound up its six months of work the end of April. The results of the survey were the basis for the charts published later. Canal Zonians of those days played as well as worked, although some of their recreation was quaint by present day standards. In April, 1,0 years ago, the Hill Magical Troupe, who specialized in "necromancy and hypnotism," was playing at Zone clubhouses. Moving picture shows were becoming increasingly popular. At Gorgona, one night, 21f5 people attended the movies and there was even a special show at one o'clock in the morning after the night force stopped work. Coffee and sandwiches were served after this "owl" show. Another popular performer of Ifi years ago ivas Captain Jack Crawford, described as a "poet scout." He was reciting original verse and humorous anecdotes around the clubhouse circuit. The University Club of the Isthmus of Panama, 75 percent of whose members were employees of the Isthmian Canal Commission and the Panama Railroad, gave a housewarming at its new clubhouse near the Panama City sea wall. The housewarming was a reception, with dancing. One of the big steamshovels, which did such yeoman work in excavating the Panama Canal, was damaged beyond repair late in April by an unusual fire. The shovel, a 70-tonner numbered 107, was working on excavation of the channel through what is now MirafloresLake. It rested on a "crib" which was made up of five layers of railroad ties. Fire broke out at night in the depths of the crib. Although the shovel was mostly metal, the heat of the flames softened the sixinch solid steel axle connecting the hind wheels of the truck under the rear end so that it bent to an angle of about 90 degrees. The heat was most intense at the rear end where the cribbing was higher but the babbitt metal teas melted out of every journal box on the shovel. Even without this shovel, however, excavation was moving faster and faster. On one day the 44 shovels working in the Pedro Miguel, Culebra, and Empire districts excavated 68,505 cubic yards of material, during a working day of eight hours. This was a new high record for daily excavation in the Cut. Third Beaux Arts Ball To Take Place May 10 Arrangements are practically completed for the third Beaux Arts Ball to be given May 10 by the Canal Zone Art League at the Hotel Tivoli. Proceeds from the Ball will go to increase the art scholarship fund which the Art League has established and with which the organization hopes to aid some Canal Zone student in his chosen career. Chairman for the Ball Committee is Robert L. Dwelle. He is being assisted by the League's president, Bryan W. Vaughn, and by Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Henry McKenzie, P. Rodriguez, and Melvin Menges. Theme of this year's ball is "Dream Boat." Prizes will be awarded for unusual costumes and painting contests and door prizes will give the guests an opportunity to win a work of art donated by artist members of the League. Tickets, at $2 a person, may be obtained from F. R. Johnson, 2-3484; Beatrice S. Gardner, 2-1457; B. W. Vaughn, 273-3185 or H. T. McKenzie, 3-2401.

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14 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2, 1952 ANNIVERSARIES THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR Employees who observed important anniversaries during the month of April are listed alphabetical!) below. The number of years includes all Government service with the Canal or oilier agencies. Those with continuous service are indicated with (*). 42 Years Esbon S. MacSparran, Superintendent! Terminals I )ivision. 35 Years FredJ.Bauman, Supervisor, Sheet metal Shop, Maintenance Division. Dr. Jesse L.Bvrd, Medical Officer, Colon Health Office. Walter C. Fedde, Chemist, Miraflores Filtration Plant. 30 Years Paul F. Karst, Postmaster, Curundu. Rexford T. Ray, Guard, Atlantic Locks. 25 Years Joseph B. Baker, Foreman, Dredging I >i\ ision. 20 Years Thomas J. Breheney, Foreman. Dredging I >i\ ision. Elvira J. Byrne, Nurse, Gorgas Hospital. Alcide R. Hauser, Policeman, Cristobal. William R. Henter, Filtration Plant Operator, Maintenance Division. Anthony G. Lynn, Plant Supervisor, Maintenance Division. Joseph F. Shea, Chauffeur, General Operator and Craneman, Maintenance Division. Roger C. Wright, Automobile Repair Machinist, Motor Transportation Division. 15 Years 'Thomas V. Kelly, Locomotive Engineer, Railroad I (ivision. 'Frank McGuinness, Train Dispatcher, Railroad Division. *Harvey D. Smith, Carpenter Foreman, Maintenance Division. George O. Tarflinger, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic, Commissary 1 (ivision. *Winton A. Webb, Pharmacist, Gorgas ( hit -patient Sen ice. "William H. Will, Tilesetter, Maintenance I (ivision. RETIREMENTS IN APRIL Emplo) ees who retired at the end of April, their birthplace, titles, length of service at retirement, and their future addresses are: Anthony Fernandez, Spain; Foreman. Marine Bunkering Section; 30 years, 3 months, 1 day; address uncertain. Floyd W. Forrest, Virginia; Chief, Aids lo Navigation Division; 24 years 8 months, 8 days; I Iudgins, Ya. Frank J. Gerchow, Louisiana; Lockmaster, Mirations Locks, 39 years,2 months 8 days; Monteoursville, Pa. John W. Manush, Alabama; Tunnel Operator, Pedro Miguel Locks; 38 years, 9 months, 26 days; Portland, Me. John B. McDougall, Pennsylvania; Clerk, Maintenance Division; 25 years, 11 months, 7 davs; Flushing, X. Y. Avory O.McGlade, Illinois; Planing Mill Hand, Industrial Bureau; 23 years, 1 month, 13 davs; Balboa. Dr. John D. Odom, Alabama; Quarantine Officer, Balboa; 34 years, 5 months, 22 days; Dothan, \1 i. Jerome F. Prager, Oregon; Superintendent. Storehouse Division; 37 years, 9 months, 24 days; Berkeley, Calif. William P. Quinn, North Carolina; Assistant Chief, Aids to Navigation; 38 years, 2 months, 2') days; Salisbury, N. C, William F. Rabiteau, Michigan; Truck I (river. Motor Transportation Division; 35 years, 11 months, 2 davs; Alpena, Midi. Marie C. Stapf, Pennsylvania; Governmental Accountant, Finance Bureau; 33 • us, 10 months, 20 davs; plans uncertain. Rudolph Swan, New York; Postmaster, Corozal; 14 years, 4 months, 15 days; Fort Edward, N. Y. Henry D. Weaver, Pennsylvania; Admeasurer, Navigation Division; 36 years, 2 months, 16 days; Florida. (Note. — Representatives of organizations listed below, or of others to be included in this calendar, arc asked to notify the FMitor, Panama Canal Review, by the 20th of each month ol any permanent changes in meeting places, dates, or times.) MAY 2nd — American Legion No. 6, Gamboa, 7:30 p. m. 3rd— Track Foremen No. 2741, Balboa B & B Shops. 