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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00099
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: April 1952
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00099
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum
_ PANAMA


AL


Vol. 2, No. 9 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, APRIL 4, 1952 5 cents


1953


BUILDING


PROGRAM


CALLS


FOR


EXPENDITURE


OF


$31,750,000


Distinguished


FOR


HOUSES,


Sightseers


PUBLIC
Schedule


BUILDINGS
Will Reach


Peak In
After


Months


Next July


ANDREW HEISKELL, publisher of Life Magazine, and Mrs. Heiskell (Madeleine Carroll)
among the group of leading publishers and editors of North and South America visiting the Pedr
guel Locks recently. The visit was made during the course of the meeting of the Directors of the 1
American Press Association held in Panama during the latter part of March.
Miss Carroll, beautiful stage and screen actress, and her husband were as thrilled by the Loci
ration as thousands of other visitors who see them for the first time. After their visit to the
Miguel Locks. the Proun made the trin through Gaillard Cut ahnard tha orhrnehnu, Atlans.


A program of contracting for
approximately $31,750,000 for
Canal housing is planned dur-
ing the coming fiscal year if ap-
propriation requests now before
Congress are approved.
The House Appropriations
Committee has recommended a
$3,000,000 cut in the amount
requested for the building pro-
gram next year.
The building schedule will
reach a peak during the 12-
month period beginning in July
1952 under the revised plans
which call for completion of the
quarters replacement and con-
struction program by the end
of the fiscal year 1956 instead
of 1958. Next year's expendi-
ture will be by far the largest
of any year in the six-year pro-
gram, although work to be
started will extend well beyond
July 1953.


ks op-
Pedro


The majoi
year will be


r portion of the money next
spent on the local-rate quar-


I This istne of your CANAL REVIw was dclaved I


-|-C7-




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


Conferees


Discuss


Girl


Scouts'


40th


Birthday


Housing, Food Cost,

And Schoolbusses

The housing program is beginning to
move along, Lieutenant Governor Her-
bert D. Vogel told the Governor-Employ-
ee Conference during the March meeting.
Matters of housing, commissary sup-
plies and prices, school busses and park-
ing occupied most of the time of the con-
ference which lasted beyond the usual
four o'clock closing time.
During a general discussion of housing.


.C7


-,


during which Colonel Vogel said he was
unable at that time to give the conferees
any definite information on the transfer
by the Army of land to replace the Sum-
mit building site, the Lieutenant Gover-
nor said that sufficient housing will be


completed
begin the
Cristobal.
Colonel
housing co
readjusted
housing to


at Margarita by October to
vacating of old quarters in
Vogel commented that the
instruction program had been
to permit the oldest and worst
be replaced first, deferring the


replacement of some of the comparatively
newer existing houses until later in the


GIRL SCOUT TROOPS from both sides of the Isthmus lined the Administration Building steps at a
rally last month in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the founding of the organization. Highlight
of the impressive ceremony was the presentation of a Thanks Badge of the Girl Scouts to Mrs. F. K. New-
comer, wife of the Governor, for her help in Scout work during the eight years of her residence in the Canal
Zone. This is one of the highest honors bestowed by the organization. Mistress of ceremonies at the 40th
anniversary rally was Mrs. M. D. Monagan. The address of welcome was presented by Mrs. Andrew Bail-


kowski and the group singing was led by Miss Mary


Patton, Director of Girl Scouts in the Canal Zone.


program.
For instance, he said, the houses
construction in New Cristobal will
immediately replaced. Quarters
provided instead for those living
very old quarters of other areas.


of later
not be
will be
in the


CANAL I

IN


NOW


LISTED


DEFENSE


WITH


AGENCY


PERSONNEL


ACTION


"Worst First" Scheduled
The schedule he said had been realigned
to replace the "worst first, the best of the
old houses last, and spread the benefits of
new housing out."
He touched briefly on plans for the
coming fiscal year and said the entire pro-
gram was scheduled for completion in fis-
cal year 1956.
Daniel P. Kiley, representing the Paci-
fic side Locks employees asked if gasoline
prices would go higher, and Colonel Vogel
said that no further increase-except in
case of an increase in the supplier's
charges-was contemplated. After a gen-
eral discussion of the gasoline situation,
the conferees were told that a fuller report
would be made at a coming meeting.
Bronson Powell. of the Pdirn Mirnml


Both the Panama Canal Company and
the Canal Zone Government have now
been listed as defense agencies in connec-
tion with personnel actions under Civil
Service regulations.
This action will have an important
effect on the employment of personnel
and on voluntary separations from the
Company-Government service. It gives
the Company and Government authority
for making non-competitive appointments
of certain present or former employees in
the "indefinite" status.
It also grants the prerogative of acquir-
ing new employees by transfer or other-
wise from non-defense agencies. This has
not been possible under Civil Service reg-
ulations during the present emergency
. 1


ment will have authority to restrain em-
ployees from employment with non-
defense and other defense agencies. This,
however, is a permissive authority, and
the Company-Government may grant
permission for the transfer of an employ-
ee to another Government agency.
The listing of the Company and Gov-
ernment as defense agencies means that
the reemployment rights hitherto effect-
ive for employees transferring to a de-


fense agency will n
unless such a transfc
However, an emplo:
the Panama Canal C
Zone Government
agency will have the
granted under Civil


o longer be effective
ir is with permission.
yee who transfers to
company or the Canal
from a non-defense
reemployment rights
Service regulations.


The Civil Service Commission's depart-


CONNECTION





April 4, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Residents


On


Of


New


Silver

Official


City Will

Name Of


ote


Their


own


THIS AERIAL VIEW of the new section of Silver City shows the large
number of new houses which have been completed in that area. This section
has been nicknamed "Rainbow City" by the residents because of the multi-
colored houses there. THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW is sponsoring a referen-
dum of all residents of Silver City and the area now known as Camp Coiner


to determine if the majority want the name of their town officially changed.
A total of 91 duplex apartment buildings were constructed in this area by
Framorco, Inc., under last year's program and 96 more duplexes are now
under construction by the Isthmian Constructors, Inc.


For the first time in the history of the
Canal Zone the residents of a community
are to be given an opportunity to vote
their preference for the name of their
town.
Governor Newcomer has authorized
THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW to conduct
a poll of the residents of Silver City
(including Camp Coiner) to determine if
they wish to change the name of the
town. The poll will be conducted this
month by THE REVIEW in collaboration
with the International Boy Scouts by a
house-to-house canvass.
Six names have been proposed. They


Silver City
Rainbow City
Folks City


Manzanillo
Granada
Mindi


rpI, n nmnrn ar f,% ,ci l int* 4 rn 'iT 4-,,


Boy Scout Council in the Canal Zone;
and J. Rufus Hardy, Editor of THE
REVIEW.
A formal report on the result of the
balloting will then be forwarded to
Governor Newcomer for the selection of
the official name, which will be an-
nounced in the next issue of THE REVIEW.
The ballots will be distributed and
collected by the members of the five
International Boy Scout Troops of Silver
City, who will work under the general
direction of Joseph A. Hassocks, Scout
Commissioner, and Romeo G. Miller,
District Commissioner. There are over
200 members of the five troops and it is
expected that the ballots can be distri-
buted and collected in a few hours' time.
Scout Troops To Help
Thp .eniit tronns to assist and their


first reference to it was a report of the
Building Site Committee which recom-
mended that "when funds are available,
a town for silver employees be built on
the new fill south of Folks River and
south and east of the Corral." This
recommendation, approved by Governor
Harding, was signed by Major E. E,
Person, Assistant Chief Health Officer,
Chairman; Major W. R. Grove, Chief
Quartermaster; Hartley Rowe, Resident
Engineer of the Building Division; and
Daniel E. Wright, Municipal Engineer.
The memorandum of the Building Site
Committee was forwarded to the Gov-
ernor by Judge Frank Feuille, then
Special Attorney for The Panama Canal,
who was serving as Chairman of a Com-
mittee on Standard Nomenclature of
Geographic Features of the Canal Zone,





