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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00098
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: March 1952
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00098
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text
Y7 -


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum
PANAMA


CANAL


Vol.2, No. 8 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, MARCH 7, 1952 5 cents


AWARD


$8,500,000


CONSTRUCTION


CONTRACTS


FOR


CANAL


COMPANY'S


1952


HOUSING


PROGRAM


TROPICAL


TOBOGGANING


Maintenance


Handle


Costing


Division
Projects


Over Million


Contracts totaling $8,500,000
ve been awarded since De-
mber in the Canal's 1952


GRASSY SLOPES in the dry season provide ideal toboggan slides for the younger set. Ready-made
toboggans are provided by the numerous big royal palm trees when they shed their fronds.
The slope around the Administration Building at Balboa Heights is one of the most popular of the sledding
runs on the Pacific side. The palm frondL carry one, two, or sometimes as many as four customers on a trip.
The group above is composed of Mary Smith, Suzy Hele, and Don Grant (left to right), on a downhill slide,
and Ellen Anne Rennie with young Steve Grant at the right on their way uphill for another thrilling ride.
The principal spectator and helper at the extreme left is "Ditto," one of the better-known canine residents
of the Pacific side, who makes his home at the Rennies.


Canal's


Purchase


Supplies


Panama


quarters construction program.
In addition, building and site
work scheduled to be done by
the Maintenance Division will
cost nearly $1,200,000.
This year's program provides
for 243 new family apartments
for U. S.-rate employees and 422 family
apartments for local-rate employees, as
well as the preparation of sites for several
hundred new buildings to be erected
during the coming year.
The work will be centered mainly in
the Atlantic side towns of Margarita and
Silver City, and in Ancon and the new
Pacific side townsites of Cardenas and
Summit. Other work includes the con-
struction of small groups of houses in
Gatun, Diablo Heights, and Balboa.
In scale, the quarters construction
program this year is the largest under-
taken by the Canal organization since
the Canal construction period. Con-
tracts awarded this year total the largest
amount in any year since the Third


Locks construction


was in


progress


years ago.
All Contracts Awarded


ha
ce





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


March 7, 1952


Central


Labor


Union-Metal


Third


rades


Of U. S.-Rate


Council


workers


REPRESENTATIVES of organized labor in the Canal Zone met with
Secretary of War Newton D. BaKer during the Secretary's visit here in Decem-
ber 1919. Mr. Baker, wearing rimmed glasses and with his hat in his hand,
is in the center of the front row. In uniform beside him is Governor Chester
Harding, whose term extended from January 1917 to February 1921.
On Governor Harding's other side is William C. Hushing, now chairman of
the Legislative Committee of the American Federation of Labor. Third


from the left in the front row is the late Dr. George Eugene. At the right
end of the front row is George F. Wright, who provided this photograph for
The Panama Canal Review.
Mr. Wright, one-time president of the Blacksmith's Union, installed the
first officers for the Metal Trades Council and for the Central Labor Union.
He has continued as installing officer for many years.


With a total membership of about
1,400 men and women in 24 local unions,
the Central Labor Union-Metal Trades
Council serves as liaison with the Ameri-
can Federation of Labor for roughly one-
third of the U. S.-rate employees of the
Panama Canal Company and the Canal
Zone Government.
Today most Canal Zone bachelors have
comfortable beds and hot water for
shaving because of these two interlocking


labor groups-but
This month the
is celebrating its
Central Labor Uni
What are these t
difference in their
they operate? No


more of that later.
Metal Trades Council
38th anniversary; the
on is four year younger.
two groups; what is the
functions and how do
t even a good many of


their members understand. Here is how
the officers of the CLU-MTC explain
them:
The Metal Trades Council, which was
organized in March 1914 in the old con-
�iwii /k .i f .v, f4. -s ri :r :,,iT j-� EJw y m n ��an�


Here in the Canal Zone most of the
skilled trades are affiliated with the
Metal Trades although some crafts, such
as the carpenters, hold a second AFL
charter with the Building and Construc-
tion Trades Department. This charter
was obtained in 1942 during the local
building boom.
This charter, however, is not used and
for purposes of convenience these building
and construction crafts operate through
the AFL's Metal Trades Department
charter.
"The unions are affiliated into a council
because labor feels that a union working
by itself is like a man working by him-
self," labor officials explain. And they put
it more formally so: "The AFL advocates
that all local units of the national or
international labor unions affiliated with
it become members of the central body."
In the United States, the various Metal
Trades Councils have a committee which


Where Central Labor Unions are estab-
lished, the Metal Trades Department
authorizes the MTC to operate as a unit
of this CLU.
The CLU's principal function, beside
being a union of unions, is legislation. In
the United States, the city groups deal
with municipal bodies on municipal labor
laws. The state bodies deal with state
legislatures and the national body deals
with Congress, through the Legislative
Committee of the AFL.
Since there are no city or state legisla-
tive bodies here, the CLU handles its
legislative problems directly with the
National Committee, the chairman of
which is William C. Hushing. Mr. Hushing
is a former Canal employee-he was a
patternmaker in the old Mechanical Divi-
sion from 1916 to 1921-and is the brother
of John Hushing, United States Marshal
for the Canal Zone.
Voting Procedure Differs


Represent One-


w





March 7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


SHIP


FARES


AND


VEGETABLE


BUYING


HEAD Council President


DISCUSSED


Persistent and widespread rumors that
fares for employees on the Panama Line
ships would be increased drastically were
killed last week by Lieutenant Governor
Herbert D. Vogel in the monthly Gover-
nor-Employee Conference.
Colonel Vogel presided over the confer-
ence between administration and employee
representatives in the absence of Governor
F. K. Newcomer.
Except for knowledge that there were
rumors to the effect that the steamship
fares would be upped, Colonel Vogel told
the Conference that he had no knowledge
of any such change.
He said he believed that the rumors
might have originated in the "bookkeep-
ing transactions" in which the Panama
Canal Company is paying the difference
between the fare paid by the employees
and the actual cost of the transportation.
Minimum fare, one way, is $40; the actual
cost of transporting a passenger one way
is about $120.
Rufus Lovelady, president of AFGE
Lodge No. 14, reported at some length
on a talk earlier in the month with John
Barton, who handles the purchase of fresh


(Continued from page 2) Trimble. He has
been employed by the Electrical Division
since 1940.
The second vice president, tradition-
ally an Atlantic Sider, is Eugene Break-
field. He is a postal clerk at Cristobal and
is a comparative newcomer to the Isth-
mus, having been here only since 1948.
Both the secretary, E. W. Hatchett,
who has held that job for 14 years, and
the treasurer, Walter Fischer, are on the
faculty of Balboa High School.
Howard E. Munro, another electrician,
is the Labor member on the Company-
Government Wage Board. He is ao-


pointed by the Governor
directly to the Governor.
Another important post is
lative representative, who,
William M. Price. He left th
late in December to be in


and reports
that of legis-
currently is
e Canal Zone
Washington


during the present session of Congress.
Fight Against Rent
From the time of its organization, the


MONTHLY


fruits and


CONFERENCE


vegetables for the Commis-


series in the New York office of the
Company.
Mr. Barton, according to Mr. Lovelady,
explained the difficulty of anticipating
sales and markets. He visited several
retail commissaries and found some mer-
chandise in unusable condition.
He would recommend, he told Mr.
Lovelady, that such merchandise either
be removed from the sales counters or
sold as damaged merchandise at reduced
costs.
Colonel Vogel said that substantially
the same conversation had been held
with Mr. Barton in the Governor's office.


