Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum
PANAMA


AL


Vol. 2, No. 9 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, APRIL 4, 1952 5 cents


1953


BUILDING


PROGRAM


CALLS


FOR


EXPENDITURE


OF


$31,750,000


Distinguished


FOR


HOUSES,


Sightseers


PUBLIC
Schedule


BUILDINGS
Will Reach


Peak In
After


Months


Next July


ANDREW HEISKELL, publisher of Life Magazine, and Mrs. Heiskell (Madeleine Carroll)
among the group of leading publishers and editors of North and South America visiting the Pedr
guel Locks recently. The visit was made during the course of the meeting of the Directors of the 1
American Press Association held in Panama during the latter part of March.
Miss Carroll, beautiful stage and screen actress, and her husband were as thrilled by the Loci
ration as thousands of other visitors who see them for the first time. After their visit to the
Miguel Locks. the Proun made the trin through Gaillard Cut ahnard tha orhrnehnu, Atlans.


A program of contracting for
approximately $31,750,000 for
Canal housing is planned dur-
ing the coming fiscal year if ap-
propriation requests now before
Congress are approved.
The House Appropriations
Committee has recommended a
$3,000,000 cut in the amount
requested for the building pro-
gram next year.
The building schedule will
reach a peak during the 12-
month period beginning in July
1952 under the revised plans
which call for completion of the
quarters replacement and con-
struction program by the end
of the fiscal year 1956 instead
of 1958. Next year's expendi-
ture will be by far the largest
of any year in the six-year pro-
gram, although work to be
started will extend well beyond
July 1953.


ks op-
Pedro


The majoi
year will be


r portion of the money next
spent on the local-rate quar-


I This istne of your CANAL REVIw was dclaved I


-|-C7-




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


Conferees


Discuss


Girl


Scouts'


40th


Birthday


Housing, Food Cost,

And Schoolbusses

The housing program is beginning to
move along, Lieutenant Governor Her-
bert D. Vogel told the Governor-Employ-
ee Conference during the March meeting.
Matters of housing, commissary sup-
plies and prices, school busses and park-
ing occupied most of the time of the con-
ference which lasted beyond the usual
four o'clock closing time.
During a general discussion of housing.


.C7


-,


during which Colonel Vogel said he was
unable at that time to give the conferees
any definite information on the transfer
by the Army of land to replace the Sum-
mit building site, the Lieutenant Gover-
nor said that sufficient housing will be


completed
begin the
Cristobal.
Colonel
housing co
readjusted
housing to


at Margarita by October to
vacating of old quarters in
Vogel commented that the
instruction program had been
to permit the oldest and worst
be replaced first, deferring the


replacement of some of the comparatively
newer existing houses until later in the


GIRL SCOUT TROOPS from both sides of the Isthmus lined the Administration Building steps at a
rally last month in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the founding of the organization. Highlight
of the impressive ceremony was the presentation of a Thanks Badge of the Girl Scouts to Mrs. F. K. New-
comer, wife of the Governor, for her help in Scout work during the eight years of her residence in the Canal
Zone. This is one of the highest honors bestowed by the organization. Mistress of ceremonies at the 40th
anniversary rally was Mrs. M. D. Monagan. The address of welcome was presented by Mrs. Andrew Bail-


kowski and the group singing was led by Miss Mary


Patton, Director of Girl Scouts in the Canal Zone.


program.
For instance, he said, the houses
construction in New Cristobal will
immediately replaced. Quarters
provided instead for those living
very old quarters of other areas.


of later
not be
will be
in the


CANAL I

IN


NOW


LISTED


DEFENSE


WITH


AGENCY


PERSONNEL


ACTION


"Worst First" Scheduled
The schedule he said had been realigned
to replace the "worst first, the best of the
old houses last, and spread the benefits of
new housing out."
He touched briefly on plans for the
coming fiscal year and said the entire pro-
gram was scheduled for completion in fis-
cal year 1956.
Daniel P. Kiley, representing the Paci-
fic side Locks employees asked if gasoline
prices would go higher, and Colonel Vogel
said that no further increase-except in
case of an increase in the supplier's
charges-was contemplated. After a gen-
eral discussion of the gasoline situation,
the conferees were told that a fuller report
would be made at a coming meeting.
Bronson Powell. of the Pdirn Mirnml


Both the Panama Canal Company and
the Canal Zone Government have now
been listed as defense agencies in connec-
tion with personnel actions under Civil
Service regulations.
This action will have an important
effect on the employment of personnel
and on voluntary separations from the
Company-Government service. It gives
the Company and Government authority
for making non-competitive appointments
of certain present or former employees in
the "indefinite" status.
It also grants the prerogative of acquir-
ing new employees by transfer or other-
wise from non-defense agencies. This has
not been possible under Civil Service reg-
ulations during the present emergency
1


ment will have authority to restrain em-
ployees from employment with non-
defense and other defense agencies. This,
however, is a permissive authority, and
the Company-Government may grant
permission for the transfer of an employ-
ee to another Government agency.
The listing of the Company and Gov-
ernment as defense agencies means that
the reemployment rights hitherto effect-
ive for employees transferring to a de-


fense agency will n
unless such a transfc
However, an emplo:
the Panama Canal C
Zone Government
agency will have the
granted under Civil


o longer be effective
ir is with permission.
yee who transfers to
company or the Canal
from a non-defense
reemployment rights
Service regulations.


The Civil Service Commission's depart-


CONNECTION





April 4, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Residents


On


Of


New


Silver

Official


City Will

Name Of


ote


Their


own


THIS AERIAL VIEW of the new section of Silver City shows the large
number of new houses which have been completed in that area. This section
has been nicknamed "Rainbow City" by the residents because of the multi-
colored houses there. THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW is sponsoring a referen-
dum of all residents of Silver City and the area now known as Camp Coiner


to determine if the majority want the name of their town officially changed.
A total of 91 duplex apartment buildings were constructed in this area by
Framorco, Inc., under last year's program and 96 more duplexes are now
under construction by the Isthmian Constructors, Inc.


For the first time in the history of the
Canal Zone the residents of a community
are to be given an opportunity to vote
their preference for the name of their
town.
Governor Newcomer has authorized
THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW to conduct
a poll of the residents of Silver City
(including Camp Coiner) to determine if
they wish to change the name of the
town. The poll will be conducted this
month by THE REVIEW in collaboration
with the International Boy Scouts by a
house-to-house canvass.
Six names have been proposed. They


Silver City
Rainbow City
Folks City


Manzanillo
Granada
Mindi


rpI, n nmnrn ar f,% ,ci l int* 4 rn 'iT 4-,,


Boy Scout Council in the Canal Zone;
and J. Rufus Hardy, Editor of THE
REVIEW.
A formal report on the result of the
balloting will then be forwarded to
Governor Newcomer for the selection of
the official name, which will be an-
nounced in the next issue of THE REVIEW.
The ballots will be distributed and
collected by the members of the five
International Boy Scout Troops of Silver
City, who will work under the general
direction of Joseph A. Hassocks, Scout
Commissioner, and Romeo G. Miller,
District Commissioner. There are over
200 members of the five troops and it is
expected that the ballots can be distri-
buted and collected in a few hours' time.
Scout Troops To Help
Thp .eniit tronns to assist and their


first reference to it was a report of the
Building Site Committee which recom-
mended that "when funds are available,
a town for silver employees be built on
the new fill south of Folks River and
south and east of the Corral." This
recommendation, approved by Governor
Harding, was signed by Major E. E,
Person, Assistant Chief Health Officer,
Chairman; Major W. R. Grove, Chief
Quartermaster; Hartley Rowe, Resident
Engineer of the Building Division; and
Daniel E. Wright, Municipal Engineer.
The memorandum of the Building Site
Committee was forwarded to the Gov-
ernor by Judge Frank Feuille, then
Special Attorney for The Panama Canal,
who was serving as Chairman of a Com-
mittee on Standard Nomenclature of
Geographic Features of the Canal Zone,





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


April 4,1952


Like lightning, model railroading as a
hobby may hit anybody, any time, at
any age. And, like lightning, the hits
may be few and far between but a second
stroke is rarely needed.
For example, when junior wakes up
on Christmas morning, he may find the
old man under the Christmas tree oper-
ating his new train which Santa just left
him. Such an occasion often means
that an adult model railroad engineer


has b
Fey
road
pastir
basis.
Assoc


een born.
v outside the k
ig realize that
ne and is organ
The National
nation, Inc., has


hers scattered through
and several other c


:en of model rail-


it is
sized on
Model
some 9
the Uni
countries.


lishes its own periodical wh
in its 18th year and is widely


Here in the Canal


known
Model
are als
ization
seven r
although
bership
associa
ing to
Wha
bers, h
enthusi


1


Zone the


national
National
Railroad
)00 mem-
ed States,
It pub-
h is now
irculated.
group is


as the Canal Zone Society of
Railroad Engineers, all of whom
o members of the national organ-
. The local branch now has only
members and three junior members
gh it also claims an inactive mem-
of eight who retained their
tion with the society after return-
the United States.
.t the local society lacks in num-
owever, the members make up in
iasm and in railroad track, loco-


motives, rolling stock, yards, swi
tunnels, depots, scenery, trestles,
all the other paraphernalia.


tches,
and


its fourth anniversary. During those
four years the intricate track system has
been rebuilt three times. Each rebuild-
ing, they claim, only incites further inter-
est for improvements and developments.
One of the club's current problems,
according to C. F. Van Steenberg, Jr.,
President of the Society, is to arrange for
a proper division of the railway system.
When completed, this will permit a
member to operate the yards and transfer
control to another member when a
train reaches the main line.
Variety of Occupations
A roster of the club membership is
the best indicator that model railroading
is a bug which can bite anyone. Mr.
Van Steenberg is employed as an elec-
trical engineer by the Navy. The occu-
pations of other officers and members
are: A. G. Baggott, Tunnel Operator at
Gatun Locks, Vice President; Mrs. Ida
H. Fuller, of the Payroll Division, Secre-
tary and Treasurer; J. J. Wood, of the
Finance Bureau; B. M. Duff, Automo-
tive Inspector of the (See page 12)


RELATIVE SIZE is demonstrated here by pretty
Marie Jenkins, Balboa High School student, holding
a section of tracks with a late-model Diesel engine
and car. Much of the wall space at the club's head-
quarters in the Corozal railroad station is taken up
by pictures of railway equipment, such as the cal-
endar in the background of this picture.


Headquarters at Corozal
Headquarters of the model railroaders
are in the old Corozal railroad station
which the club rents at a nominal fee.
The entire baggage room is occupied by
a built-up platform, except for a narrow
passageway around the walls, on which
has been built some ten miles (in mini-
ature) of track. The model itself,
known as the Pan-Am Railroad, is
complete with railroad yards, towns,
mountain scenery, switches, and a maze
of wiring to control the trains and the
block system.
The Canal Zone Society of Model
Railroad Engineers last month celebrated


THIS BUCOLIC scene with the barn and silo in the background is built along one section of the main
tracks. This scenery was recently completed by Mrs. Ida H. Fuller, only woman member of the club.
The tunnel at the left is one of several located on the 650 feet of main track. The model railroaders are
particular about every small detail of the layout and one member recently brought some tiny tramps
made of safety pins to lie alongside the tracks or "ride the rods?."


Model Railroading Is Intensive Fun






April 4,1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


OUR 1951 TOLL-
1 FATALITY-550 DISABLED


During the calendar
Canal Company-Ca


had 550 lo,
a fatality
38,112 wo
The accid
was 15.23,
provement
17.02. esta
rate is a


organ iza
The d


1951
one


st time inJuries, one
. These represent
rking days lost fr
ent frequency rate
which was an 11
over the previous b
blished in 1949. Th
new low record fo


tion.
divisions


sible for this
the Building I
Fire Divisioi
Grounds Main
Division, and
following; Sun
Civil Affairs B
Bureau, and I
reau. These u


requei
o 100


and u
ver-all
vision,
Con


tenance


miscel
apply a
bureau,
Railroad
nits est


icy rates ra
percent over


records.
Because
the first
for all the
"Accident
1951," w
compares
with their
with any
may have


Sof the
rear tha
bureaus
Statistic
which ha
the 195
r own 1
previous:
had pri


, the Panama
Government
of which was
a total of
om the job.
experienced
percent im-
est record of


uis freq
r the


mils chief
improved
Industrial
emissary
Division,


laneous tiun
nd Service
Community
i and Tern
abolished ne
ing from 1
eir own pre


reorganization
t statistics are
as they now e


s for the
just b
record
50 record
low rece
r to the


uency
entire


ly respon-
nent were
1l Bureau,
Division,
Terminals
its of the
Bureau,
y Services
finals Bu-
w accident
0 percent
vious best

i, 1950 is
available
xist. The


Calendar Year
een published,
of all bureaus
d, rather than
ord which any
reorganization.


This starting from "scratch," as it were,
places all bureaus on an equal basis for any
future comparison of one record with that
of another.
Almost all the bureaus bettered their
own 1950 accident frequency record by a


HONOR


ROLL


Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
February


COMMUNITY


SERVICES


BUREAU


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEA
Community Services .............
Industrial...............-------------------.--.
Civil Affairs-----.-.----.--- -..
Engineering and Construction --..---
Health... ....Ii.... . .
Marine. ........ .............
Railroad and Terminals---------


R
2
1
0
0


percent to 54 percent improvement
e Industrial Bureau taking top
[th the 54 percent improvement.
bureaus were the Industrial, Supp
*rvice, Railroad and Terminals,
unity Services, Engineering and
ruction, Health, and Civil Affairs.
hievements in accident prevention
ntrilbuted to the substantial lowe


accident


fr


organization.
It is possible
to better their
is the goal towa
ually direct the
it comes to ac
promotion of s
much where a d
given time in c
the important t
ually strive to i
As their fre
minimum, the
additional impi
greater, and the
will have great


equency rat

for all div


own best
rd which a
ir efforts.
cident pre'
;afety, it c
division or u
comparison
hing is for
improve the
quency ra
effort nec
movement "
least letup
er adverse


e for the


isi

*cord, a
should
herefor
untion a
es not
t stand
ith oth


t, with
honor-,
These
ly and
Comn-
Con-
These
greatly
ring of
entire


and units


nd this
contin-
e, when
nd the


them to contin-
ir own record.
tes approach a
essarv to show
will have to be


in safe
results


It is hoped that everyone
with the splendid spirit of int
ation, and effort, that has b
1951 for accident prevention
resultant promotion of human;
elimination of pain, suffering
loss that occurs when safety
the support it deserves.
The following units will
Division HonorRoll award for


n juries


for the month


of Fe


GATION DIVISION, MO
PORTATION DIVISION,
STOREHOUSES, GROUN
NANCE DIVISION. The
tenance Division is tied in
the Division of Storehouses
of awards for this year.


The COMMUNI
REAU for the seco
receive the Bureau
having the Best Rec
While L. W. Char
for the Locks Divisi
States, he will attend
Michigan and Ohio
on "Fundamentals
National Safety Co
sence, R. S. Phillip
Safety Inspector for
R. J. Danielsen,
Safety Inspector for


TY SE


ict ices
their


I contain ue
st, cooper-
shown in
with its
welfare and
and wage
not given


ive the
isabling
Nx*


bruary: '
TOR TR
DIVISION
DS MAI
Grounds
first place
in the n

R\VICES


nd time th
Honor Rol


ord c
nbern
)n, is
dSaf
, and
of I
uncil


of the MI
s, Safety
on vaca
ety Con
a train
ndustria
* Durir


s, engineer
the Pacific
engineer,
the Atlant


FEBRUARY 1952


IT HAPPENED this way, Police officer hiram
Overall could be telling Balboa Magistrate Edward
Altman. To demonstrate how accidents occurred,
miniature cars and trucks can be placed in any posi-
tion (except on their sides) on the new magnetized
board. The board is visible from any point in the
courtroom, unlike small disgrams which were used
formerly. The board is the only one of its kind in
the Canal Zone courts.


s^AVI-
LANS-
N OF
NTE-
Main-
e with
number


' year will
award for
onth.
Inspector
tion in the
ferences in
ing course
1 Safety,"
ig his ab-
wvill act as
ranch, and
:11 act as
Branch.


SAFE alpha BETS

A


........ is for accidenlt-
Also Alert.
The second helps keep you
From getting hurt.
The first, you can see
\Without being a wizard,
Knocks you and production
From "A" down to "Izzard."


........ .warns of B
Bruises, Bumps, B
They can happen to
Borkowski or Jone
So Be careful, Be wa
Be Bright and Be
If you're stung By th
Brother, then you'


urns,
ousted
Bauer


Bones.


s-
tchful,
Brave.
tese B's,
II Behave.


Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked
(Freauencv Rate)


J


-





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


Chauffeur Since 1908
War, Jamaica Quake,


Recalls


Boer


Ten


Canal Building


ears


Ago


March


A swagger stick and a smile-that's
Fitz Herbert Alleyne Griffith. The swag-
ger stick-the current one is of polished
black palm is a habit acquired in the
nine years he spent in Queen Victoria's
British Army before he came to work for
the Isthmian Canal Commission way back
in 1908. The smile is just a part of him.
Griffith was 73 years old March 2, just
two days after he was retired from his
job of many years, driving a truck which
hauled lumber to repair Pacific side
houses. With the exception of a 15-day
lay-off in the fall of 1908, when he
switched from his first Canal Zone job
as a carpenter for the Panama Railroad
to the job he held for so many years, his
service was unbroken.
When Griffith went to work as a team-
ster for the Motor Transportation Divi-
sion on November 15, 1908, the Ancon
"corral" was located near the site of the
presentAnconpostoffice. He workedwith
horses and mules, the latter just as stub-
born as mules anywhere else in the world.
Only way to get along with them, he re-
calls, was to let them know right off who
was boss.
When the Division was motorized he
became a chauffeur and was listed that
way on the rolls during all his years of
service.
Served In Africa


Born in th
bados, Griffit
1899, when h
British Army
was khaki but
something to
low seams do
and, for speci
The Boer w
it was only af
ing in Jamai
unit was sent


into the ac
as a reserve
where Afri
Atlantic.
corporal b
lery, earnir
Two ye


tiv
e (
ca'
In
om


eP;
h
e w
/.
thi,
see
wn


parish of St. Lucia in Bar-
vent to school there. In
'as 20, he enlisted in the
His day-by-day uniform
s dress uniform was really
: black trousers with yel-
the sides, a flannel coat


al occasions, a scarlet jacket.
iar had just broken out, but
ter some 18 months of train-
ca that Griffith's infantry
to Africa. They never got
'e fighting. They were held
component at Sierra Leone,
s shoulder juts out into the
1905 Griffith was made a
bardier in the Royal Artil-


ig "one and sixpence a
irs later, and a year


had been returned to
took a hand in ending


Jamaic
Griffith',


a,
3 1


day."
after he
nature
military


- 1


- -


FITZ HtERBERIT ALLEYNE G(RIFFITIL


on his way toc
revolver lying
Ancon postoffi
was examining
bullet passing
on his left hand
belonged to a
routed by polli


Work when he found a
in the street near the
ce. He picked it up and
it when it went off, the
through the index finger
1. The revolver apparently
prowler who had been
ce a short time earlier as


he was trying to force his way into the
old Ancon Masonic Temple.
Now that he is a retired man, Griffith
doesn't know exactly how he will spend
his time. He must care for his wife who
has been blind for almost three years.
He expects to find some chance to read
the Scriptures and "figure the right and
wrong of it," and he will also have more
time for his three grandchildren, the sons
and baby daughter of Joseph N. Griffith
of the Industrial Bureau. As grandfather
he enjoys them all, but he "favors" the
five-year-old boy.


Inquiries Still Coming
On French Company


War, and its local repercussions, and
the Third Locks continued to make Isth-
mian headlines ten years ago.
Reporters interviewed the sole survivor
of a torpedoed ship, a duty which was to
become only too familiar as the months
passed. He was a 17-year-old messboy
who had spent 21 days in a floating life-
boat, without water and covered with oil.
From his bed at the Coco Solo Naval
Hospital, the youth reported how one by
one the ten others in the lifeboat had died
or gone mad and jumped into the sea.


Instructions were issued to civilian and
military personnel as to how to recover bar-
rage balloons which had escaped from their
moorings around vital installations. In the
Canal Zone 431 air-raid shelters had been
completed or were under construction.
Strict regulations governing the taking of
photographs and possession of cameras in
or about the Canal Zone were issued. Some
250 local students began turning out the
scale model planes to be used in aircraft
recognition training.

The Canal announced that negotiations
were successfully completed with a large
Eastern manufacturing firm for fabricat-
ing and furnishing the miter gates, main
valves, and bulkheads for the third locks.
The cost was to be $16,190,418.
Earlier in the month the United States
Steel Export Company had submitted a
bid of $17,503,411 for the 44 miter gates
alone and had asked for as long as five
years to complete delivery. This bid was
rejected.

Col. Thomas B. Larkin, head of the Spe-
cial Engineering Division, was ordered back
to Washington for a new assignment. Later,
with the rank of Major General, he became
Quartermaster General of the Army.
He was succeeded as Supervising Engin-
eer by Col. Hans Kramer; Lt. Col. Charles
Barth (killed in May 19438 in the same plane
crash which cost the life of Lt. Gen. Frank


A t*Y I~ t C..- /


Bonds


Andrews)
Engineer.


became


Assistant


Supervising





1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


rr._J(p


Army


Secretary


Visits


Canal


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Panama Canal Press
Mount Hope. Canal Zone

F. K. NEWCOMER, Governor-President


H.D.


VOGEL, Lieutenant Governor


E. C. LOMBARD, Executive


cretary


J. RUFUS HARDY, Editor

ELEANOR H. MCILHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


letters


criticism


containing


is, or


will be welcomed.
will be published


used unless


desired.


inquiries,


suggestions,


opinions of a general


Those


of sufficient


but signatures


natures
interest


S--* ..^"t .
. ''- -.* ,


will not be


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$S1.00 a year
SINGLE COPIES-5 cents each


. i '- -
.= ',.: 'I
.4-


:- .
.' S' ^J :
.,
': "'
"*&,A'-^


On sale


at all Panama Canal


Commissaries, and
publication date.


Hotels


Clubhouses,


for 10 days after


SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10cents each


BACK COPIES-10 Cents Each


On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk. Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.


Postal money orders should


be made pay-


able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal


pany,
PANAM.


and mailed
A CANAL Ri


FRANK
day visit last


PACE,
month.


engineering mgen


., Secretary of the Army,


a press
of near'


Secretary Pace spent the
on matters pertaining to the Pa


tjon trip to


to the Editor,


EVIEW,


Balboa


Heights,


the Pacific


The picture


landing in


Locks


above was taken


(,atun. Left to right


dore E. Englebright;


Lieutenant


of the Army Counsellor.


The special


eminent from Secretar


had his first view


interview on the day before his


ly


years ago


of the Panama Canal


departure


he expressed


which made possible the Canal


entire day, Sunday, March 23,


Canal Company and the Canal Zone


and a trip through the Canal.


and its


during a


three-


amazement
facilities.


in conference with Governor Newcomer


Government and on ai


just after the party left the launch at the Aids


are: Governor Newcomer;


Governor


message to the employees


Herbert D.


of the


Panama


Secretary Pace;


Vogel; and Fred Korth, Deputy Department


n


to Navigation D
i Zone Policeman


minspec-

ivision
Theo-


Canal Company


y Pace, issued on the day of his departure, is shown below.


The last time the Canal Zone


retary I
while in


(enneth


C. Royall


was visited


was here. Although


office have been relatively


begun in May


Secretary


by a Secretary of the


visits to the


infrequent, there


and the Canal


Army was four years


Canal by Secretaries


have been several


1904. William Howard Taft was the first, coming to


of War.


C.'A NAT


OIPltOI


of the Army


Zone Gov-


when Sec-
-or War)


since the construction work was


the Isthmus in


November


1904, while


>NE GOVERNMENT
HRK'HTT, OMWAL ZONE
OF 'TB GoVKUNOR


Residents Of Silver City To Vote
On Official Name Of Their Town


(Continued from
and Balboa.


page 3)


Frijoles,


March
La Boca,


25, 1952


I I
J*


/+


Com-


Canal


Li^l




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


4,1952


Electric


Join


Brain,


Forces


Mechanical


Punch


'ermites


Paychecks


Ieni and machines are getting together
these days at )iablo Hleights to turn out
pavehecks for men and women of the
l'Panma ('anal Company and Canal Zone
governmentl.
The results of some of their labors lookt
like Swiss cheeses gone mo dern; some (of
the others look as if oblong termites have
taken a bite or two.
Thet heart of the new system of mech-
anized paychecks if machinescan besaid
to have a heart is a battery of 24 Inter-
national Business machines, 22 of them
concentrated in a smallish room on the
ground floor of the Payroll Division build-
ing at Diablo Heights.
There are some things, of course, which
will still have to be done by human brains.
But of the 52 steps which have been
worked out for processing Company-Gov-
ernment payrolls, the machines- or the
section where the machines are located-
can handle 3&.


in addition,


the machines


able, at the push of a switch to turn out
in a fantastically short time, just about
any sort of resume which is wanted.
Suppose the Treasurer, as he needs to
every quarter, wants to find out just how
much withholding tax has been deducted
from employee's salaries. A stack of
cards, one for each employee, is fed into
a machine. In almost no time at all, from
little holes in these individual cards, an
"electric brain" figures the total, checks
it, and prints it.
Holes Are the Cue
The holes are the cue to the entire pro-
cedure, which is known in accountant's
parlance as punched card accounting. The
holes give all kinds of information; they
further show the bitese" which are taken
out of each employee's salary for rent, or
income tax, or water, or light, or what
haven't you.
Take the first check which was issued
by machine, for instance. It went to
William H. Dunlop, Finance Director.
His IC number 15-happened to be the
lowest on the first gang to be processed


)by the machines early last month.
Sometime earlier, from information sup-
plied by Personnel, Finance, etc., a master
card had been prepared for him. It tells
everything machines or people need to
know about him for payroll purposes.
The card, perhaps significantly, is just
the size of an old-fashioned $1 bill.
Held so that light shines through its
perforations, its 69 holes mean nothing to
anyone but the experts. But the holes say
this to the IBM machines:
His roll, 4; his gang, 1; his IC number,
15; his name, which becomes in figures-
0-6, 12-9, x-3, x-3, 12-9, 12-1, x-4 (that's
William), 12-8 (that's H.), 12-4, 0-4, x-5,
x-3, x-6, x-7 (that's Dunlop).
Punches Tell Status
A little farther over on the card a punch
through a number 7 indicates that he is
a classified employee. Another punch
shows the number of his tax exemptions.
A hole through a zero shows that he is a
full-time employee, subject to retirement
and withholding tax.
(If he were a temporary employee, sub-
ject to withholding tax and social se-
curity- but not retirement the figure
punched would have been a 1. There are
other code figures for other types of em-


ployees.)
Still further toward the right side of
the plastic-impregnated oblong of stiff
paper, punches indicate that he is paid
bi-weeklv and give the amount of his


gross bi-weekly pay.
More punches tell the
his unit rate is by the ho
official rate is by the


machines that
ur and that his
year. Another


punched hole indicates his GS grade.
The last six punches show his personnel
status and are used to make up force and
budget reports.
To make these Swiss cheese effects is
the principal job of two machines known
as keypunches, informally called "me-
chanical termites." They transcribe
printed information into punched num-
bers, a great deal like coding machines.
To get the figures which stand for


William H. Dunlop, an operator like
Florence Scott or Shirley McNall types
the name on a keyboard lettered like a
typewriter. Instead of printing letters,
however, the machine reproduces the
name in figures which are punched on
the card.
Cards and Cards and Cards
This dossier in inhuman form, the mas-
ter card, is only one of several punched
cards from which the machines get the
information which eventually becomes a
paycheck.
Information on payroll deductions--
there are 80 possible ones for Company-
Government employees-is transcribed
onto other cards in the form of the little
oblong holes. A $20 bi-weekly rent rate,
for instance, shows up as 02000 on the
punched card. A hospital bill of $35 be-
comes 03500 by holes.
There is a separate card for each deduc-
tion. Those which are standard, like rent,
telephone, furniture rental, electric range
charges, can be used over and over again.
All the other cards are used only once and
discarded.
J. O. Barnes, Chief of the Payroll Div-
ision, estimates that 50,000 separate de-
duction cards will be used to process a
payroll. Each of these cards is punched
with the employee's roll, gang, IC num-
ber, name, etc.
Eventually they are sorted together by
one of the three machines whose opera-
tion is the most fascinating to watch of
any in the machine room. (Some of the
others are far more complex but the aver-
age observer can't understand them.)
The uncanny sorters see to it that all
of Mr. Dunlop's deduction cards-or
those of any other employee-are placed
together so that they can be summarized
for the final processes by which they are
(1) totaled and printed on the deduction
slip which will accompany each pay check
and (2) subtracted from the amount of
money earned to give the amount of the
check itself.


Works on Credit Side, Too


But that's all on the debit side. On the
credit side, men and machines also work
together to see how much Mr. Dunlon


Out


-





April 4,1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


visibly impressive (until you see its maze-
like insides) -of the 22 machines.


This electric
control board
ticular job it ii


"MECHANICALTERMITES" is the nickname for these keypunch machines. They "chew" little
holes into cards to guide the calculating, accounting, and sorting machines. Their operators, left to right,
are: Rosalie Smith, Florence Scott, Mrs. Kathryn Ammirati, and Shirlev McNall.


loses any money through
the time card.
It is also his job to furn
section with a total of h
basic, overtime, and hold
totals are the controls whii
must later reach. If the
do not agree with the
something is wrong some
Before the machine pro


Thornton turns
the others on hi
Durham, whose
stand him in go
trol clerk. He I
which are the f


the figuring on

ish the machine
ours worked at
ay rates. These
ch the machines
machine totals
manual totals,
where.
cess starts, Mr.


Mr. Dunlop's card and
is rolls over to Edward A.
15 years of Canal service
od stead in his job as con-
heads the U. S.-rate rolls,
irst being mechanized.


When he has made a check, the ma-
chine process of computing the paychecks
is ready to begin.
Computation Starts
The time cards are bundled up and sent
downstairs to Charles H. McKeon, head
of the machine section. Mr. McKeon, a
proud Texan who is a Certified Public
Accountant and who worked for IBM
before he came here last September, turns
the cards over to Don Herr, who has ten
years of government service in payroll
work, or to John A. Morales, whose serv-


ice-all with payrolls -dates
1931.
They pack the cards into sor
chines, three of which line a wa
i A t C rl j i i ,


back to


ring ma-
ll at one
i


process, two other operators take over
They are Rosalie Smith, who has worked
for several years in the machine account-
ing section at the Administration Build-
ing, and Mrs. Kathryn Ammirati, who
did keypunch work in the United States.
They operate verifiers. These machines
look almost exactly like the keypunches.
Miss Smith and Mrs. Ammirati have a


stack of time cards
stack of the already-p
cards on the other.
the time cards they
process which Miss
Nall have already coi


on one
unched
From in
go throi
Scott ai
mpleted


hand, and a
computation
formation on
ugh the same
nd Miss Mc-
. If the cards


were punched correctly in the first place,
the verifier runs without interruption.
Otherwise it flashes a red "error" light.
The punched computation cards have
up to now, been handled by rolls and in
sequence according to IC number, lowest
first. That's how Mr. Dunlop happened
to be low man on his totem pole. In this
order the punched and verified cards are
fed into an accounting machine which
totals and tabulates the number of hours
classified and wage board employees have
worked, by rolls. The totals are com-
pared with those sent from the control
section upstairs.
In the next step, the punched compu-
tation cards are turned over to the cal-
culating punch, the most amazing-if not


cal wizard is operated by a
which is wired for the par-
s to perform. A complicated


control board will take 10 to 12 hours to
wire. Mr. McKeon has wired most of the
boards so far, and Mr. Morales and Mr.
Herr are learning.
There are two of these calculating
punches in the payroll office. They can
add, subtract, multiply, and divide at an
amazing speed. They can even figure
income tax-unfortunately.
At the rate of one card each five
seconds, the machine performs the pro-
cesses necessary to find out what anyone
has earned in a certain number of hours
at his fixed rates. The results are punched
into the cards, for more Swiss cheese
effects.
By this time the machines have totaled
and chewed out of various cards Mr. Dun-
lop's gross earnings and have also totaled
and indicated by holes, just what deduc-
tions are to be taken out.
Now the payroll people are ready to
move on to the last of the machine calcu-
lations. A collator matches current pay
cards, which show the amount taken.
Any of the operators can run this machine.
(In addition to Mr. Herr and Mr. Mor-
ales, Carl Pajak is learning machine oper-
ation, dividing his time between his regu-
lar job as head of the deduction section
and the machine room.)
To "Electric Brain"
Back to the "electric brain" the cards
now go. The proper panel is set in place-
changing a panel takes only a matter of
seconds-and the calculating punch goes
to work. Into the card it computes and
punches taxes, retirement, and net pay,
and indicates those cards on which deduc-
tions exceed earnings. (Cards like the
latter call for special and complicated
handling.)
From the resulting pay cards the checks
themselves are printed and sent to the
Treasurer's office for signature. Even this
is mechanized.
The signature of the Company's Treas-
urer, J. W. Greene, has been reproduced
onto a metal plate which, for obvious
reasons, is kept under lock and key. The
plate is inserted into a check-signing ma-
chine which can sign and date 250 checks
a minute.
There are further steps, (8ee page 15)





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


2,500 Men Being Employed
For Canal Building Program
(Continued from page 1) work to be done by
Canal forces on the housing program will
require 200 or more additional employees.
Direct Income for Panama
The monthly payrolls of Canal con-


tractors will be, practically
direct flow into the Republi
since such employees are
commissary privileges unles
the Canal Zone. This influx
$200,000 a month in payroll
the stimulation of economy
the two cities of Panama
where unemployment ranks
since the money will be sp
food, clothing, and other ne
The monthly payrolls dire
from the Panama Canal Con
000,000 housing program w


augmented over the next ti
years by the acceleration of
which has been planned.
Although still in its early
building program is placing
onunemployment figureswhi
high locally for the past four y
the number to be used on q
struction this fiscal year will
absorb the bulk of the unemp
Republic of Panama, it will
able dent in unemployment
will go far to relieving the


speaking, a
c of Panama
not granted
s residing in
of more than
Is will aid in
principally in
and Colon,


are thickest,
ent for rent,
cessities.
etly resulting
npany's $80,-
ill be greatly


tree or four
the program

stages, the
a checkrein
ch have been
'ears. While
quarters con-
by no means
loyed in the
make a size-
figures and
present eco-


nomic strain.
At the present time the Canal's local-
rate force is about 3,500 less than the
immediate post-war level of 1948. By the
end of May, however, it is expected that
the force, plus those to be employed by
Canal contractors, will bring the total
number employed on local-rate rolls to
within about 1,000 of the July 1948 figures
when 17,700 were working.
Many Benefit Indirectly
These figures relate only to the work to
be done in the Canal Zone proper. Hun-
dreds of others will be given employment
in the Republic of Panama indirectly as
a result of the rapidly expanding building
program which entails the purchase of
great quantities of construction material
in the local markets. An instance of these
indirect benefits is the purchase of up-
wards of $750,000 worth of native lumber
for which contracts were recently awarded
The furnishing of this lumber will require
a major expansion of milling facilities,
principally in the Province of Chiriqui.