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


April 4,1952


Like lightning, model railroading as a
hobby may hit anybody, any time, at
any age. And, like lightning, the hits
may be few and far between but a second
stroke is rarely needed.
For example, when junior wakes up
on Christmas morning, he may find the
old man under the Christmas tree oper-
ating his new train which Santa just left
him. Such an occasion often means
that an adult model railroad engineer


has b
Fey
road
pastir
basis.
Assoc


een born.
v outside the k
ig realize that
ne and is organ
The National
nation, Inc., has


hers scattered through
and several other c


:en of model rail-


it is
sized on
Model
some 9
the Uni
countries.


lishes its own periodical wh
in its 18th year and is widely


Here in the Canal


known
Model
are als
ization
seven r
although
bership
associa
ing to
Wha
bers, h
enthusi


1


Zone the


national
National
Railroad
)00 mem-
ed States,
It pub-
h is now
irculated.
group is


as the Canal Zone Society of
Railroad Engineers, all of whom
o members of the national organ-
. The local branch now has only
members and three junior members
gh it also claims an inactive mem-
of eight who retained their
tion with the society after return-
the United States.
.t the local society lacks in num-
owever, the members make up in
iasm and in railroad track, loco-


motives, rolling stock, yards, swi
tunnels, depots, scenery, trestles,
all the other paraphernalia.


tches,
and


its fourth anniversary. During those
four years the intricate track system has
been rebuilt three times. Each rebuild-
ing, they claim, only incites further inter-
est for improvements and developments.
One of the club's current problems,
according to C. F. Van Steenberg, Jr.,
President of the Society, is to arrange for
a proper division of the railway system.
When completed, this will permit a
member to operate the yards and transfer
control to another member when a
train reaches the main line.
Variety of Occupations
A roster of the club membership is
the best indicator that model railroading
is a bug which can bite anyone. Mr.
Van Steenberg is employed as an elec-
trical engineer by the Navy. The occu-
pations of other officers and members
are: A. G. Baggott, Tunnel Operator at
Gatun Locks, Vice President; Mrs. Ida
H. Fuller, of the Payroll Division, Secre-
tary and Treasurer; J. J. Wood, of the
Finance Bureau; B. M. Duff, Automo-
tive Inspector of the (See page 12)


RELATIVE SIZE is demonstrated here by pretty
Marie Jenkins, Balboa High School student, holding
a section of tracks with a late-model Diesel engine
and car. Much of the wall space at the club's head-
quarters in the Corozal railroad station is taken up
by pictures of railway equipment, such as the cal-
endar in the background of this picture.


Headquarters at Corozal
Headquarters of the model railroaders
are in the old Corozal railroad station
which the club rents at a nominal fee.
The entire baggage room is occupied by
a built-up platform, except for a narrow
passageway around the walls, on which
has been built some ten miles (in mini-
ature) of track. The model itself,
known as the Pan-Am Railroad, is
complete with railroad yards, towns,
mountain scenery, switches, and a maze
of wiring to control the trains and the
block system.
The Canal Zone Society of Model
Railroad Engineers last month celebrated


THIS BUCOLIC scene with the barn and silo in the background is built along one section of the main
tracks. This scenery was recently completed by Mrs. Ida H. Fuller, only woman member of the club.
The tunnel at the left is one of several located on the 650 feet of main track. The model railroaders are
particular about every small detail of the layout and one member recently brought some tiny tramps
made of safety pins to lie alongside the tracks or "ride the rods?."


Model Railroading Is Intensive Fun






April 4,1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


OUR 1951 TOLL-
1 FATALITY-550 DISABLED


During the calendar
Canal Company-Ca


had 550 lo,
a fatality
38,112 wo
The accid
was 15.23,
provement
17.02. esta
rate is a


organ iza
The d


1951
one


st time inJuries, one
. These represent
rking days lost fr
ent frequency rate
which was an 11
over the previous b
blished in 1949. Th
new low record fo


tion.
divisions


sible for this
the Building I
Fire Divisioi
Grounds Main
Division, and
following; Sun
Civil Affairs B
Bureau, and I
reau. These u


requei
o 100


and u
ver-all
vision,
Con


tenance


miscel
apply a
bureau,
Railroad
nits est


icy rates ra
percent over


records.
Because
the first
for all the
"Accident
1951," w
compares
with their
with any
may have


Sof the
rear tha
bureaus
Statistic
which ha
the 195
r own 1
previous:
had pri


, the Panama
Government
of which was
a total of
om the job.
experienced
percent im-
est record of


uis freq
r the


mils chief
improved
Industrial
emissary
Division,


laneous tiun
nd Service
Community
i and Tern
abolished ne
ing from 1
eir own pre


reorganization
t statistics are
as they now e


s for the
just b
record
50 record
low rece
r to the


uency
entire


ly respon-
nent were
1l Bureau,
Division,
Terminals
its of the
Bureau,
y Services
finals Bu-
w accident
0 percent
vious best

i, 1950 is
available
xist. The


Calendar Year
een published,
of all bureaus
d, rather than
ord which any
reorganization.


This starting from "scratch," as it were,
places all bureaus on an equal basis for any
future comparison of one record with that
of another.
Almost all the bureaus bettered their
own 1950 accident frequency record by a


HONOR


ROLL


Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
February


COMMUNITY


SERVICES


BUREAU


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEA
Community Services .............
Industrial...............-------------------.--.
Civil Affairs-----.-.----.--- -..
Engineering and Construction --..---
Health... ....Ii.... . . .
Marine. ........ .............
Railroad and Terminals---------


R
2
1
0
0


percent to 54 percent improvement
e Industrial Bureau taking top
[th the 54 percent improvement.
bureaus were the Industrial, Supp
*rvice, Railroad and Terminals,
unity Services, Engineering and
ruction, Health, and Civil Affairs.
hievements in accident prevention
ntrilbuted to the substantial lowe


accident


fr


organization.
It is possible
to better their
is the goal towa
ually direct the
it comes to ac
promotion of s
much where a d
given time in c
the important t
ually strive to i
As their fre
minimum, the
additional impi
greater, and the
will have great


equency rat

for all div


own best
rd which a
ir efforts.
cident pre'
;afety, it c
division or u
comparison
hing is for
improve the
quency ra
effort nec
movement "
least letup
er adverse


e for the


isi

*cord, a
should
herefor
untion a
es not
t stand
ith oth


t, with
honor-,
These
ly and
Comn-
Con-
These
greatly
ring of
entire


and units


nd this
contin-
e, when
nd the


them to contin-
ir own record.
tes approach a
essarv to show
will have to be


in safe
results


It is hoped that everyone
with the splendid spirit of int
ation, and effort, that has b
1951 for accident prevention
resultant promotion of human;
elimination of pain, suffering
loss that occurs when safety
the support it deserves.
The following units will
Division HonorRoll award for


n juries


for the month


of Fe


GATION DIVISION, MO
PORTATION DIVISION,
STOREHOUSES, GROUN
NANCE DIVISION. The
tenance Division is tied in
the Division of Storehouses
of awards for this year.