^ /


* *,*<
* *ttt


6'U.A


.3

9'
til


Local Purchases Made


Some
being p
fruit an
stained
Arizona
shipped


foodstuf
purchased
d vegeta
from so
. This
to New


fs of this type are
in Boquete and
ble items are bein
uthern California
merchandise is
Orleans by special


now
other
g ob-
and
being
train


and from New Orleans to the Canal Zone
by ship.
Colonel Vogel commented that he
considered Mr. Barton's (See page 15)

CLU-MTC has held a reputation as a
fighting crew. One of the unions' earliest
campaigns was for the betterment of
bachelor quarters. The bachelors wanted
decent furniture, comfortable beds, single
rooms and hot water, although an official
comment of the period was to the effect
that "few men experience difficulty
shaving with cold water in this climate."
In 1921, the CLU-MTC began a long
and costly, if unsuccessful, fight to prevent
employees from having to pay rent for
their quarters. The fight went all the
way to the United States Supreme Court
and in three years cost over $25,000.
A similar campaign was undertaken
more recently when rents on Canal
quarters were increased, but this never
got beyond the early legal stages.
Other matters in which the CLU- MTC
has been active include: Restoration, in
1935, of a 15 percent pay cut; extension of
the 40-hour week to the Canal Zone; im-


FIRST WOMAN to be elected president of a
Canal Zone Civic Council is Margaret Rennie of
Ancon. She heads the Pacific Civic Council. A
resident of the Canal Zone since 1937, Mrs. Rennie
has served on the council for 4 years. She is an
interior decorator by profession and is particularly
inte-ested in housing. Several years ago, she
served on the committee which mane a survey of the
Canal Zone to determine types of housing desired
by the employees.


provements in retirement law
portion of Canal Zone retirn
the Civil Service system;
recently, cancellation of the
phase of income tax; and pay
latively for policemen, firemen
ers, and administratively
employees.
Until the early 1930's the
had no permanent legislative
tion, although on several
selected members made trips t
ton to appear before corn
Congress on one matter or an
For several years after 1922


and incor-
ement with
and, more
retroactive
raises legis-
and teach-
for other


CLU-MTC
representa-
occasions
o Washing-
mittees of
their .
when Mr.


Hushing left his Panama Canal job, he
represented the CLU-MTC in Washing-
ton. In 1925 he suggested that a local
representative be maintained in Washing-
ton during Congressional sessions. It
was several years, however, before such a
representative was elected and in the
meantime Mr. Hushing, who by that time
was a member of the AFL legislative com-
mittee, continued to represent Canal Zone
interests.


AGENDA





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


March 7,1952


ver


30,000


Handled


Pieces


By


of


Airmail


Busy


Daily

Postal


Clerks


All the love letters, business correspond-
ence, family communiques, mail orders,
and miscellaneous notes and cards that
fly by regular airmail between Canal
Zonians and correspondents all over the
world go through the Airmail Field or
Airmail Section of the Canal Zone
Postal System.
And most of the correspondence to and
from the Canal Zone does fly.
Last year 91 percent of the paid first
class mail forwarded was dispatched by
air-a proportion that has climbed
steadily year after year since the first
regular airmail service was established
between France Field and Miami in 1929.
In weight the airmail to and from the
Canal Zone amounts to about 500 to 700
pounds every day, roughly 28,000 to
38,000 pieces of mail.
All of it is handled by nine postal clerks,
headed by Julius M. Culpepper, Clerk-in-
Charge at the Airmail Section, in the
Civil Affairs Building in Ancon and at
Tocumen Airport.
Together they comprise the local "Air-
mail Field." The term, as used in the
United States postal service, means a unit
of the Post Office Department at desig-
nated air terminals where mail is received
and "worked out" to a certain area of
the country.


Most Goes To U. S.


About 78 percent of the airmail dis-
patched from the Canal Zone goes to the
United States. All of it--except on two
direct flights to Los Angeles is unloaded
at Miami. From there, it is sent on the
quickest direct flight to one of eight desig-
nated Air Mail Fields.
Mail for Texas, Arizona, New Mexico,
Oklahoma, or Kansas, for instance, is dis-
patched to the Air Mail Field at Houston.
That to Georgia, Alabama, South Caro-
lina, Missouri, Michigan, or Ohio goes to
the Air Mail Field at Atlanta.
Airmail to California, on the other
hand, goes first one way and then an-
other. On Sunday and Thursday, when
there are direct flights to Los Angeles, it
is dispatched to that Air Mail Field. On


THIS MODIFIED Bob Feller pitching technique is used by Julius M. Culpepper, clerk in
charge of the Airmail Section, to put outgoing mail into the right airmail sacks bound for the
United States.


other days
Mail Field
Alaska, Co
Chicago),
Montana,
Oregon, So
State, Wis
Canada.


, it goes to the Chicago Air
, which also handles mail for
lorado, Idaho, Illinois (except
Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota,
Nebraska, North Dakota,
uth Dakota, Utah, Washington
consin, Wyoming, and Western


Most of the airmail from the Canal
Zone goes to the Atlanta and Chicago
Air Mail Fields, according to the clerks
of the Air Mail Section.
Then there are a few addressees who
receive so much Canal Zone airmail that
they rate individual pigeonholes in the
cases at the Airmail Section in which the
mail is sorted for destinations in the
United States.
Some Have Special Sacks
Among them are Sears, Roebuck and
Company, Kodak, for which there are so
many films that the company has a
special airmail sack among the group


bound for various Air Mail Fields, the
Government Employees Finance Com-
pany in Fort Worth, Texas and Life
Study Fellowship in Noroton, Conn.
Transatlantic mail-for Europe, Asia,
and Africa-goes to the Air Mail Field at
Washington, D. C. That for the Philip-
pine Islands, New Zealand, Australia,
Japan, and Hong Kong is dispatched on
direct flights to Los Angeles on Sunday
and Thursday. On other days, that also
goes to the Air Mail Field at Chicago,
from which it is sent to West Coast Air
Mail Field enroute to its final destination.
Canal Zone airmail for South America
is dispatched direct-on one flight down
the East Coast and another down the
West Coast. Mail for Jamaica is also
dispatched direct twice a week, with that
for the other islands in the West Indies
going to Port-of-Spain or Miami for hand-
ling.
A day in the life of a (See page 6)


Zone's






March 7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


SAFETY


ON THE RAILROAD


The Panama Railroad strives to
maximum safety throughout its
ganization. The Railroad won the


Honor


Roll award f


INJURIES five t
tied for second p
sions. Though t
there can be no h
if we expect to
performance. In
our employees,
safety of nonraihr
or near Panama


timess
lace
his is
etup
main
addi
no li


oa
Ra


maintain
entire or-
Division


NO DISABLING
ring 1951, and was
h three other divi-
i impressive record
our safety program
n or improve this
n to the safety of
important is the


d employees wo
ilroad facilities,


rkming
and t


safety of the general public.
Cooperation with the Railroad is essential
for the safety of all these employees. The
railroad tracks are constructed and main-
tained primarily for the purpose of operating
trains in accordance with certain rules and
regulations. While the Railroad will comply
with reasonable requests for specific pro-
tective safety measures, gang foremen and
others should plan their work to fit the
operating requirements of the Railroad.
There are several basic rules which should be
observed at all times if accidents are to be
prevented.
Track speeder operators must pass an
examination on the Panama Railroad Oper-
ating Rules and Regulations before being
permitted to operate speeders over the
tracks of the Railroad. They and others
working on or along the right of way should
be conversant with and observe these rules
and regulations together with the Panama
Railroad Safety Rule Book. They should
carry an accurate timepiece and a copy of


HONOR


ROLL


Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
January

COMMUNITY SERVICES
BUREAU

INDUSTRIAL BUREAU


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEA
Community Services .............
Industrial .....--------....-------------
Civil Affairs ........-----------..--.---
Engineering and Construction-- ....
Health..--..------.....-------------
Marine------------------------. ,


the current time-table.
familiar with the schedule
trains and secure informati<
from the Train Dispatcher
requires.
The gang foremen shou
men are vigilant and alert,
them constantly that train
time and in either direction
should rely on others to g
approaching train, even the
has been posted for that
For added safety, their wori


centrated in
they can kno
proper precat
Tools are r
nor resting (
Equipment,
trials must
the nearest
clearance for
Safety for
difficult prob
dependently
rent reason.


eliminate k
ever, there
can take a
can learn
improve th4
The railr
sidewalk or
sitting on t
is pure folly
train may r


train to
train in
the eng


the smallest p
w that all their
utions to avoid i
lot to be left be
n the rails wh
temporary struck
not be placed w


rail
pas
the
lem
and
TI


fnown
are m
nd m
to av
eir saf
oad t
r trail
he rai


must be
I regular
tra trains
as safety


Ssee that their
id impress upon
may run at any
. No employee
e warning of an
gh a watchman
specific purpose.
: should be con-
ossible area so
men are taking
injury.
tween the rails,
en not in use.
tures, and ma-
ithin six feet of


to allow proper and safe
sing trains.
general public is a more
because individuals act in-
sometimes without appa-
he Railroad endeavors to
hazards promptly. How-
any precautions the public
any unsafe practices they


oid
ety.
rack
L PI
Is, or


The e
ot see


a stop.
time to
ineer ha


ngir
you


which


is not
saying
lying
ieer of
Sintir


You may
move clear
s seen yo


would


greatly


playground,
the tracks,
the crossties
approaching
to bring his


not hear
ar of the
u in tim


or see t
track.
e to st


his train, he may misinterpret your actions
to indicate you are aware of the train's
approach. Always be on the lookout for
trains in both directions, and get off the
tracks as quickly as possible for your own
protection. It should therefore be clear that
if you are on the track and do not move off
when a train approaches, the chances are
you will be run over and killed.
Safety lines painted on station platforms
are there for your protection. If you insist
on standing, or running on the track side of
these lines, you are placing yourself in a posi-
tion where you can be struck by a passing
train. The practice of running, roller skat-
ing, or riding a bicycle beside a moving train
is very hazardous. Should you stumble, or


..fcr *'
S.
*. *
a,.
I ..