THE LIST OF JOBS available are posted daily on the bulletin boards of the Central Labor Office
in Balboa and Cristobal. During the past few years there have generally been more applicants than
jobs in all categories. The list is compiled from requests of all employing agencies in the Canal Zone,
including contractors.


READY FOR WORK is this group of men in the Central Labor Office in Balboa. The men rep-
resent several different types of workers. They are being given instructions on where and when to report
to work by John Eastmond, Clerk in the Central Labor Office. Men seeking employment must have
valid eligibility cards before they are accepted.


are already at
Manuel Calde
struction of a
building at M
a force of 100
this month.
The largest
fliW,.t n, m tO 1


work. In addition to these,
ron, contractor for the con-
new Commissary Division
ount Hope, expects to have
I engaged by the middle of

single force on contract
Papifipe id will he used hv


both sides of the Isthmus has been greatly
increased lately by the building program.
The increase was noted beginning at the
first of March after all construction con-
tracts were awarded. More new local-rate
employees were hired by the Canal dur-
ing the first two weeks in March than the
entire total in February.


W




April 4, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


NEW


ARTIFICIAL


RESPIRATION


11


METHOD


FIRST STEPin the newback-pressure arm-lift: or (HolgerNielson) method
of artificial respiration is demonstrated by Kenneth R. Coleman of the Balboa
Station, kneeling. He is instructing in the new method which has been adopted
officially here. The "victim" is Frank R. Constanzo, also of the Balboa Fire
Station.


ARMS ARE lifted toward the operator when pressure on the "victim's"
backisreleased. The accompanying article explainsdetailsof the back-pressure
arm-lift resuscitation method.


(Condensation of a release by Department
of Defense, Office of Public Information,
Washington, D. C.)
Many of you will at some time have to
administer artificial respiration to an ac-


cident victim. Be it a victim of drown-
ing, electric shock, or asphyxiation for
other reasons, artificial respiration must
be started by the first person on the scene
and that may be you.
Most of us are at least on speaking
terms with the Schafer prone pressure
method where the victim is placed face
down, the operator straddles him and
rhythmically applies pressure to the chest.
This forces air out of the lungs, but there
is no active manipulative phase to draw
new air into the lungs. It has recently
been proven by researchers that the Scha-
fer method is only about one-half as effi-
cient as most of the other known methods.
It has therefore been recommended that
another be adopted as a standard method.
This new method is called the back-pres-
sure arm-lift (or Holger Nielson) method.
The arm-lift provides a phase of active
intake of air.
In any method of artificial respiration
^n ~ */^~tlt/ t'i tr/ iv\v ...m I Ijv"


cline so the head is lower than the feet to
promote drainage from the nose and
mouth. The elbows are bent, the hands
placed one on the other and the head
placed so that one cheek rests on the
hands.
The victim's neck is extended (pulled
backwards) to provide a more open air
passageway. The operator then kneels at
the victim's head and faces his feet. With
the forefinger sweep the back of the
throat and mouth clean of debris and pull
the tongue forward. The operator's hands
are then placed on the victim's back on


Forty

In


ears


Ago


March


It was a month of records, with Steam-
shovel 124 leading the pack. On March 1
this 70-ton Bucyrus shovel with its three-


yard dipper
into 283 du
eight hours.
of material
type in one
7'. -


* loaded 2,830 yards of e
mp cars in a working da
It was the greatest am
excavated by a shovel of
day since work began.
J -.^. I^u 1 t-H 1- -1 -


arth
y of
3unt
that


a line drawn across just below his arm-
pits, the fingers are spread out and thumb
point toward each other.
Then with your elbows straight, slowly
rock forward, gradually applying pres-
sure, gently release, and as you rock back-
wards grasp the victim's arms just above
the elbows and draw them upward and
toward you until you begin to feel resist-
ance and tension at the victim's shoulders.
Then gently drop the arms to the ground
and repeat the whole cycle at the rate of
12 to 15 per minute. It is as simple as
that and you may save a life.


After a 12,000-mile voyage from Fal-
mouth, England, the twin-screw ladder
dredge Corozal reached Balboa on March 27.
The dredge had left Falmouth December
29 and was 88 days in making its long
voyage across the Atlantic and around
South America. It was subsequently used
for underwater excavation at the Pacific
entrance of the Canal.


New vehicular speed limits, repli
those which had been set in 1908,
established hv executive nrdor


acing
were





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


SCOUT


PRESIDENT


our wo


lures-some
exceptionally
A really
to us as to
consider exc
this motion /
We consider
for Clubhous
Balboa Theat


rk we s
so-so,
SO S0,
fine.
excellentt


you,
11 a


Goers-


ee a great


some


good,


picture


we have 7\
7 -


'tlent n every aetai
ncture is With a Son!
ourselves fortunate to
e theater patrons, and


er


rst seen
. The n
g in My
have see


a treat


one


ame or
I Ieart.
cured it


it opens in /


WILLIAM JUMP President of the International
Boy Scout Council of the ('anal Zone, will assist in the
voting for the official name for Silver City.

Model Railroading Is Great
Fun For Group At Corozal
(Continued from page 4) Army; Joseph W.
Coffin, Gatun Fireman; and D. H. Searle,
Policeman at Gatun.
The three Junior members, Richard
Abbott, David Otten, and Stuart Bush,
are all Balboa High School students.
The society holds weekly meetings on
Thursday nights and the three Gatun
members usually come over on the late
afternoon train, spend a few hours at
their hobby and return on the night trainm.
New Members Wanted
The club is presently looking for
additional members who must be U. S.
citizens and entitled to commissary privi-
leges. There are no initiation fees and the
dues are three dollars a month for the first
year and two dollars a month thereafter.
Membership in the club entitles a member
to use the track layout but the rolling stock
is individually owned, the amount being
governed by enthusiasm and affluence.
The monthly dues also go to pay the
rent, water and light, and the dues to
the national organization. Membership
in the Zone Club carries with it the
privilege of buying model railroad equip-
ment from manufacturers at a consider-
able discount.
Although the club meetings are every
Thursday night, many members spend


Done entirely iz
My Heart is bas
Miss Froman, as
seriously injured
entertain troops d
prophesied that sh
her successful sin.


severance,


able to resume
tainment world.
Susan Ilayw
in the picture,
is that of Miss


The story is
and song-laden
and emotions,


d
he


n
ed
tY
y
in
ur


Technicolor, With a
on the life of Jane
,ou may remember,
a plane crash while
ing World War II.


e would nev
going career.
?termination,
r place as c


ard play
but the s
Roman.


PS
*i


warm en


enough
tose of


millions of persons through
eventually see this great music
We urge you to see it! W
With a Song in My Heart
as impressive as we did.


Star


the part of
nging voice


Song in
Froman.
was very
flying to
Doctors


be able to resume


, per-
' was
enter-


in the


moving,
interest
\ of the
'ho will
ln.
ril find
ing and


The Clubhouse Management


many additional hours at the headquar-
ters. This is specially true when the
club has some particular project in
progress. Mrs. Fuller, the only woman
member, is one of the chief decorators
and scenery shifters. One of her most
recent and best creations is a tiny village


located
which is
out the
Other
time to
as the
track, o


along one section of main track
complete to a housewife hanging
weekly wash.
members devote most of their
their particular specialty, such
intricate wiring system, laying
r installing switches.


m- ^. sr I -


Movie


To

In


many
and1


moving
just a


is as much


on Saturday, April


By her pluck
however, she


Miss Froman
that you hear


ough, appealing,
to capture your
your family, an


ut the world s
cal production
e know you
as entertain


!


:r


t





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


There

Your
Pastry


a time to buyl
special pastry


Canal c


Brownies inrthe
sections of 12


ommissaries.


is true of 31 other bakery


Schedule that


are sold only


on certain


days of the week, in addition to


37 breads and
the time.


pastries


The schedule for


Tuesday:


Princess


in the


stores


cialties


pats; cinnamon


There


are new "Honeydeb


stores
The Family people
Shoe Women


Situation


now. 0
call them


s" in the


Commissar
"casuals.


who see them


probably call them good


ing low heeled


shoes.


are wedgie pumps and sandals
colors. Some are elk; some a


with nylon mesh; and


some


and that ain't hay-it'
Switzerland.


are


in


look-
There
Snice


re linen
raffia


straw


bread
ers;
bread


; date nut cookies; applesauce
coconut drops; and salt r


Wednesday: Jelly


squares;


lemon


strips


meringue


*
pie


ring; pineapple upside down c
apple cake; and chocolate chip


Thursday:


Brownies;


oatmeal


devil's food cups; coconut strips;
drops; and salt rising bread,


Friday: Lady
ginger cookies:


ROOSEVELT


AVENUE, which could be called


Banyan Boulevard, runs under an arch
Chinese Banvan trees.


of spreading


fingers;


lemon


rising


ice cream
e; tropical
"ake; pine-
cookies.


cookies;
coconut

cones;


snowballs; tropical ring;


pineapple upside down cake; and choco-
late chip cookies.


Saturday: Chiffon cakes; crumb


cake;


chocolate


jelly buns;


Chinese


Banyan


(Ficus


retusa) along that section of Roosevelt
Avenue between the Railroad station and
the Balboa Commissary Annex form an
arch of beauty.
The trees were planted in 1916, soon


Balboa


was first laid out.


Banyans on Roosevelt Avenue were pro-
pagated from layings made on the trees
in Cathedral Plaza in Panama City.


It has become


necessary


coffee-


filled roll; cheesecake;


and pineapple cake.


There are even bags to match the linen


and raffia shoes.
Children will
cushion-crepe s


stores.


a lot of kicks


shoes


The soles feel


wear very hard.
Extra wide shoes


don't like sq


sections.


white sandals


Can-o
already
already


pener


ueeze


in sizes 4


cooks


out of


now in the


very light


lor women wno
's are new in the
are inexpensive
to 11 and w-i-d-e.


can buy


tomatoes


stewed, potatoes pre-cooked,


"Harvarded,


already broiled.
grocery sections.


They're


beets


hamburgers
in cans in the


White crinoline half slips, now in


stores,


Small fry Easter paraders will


cute


as their Easter bunnies in pastel organdy


dress
series


and bonnet sets


now in the commis-


make


a pretty


dress


a standout.


They're now on the "haff-to-have


fashion-minded


" list


misses.


Mr. and Mrs. Fixit can fix utip ugly chinks


with Plastic Wood; now in the


For really small


small fry,


there's


a new


all-in-one baby bath and beauty treatment


called "Tod'l."
a lather that is


all in


soap,


one.


a liquid that forms


cream


and lotion


to remove


almost half of the trees to save the rest.
Contrary to popular belief, the orange-
colored lichen (mold) is not causing
serious damage and is not the cause of
their being thinned.
At the present time the trees are so
close together that there is not sufficient
room for root expansion.


New Westinghouse


refrigerators.


handy tubes.


It handles


hardens into wood.


Tomatoes


in the


stores


stores


like putty

rom early M


to late April taste especially good b


are ripened on the


vine.


,e'


larch
cause


They come


from Panama and don't have to be picked
green to withstand a trip from a United
States garden to a Canal Zone commissary.


automatic defrosting and all
the newest developments, will


costs


housewares sections.


wringing


ises rep


lacement


lever at waist


sponges.


pies-are
sections.


38 cents.


USCIOUS


sections


every


pastry


lattice work.


have lattice
ork out of


stores now.


rayon


sections.


stores arn


vs.... .. ... ..


eaters


and meat sauce.


can


in care,
satisfiers


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS


save


. , i A ^


* 1


rv


*





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


APRIL.


4th American Legion 1'ost No. 6, Gain-
boa, 7:30 p). nm.
5th Track Foreman No. 2741, Balboa
B & B Shops.
6th Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No.
3857. Veterans' Club, Cristobal,
9 a. in.
7th Cristobal-Margarita Civic Coun-
cil, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30
p. in.
Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Union
Church, 7 p. inm.
Postal Employees No. 23160, Bal-
boa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.


Veterans ol
727, Fort
Veterans ol
3822, Cnr


8th --Electrical
Memorial
Veterans (
100, Old
tobal, 7:.
American
Clayton,
American
Balboa,


F Foreign
Clayton,
f Foreign
Iundu Roa


Wars Post No.
7:30 p. m.
Wars Post No.
Ld, 7:30 p. m.


Workers No. 397, Wirz
il, 7:30 p. m.
)f Foreign Wars Post No.
Boy Scout Building, Cris-
30 D. im.


|
Legion Post No.
7:30 p. nm.
Legion Auxiliary
7:30 p. nm.


7, Fort

No. 1,


9th-Carpenters No. 913, Balboa Lodge
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Pacific Civic Council, Board Room,


Administration Building, 7:
American Legion Post No. 2
tobal, 7:30 p. m.
lilth-Good Friday.
13th-Pipefitters, Margarita Club
9:30 a. m.
Sheetmetal Workers No. 15
boa Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m.
Plumbers No. 606, Balboa
Hall, 9:30 a. m.
14th-Machinists No. 699, Margai
of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post No.
boa, 7:30 p. m.


15th-


16th --


Machinist
Hall, 7:3(
Operating
garita K.
Veterans o
40, Balbo
American


Lodge
ita K.

1, Bal-


s No. 811, Balboa L
0 p. m.
Engineers No. 595,
of C. Hall, 7 p. inm.
f Foreign Wars Posi
>a K. of C. Hall, 7:30
Federation of Gov


ment Employees No.
Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.


odge
Mar-

t No.
p.m.
ern-


14, Balboa


American Legion Auxiliary


Gatun,
17th-American
Gamboa
20th-Central
Trades
Hall, 8:3
21st--Electrical
Masonic


No. 3


Metal
Lodge
Gatun
1.


Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall,
7 p. nm.
22d- Operating Engineers No. 595, Bal-
boa Lodge Hall, 7 p. inm.
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No.
100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cris-
tobal, 7:30 p. m.
23d- American Federation of Govern-
ment Employees No. 88, Mar-
garita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. in.
American Legion Auxiliary No. 2,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
24th-Governor-Employee Conference
Board Room, Administration Build-
ing, 2 p. m.


28th-Machinists
of C. Hall,
Veterans of
liary Post
p. m.

1st-Carpenters
Clubhouse.


April


Ancon ..
Panama .
Cristobal_- -
Ancon. .


Panama .
Cristobal ..
Ancon ....
Panama..
Cristobal _


No. 699, Margarita K.
7:30 p. m.
Foreign Wars Auxi-
3822 Post Home, 7:30


lAY


Margarita


p. m.


Sailings

From Cristobal
-.-- pril
_April 11
.-... ... April 18
_April25
From New York


April 2
April 9
_April l6
. April 23
----April30


Employees who ol
versaries during th
listed alphabetically
years includes all G
the Canal or other
continuous Canal c
indicated with (*).


observed important anni-
e month of March are
Below. The number of
government service with
agencies. Those with
or Railroad service arc


35 YEARS
John B. Corliss, Chief Towboat
eer, D)redging Division.


Engin-


30 YEARS
Harold V. Goddard, Craneman and Op-
erator, Motor Transportation Division.
Clarence Sibus, Assistant Superintend-
ent, Pacific Branch, Locks Division.


25 YEARS
Henry P. Butcher, Lock Ope
chinist Leader, Locks Division.
Julian P. Hackett, Telephone
er, Communications Branch.
Frederick W. Hensler, Dock
Navigation Division.
Dr. Ezra Hurwitz, Superinten
Seco.


rator


Maintain-

Foremnan,

dent, Palo


Edwin F. Rigby, Storekeeper, Division
of Storehouses.
Edna C. Whitver, Government Account-
ant, Finance Bureau.
20 YEARS
Murphy B. Alexander, Principal Con-
struction and Maintenance Foreman, Main-
tenance Division.
Violet M. Courville, School Nurse, Bal-
boa.
Charles F. Delaney, Postal Clerk.
George M. Lowe, Administrative Assist-
ant, Locks Division.
A-Alfred E. Osborne, Supervisor of In-
struction, Canal Zone Colored Schools.
15 YEARS
Kenneth A. Brown, Clerk-Typist, Divi-
sion of Storehouses.
James H. Burns, Chief Towboat Engin-
eer, Navigation Division.
*Webster G. Farrell, Pilot, Navigation
Division.
Milton J. Halley, Postal Clerk.
Thomas T. Jordan, Machinist, Indus-
trial Bureau.
Hayward H. Shacklett, Safety Engin-
eer, Safety Branch.
Joseph J. Svihra, Fireman.
*ADaniel C. Zitzman, Supply Clerk,
Housing Division.


RETIREMENTS IN MARCH


following list contains the names of
' S.-rate employees who were trans-
from one division to another or


from one type of work to another. It does
not contain within-grade promotions and
rnerr.,I' i l irei-


Ernest P. Muzzio, from Plumber,
Maintenance Division, to Plumbing In-
spector, Contract and Inspection Division.