The COMMUNI
REAU for the seco
receive the Bureau
having the Best Rec
While L. W. Char
for the Locks Divisi
States, he will attend
Michigan and Ohio
on "Fundamentals
National Safety Co
sence, R. S. Phillip
Safety Inspector for
R. J. Danielsen,
Safety Inspector for


TY SE


ict ices
their


I contain ue
st, cooper-
shown in
with its
welfare and
and wage
not given


ive the
isabling
Nx*


bruary: '
TOR TR
DIVISION
DS MAI
Grounds
first place
in the n

R\VICES


nd time th
Honor Rol


ord c
nbern
)n, is
dSaf
, and
of I
uncil


of the MI
s, Safety
on vaca
ety Con
a train
ndustria
* Durir


s, engineer
the Pacific
engineer,
the Atlant


FEBRUARY 1952


IT HAPPENED this way, Police officer hiram
Overall could be telling Balboa Magistrate Edward
Altman. To demonstrate how accidents occurred,
miniature cars and trucks can be placed in any posi-
tion (except on their sides) on the new magnetized
board. The board is visible from any point in the
courtroom, unlike small disgrams which were used
formerly. The board is the only one of its kind in
the Canal Zone courts.


s^AVI-
LANS-
N OF
NTE-
Main-
e with
number


' year will
award for
onth.
Inspector
tion in the
ferences in
ing course
1 Safety,"
ig his ab-
wvill act as
ranch, and
:11 act as
Branch.


SAFE alpha BETS

A


........ is for accidenlt-
Also Alert.
The second helps keep you
From getting hurt.
The first, you can see
\Without being a wizard,
Knocks you and production
From "A" down to "Izzard."


........ .warns of B
Bruises, Bumps, B
They can happen to
Borkowski or Jone
So Be careful, Be wa
Be Bright and Be
If you're stung By th
Brother, then you'


urns,
ousted
Bauer


Bones.


s-
tchful,
Brave.
tese B's,
II Behave.


Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked
(Freauencv Rate)


J


-





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


Chauffeur Since 1908
War, Jamaica Quake,


Recalls


Boer


Ten


Canal Building


ears


Ago


March


A swagger stick and a smile-that's
Fitz Herbert Alleyne Griffith. The swag-
ger stick-the current one is of polished
black palm is a habit acquired in the
nine years he spent in Queen Victoria's
British Army before he came to work for
the Isthmian Canal Commission way back
in 1908. The smile is just a part of him.
Griffith was 73 years old March 2, just
two days after he was retired from his
job of many years, driving a truck which
hauled lumber to repair Pacific side
houses. With the exception of a 15-day
lay-off in the fall of 1908, when he
switched from his first Canal Zone job
as a carpenter for the Panama Railroad
to the job he held for so many years, his
service was unbroken.
When Griffith went to work as a team-
ster for the Motor Transportation Divi-
sion on November 15, 1908, the Ancon
"corral" was located near the site of the
presentAnconpostoffice. He workedwith
horses and mules, the latter just as stub-
born as mules anywhere else in the world.
Only way to get along with them, he re-
calls, was to let them know right off who
was boss.
When the Division was motorized he
became a chauffeur and was listed that
way on the rolls during all his years of
service.
Served In Africa


Born in th
bados, Griffit
1899, when h
British Army
was khaki but
something to
low seams do
and, for speci
The Boer w
it was only af
ing in Jamai
unit was sent


into the ac
as a reserve
where Afri
Atlantic.
corporal b
lery, earnir
Two ye


tiv
e (
ca'
In
om


eP;
h
e w
/.
thi,
see
wn


parish of St. Lucia in Bar-
vent to school there. In
'as 20, he enlisted in the
His day-by-day uniform
s dress uniform was really
: black trousers with yel-
the sides, a flannel coat


al occasions, a scarlet jacket.
iar had just broken out, but
ter some 18 months of train-
ca that Griffith's infantry
to Africa. They never got
'e fighting. They were held
component at Sierra Leone,
s shoulder juts out into the
1905 Griffith was made a
bardier in the Royal Artil-


ig "one and sixpence a
irs later, and a year


had been returned to
took a hand in ending


Jamaic
Griffith',


a,
3 1


day."
after he
nature
military


- 1


- -


FITZ HtERBERIT ALLEYNE G(RIFFITIL


on his way toc
revolver lying
Ancon postoffi
was examining
bullet passing
on his left hand
belonged to a
routed by polli


Work when he found a
in the street near the
ce. He picked it up and
it when it went off, the
through the index finger
1. The revolver apparently
prowler who had been
ce a short time earlier as


he was trying to force his way into the
old Ancon Masonic Temple.
Now that he is a retired man, Griffith
doesn't know exactly how he will spend
his time. He must care for his wife who
has been blind for almost three years.
He expects to find some chance to read
the Scriptures and "figure the right and
wrong of it," and he will also have more
time for his three grandchildren, the sons
and baby daughter of Joseph N. Griffith
of the Industrial Bureau. As grandfather
he enjoys them all, but he "favors" the
five-year-old boy.


Inquiries Still Coming
On French Company


War, and its local repercussions, and
the Third Locks continued to make Isth-
mian headlines ten years ago.
Reporters interviewed the sole survivor
of a torpedoed ship, a duty which was to
become only too familiar as the months
passed. He was a 17-year-old messboy
who had spent 21 days in a floating life-
boat, without water and covered with oil.
From his bed at the Coco Solo Naval
Hospital, the youth reported how one by
one the ten others in the lifeboat had died
or gone mad and jumped into the sea.


Instructions were issued to civilian and
military personnel as to how to recover bar-
rage balloons which had escaped from their
moorings around vital installations. In the
Canal Zone 431 air-raid shelters had been
completed or were under construction.
Strict regulations governing the taking of
photographs and possession of cameras in
or about the Canal Zone were issued. Some
250 local students began turning out the
scale model planes to be used in aircraft
recognition training.

The Canal announced that negotiations
were successfully completed with a large
Eastern manufacturing firm for fabricat-
ing and furnishing the miter gates, main
valves, and bulkheads for the third locks.
The cost was to be $16,190,418.
Earlier in the month the United States
Steel Export Company had submitted a
bid of $17,503,411 for the 44 miter gates
alone and had asked for as long as five
years to complete delivery. This bid was
rejected.

Col. Thomas B. Larkin, head of the Spe-
cial Engineering Division, was ordered back
to Washington for a new assignment. Later,
with the rank of Major General, he became
Quartermaster General of the Army.
He was succeeded as Supervising Engin-
eer by Col. Hans Kramer; Lt. Col. Charles
Barth (killed in May 19438 in the same plane
crash which cost the life of Lt. Gen. Frank


A t*Y . I~ t C..- /


Bonds


Andrews)
Engineer.


became


Assistant


Supervising





1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


rr._J(p


Army


Secretary


Visits


Canal


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Panama Canal Press
Mount Hope. Canal Zone

F. K. NEWCOMER, Governor-President


H.D.


VOGEL, Lieutenant Governor


E. C. LOMBARD, Executive


cretary


J. RUFUS HARDY, Editor

ELEANOR H. MCILHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


letters


criticism


containing


is, or


will be welcomed.
will be published


used unless


desired.


inquiries,


suggestions,


opinions of a general


Those


of sufficient


but signatures


natures
interest


S--* ..^"t .
. ''- -.* . ,


will not be


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$S1.00 a year
SINGLE COPIES-5 cents each


. i '- - -
.= ',.: 'I
.4-


- - :- .
� .' S' ' ^J - �:
.,
, ': . - * "'
"*&,A'-^


On sale


at all Panama Canal


Commissaries, and
publication date.


Hotels


Clubhouses,


for 10 days after


SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10cents each


BACK COPIES-10 Cents Each


On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk. Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.