,.
I'








V:'


C. B. McILVAINE
Conductor and Safety Assistant,
Panama Railroad


be accidently pushed,
fall under the wheels.
permit their children
bicycles on a station
When boarding a t:
the safety line until t
then take all the tim


aboard. \
seated until
have many
ask for help
desire to be
result in inj
Engaging
coach to co
is dangerous
forms and
lose his bala
are applied
curve. Sta
and getting
in motion i1
Safety is


hen riding
the train
packages,
to get on
first on,
ury to you


chances
Parents
to roller
platform
rain stay
he train
[e necess
Son the


are you will


uld never
e, or ride
ny time.
1 back of
stopped,
to climb
, remain


shout
skati
at a
Swell
has
ary
train


has stopped. If
baggage, or chilc
or off the train.
or off, the train
rself and others.


m horse la


walkinmr


* -'�- ^ �- ** . ~r , * -- *
hach while the train is
;s. All coaches have
a person on the pla
since, or stumble, when
, or when the train
endingg or sitting on th
Son or off the train
s prohibited by law.
not a one-sided affair.


must take normal pre
jury to ourselves and
should minimize its im
lives.


in motion
open plat-
tform can
the brakes
rounds a
e platform
while it is


All of


cautions
others.
portance


Disabling Injuries per 1,060,000 Man-Hours Worked


i

i


R





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


March 7, 1952


New District Attorney






i^ ,


.A.


% -



ROWLAND K. HAZARD was confirmed by the
Senate last month as the new District Attorney for
the Canal Zone. A graduate of Holy ('ross and
Georgetown Universities, he came to the Isthmus
in February 1948 as Assistant Dietrict Attorney.
He succeeds Daniel E. McGrath, District Attorney
since 1910.

Over 30,000 Pieces of Airmail Daily
Handled By Zone's Busy Postal Clerks


(Continued from pag
Airmail Sectio
Building begin
morning and en
volume of mail
When there is
stay until it


meant 7 o'clock


e 4) postal clerk
>n at the Civil
s at 11:30 o'clock i
ds-barring an extra
-at S:30 o'clock at
a lot of mail, the
is all worked-and


in the


morning


at the
Affairs
n the
i large
night.
clerks
that


for some


of them during the past Christmas season.
The clerks at Tocumen Airport go to
work at 8:30 o'clock at night and close
up shop at 4:30 o'clock min the morning.
Schedule Set By Flights
The working schedule of the Airmail
Section is arranged to fit the airmail
flights. Those on which mail may be
carried are designated by the Postmaster


Genern
flight
Field i
the ne
direct
The
mail fi
leave


al in Washington.
is delayed, howev
s authorized to disp
xt available flight
route to its destiny
normal schedule
rom the Canal Zo:
at 1:45 and 2:20


'er
)at
an


If an airmail
, the Airmail
;ch the mail on
d by the most


tion.
flight
ne is
o'cl


s on which
dispatched
ock in the


morniiiing.
Outgoing airmail starts coming i
Airmail Section at Ancon at noon
the Pacific side postoffices and
noon train from the Atlantic side
A letter mailed at the Balboa
Postoffice, for instance, between 7
at night and about noon the next


picker
been \
out in
private
the Ai
and 4
and 7
At
pickedc
in the


I

*
1


I up there at noon, after
worked into airmail "cases" a
packages addressed to the
Airmail Fields. Other pick
rmail Section are made at 1.


nto the
-from
off the

Heights
o'clock
day, is
having
nd tied
appro-
ups for
2,3:30,


o'clock in the afternoon and at 6
o'clock at night.
the "line" postoffices, the mail is
I up once in the morning and once
afternoon.


All afternoon and until the last airmail
pickup at the Civil Affairs Building letter
drop at 7:45 o'clock at night, the Airmail
Section postal clerks work it out into the
pigeonholed cases for various cities and
then into big bags for various Airmail
Fields and foreign destinations.


Mistakes Not Allowed


Postal clerks just are
make mistakes in getting
of mail in the right pigeo


listing registered
thousand other d
dispatch of mail,
large volume of i
panics each dispa
and the clerk wh
the exacting detail


mail, or
details ti
* And
aperr w(
tch sho'
o did th
il and su


a vast and farflung system


n't supposed to
the right piece
nhole or bag, in
in any one of a
hat go into the
if they do, the
ork that accom-
ws up the error
ie deed with all
per sleuthing of
m set up to get


mail to its proper destination-and no
place else.


Postal clerks in the Airmail Section


bear n
of the
freely
as all
The
which
should
rather


10 special allegiance to that branch
postal service, but are transferred
from one postoffice to another, just
Canal Zone postal clerks.
y all seem to develop a sixth sense
tells them where a piece of mail
Sbe sent, sometimes in spite of
than because of. the address.


Sometimes with the help of a large
"Dictionnaire des Bureaux de Poste"
published by the Union Postale Univer-
salle, the "Bible" for postal personnel the
world around, they learn to decipher-and
send to the right place-letters addressed
in many strange manners.
For instance, there was one not too long
ago that came through the Airmail Sec-
tion addressed "MFS 10C." Only a long-
time postal clerk could have figured out
that it was intended for Memphis, Tenn.,
but that was where it was sent-and
rightly so.
Incoming airmail for the Canal Zone is
worked by the postal clerks at Tocumen
Airport for various towns. When the
clerks leave the Civil Affairs Building
about 5 o'clock in the morning, they drop
the airmail for Ancon at that postoffice.
All the rest of the airmail goes to the
Balboa Postoffice. That for the Atlantic
side leaves on the morning tramin. The
mail for Pacific side postoffices is de-
livered by truck, getting to Howard
Field-or Fort Kobbe-about 9 o'clock in
the morning.
Building and demolition of buildings
went on 40 years ago, just as it does today.
In preparation for the rise of Gatun
Lake, buildings in the villages of Bohio,
Frijoles, San Pablo, and Tabernilla had
practically all been sold, destroyed, or
moved elsewhere for reconstruction.
At the Hotel Tivoli a large addition was
nearing completion. It was expected that
the two upper floors would be ready for
occupancy before the end of the month.


Little


League


Park


Built


By


volunteers


-- - - r


1


,






March 7, 1952


THE PANAMA


"'"""""~~~CN A R E V I EW"1 1 111.111 -'j , �innnnnnn* __ .,����� ,���..��i~ni � ������������,,�_


Official


Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Panama Canal Press
Mount Hope, Canal Zone
F. K. NEWCOMER, Governor-President
H. D. VOGEL, Lieutenant Governor


E. C. LOMBARD, Executive


Secretary


J. RurFUS HARDY, Editor
ELEANOR H. McJLHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters containing inquiries, suggestions,
criticisms, or opinions of a general nature
will be welcomed. Those of sufficient interest
will be published but signatures will not be
used unless desired.


EVER-LENGTHENING LINES at the Income Tax Office
of March 15, deadline for filing final 1951 income tax returns and
much urging on the part of Internal Revenue officials for resident
the sao duty until the last and find themselves in a long line


in Balboa
estimated
ts to file th
of custoine:


Clubhouse signalized the approach
tax declarations foi 1952. Despite
ei' final returns early, many delay
rs,


of the puzzled,


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$1.00


SINGLE


year


The group above photographed recently show the
apprehensive citizen on his approach to the tax office.