4th -VFW No. 3857, Veterans' Club, Cristobal, 9 a. m. 5th— Postal Employees No. 23160, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. VFW No. 727, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m. VFW No. 3822. Curundu Road, 7:30 p.m. Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Union Church, 7 p. m. Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. American Legion No. 3, Gatun, 7:30 p. m. 6th — Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Teachers No. 228, Cristobal High School, 3:30 p. m. Gamboa Civic Council, Community Center, 7:30 p. m. Gatun Civic Council, Gatun Clubhouse, 7:30 p. in. 7th— VFW No. 40, Wirz Memorial, 7:30 p. m. 9th Blacksmiths, No. 400, with Boilermakers 463 and 471, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m. 11th — Pipefitters, Margarita Clubhouse, 9:30 p. m. Sheetmetal Workers, No. 157, Balboa Clubhouse, 0:30 a. ill. Plumbers, No. 606, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 9:30 a. m. 12th — Machinists, No. 699, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m. American Legion, No. 1, Balboa, 7:30 p. in. 13th— Electrical Workers, No. 397, Wirz Memorial, Balboa, 7:30 p. m. VFW, No. 100, Old Boy Scout Building, May Sailings From Cristobal Panama... __May 2 Cristobal.. ..May 9 Ancon May 16 Panama .May 23 Cristobal.. .May 30 From New York Ancon „_May 7 Panama . May 14 Cristobal.. ..May 21 Ancon May 28 Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. American Legion, No. 7, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary, No. 1, Balboa, 7:30 p. m. 14th— Carpenters, No. 913, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. in. Pacific Civic Council, Board Room, Administration Building, 7:30 p. m. American Legion, No. 2, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. 18th— CLU-MTC— Margarita Clubhouse, 8:30 a. in. 19th Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Electrical Workers, No. 677, Gatun Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m. 20th— Machinists, No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Operating Engineers, No. 595, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7 p. m. 21st— AFGE, No. 14, Balboa Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. Teachers, No. 227, Balboa High School, 7 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary, No. 3, Gatun, 7:30 p. in. 22nd— American Legion Auxiliary, No. 6, Gamboa, 7:30 p. m. 26th— Machinists, No. 699, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m. VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822 Post Home, 7:30 p. m. 27thOperating Engineers, No. 595, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. in. VFW, No. 100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. American Legion, No. 7, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m. 28th— AFGE, No. 88, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary, No. 2, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. 29th — Governor-Employee Conference, Board Room, Administration Building, 2 p. m. JUNE 1st— VFW, No. 3857, Cristobal Veterans' Club, 9 a. m. 2nd — American Legion, No. 3, Gatun, 7:30 p. m. Postal Employees, No. 23160, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m. VFW, No. 727, Fort Clavton, 7:30 p. in. VFW, No. 3822, Curundu Road, 7:30 p.m. Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Union Church, 7 p. m. Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. 3rd — Gamboa Civic Council, Community Center, 7:30 p. m. Gatun Civic Council, Gatun Clubhouse 7:30 p. in. Machinists, No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Teachers, No. 228, Cristobal High School, 3:30 p. m. 4th VFW, 40, Wirz Memorial, 7:30 p. m. 5th Carpenters, No. 667, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. March 15 Through April 15 The following list contains the names of those 1. S.-rate employees who were transferred from one division to another (unless I hi' change is administrative) or from one type of "work to another. It does not contain vvithin-grade promotions and regradings: CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Mrs. Melba L. Young, Clerk-stenographer, Wage and Classification Division, to Clerk-stenographer, Schools Division. Mrs. Edith M. Davis, Mrs. Sophia M. Von Pohle, from Substitute Teacher to Elementary School Teacher, Schools Division. Ralph E. Shuev, from Postmaster, Howard AFB, to Special Postal Clerk, Postal Service. Mrs. Irene S. Walling, from Clerk-stenographer, Finance Bureau, to Clerk-stenographer, Police Division. Louis F. Dedeaux, from Commissary Assistant, Commissary Division, to Postal Clerk, Postal Service. Sam A. Foreman, from Guard, Atlantic Locks, to Fireman, Fire Division. ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU James J. McDade, from Construction Supervisor, Maintenance Division, to Construction Inspector, Contract and Inspection 1 (ivision. George W. Wertz, from Wireman and Wireman Leader to Foreman, Electrical Division. Mortimer J. Brennan, George W. Cunningham, from Wireman to Wireman and Leader, Electrical Division. Keith J. Lane, Julius J. Hentschel, from Wireman to Distribution Foreman, Electrical Division. Wilfred Morris, from Carpenter Foreman, Maintenance Division, to General Construction Inspector, Contract and Inspection Division. (See page /j)

PAGE 15

May 2,1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15 PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS (Continued from page 14) Francis E. Conover, from Commissary Assistant to Supply Distribution Assistant, Contract and Inspection Division. Constant W. Chase, Jr., from Electrical Engineer to Chief, Construction and Maintenance Branch, Electrical Division. W. Houlton Esslinger, from Assistant Chief Hydrographer to Chief Hydrographer, Engineering Division. Alvaro Cabal, from Cartographic Survey Aid, Surveys Branch, to Civil Engineering Draftsman, Engineering Division. Zane Z. Zizz, from Powerhouse Operator to Powerhouse Operator-Dispatcher, Electrical Division. HEALTH BUREAU Marie V. Weber, from Nurse, Gorgas Hospital, to Chief Nurse, Palo Seco. MARINE BUREAU Victor L. Sanger, Victor C. Melant, from Junior Foreman, Ferry Service, to Drill Runner, Dredging Division. Arthur J. McLean, Arthur J. Logan, Clive W. Lewis, from pilot-in-training to probationary pilot, Navigation Division. Leonard S. Hart, Julius F. Dietz, Andrew Stohrer, from probationary pilot to pilot, Navigation Division. John P. Sterritt, from Stevedore Foreman, Terminals Division, to Towboat Master, Navigation Division. Glenn R. McNall, from Guard, Pacific Locks, to Junior Foreman, Ferry Service. David W. Ellis, from Tractor-bulldozer Operator to General Operator, Dredging Division. Claud M. Kreger, from Junior Foreman to Drill Runner, Dredging Division. John H. Droste, from Guard, Atlantic Locks, toPumpOperator, Dredging