Postal money orders should


be made pay-


able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal


pany,
PANAM.


and mailed
A CANAL Ri


FRANK
day visit last


PACE,
month.


engineering mgen


., Secretary of the Army,


a press
of near'


Secretary Pace spent the
on matters pertaining to the Pa


tjon trip to


to the Editor,


EVIEW,


Balboa


Heights,


the Pacific


The picture


landing in


Locks


above was taken


(,atun. Left to right


dore E. Englebright;


Lieutenant


of the Army Counsellor.


The special


eminent from Secretar


had his first view


interview on the day before his


ly


years ago


of the Panama Canal


departure


he expressed


which made possible the Canal


entire day, Sunday, March 23,


Canal Company and the Canal Zone


and a trip through the Canal.


and its


during a


three-


amazement
facilities.


in conference with Governor Newcomer


Government and on ai


just after the party left the launch at the Aids


are: Governor Newcomer;


Governor


message to the employees


Herbert D.


of the


Panama


Secretary Pace;


Vogel; and Fred Korth, Deputy Department


n


to Navigation D
i Zone Policeman


minspec-

ivision
Theo-


Canal Company


y Pace, issued on the day of his departure, is shown below.


The last time the Canal Zone


retary I
while in


(enneth


C. Royall


was visited


was here. Although


office have been relatively


begun in May


Secretary


by a Secretary of the


visits to the


infrequent, there


and the Canal


Army was four years


Canal by Secretaries


have been several


1904. William Howard Taft was the first, coming to


of War.


C.'A NAT


OIPltOI


of the Army


Zone Gov-


when Sec-
-or War)


since the construction work was


the Isthmus in


November


1904, while


>NE GOVERNMENT
HRK'HTT, OMWAL ZONE
OF 'TB GoVKUNOR


Residents Of Silver City To Vote
On Official Name Of Their Town


(Continued from
and Balboa.


page 3)


Frijoles,


March
La Boca,


25, 1952


I I
J*


/+


Com-


Canal


Li^l




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


4,1952


Electric


Join


Brain,


Forces


Mechanical


Punch


'ermites


Paychecks


Ieni and machines are getting together
these days at )iablo Hleights to turn out
pavehecks for men and women of the
l'Panma ('anal Company and Canal Zone
governmentl.
The results of some of their labors lookt
like Swiss cheeses gone mo dern; some (of
the others look as if oblong termites have
taken a bite or two.
Thet heart of the new system of mech-
anized paychecks if machinescan besaid
to have a heart is a battery of 24 Inter-
national Business machines, 22 of them
concentrated in a smallish room on the
ground floor of the Payroll Division build-
ing at Diablo Heights.
There are some things, of course, which
will still have to be done by human brains.
But of the 52 steps which have been
worked out for processing Company-Gov-
ernment payrolls, the machines- or the
section where the machines are located-
can handle 3&.


in addition,


the machines


able, at the push of a switch to turn out
in a fantastically short time, just about
any sort of resume which is wanted.
Suppose the Treasurer, as he needs to
every quarter, wants to find out just how
much withholding tax has been deducted
from employee's salaries. A stack of
cards, one for each employee, is fed into
a machine. In almost no time at all, from
little holes in these individual cards, an
"electric brain" figures the total, checks
it, and prints it.
Holes Are the Cue
The holes are the cue to the entire pro-
cedure, which is known in accountant's
parlance as punched card accounting. The
holes give all kinds of information; they
further show the bitese" which are taken
out of each employee's salary for rent, or
income tax, or water, or light, or what
haven't you.
Take the first check which was issued
by machine, for instance. It went to
William H. Dunlop, Finance Director.
His IC number 15-happened to be the
lowest on the first gang to be processed


)by the machines early last month.
Sometime earlier, from information sup-
plied by Personnel, Finance, etc., a master
card had been prepared for him. It tells
everything machines or people need to
know about him for payroll purposes.
The card, perhaps significantly, is just
the size of an old-fashioned $1 bill.
Held so that light shines through its
perforations, its 69 holes mean nothing to
anyone but the experts. But the holes say
this to the IBM machines:
His roll, 4; his gang, 1; his IC number,
15; his name, which becomes in figures-
0-6, 12-9, x-3, x-3, 12-9, 12-1, x-4 (that's
William), 12-8 (that's H.), 12-4, 0-4, x-5,
x-3, x-6, x-7 (that's Dunlop).
Punches Tell Status
A little farther over on the card a punch
through a number 7 indicates that he is
a classified employee. Another punch
shows the number of his tax exemptions.
A hole through a zero shows that he is a
full-time employee, subject to retirement
and withholding tax.
(If he were a temporary employee, sub-
ject to withholding tax and social se-
curity- but not retirement the figure
punched would have been a 1. There are
other code figures for other types of em-


ployees.)
Still further toward the right side of
the plastic-impregnated oblong of stiff
paper, punches indicate that he is paid
bi-weeklv and give the amount of his


gross bi-weekly pay.
More punches tell the
his unit rate is by the ho
official rate is by the


machines that
ur and that his
year. Another


punched hole indicates his GS grade.
The last six punches show his personnel
status and are used to make up force and
budget reports.
To make these Swiss cheese effects is
the principal job of two machines known
as keypunches, informally called "me-
chanical termites." They transcribe
printed information into punched num-
bers, a great deal like coding machines.
To get the figures which stand for


William H. Dunlop, an operator like
Florence Scott or Shirley McNall types
the name on a keyboard lettered like a
typewriter. Instead of printing letters,
however, the machine reproduces the
name in figures which are punched on
the card.
Cards and Cards and Cards
This dossier in inhuman form, the mas-
ter card, is only one of several punched
cards from which the machines get the
information which eventually becomes a
paycheck.
Information on payroll deductions--
there are 80 possible ones for Company-
Government employees-is transcribed
onto other cards in the form of the little
oblong holes. A $20 bi-weekly rent rate,
for instance, shows up as 02000 on the
punched card. A hospital bill of $35 be-
comes 03500 by holes.
There is a separate card for each deduc-
tion. Those which are standard, like rent,
telephone, furniture rental, electric range
charges, can be used over and over again.
All the other cards are used only once and
discarded.
J. O. Barnes, Chief of the Payroll Div-
ision, estimates that 50,000 separate de-
duction cards will be used to process a
payroll. Each of these cards is punched
with the employee's roll, gang, IC num-
ber, name, etc.
Eventually they are sorted together by
one of the three machines whose opera-
tion is the most fascinating to watch of
any in the machine room. (Some of the
others are far more complex but the aver-
age observer can't understand them.)
The uncanny sorters see to it that all
of Mr. Dunlop's deduction cards-or
those of any other employee-are placed
together so that they can be summarized
for the final processes by which they are
(1) totaled and printed on the deduction
slip which will accompany each pay check
and (2) subtracted from the amount of
money earned to give the amount of the
check itself.


Works on Credit Side, Too


But that's all on the debit side. On the
credit side, men and machines also work
together to see how much Mr. Dunlon


Out


-





April 4,1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


visibly impressive (until you see its maze-
like insides) -of the 22 machines.


This electric
control board
ticular job it ii


"MECHANICALTERMITES" is the nickname for these keypunch machines. They "chew" little
holes into cards to guide the calculating, accounting, and sorting machines. Their operators, left to right,
are: Rosalie Smith, Florence Scott, Mrs. Kathryn Ammirati, and Shirlev McNall.


loses any money through
the time card.
It is also his job to furn
section with a total of h
basic, overtime, and hold
totals are the controls whii
must later reach. If the
do not agree with the
something is wrong some
Before the machine pro


Thornton turns
the others on hi
Durham, whose
stand him in go
trol clerk. He I
which are the f


the figuring on

ish the machine
ours worked at
ay rates. These
ch the machines
machine totals
manual totals,
where.
cess starts, Mr.