COPIES-5 cents each


On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses,
Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after
publication date.
SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-0lOcents each
BACK COPIES-10 Cents Each
On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.
Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to the Editor, THE
PANAMA CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights,
C.Z.


Special


Notice


Readers:


Letters of inquiry to THE PAN-


AMA


CANAL REVIEW will be


cheerfully answered when it is ap-
parent that the writers are seeking


information not easily


obtainable


NEW RULE ON QUARTERS
Residents of Pedro Miguel will be permit-
ted to apply for and receive assignments
to quarters in the Balboa-Ancon-Diablo
Heights area after the first of next month.


The change in


the rules


quarters


assignments was made in conformity with
the Housing Division's overall policy to


remove undesirable or inequitable
tions on employee residence in all


Contractors and the value of the lumber


to be furnish
Cerro Punta
Osmond L.


887,000; and
qui, 864,675.
ated after the
were all rejec


restrnc-
possible


instances. Pedro Miguel residents have
requested the change in the housing assign-
ment rule on numerous occasions and their
requests have been backed by the Chief


of the Locks Division whose employees
mostly assigned there.


The change will become
the present "freeze" on assig
terminal towns of the Pacific


The restrictions
were placed in
was reached fc
to the Navy.
removed at the


e ff active


are


after
in the
lifted.


on quarters assignments
effect after an agreement
r the transfer of Cocoli


They were to
end of Februar


have been
i but were


extended for one month.


OLD-TIMERS' ANNUITIES
No further court action is to be taken
by the Internal Revenue Bureau on the
payment of income tax on annuities of
Canal construction employees, accord-
ing to information from Maurice H.
Thatcher, attorney in the Dewling
case. It was this case in which the


hed by each are: Aser
i, of El Volcan, $2:
Maduro. of Panama
Aserradero Arco Iris, of
The contracts were
bids, opened early last


ted l.


*2


radero
8,815;
City,
Chiri-


negoti-
month.


PRICE INCREASES


Rate revisions to place the Com-
mercial Activities group of the Panama
Canal Company on a break-even basis
were made effective at the first of this
month.
Three price changes were made which
directly affect retail customers. Gaso-
line prices were increased two cents a
gallon, cigarettes were advanced two
cents a package or 10cents when bought
by the carton, and telephone rates for
private users were raised 50 cents a
month.
The rate changes affecting general
services include those for stevedoring,
marine bunkering, and the handling
and transfer of cargo over the piers.
Room rates at the Tivoli Guest House
were also increased about 10 percent.
The price increases affecting employ-
ees were alleviated by the concurrent
announcement that the care of grounds
around employees' quarters will be


free.


OF CURRENT INTEREST


average looks


resigned,


irritated,


)


CANAL REVIEW


a


.*





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 7,1952


Beautiful


Surroundings,


New


Treatment


Brighten


Life


For


Palo


Seco


Patients


Dr.

ArE

To


and


Mrs.


Hurwitz

Friends

Z Colony


The Palo Seco Leper Colony has the
same scenic charm which probably in-
fluenced Col. William C. Gorgas when he
chose the site in 1907 but the outlook of
patients has brightened beyond the wild-
est hopes of that day.
In 1907, the plight of lepers had changed
very little since Biblical days when the
cry of "unclean" voiced all the fear and
loathing with which the world viewed
their disease. "Death before death," it
was commonly called.
The colony, which cares for all the
leprosy cases discovered in Panama and
the Canal Zone, sits on a promontory into
Panama Bay and looks out at the entrance
to the Panama Canal.
Center of its 340 acres is a windswept
quadrangle of buildings, enclosed on three
sides by a tropical forest that slopes
downhill to a cove in the Bay.
The scenery, which makes Palo Seco
a paradise among leprosariums, had
clinical as well as aesthetic importance
when the colony was founded. Without
real hope of effective treatment, patients
then could expect to look at the same sur-
roundings day after day and year after
year and so live out their lives.
Leprosariumsatthattimewere primarily
places of asylum shielding the public from
sight and contact with the disease and its
victims.


Palo Seco's unique currency, which is
now dwindling and will not be coined
again, was a manifestation of the per-
vading fear of infection. So was the rule
against dogs and cats-another regulation
which has been abandoned.
The pierced aluminum and brass coins
used at the colony are gradually being lost
or carried away as souvemnirs and Pana-


�r
manian and United States money are also
used there now.
Known as Hansen's Disease


THIS YOUNG PATIENT makes and sell, fishing nets like tre one shown here. Others work for the
Palo Seco Colony, raise chickens, fruits and vegetables which they sell the Colony Commissary or hunt and
fish and sell their catch.


the practice as a psychological concession
to persistent public fear of the disease.
In 1941 Dr. G. H. Faget at the Lepro-
sarium at Carville, La., the only one in
the United States, first used sulphone
drugs to treat leprosy.
His work utilized findings of researchers
at the Mayo Clinic whose original work
with sulphone was done in connection
with tuberculosis.
Sulphone Arrests Leprosy
It was not and is not known how the
sulphone drugs work on the leprosy bacilli
or on the body but they did work wonders
for the patients.
Experimental possibilities are limited
because, to present knowledge, the bacilli
exists only in the human body and cannot
be cultivated in the laboratory.
Many heroic volunteers have attempted
to contract leprosy-but without success.
"Cure" is a word that is not used in
connection with the disease but sulphone
* - .b *r


When there are no ulcers that make the
victim repugnant in appearance and
microscopic smears show no leprosy
bacilli, patients are permitted to visit out-
side the colony frequently, and almost as
they choose. Adults may visit Palo Seco
any time during the day.
There are two types of leprosy which
often combine to form a third or mixed
type. The nodular or skin type progresses
from pinkish spots or papules on the skin
to nodules and finally, the lionlike appear-
ance of the advanced stages.
In the anaesthetic or nerve type, the
peripheral nerves are attacked, causing
neuralgic pains and loss of feeling, trophic
ulcers, and eventual contraction of the
fingers and toes. The disease is often
discovered when victims burn or cut
themselves and cannot feel it.


Palo Seco Is Home


Several patients at


Palo Seco whose


/OQOQO nra 'br,'offlA irrn~~~ An -nnt4- ,nonfi


Mentors,

118 In C





March 7, 1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


The road was not built until 1932.
Mrs. Hurwitz mothers a brood of about
20 children who were born to patients in
the colony and now live in orphanages or
with families on the outside. Aside from
the practical arrangements for their care,


that may mean an afternoon
trip and an ice cream soda for
ster in an orphanage, stitching
red polleia for another, or a
another about his school work.
There have been about 30
Palo Seco patients since Docto:
Hurwitz have been there and
ber has increased since the
treatments.


y� W' t'- w 7t "*"'**


shopping
one young-
up a pretty
talk with


births to
r and Mrs.
the num-
sulphone


4-t


Nine Babies In Ten Years
One patient has had four sets of twins
and one single birth in the last 10 years.
The babies are born at Gorgas Hospital
and Mrs. Hurwitz is usually there soon
after the event-doing all the motherly
things a new or expectant mother wants.
Mrs. Hurwitz shops for the patients;
she deals with organizations and individ-
uals who visit and contribute to the
colony; and she carries messages and ad-
vice, flavored with her own sparkling
personality, between patients and families
and friends outside the colony.
There are 118 patients at Palo Seco, 14
of whom are charges of the Canal Zone as
former Canal employees or dependents of
employees. The rest are from the Re-
public of Panama, which pays the Canal
a per diem rate for their care in accord-
ance with an agreement between the two
countries. The rate, which is based on


actual operating
December.


was $2.38


First at Marafion Beach
When United States assumed control of
the Canal Zone in 1904, four or five lep-
rous families were segregated on Maranfion


Beach.
moved
in a se
Seven
Seco w
The
Seco is


At that time some of these were
to Empire where they were isolated
action of the old Empire Hospital.
patients were transferred to Palo
hen the leper colony was founded.
average age of the patients at Palo
about 45. There are twice as many


men as women-a pattern common
leprosy everywhere.