Division. Slaughter S. Sharpensteen, Edward O. Pike, from drill runner to blaster, Dredging Division. Charles S. Joyner, Charles J. Connor, from Drill Barge Blaster to Drill Barge Mate, Dredging Division. Edward H. Halsall, from Clerk, Housing Division, to Chief, Locks Security Branch, Locks Division. Marion S. Herring, from Dipper Dredge Engineer to Chief Towboat Engineer, Dredging Division. Roy J. Wiley, from YVireman, Electrical Division, to Lock Operator YVireman, Pacific Locks. William H. Walston, from Foreman to Mate, Pipeline Suction Dredge, Dredging I livision. PERSONNEL BUREAU Mrs. June B. Young, from Clerk-stenographer, Employment and Utilization, Division, to Secretary, Director's Office. Mrs. Lois B. Grant, from Clerk-typist, Personnel Records Division, to Clerk-typist, Employment and Utilization Division. Mrs. Zelda B. Glassburn, from Clerktypist to Personnel Clerk, Employment and Utilization Division. Billy Gene Mauly, from Recreation Supervisor, Schools Division, to Personnel Assistant, Personnel Bureau. RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU Mrs. Robin L. Comer, from Accounting Clerk to Transportation Rate Audit Clerk, Terminals Division. Hugh A. Turner, from Gauger, Storehouse Division, to Cribtender and Gauger Foreman, Terminals Division. SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU Francis J. Sweek, from YVireman, Electrical Division, to Plant Electrician, Commissary Division. Henry E. May, Jr., from Pump Operator Dredging Division, to Gauger, Storehouses Division. Cecil Kovel, from Meatcutter, Commissary Division, to General Storekeeper, Storehouses Division. Herbert A. Taake, from Lock Operator, wireman, Pacific Locks, to Electrician, Commissary Division. Eulie M. Bennett, from Accounting Clerk to Storekeeper, Motor Transportation Division. Frank N. Light, from Truck Driver and Craneman, Motor Transportation Division, to Hoisting and Portable Engineman, Storehouses Division Harry J. Ailant, James M. Purdy, from Heavy Truck Driver to Heavy Truck Driver and Tire Rebuilder, Motor Transportation Division. Canal Review 3rd Birthday Observed With This Issue The Panama Canal Review is blowing out a birthday candle. It is now 14 issues and 2 years old and this is its birthday edition. With two years of publishing under its belt, The Review has these words for its widening public about the other parts of its public and a review of its own facts of life. The Review was born May 5, 1950, coming into an organization which was then without journalistic chick or child. The Review's older sister, the old Canal Record, had dwindled away to shipping statistics, then died early in World War II, choked by the ban on publication of such facts and figures. When The Review arrived, after about a year aborning, it was dedicated by Governor Newcomer, in the first of his Review messages to employees, to "a better understanding of our common (Canal) problems." And from that time on, The Review has been telling its readers about people, places, plans, and interests that touch the Canal and its employees. Then in August, 1951, there was a change, and The Review became a monthly instead of a quarterly publication Now 760 Subscribers When the stories and pictures started coming out by the month instead of by quarters, the number of subscriptions was only about 100. By April 1952, the number of subscribers had climbed to 760 people who were scattered through 43 of the 48 States in the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Salvador, Jamaica, Honduras, Puerto Rico, Bolivia, the Canal Zone, and Panama. Retail sales at Commissaries, Clubhouses and Hotels average over 5,000 monthly. The Review also goes to many libraries; colleges, industrial organizations; newspaper and magazine representatives; government agencies in Washington and elsewhere; Congressmen; shipping companies and their representatives on the Isthmus, in the United States and other countries; the Suez Canal; shipping publications; port authorities; banking concerns; airlines; branches of the Armed Services; and various embassies and consulates. The Review's continuing invitation to readers to write to the editor opinions and suggestions has provided ideas which later turned into stories and features in the publication. Many other opinions and comments come to the editor in letters which accompany requests for subscriptions. Most subscription letters contain only favorable comment, coming, as they do from people who express with their dollars their general approval and desire for more of the same. Operation With Two Panama Line Ships To Be Considered By Board Retires Soon (Continuzd fnm page 1) consulting services for a general study of the Panama Line operations. The bids were not accepted and at the Board's meeting here in January a committee composed of W. R. Pfizer, Vice-President of the Company, and Daniel E. Taylor, Board member and President of the West India Fruit and Steamship Company, was appointed to make a study of the Line's operation. Report Is Submitted Their report was submitted at the April meeting at which time the Board voted to defer all action until data could be obtained on possible economies which might be effected by the removal of one ship from service as well as the possible effect such action would have on the passenger and freight service for the Company. This study is now in progress and the report will be submitted to the Board for consideration at the coming meeting. The Panama Line, then named the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, used only two ships for many years before the three new liners were built and put in service during the late 1930's. During that period, the two vessels, the SS Ancon and SS Cristobal, maintained a ten-day round-trip service between Cristobal and New York with Port-au-Prince, Haiti, as a port of call both on the northbound and southbound sailings. The WILLIAM H. DUNLOP, Director of Finance plans to retire from the Canal service at the end of this month after 26 years of service. A native of Beardstown, 111., Mr. Dimlop joined the Canal organization in January 1920 as an employee in the Engineering Division. He had served as Chief of the Management Division before his transfer to the Finance Bureau in June 1951 after the retirement of Arnold Bruckner as Director of the Bureau. Mr. Dunlop served several months as Acting Director and was elected to the position by the Board of Directors at the January meeting in the Canal Zone. The Finance Director is a general officer of the Company and the by-laws require his election by the Board of Directors. Port-au-Prince calls were eliminated when the Panama Line's service was renewed after the close of the war.