John
Foreman,


W. Whipple, from Ir
Maintenance Division,


to
to


worker
Con-


Employees who retired at
March, their birthplaces, title
service at retirement, and th
dresses are:
Leonard C. Lauterbach, t
Electrical Machinist, Balboa
Electrical Division; 28 years
. .. -1 g' J/ .. . -"1 ... . "~-t _.


Sthe end of
les, length of
eir future ad-

Pennsylvania;
Field Office,
, 10 months,


THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR


ANNIVERSARIES


7:30 p. m.
Legion Auxiliary
, 7:30 p. m.
Labor Union -
Council, Balboa
30 a. in.
Workers No. 677,
Temple, 7:30 p. T


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


The
those I
ferred


February 15 Through March 15


)h





April 4, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Old


DQM


Office


Disappears


LOCKS


SECURITY


CHIEF


Edward H. Halsall, below,


has been


appointed Chief of the new Locks
Security Force. His appointment was
effective last Monday. With his new
position he assumed the title of Captain.


Captain Halsall has been employ
The Panama Canal and Panama
Company for almost 24 years, 15 of
on the Canal Zone Police fore
native of Stamford, Connecticu
came to the Canal Zone on July 4,
from Jamaica where he had been w(
as an overseer on a coffee and b.
plantation.


ed by
Canal
them
e. A
t, he
1928,
)rking
anana


$ .. r.. :.-* .
*-*~ ~ :'/..*>* .'
k-c.
*^'*.:.:;'&.fc ,.
.., ,: .f, *'
i ,,*
%: ..:.r ,.
Lt *
rrl


ONE OF THE oldest buildings in Balboa, the Housing Office or old District Quartermastr Building,
was demolished last month. The two-story frame structure was built soon ofter the town of Balboa was
occupied.


1953 Building Program Calls
For $31,750,000 Expenditure


from page 1)


will also see the


first of the new-type bachelor apartment
buildings constructed for U. S.-rate em-
ployees. These will be 17-unit, masonry
buildings. Tentative plans call for the
location of one of these in Ancon; two in


Diablo Heights;
ment buildings
A total of 15


and eight bachelor apart-
in Margarita.
3 family apartments are


to be built in the new residential area
being developed this year at Margarita.
Other work there next year includes the
construction of a swimming pool, 100 feet
wide and 50 meters long. Present plans
call for the construction of approximately
230 family apartments in the area selected
for the new townsite development on the
Pacific side. An elementary school is also
to be constructed in this area.
Construction will begin during the com-
ing year on practically all of the com-
munity facilities planned for the new
town of Cardenas, and a total of $2,683,-
non wir ll on,-^\-saa f\ l, t9 -han r hr


senior high school; a Commissary build-
ing; theater; Clubhouse (including a li-
brary); post office; police and fire stations;
a medical-dental clinic; and an office for
the Housing Manager and Grounds Main-
tenance Division. All of these facilities,
with the exception of the two schools and
the swimming pool, will be located in a
central community center area.
In addition to the house-building pro-
gram at Chagres and in the Camp Bierd
and Old Cristobal areas on the Atlantic
side, a new elementary and junior high
school building is to be built at Silver
City. No new quarters are scheduled for
construction in the Silver City-Camp
Coiner area during the coming year.


Electric Brain, Mechanical Termites
Join Forces To Punch Out Paychecks


(Continued from page 9) of course, but
most of them have to do with posting,
auditing, and accounting, so that at any
time the division can tell in a matter of
minutes usmat how much has hbn nntnfn


EDlX'ARD II. HALSALL
Before going to Jamaica, he had
served for almost S years in the Army,
21 months of this time being spent
overseas.
As head of the new Locks Security
Force, he will be in charge of 55 U. S.-rate
and 12 local-rate locks guards. The
U. S.-rate guards will be armed and will
have full authority to apprehend sus-
picious persons and to gather and safe-
guard evidence. This organization is


now being
force of 32


formed, with the present
U. S.-rate and 7 local-rate


men as its nucleus


During his 15 years on the Police
Force, Captain Halsall was stationed at
Ancon, Balboa, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel
and was sub-station commander at
Chiva-Chiva when he transferred to the
.- J't I j I i*' 1 -


1 -


: .,K- -


II.


(Contfinued





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4,1952


Scrap--It's


Everywhere


Atlantic Si

Rousing


de


July


Fourth


Plans for a rousing Fourth of July
celebration for the Atlantic side are
already under way with a bang-and a
pun is intended. So far on the Pacific
side no July 4 Committee has been
formed.
Atlantic side co-chairman John S.
Rice and Herbert Engelke are confident
that they and their committees will
provide residents of New and Old Cris-
tobal, Gatun, and Margarita with one of
the best celebrations in many years.
The July 4 program is sponsored by the
Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council. In-
vitations to participate have been ex-


Plans


AN ABANDONED DUMP of old railroad equipment near the Cucaracha signal station will yield
an estimated 50 tons of scrap for the current drive for old metal. J. F. Prager, Superintendent of the


Storehouse Division, above, ploughed through grass
Scrap, the people at the Panama Canal
Company's Division of Storehouses are
finding, is everywhere.
Scrap from old machinery which has
been declared obsolete or surplus, from
old railroad rails, from old pipe, and


screening an
quarters, is c
sion has gone
scrap and a
From old d
with grass,
from encroac


d metal
old stuff.
further1
afield is t
lumps, fr
from the
*hing junj


ers are bringing
up and sold for
will find its way
places where scr
Some of the
being recovered
when the Canal
it was easier to l
to move it. "S
heard of and in
of moving old eq
more than it wa,


fittings from razed
But now the Divi-
afield in its hunt for
he proper word.
om fields overgrown
Canal banks, and
gle, the scrap hunt-


back old metal to be cut
scrap which, eventually,
into steel mills and other
ap is vitally needed.
material which is now
for scrap was abandoned
was completed, because
eave it where it was than
crap" was practically un-
many cases the expenses
uipment would have been
s worth.


For instance, when Gatun Dam was
SircihA 16 Ainmn arir wrn iqnlbfnd nn


and underbrush to evaluate the find.


Even Fence Posts Salvaged
Even fence posts, long abandoned, will
go to swell the scrap pile. From old pas-
tures which were used between 1917 and
1934 for the Canal's cattle industry, the
Storehouse Division is salvaging an esti-
mated 3,000 metal fence posts.
The posts were made from T-rails which
themselves were salvage. After the balls
of the rails were removed to make rein-
forcing bars, the rest of the rails were cut
into lengths for posts to fence in pastures
at Summit and Caimito.
Altogether, from dump cars, the aban-
doned dump near Cucaracha, the Canal
banks, and the old pastures, the Store-
house Division expects to salvage close
to 900 tons of scrap.
Since the scrap salvage program was
started last July 1, a total of 4,212 tons
have been& collected. Of this some 4,000
tons were classified as ferrous (or with an
iron base) and 212 tons were non-ferrous.
On April 14, bids to purchase close to
2,200 net tons of ferrous scrap will be
opened at the Storehouse office in Balboa
and two days later bids on about 150 tons


tended
about 1
them t
Columb
Presei
which w
morning
will inc
games,
ming m
evening
activities
part in


tc
5
he
us
nt


Sthe Gatun council and to
different organizations, among
Army, Navy, Knights of
, Elks, and veterans' groups.
plans call for a celebration


till last from eight o'clock in
Sto ten o'clock at night and w
lude a parade, athletic evw
a community luncheon, a s
ieet at Gatun, and, of coi
fireworks. Part of the d
s will take place in Gatun
Margarita.


Rifle


the
which
cents,
wim-
urse,
lay's
and


Champion


-

",4-------
10
O' -


-




Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum tmie: ^-]-\Tl4) Vol. 2, No. 9 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, APRIL 4, 1952 5 cents Distinguished Sightseers 1953 BUILDING PROGRAM CALLS FOR EXPENDITURE OF $31,750,000 FOR HOUSES, PUBLIC BUILDINGS Schedule Will Reach Peak In 12 Months After Next July 1 A program of contracting for approximately $31,750,000 for Canal housing is planned during the coming fiscal year if appropriation requests now before Congi'ess are approved. The House Appropriations Committee has recommended a $3,000,000 cut in the amount requested for the building program next year. The building schedule will i-each a peak during the 12month period beginning in July 1952 under the revised plans which call for completion of the quarters replacement and construction program by the end of the fiscal year 1956 instead of 1958. Next year's expenditure will be by far the largest of any year in the six-year program, although work to be started will extend well beyond July 1953. The majoi' portion of the money next year wOl be spent on the local-rate quarANDREW HEISKELL, publisher of Life Magazive, and Mrs. Heiskell (Madeleine Carroll) were among the group of leading publishers and editors of North and South America visiting the Pedro Miguel Loclis recently. The visit was made during the course of the meeting of the Directors of the InterAmerican Press .Association held in Panama during the latter part of March. Miss Carroll, beautiful stage and screen actress, and her husband were as thrilled by the Locks operation as thousands of other visitors who see them for the first time, .\fter their visit to the Pedro Miguel Locks, the group made the trip through Gaillard Cut aboard the craneboat Atlas. 2,500 Men Being Employed As Result Of Canal Building, Townsite Program This issue of your Canal Review was delayed in expectation of announcing a decision in Washington. D. C. on the proposed transfer of a tract of land under military jurisdiction to the Canal Zone Government for the housing program. .\n unexpected postponement of a final decision required a partial reprinting of this entire issue. Tlie plans for the Canal's quarters construction program for the coming fiscal year, as described in this issue, are subject to drastic changes, dependent upon final action on the request for appropriations. Monthly payrolls on the Isthmus will have been increased this year by approximately $2.50,000 by the end of AprO as a result of the Canal's building and townsite development program for this fiscal year. It is presently expected that some 2, .500 men who were without jobs at the beginning of last January will be on the payrolls of the Canal or its contractors by the middle of May. The peak of employment for the Canal's contract work this fiscal year, amounting to $8,500,000 for housing alone, will be reached about that time and wUl continue for several months thereafter. Estimates of their labor requirements furnished the Canal by contractors total 2,300 men, exclusive of supervisory and technical forces. All of these will be recruited locally and will be "employed" through the Canal's Central Labor Office which is the centralized employing agency for all local-rate work in the Canal Zone. The rates of pay for these 2, .300 employees, plus the number to be employed by the Canal Company itself, wOl range from 35 cents to $1.50 an hotu", with an average rate of 60 cents. Under the work schedules of some of the contractors of more than 40 hours weekly, this hourly wage average will mean an income of over $100 a month a man. In addition to 2,300 given employment by Canal contractors, the (See page lO) ters construction. The entire new town of Cardenas with 933 family apartments and 300 bachelor units is scheduled for construction. In addition, 200 family apartments and 50 bachelor units will be constructed at Chagres, and 200 family apartments and 150 bachelor units will be built in the Camp Bierd and Old Cristobal area. Margarita on the Atlantic side and the area selected for the new townsite development on the Pacific side will be the principal scenes of activity in the U. S.rate communities. In addition, 24 new family apartments are to be buOt on Empire Street in Balboa. Bachelor Apartments Planned The coming fiscal year (See page 15)

PAGE 2

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4, 1952 Conferees Discuss Girl Scouts' 40th Birthday Housing, Food Cost, And Schoolbusses The housing program is beginning to move along, Lieutenant Governor Herbert D. Vogel told the Governor-Emplo\ee Conference during the March meeting. Matters of housing, commissary supplies and prices, school busses and parking occupied most of the time of the conference which lasted beyond the usual four o'clock closing time. During a general discussion of housing, during which Colonel Vogel said he was unable at that time to give the conferees any definite information on the transfer by the Army of land to replace the Summit building site, the Lieutenant Governor said that sufficient housing will be completed at Margarita by October to begin the vacating of old quarters in Cristobal. Colonel Vogel commented that the housing construction program had been readjusted to permit the oldest and worst housing to be replaced first, deferring the replacement of some of the comparatively newer e.xisting houses until later in the program. For instance, he said, the houses of later construction in New Cristobal will not be immediately replaced. Quarters will be provided instead for those living in the very old quarters of other areas. "Worst First" Scheduled The schedule he said had been realigned to replace the "worst first, the best of the old houses last, and spread the benefits of new housing out." He touched briefly on plans for the coming fiscal year and said the entire program was scheduled for completion in fiscal year 1956. Daniel P. Kiley, representing the Pacific side Locks employees asked if gasoline prices would go higher, and Colonel Vogel said that no further increase — except in case of an increase in the supplier's charges — was contemplated. After a general discussion of the gasoline situation, the conferees were told that a fuller report would be made at a coming meeting. Bronson Powell, of the Pedro Miguel Civic Council, protested the "second-and third-class canned stuff we are getting in the commissaries." This was followed by a general discussion of commissary quality and prices. Rufus Lovelady of the AFGE reported that an independent survey of prices of 58 staple items showed an increase of 4.84 percent in the last nine months, as against an increase of 4.7 percent for generally similar items in the United States. School Bus Suggestion The question of school bus transportation was brought up by Raymond Ralph of the Gatun Civic Council. Several of those present asked if bus schedules could not be adjusted to provide accommodations for chikh-en remaining after school for extracurricular activities. During this discussion, Russell Hileman of the Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council asked if "we couldn't get together with the Army and consolidate our bus facilities." Colonel Vogel said he would apGIEL SCOUT TROOPS from both sides of the Isthmus lined the Administration Building steps at a rally last month in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the founding of the organization. Highlight of the impressive ceremony was the presentation of a Thanks Badge of the Girl Scouts to Mrs. F. K. Newcomer, wife of the Governor, for her help in Scout worlt during the eight years of her residence in the Canal Zone. This is one of the highest honors bestowed by the organization. Mistress of ceremonies at the 40th anniversary rally was Mrs. M. D. Monagan. The address of welcome was presented by Mrs. Andrew Bailkowski and the group singing was led by Miss Mary Patton, Director of Girl Scouts in the Canal Zone. CANAL NOW LISTED AS DEFENSE AGENCY IN CONNECTION WITH PERSONNEL ACTION Both the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government have now been listed as defense agencies in connection with personnel actions under Civil Service regulations. This action will have an important effect on the employment of personnel and on voluntary separations from the Company-Government service. It gives the Company and Government authority for making non-competitive appointments of certain present or former employees in the "indefinite" status. It also grants the prerogative of acquiring new employees by transfer or otherwise from non-defense agencies. This has not been possible under Civil Service regulations during the present emergency period. Under the employment rules governing defense agencies, the Company-Government will have authority to restrain employees from employment with nondefense and other defense agencies. This, however, is a permissive authority, and the Company-Government may grant permission for the transfer of an employee to another Government agency. The listing of the Company and Government as defense agencies means that the reemployment rights hitherto effective for employees transferring to a defense agency will no longer be effective unless such a transfer is with permission. However, an employee who transfers to the Panama Canal Company or the Canal Zone Government from a non-defense agency will have the reemployment rights granted under Civil Service regulations. The Civil Service Commission's departmental circular listing the Company-Government as defense agencies for the first time was issued March 17. point a committee to see if such an arrangement could be worked out. Mr. Lovelady commented that there is a bill before Congress to grant educational assistance, including transportation, to areas outside the United States, and that possibly "someone could build a fire under that bill." During the meeting — which was held on the hottest day of the year, to dateColonel Vogel showed the conferees plans for new housing and promised a folio of house plans for each of the five Civic Councils. Other questions discussed included: locks guards; transfer of emergency patients from Colon to Gorgas Hospitals; Company subsidy of recreation; some form of identification of employees who are travelling in the United States; division of charges for Civil Government among the various Company functions; and location of fuse boxes in the newer quarters. Attending the conference were: Colonel Vogel, Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director; Forrest Dunsmoor, Executive Assistant to the Governor, for the Administration; Albert Saarinen, Carl J. Hoffmeyer, J. J. Tobin, Owen J. Corrigan, Walter Wagner, E. W. Hatchett, for the Central Labor Union-Metal Trades; F. S. Baumbach painting supervisor, a visitor; C. W. Hammond, Margaret Rennie, Mr. Hileman, William H. Ward, Mr. Ralph, and Mr. Powell for the Civic Councils; Mr. Kiley for the Pacific Locks Employees; Mr. Lovelady for the AFGE; Robert C. Daniel for the Railway Conductors and Andrew Lieberman for the Marine Engineers.