The patients receive
ments--prommin, diasone,
every morning for two
from treatment on the
the body a chance to re
The colony has single
1 -1 -. .-----1- t.


sulphone
and prome
weeks. A
third week
cuperate.
rooms for
.1 .


treat-
ctin-
recess
gives

bache-
1


treat
of tl


I
jf
L~*�


SULPHONE TREATMENTS are given every morning for two weeks, then a week elapses before the
tments are resumed. Dr. Ezca Hurwitz, in charge of Palo Seco rightsj is shown here administering one
he wonder-working drugs. On the left is Cuthbert 0. Ramsey, foreman, who has been at Palo Sro


almost 40 years.


pairing and expansion of facilities is a
continuous process. In the period in
which Maj. Gen. George W. Rice-who
has maintained special interest in the
colony-has served as Health Director,
new furniture has been added to the
dining hall and the quarters, including
inner spring mattresses, and a well-
equipped occupational-therapy and hobby
shop has been set up for the patients. The
carpentry shop, where patients make fur-
niture for sale, is one of the newest
additions.
There is a Catholic and Protestant
chapel where services are conducted regu-
larly. The Maryknoll sisters are frequent
visitors to the colony.
About 40 patients work for the colony,
as orderlies, waiters, carpenters or general
maintenance men. Twenty others raise
chickens, fruits and vegetables which they
sell to the colony commissary. Others
hunt and fish and sell their catch.
Everyone receives a "clothing allow-
ance" of $1.50 a month which serves as pin
money since most clothes are donations.
Movies, Dances and Sports
For entertainment, there are movies,
dances, baseball, hunting, and fishing.
John Thompson is clerk for the colony.
11l If' 1J j * TTT 1 � Il l I


about leprosy have bee
following manner by t
Memorial, an internati
devoted to scientific stu
How many lepers are
The generally accepted
three millions.
Where are the lepers fo
areas are in the East an
ticularly China and In
countries, Africa, and
America.
Is there any leprosy in
Some is found in the exl
occasional case in the NIS
import.


Is it true that
between infection
clinical manifestat
Is it fatal? No
usually succumbs
Is it painful?
suffers little from


n answered in the
he Leonard Wood
onal organization
idv of the disease:
there in the world?
round number is

und? The heaviest
d South Asia, par-
dia, the Malayan
parts of South

the United States?
treme South. The
orth is usually an


many years may elapse
and the development of
ions? Yes.
t as a rule. The patient
to some other cause.
As a rule the patient
the disease itself. Cer-


tain conditions of neural leprosy, how-
ever, may be marked by excessive pain.

Applications For Vacation
Travel Are Being Received


Although


the school vacation period


' A "





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 7,1952


CANAL'S PURCHASE OF SUPPLIES


Civil


Service


Officials


Meet


..rf' i] Si /tom
agents -to
con(hi ions�


page i


improve


purchasing
marketing


More Fruits and Vegetables
These efforts have resulted in heavier
buying of fresh fruits and vegetables in
the local markets. These purchases are
being steadily increased and during the
last half of 1951 the Commissary Division
bought $53,000 of Panama's fruits and
vegetables, as compared with $46,000 in
the last hlf of 1950.
The following figures show, in round
numbers, the amount of purchases made


the two comparative


July-Dec.
1950


Meat products . ......
Fruits and vegetables- ..
Other agricultural products..
Other food produ ts.....
Beverages.... ... .
Sugar and alcohol .... .
Forest product . .........
Industrial products .._..
Miscellaneous supplies ..
Totals


$654,000


V '. * . 1
*~1--1^ -->* - .rJ _ - _ _I


.1. .. . I *


6-month
July-Dec.
'95'


$905,000


Substantial increases were shown in all


ca
an
0:
fr
si
lo
D
of
in
di
st


wgeorites wILn me exception or sugar
id alcohol, and industrial products.
nly small lots of sugar were bought
om Panama producers during the past
x months since no bids were entered by
cal producers for the Commissary
vision's requirements for that period
last year. The decrease in amount of
dustrial products bought was primarily
ue to an exceptionally large order of
eel pipe placed locally during the latter


part of 1950.
Meat Purchases Nearly Doubled


Meat purchases
Panama by the C
f 1 * .1 1 U -


min the Republic of
ommissary Division


during the last half of 1951 were nearly
twice the value of those in the last half
of 1950. At present practically all beef
sold in the Commissary retail stores is
bought locally. During the war Panama's
cattle raisers were able to supply only a
small part of the beef required by the
Commissary Division and local beef was
bought only in quantities available to
supplement the supply bought in South
America. With the increase in local
herds, however, beef is available in
Panama to ment reniirrmonnf onA n,


CIVIL SERVICE PROBLEMS pertaining to the Canal organization as well as other Government agencies
here were extensively explored last month during a three-week visit to th? Isthmus of A. J. Leach, Director of
the 10th U. S. Civil Service Region.
Above, Mr. Leach, at the extreme right, is shown in one of his many conferences with E. A. Doolan,
Personnel Director of the Panama C('anal Company (center) and James Yates, Chief of the U. S.-rate Employ-
ment Branch of the Canal organization. Mr. Doolan is Chairman and Mr. Yates is Secretary of the Board
of U. S. Civil Service Examiners for the Canal Zone.
This was Mr. Leach's second visit to the Canal Zone since this area was made a part of the 10th Region.
He spent a short time here in 1947 soon after the change was made. His headquarters are in New Orleans.


while substantial increases
in soft-drink purchases.


were shown


Change In Purchasing Policy
A recent change in the purchasing
policy of the Canal organization has had
a substantial effect on the amount of
both industrial products and miscellane-
ous supplies bought. Until recently the
Canal bought most of these supplies,
in relatively small amounts, by competi-
tive bidding. These restrictions have
now been relaxed, and more purchases
are being made "over-the-counter" from
Panama's merchants.
One of the chief difficulties in the past
in making local purchases has been the
lack of regular or guaranteed deliveries
of produce of uniform grades. This has
especially hampered the purchase of


locally-grown fruit and vegetables by
the Commissary Division which must
anticipate its requirementswell in advance
of deliveries. The same has been true,
to an extent, on lumber caused by the
lack of proper facilities for drying lumber.
A number of trips to the interior of
the Republic have been made during the
past two years by representatives of the
three principal Canal purchasing units to
stimulate local markets. These repre-
sentatives have largely concentrated their
efforts on the quality of produce desired
for resale and the importance of prompt
and regular deliveries. It is believed
that these cooperative efforts between
buyers and producers is beginning to
show satisfactory results as evidenced by
the increasing supplies of agricultural
products being bought in the Republic.


GOAL


. . .. . �.1, *A v %* -J [f "laUt- .,H, AJX ]1


during
periodI:






March 7


1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Now is the time f
ers to look to their


Dresses fr
S
Dresses t
for the )
Tropics
e
The much


summt nner


0om
,tate
he


or Corn


missary


year-round


custom-


wardrobes.


the spring lines of United


manufacturers arrive


stores


March.


They


February
are shown


delivered to wholesalers in Dec-
mber, January, and February.


larger


sup;
arrive


p


lv of dresses


from


in the commissar-


ies in April, May, and June after having
been shown by the manufacturers in March,


)ril, and May.
Few dresses


suitable for tropical


short sleeves, solid colors and prints, approx-


imately 50 percent


nIUm colo(
nmust be
ized."''


pastels, 35


percent


guaranteed


. . . 12 of a style


size 9, 90 size
at $4.08 and


11, 90
5.75."


perce


dark colors.


fast color


nt mled-
Cottons
sanfor-


in assor{te( co
size 13, and 72


The number of dresses of


decreases


as the dresses


sive, ranging from six of
ium price line to only o


most expensive


wear


can be purchased from the manufacturer


any other time of


As fo
for the
Februa


year.


r men's clothing, the supply of suits
entire year is purchased in January,
ry, and March and are then shipped


to the stores


as needed.


The suits


now ar-


any one style
e more expen-


one style i


ne of


a sty


n a med-
le in the


dresses purchased.


Manufacturers generally make une


style


at a time, finish that one, and then manu-


facture another.


forays
ferent
Somit


Therefore it took many


into the market and, rnally, 20 d
orders to fill the entire requisition.


e dresses are a


Commissaries


lso b 1)


in other ways.


if-


ht for


driving in the stores
label, marking them


price


THE GUAYACAN
dry season.


flaunts


its golden glory


in the


The most outstandingly beautiful tree
in the local forests, in bloom in March and
April, is the guayacan, Tabebuia guayacan.
The large, showy yellow flowers are borne
min terminal clusters when the trees are
leafless, presenting a splash of gold in the
forest.