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16 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2,1952 Work In Corozal Area Will Be Rushed; About 250 Family Apartments Planned Where Did He Get That Hat? Old-time Canal Employee's Had 'Em Eor Years ituedfom page 12) in Otis' History of the Panama Railroad, printed in 1867, shows that the first stop made by the two daily trains on the northbound run from Panama to Aspinwall (now Colon) was at Summit, 10 2 miles from Panama City. An old French map, dated 1886, shows "Canal buildings" and an old powderhouse at Corozal. Another map, dated November 17, 1899, shows 24 houses and a railroad station in the "Village of Corozal." Once Was Schuber Land Much of the land in the Corozal area was once owned by Henry Schuber, grandfather of Lewis B. Moore, Supply and Service Director. He recalls hearing his family say that the Schuber estate extended from about the present location of the Panama stadium to the general vicinity of the Cardenas River north of Corozal. Mr. Schuber, who built the Hotel Central in Panama City about 1880, had cattle and dairy farms on the land. Some of the rest was devoted to agriculture alone. When this area became part of the Canal Zone, the Schuber estate was eventually purchased by a land commission, although the final adjudication of the family's claim was not made until 1913 or 1914. After the United States took over the French Canal Company in 1904, Corozal became a residence for many of the men who worked at the Canal's headquarters in Panama City. The first ICC "hotel," really a large bachelor quarters, was built at Corozal and the men working in Panama City went back and forth to their jobs by train. As rapidly as quarters could be built— oldtimers recall that some of them were converted boxcars— bachelors and families were moved from Panama City to Corozal. On January 1, 1908, 13 married quarters at Corozal were occupied; by July 1 the number had increased to 29. Ninety-eight American men were in bachelor quarters and 470 laborers in the European and West Indian messes. Ernest Alphonso Blades, who has been an Isthmian for almost 47 years, does not remember just when he got his first Army campaign hat. The hat was a gift from his old boss, J. H. K. Humphrey, former Assistant Chief Quartermaster who retired in June 1941, and it was a good many years before 1941 that the hat changed hands, or heads. Ernest, as all the youngsters and most of the oldsters of Pedro Miguel, Red Tank and Paraiso know him, is wearing his third Army Stetson now. It was a gift of Fred DeV. Sill who wore the hat himself during the 1920's when, as a reserve officer, he was on active duty with the Engineers here. Ernest's headgear is as much a part of him as his job of care-of-groundsman, in the three communities, a job he has held in this same area since 1918. And very An ICC garden of some two-and-a-half acres supplied the hotel and the townspeople with fresh vegetables. Fifty street lights were installed and Corozal had a volunteer fire company. First School In 1909 Late that year plans were made for the first school, a two-room wooden building. The following year the total population had increased to 1,116—815 of these in the labor camps. A census taken in 1914 showed that the population of Corozal had more than doubled in five years, and also disclosed the presence there of troops. In 1914 there were 120 soldiers at Corozal, 1,127 American employees or their families, 1,071 men living in labor camps, and 374 others in what was described as "rural areas." Quarters for some of the families had been moved in from Culebra and Gorgona. Between 1914 and 1920 when, by Executive Order, Corozal became part of a military reservation, detachments of Engineers, Signal Corps, Quartermaster Corps, Field Artillery, and Cavalry were stationed at Corozal at some time or another. ERNEST A. BLADES BACHELORS of the early construction days lived in this "hotel" at Corozal. The first of its kind to be built in the Canal Zone, the hotel provided room and board for its guests at the rate of 90 cents a day. This photograph, taken in 19011, is one of the oldest in the Canal files. successfully too, his Pedro Miguel friends say. Ernest was born in St. Phillips, Barbados, 70 years ago last November 18. He worked on the island as a blacksmith's helper. Along about 1905 business was poor and work was scarce. A recruiting team from the Panama Canal organization visited Barbados and Ernest signed up, with several hundred other men, to come to the Canal Zone. The voyage from Barbados, he recalls, was made in a big transport which carried between 500 and 600 other West Indians who had been recruited for the Canal work. The trip, because of stops at other islands, took 10 days. Worked On Hotel Tivoli Ernest's first job, when he landed here (in September 21, 1905, was on the foundations of the Hotel Tivoli. After that came work in the lumber yard and machine shop of the Building Division and then a short stint as a blacksmith's helper in the Central Division at Empire. In 1909 he was transferred to the Quartermaster's Department and moved back to Ancon. For four years he worked as a gardener around the big official quarters near what is now the Ancon Courthouse. Then he went to Corozal where he worked again as a gardener, until Corozal became a military post. In 1918 he was moved to Pedro Miguel where, along with Red Tank and Paraiso, he has worked ever since. He enjoys some prowess as a snake hunter, but he dismisses this lightly. "Hundreds of snakes pass my path and I kill them," is all he has to say, except to add that he has never killed a bushmaster. Matter of fact, he cannot remember ever having seen one. Ernest lives with his wife in Paraiso. They have four sons and 23 grandchildren. No great-grandchildren yet, though. Norman, one of the sons, works for the Maintenance Division, as does Amos. Leo is a policeman and Charles an attendant at the Pedro Miguel gasoline station. They all live in Paraiso. At 70, most people are thinking of taking things a little easier, but not Ernest. He isn't ready to stop working just yet. He feels sure he has another couple of years work in him, he says. And few men 20 years younger look as well as he does, Army Stetson and all.

PAGE 17

May 2,1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 17 STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1939. PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY IS OLDEST HERE Honors as the oldest steamship company on the Isthmus of Panama go to the Pacific Steam Navigation Company. The company received its Royal charter on February 17, 1840. only three years after the young Victoria became Queen of England, and the long era of British steamship enterprise began. Its first charter granted it the right to work concessions obtained from the various Republics of the west coast of South America, with Panama as its northern terminal port. Together with the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, PSXC has been intimately connected with the narrow neck of land which unites the Americas since the company's beginning as a steamship enterprise. Passengers were taken to the Chagres River by steamers of the Royal Mail line, which was the Atlantic carrier. Then they continued up the Chagres by small boats and across the remainder of the Isthmus by pack mule. The trans-Isthmian trip took four days and nights and cost $18, without taking into account meals and other incidental expenses — a far cry from the one and one-half hour, $1.25 (by train) journey of today. Panama soon developed into a highly important section of the Pacific Steam Navigation Company's sphere of operations. The company purchased Morro Island, which is separated from Taboga Island at high water and is connected by a narrow strip of land at low tide. Here PSNC established workshops, houses drydocks, hospitals, and the famous "gridiron" where ships were drydocked and repaired. There are still remnants of the old buildings, paddle steamers, and other machinery on the island. In 1866, in order to get a supply of fresh water for its vessels, PSNC purchased a small area on Taboga Island. The company was unique in being the only steamship concern to have possession of island territory with monarchial rights. Both PSNC and the Royal Mail Company subscribed capital to the Panama Railroad Company in the mid 1850's. Traffic rapidly increased but the harmony between railroad and shippers was not to last. Argument with Railroad In 1869 the Pacific Steam Navigation Company complained to the Railroad that the division of through rates was excessive on traffic to and from Europe over the A. F. HOWARD, whose 29 years of service with the Pacific Steam Navigation Company include 23 years on the Atlantic side of the Isthmus, was interrupted by the camera in a business talk with Michael MacDonald, standing, head of the PSNC passenger department. Mr. Howard is manager for PSXt on the Isthmus. Mr. MacDonald, a comparative newcomer to the Isthmus— he has been here for only a couple of years — compiled the material for the accompanying history of PSNC activities on the Isthmus. railroad. The Railroad's Superintendent at Panama, Colonel A. J. Center, went to Callao to discuss the question with George Petrie, PSNC's west coast manager. They reached an agreement whereby the through rates were divided on a basis of one-third for the Atlantic carrier, one-third for the Railroad, and one-third for the Pacific carrier. Directors of the Railroad Company, however, rejected this agreement and the Pacific Steam Navigation Company removed its shops and dockyards from Morro Island to Callao and established a fast, direct line to Europe via the Straits of Magellan. Although the new direct service inaugurated by PSNC did not diminish, but rather increased, the coastal services on the west coast of South America, it did affect the trans-Isthmian route and the demand for coastal traffic to and from Panama fell away BEST KNOWN of any of the PSNC vessels which ply back and forth through the Canal is the Reina del Pacifico. This 17,872-ton, four-screw motor vessel, 551 feet long, averages eight trips a year through the Canal between England and the west coast of South America. She has accommodations for 780 passengers, and has been the repatriation craft fcr many West Indian oldtimers of Canal construction days who are going back home to the Islands. considerably as the direct service from Europe improved. Income from the railroad activities dropped appreciably. PSNC, however, with inauguration of the new service increased its business to such an extent that in 1874 H had become the largest -hipping company in the world, with a total of 57 steamer-, aggregating 127,700 tons. This tonnage was equal to that of the entire United States Navy at that time. In 1877 PSNC expanded further, establishing the Orient Line from the United Kingdom to Australia. Half a century later the Panama Canal was opened to commerce and PSNC was among the first shipping companies to utilize the waterway. Move to Cristobal In 1913 the Company's local offices were transferred from Panama City to Cristobal and later occupied the new Royal Mail Line Building (now known as the Pacific Steam Navigation Building) in the heart of Cristobal's "Steamship Row." Between World Wars I and II, PSNC became one of the Panama Canal's best customers. Many of those living here will recall the familiar buff funnels of the popular "O" class mail steamers, like the Orduna and the Orbila which transited the Canal every two weeks, and the small coastal vessels in the Central American and Caletero service which arrived in Cristobal with loads ol coffee, cocoa, and cotton for trans-shipment to Europe and the United States. The coastal service lasted from 1915 to 1945 when the coastal steamers, Acajutla and Salvador, were sold. During their 30 year's of service the two vessels each transited the Canal about twice a month, undoubtedly setting a record for those days for transits by any single craft. In the meantime PSNC had entered the agency business and had become representatives for such lines as Cunard Steamship Company, Holland-America Line, Port Line, Furness-Withv Line, and many others. More than 75 percent of the cruise liners which visit the Canal Zone are handled by PSNC. Among these are such famous transAtlantic liners as the Caronia, Mauretania, Ryndam, Nieuw