PAGE 3

April 4, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Residents Of Silver City Will Vote On New Official Name Of Their ToAvn THIS AERIAL VIEW of the new section of Silver City shows the large number of new houses which have been completed in that area. This section has been niclinamed "Rainbow City" by the residents because of the multicolored houses there. The Panama Can'al Re\ie\v is sponsoring a referendum of all residents of Silver City and the area now Icnown as Camp Coiner to determine if the majority want the name of their town officially changed. A total of 91 duplex apartment buildings were constructed in this area by Framorco, Inc., under last year's program and 96 more duplexes are now under construction by the Isthmian Constructors, Inc. For the first time in the history of the Canal Zone the residents of a community are to be given an opportunity to vote their preference for the name of their town. Governor Newcomer has authorized The Panama Canal Review to conduct a poll of the residents of Silver City (including Camp Coiner") to determine if they wish to change the name of the town. The poll will be conducted this month by The Review in collaboration with the International Boy Scouts by a house-to-house canvass. Six names have been proposed. They are: Silver City Manzanillo Rainbow City Granada Folks City Mindi The Governor's decision to take a vote on the name of the Canal Zone's largest and presently the fastest-growing town was reached after the nickname "Rainbow City" came into general use by residents of the new section of Silver City. The name "Rainbow" was chosen as being most descriptive of the varied colors of the new houses. Unless there is an overwhelming vote in favor of one name, Governor Newcomer will make the final selection from the three names receiving the most votes. If the residents express an overwhelming preference for any one name, the Governor has announced that he will choose that name. Vote Planned For April 16-18 It is presently planned to distribute ballots April 16 to all employees who have assignments to quarters in the area. The votes will be collected two days later after which the votes will be tabulated by a committee composed of Judge E. I. P. Tatelman, Cristobal Magistrate; William Jump, President of the International Boy Scout Council in the Canal Zone; and J. Rufus Hardy, Editor of The Review. A formal report on the result of the ballotmg will then be forwarded to Governor Newcomer for the selection of the official name, which will be announced in the next issue of The Review. The ballots will be distributed and collected by the members of the five International Boy Scout Troops of Silver City, who will work under the general direction of Joseph A. Hassocks, Scout Commissioner, and Romeo G. Miller, District Commissioner. There are over 200 members of the fi\'e troops and it is expected that the ballots can be distributed and collected in a few hours' time. Scout Troops To Help The scout troops to assist and their Scoutmasters are: Troop 1, David Stanley; Troop 2, Charles Lucas; Troop 4, Daniel T. Foster; Troop 12, Romeo G. Miller, who also serves as District Commissioner; and Troop 13, V. A. Laing. According to old Panama Canal records the name Silver City was never officially adopted by the Canal. The name sort of "grew up" with the town after a series of evolutions. Accordingly, the town will be officially named by Governor Newcomer after the vote is taken. The construction of the town was authorized in July 1919 by Governor Chester Harding. The area was filled by spoil taken from the Army post of Fort Davis then under construction, and the houses were built during 1920 and 1921. The town cost originally in the neighborhood of $750,000, of which $600,000 was paid by the Panama Railroad Company. Town's Name "Grew Up" The evolution of the town's name as SOver City was a tortuous one. The first reference to it was a report of the Building Site Committee which recommended that "when funds are available, a town for silver employees be built on the new fill south of Folks River and south and east of the Corral." This recommendation, approved by Governor Harding, was signed by Major E. E. Person, Assistant Chief Health Officer, Chairman; Major W. R. Grove, Chief Quartermaster; Hartley Rowe, Resident Engineer of the Building Division; and Daniel E. Wright, Municipal Engineer. The memorandum of the Building Site Committee was forwarded to the Governor by Judge Frank Feuille, then Special Attorney for The Panama Canal, who was serving as Chaii'man of a Committee on Standard Nomenclature of Geographic Features of the Canal Zone, which had been appointed some years earlier by Col. George W. Goethals. In forwarding the report, Judge Feuille used the original and proper name of "Fox" River instead of "Folks" River. Many Names Used During the time the town was being constructed, several different designations were used. Among these were: The Folks River end of Manzanillo Island; silver town at Mount Hope; new silver townsite at Big Tree; and Cristobal Silver Townsite. After the area was occupied, it was variously called Silver town. Silver Town, and Silver city. The name "city" in Silver City was not capitalized until July 1921 when used in some official correspondence. Thereafter, however, all official correspondence referred to the town as Silver City, although the files do not indicate that it was formally named as were other towns of the Canal Zone, such as (See page 7)

PAGE 4

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4, 1952 Model Railroading Is Intensive Fun Like lightning, model railroading as a hobby may hit anybody, any time, at any age. And, like lightning, the hits may be few and far between but a second stroke is rarely needed. For e.xample, when junior wakes up on Christmas morning, he may find the old man under the Christmas tree operating his new train which Santa just left him. Such an occasion often means that an adult model railroad engineer has been born. Few outside the ken of model railroading realize that it is a national pastime and is organized on a national basis. The National Model Railroad As.sociation, Inc., has some 9,000 members scattered through the United States, and several other countries. It publishes its own periodical which is now in its 18th year and is widely circulated. Here in the Canal Zone the group i.s known as the Canal Zone Society of Model Railroad Engineers, all of whom are also members of the national organization. The local branch now has only seven members and three junior members although it also claims an inactive membership of eight who retained their association with the society after returning to the United States. What the local society lacks in numbers, howe\er, the members make up in enthusiasm and in railroad track, locomotives, rolling stock, yards, switches, tunnels, depots, scenery, trestles, and all the other paraphernalia. Headquarters at Corozal Headquarters of the model railroaders are in the old Corozal railroad station which the club rents at a nominal fee. The entire baggage room is occupied by a built-up platform, except for a narrow passageway around the walls, on which has been built some ten miles (in muiiature) of track. The model itself, known as the Pan-Am Railroad, is complete with railroad yards, towns, mountain scenery, switches, and a maze of wirmg to control the trains and the block system. The Canal Zone Society of Model Railroad Engineers last month celebrated its fourth anniversary. During those four years the intricate track system has been rebuilt three times. Each rebuilding, they claim, only incites further interest for improvements and developments. One of the club's current problems, according to C. F. Van Steenberg, Jr., President of the Society, is to arrange for a proper division of the railway system. When complet<>d, this will permit a member to operate the yards and transfer control to another member when a train reaches the main line. Variety of Occupations A roster of the club membership is the best indicator that model railroading is a bug which can bite anyone. Mr. Van Steenberg is employed as an electrical engineer by the Navy. The occupations of other officers and members are: A. G. Baggott, Tunnel Operator at Gatun Locks, Vice President; Mrs. Ida H. Fuller, of the Payroll Division, Secretary and Treasurer; J. J. Wood, of the Finance Bureau; B. M. Duff, Automotive Inspector of the {See page 12) RELATIVE SIZE is demonstrated here by pretty Marie JenlUns, Balboa High School student, holding a section of tracks with a late-model Diesel engine and car. Much of the wall space at the club's headquarters in the Corozal railroad station is taken up by pictures of railway equipment, such as the calendar in the background of this picture. THIS BUCOLIC scene with the barn and silo in the background is built along one section of the main tracks. This scenery was recently completed by Mrs. Ida H. Fuller, only woman member of the club. The tunnel at the left is one of several located on the 650 feet of main track. The model railroaders are particular about every small detail of the layout and one member recently brought some tiny tramps made cf safety pins to lie alongside the tracks or "ride the rods." n n^T? A POTEN'TIAL model railroader is Governor Newcomer who visited the headquarters of the Canal Zone Society cf Model Raitoad Engineers recently. The Governor donned an engineer's cap and operated a model of the Panama Railroad train. The town in this picture was built by the members of the club, complete with the church and steeple at the far right. The streetcar in front of the main building can be operated on the train tracks.

PAGE 5

April 4, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW FOR YOUR A INTEREST AND i-jm GUIDANCE IN i-/ ^ CCIDENT PREVENTION OUR 1951 TOLL— 1 FATALITY— 550 DISABLED During the calendar \ear IQ51, the Panama Canal Company — Canal Zone Government had 550 lost time injuries, one of which was a fatality. These represent a total of 38,112 working days lost from the job. The accident frequencxrate experienced was 15. 2,!, which was an 11 percent impro\ement over the pre\ious best record of 17.02. established in 1949. This frequency rate is a new low record for the entire organization. The divisions and units chiefl\' responsible for this over-all improvement were the Building Division, Industrial Bureau, Fire Division, Commissary Division, Grounds Maintenance Division, Terminals Division, and miscellaneous units of the following; Supply and Service Bureau, Civil .Affairs Bureau, Community Services Bureau, and Railroad and Terminals Bureau. These units established new accident frequency rates ranging from 10 percent to 100 percent over their own previous best records. Because of the reorganization, 1950 is the first year that statistics are available for all the bureaus as they now exist. The ".Accident Statistics for the Calendar Year 1951," which has just been published, compares the 1951 record of all bureaus with their own 1950 record, rather than with any previous low record which any may have had prior to the reorganization. This starting from "scratch," as it were, places all bureaus on an equal basis for any future comparison of one record with that of another. .Almost all the bureaus bettered their own 1950 accident frequency record by a HONOR ROLL Bureau Award For BEST RECORD February COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Community Services 2 I ndustrial I Civil Affairs Engineering and Construction Health Marine Railroad and Terminals Supply and Service Division Awards For NO DISABLING INJURIES February NAVIGATION DIVISION MOTOR TRANSPORTATION DIVISION DIVISION OF STOREHOUSES GROUNDS MAINTENANCE DIVISION AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Grounds Maintenance __ 2 Storehouses 2 Clubhouses 1 Electrical 1 Motor Transportation 1 Navigation 1 Commissary Dredging _. Hospitalization and Clinics Locks Maintenance Railroad Sanitation Terminals .. 5 percent to 54 percent improvement, with the Industrial Bureau taking top honors with the 54 percent improvement. These Bureaus were the Industrial, Supply and Service, Railroad and Terminals, Communit\Services, Engineering and Construction, Health, and Civil .Affairs. These achievements in accident prevention greatly contributed to the substantial lowering of the accident frequency rate for the entire organization. It is possible for all divisions and units to better their own best record, and this is the goal toward which all should continually direct their efforts. Therefore, when it comes to accident prevention and the promotion of safety, it does not matter much w^here a division or unit stands at any given time in comparison with others, but the important thing is for them to continually strive to improve their own record. .As their frequency rates approach a minimum, the eft'ort necessary to show additional impro\-ement will have to be greater, and the least letup in safe practices will have greater adverse results in their records. It is hoped that everyone will continue with the splendid spirit of interest, cooperation, and effort, that has been shown in 1951 for accident prevention, with its resultant promotion of human welfare and elimination of pain, suffering, and wage loss that occurs w-hen safety is not gi\en the support it deserves. The following units will receive the Di\ision HonorRoll award for No Disabling Injuries for the month of February: N.A\'IG.ATIOX DIVISION. MOTOR TR.ANSPORT.ATION DIVISION, DIX'ISION OF STOREHOUSES, GROUNDS M.AINTENANCE DIVISION. The Grounds Maintenance Division is tied in first place with the Division of Storehouses in the number of awards for this vear. The COMMUNITY SERXICES BURE.AU for the second time this year will receive the Bureau Honor Roll award for having the Best Record of the Month. While L. \V. Chambers, Safety Inspector for the Locks Division, is on vacation in the States, he will attend Safety Conferences in Michigan and Ohio, and a training course on "Fundamentals of Industrial Safety," National Safety Council. During his absence, R. S. Phillips, engineer, will act as Safety Inspector for the Pacific Branch, and R. J. Danielsen, engineer, will act as Safety Inspector for the Atlantic Branch. IT HAPPEXED this way. Police officer Hiram Overall could be telling Balboa Magistrate Edward Altman. To demonstrate how accidents occurred, miniature cars and trucks can be placed in any position (except on their sides) on the new magnetized board. The board is visible from any point in the courtroom, unlilre small disgi-ams which were used formerly. The board is the only one of its kind in the Canal Zone courts. SAFE alpha BETS is for accident — Also Alert. The second helps keep you From getting hurt. The first, you can see Without being a wizard. Knocks you and production From "A" down to "Izzard." B warns of Burns, Bruises, Bumps, Bustecl Bones. They can happen to Bauer, Borkowski or Jones, So Be careful, Be watchful. Be Bright and Be Brave. If you're stung By these B's, Brother, then you'll Behave. FEBRUARY 1952 Communily Services Bureau Civil Affairs Bureau Marine Bureau Engineering and Conslruclion Bureau Supply and Service Bureau Panama Canal Co.-C. Z.Gov'l (Best Year) Panama Canal Co.C 1. Gov'l(I952 lo Dale) Panama Canal Co. C. Z. Gov't (This month) Industrial Bureau Health Bureau Railroad and Terminals Bureau Number of Disabling Injuries. .49 Disabling Injuries per 1,060,000 Man-Hours Worked (Frequency Rale) Man-Hours Worked. 2,795,601 LEGEND Amount Better Than Panama Canal Company— Canal Zone Government Best Year Amount Worse Than Panama Canal Company — Canal Zone Government Best Year

PAGE 6

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4, 1952 Chauffeur Since 1908 Recalls Boer War, Jamaica Quake, Canal Building Ten Years Ago In March A swagger stick and a smile— that's Fitz Herbert AUeyne Griffith. The swagger stickthe current one is of polished bhick palm— is a habit acquired in the nine years he spent in Queen Victoria's British Army before he came to work for the Isthmian Canal Commission way back in 1908. The smile is just a part of him. Griffith was 73 years old IVIarch 2, just two days after he was retired from his job of many years, driving a truck which hauled lumber to repair Pacific side houses. With the exception of a 15-day lay-off in the fall of 1908, when he switched from his first Canal Zone job as a carpenter for the Panama Railroad to the job he held for so many years, his service was unbroken. When Griffith went to work as a teamster for the Motor Transportation Division on November 15, 1908, the Ancon "corral" was located near the site of the present Ancon postoffice. He worked with horses and mules, the latter just as stubborn as mules anywhere else in the world. Only way to get along with them, he recalls, was to let them know right off who was boss. When the Division was motorized he became a chauffeur and was listed that way on the rolls during all his years of service. Served In Africa Born in the Parish of St. Lucia in Barbados, Griffith went to school there. In 1899, when he was 20, he enlisted in the British Army. His day-by-day uniform was khaki but his dress imiform was really something to see: black trousers with yellow seams down the sides, a flannel coat and, for special occasions, a scarlet jacket. The Boer war had just broken out, but it was only after some 18 months of training in Jamaica that Griffith's infantry unit was sent to Africa. They never got into the active fighting. They were held as a reserve component at Sierra Leone, where Africa's shoulder juts out into the Atlantic. In 1905 Griffith was made a corporal bombardier in the Royal Artillery, earning "one and sixpence a day." Two years later, and a year after he had been returned to Jamaica, nature took a hand in ending Griffith's military career. One of Port Royal's frequent earthquakes destroyed most of the artillery's guns. This led to the disbanding of one of the two artillery companies stationed there. Griffith went back to Barbados and then to Demarara, British Guiana, for a while. His brother was working in the Canal Zone and Griffith decided to come here. He landed in Cristobal on March 11 and two days later was at work. Ancon As It Was In 1908 When he went to work in the Ancon Corral, the Ancon commissary was a "little shack" near the present police station, where cold storage was distributed every day. The Ancon postoffice was where it now stands but it was an old wooden building. The District Court was located about on the site of the present Ancon school. A gate across Gorgas Road, just about at the location of the present St. Luke's Cathedral, shut off the Ancon Hospital grounds. One day in February 1928 Griffith was FITZ HERBERT .\LLEYNE GRIFFITH on his way to work when he found a revolver lying in the street near the Ancon postoffice. He picked it up and was examining it when it went off, the bullet passing through the index finger on his left hand. The revolver apparently belonged to a prowler who had been routed by police a short time earlier as he was trying to force his way into the old Ancon Masonic Temple. Now that he is a retired man, Griffith doesn't know exactly how he will spend his time. He must care for his wife who has been blind for almost three years. He expects to find some chance to read the Scriptures and "figure the right and wrong of it," and he will also have more time for his three grandchildi'en, the sons and baby daughter of Joseph N. Griffith of the Industrial Bureau. As grandfather he enjoys them all, but he "favors" the five-year-old boy. Inquiries Still Coming On French Company Bonds Although the second French Canal Company went out of business in the Canal Zone almost 50 yeai-s ago and it is well over 60 years since the first bond issue was sold in France for construction of a canal m Panama, inquiries are still being received here as to the \'alue of the old bonds. During the past year inquiries have come from Pakistan, France, the island of Cyprus, India, Canada, and Egypt. One inquiry came from New 'i'ork City, but this apparently concerned other bonds and not those of the French Company. Questioners are being told that the United States Government, present owner of the Panama Canal, did not assume responsibility for the transactions of the French Canal Company. They are referred to the Credit Lyonnais, in Paris, for information on the bonds. According to the United States Consul General in Paris, this firm acts as intermediary for the Societe Civile des Obligations a Lots du Canal Interoceanique de Panama. War, and its local repercussions, and the Third Locks continued to make Isthmian headlines ten years ago. Reporters interviewed the sole survivor of a torpedoed ship, a duty which was to become only too familiar as the months passed. He was a 17-year-old messboy who had spent 21 days in a floating lifeboat, without water and covered with oil. From his bed at the Coco Solo Naval Hospital, the youth reported how one by one the ten others in the lifeboat had died or gone mad and jumped into the sea. Instmdions were issued to civilian and military personnel as to how to recover barrage balloons ichich had escaped from their moorings aroiind vital installations. In the Canal Zone 431 air-raid shelters had been completed or were under construction. Strict regulations governing the taking of photographs and possession of cameras in or about the Canal Zone were issued. Some 250 local students began turning out the scale model planes to be used in aircraft recognition training. The Canal announced that negotiations were successfully completed with a large Eastern manufacturing firm for fabricating and furnishing the miter gates, main valves, and bulkheads for the third locks. The cost was to be $16,190,418. Earlier in the month the United States Steel Export Company had submitted a bid of $17,503,411 for'the 44 miter gates alone and had asked for as long as five years to complete delivery. This bid was rejected. Col. Thomas B. Larkin, head of the Special Engineering Division, ivas ordered back to Washington for a new assignment. Later, with the rank of Major General, he became Quartermaster General of the Army. He was succeeded as Supervising Engineer by Col. Hans Kramer; Lt. Col. Charles Barth (killed in May 1943 in the sa77ie plane crash which cost the life of Lt. Gen. Frank Andrews') became Assistant Supervising Engineer. The razing of a number of buildings at Gatun and Pedro Miguel was started by The Panama Canal. This was the result of tests which showed that buildings burning on or above the le\-el of the locks would light up the locks and possibly aid in accurate bombing. Buildings to be razed included the old Gatun postoffice, several quarters in Pedro Miguel, all unnecessary buildings inside the lock walls and the second floor of the Gatun Clubhouse. "Light fences," 26 feet high, later were built along the locks. The Panama Railroad let it be known that the color of all its passenger coaches was to be changed from the oldtime maroon to a new Pullman green. The new change was an indirect result of war conditions. The maroon paint had been made with a cadmium base which with the war became not only exceedingly expensive but difficult to obtain as it was considered a strategic material.