Several


of these handsome trees are


located on Ancon Hill and across from the
Governor's residence. Many more may be
seen on the hills east of Gamboa.
The wood is olive-brown, very dense
and hard, fine-grained, very durable, and
takes a high polish. It is considered one of
the best woods of Panama, and makes
beautiful salad or nut bowls.
Many people have thought they had
spotted an early flowering guayacan tree,
only to find that the flowers were smaller
and more like yellow poinciana flowers.
This was undoubtedly the Schizolobium
covilleanum, a tall, striking pale yellow,
flowering jungle tree which is in its glory


about


two months


earlier


guayacans.
Specimens of these trees may be spotted
along the trans-Isthmian highway, Mad-
den Road and on the hills east of Gamboa.
The roble, Tabebuia pentaphylla, is a


close relative


of the guayacan and is
Ltiful. During the end of


po
Se


bear the Robert Hall


Palm


d goods
Beach


in a popu-
and other


)pular lines are also carried regularly.
The Manager of the Wholesale Drygoods
action is in New York now on his semi-


annual expedition to the market. He does
little actual buying while he is there, but
he does feel out current fads and fancies.


There is no pat procedure in bu


yng wonm-


en's clothes, he explains, but it usually in-
volves the D)rygoods Section on the Isthmus,
buyers in the New York office of the Pan-


ama Canal Company, ai
Merchandise Company in


A. M.


b Wi
buying
eluding
dale's


id tht
New


one of the largest


agencies, has
Hutzler's in
in New York,


Bullock's in Los


and others


22 memb


e Associated
York.
cooperative
er stores, in-


Baltimore, Blooming-


Angeles,


of comparable


Filene's in


Boston,


Rich's in Atlanta,


S1


The Comnmissary Division
her of A. M. C. but is inclu


ze and quality.
is not a mem-
ded by special


arrangement, paying for its buying
on a percentage of actual purchases.


\. M. C. buyers, who are in the market
all the time select many of the women's
ready-to-wear accessory items and, act as
advisors for the Canal Company buyers in


New York


who place or confirm the orders


for the Commissary Division.
The Commissary Division buying mach-
inery worked something like this in the case
of one "for instance" requisition for some


of the


dresses


the Isthmus.


which are now being sold on


This "for instance


Dress
Buying


Commissary


requisition from the
rv Division was dated


October 30, 1951, for compara-


tively inexpensive


dresses from


Procedures spring lines shown in Decem-
ber, to be delivered on the


Isthmus
sooner i


"in January or February
f available."


It read something


ton dresses,


assorted


1952 or


service


The Drygoods Section at Mount


receives,


in some cases,


advance


about dresses from well known


information
firms that


are to be advertised in national fashion


azmes


at a specified future date.


0


mag-
n the


basis of this information, the Drygoods Sec-
tion frequently requests the New York office


purchase


a few of the


Lenten menu


Your
Lenten
Menus


maker


these things


shown.


s should know about
in the Commissaries:


Brook trout from Denmark, fresh
and fast-frozen sell for 65 cents a
poundcompared toaboutS65 for the
catch of do-it-the-hard-way family


trout fishermen.
The corbina and red snapper that are


asking


to be caught this time of


cooler-than-usual Isthmian


course,


available in


waters


the commissaries.


come from local fishermen


year in
are, of


via the


supplier who has been buying them in the
market and selling them to the Commissary


Division for about


years.


Packaged frosted fish now in the


which


are sometimes


available and


stores
some-


times not, include: Crab legs, crab and lobs-


ter meat,


lobster


smelt, and swordfish


tails, scallops,


shrimp,


steaks.


The handling of fresh fruits and


Fruits
and
Vegetables


tables from the


vege-


United States


was studied on the Isthmus re-


cently
makes


by John Barton,


these


Commissaries


purchases for the


in the


New York


office of the Panama Canal Company.
Studies to improve the quality of these
items from the United States were coupled
with a recent review of the local fruit and
vegetable market in the Commissary Div-


ision's
. .
I1OU01 5


continuing


attempts


styles and materials, Isthmian back yard.


to purchase
n their own


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS


e





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


March 7, 1952


veteran


Of


Retires


wo C

After


anal


44


Companies


ears'


Service


Ten
In


ears


Ago


February


War was beginning to play a larger part
in the day-to-day lives of the people who
lived in the Canal Zone.
Although there were no Canal employ-
ees involved, the Zone was saddened by
the first large-scale local tragedy.


On February 8 memorial services were
held in Panama Bay for the 33 men who
lost their lives when the submarine S-26
sank in 301 feet of water after a night colli-
sion with an escort vessel 10 days earlier.
Because of wartime security, the news of the
accident was not released until all hope had
been abandoned.
Of the four men, including the craft's
commander, who were on the submarine's
bridge at the time of the crash, three were
saved and assisted in the search for the
sunken sub. Six divers were flown from
Washington to attempt to free the trapped
men but the most skilled attempts were
unsuccessful.


TI AT STAIRWAY went to Empire, Esteban Vialette says, as he looks over the Pennell litho-


h of Culebra Cut at Las Cascada.


Vialette who has just retired after 44 years of service, was


employed by both French and American Canal Companies.


Esteban Raul Vialette is a tourist these
days, he says. From now on, he will have
plenty of time to hunt deer or wild turkeys
up the Pequeni River or in other of his
favorite haunts.
For, after 44 years of service with the
United States Government, this 68-year-
old veteran of two Panama Canal Com-
panies -the first was the French Com-
pagnie Nouvelle du Canal de Panama-
has just retired. He makes his home with
one of his two sons at Vista Hermosa, a
Panama City suburb.
Forty-four years at work brings plenty
of memories for anyone and Vialette has
many outstanding recollections. He has
talked with two President Roosevelts, al-
though the first time he did not know who
the "'stout man with the glasses" was.
That was in 1907 when he was working in
the Gorgona shops as a drill press operator
and President Theodore Roosevelt was on
the Isthmus looking over the Canal work.
They met twice that day in the shops
and the President asked Vialette, who had
been busy repairing clutches, what his job
, " *a 1 i ,i i. .t -- .-


you bring


us fair weather,"


Vialette answered.
Vialette also recalls the day, some 40
years ago, when an explosion in the Cut
took a heavy death toll. He was working
nearby and went to the aid of the injured.
"First," he says, "we had to shovel the
dead aside."
And he remembers, vividly, the week or
so early in World War II when along with
other Lock employees he worked day and
night to put through to the Pacific a great
flotilla of Uncle Sam's men-of-war.
Although he comments wryly that this
work was done without overtime pay, he
is still fiercely proud of the part that he
and his Panamanian countrymen played
here during the war.
"We are loyal, loyal!" he says.
Born in Panama City of French parents,
Vialette spent his early boyhood in the
capital where his family owned much of
the land near the present J Street-Tivoli
Avenue intersection. Most of this land
was sold a few years after Vialette was
born and he moved to Gorgona.
_ - - . - flo C "


A Governor's circular required that all
employees, except San Blas and Darien
Indians, submit proof of citizenship.
Departure control offices were set up in
Balboa and Cristobal and all steamship
and airlines offices were notified that
tickets might not be sold until the depar-
ture clearances had been submitted.
Priorities on plane travel were enforced
locally.


On the lighter side of the war: Three
local rate workers who had taken over an
air raid shelter at Camp Bierd as their
private domicile were sentenced to 10 days
each for loitering.
Light posts were fast becoming casualties.
At least a dozen had been damaged between
January 26, when the intensified blackout
started, and February 4.
A defendant who stole 344 sandbags and
another who stole 76, for resale in Panama,
drew fines and maximum jail sentences.


Again on the serious side, local authori-
ties took a grim view of attacks made by
German submarines on the island of
Aruba, less than four hours by air from
.*-^ I �-I I* Hl ~


-w


"� �^ ,,
4/





March 7, 1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Award


$8,500,000


Construction


Canal


Company


Contracts


1952 Housing


Program


Forty
In


Years A
February


go


On th
a portion
the eas
Culebra
Gold H
95-foot
At th


west bank
quiescent fi
activity.
some 750,0
in motion,
the rate of
Howeve]
CANAL RE
would not
for the Cu


Le afternoon of February 10, 19
n of the bank of Culebra Cut,
t side, opposite the village
and about 500 yards north
ill, broke off, carrying away 1
berm.
e same time an old slide on


t Culebra, whi
over two years
gether, engineer
I cubic yards of


advancing
18 to 24 in
r, a week
CORD estin


affect
t exca'


had improved to


toward
ches a d
later
iated tF


the


ch had been
, renewed its
rs estimated,
material was
the prism at
lay.
the official
tat the slides


the time of completion
nation because efficiency
such a great degree since


the estimate had been made.