Amsterdam, and the new Ocean Monarch. Losses in World War II With the outbreak of World War II, PSNC became joint agents for the Ministry of War Transport and local agents for Timber Control. A few familiar PSNC hulls disappeared: the 15,000-ton Oropesa was torpedoed and sunk off northern Ireland, the cargo vessel La Paz was torpedoed off Florida, and the MV Lagana was also torpedoed but managed to limp from the Caribbean into Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She was later repaired and returned to service. The company's largest liner, the Reina del Pacifico, was stripped of all her luxurious fittings. As a troop transport she saw service in many parts of the world. She was in Norway for evacuation of Allied troops; she took part in the North African landings. The liners Orbila and Orduna also saw war service but did not return to the Company's fleet at the cessation of hostilities. They continued.'as transports until recently when they were sold for scrap. The coastal steamer Acajutla was taken over by the United States Navy early in 1941 and WcS used to carry supplies and materials for the construction of airbases in the Pacific and Central American countries and in the Caribbean. During World War II the staff of PSNC's Cristobal office took part in many wartime activities, raising funds for "Spitfires," and collecting clothing for air raid victims in the United Kingdom. More Ships Ordered After the war the company began to rebuild. Its present fleet consists mostly ol post-war vessels. Among these are the fast cargo-passenger ships Kenuta, Flamenco, and" Cuzco, which have inaugurated a fast, direct service from Liverpool '-See page nj)

PAGE 18

18 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2, 1952 II. S. Registry Ships Hold Top Position For Third Quarter Vessels ol I nited States registry continued to have the largest number of transits (luring the third quarter of the fiscal year. Figures on the three muni lis traffic have 1 1 1 1 been released. The three next places, in frequency ol transits, remained unchanged from the two previous quarters: British, Norwegian and Honduran registries, in that order. Although United States ships remained In tirst place, in both transits and cargo carried, both figures for I'. S.-flag ships were less in the third quarter than in the two previous quarters of < his fiscal year. During the three mouths of January, February and March. 404 U. S. -registered ships, carrying 3,144,490 tons of cargo, t ransited I he Canal. During the second quarter there were 535 I, S.-registered vessels, with 3,400,570 ions ol cargo and in the first quarter 534 IS. ships with 3,699,405 tons of cargo. British shipping, which carried 2,096,489 tons during the past quarter in 340 vessels, was up. In the second quarter there were 297 British vessels and in the first 286. Norwegian shipping, in third place throughout this fiscal year, had 111 ships in the third quarter, 210 in the second and 175 in the first. Honduran vessels numbered 107 in the third quarter, 115 in the second and 101 ill the first. The first Iranian ship this year carrying 9,220 tons of cargo, transited during the past quarter. This was the sole Iranian transit. Mexico was second lowest with two and Costa Rica. Germany, Peru, Switzerland and Venezuela were tied with three apiece. Councils To Report Civil Defense Plans The progress which has been made in civil defense plans for the Canal Zone's civilian communities will be reported within the near future at a meeting of the General Committee of Civic Councils. Charles W. Hammond, General Committee President, said that the meeting would be called before the middle of May. The Civic Council became active in the civil defense picture following an air raid alert the night of Sunday, March 30. At a meeting the following Friday at Balboa Heights the Council leaders iigreed to begin a survey of volunteer strength in each community as well as to study other civil defense measures. Primary stress was to be laid on telling civilian residents what to do and where to take shelter in case of a raid alert, Mr. Hammond said. Arrangements have been made in Pedro Miguel for first-aid classes and a survey has been made of the town's four World War II air raid shelters. The area around these shelters has been cleared with cooperation of the police. First-aid classes are also to be held in Gamboa and other towns are expected to make similar arrangements. The classes will include some instruction in cal, chemical and atomic warfare, as well as in routine first aid procedure. After the meeting this month, Mr. Hammond said he will present to the administration at Balboa Heights a summary of the council activities. He said that possibly a little later a Canal Zone-wide simulated alert may be held to test and coordinate the activities of the various communities. Governor Newcomer Appears At His Last Employee Conference Continued from page 3) of failure to increase rentals was directed at the military services. In answer to two questions from Walter Wagner, CLU-MTC president, Governor Newcomer said that, 1 ) the cost of work already done at Summit was charged against Government funds, as is all site preparation, and 2) that grading at the new Corozal housing site will be held to a minimum. Attending the conference were: the Governor, Lieutenant Governor Herbert D. Vogel, Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director, and Forrest G. Dunsmoor, Executive Assistant to the Governor, for the Administration. Walter Wagner, E. W. Hatchett, J. J. Tobin, Carl J. Hoffmeyer, and Owen J. Corrigan, CLU-MTC; Pat Coakley, a visitor; Margaret Rennie, Russell Hileman, M. J. Goodin, and Raymond Ralph, Civic Councils; Daniel P. Kiley, Pacific Locks; H. J. Chase and Rufus Lovelady, AFGE; Robert C. Daniel, Railway Conductors; Andrew Lieberman, Marine Engineers; James Ahearn, Plumbers; and William S. McKee, Machinists. CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT Third Quarter — Fi seal Year 1052 1951 1938 Atlantic to Pacific Pacific to Atlantic Total Total Total Commercial vessels: Ocean-going 809 853 1,642 1,370 1,386 *Small 208 197 405 264 219 Total, commercial ..-..-1,017 1,030 2,047 1,634 1,605 'T. S. Government \essels: 126 96 111 *Small 71 11 112 1,214 1,167 2,381 Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons. ** Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated ships i ransited free. TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes: Third Q uarter, Fiscal Year 1952 1951 1938 130 126 264 434 305 145 131 101 30 219 196 142 51 27 39 189 192 271 104 79 134 107 70 65 277 274 296 1,642 1,370 1,386 CARGO HANDLED OVER PIERS (In short tons) 'Third Quarter Fiscal Year 1952 Average quarter, 1951 Average quarter, 1938 Cristobal Balboa Total All piers All piers 67,437 38,322 105,759 96,005 87,968 Local cargo forwarded 16,513 23,035 39,548 25,810 9,388 Transfer cargo received 102,353 1,946 104,299 105,137 138,386 Total incoming cargo handled 186,303 63,303 249,606 226,952 235,742 3,603 138 3.741 3,552 1,584 Transfer cargo forwarded.. 05.933 2,027 97,960 102,562 136,127 Total cargo handled and 285,839 65,468 351,307 333,066 373,453

PAGE 19

May 2,1952 THEfPANAMA CANAL REVIEW 19 HEADQUARTERS of the Pacific Steam Navigation Company are in this handsome three-story building, with penthouse apartment, directly opposite the Cristobal postoffice. Although the building's original name, Royal Mail, still appears on the facade, it is officially known as the Pacific Steam Navigation building. Traffic And Tol ls Reac h All-time Peak The increase in commercial shipping through the Panama Canal, which began last September, climaxed during the end of the last quarter with a new alltime record for the number of transits, cargo and Panama Canal net tonnage and the amount of tolls collected. The new record was 613 commercial vessels of over 300 tons, set in March. Cargo tonnage totaled 3,114,989 tons, Panama Canal net tonnage was 2,872,628 tons and tolls collected were $2,512,008.70 for the month. The previous high of 597 commercial ships of more than 300 tons was set in January 1929. During that same month the previous tolls record $2,501,949.64 — was set. The past quarter began with a slight drop in shipping from the end of the previous quarter. In December, 550 commercial vessels were put through the Canal. At the beginning of the quarter, January, this figure dropped to 522 and declined still farther to 507 in February. Tolls were also lower in January and February than they had been in December But the figure of 613 set in March and the record amount of tolls, pulled the entire quarter up so that the average monthly was 547 and the average monthly amount of tolls was over $2,234,000. The number of commercial transits has been over 500 each month since last September but went over 600, for the first time, in March. Grand Totals Is 2,381 In addition to the 1,642 large commercial vessels which transited during the quarter, there were 405 craft of less than 300 tons, and 334 U. S. Government vessels, to make a grand total for the quarter of 2,381. There was a marked increase in the amount of oil carried through the Canal by tankers in the Atlantic-Pacific trade, the figure this past quarter for this commodity being 838,471 tons as compared to 501,657 tons for the third quarter of the past fiscal year. Coal and coke shipments from the Atlantic to Pacific Ports were up. This commodity took the number two spot in the quarter just concluded with a total of 587,976 tons, as against 410,689 for the previous quarter and 377,347 for the corresponding quarter of the past fiscal year. Another increase, but this for trade in the opposite direction, was shown in banana shipments. These totaled 183,901 tons for the quarter just concluded, as compared with 182,532 for the previous quarter and 126,064 tons for the third quarter of fiscal year 1951. Newcomer's In Top Cargo Three commodities moved into the 15 most frequently carried cargoes, for the first time this fiscal year. One of these was soybeans and soybean products, 72,195 tons, although this figure was well below that of the previous fiscal year when this commodity, with 120,564 tons for the corresponding quarter, was eighth on the Atlantic-Pacific commodity flow. Chemicals, unclassified, are in the top 15, with 49,960 tons carried during the past quarter, as compared with 31,898 for the corresponding quarter in 1951. The other newcomer this year to the top 15 was manufactures of iron and steel, from Pacific to Atlantic. During the three months of the third quarter shipments of this commodity totaled 91,682 tons, as against 78,652 tons for the third quarter of 1951. As it has been for some time, mostly because of banana shipments, the largest number of ships using the canal were on the trade route between the east coast of the United States and the west coast of South America. This number, 434 for the past quarter, was up appreciably from the two previous quarters this year. The next most frequently used trade route was that between Europe and the U. S. Canadian west coast. Intercoastal traffic, 130 ships for the quarter just ended, remained close to the figure for the previous two quarters this year. This trade, however, is considerably lower than for 1938. Pacific Steam Navigation is Oldest Here {Continued from page ij) to the Canal Zone. They make the run in 12 days. These three ships have been so popular that PSNC has placed orders for three more vessels of the same type. The additional three will soon be in service. The Reina del Pacifico, completely refitted, rejoined the service in 1949 and is now a link between the United Kingdom, France, Spain, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Havana, Jamaica, the Canal Zone and ports on the South American west coast. The present local business activities of PSNC are handled by Arthur F. Howard, who has been in the Canal Zone for over 23 years. He became manager January 1, 1951, after the retirement of Alan N. Dodd. He is assisted by a group of young Englishmen, all of whom have served with some branch of the British military service, and by a local staff of Panamanian and West Indian employees. Some of these have been with PSNC for over 40 vears. MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS Vessels of 300 tons net or over By fiscal years Month Transits roils (In thousands of dollars) 1952 1951 1938 1952 1951 1938 July 463 513 457 $1,981 $2,373 $2,030 490 453 505 2,103 2,093 2,195 516 446 444 2,189 1,982 1,936 October __ 544 480 461 2,230 2,iioS 1,981 502 446 435 2,053 1,844 1,893 December 550 452 439 2,34 7 1,886 1,845 522 452 444 2,121 1,854 1,838 February,_ 507 444 436 2,082 1,853 1,787 March.. _:_ ... .... 613 474 506 2,512 1,943 2,016 April 470 487 2,007 1,961 May 485 465 2,020 1,887 478 445 1,982 1,801 Totals for first nine months of fiscal vear 4,707 4,160 4,127 $19,618 $17,896 $17,521 Totals for fiscal year