PAGE 7

April 4, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW ^PANAMA Bj^jj CAN A L Official Panama Canal Company Publication Published Monthly at BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE Printed by the Panama Canal PreBB Mount Ho-pe, CanalZone F. K. Newcomer, Governor-President H. D. VoGEL, Lieutenant Governor E. C. Lombard, Executive Secretary J. RuFUS Hardy, Editor Eleanor H. MclLHE>fNY Oleva Hastings Editorial Assistants LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters containing inquiries, suggestions, criticisms, or opinions of a general nature will he welcomed. Those of sufficient interest will be published but signatures will not be used unless desired. SUBSCRIPTIONS— $1.00 a year SINGLE COPIES— 5 cents each On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses, Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after publication date. SINGLE COPIES BY M.\IL-10 cents each BACK COPIES— 10 Cents Each On sale when available, from the Vault Clerk. Third Floor, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. Postal money orders should be made payable to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company, and mailed to the Editor, The Pan.\ma Canal Review, Balboa Heights, C. Z. To Subscribers Please notify us promptly of any change in your mailing a ddress. Post offices everywhere have pre1 pored postal card forms for notices of changes of address. Residents Of Silver Cily To Vote On Official Name Of Their Town Army Secretary Visits Canal FRANK PACE, .Jr., Secretary of the Army, had his first view of the Panama Canal diu-ing a threeday visit last month. At a press interview on the day before his departure he expressed amazement at the engineering mgenuity of nearly 50 years ago which made possible the Canal and its facilities. Secretary Pace spent the entire day, Sunday, March 23, in conference with Governor Newcomer on matters pertaining to the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government and on an inspection trip to the Pacific Locks and a trip through the Canal. The picture above was taken just after the party left the launch at the Aids to Navigation Division landing in Gatun. Left to right are: Governor Newcomer; Secretary Pace; Canal Zone Policeman Theodore E. Englebright; Lieutenant Governor Herbert D. Vogel; and Fred Korth, Deputy Department of the Army Counsellor. The special message to the employees of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government from Secretary Pace, issued on the day of his departure, is shown below. The last time the Canal Zone was visited by a Secretary of the .\rmy was four years ago when SecretaryKenneth C. Royall was here. Although visits to the Canal by Secretaries of the Army (or War) while in office have been relatively infrequent, there have been several since the construction work was begun in May 1904. William Howard Taft was the first, coming to the Isthmus in November 1904, while Secretarv of War. 'ANAI. ZONK OOVKRNMENT IVAI.BOA URIOUT*!. nANAL ZOrfB OKFlr>H OK T!1R OOVKHNOR (Continued from page 3) Frijoles, La Boca, and Balboa. Camp Coiner Included The official name to be selected for Silver City will include the section now known as Camp Coiner and residents there will be given an opportunity to vote along with residents of "rainbow" city and those of the old section of Silver City. The name Camp Coiner, which is to be eliminated after the selection of the new name, was given to the area in 1942 when it was occupied by the main offices of the Construction District of the Panama Engineer Division. Up until then, it had been known as Camp Randolph and the change in names was made to avoid confusion. The name was selected in honor of Lt. Col. Richard T. Coiner, Corps of Engineers, who died in August 193.3 while .serving as Department Engineer in the Canal Zone. The use of the name was continued without official recognition after the area was transferred to the Canal in 194.5 for a housing development. March 25, 1952 It has been a source of great satisfaction to see the Panaaa Canal and to observe parts of its operation during my brief visit to the Canal Zone. It is truly one of the engineering HBrrels of our nation. During the past year the Government entity responsible for the oneration of the Canal and the Government of the Caie.1 Zone has undergone a fundamental alteration. The very nature of this change requires that plans be developed with care and deliberation. The adjustments required are still in progress, and during this period of adjustment I want to assure all employees that their welfare has been and will continue to be constantly borne in mind Despite its relative youth, the Canal organization has a great tradition of accomplishjnsnt. Its future, I am sure, will be a continuation of that tradition and all of the employees of the enterpri.'ie can take Just pride in their part in its success, I am very glad to have the opportunity to extend ny compliments to all employees of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government for a work which is being well done. FRANK PACE, JR, ^ Saeretary of the Army

PAGE 8

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4, 1952 Electric Brain, Mechanical Termites Join Forces To Punch Out Paychecks Men and machines are getting together these days at Diablo Heights to turn out paychecks for men and women of the Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Ciovernment. The results of some of their labors look like Swiss cheeses gone modern; some of the others look as if oblong termites have taken a bite or two. The heart of the new system of mechanized paychecks— if machines can be said to ha\-e a heart— is a battery of 24 International Business machines, 22 of them concentrated in a smallish room on the ground floor of the Payroll Division building at Diablo Heights. There ai'e some things, of course, which will still have to be done by human brains. But of the 52 steps which h&xe been worked out for processing Company-Government payrolls, the machines— or the section where the machines are located— can handle 38. .\nd, in addition, the machines are able, at the push of a switch to turn out in a fantastically short time, just about any sort of resume which is wanted. Suppose the Treasurer, as he needs to every quarter, wants to find out just how much withholding tax has been deducted from employee's salaries. A stack of cards, one for each employee, is fed into a machine. In almost no time at all, from little holes in these individual cards, an "electric brain" figures the total, checks it, and prints it. Holes Are the Cue The holes are the cue to the entire procedure, which is known in accountant's pai'lance as punched card accounting. The holes give all kinds of information; they further show the "bites" which are taken out of each employee's salary foirent, or income tax, or water, or light, or what haven't you. Take the first check which was issued by machine, for instance. It went to William H. Dunlop, Finance Director. His IC number— 15— happened to be the lowest on the first gang to be processed by the machines early last month. Sometime earlier, from information supplied by Personnel, Finance, etc., a master card had been prepared for him. It tells everything machines or people need to know about him for payi'oll purposes. The card, perhaps significantly, is just the size of an old-fashioned $1 bill. Held .so that light shines through its perforations, its 69 holes mean nothing to anyone but the experts. But the holes say this to the IBM machines: His roll, 4; his gang, 1 ; his IC number, 15; his name, which becomes in figures0-6, 12-9, x-3, .X-:?, 12-9, 12-1, x-4 (that's William), 12-8 (that's H.), 12-4, 0-4, x-5, x-3, x-6, x-7 (that's Dunlop). Punches Tell Status A little farther over on the card a punch through a number 7 indicates that he is a classified employee. Another punch shows the number of his tax exemptions. A hole through a zero shows that he is a full-time employee, subject to retirement and withholding tax. (If he were a temporary employee, subject to withholding tax and social security—but not retirement -the figure punched would have been a 1. There are other code figures for other types of employees.) Still further toward the right side of the plastic-impregnated oblong of stiff paper, punches indicate that he is paid bi-weekly and give the amount of his gross bi-weekly pay. More punches tell the machines that his unit rate is by the hour and that his official rate is by the year. Another punched hole indicates his GS grade. The last six punches show his personnel status and are used to make up force and budget reports. To make these Swiss cheese effects is the principal job of two machines known as keypunches, informally called "mechanical termites." They transcribe printed infoi-mation into punched numbers, a great deal like coding machines. To get the figures which stand for I\TRIC.\CIES of the "Electric Brain" which adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides, checks its own work and punches the answers into cards are examined by Charles H. McKeon, left, and \'ictor Herr. The "brain" is an important step in the business of handling Company-Government payrolls by machine. William H. Dunlop, an operator like Florence Scott or Shirley McNall types the name on a keyboard lettered like a typewriter. Instead of printing letters, however, the machine reproduces the name in figures which are punched on the card. Cards and Cards and Cards This dossier in inhuman form, the master card, is only one of several punched cards from which the machines get the information which eventually becomes a paycheck. Information on payroll deductionsthere are 80 possible ones for CompanyGovernment employees is transcribed onto other cards in the form of the little oblong holes. A $20 bi-weekly rent rate, for instance, shows up as 02000 on the punched card. A hospital bill of $35 becomes 03500 by holes. There is a separate card for each deduction. Those which are standard, like rent, telephone, furniture rental, electric range charges, can be used over and over again. All the other cards are used only once and discarded. J. 0. Barnes, Chief of the Payroll Division, estimates that 50,000 separate deduction cards will be used to process a payroll. Each of these cards is punched with the employee's roll, gang, IC number, name, etc. Eventually they are sorted together by one of the three machines whose operation is the most fascinating to watch of any in the machine room. (Some of the others are far more complex but the average observer can't understand them.) The uncanny sorters see to it that all of Mr. Dunlop's deduction cards— or those of any other employee— are placed together so that they can be summarized for the final processes by which they are (1) totaled and printed on the deduction slip which will accompany each pay check and (2) subtracted from the amount of money earned to give the amount of the check itself. Works on Credit Side, Too But that's all on the debit side. On the credit side, men and machines also work together to see how much Mr. Dunlop has earned. First step in this process is a time card which, as the rolls become entirely mechanized, will replace the old-fashioned time book. Onto each time card a machine has printed and punched an employee's roll, gang, IC number, etc., from information on the key master card. In Mr. Dunlop's case, this printed card went with others on his roll to Kathleen McGuigan, who has worked in the Finance Bureau for 17 years and who is timekeeper for this roll. She enters, by hand, the total number of hours he has worked and what leave, if any, has been taken. Back at Diablo, the time card goes to William Thornton, one of six rollkeepers in his .section. He checks Miss McGuigan's figures to make sure that the timing was legal. He handles four rolls, two of which are mechanized and two still under the oldfashioned manual system. It is his job to see that neither employee nor company

PAGE 9

April 4, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW "Mechanical; TERMITES" is the nickname for these keypunch machines. They "chew" little holes into cards to guide the calculating, accounting, and sorting machines. Their operators, lefl to right, are: Rosalie Smith, Florence Scott, Mrs. Katbryn .\mmirati, and Shirley McXall. loses any money through the figuring on the time card. It is also his job to furnish the machine section with a total of hours worked at basic, overtime, and holiday rates. These totals are the controls which the machines must later reach. If the machine totals do not agree with the manual totals, something is wrong somewhere. Before the machine process starts, Mr. Thornton turns Mr. Dunlop's card and the others on his rolls over to Edward A. Durham, whose 1.5 years of Canal service stand him in good stead in his job as control clerk. He heads the U. S.-rate rolls, which are the first being mechanized. When he has made a check, the machine process of computing the paychecks is ready to begin. Computation Starts The time cards are bundled up and sent downstairs to Charles H. McKeon, head of the machine section. Mr. McKeon, a proud Texan who is a Certified Public Accountant and who worked for IBM before he came here last September, turns the cards over to Don Herr, who has ten years of government service in payroll work, or to John A. Morales, whose service—all with payrolls — dates back to 19.31. They pack the cards into sorting machines, three of which line a wall at one end of the room. So fast that they look like a steady stream, the cards flow across a brush which separates them into two heaps— classified and wage board. Over by the windows overlooking the Diablo Clubhouse, Miss McNall and Miss Scott are waiting to punch into the time cards the number of hours worked. From these punches, the computing machines will later figure out just how much Mr. Dunlop and the rest of us have earned. The classified cards ai-e turned over to Miss Scott, the wage board cards to Miss McNall. Both girls are comparative newcomers to the Canal organization but both have had machine experience. They have had special keypunch training and Miss Scott, in addition, has done similar work in the United States. From the stacked time cards the>punch into new computation cards the holes which indicate the number of hours worked and the rate at which the employee is paid. As fast as they ha\'e completed this process, two other operators take over They are Rosalie Smith, who has worked for several years in the machine accounting section at the Administration Building, and Mrs. Kathryn Ammirati, who did keypunch work in the United States. They operate verifiers. These machines look almost exactly like the keypunches. Miss Smith and Mrs. Ammirati have a stack of time cards on one hand, and a stack of the already-punched computation cards on the other. From information on the time cards they go through the same process which Miss Scott and Miss McNall have already completed. If the cards were punched correctly in the first place, the verifier runs without interruption. Otherwise it flashes a red "error" light. The punched computation cards have up to now, been handled by rolls and in sequence according to IC number, lowest first. That's how Mr. Dunlop happened to be low man on his totem pole. In this order the punched and verified cards are fed into an accounting machine which totals and tabulates the number of hours classified and wage board employees have worked, by rolls. The totals are compared with those sent from the control section upstairs. In the next step, the punched computation cards are turned over to the calculating punch, the most amazing — if not visibly impressive (until you see its mazelike insides) — of the 22 machines. This electrical wizard is operated by a control board which is wired for the particular job it is to perform. A complicated control board will take 10 to 12 hours to wire. Mr. McKeon has wired most of the boards so far, and Mr. Morales and Mr. Herr are learning. There are two of these calculating punches in the payroll office. They can add, subtract, multiply, and divide at an amazing speed. They can even figure income tax— unfortunately. At the rate of one card each five seconds, the machine performs the processes necessary to find out what anyone has earned in a certain number of hours at his fixed rates. The results are punched into the cards, for more Swiss checso effects. By this time the machines have totaled and chewed out of various cards Mr. Dunlop's gross earnings and have also totaled and indicated by holes, just what deductions are to be taken out. Now the payroll people are ready to move on to the last of the machine calculations. A collator matches current pay cards, which show the amount taken. Any of the operators can run this machine. (In addition to Mr. Herr and Mr. Morales, Carl Pajak is learning machine operation, dividing his time between his regular job as head of the deduction section and the machine room.) To "Electric Brain" Back to the "electric brain" the cards now go. The proper panel is set in place— changing a panel takes only a matter of seconds -and the calculating punch goes to work. Into the card it computes and punches taxes, retirement, and net pay, and indicates those cards on which deductions exceed earnings. (Cards like the latter call for special and complicated handling.) From the resulting pay cards the checks themselves are printed and sent to the Treasurer's office for signature. Even this is mechanized. The signature of the Company's Treasurer, J. W. Greene, has been reproduced onto a metal plate which, for obvious reasons, is kept under lock and key. The plate is inserted into a check-signing machine which can sign and date 2.50 checks a minute. There are further steps, (.See page lo) F.\STER THAN an eye can follow, the three sorting machines ai im1 ayroll Division deposit punched cards into their proper places, one of the many steps in getting out paychecks. Carl Pajak, left, and John A. Morales work with these and others of the 22 machines which are installed at Diablo Heights.

PAGE 10

10 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4, 1952 2,500 Men Being Employed For Canal Building Program {Continued fram page 1 1 work to be done by Canal forces on the housing program will require 200 or more additional employees. Direct Income for Panama The monthly payrolls of Canal contractors will be, practically speaking, a direct flow into the Republic of Panama since such employees are not granted commissary privileges unless residing in the Canal Zone. This influx of more than $200,000 a month in payrolls will aid in the stimulation of economy principally in the two cities of Panama and Colon, where unemployment ranks are thickest, since the money will be spent for rent, food, clothing, and other necessities. The monthly payrolls directly resulting from the Panama Canal Company's $80,000,000 housing program will be greatly augmented over the ne.xt three or four years by the acceleration of the program which has been planned. Although still in its early stages, the building program is placing a checkrein on unemployment figures which have been high locally for the past four years. While the number to be used on quarters con.struction this fiscal year will by no means absorb th(^ bulk of the unemployed in the Republic of Panama, it will make a sizeable dent in unemployment figures and will go far to relieving the present economic strain. At the present time the Canal's localrate force is about 3,500 less than the immediate post-war level of 1948. By the end of May, however, it is expected that the force, plus those to be employed by Canal contractors, will bring the total number employed on local-rate rolls to within about 1 ,000 of the July 1948 figures when 17,700 were working. Many Benefit Indirectly These figures relate only to the work to be done in the Canal Zone proper. Hundreds of others will be given employment in the Republic of Panama indirectly as a result of the rapidly expanding building program which entails the purchase of great quantities of construction material in the local markets. An instance of these indirect benefits is the purchase of upwards of $750,000 worth of native lumber for which contracts were recently awarded The furnishing of this lumber will require a major expansion of milling facilities, principally in the Province of Chiriqui. The number of new employees to be recruited locally for work in the Canal Zone will be divided about equally between the Atlantic and Pacific sides. Contractors on the Atlantic side have furnished the Canal with estimates of 1,300 workers needed by the middle of next month. The number to be used by contractors on the Pacific side is considerably less, but the Atlantic and Pacific side figures probably will be nearly equalled by the extra men needed by the Maintenance Division. Most Labor at Margarita The bulk of the labor on the Atlantic side will be used at Margarita where the Macco-Panpacific Company has contracts for nearly $3,400,000 worth of work. They estimate they will require a localrate force of 900 men by the middle of June when their work is in full swing. The work to be done by Isthmian Constructors, Inc. on contract work in Silver City and quarters construction at Gatun will require about 300 men, most of whom THE LIST OF JOBH available are pusted daily on the bulletin boards of the Central Labor Office in Balboa and Cristobal. During the past few years there have generally been more applicants than jobs in all categories. The list is compiled from requests of all employing agencies in the Canal Zone, including contractors. n r I'.EAUV I'Oli \\(J|;K if^ this t^iuup of men in the Central Labor Office in Balboa. The men represent several different types of workers. They are being given instructions on where and when to report to work by John Eastmond, Clerk in the Central Labor Office. Men seeking employment must have valid eligibility cards before they are accepted. are already at work. In addition to these, Manuel Calderon, contractor for the construction of a new Commissary Division building at Mount Hope, expects to have a force of 100 engaged by the middle of this month. The largest single force on contract work on the Pacific side will be used by Tucker McClure on his work at Paraiso. His force estimates furnished the Canal indicate that he will employ 450 men at the peak of the work which will be in May. The number to be employed on other Pacific side contract work includes 250 men by Framorco on its million-dollar building contract in Ancon; ISO by Macco-Panpacific for the Cardenas townsite grading; and 60 by the Republic Construction & Maintenance Company for the construction work at Diablo Heights. The Maintenance Division will employ well over 100 extra men for its work in the construction of the concrete tanks and sewage system at Paraiso and the house building program in Balboa. There is presently no estimate of the extra labor force which may be required in other work under the 1952 fiscal year program because of the alteration in plans for the new town of Summit. Central Labor Office Busy Work in the Central Labor offices on both sides of the Isthmus has been greatly increased lately by the building program. The increase was noted beginning at the first of March after all construction contracts were awarded. More new local-rate employees were hired by the Canal during the first two weeks in March than the entire total in February. The labor pool now available through the Central Labor Office is ample to supply a labor force many times the size required. There are presently approximately 14,000 eligibility cards outstanding. 'The only holders of eligibility cards are those who have been hired by some employing agency in the Canal Zone since January 1, 1946, although a few others with special qualifications are processed monthly. The establishment of a centralized agency for the processing and clearance of local-rate labor took place before the beginning of the World War II by agreement among the major employing agencies in the Canal Zone. Although modified from time to time in adjustment to changing conditions, the system then established has been used now for more than 12 years and has proved to be highly satisfactory in the handling of labor problems entailed in the great upswing and down-swing of employment which has taken place during that time.