Mr. Dunlop's card and
is rolls over to Edward A.
15 years of Canal service
od stead in his job as con-
heads the U. S.-rate rolls,
irst being mechanized.


When he has made a check, the ma-
chine process of computing the paychecks
is ready to begin.
Computation Starts
The time cards are bundled up and sent
downstairs to Charles H. McKeon, head
of the machine section. Mr. McKeon, a
proud Texan who is a Certified Public
Accountant and who worked for IBM
before he came here last September, turns
the cards over to Don Herr, who has ten
years of government service in payroll
work, or to John A. Morales, whose serv-


ice-all with payrolls -dates
1931.
They pack the cards into sor
chines, three of which line a wa
i A t C rl j i i ,


back to


ring ma-
ll at one
� - i


process, two other operators take over
They are Rosalie Smith, who has worked
for several years in the machine account-
ing section at the Administration Build-
ing, and Mrs. Kathryn Ammirati, who
did keypunch work in the United States.
They operate verifiers. These machines
look almost exactly like the keypunches.
Miss Smith and Mrs. Ammirati have a


stack of time cards
stack of the already-p
cards on the other.
the time cards they
process which Miss
Nall have already coi


on one
unched
From in
go throi
Scott ai
mpleted


hand, and a
computation
formation on
ugh the same
nd Miss Mc-
. If the cards


were punched correctly in the first place,
the verifier runs without interruption.
Otherwise it flashes a red "error" light.
The punched computation cards have
up to now, been handled by rolls and in
sequence according to IC number, lowest
first. That's how Mr. Dunlop happened
to be low man on his totem pole. In this
order the punched and verified cards are
fed into an accounting machine which
totals and tabulates the number of hours
classified and wage board employees have
worked, by rolls. The totals are com-
pared with those sent from the control
section upstairs.
In the next step, the punched compu-
tation cards are turned over to the cal-
culating punch, the most amazing-if not


cal wizard is operated by a
which is wired for the par-
s to perform. A complicated


control board will take 10 to 12 hours to
wire. Mr. McKeon has wired most of the
boards so far, and Mr. Morales and Mr.
Herr are learning.
There are two of these calculating
punches in the payroll office. They can
add, subtract, multiply, and divide at an
amazing speed. They can even figure
income tax-unfortunately.
At the rate of one card each five
seconds, the machine performs the pro-
cesses necessary to find out what anyone
has earned in a certain number of hours
at his fixed rates. The results are punched
into the cards, for more Swiss cheese
effects.
By this time the machines have totaled
and chewed out of various cards Mr. Dun-
lop's gross earnings and have also totaled
and indicated by holes, just what deduc-
tions are to be taken out.
Now the payroll people are ready to
move on to the last of the machine calcu-
lations. A collator matches current pay
cards, which show the amount taken.
Any of the operators can run this machine.
(In addition to Mr. Herr and Mr. Mor-
ales, Carl Pajak is learning machine oper-
ation, dividing his time between his regu-
lar job as head of the deduction section
and the machine room.)
To "Electric Brain"
Back to the "electric brain" the cards
now go. The proper panel is set in place-
changing a panel takes only a matter of
seconds-and the calculating punch goes
to work. Into the card it computes and
punches taxes, retirement, and net pay,
and indicates those cards on which deduc-
tions exceed earnings. (Cards like the
latter call for special and complicated
handling.)
From the resulting pay cards the checks
themselves are printed and sent to the
Treasurer's office for signature. Even this
is mechanized.
The signature of the Company's Treas-
urer, J. W. Greene, has been reproduced
onto a metal plate which, for obvious
reasons, is kept under lock and key. The
plate is inserted into a check-signing ma-
chine which can sign and date 250 checks
a minute.
There are further steps, (8ee page 15)





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


2,500 Men Being Employed
For Canal Building Program
(Continued from page 1) work to be done by
Canal forces on the housing program will
require 200 or more additional employees.
Direct Income for Panama
The monthly payrolls of Canal con-


tractors will be, practically
direct flow into the Republi
since such employees are
commissary privileges unles
the Canal Zone. This influx
$200,000 a month in payroll
the stimulation of economy
the two cities of Panama
where unemployment ranks
since the money will be sp
food, clothing, and other ne
The monthly payrolls dire
from the Panama Canal Con
000,000 housing program w


augmented over the next ti
years by the acceleration of
which has been planned.
Although still in its early
building program is placing
onunemployment figureswhi
high locally for the past four y
the number to be used on q
struction this fiscal year will
absorb the bulk of the unemp
Republic of Panama, it will
able dent in unemployment
will go far to relieving the


speaking, a
c of Panama
not granted
s residing in
of more than
Is will aid in
principally in
and Colon,


are thickest,
ent for rent,
cessities.
etly resulting
npany's $80,-
ill be greatly


tree or four
the program

stages, the
a checkrein
ch have been
'ears. While
quarters con-
by no means
loyed in the
make a size-
figures and
present eco-


nomic strain.
At the present time the Canal's local-
rate force is about 3,500 less than the
immediate post-war level of 1948. By the
end of May, however, it is expected that
the force, plus those to be employed by
Canal contractors, will bring the total
number employed on local-rate rolls to
within about 1,000 of the July 1948 figures
when 17,700 were working.
Many Benefit Indirectly
These figures relate only to the work to
be done in the Canal Zone proper. Hun-
dreds of others will be given employment
in the Republic of Panama indirectly as
a result of the rapidly expanding building
program which entails the purchase of
great quantities of construction material
in the local markets. An instance of these
indirect benefits is the purchase of up-
wards of $750,000 worth of native lumber
for which contracts were recently awarded
The furnishing of this lumber will require
a major expansion of milling facilities,
principally in the Province of Chiriqui.


THE LIST OF JOBS available are posted daily on the bulletin boards of the Central Labor Office
in Balboa and Cristobal. During the past few years there have generally been more applicants than
jobs in all categories. The list is compiled from requests of all employing agencies in the Canal Zone,
including contractors.


READY FOR WORK is this group of men in the Central Labor Office in Balboa. The men rep-
resent several different types of workers. They are being given instructions on where and when to report
to work by John Eastmond, Clerk in the Central Labor Office. Men seeking employment must have
valid eligibility cards before they are accepted.


are already at
Manuel Calde
struction of a
building at M
a force of 100
this month.
The largest
fliW,.t n, m tO 1


work. In addition to these,
ron, contractor for the con-
new Commissary Division
ount Hope, expects to have
I engaged by the middle of

single force on contract
Papifipe id will he used hv


both sides of the Isthmus has been greatly
increased lately by the building program.
The increase was noted beginning at the
first of March after all construction con-
tracts were awarded. More new local-rate
employees were hired by the Canal dur-
ing the first two weeks in March than the
entire total in February.


W�




April 4, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


NEW


ARTIFICIAL


RESPIRATION


11


METHOD


FIRST STEPin the newback-pressure arm-lift: or (HolgerNielson) method
of artificial respiration is demonstrated by Kenneth R. Coleman of the Balboa
Station, kneeling. He is instructing in the new method which has been adopted
officially here. The "victim" is Frank R. Constanzo, also of the Balboa Fire
Station.


ARMS ARE lifted toward the operator when pressure on the "victim's"
backisreleased. The accompanying article explainsdetailsof the back-pressure
arm-lift resuscitation method.


(Condensation of a release by Department
of Defense, Office of Public Information,
Washington, D. C.)
Many of you will at some time have to
administer artificial respiration to an ac-


cident victim. Be it a victim of drown-
ing, electric shock, or asphyxiation for
other reasons, artificial respiration must
be started by the first person on the scene
and that may be you.
Most of us are at least on speaking
terms with the Schafer prone pressure
method where the victim is placed face
down, the operator straddles him and
rhythmically applies pressure to the chest.
This forces air out of the lungs, but there
is no active manipulative phase to draw
new air into the lungs. It has recently
been proven by researchers that the Scha-
fer method is only about one-half as effi-
cient as most of the other known methods.
It has therefore been recommended that
another be adopted as a standard method.
This new method is called the back-pres-
sure arm-lift (or Holger Nielson) method.
The arm-lift provides a phase of active
intake of air.
In any method of artificial respiration
^n ~ */^~tlt/ t'i tr/ iv\v ...m I * Ijv"


cline so the head is lower than the feet to
promote drainage from the nose and
mouth. The elbows are bent, the hands
placed one on the other and the head
placed so that one cheek rests on the
hands.
The victim's neck is extended (pulled
backwards) to provide a more open air
passageway. The operator then kneels at
the victim's head and faces his feet. With
the forefinger sweep the back of the
throat and mouth clean of debris and pull
the tongue forward. The operator's hands
are then placed on the victim's back on


Forty

In


ears


Ago


March


It was a month of records, with Steam-
shovel 124 leading the pack. On March 1
this 70-ton Bucyrus shovel with its three-


yard dipper
into 283 du
eight hours.
of material
type in one
7'. . -


* loaded 2,830 yards of e
mp cars in a working da
It was the greatest am
excavated by a shovel of
day since work began.
J -.^. I^u . 1 t-H 1- -1 . * -


arth
y of
3unt
that


a line drawn across just below his arm-
pits, the fingers are spread out and thumb
point toward each other.
Then with your elbows straight, slowly
rock forward, gradually applying pres-
sure, gently release, and as you rock back-
wards grasp the victim's arms just above
the elbows and draw them upward and
toward you until you begin to feel resist-
ance and tension at the victim's shoulders.
Then gently drop the arms to the ground
and repeat the whole cycle at the rate of
12 to 15 per minute. It is as simple as
that and you may save a life.


After a 12,000-mile voyage from Fal-
mouth, England, the twin-screw ladder
dredge Corozal reached Balboa on March 27.
The dredge had left Falmouth December
29 and was 88 days in making its long
voyage across the Atlantic and around
South America. It was subsequently used
for underwater excavation at the Pacific
entrance of the Canal.


New vehicular speed limits, repli
those which had been set in 1908,
established hv executive nrdor


acing
were





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


SCOUT


PRESIDENT


our wo


lures-some
exceptionally
A really
to us as to
consider exc
this motion /
We consider
for Clubhous
Balboa Theat


rk we s
so-so,
SO S0,
fine.
excellentt


you,
11 a


Goers-


ee a great


some


good,


picture


we have 7\
7 , -


'tlent n every aetai
ncture is With a Son!
ourselves fortunate to
e theater patrons, and


er


rst seen
. The n
g in My
have see


a treat


one


ame or
I Ieart.
cured it


it opens in /


WILLIAM JUMP President of the International
Boy Scout Council of the ('anal Zone, will assist in the
voting for the official name for Silver City.

Model Railroading Is Great
Fun For Group At Corozal
(Continued from page 4) Army; Joseph W.
Coffin, Gatun Fireman; and D. H. Searle,
Policeman at Gatun.
The three Junior members, Richard
Abbott, David Otten, and Stuart Bush,
are all Balboa High School students.
The society holds weekly meetings on
Thursday nights and the three Gatun
members usually come over on the late
afternoon train, spend a few hours at
their hobby and return on the night trainm.
New Members Wanted
The club is presently looking for
additional members who must be U. S.
citizens and entitled to commissary privi-
leges. There are no initiation fees and the
dues are three dollars a month for the first
year and two dollars a month thereafter.
Membership in the club entitles a member
to use the track layout but the rolling stock
is individually owned, the amount being
governed by enthusiasm and affluence.
The monthly dues also go to pay the
rent, water and light, and the dues to
the national organization. Membership
in the Zone Club carries with it the
privilege of buying model railroad equip-
ment from manufacturers at a consider-
able discount.
Although the club meetings are every
Thursday night, many members spend


Done entirely iz
My Heart is bas
Miss Froman, as
seriously injured
entertain troops d
prophesied that sh
her successful sin.


severance,


able to resume
tainment world.
Susan Ilayw
in the picture,
is that of Miss


The story is
and song-laden
and emotions,


d
he


n
ed
tY
y
in
ur


Technicolor, With a
on the life of Jane
,ou may remember,
a plane crash while
ing World War II.


e would nev
going career.
?termination,
r place as c


ard play
but the s
Roman.


PS
*i


warm en


enough
tose of


millions of persons through
eventually see this great music
We urge you to see it! W
With a Song in My Heart
as impressive as we did.


Star


the part of
nging voice


Song in
Froman.
was very
flying to
Doctors


be able to resume


, per-
' was
enter-


in the


moving,
interest
\ of the
'ho will
ln.
ril find
ing and


The Clubhouse Management


many additional hours at the headquar-
ters. This is specially true when the
club has some particular project in
progress. Mrs. Fuller, the only woman
member, is one of the chief decorators
and scenery shifters. One of her most
recent and best creations is a tiny village


located
which is
out the
Other
time to
as the
track, o


along one section of main track
complete to a housewife hanging
weekly wash.
members devote most of their
their particular specialty, such
intricate wiring system, laying
r installing switches.


m- ^. sr " I - -


Movie


To

In


many
and1


moving
just a


is as much


on Saturday, April


By her pluck
however, she


Miss Froman
that you hear


ough, appealing,
to capture your
your family, an


ut the world s
cal production
e know you
as entertain


!


:r


t





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


There

Your
Pastry


a time to buyl
special pastry


Canal c


Brownies inrthe
sections of 12


ommissaries.


is true of 31 other bakery


Schedule that


are sold only


on certain


days of the week, in addition to


37 breads and
the time.


pastries


The schedule for


Tuesday:


Princess


in the


stores


cialties


pats; cinnamon


There


are new "Honeydeb


stores
The Family people
Shoe Women


Situation


now. 0
call them


s" in the


Commissar
"casuals.


who see them


probably call them good


ing low heeled


shoes.


are wedgie pumps and sandals
colors. Some are elk; some a


with nylon mesh; and


some


and that ain't hay-it'
Switzerland.


are


in


look-
There
Snice


re linen
raffia


straw


bread
ers;
bread


; date nut cookies; applesauce
coconut drops; and salt r


Wednesday: Jelly


squares;


lemon


strips


meringue


*
pie


ring; pineapple upside down c
apple cake; and chocolate chip


Thursday:


Brownies;


oatmeal


devil's food cups; coconut strips;
drops; and salt rising bread,


Friday: Lady
ginger cookies:


ROOSEVELT


AVENUE, which could be called


Banyan Boulevard, runs under an arch
Chinese Banvan trees.


of spreading


fingers;


lemon


rising


ice cream
e; tropical
"ake; pine-
cookies.


cookies;
coconut

cones;


snowballs; tropical ring;


pineapple upside down cake; and choco-
late chip cookies.


Saturday: Chiffon cakes; crumb


cake;


chocolate


jelly buns;


Chinese


Banyan


(Ficus


retusa) along that section of Roosevelt
Avenue between the Railroad station and
the Balboa Commissary Annex form an
arch of beauty.
The trees were planted in 1916, soon


Balboa


was first laid out.


Banyans on Roosevelt Avenue were pro-
pagated from layings made on the trees
in Cathedral Plaza in Panama City.


It has become


necessary


coffee-


filled roll; cheesecake;


and pineapple cake.