PAGE 20

20 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW May 2,1952 = NEW SUPERINTENDENT KDWARD R. JAPS became Superintendent of Storehouses April 27, succeeding J. F. Prager, who retired during the month and is now en route to his new home in California. Mr. Japs has been with the I'imama Canal organization since 1917 when De went to work as a foreman in the Building Division. He has been with the Division of Storehouses since 1925. Governor Newcomer's Four-Year Term Notable For Far-Reaching Changes iCtmtinuedframpagell) a few ranking officials occupy the same positions in 1952 as in 1948. Retirements and reassignments were responsible for the change and the creation of new bureaus brought new officials into office. Employee Relations Improved To better employee relations, Governor Newcomer began monthly "shirtsleeve conferences" which are just as informal as their nickname— they are known, officially, as Governor-Employee Conferences. At these meetings representatives of labor groups and Civic Councils discuss matters of overall interest. The Governor has held frequent round table discussions with labor groups, in addition to the monthly meetings. In May 1950 he conferred for several days with national and local leaders of the American Federation of Labor. Another step toward betterment of employee relations was the institution of The Panama Canal Review. Its first issue two years ago announced that its primary objective was "giving all employees a better understanding of problems affecting any considerable number." During his term of office, his associates believe, Governor Newcomer has been required to devote more time to official visitors than any preceding chief executive. These visitors have included the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Army, a large number of Congressmen, members of the Board of Directors, representatives of the Bureau of the Budget, and a number of special consultants on various projects such as incorporation changes and the housing program. Despite a busy official life, Governor Newcomer has found time for a few outside activities. He is a member of the Chapter of St. Luke's Cathedral. He is interested in watching baseball. And he is an ardent— if not very good — golfer. All in all, the four years between May 20, 1948 and May 19, 1952, have been, for the Canal Zone as well as for Governor and Mrs. Newcomer, busy, important, significant, and interesting. Principal commodities shipped through the Canal (All figures in long tons) Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1949 columns indicate relative positions in those years ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC Commoditv Mineral oils Coal and coke -Manufactures of iron and steel Phosphates Paper and paper products Machinery Vutomobiles and accessories.. Cement Tinplate Soybeans and products Sulphur Raw Cotton Sugar Chemicals, unclassified. Ammonium compounds All others Total Third Quarter, Fiscal Year 1952 838,471 587,976 448,629 201,966 116,138 86,562 85,664 79,497 73,452 72,195 70,642 62,507 58,836 49,960 39,412 925,564 3,797,471 1951 501,657 (1) 377,347 (3) 388,345 (2) 128,577 (4) 79,796 (5) 61,629 (11) 73,920 (10) 67,196 (15) 44,723 (13) 120,564 (8) 49,543 (9) 87,922 (6) 43,521 (7) 31,898 (16) 23,168 (14) 828,909 2,908,715 1938 Olz 00 = ISJ236,664 (2 27,867 (13 362,008 (1 67,518 (6; 90,274 (4) 40,735 (10) 76,102 (5) 26,719 (14) 56,451 (7) 493 (~) 44,830 (9) 56,323 (8) 32,587 (11) 25,179 (17) 10,409 (22) 895.495 2,049.654 PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC Commodity ( (res, various Lumber Wheat Nitrate Canned food products.-. Bananas Sugar — Metals, various Refrigerated food products (except fresh fruit) Mineral oils Iron and steel manufactures. Wool Coffee. -. Copra Dried fruit All others Total. Third Quarter, Fiscal Year 1952 825,352 733,110 583,416 358,579 312,537 183,901 181,890 158,633 156,751 110,043 91,682 78.839 77,565 63,830 61,847 660,538 1951 4,573,793 970,117 870,197 407,556 391,256 308,294 126,064 240.622 140,269 (1) (2) (4) (5) (6) (9) (7) (8) 128.626 (10) 95,729 (3) 78,652 (14) 63.299 (13) 63.838 (12) 45,670 (11) 22,124 (19) 679.069 4,575,266 1938 542,936 632,901 267,904 530,861 220,124 20,076 (17) 299,404 (5) 1 (.5,473 (8) (2) O) (6) (3) (7) 106,820 (10) 498,282 (4) 2,263 (-) 37,915 (15) 53,179 (13) 51,926 (18) 62,570 (12) 726,406 4,313,123 Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels Third Quarter — Fiscal Year 1952 1951 1938 Nationality Number of transits Tons of cargo Number of transits Tons of cargo Number of transits Tons of cargo British 340 15 9 30 3 2,096,489 62,259 77,789 31,021 9,217 264 15 2 17 1 1,682,785 72,161 18,490 15,927 9,400 348 3 1,626,625 10,012 2 56 48 34 234,802 28,008 49 69 177,813 29,075 161,735 1 26 86 19 10 4.021 40 3 29 107 1 8 20 26 1 7 1 ,393 7,416 272,616 130,462 9,220 5,540 110,637 188,743 28 2 26 84 153,543 2,391 237,518 173,751 138,303 312,330 96,467 Honduran 3,839 Irish 20 17 126,475 133,030 12 77 1 31,762 495,136 25 2 27 74,022 2.000 148,289 10 2 23 4 140 53 2 6 2 38,780 Netherlands 112,587 1.250 578,622 344,051 6,975 37,501 8,860 77 179,917 Norwegian Panamanian Peruvian Philippine 222 100 3 6 782,748 506,624 7,710 37,674 174 44 3 2 848,325 56,087 4,008 2 4,375 6 40 3 47,086 168,851 11,612 32 145,537 28 187,191 United States 492 3 3,144,490 4,546 498 4 3,373,214 3,615 413 2,195,344 2 7,300 Total 1,642 8,371,264 1 1,370 7,483,981 1,386 6,362,777


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