PAGE 11

April 4, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 11 NEW ARTIFICAL RESPIRATION METHOD l''IR.ST8TliPinthe new back-pressure arm-lift : or (HolgerNielson) method of artificial respiration is demonstrated by Kenneth R. Coleman of the Balboa Station, kneeling. He is instructing in the new method which has been adopted officially here. The "victim" is Frank R. Constanzo, also of the Balboa Fire Station. ARMS ARE lifted toward the operator when pressure on the "victim's" back is released. The accompanying article explains details of the back-pressui'e arm-lift resuscitation method. {Condensation of a release by Department of Defense, Office of Public Information, Washington, D. C.) Many of you will at some time have to administer artificial respiration to an accident victim. Be it a victim of drowning, electric shock, or asphyxiation for other reasons, artificial respiration must be started by the first person on the scene and that may be you. Most of us are at least on speaking terms with the Schafer prone pressure method where the victim is placed face down, the operator straddles him and rhythmically applies pressure to the chest. This forces air out of the lungs, but there is no active manipulative phase to draw new air into the lungs. It has recently been proven by researchers that the Schafer method is only about one-half as efficient as most of the other known methods. It has therefore been recommended that another be adopted as a standard method. Thii new method is called the back-pressure arm-lift (or Holger Nielson) method. The arm-lift provides a phase of active intake of air. In any method of artificial respiration remember these general rules: (1) Seconds count, start at once. Don't try to move the victim to a more favorable location and don't wait for help. (2) Use the method with which you are familiar until you learn a better one. Many lives have been saved by the familiar Schafer method. (3) Any method is useless unless the air can get in and out of the lungs so make sure the passages are open. Clean out the throat and mouth and slide the t(jngue and jaw forward. (4) Keep it going, especially in electrical shock victims, until recovery or until pronounced dead by a physician. Don't abandon hope too soon. The back-pressure arm-lift method may be performed by a small person upon a larger one for an extended period of time and without undue fatigue. The technique is simple and easily mastered. The victim is placed in the prone or face-down position and if readily available on an incline so the head is lower than the feet to promote drainage from the nose and mouth. The elbows are bent, the hands placed one on the other and the head placed so that one cheek rests on the hands. The victim's neck is extended (pulled backwards) to provide a more open air passageway. The operator then kneels at the victim's head and faces his feet. With the forefinger sweep the back of the throat and mouth clean of debris and pull the tongue forward. The operator's hands are then placed on the victim's back on a line drawn across just below his armpits, the fingers are spread out and thumb point toward each other. Then with your elbows straight, slowly rock forward, gradually applying pressure, gently release, and as you rock backwards grasp the victim's arms just above the elbows and draw them upward and toward you until you begin to feel resistance and tension at the victim's shoulders. Then gently drop the arms to the ground and repeat the whole cycle at the rate of 12 to 15 per minute. It is as simple as that and you may save a life. Forty Years Ago In March It was a month of records, with Steamshovel 124 leading the pack. On March 1 this 70-ton Bucyrus shovel with its threeyard dipper loaded 2,830 yards of earth into 283 dump cars in a working day of eight hours. It was the greatest amount of material excavated by a shovel of that type in one day since work began. Fourteen days later 124 broke its own record by 70 yards. In eight hours 124 loaded 290 dump cars with 2,900 cubic yards of material. And as a mass effort, on March 6, 26 shovels working in Culebra Cut excavated a total of 41,254 cubic yards, car measurement, in an eight-hour day. This was a record for a single day's excavation in the Culebra district. After a 12,000-mile voyage from Falmouth, England, the twin-screw ladder dredge Corozal reached Balboa on March 2T. The dredge had left Falmouth December 29 and was 88 days in making its long voyage across the Atlantic and around South America. It was subseqiiently used for underivater excavation at the Pacific entrance of the Canal. New vehicular speed limits, replacing those which had been set in 1908, were established by executive order. Motorists, bicyclists, and motorcyclists could burn up the road at all of 15 miles an hour, providing the highway was straight. On curves, at road forks and crossroads and within town limits, the speed had to be cut to eight miles an hour. Gatun lake was sloivly rising. On March 2, the surface elevation was 16.2 feet and the height of the Chagres River at Bohio was the same. Over 82 percent of the concrete for the locks was in place as of March 23. At the close of work on that day 3,448,881 cubic yards had been poured. Of the three flights of locks, Gatun was 92 percent finished as far as the concrete was concerned; Pedro Miguel locks had 98 percent of its concrete in place; and Miraflores was moving along with 55 percent of concrete laid. Canal Zone visitors included Joseph Pennell who spent some time here obtaining material for pictures of Canal work to be xlsed in Century Magazine. Some of the lithographs which resulted : from the artist's visit hang in the Board R<)om and several offices at the Balboa Heights Administration Building. A working model of a section of the locks was built in the Gorgona shops by modelmaker Taylor T. Curran. The model, six feet four inches long and eight and a half feet wide, included one lock chamber and enough of the center wall to show the relationship of the twin chambers

PAGE 12

12 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4, 1952 SCOUT PRESIDENT WILLIAM JUMP President of the International Boy Scout Council of the Canal Zone, will as afternoon train, spend a few hours at their hobby and return on the night train. New Members Wanted The club is presently looking for additional members who must be U. S. citizens and entitled to commissary privileges. There are no initiation fees and the dues are three dollars a month for the first year and two dollars a month thereafter. Membership in the club entitles a member to use the track layout but the rolling stock is individually owned, the amount being governed by enthusiasm and affluence. The monthly dues also go to pay the rent, water and light, and the dues to the national organization. Membership in the Zone Club carries with it the privilege of buying model railroad equipment from manufacturers at a considerable discount. Although the club meetings are every Thursday night, many members spend To Movie Goers — Ju our work wc see a great many iiioving pictures — some so-so, some good, and just a few exceptionally fine. A really excellent picture is as much a treat to us as to you, and we have just seen one we consider excellent in every detail. The name of this motion picture is With a Song in Ah' Heart. We cojisider ourselves fortunate to have secured it for Clubhouse theater patrons, a}ul it opens in the Balboa Theater on Saturday, April I'K Done oitirely in Technicolor, With a Song in My Heart is based on the life of Jane Froman. Miss Froman, as you may remember, was very seriously injured in a plane crash while flying to entertain troops during World War II. Doctors prophesied that she woidd never be able to resume her successful singing career. By her pluck, perseverance, and determination, hoivcver, she was able to resume her place as a star in the entertainment u'orld. Susan Ilayivard plays the part of Miss Fronuin in the picture, but the singing voice that you hear is that of Miss Froman. The story is ivarni enough, appealing, moving, and song-laden enough to capture your interest and emotions, those of your family, a)id of the millions of perso)is throughout the world who will even'ually see this great musical production. We urge you to see it! IIV knoic you will find With a Song in My Heart as oilcrtaijiing and as impressive as zw did. The Clubhouse Management many additional hours at the headquarters. This is specially true when the club has some particular project in progress. Mrs. Fuller, the only woman member, is one of the chief decorators and scenery shifters. One of her most recent and best creations is a tiny \'illage located along one section of main track which is complete to a housewife hanging out the weekly wash. Other members devote most of their time to their pai'ticular specialty, such as the intricate wiring system, laying track, or installing switches. 'TT^nraTT—?^ FROM BOTH SIDES of the Isthmus and from widely different jobs come the members of the Canal Zone Society of Model Railroad Engineers to work on their layout at the Corozal railroad station. Left to right, in the front row are Byron M. DufT, who works for the Army, and Mrs. Ida H. Fuller, a Payroll Division employee. In the back row are: left In right: J. .1. Wood of the Finance Bureau; Stuart Bush, a student at Balboa High School; C. F. Van Steenberg, Jr., an electrical engineer for the .Xavy and president of the local Society; A. G. Baggott, a tunnel opcratrr at Gatun Lix-ks; Joseph W. Coffin, a fireman from Gatun, and .'\(lrian M. Boiicho, signalman at Flamenco Island, who is a former member.

PAGE 13

April 4, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 13 OUR OUT-OF-DOORS ROOSEVELT AVENUE, which could be called Banyan Boulevard, runs under an arch of spreading Chinese Banyan trees. The Chinese Banyan trees (Ficus retusa) along that section of Roosevelt Avenue between the Railroad station and the Balboa Commissary Annex form an arch of beauty. The trees were planted in 1916, soon after Balboa was first laid out. The Banyans on Roosevelt Avenue were propagated from layings made on the trees in Cathedral Plaza in Panama City. It has become necessary to remove almost half of the trees to save the rest. Contrary to popular belief, the orangecolored lichen (mold) is not causing serious damage and is not the cause of their being thinned. At the present time the trees are so close together that there is not sufficient room for root expansion. Several trees had died before it was decided to thin out the remaming trees in an effort to save the beautiful shady arch. A project is now under way to remove approximately every other tree. The street will, of course, look bare for some time, but the remaining trees have responded so well to the additional light and sun that within a short time the trees which have been removed will scarcely be missed. The Chinese Banyan is a native of Asia and was brought to the Americas many years ago. Very old trees are found in almost every park in Central and South America, where they are called "Laurel de India." ROTC To Hold Spring Camp At Empire April 5-10 Approximately 180 cadets from the Junior ROTC units at Balboa and Cristobal High Schools will spend five days at Empire in this year's Spring Camp. The cadets will fire the M-1 rifle, carbine, light machine gun, and Browning automatic rifle and will also run a platoon in an attack problem. There's a time to |buyJBro\vnies in'Jthe special pastry sections of 12 Your Canal commissaries. The same Pastry is true of 31 other bakery items Schedule that are sold only on certain days of the week, in addition to 37 breads and pastries in the stores all the time. The schedule for the specialties is: Tuesday: Princess pats; cinnamon bread; date nut cookies; applesauce la\ers; coconut drops; and salt rising bread. Wednesday: Jelly strips; ice cream siiuares; lemon meringue pie; tropical ring; pineapple upside down cake; pineapple cake; and chocolate chip cookies. Thursday: Brownies; oatmeal cookies; devil's food cups; coconut strips; coconut drops; and salt rising bread. Friday: Lady fingers; lemon cones; ginger cookies; snowballs; tropical ring; pineapple upside down cake; and chocolate chip cookies. Saturday: Chiffon cakes; crumb coffeecake; chocolate filled roll; cheesecake; jelly buns; and pineapple cake. .Small fry Easter paraders will be cute as their Easter bunnies in pastel organdy dress and bonnet sets now in the conmiissaries. For really small small fr>', there's a new all-in-one baby bath and beauty treatment called "Tod'l." It is a liquid that forms a lather that is soap, oil, cream, and lotion all in one. New Westinghouse refrigerators, with automatic defrosting and all New the newest developments, will Refrigerators be ready for delivery to purchasers' homes about the first of IVIay. Prices and other details will be in the commissar\' bulletin before they go on sale. Fresh frozen cherries — the kind that make good pies — are new in the quick frozen food sections. A 20-ounce tin costs 38 cents. For pies that look as luscious as they taste, the houseware sections have lattice pie cutters that take the work out of pastry lattice work. New eye and beau catchers now in the stores are mask veils, which And, Now, look so much like hats they Mask Veils are sold in the millinery sections. They have a pretty peek-a-boo of veil in front and a bit of a velvet bow behind and glamour girls wear them for — hats! "Miracle cleaning aids" are the current crush of the people at Mount Hope who handle housewares for the commissaries. The cleaning "cloths" look like a latticed cross between a chainois and a sponge and that's just the way they work. .Sponges have other competition for the favor of housewives on cleanup details. There are now plastic "sponges" of ivalon that are softer and wear longer than the plain old marine variety. It's apple-picking time in Chile and the Commissary Division has picked up a solid price advantage in buying the current supply of apples, grapes, plums, honeydew melons, and onions there. The retail price on Chilean apples now in the stores, for instance, is substantially lower than it would have to be for apples of similar type and quality from the States. There are new "Honeydebs" in the stores now. Commissary The Family people call them "casuals." Shoe Women who see them will Situation probably call them good looking low heeled shoes. There are wedgie pumps and sandals in nice colors. .Some are elk; some are linen with nylon mesh; and some are raffia — and that ain't hay — it's straw from Switzerland. There are even bags to match the linen and rafifia shoes. Children will get a lot of kicks out of cushion-crepe soled shoes now in the stores. The soles feel verv light and wear \er\' hard. E.xtra wide shoes for women who don't like squeeze plays are new in the shoe sections. They are inexpensive white sandals in sizes 4 to 11 and w-i-d-e. Can-opener cooks can buy tomatoes already stewed, potatoes pre-cooked, beets already "Harvarded," and hamburgers already broiled. They're all in cans in the grocery sections. White crinoline half slips, now in the stores, make a pretty dress a standout. They're now on the "haff-to-have list of fashion-minded misses. Mr. and Mrs. Fi.xit can fix up ugly chinks with Plastic Wood; now in the stores in handy tubes. It handles like putty and hardens into wood. Tomatoes in the stores from early March to late April taste especially good because they are ripened on the vine. They come from Panama and don't have to be picked green to withstand a trip from a United States garden to a Canal Zone commissary. Hydromatic action costs $3.35 if you buy it on sponge mops, new Hydromatic in the housewares sections. A Action In wringing lever at waist height Mops takes the stoop out of scrubbing. The Commissary promises replacement sponges. There are sport shirts and sport shirts and sport shirts in the stores now. Among them are two by Arrow, one a long-sleeved washable rayon in patterns and solid colors; the other, a short-sleeved cotton skipdent broadcloth in solid colors. Dietetic meats and jellies are new in the health food sections. Meat eaters can have beef hash, beef stew, chili con carne, and meat sauce. Sweet-tooth satisfiers are cherry, raspberry, grape, and strawberry jelly. Redhead shampoo by Helena Rubenstein is new in the stores. Not only for the carrot top crowd, it reddens red tinges in blonde and brown hair too. Sweet talk says there's a lot of candy in the stores — now and for Easter Easter and then on. For sound Parade Of as well as savor, consider: Sweets Starlight kisses, anise scotties, old-fashioned and salt-water taffy, peppermint sunbeams, spice strings, chicken bones, boston baked beans, butter balls, and almost ad infiniliim. Chocolate sundaes now come in pint packages in the frozen food sections. A special chocolate mix melts faster than the \anilla ice cream in the package and overflows to make a sundae. If all this bores you, try "No-Doz" awakeners. You can buy them in the commissaries, too.