There are even bags to match the linen


and raffia shoes.
Children will
cushion-crepe s


stores.


a lot of kicks


shoes


The soles feel


wear very hard.
Extra wide shoes


don't like sq


sections.


white sandals


Can-o
already
already


pener


ueeze


in sizes 4


cooks


out of


now in the


very light


lor women wno
's are new in the
are inexpensive
to 11 and w-i-d-e.


can buy


tomatoes


stewed, potatoes pre-cooked,


"Harvarded,


already broiled.
grocery sections.


They're


beets


hamburgers
in cans in the


White crinoline half slips, now in


stores,


Small fry Easter paraders will


cute


as their Easter bunnies in pastel organdy


dress
series


and bonnet sets


now in the commis-


make


a pretty


dress


a standout.


They're now on the "haff-to-have


fashion-minded


" list


misses.


Mr. and Mrs. Fixit can fix utip ugly chinks


with Plastic Wood; now in the


For really small


small fry,


there's


a new


all-in-one baby bath and beauty treatment


called "Tod'l."
a lather that is


all in


soap,


one.


a liquid that forms


cream


and lotion


to remove


almost half of the trees to save the rest.
Contrary to popular belief, the orange-
colored lichen (mold) is not causing
serious damage and is not the cause of
their being thinned.
At the present time the trees are so
close together that there is not sufficient
room for root expansion.


New Westinghouse


refrigerators.


handy tubes.


It handles


hardens into wood.


Tomatoes


in the


stores


stores


like putty

rom early M


to late April taste especially good b


are ripened on the


vine.


,e'


larch
cause


They come


from Panama and don't have to be picked
green to withstand a trip from a United
States garden to a Canal Zone commissary.


automatic defrosting and all
the newest developments, will


costs


housewares sections.


wringing


ises rep


lacement


lever at waist


sponges.


pies-are
sections.


38 cents.


USCIOUS


sections


every


pastry


lattice work.


have lattice
ork out of


stores now.


rayon


sections.


stores arn


vs.... .. ... ..


eaters


and meat sauce.


can


in care,
satisfiers


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS


save


. , , i A ^


* 1


rv


*





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4, 1952


APRIL.


4th American Legion 1'ost No. 6, Gain-
boa, 7:30 p). nm.
5th Track Foreman No. 2741, Balboa
B & B Shops.
6th Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No.
3857. Veterans' Club, Cristobal,
9 a. in.
7th Cristobal-Margarita Civic Coun-
cil, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30
p. in.
Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Union
Church, 7 p. inm.
Postal Employees No. 23160, Bal-
boa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.


Veterans ol
727, Fort
Veterans ol
3822, Cnr


8th --Electrical
Memorial
Veterans (
100, Old
tobal, 7:.
American
Clayton,
American
Balboa,


F Foreign
Clayton,
f Foreign
Iundu Roa


Wars Post No.
7:30 p. m.
Wars Post No.
Ld, 7:30 p. m.


Workers No. 397, Wirz
il, 7:30 p. m.
)f Foreign Wars Post No.
Boy Scout Building, Cris-
30 D. im.


|
Legion Post No.
7:30 p. nm.
Legion Auxiliary
7:30 p. nm.


7, Fort

No. 1,


9th-Carpenters No. 913, Balboa Lodge
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Pacific Civic Council, Board Room,


Administration Building, 7:
American Legion Post No. 2
tobal, 7:30 p. m.
lilth-Good Friday.
13th-Pipefitters, Margarita Club
9:30 a. m.
Sheetmetal Workers No. 15
boa Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m.
Plumbers No. 606, Balboa
Hall, 9:30 a. m.
14th-Machinists No. 699, Margai
of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post No.
boa, 7:30 p. m.


15th-


16th --


Machinist
Hall, 7:3(
Operating
garita K.
Veterans o
40, Balbo
American


Lodge
ita K.

1, Bal-


s No. 811, Balboa L
0 p. m.
Engineers No. 595,
of C. Hall, 7 p. inm.
f Foreign Wars Posi
>a K. of C. Hall, 7:30
Federation of Gov


ment Employees No.
Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.


odge
Mar-

t No.
p.m.
ern-


14, Balboa


American Legion Auxiliary


Gatun,
17th-American
Gamboa
20th-Central
Trades
Hall, 8:3
21st--Electrical
Masonic


No. 3


Metal
Lodge
Gatun
1.


Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall,
7 p. nm.
22d- Operating Engineers No. 595, Bal-
boa Lodge Hall, 7 p. inm.
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No.
100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cris-
tobal, 7:30 p. m.
23d- American Federation of Govern-
ment Employees No. 88, Mar-
garita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. in.
American Legion Auxiliary No. 2,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
24th-Governor-Employee Conference
Board Room, Administration Build-
ing, 2 p. m.


28th-Machinists
of C. Hall,
Veterans of
liary Post
p. m.

1st-Carpenters
Clubhouse.


April


Ancon ..
Panama .
Cristobal_- -
Ancon. .


Panama . .
Cristobal ..
Ancon ....
Panama..
Cristobal - _


No. 699, Margarita K.
7:30 p. m.
Foreign Wars Auxi-
3822 Post Home, 7:30


lAY


Margarita


p. m.


Sailings

From Cristobal
�-.--� ��� - pril
_April 11
.-... ... April 18
- _April25
From New York


April 2
- April 9
_April l6
. April 23
----April30


Employees who ol
versaries during th
listed alphabetically
years includes all G
the Canal or other
continuous Canal c
indicated with (*).


observed important anni-
e month of March are
Below. The number of
government service with
agencies. Those with
or Railroad service arc


35 YEARS
John B. Corliss, Chief Towboat
eer, D)redging Division.


Engin-


30 YEARS
Harold V. Goddard, Craneman and Op-
erator, Motor Transportation Division.
Clarence Sibus, Assistant Superintend-
ent, Pacific Branch, Locks Division.


25 YEARS
Henry P. Butcher, Lock Ope
chinist Leader, Locks Division.
Julian P. Hackett, Telephone
er, Communications Branch.
Frederick W. Hensler, Dock
Navigation Division.
Dr. Ezra Hurwitz, Superinten
Seco.


rator


Maintain-

Foremnan,

dent, Palo


Edwin F. Rigby, Storekeeper, Division
of Storehouses.
Edna C. Whitver, Government Account-
ant, Finance Bureau.
20 YEARS
Murphy B. Alexander, Principal Con-
struction and Maintenance Foreman, Main-
tenance Division.
Violet M. Courville, School Nurse, Bal-
boa.
Charles F. Delaney, Postal Clerk.
George M. Lowe, Administrative Assist-
ant, Locks Division.
A-Alfred E. Osborne, Supervisor of In-
struction, Canal Zone Colored Schools.
15 YEARS
Kenneth A. Brown, Clerk-Typist, Divi-
sion of Storehouses.
James H. Burns, Chief Towboat Engin-
eer, Navigation Division.
*Webster G. Farrell, Pilot, Navigation
Division.
Milton J. Halley, Postal Clerk.
Thomas T. Jordan, Machinist, Indus-
trial Bureau.
Hayward H. Shacklett, Safety Engin-
eer, Safety Branch.
Joseph J. Svihra, Fireman.
*ADaniel C. Zitzman, Supply Clerk,
Housing Division.


RETIREMENTS IN MARCH


following list contains the names of
' S.-rate employees who were trans-
from one division to another or


from one type of work to another. It does
not contain within-grade promotions and
rnerr.,I' i l irei-�


Ernest P. Muzzio, from Plumber,
Maintenance Division, to Plumbing In-
spector, Contract and Inspection Division.


John
Foreman,


W. Whipple, from Ir
Maintenance Division,


to
to


worker
Con-


Employees who retired at
March, their birthplaces, title
service at retirement, and th
dresses are:
Leonard C. Lauterbach, t
Electrical Machinist, Balboa
Electrical Division; 28 years
. .. - -1 g' J/ .. . . -"1 . ... . . . "~-t _.


Sthe end of
les, length of
eir future ad-

Pennsylvania;
Field Office,
, 10 months,


THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR


ANNIVERSARIES


7:30 p. m.
Legion Auxiliary
, 7:30 p. m.
Labor Union -
Council, Balboa
30 a. in.
Workers No. 677,
Temple, 7:30 p. T


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


The
those I
ferred


February 15 Through March 15


)h





April 4, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Old


DQM


Office


Disappears


LOCKS


SECURITY


CHIEF


Edward H. Halsall, below,


has been


appointed Chief of the new Locks
Security Force. His appointment was
effective last Monday. With his new
position he assumed the title of Captain.


Captain Halsall has been employ
The Panama Canal and Panama
Company for almost 24 years, 15 of
on the Canal Zone Police fore
native of Stamford, Connecticu
came to the Canal Zone on July 4,
from Jamaica where he had been w(
as an overseer on a coffee and b.
plantation.


ed by
Canal
them
e. A
t, he
1928,
)rking
anana


$ . .. r.. :.-* . .
*-*~ ~ :'/..*>* .'
k-c.
*^'*.:.:;'&.fc ,.
� .., ,: .f, *'
i ,,*
%: ..:.r ,.
Lt *
rrl


ONE OF THE oldest buildings in Balboa, the Housing Office or old District Quartermastr Building,
was demolished last month. The two-story frame structure was built soon ofter the town of Balboa was
occupied.


1953 Building Program Calls
For $31,750,000 Expenditure


from page 1)


will also see the


first of the new-type bachelor apartment
buildings constructed for U. S.-rate em-
ployees. These will be 17-unit, masonry
buildings. Tentative plans call for the
location of one of these in Ancon; two in


Diablo Heights;
ment buildings
A total of 15


and eight bachelor apart-
in Margarita.
3 family apartments are


to be built in the new residential area
being developed this year at Margarita.
Other work there next year includes the
construction of a swimming pool, 100 feet
wide and 50 meters long. Present plans
call for the construction of approximately
230 family apartments in the area selected
for the new townsite development on the
Pacific side. An elementary school is also
to be constructed in this area.
Construction will begin during the com-
ing year on practically all of the com-
munity facilities planned for the new
town of Cardenas, and a total of $2,683,-
non wir ll on,-^\-saa f\ l, t9 -han r hr


senior high school; a Commissary build-
ing; theater; Clubhouse (including a li-
brary); post office; police and fire stations;
a medical-dental clinic; and an office for
the Housing Manager and Grounds Main-
tenance Division. All of these facilities,
with the exception of the two schools and
the swimming pool, will be located in a
central community center area.
In addition to the house-building pro-
gram at Chagres and in the Camp Bierd
and Old Cristobal areas on the Atlantic
side, a new elementary and junior high
school building is to be built at Silver
City. No new quarters are scheduled for
construction in the Silver City-Camp
Coiner area during the coming year.


Electric Brain, Mechanical Termites
Join Forces To Punch Out Paychecks


(Continued from page 9) of course, but
most of them have to do with posting,
auditing, and accounting, so that at any
time the division can tell in a matter of
minutes usmat how much has hbn nntnfn


EDlX'ARD II. HALSALL
Before going to Jamaica, he had
served for almost S years in the Army,
21 months of this time being spent
overseas.
As head of the new Locks Security
Force, he will be in charge of 55 U. S.-rate
and 12 local-rate locks guards. The
U. S.-rate guards will be armed and will
have full authority to apprehend sus-
picious persons and to gather and safe-
guard evidence. This organization is


now being
force of 32


formed, with the present
U. S.-rate and 7 local-rate


men as its nucleus


During his 15 years on the Police
Force, Captain Halsall was stationed at
Ancon, Balboa, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel
and was sub-station commander at
Chiva-Chiva when he transferred to the
.- J't I j I i*' 1 -


1 -


: .,K- �-


II.


(Contfinued





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


April 4,1952


Scrap--It's


Everywhere


Atlantic Si

Rousing


de


July


Fourth


Plans for a rousing Fourth of July
celebration for the Atlantic side are
already under way with a bang-and a
pun is intended. So far on the Pacific
side no July 4 Committee has been
formed.
Atlantic side co-chairman John S.
Rice and Herbert Engelke are confident
that they and their committees will
provide residents of New and Old Cris-
tobal, Gatun, and Margarita with one of
the best celebrations in many years.
The July 4 program is sponsored by the
Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council. In-
vitations to participate have been ex-


Plans


AN ABANDONED DUMP of old railroad equipment near the Cucaracha signal station will yield
an estimated 50 tons of scrap for the current drive for old metal. J. F. Prager, Superintendent of the


Storehouse Division, above, ploughed through grass
Scrap, the people at the Panama Canal
Company's Division of Storehouses are
finding, is everywhere.
Scrap from old machinery which has
been declared obsolete or surplus, from
old railroad rails, from old pipe, and


screening an
quarters, is c
sion has gone
scrap and a
From old d
with grass,
from encroac


d metal
old stuff.
further1
afield is t
lumps, fr
from the
*hing junj


ers are bringing
up and sold for
will find its way
places where scr
Some of the
being recovered
when the Canal
it was easier to l
to move it. "S
heard of and in
of moving old eq
more than it wa,


fittings from razed
But now the Divi-
afield in its hunt for
he proper word.
om fields overgrown
Canal banks, and
gle, the scrap hunt-


back old metal to be cut
scrap which, eventually,
into steel mills and other
ap is vitally needed.
material which is now
for scrap was abandoned
was completed, because
eave it where it was than
crap" was practically un-
many cases the expenses
uipment would have been
s worth.


For instance, when Gatun Dam was
SircihA 16 Ainmn arir wrn iqnlbfnd nn


and underbrush to evaluate the find.


Even Fence Posts Salvaged
Even fence posts, long abandoned, will
go to swell the scrap pile. From old pas-
tures which were used between 1917 and
1934 for the Canal's cattle industry, the
Storehouse Division is salvaging an esti-
mated 3,000 metal fence posts.
The posts were made from T-rails which
themselves were salvage. After the balls
of the rails were removed to make rein-
forcing bars, the rest of the rails were cut
into lengths for posts to fence in pastures
at Summit and Caimito.
Altogether, from dump cars, the aban-
doned dump near Cucaracha, the Canal
banks, and the old pastures, the Store-
house Division expects to salvage close
to 900 tons of scrap.
Since the scrap salvage program was
started last July 1, a total of 4,212 tons
have been& collected. Of this some 4,000
tons were classified as ferrous (or with an
iron base) and 212 tons were non-ferrous.
On April 14, bids to purchase close to
2,200 net tons of ferrous scrap will be
opened at the Storehouse office in Balboa
and two days later bids on about 150 tons


tended
about 1
them t
Columb
Presei
which w
morning
will inc
games,
ming m
evening
activities
part in


tc
5
he
us
nt


Sthe Gatun council and to
different organizations, among
Army, Navy, Knights of
, Elks, and veterans' groups.
plans call for a celebration


till last from eight o'clock in
Sto ten o'clock at night and w
lude a parade, athletic evw
a community luncheon, a s
ieet at Gatun, and, of coi
fireworks. Part of the d
s will take place in Gatun
Margarita.


Rifle


the
which
cents,
wim-
urse,
lay's
and


Champion


-

",4-------
10
O' -


-