- - -
- U
~
_ 72'

~


TYPE 332 2 BEE
tN-6S 4AlNI / C' MS UCT 'OW
AACMi~tc'rURnA SBAC'4.C


ROOM HOUSE


0 5


ANOTHER NEW type house which is included in this year's building program is illustrated above.
Nine of these houses will be built in Ancon and 37 in Mar'garita.
Distinctive features of this smaller, two-bedroom house are the long, narrow kitchens which permit ample
space for a breakfast or luncheon table and new-type aluminum casement windows with aluminum screens.
Tne floors will be cement tile, except in the kitchen and bathroom where ceramic tile will be used. A glazed
tile wainscoting will be set around the bathtub.
In addition to closet space, with sliding doors, in the two bedrooms, there is open shelving in one bedroom,
off the hallway and in the bathroom. That in the bathroom has space above for storage and below for a
laundry hamper.


(Continued fom page 2)
uled for completion
the other work is
June of next year.
SILVER CITY:
this year's program
Isthmian Construct
tracing firm, for 9
192 apartments, at
730. The contract
installation of muni
buildings and the co
September.
GATUN: Isthmi


grading is sched-
by next June, while
to be completed by

The first contract in
was awarded to the
ors, Inc., a local con-
6 masonry buildings,
a total cost of $645,-
t provides for the
cipal facilities for the
mpletion date is next


an Constructors


was


awarded hhe contract to huild 10 masonry


completion
next year.
ANCON
the develop
cleared of
the last fisc
building of


of the buildings by May of

The work in Ancon involves


pment of the largest
buildings and graded
al year. The contract f
streets, installation of


cipal facilities, an
56 family apartme
652 was awarded I


City contracting
building contract
City last year.
for completion in
DIATRLO HETI


area


iu
or
m


d the construction
nts at a cost of $1,0
;o Framorco, a Panr
firm which won
for the work in Si
The work is schedi
March 1953.
CHTR: Finurtpon


ring
the
uni-
i of
96,-
ama
the
lver
uled
mI -


The tug Reliance and three 600-yard
barges left Cristobalfor a 10,000 mile trip--
to Balboa. The voyage was to be made by
sea, via the Straits of Magellan.
The barges were to take the place of three
old French clapets which were so worn that
they had to be retired. Just 126 days later
the tug and barges arrived in Balboa, 50
land miles from their starting point. They
were in good condition, despite moderate to
heavy seas en route. The actual sailing
time for the epic trip was 86 days.
Col. George W. Goethals, Chairman of
the Isthmian Canal Commission, who had
been in the United States on official busi-
ness, was directed to go on to Europe to
investigate matters relating to Canal
terminals.
During his absence, Col. H. H. Hodges
acted as Chief Engineer and Chairman.
At the first of the month, the force at work
totalled 87,4388. Of these. 30,114 were
employed on the Panama Canal force and
7,324 on the railroad force.
Three weeks earlier the combined Canal
and Railroad force had numbered 88,505,
the second largest since the beginning of
the Canal work. The largest force from
1904 to 1912 was reported as 38,676
employees on March 10, 1910.
Some of the 1912-employees must have
been intrepid souls, too. At any rate,
there were some brave enough to put on a
baby show.
T-l I* i e -1 . . . . _ - _ ' _


:*






THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 7, 1952


Employees who o1


ties during the
alphabetically
includes all Gc


the ('anal or other


Canal
th (*).


William Coffy,


)served important ant-
month of February arec
below. The number of
vernment service, with
agencies. Those with


or Railroad


service


*William Jump, Timekeeper, Industrial
Bureau.
42 YEARS


W. P. Quinn, Assistant Chief
Navigation.
41 YEARS


C. Cotton,


Printer,


Signalman,


I division .
Harry W. Peterson, Custodian,
bal Post Office.
30 YEARS


Locks.
Ethel M. Pitman, Clerk-Typist, Hospi-
tal and Clinics DI)ivision.
Ralph F. Schnell, Organization and
Methods Examiner, Management Division.
25 YEARS


Frederic
tendent, Dr
William
trator, Adm
Alton E.
Navigation
Gordon


k C. Atkinson, Shops Superin-
edging D)ivision.
D. Hardie, Records Adminis-
linistrative Branch.
Jones, Chief Towboat Engineer,
Division.
F. Kariger, Pilot, Navigation


1 division .
Rudolph D. Melanson,
boa Commissary.
*Earl E. Trout, Safety
missary division .
John C. Wallace, Man;


Manager,


Ga m-


Inspector, Conm-


eager,


Silver


Commissary.
20 YEARS
*Edward E. Bernsee, Jr., Clerk-Typist,
Commissary Division.
John I. Frank, Fleet Machinist, D)redg-
ing I)ivision.
Dorothy W. Montayne, Clerk-Steno-
grapher, Industrial Bureau.


15 YEARS


Henry J. Clancy, Wire
I)ivision.
*Conrad G. Didrickson
thon i)ivision.
Harold W. Griffin,
Hospital.
George R. Howard, Po
1 division .
Thomas B. Idol, Physi
Engineering D)ivision.
F. R. Johnson, Assi
Supply and Service Bureau.


man,
, Pilot

Clerk,


Electrical
, Naviga-

, Gorgas


Aliceman, Police

cal Science Aid,


stant


Director,


Earl M. Seagrave, Generation and
Transmission Supervisor, Electrical l)ivision.
William J. Tuttle, Auto Repair Machin-


7th-VFW,
7:30 p. m.


MARCH
No. 3857.


American Legion,
p. m.
9th-Pipefitters, 1\
9:30 a. m.


7:30 p. m.
American Legion
Gatun, 7:30 p. m.


The fo
those U.


allowing
S.-rale


ferred from one


Auxi


20th-American Legion
Gamboa, 7:30 p. m.
21st-VFW, No. 3857,
7:30 p. m.
24th-Machinists, No. (
of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.


New Cnristohal,


No. 6, Gamboa,


Margarita


Clubhouse,


iliary, P


list contains the names of
employees who were trans-
division to another or from


one type of work to another.
contain within-grade pror
regradings.


It does not


motions


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
.efldAi Wsll fr(mm Police Lieutenant to


oiler-
K. of

housec
Gatun

595,
Club-
Hall,
o. 3.


Auxiliary, No. 6,
New Cristobal,


699,


Margarita K.


VFW Auxiliary, Post 3833 Post Home,
7:30 p. m.
25th-Operating Engineers, No. 595,
Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. m.
VFW, No. 100, Old Boy Scout Building,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion No. 7, Fort Clayton,
7:30 p. m.
26th-AFGE, No. 88, Margarita Club-
house, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Auxiliary, No. 2,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
27th-Governor-Employee Conference,
Board Room, Administration Building,
2p. m.


APRIL
lst-Gamboa Civic Council, Commu-
nity Center, 7:30 p. m.
Gatun Civic Council, Gatun Club-
house, 7:30 p. m.
2d-VFW, No. 40, Balboa K. of C. Hall,


11, Balboa Lodge Hall,
Association, Diablo


Sheetmetal Workers, Balboa Club-
house, 9:30 a. m.
Plumbers, No. 606, Margarita K. of C.
Hall, 9:30 a. m.
10th-Machinists No. 699, Margarita K.
of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion No. 1, Balboa, 7:30
p. m.
11th-Electrical Workers, No. 397, Wirz
Memorial, 7:30 p. m.
VFW, No. 100, Old Boy Scout Building,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion No. 7, Fort Clayton,
7:30 p. m.
American Legion Auxiliary, No. 1, Bal-
boa, 7:30 p. m.
12th-Carpenters, No. 913, Balboa Lodge
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Pacific Civic Council, Board Room,
Administration Building, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion, No. 2, Cristobal, 7:30


p. m.


Sailings
From Cristobal
..-.-.March 7
-March 14
-_ March21
- _ March28
From New York


SMarch 5
... March 12
-. March 19
_-March 26


Robert J. Risberg, from Superintendent,
Atlantic Area Water and Laboratories
Branch to Assistant Chief, Water and
Laboratories Branch, Maintenance Division.
Clinton N. Bohannon, from Wireman
Leadingman to Foreman, Electrical Division.
Benjamin Suisman, from Carpenter
Foreman, Maintenance Division, to Con-
struction Inspector, Contracts and Inspec-


ANNIVERSARIES


ve irs


continio(i
indicated


THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR


47 YEARS


*Ernest
(Canal Press


35 YEARS


Pananma


Navigation


Cnsto-


Francis J.


, Margarita


Krause, Lockmaster, Pacific


p. m.
14th-Blacksmiths, No. 400 (with B
makers 463 and 471) Margarita
C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.
16th-CLU-MTC, Margarita Club
8:30 a. m.
17th-Electrical Workers, No. 677,
Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m.
18th-Operating Engineers, No.
Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7 p. m.
19th-AFGE, No. 14, Balboa
house, 7:30 p. m.
VFW, No. 40, Balboa K. of C.


7:30 p. m.
Machinists, No. 8
7:30 p. m.
Isthmian Nurses
Clubhouse, 7:30
3d-Carpenters,
Clubhouse, 7:30


March


Cristobal --
Ancon ..
Panama - -
Cristobal .


Ancon_
Panama. _
Cristobal --


neon _ _


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


January 15 Through February 15






March 7, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS
(Continued from page 11) strong and is
highly esteemed for construction and for
furniture.
Over 25 species of Cassias are being
grown in the Canal Zone. Most of these
have large, showy flowers. The most con-
spicuous species are the golden shower,
C. fistula, which line the Prado in Balboa;
the pink-and-white shower, C. nodosa,
which has masses of pink and white blos-
soms along the branches; the bronze
shower, C. moschata, with pendulant,
grape-like clusters of bronze flowers; cania-
fistula, C. grandis, which has delicate pink
blossoms giving the tree a striking resem-
blance to apple trees.
The royal poinciana, or flametree,
Delonix regia, a native of Madagascar, is
extensively planted as an ornamental
tree. It is large and spreading and not
attractive except when in flower, when it
becomes a mass of flame-colored blossoms.
An exceptionally handsome poinciana
grows near the Balboa Heights Baptist
Church.
The African fountain tree, also known
as a tulip tree, is the Spathodea campanu-
lata of tropical Africa. Specimens may be
found along Barneby Street in Balboa
and near the Cristobal Administration
Building. The tree is tall, with a narrow
crown and the large, dark-red flowers are
borne in short terminal racemes (clusters
like the common lily of the valley).

PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS
(Continued from page i4) Maintenance Foreman
to Drill Barge Master, Dredging Division.
Edward W. MacKenzie, from Dipper
Dredge Engineer, Dredging Division, to
Chief, Towboat Engineer, Navigation Divi-
sion.
George M. Sylvester, from Chief Tow-
boat Engineer to Senior Chief Towboat
Engineer, Navigation Division.
Allen G. Tuttle, from Auto Repair
Machinist, Motor Transportation Division,
to Motorboat Maintenance Mechanic, Navi-
gation Division.
Percy A. Lawrence, from Lock Operator,
Wireman, to Lock Operator, Wireman
Leader, Atlantic Locks.
Roy A. Hall, Jr., from Building and
Equipment Supervisor, Clubhouse Division,
to Drill Barge Engineer, Dredging Division.
John H. Droste, from Restaurant Serv-
ice Supervisor, Clubhouse Division to
Guard, Atlantic Locks.
David E. Dickson, from Control House
Operator to Lockmaster, Pacific Locks.
John E. Schmidt, from Lock Operator
Wireman Leader to Control House Operator,
Ii nfl:-� i-t 1 T ~ir^/*v-


Pitcairn


Radio


Repaired


PITCAIRN ISLANDERS will soon have a radio again, thanks to the work of the two local
"hams" above, Herbert A. Greene, Jr., left, and Prentiss C. Combs. The radio and an appeal for
help in repairing it "because radio is very important as we have no change here but listen to the
radio in the stillness of the evening," arrived February 12 aboard the Rangitiki. Its owne- is Floyd
McCoy, a descendent of one of the original "Mutiny on the Bounty" men wno settled the little
island which is just a speck on a map of the wide Pacific.
He consigned the radio to Robert Woraley of Balboa who has been personal shopper for the
islanders for a dozen or so years. In the past few months he has bought lace, lamp chimneys, oilcloth,
clothes, and dress patterns for them.
Mr. Worsley turned it over to the two "hams," who, working in their spare time, replaced 25
condensers on the batte-y-operated receiving set and obtained for it a brand new speaker. The set
and speaker were to leave Balboa yesterday aboard the Ruahine for the tiny island, just the size
and shape of Taboga.


RATES ON STEAMSHIPS
(Continued from page 3) visit here an
excellent thing for both commissaries
and commissary customers.
Considerable time during the confer-


ence was devoted to
situation. Colonel V
during the first weel
from February 18-2t
out-patient service a
(which combines the
former Ancon and B


the local hospital
ogel reported that
k of its operation,
, the consolidated
t Gorgas Hospital
operations of the
alboa dispensaries)


had handled 907 patient visits. Of these
413 were for U. S.-rate employees or
their families and 484 for local-rate
workers or dependents.
Another subject which came up for
some discussion was that of maintenance
of old houses which are scheduled to be
torn down in the housing replacement
program.
Bronson Powell, representing the Pedro


regular visits to the Dredging Division
town.
J. J. Tobin of the Central Labor Union
asked Colonel Vogel if he could use the
"good offices" of the Governor's office to
ask that a representative of the Internal
Revenue office be in Cristobal more than
one day a week, especially during the
first three months of the year.
Other items discussed during the
February conference included: A report
that all operations of the License Section
are now being reviewed-this in answer
to a previous request from representatives
of the Atlantic side for a permanent
license section there; improvements for
the night-lighting poles at the Balboa


stadium for the


safety of men working


on the standards; free swimming for
children during the Summer Recreational
Program; a brief discussion of a bill which
would repay to the Treasury-for use
in the Canal Zone-an amount equal





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


March 7, 1952S


oung


Zone


Learn


Two hundr


slight
throu
elders
43 at
Th
School
later.


ly in the
gh a cou
. And 6
Balboa,
e first l
l in No
Since i


Drivers


How--And


Why


ed and fifty-three young Canal Zone people, boys
majority, are qualified to drive automobiles today
irse of training which would benefit some of their
1 others, 18 of them in Cristobal High School and
are in the process of learning.
ocal drivers' class was started at Balboa High
vember 1949. Cristobal began its course a year


)


he school


those used in many U. S. scho
prepared by the American A
dents have classes at school;
direction of a parent or other
lesson sheets coordinated with
At first the students had to
traffic regulations were chang
licensed if they have complete


LEARNERS' PERMITS come first. Leona Hart, Balboa High School senior,
who posed for this series, gets her test from Police Officer John F. McDowell.
Paul Stewart is license examiner in Cristobal.


no dual control automo
ols, the course is based o
automobile Association.
road practice is done u
adult sponsor, working fr
the class work.
be at least 18 years old.


-
IB-



on

a
-
-a
0>^


'biles like
n lessons
The stu-
Lnder the
om home


In 1950


and 17-year-olds may now be
the drivers' training program


successfully.
The parent sponsors are required to attend the class's first
meeting and also are usually present at the stopping demonstra-
tion given to each group by the C. Z. Police.
The course consists of 10 weekly class and driving lessons,
plus a visit to the Magistrate's court, a bumper-detonator
(stopping) test and other demonstrations. The student first
learns to identify various parts of the car while lessons in back-
ing, parking, driving in traffic, etc., come later.
By the end of the course the student has learned not only the
hows but also the whys of car operation.
The Canal Zone police believe that the drivers' courses have
had a healthy effect on the driving habits of this young group.
A survey is now being made to verify or disprove this belief.


HIfERE'S A GEAR, Instructor Paul Kuyoth tells Leona in a class session. Noel
(ibson does the teaching for CristobaliHigh School. Class periods are divided
between instruction and discussion.


r- ** " -.


THAT'S RUBBER, Sgt. E. C. Fishbough shows Leona. The police car laid
S- t 'I ,, t* i f *I1


t