PAGE 14

14 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4, 1952 THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR ANNIVERSARIES APRIL 4th — American Legion Post No. 6, Gainboa, 7:.?0 p. m. 5lh— Track Foreman No. 2741, Balboa B & B Shops. 6th — Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 3857, X'etcrans' Club, Cristobal, 9 a. 111. 7th — Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. 111. PedroMiguelCivicCouncil, Union Church, 7 p. ni. Postal Employees No. 23160, Balboa Locl^e Hall, 7:30 p. m. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 727, Fort Claylcm, 7:.)p. m. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 3822, Ciiriiiulu Road, 7:30 p. m. 8thElectrical Workers No. 397, Wirz Memorial, 7:30 p. in. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. ni. American Legion Post No. 7, Fort Cla\ton, 7:,W p. m. American Legion Auxiliary No. 1, Balboa, 7:30 p. m. 9th — Carpenters No. 913, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Pacific Civic Council, Board Room, .Administration Building, 7:30 p.m. American Legion Post No. 2, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. lllh-Good Friday. 13th — Pipefitters, Margarita Clubhouse, 9:30 a. ni. Slieetmetal Workers No. 157, Balboa Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m. Plumbers .No. 606, Balboa Lodge Hall, 9:.50 a. m. 14th— Machinists No. 699, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7:,W p. m. American Legion Post No. 1, Balboa, 7:30 p. 111. 15lli — Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:,30 p. m. Operating Engineers No. 595, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7 p. in. 16th — Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 40, Balboa K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p.m. American Federation of Government Employees No. 14, Balboa Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary No. 3, Gatun, 7:30 p. m. 17th — American Legion Auxiliary No. 6, Ganiboa, 7:30 p. m. 20th — Central Labor Union Metal Trades Council, Balboa Lodge Hall, 8:30 a. m. 21st — Electrical Workers No. 677, Galuii Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m. Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. 111. 22d— Operating Engineers No. 595, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. in. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. 23d — Anjerican Federation of Government Employees No. 88, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary No. 2, Cristobal, 7:30 p. in. 24th — Governor-Employee Conference Board Room,.\diiiiiiistration Building, 2 p. m. 28th — Machinists No. 699, Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m. Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary Post 3822 Post Home, 7:30 p. in. MAY 1st — Carpenters No. 667, Margarita Clubhouse. 7:30 p. in. April Sailings From Cristobal S. S. Ancon April 4 S. S. Panama April 11 S. S. Cristobal April IS S. S. Ancon April 2.5 From New York S.S.Panama April 2 S. S. Cristobal April 9 S. S. Ancon April 16 S. S. Panama April 23 S. S. Cristobal April 30 PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS February 15 Through March 15 The following list contains the names of those U. .S.-rate employees who were transferred from one division to another or from one type of work to another. It does not C()iitaiii within-grade promotions and regradiiigs. ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH William S. Wigg, from Clerk-typist, Records Section, to Correspondence Clerk, Correspondence Section. CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Mrs. Elizabeth Luhr, Mrs. Bessie G. Herring, and Mrs. Marjorie H. Mullaly, from Substitute Teacher to Elementary School Teacher, Schools Division. Mrs. Evelyn D. Engelke, from Personnel Clerk (typist). Personnel Bureau, to Clerk-Stenographer, Police Division. CIVIL INTELLIGENCE BRANCH Earl J. Williamson, from Investigator to Chief. COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU Wendell G. Cotton, from Manager, Gatun Housing Office, to Administrative Assistant, Housing Division. Mrs. Marion E. Middlebrook, from Clerk-typist, Terminals Division, to Clerktypist, Grounds Maintenance Division. ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Mrs. Frances A. Hunter, from Mail Clerk, office of Director, Personnel Bureau, to Clerk-typist, Contract and Inspection Division. Ernest P. Muzzio, from Plumber, Maintenance I)i\isioii. to Plumbing Inspector, Contract antl Inspection Division. John W. Whipple, from Ironworker Foreman, Maintenance Division, to Construction Inspector, Contract and Inspection Division. Curtis H. George, from Wireinan to Wirenian Leadingman, Klectrical Di\isioii. James C. Sisson, from Construction .Supervisor, Maintenance Division, to Construction Inspector, Contract and Inspection Division. John E. Davis, from Principal Foreman to Pumpman, Maintenance Division. Murray Klipper, from Wiremaii, Klectrical Di\isioii, to Klectrical Construction Inspector, Contract and Inspection Division. HEALTH BUREAU Mary E. Willis, from Nurse, Gorgas Hospital, to Public Health Nurse, Panama Health Office. Mary L. Azcarraga, from Clerk-Stenographer, Division of Schools, to ClerkTranslator, Panama Health (Jffice. INDUSTRIAL BUREAU Robert M. Blakely, from Machinist and Inspector to Machinist Leadingman, Production Division. MARINE BUREAU Graydon W. Brown, from Lock Operator VVireman Leader to Control House Operator, Pacific Locks. PZmpIoyees who observed Important anniversaries during the month of March are listed alphabetically below. The number of years includes all Government service with the Canal or other agencies. Those with continuous Canal or Railroad service are indicated with {if). .15 YEARS John B. Corliss, Chief Towboat Engineer, Dredging Division. 30 YEARS Harold V. Goddard, Craneman and Operator, Motor Transportation Division. Clarence Sibus, .Assistant Superintendent, Pacific Branch, Locks Division. 25 YEARS Henry P. Butcher, Lock Operator, Machinist Leader, Locks Division. Julian P. Hackett, Telephone Maintainer. Communications Branch. Frederick W. Hensler, Dock Foreman, Navigation Division. Dr. Ezra Hurwitz, Superintendent, Palo .Seco. Edwin F. Rigby, Storekeeper, Division of Storehouses. Edna C. Whitver, Government .Accountant, Finance Bureau. 20 YEARS Murphy B. Alexander, Principal Construction and Maintenance Foreman, Maintenance Division. Violet M. Courville, School Nurse, BalLioa Charles F. Delaney, Postal Clerk. George M. Lowe, Administrative .Assistant, Locks Division. ^Alfred E. Osborne, Supervisor of lustructicjn. Canal Zone Colored Schools. 15 YEARS Kenneth A. Brown, ClerkTypist, Division ol Storehouses. James H. Burns, Chief Towboat Engineer, Navigation Division. •Webster G. Farrell, Pilot, Navigation Division. Milton J. Halley, Postal Clerk. Thomas T. Jordan, Machinist, Indii.strial Bureau. Hayward H. Shacklett, Safety Engineer, .Saletv' Branch. Joseph J. Svihra, Fireman. A-Daniel C. Zitzman, .Supply Clerk, Housing Division. RETIREMENTS IN MARCH Employees who retired at the end of March, their birthplaces, titles, length ot service at retirement, and their future addresses are: Leonard C. Lauterbach, Pennsylvania; Electrical Machinist, Balboa Field Office, Electrical Division; 28 years, 10 months, and 29 days; 'Tampa, Fla. Mrs. Gabriela R. Lopp, Puerto Rico; Cashier, La Boca Commissary; 24 years and 20 days; .Atlanta, Ga. Harry J. Linker, from Leadingman Machinist, Industrial Bureau to Machinist, Dredging Division. Sydney T. Lindh, from Machinist Leader, Industrial Bureau, to Lock Operator Machinist, Pacific Locks. Morris R. Collins, from Engineer, Pipeline Suction Dredge, to First .Assistant Engineer, Pipeline -Suction Dredge, Dredging Division. Edward H. Dietrich, from Steam Kngineer, Floating Crane, to Engineer, Pipeline .Suction Dredge, Dredging Division. A. Paul Jones, from Steam Engineer, Floating Crane, to Dipper Dredge Engineer, Dredging Division. Charles J. Connor, from Foreman, Pipeline Suction Dredge, to Drill Barge Blaster, Dredging Division. Charles S. Joyner, from Foreman. Ferry Service, to Drill Barge Blaster, Dredging Division. Edward O. Pike, from Junior Foreman, Ferry Service, to Drill Runner, Dredging Division. {See page /j)

PAGE 15

April 4, 1952 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15 Old DQM Office Disappears LOCKS SECURITY CHIEF j*'^. _j ONE OF THE oldest buildings in Balboa, thi; Housing Uttice or old Uistnct Quartermaster Building, was demolished last month. The two-story frame structure was built soon ofter the toTi of Balboa was occupied. 1953 Building Program Calls For $31,750,000 Expenditure (Continued from page 1) will also See the first of the new-type bachelor apartment buildings constructed for U. S.-rate employees. These will be 17-unit, masonry buildings. Tentative plans call for the location of one of these in Ancon; two in Diablo Heights; and eight bachelor apartment buildings in Margarita. A total of 153 family apartments are to be built in the new residential area being developed this year at Margarita. Other work there next year includes the construction of a swimming pool, 100 feet wide and 50 meters long. Present plans call for the construction of appro.ximately 230 family apartments in the area selected for the new townsite development on the Pacific side. An elementary school is also to be constructed in this area. Construction will begin during the coming year on practically all of the community facilities planned for the new town of Cardenas, and a total of $2,683,900 will be apportioned for this. The program calls for the construction of the following: A swimming pool, 100 feet by 50 meters; an elementary school; a juniorClaud M. Kreger, from Pump Operator to Junior Foreman, Dredging Division. PERSONNEL BUREAU Joanne Steiner, from Clerk-Typist, Personnel Records Division, to Mail Clerk, Office of the Director. Mrs. Elsa L. Bailey, from Clerk-Stenographer to Personnel Clerk (Typist), Employment and Utilization Division. RAILROADS AND TERMINALS BUREAU Hubert W. Jarman, from Stevedore Foreman to Head Stevedore Foreman, Terminals Division. SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU Jasper W. Burton, from Clerk, Hotel Washington, to Clerk, Hotel Tivoli. Mrs. Jessie E. Albright, from Cash Accounting Clerk to Commissary Assistant, Commissary Division. Frederick B. Hill, Jr., from Commissary i'\ssistant to Property and Supply Clerk, Commissary Division. senior high school; a Commissary building; theater; Clubhouse (including a library); post office; police and fire stations; a medical-dental clinic; and an office for the Housing Manager and Grounds Maintenance Division. All of these facilities, with the exception of the two schools and the swimming pool, will be located in a central community center area. In addition to the house-building program at Chagres and in the Camp Bierd and Old Cristobal areas on the Atlantic side, a new elementary and junior high school building is to be built at Silver City. No new quarters are scheduled for construction in the Silver City-Camp Coiner area during the coming year. Electric Brain, Mechanical Termites Join Forces To Punch Out Paychecks {Continued from page 9) of COUrSe, but most of them have to do with posting, auditing, and accounting, so that at any time the division can tell in a matter of minutes just how much has been spent so far this year for what type of work and to whom. At the present time, there are 72 U. S.rate and 18 local-rate employees in the Payroll Division. When the system is completely mechanized there will be some reduction of force. All employees who have been hired for the division since last September are considered temporary. Payroll Comparatively New As a division, Payroll is comparatively new. Its functions were formerly scattered through the individual divisions and it was not until November 1950 that Payroll was set up as a division of the Finance Bureau. Its head is Mr. Barnes who did his first pa3Toll work in the Navy just after World War I. He went to work for the Canal in 1925, worked in the Accoimting and Supply Departments and has headed the Payroll Division since its formation. His assistant is Howard Turner, to whom goes much of the credit for setting up the Edward H. Halsall, below, has been appointed Chief of the new Locks Security Force. His appointment was effective last Monday. With his new position he assumed the title of Captain. Captain Halsall has been employed by The Panama Canal and Panama Canal Company for almost 24 years, 15 of them on the Canal Zone Police force. A native of Stamford, Connecticut, he came to the Canal Zone on July 4, 1928, from Jamaica where he had been working as an overseer on a coffee and banana plantation. EDW.\RD H. HALSALL Before going to Jamaica, he had served for almost 8 years in the Army, 21 months of this time being spent overseas. As head of the new Locks Security Force, he will be in charge of 55 IT. S.-rate and 12 local-rate locks guards. The U. S.-rate guards will be armed and will have full authority to apprehend suspicious persons and to gather and safeguard evidence. This organization is now being formed, with the present force of 32 U. S.-rate and 7 local-rate^ men as its nucleus During his 15 years on the Police Force, Captain Halsall was stationed at Ancon, Balboa, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel and was sub-station commander at Chiva-Chiva when he transferred to the District Quartermaster's office at Cocoli in 1943. He comes to the Locks Secizrity Force from the Balboa Housing Office. mechanized payroll system. He was sent to the States about a year ago to study mechanized procedure in New Orleans and Texas. On his retiu-n he worked out some of the code and helped set up the problems for which the control boards of the electric brains are wired. What the men and machines are doing at Diablo is perfectly clear to a handful of people. But it isn't to everyone. The day the first checks were run off. Governor Newcomer, Lieutenant Governor Vogel, and the Governor's Executive Assistant, Forrest G. Dunsmoor, came to watch. There was a whir and a buzz and the printed paychecks, Mr. Dunlop's first of all, came zipping out of the machines. The Governor shook his head. "Amazing," he said, "Very amazing and very confusing too."

PAGE 16

16 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW April 4,1952 _^ Scrap— It's EveryAvhere AN ABANDONED DUMP of old railroad equipment near the Cucaracha signal station will yield an estimated 50 tons of scrap for the current drive for old metal. J. F. Prager, Superintendent of the Storehouse Division, above, ploughed through grass and underbrush to evaluate the find. Scrap, the people at the Panama Canal Company's Division of Storehouses are finding, is everywhere. Scrap from old machinery which has been declared obsolete or surplus, from old railroad rails, from old pipe, and screening and metal fittings from razed quarters, is old stuff. But now the Division has gone further afield in its hunt for scrapand afield is the proper word. From old dumps, from fields overgrown with grass, from the Canal banks, and from encroaching jungle, the scrap hunters are bringing back old metal to be cut up and sold for scrap which, eventually, will find its way into steel mills and other places where scrap is vitally needed. Some of the material which is nowbeing i-ecovered for scrap was abandoned when the Canal was completed, because it was easier to leave it where it was than to move it. "Scrap" was practically unheard of and in many cases the expenses of moving old equipment would have been more than it was worth. For instance, when Gatun Dam was finished 16 dump cars were isolated on the west bank of the Canal. For close to 40 years they stood on an old railroad siding. They could not be brought across the locks as they were. Today the Storehouse Division is dismantling these old dump cars and bringing them across the lock gates in pieces by truck. The 500 or so tons from the old dump cars will be added to the scrap piles in Balboa. Found Old Dump Opposite Cucaracha Slide on the west bank of the Canal, not far from the Cucaracha signal station, scrap hunters found an abandoned dump of old railroad equipment. Preparations are now under way to excavate this dump and recover all of the estimated .50 tons of usable scrap. Then, too, old boilers were found along the banks of the Canal. They have been removed to Gamboa by the Dredging Division and are being cut to pieces for scrap. From this find alone, approximately 150 tons of metal scrap are anticipated. Even Fence Posts Salvaged Even fence posts, long abandoned, will go to swell the scrap pile. From old pastures which were used between 1917 and 1934 for the Canal's cattle industry, the Storehouse Division is salvaging an estimated 3,000 metal fence posts. The posts were made from T-rails which themselves were salvage. After the balls of the rails were removed to make reinforcing bars, the rest of the rails were cut into lengths for posts to fence in pastures at Summit and Caimito. Altogether, from dump cars, the abandoned dump near Cucaracha, the Canal banks, and the old pastures, the Storehouse Division expects to salvage close to 900 tons of scrap. Since the scrap salvage program was started last July 1, a total of 4,212 tons have been collected. Of this some 4,000 tons were classified as ferrous (or with an iron base) and 212 tons were non-ferrous. On April 14, bids to purchase close to 2,200 net tons of ferrous scrap will be opened at the Storehouse ofiice in Balboa and two days later bids on about 150 tons of non-ferrous scrap will be considered. Library Of Congress Books Available To Local Readers Canal Zone book-lovers henceforth will have an even wider range in the selection of their reading material. The Canal Zone Library has just announced that the Library is now authorized to borrow books for interested patrons from the Library of Congress. This privilege, which for many years was limited to libraries within the United States, has recently been extended to include libraries outside the continental United States. Readers who wish to borrow any title which is available in the Library of Congress on a loan basis will give the Library Assistant on duty at the Circulation Desk the author, title, the publisher and date of publication, if possible, for the book desired. Readers will be notified of the arrival of the books they Atlantic Side Plans Rousing July Fourth Plans for a rousing Fourth of July celebration for the Atlantic side are already under way with a bang — and a pun is intended. So far on the Pacific side no July 4 Committee has been formed. Atlantic side co-chairman John S. Rice and Herbert Engelke are confident that they and their committees will provide residents of New and Old Cristobal, Gatun, and Margarita with one of the best celebrations in many years. The July 4 program is sponsored by the Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council. Invitations to participate have been extended to the Gatun council and to about 15 different organizations, among them the Army, Navy, Knights of Columbus, Elks, and veterans' groups. Present plans call for a celebration which will last from eight o'clock in the morning to ten o'clock at night and which will include a parade, athletic events, games, a community luncheon, a swimming meet at Gatun, and, of course, evening fireworks. Part of the day's activities will take place in Gatun and part in Margarita. Rifle Champion ^ERSITY nil 262 085 u^=^^ to :-" LORIDA III 7374 ra3Ee?*t?*f-' i>js'-f*s^s-. mi m iiiiiwi >! RICH.\RDDILL.MA.\, Balboa High School senior, holds the three targets on which he made a score of 296 out of a possible 300 last month to set a new Isthmian record, lie fired from the three standard positions, prone, sitting, and standing, scoring 100 on the first two and 96 on the third. The new record was set in an Isthmian Gallery League match at the Balboa ROTC range. The new champion has been shooting since he was 12 vears old. have requested. Conditions of the inter-library loan provide that the material lent cannot ordinarly include those books which should be in a local library, books which are procurable through ordinary trade channels, books for the general reader, textbooks or popular manuals, books in the Rare Book Collection, or volumes in poor physical condition.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EDMZQ7JDM_JZX7KE INGEST_TIME 2011-04-25T18:08:18Z PACKAGE UF00097366_00099
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES