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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00097
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: February 1952
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00097
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text
I-176t .


(c, 'N>


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


CANAL


Vol. 2, No. 7 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, FEBRUARY 1, 1952 5 cents


CANAL


COMPANY


TO


GO


ON


BREAK


EVEN


BASIS


WITH


FUNDAMENTAL


CHANGES


FISCAL


STATUS


Demolition Program


Slowed By


Cocoli


Transfer

Townsite


The demolition of quarters in connec-
tion with the Canal Company's construc-
tion program is expected to slow down to
a walk and many householders who have
been notified to be prepared to move may
have an extra year or two in their present
quarters.
No large-scale demolition is now ex-
pected for at least two years and prior to
that only scattered houses will be torn
down as they become vacant and can be
spared, according to H. L. Donovan,
Community Services Director.
The transfer of the Third Locks town
of Cocoli to the Navy is one of the princi-
pal factors in slowing down the demolition
program on the Pacific side. Although a
relatively small percentage of family and
bachelor quarters there were assigned to
Canal personnel, the town, with 356
family apartments, 24 bachelors' apart-
menrits, and 160 bachelor rooms, would
have provided a large reservoir during


the construction program.
Quarters on the Atlantic s
ently in short supply and t
there will not be eased until c
new houses this year. The
the Pacific side is somewh
While there are sufficient


ide are pres-
the situation
completion of
situation on
at different.
Quarters for


A realignment of Panama Canal Company activities into three main categories-
Canal, Service, and Commercial- and the adoption of a new formula for the apportion-
ment of Canal Zone Government costs are the most significant developments in the
Company's fiscal affairs since its incorporation last July.
The two changes, embodied in the President's budget to Congress last week,


are of major interest to the Can
others, as they will vitally affect
The new policies governing thi
pany's financial operations were ap
late last year by the President an
reviewed by the Board of Direc
the meeting here last month. Regu
precluded announcement of the pi
changes until they were made pi
the President's budget message.


al Con
rate str
e Cornm-
)proved
d were
tors at
nations
proposed
iblic in


"Break-Even" Basis
Of more immediate interest to employ-
ees and other buyers of goods and services
from the Company is that the Panama
Canal Company, in accordance with in-
structions from the Bureau of the Budget,
will be placed on a "break even" basis
effective March 1. This action results
from the application of the two funda-
mental changes to the Company's budgets
for this fiscal year and for the 1953 fiscal
year. Both were revised accordingly.
Up to now the Company has been
operating at a deficit, principally in the
commercial units. This was due to the


ipany's "customers,
"uctures.


" whether employees or


decision of the Board of Directors last
June to delay rate changes until more
definite information could be obtained


under actual
The budge
does not pro
cits incurred
of this fisca
months. Ho
for the last f
and next fis
sufficient to
next March
corporation
curred in one


operating conditions.
?t revision for this fiscal
vide for the recovery of
during the first eight mo
1 year during the last
wever, the increased reve
our months of this fiscal
cal year are estimated t


me
1.
Ac1
y


et operating expenses after
The Panama Canal In-
t provided that deficits in-
ear be covered by earnings


in subsequent years unless forgiven by act
of Congress.
Chart Is Shown
The accompanying chart at the bottom
of this page shows the principal units or
operations in each of the main categories.
Under the original alignment of functions
all of the units now in the Services group,
with the exception of quarters, were in
the commercial column. Also previously
listed as a commercial activity was the
Industrial Bureau which is now in the
Canal Activities group.
The basic premise of the new division of
activities is that the operation of the
waterway would require not only those
units listed in Canal Activities but also
the services rendered by units in the Ser-
vice category. Since these services are


I


* The 1953 Panama Canal Company and
Canal Zone Government budget in
figures and understandable language-
See Page 6.
* What the Board of Directors did at the
meeting here-See pictures on Pages 12
and 13 and story on Page 12.
* The Panama Canal-the world's best
lighted waterway. Read how it's done
by the Aids to Navigation Division men.
See Pages 10 and 11.
* A new feature, Commissary Talk, with
chatty, useful information about what
goes on and what is being sold in the
Commissaries-See Page 9.
* The Boy Scouts, a special February


I





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1, 1952


Boy


Scouts


In


The


Canal


Zone


Celebrate


42d A
Remember Little Black Sambo? He ate
109 pancakes, all by himself, because he
was so hungry.
SIe would have fitted well with the Boy


Scouts of the Canal
Mateo Cubillo-'
never starts pancake
the Scout Camp, E
400 in reserve. And
kitchen crew have
going for at least an
To be sure, Cub
boys, average age a


Zone.
'Cubi" to the boys-
s out of his kitchen at
l Volcan, until he has
even then he and his
to keep production
Hour.
i is feeding some 50
bout 13. and a dozen


or so adults. And what a group of 'teen
age boys can do to food when their appe-
tites are whetted by temperatures between
50 and 75 degrees-or almost any other
time-is almost unbelievable.
When Cubi bakes apple pies, he figures
on half a pie per boy; the Scouts eat at
least four eggs apiece for breakfast. Six
dozen large loaves of bread are purchased


from a
morning
usually h
bread or
pounds o
large hog
boys anc


nearby
but bef
ave to
biscuits
)f beef.
are bu
1 these


German


ore t
e su
. Oi
Thi
tchei
are


hams and sides of b
big refrigerators.


bakery


every


he day is over they
pplemented by corn
ne dinner means 60
ree beeves and one
red monthly for the
in addition to the
acon in the camp's


Milk and vegetables, in quantities, are
obtained in the Volcan area for campers.
The sole camp restriction on food is that
the boys must eat everything on their
plates; they may have as many servings
as they want.
They Need Food!
Food consumption like that of the boys,
though, is about what one would expect
of a group of energetic young men-in-the-
making who get up at 6 a. m., police the
camp and do other chores, and do about
everything-except skiing-that there is
in the sports line.
Located at El Hato, in Chiriqui Prov-
ince, Camp El Volcan is the pride of the
674 Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, and Ex-


plorer Sco
enrolled inr
this month
sary. The
1945 and
since then
Tfa niahl


uts and their 206 leaders now
Sthe Scouting program which,
, is celebrating its 42d anniver-
camp opened in the summer of
has been operating every year
on its 82-acre plot of land.
k ohliinQ nswh namoI fnr a man


anniversary Of
check over the camp and make sure it
was ready for the four-week session


which opens this year on July 14.
Registration for the boys will begin
later. Each will be required to have a
physical examination before his applica-
tion is accepted. He gets other physical
examinations at camp, one when he ar-
rives, and the other just before he leaves.
Plans for emergencies will also be made
with the First Rescue Squadron. In past
years the Squadron has agreed to fly out
from the camp, during the daytime, or
from David, day or night, any boy who
might be injured or be critically ill.
Camping Not New
Like Boy Scouting on the Isthmus,
camping is not new. Local Scouts camped
in Boquete as long ago as 1924, going
from the Canal Zone to Chiriqui aboard
the tug Favorite. Nowadays they fly or
go by road. The 1924 campers included
several well-known local names; among
them were James F. Burgeon, Robert A.
Engelke, and Thomas Locken. Early in
1931 the Scouts camped for three days at
Alhajuela, up the Chagres River. Later


Fheir


Founding


in that decade the camps


several years itr
war years the S
Founded in 1
branch set up t
were a feature
Two of the fir
Corozal and G(
Late in 191
troops then o
granted a piece
a Scout Shack
own land and


Josta Rica
its campe
0 and with
t same ye
Early Ca
troops we
ona.


were held for
. During the
i at Rio Hato.
a Canal Zone
ar, the Scouts
nal Zone life.
ere formed at


1 each of the six Scout
n the Canal Zone was
of land on which to build
. The boys cleared their
built their own Shacks, of


lumber furnished by the Isthmian Canal
Commission.
Today there are nine Cub Scout Packs,
with a total enrollment of 354, for boys
from eight to 11; 11 Boy Scout Troops,
with a total enrollment of 201, from boys
older than 11; and for the 119 Explorers
in the older age brackets there are two
Sea Explorer Ships and one Air Explorer
Squadron.
Each Unit Sponsored
Each unit is registered with Scout head -
quarters and each is sponsored by a group
of individuals or by (See page 4)


CENTER OF ACTIVITIES at the Boy Scout Camp El Volcan is the Messhall, with its big
fireplace, long tables and benches. Here the Scouts stow away amazing quantities of food, watch an oc-
casional movie, hold their camp sings and make plans for the next day. Boy Scouting is a Community
Chest activity.


t ...u..s wr r I * I Wa __________________ - a. * - ~


r


l
L

1
I





February 1, 1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Finances, Q

Townsites,


quarters,

Discussed


At January Conference

Income derived by the Panama Canal
Company from Canal activities and com-
mercial activities falls into two distinct
compartments, Governor F. K. New-
comer told members of the Governor-
Employee Conference January 24.
Under the law which established the
Panama Canal Company, he explained,
any excess revenues from tolls-should
there be any such excess-could not be
used to reduce cost of commissary items
or charges for electricity or any other
item which comes under the commercial
activity.
The explanation, which had been made
previously in THE PANAMA CANAL RE-
VIEW and later in a press conference by
Assistant Secretary of the Army Karl
Bendetsen, came in answer to a question
by C. W. Hammond, newly-elected presi-
dent of the General Committee of Civic
Councils.
On the other hand, the Governor con-
tinued, the prices charged for commissary
items, or electricity or other purchases
from the commercial activities could not
be increased to meet any deficit in the
Canal activity should tolls not be suffi-
cient to cover the cost of this activity.
When Mr. Hammond asked where the
dividing line came between the two activi-
ties, the Governor referred him to the
current issue of THE PANAMA CANAL
REVIEW (see page 1).
The report that charges for some com-
mercial items would be increased was
not an idle rumor, the Governor said,
but the story to this effect had been
overemphasized.
He mentioned increases of two cents a
package on cigarettes and two cents a
gallon on gasoline and of monthly tele-
phone charges from the present $2.50 to $3.
No Grounds Charges
Offset against these increases, he told
the conference, will come the removal of
any charge for the care of grounds.
It has not been a practical arrangement,
the Governor said, to consider lands with-
in 30 feet of a dwelling as private and
those outside as in the public domain.
All land in the Panama Canal towns
..n4i �,^~ v,^ ,lv b n i r- n ni n v ltinn Ir Atnl- nvhj A


To
Special


The
emphasis is b


being


presently


to a supervisory training program. The ob-
jective of this program, initiated last August,
is twofold: to train and acquaint super-
visors in their work and responsibilities, and
to develop additional personnel for super-


visory work.
In furtherance of this
vices of Dr. C. Kenneth
Beach, a leading consult-
ant and teacher in the
field of industrialtraining,
have been obtained to
evaluate what is being
done and advise on what
can be done to improve
supervision within the
Company-Government
organization.
Dr. Beach is just con-
cluding a two-week period
as consultant on this
phase of our personnel
work. His advice, based
on his wide experience and


knowledge of the practical and
aspects of industrial training,
inestimable value.


gr


In an organization of our kind, no single
nioup of employees has the relative impor-


tance of supervisors on the intermediate
level. They act as a funnel for receiving
overall plans and policies and have the im-
mediate responsibilities for executing them.
On the other hand, they are responsible for,
and should be constantly aware of, the
working conditions and general welfare of
the men and women they supervise.
I have constantly stressed to the various
Bureau and Division heads the importance
of selecting capable supervisors and as-
sisting them to gain a thorough under-
standing of the purposes of basic policies or
plans they are called upon to execute. Each
supervisor should comprehend not only the
value of the work he oversees, but its relation-
ship to the whole pattern of Canal activities.
It is only with this understanding that a
supervisor can faithfully transmit to those


be increased.
Governor Newcomer said that he had
no knowledge of a rumor presented by
Rufus Lovelady, president of Lodge No.
14 of the A.F.G.E., to the effect that items
selling in the commissaries at prices below
the list nriep of t~h. naft ion-whip cnn-


program


ser-


whom he supervises the necessary confidence
that the work being performed is essential
and for the good of the organization as a
whole.
The human element in supervision is a
determining factor in whether a person is a


good or ab
or woman


ad supervisor. Generally,
who applies the Golden 1


a man
rule in


supervision makes an out-
standing success on the
job, providing other quali-
fications are present. More
often than not, it is the
little human kindnesses
which distinguish a good
"- from a bad supervisor.
One of the heaviest re-


sponsibilities of any su-
pervisor is the investiga-
tionand properadjustment
of any grievance. If these
adjustments are made ex-
peditiously and sympa-
thetically, there is seldom
cause for a grievance or


to go
y level.


beyond


the intermediate


people are emotionally unfitted to


Many


make good supervisors. These are as detri-
mental to a job as the supervisor who is
unfitted by training or experience. In the
final analysis, there is little to choose be-
tween the boss who doesn't know the work he
is supervising and the one who knows but
exercises excessive authority by abuse, ridi-
cule, or inconsiderate treatment.
The present training program is designed
to teach these and many other important
facts to the men and women who make up


our supervisor
any supervisor
to achieve a su
greatly by the c
available to the


7-7'


y force. I am confident that
Sor any employee who hopes
pervisory position can benefit
course of training being made
'm.



Governor


the Electrical Union meeting to the effect
that special income tax deductions of $150
a month per person be allowed as a com-
pensatory feature for Americans living
outside the United States.
The Governor reminded Mr. Saarinen
hif. t-ha Ahmini raftitnn hIQ Q hrFfl(I a bill


Employees


theoretical complaint
will be of supervisor




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1, 1952


Demolition Of Quarters Is Slowed
By Transfer Of Cocoli To Navy


Lunchtime


At


Balboa


(Continuedfrnm page fl supply is not so
plentiful that assignments can be made
to others.
New Towns Governing Factor
The building of the new towns of
Cardenas and Summit, plus the expansion
of Paraiso, will largely govern the demoli-
tion rate on the Pacific side. The residents
of Red Tank will be moved to Paraiso as
quarters there become available, while the
demolition of houses in La Boca cannot
be started on a large scale until the town
of Cardenas is ready for occupancy.
The first group of U. S.-rate houses
scheduled to come down are the old quar-
ters on Empire Street in Balboa. Under
the present plans these will not be vacated
before the quarters in Ancon have been
built. This is expected to be early next
year.
The first large-scale demolition program
of U. S.-rate houses on the Pacific side is
expected late in 1953 and early 1954.
Areas to be cleared then are the remaining
old-type residences in Ancon, houses along
Ridge Road, and a group of older quar-
ters on Plank Street in Balboa.
Balboa Flats In 1955
Balboa Flats will be the last extensive
clearance program for the Pacific side,
other than Pedro Miguel which is not to
be rebuilt. Presently, it is expected that
the flats can be cleared during the fiscal
year 1955.
The demolition program on the Atlantic
side will be coordinated with the building
programs at Silver City, Margarita, and
Gatun. The first big demolition program
on the Atlantic side will be Camp Bierd.
The houses there will be demolished as
residents vacate their quarters and move
to houses being completed in Silver City.
No wholesale demolition program is
scheduled for U. S.-rate quarters on the
Atlantic side. Houses in the various com-
munities will be disposed of as new
buildings become available.


Boy Scouts In The Canal Zone Celebrate
42d Anniversary Of Their Founding

(Continued from pagQe 2) an organization.


The Margarita Recreational Associa-
tion, for instance, sponsors the Margarita
Cubs and Scouts; American Legion Post
T-tv a_ * . 1 I -*,*


UPSTAIRS, in the School Lunch Cafeteria


AND DOWNSTAIRS, at the Balboa Clubhouse Soda Fountain


Lunchtime is Balboa Clubhousetime for
some 575 to 600 Canal Zone students five
days a week.
Saturday and after school is also Bal-
boa Clubhousetime, from the looks of the
Clubhouse; but we're talking about school
lunches, right now.
From 11:30 on each schoolday morning,
the Clubhouse swarms with boys and
girls, students from Pedro Miguel or Gam-
1. . , , . .. . ' >...r ... L . C n . n ^.r,.,'- ,v n


Chicken croquettes with cream sauce,
mashed potatoes, fresh string beans, rolls
and butter and fresh limeade; baked
meat loaf with onion gravy and mashed
potatoes, fresh turnips, rolls and butter,
and fresh orangeade; grilled liver steak
with onions, mashed potatoes, buttered
beets, rolls and butter, and fresh limeade;
or, fried fishcakes, with tomato sauce,
spaghetti creole, fresh carrots, rolls and
k11IrT/MO tV A~ $I4 nl . - t n1 *l *trl art'/





February 1, 1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


AND


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


THE SAFETY PROGRAM IN THE COMMISSARY DIVISION


As familiar as the Commissaries are to moved, but t


all Zonians, few know the amount of work
and planning necessary to put its mer-
chandise on display. Many items are
procured in bulk and are manufactured on
the Zone. The new trend in "self-service"
requires that more and more items be pre-
packaged in salable sizes. This trend is
adding more and more diversified activi-
ties to the old system of simple storage at
Mt. Hope. The old warehouses there are
undergoing many changes to accommo-
date this new trend.


constant sour


progi
of th
safe
help
show


ram


fo


e work
practi
elimin
that
caused
of kno
additi


ir
ers
ces
ate
abc
by
wl
on


oyees,


he human being remains
ce of danger to himself.
the education and trainiL
on safety consciousness ai
has been inaugurated
future accidents. Statisti
)ut two-thirds of all injuri
the employee's inattentic
edge or skill.
to accidents involving e
3 is a small percentage


11-
in


which customers are involved. The man-
aging personnel are constantly on the alert


The services of a
road, a large fleet o
a great many elect:
trucks are required
ment supplied and
out to all units on t
In addition to all
the retail stores, th
Mindi having some


steamship line, a rail-
f gasoline trucks, and
ric materials-handling
to keep this establish-
merchandise moving
he Canal Zone.
this at Mt. Hope and
ere is a large dairy at
1600 fine cattle and a


dog hospital. In Ancon there is a large
laundry and most towns have a gasoline
station. Each side of the Isthmus has a
refrigerator repair shop, as well as ice and
cold storage.


With
probabi
and it h
unsafe
injuries
can be
newer


so many diversified activities, the
lity of accidents occurring is high,
as taken many years of eliminating
hazards to bring the number of
down to a minimum. Machines
repaired, safety devices added,


machines


installed,


hazards


to prevent accidents
there are many thing
to help prevent them


of small
danger
they q
Bottled
tential
flying
various
always
It is
sary Di
employ
prevent


l1 children are
and if allowed


to customers, but
s a customer can do
. Inquisitive hands
always a source of
to roam unwatched,


uiekly get into unusual
I soda waters, any flavor
small bombs. When
lass can cause severe i
parts of the body and
the possibility of losing a
therefore the aim of the
vision Safety Program to
ees safety conscious - and
tion everyone's business.


trouble.
, are po-
dropped,
injury to
there is
rn eye.
Commis-
make all
accident


S* *


E. E. TROUT, Safety Inspector,
Commissary )ivsion


Hayward H. Shacklett has been trans-
ferred from the Commissary Division to
the Safety Branch as Safety Engineer.


P. H. Friedman has been appointed Safety Representative for the Supply and
Service Director and E. R. Albritton for the Railroad and Terminals Director.

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY-CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT SAFETY BOARD


ROLL


Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
December
HEALTH


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR
Civil Affairs.. .-.-------.
Engineering and Construction_
Industrial ---..--------------
Community Services --------
Health .--------------------
Supply and Service . .. .


YEAR


As the New Year starts off, the Panama Canal Company-Canal Zone Government
Safety Board is composed of the following members:
G. 0. Kellar, Chairman -------------Chief, Safety Branch


E.
D.
D.
F.
J.
Lt
4 F.
3 C.
3
2 E.
2 P.


1
a


Farlow, representing ...
Johnston, representing .-----_ Commur
. Eggleston, representing .. . Engineering and (
Baldwin, representing. --
Smith, representing...... ...
mdr. W. M. Vincent, representing ......
Hargy, representing .. .. . .. ...... . .
Dubbs, representing _
Albritton, representing . Railroad an
Friedman, representing . ......... Supply
y ~~ ~ r - - --ir *


H. I. Perantie, representing ...


Civil Affairs
iity Services
Construction
S- -Finance
.Health
Industrial
__ Marine
_ Personnel
d Terminals
and Service


Director
Director
Director
Director
Director
Director
Director
Director
Director
Director


- Executive Secretary


HONOR




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1I


1952


$13,750,000


ASKED


FOR


QUARTERS


PROGRAM


CANAL'S


$100


MILLION


BUDGET


FOR


1953


The Panama Canal Company and the
Canal Zone Government jointly will enter
the hundred-million-dollar budget cate-
gory next fiscal year if Congress approves
the two budgets as submitted.
Of the $106,400,000 budgeted, the net
expenditure will exceed $94,000,000 since
the net cost of Canal Zone Government,
amounting to over $S,000,000 must be re-
paid to the Treasury by the Company. Of
the total net, $19,300,000 will go for capi-
tal expenditures, $1S,500,000 for cost of
goods resold, and $11,000,000 for the fixed
charges of interest and depreciation.
The Panama Canal Company's esti-
mated operational budget for the coming
fiscal year follows:
Income


T olls -- . . . . . ..
Sales -f Commodities
Rents . . ...
their r Services ..
TOTAL ...


__ $26,915,000
24,S20,000
2,107,300
.20,346,700
. $74,1Si,l00


Expenses


Cost of Goods Sold
Direct Operating Ex
General Expenses.
Employment Costs


penses


Interest .... ..
Cost of Government
l)epreciation


TOTAL.


_ $1S,542,500
.... 31,606i,100
... 2,360,100)
..... 2,03S,600
.... 6,292,500
. 8,175,300
... 4,749,500


- $74, 189, 100)


Approximately two-thirds of the capital
expenditure for the Company next year
will be spent on quarters construction.
The principal capital items listed for
the three Company Activities are:


interest on the investment and amortizes
the account by depreciation. If the piece
of equipment has a "life expectancy" of
20 years, the rate of depreciation would be
five percent a year or 100 percent of the
cost at the end of 20 years.
How Housing Is Financed
The Canal quarters program will be
financed in this general fashion. It is more
complicated, however, because the cost is
being financed jointly by the Company
and the Canal Zone Government, and the
latter is not required to pay interest on its
investment. In addition, the Company is
borrowing $10,000,000 from the fund on


deposit with


the Treasury


Department


which was set up several years ago for
short term loans without interest. When
this fund is depleted, the Company will
ask Congress for an appropriation for its
share in the quarters program and this
will be financed as in the case of the piece
of equipment mentioned.

The Canal Zone Government is re-
questing an appropriation of $12,915,800
for the coming fiscal year, in addition to
an appropriation of $4,900,000 for capital
items. All but about $675,000 of the
capital expenditure will be for housing.
Of the operational budget, over $8,000,000
will be repaid by the Company and the
remainder represents non-reimbursable


Two


Zonians


End


items and income from such sources as
health services, fees, fines, rents, etc.
The Canal Zone Government budget


for the fiscal year
Congress, follows:


1953, as


requested of


Civil Administration ... . $1,019,800
Schools ..- - ...........2,522,800(
Police Protection ..... 1,442,200
Fire Protection .............. 481,000
Libra .. ... .. ..... 77,300
Courts..... . .. ... . 56,200
Highways and Sewers ....... 371,000
Hospitals .. a... ... ... 4,011,6(0
Other Public Health Services 2.160,800
Corrosion Tests ....... 102,200
Civil Defense ..... ... .. 30,000
Civil Intelligence .. .. 74,300
Contribution to Postal Fund ....... 370,000
TOTAL ............. $12,915,800
The capital items in the Government
budget for the coming fiscal year are:


Quarters .. - ..... . .
Roads and Street Replacement ..
Gamboa Bridge steel (mesh deck)
Water Supply Main to Palo Seco
Madden Road Rehabilitation ....
Equipment Replacement and Renewal- -
Miscellaneous, Minor ... .


$4,227,000
405,400
94,000
41,000
25,000
S7,600
20,000


TOTAL .. .. .... .... .---- $4,900,000
The Canal Zone Government presents
a government-type budget to Congress
and is subject to Congressional revision as


a whole or item by item.


It represents the


total gross expense for the year. Any
income derived by the Government's op-
eration must be returned to the Treasury


Long


Jeep


Trip


Canal Activity


Electrical Distribution System (LocksL.
Locomotive Cranes (Locks'.... .
Widen vehicular bridge over Gatun Locks-
Rehabilitate baffle piers (Gatun Spillway)
Aids to Navigation Equipment ....
Miscellaneou ... ......... ..
TOTAL, Canal Activity.. -. .


$960,000
600,000
177.000
130,000
111,000
135,500
$2,119,500


Commercial Activity


Commissary Division Cold Storage Ware-
house continued) .. . ---- $1,110,000
C('ommissary Division Equipment .. . 87,500
Railroad Freight Cars-- ........--. 375,000
TOTAL, Commercial Activity $1,572,5(X00


Service Activity


-- m mm- - m 's-r . m





February 1


1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Panama Canal Press
Mount Hfope, Canal Zone
F. K. NEWCOMER, Governor-President
H. D. VOGEL, Lieutenant Governor


E. C. LOMBARD, Executive


Secretary


J. RUFUS HARDY, Editor
ELEANOR H. MCILHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants
LETTERS TO TIHE EDITOR


Letters containing inquiries, suggestions,
criticisms, or opinions of a general nature
will be welcomed. Those of sufficient interest
will be published but signatures will not be
used unless desired.


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$1.00 a year


SINGLE COPIES-5


cents each


On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses,
Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after
publication date.


The main part of the


building was


social club until 1913 when it was moved to its present site and was used as a restaurant. The theater
part of the structure was originally located in Cristobal but was moved to Ancon in 1925 and made an


annex of the restaurant.


SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10


cents each


durii


BACK COPIES-10 Cents Each
On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk. Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.
Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to the Editor, THE
PANAMA CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights,
C. Z.


The theater was remodelled in 1937 and the entire building was extensively modernized
ng the boom times of war. When it was reopened then, it was renamed the Ancon Con


( enter but the name never became deeply ingrained in the
sed into the use of the Ancon Theater or Ancon movie hall.


in 1943
amunitv


public consciousness hich finally relap-
public consciousness which finally relap-


With a general slackening of business after the war and the clearance of a large number of houses
min Ancon during the past few years, the movie business dwindled so that the theater was closed last
May. Since then the various concessionnairs and the offices of the General Manager of the Club-
house Division were moved elsewhere. The old building had its last blaze of glory in DI)ecember when
the Commissary Division held its annual toy display and sale there.


being requested byhv the
Company for 2,800,000


bl)oard feet of seasoned Panama lumber, the
largest single order ever placed by the Canal
for local lumber.
The supply is being bought for the quar-
ters construction program next fiscal year.
The first deliveries are to be made within
eight months and the last within 18 months.
The order will consist of sigua, bambito,
cedro granadino, and cedro macho, all native
to the Isthmus. Bids will be opened Feb-
ruary 4 and bid forms and full information
are available in the office of the Superintend-
ent of Storehouses.

KEY PERSONNEL CHANGES
Several important changes among key
personnel of the Panama Canal Corm-
nfl flF . fl-t - . - .a - '1' 1


NEW PHONE DIRECTORIES


New Canal Zone telephone directories
will be ready for delivery within about two
weeks. The final touches to the 1952 edit ion
are now being made at the Panama Canal
Press.
The new directories will follow the 1951
pattern and will be divided into seven main


sections, which will include separate direc-
tories of private subscribers, the Canal


organization,
Force. They


r
Army, Navy,
contain all


and Air
the latest


changes up to the first of the year, including
those made as a result of the merger of the
Building and Municipal Divisions into the
Maintenance Division.
The same system of distribution will be
used as previously and the majority of
private subscribers will receive their copies
by mail. The price of single copies will be
$1.00 each.


ANNUITIES NOT TAXABLE
Welcome news to old-timers of the
Canal construction period was the
announcement early in January that
the Court of Claims had held by a four
to one decision that the so-called Old-
Timers' Annuities are not subject to
income tax.
A test suit was brought by Maurice H.
Thatcher, former Isthmian Canal Com-
mission member and head of the De-
partment of Civil Administration during
the construction period, who is now an
attorney in Washington, D. C. The suit
was brought in behalf of Andrew W.
Dewling, of Baltimore, Md., who was
employed in the Sanitary Department
when the Canal was being built.
The Court held that the annuities
paid for construction service constitute
a gratuitv and a "thank offering for


LARGEST LUMBER ORDER


Bids are now
Panama Canal


f 1 _ Ia


OF CURRENT INTEREST

























Another visible segment of the C('anal construction history will disappear when the Ancon theater
building, above, is demolished in the next few weeks. Bids for the two-story structure will be opened
late next week.


Miguel over 40 years ago and served as a


erected in Pedro




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1


1952


Versatile Atlantic
Nears 40-year S,
For a man with an unblemished 40-year
service record, Cecil A. Coleman, Baggage
Clerk for the Terminals Division in Cris-
tobal, came dangerously close to being
summarily fired a few years ago.
Only his keen observation and good
memory saved the day and turned the
threat of dismissal into a commendation.
The incident occurred quite a few ears
back when a cablegram was received from
the New York offices of the Panama Line
saying that the required death certificate
and other documents had not arrived
aboard ship with the remains of a deceased
Canal employee. It was Coleman's duty
to see that such papers were aboard.
"The purser says he did not receive the
papers and the transportation of the body
to Philadelphia for burial has to be post-
poned," the angry Receiving and For-
warding Agent told Coleman. "Now, what
have you got to say before I fire you?"
"Please cable the purser," replied Cole-


main,


"that he placed the sealed envelope


Side


service


Employee
SAnniversary


with the papers in the right-hand corner
of the file cabinet in his office."
The cablegram was sent and a shame-
faced purser admitted his error.
Passengers Want Help
While a little out of the ordinary, such
incidents are not unusual for the man
who rides herd on hundreds of pieces of
luggage every time a Panama liner docks
or leaves Cristobal. It is rare indeed when
some passenger, fractious and upset about
sailing, does not misplace luggage and
call for Coleman to help.
Coleman, a Panamanian citizen, was
born of West Indian parentage. lie will
complete 40 years of continuous service
with the Terminals Division, formerly the
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, next
August 1.
The old Panama Line ships were still
docking at Pier 4 in Colon when he was
employed in 1912 at $17.50 a month as
messenger boy. When the Cristobal piers


Low


Shu


Incident
)wn By


of


25,000


Chest


Rays


(tIL A. OLIM AN

were completed in 1914 he was transferred
to the new offices and promoted to office


helper.


Not long afterwards there was a


shortage of cargo checkers and he was


made a special checker. It was during
this period that the first two new-fangled
industrial motor trucks, now in common
use, were received and he was the first
local-rate employee to be entrusted the
use of one.


___ U - .- ' - * I-


Many Outside Interests
Coleman's versatility as well as his de-
pendability is demonstrated both in his
work for the Terminals Division and his
outside interests. Aside from his usual
duties in handling baggage, he serves as
interpreter in the office, since he reads and
writes both English and Spanish.
He has been the Atlantic Side corre-
spondent for the Star & Herald for more
than 25 years and since the advent of
radio on the Isthmus, he has become one
of the best-known program directors of
the Colon stations. Hie has been master
of ceremonies of one station for 11 years
and of another for the past five years.
He handles numerous community pro-


Tuberculosis


m


E






February 1, 1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


POROPORO, or Maximiliana Vitifolia.
Plant lovers in the Canal Zone watch
for the first flowering trees of the dry
season with as much enthusiasm as their


north
butter
of the
The
candid
part o
mn sor
where
Wit
white


rn relatives watch for the first
cups in the Spring. Already some
trees are in bloom.
Christmas tree, Calycophyllum
'issimum, began to flower the latter
f December and is still in blossom
ne places along the Pacific slope


some. Thefli
like (nearly
clusters. On
the flowers
rounded, cr


lost common.
almost unbroken r
s it is both striking an
powers are in terminal c
flat-topped) pani'
e lobe of the calyx in
is expanded into a
eamy-white, leaf-like


The heavy, strong, fine-grained
used for many purposes and
known as Lemon Wood.
The Gallito, Erythrina glauca, i
the abundant trees of Panama. I
to flower in January. The large
flowers represent small roosters'


hence the name.


nass of
d hand-
*orymb-
cles or
some of
broad,
blade.
wood is
is best

s one of
t began
orange
heads-


I
a1


The trees are commonly


planted and several good spec
be seen along the bank of the (
northeast end of the Pedro Mi
Already in flower are two ot
trees: The Jordan, Belotia
and Poroporo, Cochlospermum
The Belotias are common
and there are several handsome


on An(
violet
cymes


con Hill.
petals an
(clusters


* ** * 1 � *


cimens may
Canal at the
Lguel Locks.
her striking
panamensis,
vitifo lium.
forest trees
e specimens


The small flowers with
d pink sepals, borne in
similar to those of the
* r - * -


Most everyone south of the Tropic of
Cancer knows that the cattle sold on thei
Chicago, D)allas, and Denver markets isn't
the only beef that turns up at dinner as steak,
roast, or hamburger. And as for Commissary
customers, they seem to have forgotten that
kind exists.
The Commissaries sell both I'nited States
and "native" beef, but in
Over The proportions of about 99.99
Meat to .01 in favor of the local
Counter product. The reason is simple
cents-and dollars.
Porterhouse choice steak from local beef
costs 48 cents a pound; the same cut from
choice grade beef from the United States--
the only U. S. grade sold by the Commis-
saries-is $2.02, or about $4.00 for one steak.
And the price spread on other cuts is about
as terrifying.
The native beef is also sold chilled-not
frozen, as the States beef has to be for the
long trip to the Canal Zone. The sale of
chilled native beef is still comparatively
new; Commissary customers bought that
frozen too until about six months ago.
The native beef now in the stores comes


from Chiriqui F
rigid specificat
chased-no cow
must weigh front
hoof-the cream
Commissary
know about suc
the native beef


province and is bought under
ions. Only steers are pur-
s, bulls, stags, etc.-and they
m 800 to 1200 pounds on the
n of any herd of cattle.
people whose business it is to
h things say that, generally,
in the stores is roughly corn-


parable to commercial grade beef from the
United States. There, the grades run Prime
(bought by a very select few, mainly for the
fanciest hotel and restaurant trade), Choice,
Good, Commercial, Utility, Cutter, and
Canner.
Native cattle are inspected before and
after slaughter by a Health Bureau veteri-
narian and are slaughtered in the Company's
sanitary slaughterhouse under rigid Health


Biureal
Afte
chilled
animal
The
keep c
to-day
buyers
The
about
and is
where
Cho
busine
has joi
package


u


supervision.


'r slaughter, the beef is thoroughly
and is hung in sides to remove all
[heat and tenderize the meat slightly.
o -*
slaughtering schedule is arranged to
hilled beef in the retail stores for day-
sales, frozen beef for other large
and a small reserve supply.
meat is cut Chicago style-more
that in later "Commissary Talk"-
sent to the retail stores in quarters,
it is broken down into retail cuts.
pped beef, mainstay of the beef
ss and budget-minded housewives,
ned a growing list of Commissary pre-
ed foods. You can buy it now in the


form of minute or hamburger steaks of uni-
form size, all ready to drop in the frying pan.
The minute steaks weigh 2)4 ounces, cost
10 cents each, and come frozen, three in a
package. The hamburger steaks also weigh


The
around
Roquef
Cheese
History
found 1
Hle like
pled, an
it, etc.,
aged in


"real McCoy" comes from an area
the small town of Roquefort, France,
where an apocryphal story has it
ort the cheese originated with one
forgetful little boy, who left his
lunch of cheese in a cave where
he was playing. Much later, he
his lunch and ate it mold and all.
d it, the story goes; his family sam-
id liked it; others sampled, and liked
etc., etc., and Roquefort cheese.
caves, began.


Battery chickens-not run by, but raised
in-are sold by the Commissaries-freshly
killed and eviscerated. They are raised in a
business building right in the city of Colon
where they spend their days in wire cages,
never touching the ground or exercising to
develop muscles and toughness.
They were sold by the Commissaries some
time ago and customers liked them so much
"Batey"they ate the raiser right out of
"Battery" stock. Now the chickens are in
Chickens the stores again. They are killed
Back one morning, chilled, dressed in
the afternoon, and are on sale
the following morning. They cost 90 cents
per pound as compared with about 83 for
frozen States chicken.

Hand-cut lead crystal from the Brierley
Hill Glassworks in Staffordshire, England,
"glassmnakers for Royal families
Hand-Cut since the reign of Queen Vic-
Crystal toria." can be bought in the
Available Commissaries without fear that
it may be here today and gone
tomorrow. The two patterns now in the
stores, "Princess" and XWestminster," will
be available for years to come, the makers
have assured the Commissary DLivision.
The names of collectors and the pieces
they buy will be kept at Balboa and Cris-
tobal Commissaries so that gift givers will
know the pattern a friend has or wants and
the pieces she has already.

Pianos-in many styles and prices--may
now be bought on special orders
Hardware at prices that include actual
and delivery to your living room-for
Houseware 20 percent less than States retail
price. Managers of the stores
will tell you more.
More refrigerators are expected in March.
LONG curtain rods to match picture win-
dows in new Canal houses are now in the
Commissaries. They s-t-r-e-t-c-h from 48 to
83 inches.
Refrigerators that resemble a Fibber
McGee closet should be equipped with
Space Aisers, also coming to the Commis-
saries. Thev consist of six covered space-
cavtfn rit ic innt-nunore c nt rrmni/ In a trvr,


OUR OUT-OF-DOORS


it
h
bl


I




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1


Lighthouses,


Beacons


And


Buoys


Guide


Ships


To


And


Through


Panama


Canal


The Aids to Navigation people's claim
that the Canal is lighted "just like Broad-
way" is a slight exaggeration.
So far this enterprising outfit, whose
main duties concern all of the lighthouses,
beacons, and buoys which guide mariners
to and through the Panama Canal, has
not provided a single electric sign for the
entertainment of the public.
All through the Canal there is not one
single attraction like Broadway's huge
display which, advertising Bond's clothing,
spills thousands of gallons of water in a
never-ending cascade, or a Camel cigarette
sign where a tremendous figure of a man
blows smoke rings clear across the street.
But after all, electric signs like that


hardly are the Aids to Navigation's job.
Things like these are:


W
Carib
sees
Point
tower
miles
flash


ien a ship enters the Canal from the
bean, the first Canal light its lookout
is the flashing beam on the Tore
light. Set on top of a 100-foot
*, the light revolves so that ships 20
at sea see the beam as a five-second
followed by 25 seconds of darkness.
Coming Into Port


Two miles closer to Cristobal, or 18
miles at sea, the lookout spots the auto-
matic acetylene-gas light on the Cristobal
east breakwater and by the time the ship
has come within 12 miles of land he has
picked up the west breakwater light, also
operated by gas.
About the time he sees this west break-
water light, he can also spot the first of
the Canal's range lights, two fixed and
one occulting.
Occulting lights, which most people
think of merely as flashing lights, have a
longer period of light than of darkness;
flashing lights, technically, have a light
period equal to or shorter than the dark
period.
Once he has spotted the two break-
water lights and the range lights, the
navigator has an easy time, nautically
speaking. Hie simply steers a course of
180 degrees true to the lights and there
he is inside the breakwater.
The lights at the entrances to the Canal
and along the length of the waterway are
not operated by a time clock as are street
lights in some parts of the Canal Zone -
.. ., .\,,n.,.n r, l. w . m/ . .., n v * - ..V.. ni. t,.,' ,t I...1,.1


LIGHT from range towers such as this one in the
Gatun Lake section helps to guide pilots as they take
ships through the Panama Canal.
The beam of the light, of course, comes
from the reflector behind the bulb and


the tremendously heavy lens.
cost as much as $350 apiece.
The original plan for 1


The lenses


fighting the


Panama Canal was developed m 1911
from a study made by Walter F. Beyer,
an engineer detailed from the Lighthouse
Board in Washington. It called for the
use of range lights in concrete towers to
mark sailing lines on the longer tangents
and of side lights, buoys, and beacons to
mark the channel in the approaches and
in Gatun Lake. In 1913 Canal engineers
began to install a system of beacons


through the Cut.
These beacon lights, however, had con-


the west bank are red and the range lights
are green.
The Canal buoyage follows the United
States system: Red buoys to starboard
and black to port, when coming from sea.
A ship entering the Canal from the
Atlantic has red buoys on her starboard
and black buoys on her port until she
reaches the north end of Pedro Miguel
Locks. From there to the Pacific she is
considered to be leaving the Canal and
the red buoys then appear on the port
side and the black to starboard.
762 Aids Maintained
Altogether, in the 45-mile stretch of the
Canal between the Cristobal breakwater
and the buoy which marks the Pacific sea
terminus and in the waters near the Canal
entrances, the Aids to Navigation main-
tains 762 various lighthouses, beacons,
range lights, and buoys. The black and
white target markers along the Canal are
set up and maintained by the Dredging


Division.
All of the buoys, lighted and unlighted,


are replaced each year if they are in salt
water, each four years if they are in
brackish Miraflores Lake, and each five
years if they are in fresh water.
F. A. Boles, a Senior Machinist sta-
tioned at Gatun, is in charge of the gas-
operated aids while the electrically op-
erated ones are the charge of J. D. Tate,
the Electrical Supervisor. A record of the
buoys and their schedules is kept on a
big blackboard on the second floor, of the
Section's Headquarters at Gatun as well
as in a follow-up cardfile.
A little-known part of the Aids' job is
a kind of Good-Neighbor policy. This is
the construction and maintenance of
some 60 miles of small boat channels
through stump-filled Gatun Lake high-
ways for the people of the little lakeside
towns. Over these channels daily come
boatloads of fruits, vegetables, squealing
pigs, and cackling hens, which often make
the dav hideous with their noise when
they are unloaded at the dock near the
Aids to Navigation main office.
Outlying Lights
Outside the Canal proper the Aids to
Navigation maintains lights at San Jose
* .1 Ir ,T 1 r.-- - -1�





February 1, 1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


And outside the Canal Zone proper,
more than one distressed sailor has had
cause to thank the services of the Taboga,
the only seagoing salvage tug on the
Isthmus. This sturdy craft is stationed
in Gatun Lake so that she can be ready to
dash for either end of the Canal as she is
needed.
Taboga To The Rescue
The other day she got an emergency
call. The light at Farallon Sucio was out.
The call came at 12:25 p. mn. The Taboga
was into Gatun Locks at 12:40 p. m., on
her way out of the Canal at 1:20 p. m.
She bucked dry season winds and rolling
seas but finally reached the light, and put
a repair party ashore in a tossing row-
boat. The repairmen found that a small
leather diaphram on the sun valve had
failed. The defective valve was replaced,
the light relighted, the shore party re-
loaded and the return trip made-all in
time to get the Taboga back to Cristobal
at 9 p. m. the same day.
More spectacular of course, have been
some of the Taboaa's salvage operations


at sea. On such operations Capt. Floyd
W. Forrest, Chief of the Section and
salvage master, goes with the Taboga.
He went to sea when he was only 17
years old, served as the master of ocean-
going tugs and ships for a number of
firms, including the Merritt-Chanman


Salvag
for 195
to Nav


e Company, and was a Canal pilot
4 years before moving to the Aids
'igation.


Also aboard the Taboga, if there is
reason to think he might be needed, is a


diver.
Not long ago the Taboga was disp
from Cristobal to bring back to the
of Limon Bay the freighter Caribe,
fuel and, despite her rock ballast,
in the Caribbean.


watched
safety
out of
rolling


On the way to the Caribe, the Taboga
came on a two-masted schooner which
was cast adrift when her towing tug, the
old Bohio, sank 25 miles from the Cris-
tobal breakwater. The Taboga towed the
schooner into Cristobal, then returned to
sea to make connections with the Caribe.
More than a year ago the Taboga, then
at work laying a pipeline off the Nica-
raguan coast on a special commercial
order, was interrupted in this job to go to


the aid of a badly
the Oregonian.
The Taboga made
brought the lumber


listing lumber ship,

a tow line secure and
ship, so far over that
_._ _ � 1


BARNACLES crust the sides of a big buoy in Balboa harbor as it is raised by the Aids to Naviga-
tion Section's craneboat Toro. Buoys such as this, in salt water, are removed every year for cleaning,
repainting, and refitting.


A prime booster for the Aids to Navi-
gation section is Phifer Quinn, one of its
original personnel and now its Assistant
Chief. His first job with the section, then
known as the Lighthouse Subdivision,
was as a "lampist," or one of the men who
checks the electric and gas apparatus. He
had transferred to this job from a posi-
tion as wireman with the Electrical Divi-
sion in July 1914 after he had helped to
install the wiring and lights in various of
the electric aids.
All in all, the Aids to Navigation people
believe, what with lights and buoys and
lighthouses and beacons and with the
Toro and the Taboga, they are doing a
pretty comprehensive job helping mari-
ners reach and transit the Canal.
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the last of a
series of six stories on the men and DI)ivisions
who put ships through the Panama Canal.)


Ten


ears


Ago


January


Zonians were beginning to be accus-
tomed to living under wartime conditions.
All over the Canal Zone men turned out


Mail censorship rules were announced
and people became used to not mentioning
in their correspondence such matters as de-
fense, shipping, or the weather, and to not
using abbreviations or nicknames in their
letters. Two ship passengers and the vessel's
master were fined because the passengers
had cameras during a transit. Fines were
imposed for night parking on principal
thoroughfares.


Canal and Railroad employees were
cautioned not to talk about the work they
were doing. Regulations banning publi-
cation of shipping news were extended to
airline information. Tire rationing be-
came effective. The first sale of War
Bonds passed the half-million dollar mark.

With all of the Panama Line's ships in
military service, the Cristobal ticket office
was closed for the duration. Eggs, lettuce,
and some fresh vegetables reappeared on
local menus. An appeal was issued for
blood donors, whose names were to be
placed on a "ready" list, in case of
emergency.

A bid of $46,250,000, submitted by


t




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1, 1952


Many


Vital


By


Canal


Directors


Problems


At


January


considered


Meeting


Here


No meeting of its kind has been held in
the ('anal Zone since the days of the
Isthmian Canal Commission nearly 40
years ago which ranked in interest and
importahmce with the meeting of the Board
of l)irectors of the Panama Canal Com-
pany during the week of January 7.
The sessions, held in the Board Room of
the Administration Building, extended
over a three-day period and were attended
by eight of the thirteen directors. Officers
and directors attending were: Governor
Newcomer, President of the Company;
Karl R. Bendetsen, Chairman of the
Board; Lieutenant Governor Herbert D.
Vogel and W. R. Pfizer, Vice Presidents;
James C. Hughes, Secretary; T. Coleman
Andrews, Bernard F. Burdick, Edward D.
McKim, Maj. Gen. Julian L. Schley, and
Daniel E. Taylor.
Also attending the meetings were
Matthew Robinson and Peter Beasley,
Special Consultants to the Secretary of
the Army, who had accompanied Mr.
Bendetsen to the Isthmus a week earlier.
Financial affairs of the new Panama
Canal Company occupied a major portion
of the Board's attention. Other subjects
and matters before the Board included:
Rents; election of a Finance Director;
establishment of a Comptroller's Office;
realignment of Company activities; local-
rate retirement; Panama Line operations;
reports by Bureau Directors; capital
expenditures; income tax; and functioning
of the New York and Washington Offices.
The following summarizes briefly action
taken on these important matters:


RENTS:


The Board authorized


previously approved plan to increase from
100 to 150 percent the surcharge on Canal
housing occupied by personnel engaged in
any type commercial activity and a 100
percent surcharge on housing occupied by
personnel in any category other than
Government or commercial. It also ap-
proved a 100 percent rental increase on the
12-family, type 201 apartment buildings
in Diablo Heights regardless of occupancy.
FINANCE DIRECTOR: W.H. Dun-
lop, who has 25 years of service with the
Canal organization and who has been
acting Finance Director since last June,
was elected Finance Director and thereby
1 1 v pV * I ' <


PANAMA LINE OPERATIONS: No
action was taken on the question of
changing the northern terminus of the
Panama Line or changing the schedules,
but Mr. Pfizer and Mr. Taylor were ap-
pointed as a committee to study the
Line's operations generally and report
their findings at a later meeting.
BUREAU DIRECTORS' REPORTS:
Most of the second-day sessions were
occupied by hearing reports of various
Bureau Directors on the functions and
activities of their units. Each of the direc-


tors presented


charts


statistical


material showing comparisons of unit
operations during the first quarters of
this fiscal year and last.
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: Capi-
tal items of the 1953 fiscal year were
approved. A list and description of the
proposed capital expenditures for the


fiscal year 1954 were presented and several
Board members who remained on the
Isthmus after the meeting made an on-
the-ground inspection of the proposed


items.
INCOME TAX:


The Board devoted


much attention to this important subject,
and means of possible relief of the burden
on employees. No formal action resulted
in view of the question as to whether the
problem is within the purview of the
Company or the Canal Zone Government.


However, the Governor, as President of
the Company, was authorized by the
Board to discuss the matter informally
with Bureau of the Budget officials with
a view to developing a solution.
WASHINGTON AND NEW YORK
OFFICES: The Governor was authorized
to employ consultants to study functions
of the two offices to determine what
economies may be effected in their
operations.
Most of the visiting members of the
Board remained on the Isthmus for the
week following the Board sessions. Mr.
Taylor left on Wednesday morning to
keep a prior business engagement and did
not attend the sessions that day. Mr.
Andrews left the following day. The
Assistant Secretary of the Army and Mr.
Robinson, Special Consultant, returned to
the States on the Panama Liner sailing on
Friday after the meeting, while Mr.
Beasley, the other Special Consultant,
remained on the Isthmus for the entire
month of January and sailed today.
Board members who sailed on the
Panama Line January 18 were General
Schley, Mr. Pfizer, and Mr. Burdick. Also
sailing that date was Mr. Hughes.
Mr. and Mrs. McKim and their two
daughters are still here, spending part of
their winter vacation season on the
Isthmus.


S..-
15 J- Am


MANY CANAL OFFICIALS were at the Panama Railroad station to greet
the Directors upon arrival. Left to right: Major General George W. Rice, Health
Director; Governor Newcomer; Colonel Richardson Selee, Civil Affairs Director;
Lieutenant Governor Vogel; B. F. Burdick (back to camera); James C. Hughes
greeting E. C. Lombard, Executive Secretary; Lt. Col. Marvina L. Jacobs. Military
Assistant to the Governor, next to motor car; and James C. Marshall. Chief of
the Customs, Immigration and Postal Division, extreme right.


- - .*J





February 1


1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Canal


Company


To Go On Break-Even Basis


With


(Co lined from paq
Activities, such
supplied to all


Fundamental


in the Commercial


services


users


and goods will be


at rates sufficient to


recover operating and maintenance costs,


including


interest and


depreciation


Changes


In Fiscal


Status


capital investments.
No part of the civil government expense


will be allocated to this group.


Howe


with the exception of quarters, rate ad-


justments will be required in al


Service


Activities units to meet the new operating
conditions.
Loss In Quarters Operations
A loss in the operation of quarters is
contemplated because rental rates are not


set to cover interest.


However, expenses


of operation, maintenance, and deprecia-
tion must be covered. This situation will
be met by the curtailed maintenance pro-
gram which has already been inaugurated
so as to avoid rent increases on older type
houses. The loss on quarters operations
will be apportioned on the basis of occu-


panty


to units of


the Company


Government.
In determining the division of the net
costs of the Canal Zone Government be-
tween the Canal and Commercial Activi-
ties, the valuation of assets and properties
in each group will be an element of the


formula adopted.


In recommending this


basis, budget officials took cognizance of
the fact that some form of property valua-


tion is used as the basis


ARRIVAL IN CRISTOBAL meant greetings and renewal of
At extreme right, the Railroad and Terminals Director and Mrs. E.
informally with former Panama Canal Governor and Mrs. Schley.


of taxes for local


government throughout the United States.
The two important changes reflected in
the revised budgets for this fiscal year and
next in no way remove the financial obli-


acquaintances.
N. Stokes chat


nations imposed on the three


which are that


each must b


main groups,
e (See pae 18)


SERIOUS COMPANY BUSINESS


is indicated in the


expression on the faces


of Mr. Pfizer and Lieutenant Governor Vogel (right) the two Panama Canal
Company Vice Presidents, while Mr. Andrews chats informally with Mr. McKim
(back to camera). E. C. Lombard is seen at extreme left.


MORE SERIOUS BUSINESS


Andrews,


engages


the attention of Mr.


a member of the Board's Executive Committee and Mr.


Pfizer upon their meeting at the Balboa Heights station.


S S




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1, 1952


Forty


ears


Ago


January


Visitors included 110 members
American Institute of Electrical En


of the
gineers


who arrived in two groups, spent six days
on the Isthmus; Lt. General Sir Robert
Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scout
movement, and Mlabel Boardman, Chair-
man of the National Red Cross Executive
Committee. She spoke at the National
Theater in Panama.

A tnmoreu' was started to form a provisional
regiment on the Isthmus, similar to the
National Guard in the States. Directors of
the movement hoped to get enough volunteers
to form at least one regiment of infantry and
one mounted troop.


MI) AY b t e:nth l a dth e w sth ,. ,. '
M II)\VA1 ltwetn the old and the now wag the ( ristobal fire station 40 years ago. When this
photograph was taken in August 1912 motor equipment was on order to replace the remainder of the
horse-drawn engines. The "new reinforced: concrete building" hai just been completed.


Work
apace.


on the Canal
On January 27,


was proceeding
1912, over 77


percent of the concrete for the locks was
in place; at Gatun Locks S9 percent had
been laid. The first consignment of
towing track 60 sections of rack track,
each section six feet in length had
arrived for G(atun Locks. Installation had
been started on the east side wall.


Reclamation of swamp
C('anal channel and the
Miraflores to Corozal, uwa
the north. The lowlands


lands between the
Railroad, from
s proceedings fromi
were beinq raised


by means f silt pumped from the hydraulic
excavation s ith of Miraflire.s Locks. Else-
where on the Canal Zone advancing eon-
struection caused cancellation a rum distillery nearGorgona.
The Canal Zone was going modern.
Water from the new filtration plant at
Agua Clarn Reservoir, which supplied the
villages of Gatun, New Gatun, and Spill-
way, was turned into the mainr. Carts
which had delivered distilled water from
door to door ever since there were Ameri-
can homes, were dispensed with.
The Webb Motor Fire Apparatus Co. of
St. Louis wca* given the award for two auto-
mobile fire pumps and trucks at $8,000 each.
Requisition was made for the purchase 'fan


Boy Scouts In The Canal Zone Celebiale

(,nt ,inwed fr m page/ all Over the world.
International Boy Scouts


automobile tractor and supplementary pair
of wheels to he substituted for horses in
drawing the No. 3 Sil'sby fire engine at
Cristobal. It was to be capable of going 2.5
miles an hour on level road and 10 miles an
hour up a O10-percent grade.


Names were given to forts inside the
Canal Zone. They were Grant (at Amador


and the Fortified Islands) for
U. S. (Grant; Amador, for the fi
dent of Panama, Dr. Manuel
Guerrero; Sherman for Gen.
Tecumseh Sherman; Randolph
Gen. Wallace F. Randolph;
Lesseps for Count Ferdinand D
promoter of the Panama Canal.


President
rst Presi-
Amador
William
for Maj.
and De-
eLesseps,


TABLE 3


CIIARGES FOR DENTAL


TREATMENT


AT ALL DENTAL CLINICS


OPERATED BY THE HEALTH BUREAU


AND BY


DISTRICT DENTISTS


Salary Groups


(;rouips 1 and 2


1. I lent
(. )


2. lFillin
(a
(b)
() C
(e)
. IExtra
(a)
(10 )
(c)
(d)


ups 3, 4,
and 6


al X-Rays:
Single im . ..
Each additional film- --
( No charge to employees of the Panaima
Canal Company or Canal Zone Govern-
ment for diagnostic purposes at the
request of a physician, or on account of
injury in line of duty).


gs:
\Amalgam-
Porcelain (synthetic) .. ..
Gold inlay (not included in bridge)
Temporary or cement base _
.\crylic inlay . -.. . .
ic ions and Oral Surgery:
Tooth extractions -local anesthetic
Tooth extractions--teneral anesthe
Removal of impacted teeth, each_ -
Alveolectomy, partial . - -


tic -


1.50 to
1.50 to
5.00) to 1
.5i lo
3.o00 to 1

1.50
3.00 to
2.00( to
2.00


2.50
5.00 to 10.00
5.00 to 15.00
3.00


EMPLOYEE representatives attending the Governor-Employee Conference
recently requested publication, in THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW, of the Med-
ical TariT. The first sections were printed in the December and January
issues. The remaining tables appear in this issue.


inan ninuininessian






February 1


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


TABLE


3--(Continued


LOW INCIDENCE OF TUBERCULOSIS


(Continued from


Salary Groups


payc 8)


of the Canal


Zone Government and the Medical De-


Groups


7. ventures:
(a) Full
(b) Full
(c) Parn
(d) Part
(e) Lin
(f) Re-I
(g) Den
8. Oral Prop
editions:


upper or lo
upper or lo
tial denture,


ver, Vulcanite, each . .
ver, Acryliche, each_
Vulcanite- -


tial denture, Acrylic -
gual or palatal bar ...
base denture - --..


tture,


repair _ __


hylaxis and Treatment of Gum


I and 2


Groups 3, 4,
5 and 6


apartment of the Army.


program.


The Army has


installed two photofluorographic machines
and provides for their maintenance and
repair. The Health Bureau supplies the
films and personnel for conducting the


o 30.00 $40.00 to 50.00
o 50.00 50.00 to 70.00
o 50,00 30.00 to 60.00
o 50.00 50.00 to 00.00
o 15.00 10.00 to 15.00
o 15.00 15.00 to 30.00
o 10.00 4.00 to 15.00


To date, all employees of the Canal


The Bureau's Division of Pre-


ventive Medicine schedules
the examination.


the groups for


(a) Oral prophylaxis, adult, per sitting.
(b) Oral prophylaxis, children
(c) Gingivitis, treatment for, per sitting
(d) Gingivitis, Vincentis treatment for


2.00 to


, per


sitting .
(e) Pyorrhea, treatment for, per sitting .
(f) Sodium fluoride prophylaxis for preven-


tion of dental


cares,


series


of treatment


9. Root Canal Work:
(a) Devitalization and removal of pulp
(b) Root canal treatment ...
(c) Root canal filling
10. Orthodontia Appliances and Treatments:
(a) Appliances, each. _
(b) Orthodontia treatments, per month
11 . Miscellaneous:
(a) Treatments, pre- or post-operativw


sitting _
Occlusion balanced
Various minor operations __
Gold dummies on dentures ......
Re-cement crown or inlay
Re-cement bridge
Crown, removal of _.
Bridge, removal of
Anesthesia, local for cavity preparation_
Emergency treatment for relief of pain,
for conditions not specifically included


above . --
(k) Treatment for unusual or rare cond
not covered above .__


iti


(1) Professional visit at home of patient
office consultation -------


ons

or


1.00
1.00 to 2.00
5.00
1.50 to 3.00
1.00
1.00
15.00 to 25.00
5.00


2.00
1.00 to
6.00


Government,


Company


2.00 to 3.00
5.00 to 10.00

3.00 to 5.00
2.00
2.00
25.00 to 50.00
10.00


1.00 Ito
3.00
3.00 to
10.00
1.00 to
2.00 to


the Panama


Canal


and all civilian employees of


the Army have had chest X-rays made.
Last month all college, high school, and
junior high school students were X-rayed.
Other groups will follow and it is expected
that these will include families. Some will


be X-rayed


annually


intervals of two or three


others


years.


Richard L. Wright and Louise Goldson


take and develop all the X-ray pictures
and keep the necessary day-to-day rec-
ords. The films are developed at Gorgas
Hospital and interpreted by the Chief of
the Chest Service. The consolidated rec-
ords are maintained by Mrs. Tulia Pinilla
of the Chest Service.
Each person X-rayed receives a report


15.00


1.00 to 2.00
2.00 to 4.00
1.00


Estimated,
Health


Same


Iin approval
l)irector.


as out-patient
charge.


of his examination.


If the film shows a


completely normal chest, the individual is
so advised for his own assurance.
If the film suggests the need for a fur-
ther examination, this is so arranged. This


usually requires at


least another


X-ray


and in some instances means a visit or
repeated visits to the Chest Service at


either Gorgas or Colon Hospital.


indicated,


hospitalized


observations


When
i and


NOTE :


A unit is defined
tooth making up


as each attachment
a bridge or cast.


a natural tooth


and each artificial


treatment are advised.


All examinations


charge


are made


but the hospitalization,


without
when


Items 3f,
and Cana


i, j, k, and ll(c), free to empl
SZone Government.


ovees


of Panaml8a Can


al Conipainy


needed, is in accord with applicable rules


of the Medical Tariff.


Financial aid, if


necessary,


is supplied by the Canal Zone


Chapter of the


American


Tuberculosis


TABLE 4


FUNERAL SERVICES


Association with funds derived from the
annual sale of Christmas seals.
Started With Two-Fold Purpose


The program


was started with a two-


SALARY
GROUPS


Coffins,
caskets
and
urns


Lining
I and
E- sealing
Em^ of
Ialm- of
ialm- caskets
Sing for


Storage
of hodl4
in re-
friger-
ator.


Hearse


fold purpose:


1, To determine the extent


of pulmonary tuberculosis in the Canal
Zone, and 2, to find cases in the early
stages of the disease when an early diag-
nosis means an early cure.


Sinen nhiopriilnQiq ig n onmrnminiohlh


All Employees X-Rayed


- 9 1 --


.


,


I r


1





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1


1952


FEBRUARY


lst-V.F.W. Post No. 3857,
bal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion, P'ost No.
7:30 p. m.
2d-Track Foremen, No. 1
B & B Shops.
4th-Postal Employees, No.
boa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. nm.
Pedro Miguel Civic Coun


Church, 7 p, m.
Cristobal-Margarita
Margarita Clubhous
V.F.W., Post No. 7
7:30 p. nm.
V.F.W., Post No. 382
7:30 p. m.


New Cristo-

6, Gamboa,


Balboa


23160. Bal-


icil,


Civic
7:30 p.
. Fort


I ' ion


Council,
nl
Clayton,


Curundu Road,


American Legion, Post No.
7:30 p. m.
5th -Gamboa Civic Council,
nity Center, 7:30 p. nm.
Gatun Civic Council, Gat


house, 7:30 p m.
Teachers, No. 228, (
School Auditorium, 3:3(
6th-V.F.W., Post No. 40,
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Isthmian Nurses Assoc
Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.
7th-Carpenters, No. t
Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.
10th-Plumbers, No. 606,
Hall, 9:30 a. m.
Pipefitters, Margarita C
a.i n.
Sheetmetal Workers, N
Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m.
11th-American Legion,


Balboa, 7:30 p. nm.
Machinists, No. 699,
Hall, 7:30 p. in.
12th--V.F.W., Post N
Scout Building, Cr


American


Legion


I,


Gatun


u


Con mmu-

n Club-


ristobal High
0 p. m.
Balboa K. of C.

nation, DI)iablo


Margarita


Balboa

lubhous

o. 157.


Margarita

qo. 100, (
istobal, 7:3
Post No.


Clayton, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Auxilia
Balboa, 7:30 p. m.
Electrical Workers, No. 39
morial Building, 7:30 p. m.
th-Pacific Civic Council, B
Administration Building, 7
American Legion, Post No.
7:30 p. m.


Carpenters, No. 913, Balboa
7:30 p. m.
15th-V.F.W., Post No. 3857
tobal, 7:30 p. m.
17th-C.L.U.-M.T.C., Balboa
8:30 a. m.


1ry,


Lodge

e, 9:30

Balboa


Ild Boy
0 p. inm.
7, Fort

No. 1,


7, Wirz Me-

ioard Room,
:30 p. m.
2, Cristobal,


Lodge Hall,

SNew Cris-


Lodge


18th-Electrical Workers, No. 677,
Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m.
19th-Operating Engineers, No.
Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7 p. inm.
20th-A.F.G.E., No. 14, Balboa
house, 7:30 p. m.
V.F.W.. Post No. 40. Balboa K.


Hall, 7:30 p. m.


American
Gatun, 7


Legion
:30 p. m.
M -Tin7


Auxiliary,
It 1. . . Tr _t


Gatun

595,

Club-

of C.

4o. 3,


21st-American Legion Auxiliary, No. 6*
Gamboa, 7:30 p. mn.
22d -Washington's Birthday-Holiday
25th-V.F.W. Auxiliary, Post 3822, Post
Home, 7:30 p. m,.
Machinists, No. 690, Margarita K. of C.
tall, 7:30 p. m.
26th-American Legion, Post No. 7. Fort
Clayton, 7:30 p. m.
Operating Engineers, No. 595, Balboa
Lodge Hall, 7 p. nm.
V.F.W., Post No. 100, Old Boy Scout
Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. nm.
27th-American Legion Auxiliary, No. 2,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
A.F.G.E., No. 88, Margarita Clubhouse,
7:30 p. m.
28th-Governor-Employee Conference,
Board Room, Administration Building.
2 p. m.
29th-Blacksmiths, No. 400 (affiliated
with Boilermakers, No. 463 and 471)
Margarita K. of C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.

MARCH


1st-Track Foremen, No. 157,
B & B Shops.
3d-Postal Employees, No. 2314
boa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Pedro Miguel Civic Council,
Church, 7 p. m.
Cristobal-Margarita Civic C
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. n
V.F.W., Post No. 727, Fort C
7:30 p. m.
V.F.W., Post No. 3822, Curundi


7:30 p. Im.
American Legion,
7:30 p. m.
4th-Gamboa Civic
nity Center, 7:30 p.
Gatun Civic Cour
house, 7:30 p. m.
5th-V.F.W. Post No.
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Isthmian Nurses A


Post


Balboa

60, Bal-


mnion


council,
I.
?layton,

SRoad,


No, 3, Gatun,


Council, C
. m.
icil, Gatun

40, Balboa

association,


Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.
6th-Carpenters, No.
Clubhouse, 7:30 o. m.


February


Ancon
Panama
Cristobal
Ancon .


Cristobal..
Ancon _
Panama
C'qr4 oclhin) l


Ao)null-


Club-


K. of C.

D)iablo


, Margarita


Sailings

From Cristobal
_February 1
...... February 8
~. .February 15
.._February 22

From New York


.. February
Y_ February
SFebruary


"- I


Employees who observed important anni-
versaries during the month of January are
listed alphabetically below. The number of
years includes all Government service, with
the Canal or other agencies. Those with
continuous Canal or Railroad service are
indicated with (*).
40 YEARS


Gregor Gramlich, Master, Di
Dredge Las Cascadas.
Joseph B. Higginbotham, Motor
spector, Fire Division.
John E. Ridge, Boilermaker, Indus
Division.


35 YEARS


*Edward R. Japs, Assistant
tendent, Division of Storehouses.
James McKeown, Foreman
Maintenance D)ivision.


30 YEARS


Walter
visor, Elect
Homer
Division.
William
Division.
John H.


E. Benny,
rical Divisiog
V. Crooks

J. Dorgan,


Ward,


Mechanical
n,
, Sergeant,

Foreman, E


Lockmnaster,


pper
In-

trial


Superin-

Rodman,


.Super-

Police

electrical

ks Divi-


Loc


sion.
25 YEARS
Alva H. Cooke, Safety Inspector, D)redg-
ing Division.
Walter G. Laurie, Assistant Foreman,
Marine Bunkering Plant.
Anthony C. Maggiori, Lock Operator,
Locks Division.
Mrs. Gretchen E. Melanson, Commis-
sary Assistant, Commissary Division.
Marc Quinn, Chief, Management Divi-


s1on,
Ray B. Wells,


Clerk,


Fire Division.


20 YEARS


James A. Brooks, Storekeeper Checker,
Terminals DI)ivision.
Robert Cole, Clerk, Health Bureau.
Paul W. Colby, Architectural Designer,
Engineering 1 division .
John C. DeYoung, Gas Plant Operator.
*Elmer F. Forbes, Jr., Moving Picture


Operator, Clubhouse Division.
Carleton F. Hallett, Fireman,
Division.
Florence M. Peterson. Clerk-'I


Finance Bureau.
William F.
Manager, Commi


Robinson,
ssarv Divisio


y"ist


T I
Commissary
)n.


15 YEARS


Bruce A. Chance, Pumpman and
tor-Bulldozer Operator, Maintenance


sion.
Howard


L. Clarke, Jr.,


R


Diver, Industrial Bureau.
Matthew A. Gabric, Pharm
gas Hospital.
William M. Martin, Lock
Wireman, Locks Division.
Rose A. McGuigan, Voucher


bigger

acist,


Operator,

Exam i ner,


THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR


ANNIVERSARIES


13


1


s


1





February 1,1952


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Panama


Agencies


Predates


Canal


Opening


An important
liaison between
tomers. For t
the liaison men
handle the milli
which are not
transit itself. (
Zone agencies i:


Although
wasestablis
company of
offices in C
the parent
Isthmus dat
handled by
close to $6,C
In additic


P
hed
WV
rist
CO
e b
Pa
300,
n t


it part of any business is the
n that company and its cus-
he Panama Canal Company
are the shipping agents, who
ion and one details of shipping
directly concerned with the
)ne of the oldest of the Canal
s Panama Agencies Company.
anama Agencies Company
in 1911 as a direct subsidiary
. R. Grace & Company, with
tobal, Balboa, and Panama,
mpany's contacts with the
ack to 1848. Today the lines
mnama Agencies pay tolls of
,000 annually.


o the


11


$6,000,000, other payn
organization for cargo
sary supplies, wharfage,
to a considerable sum ea
Payments to Panama
supplies and service r
under the direction of
total $350,000 to $400,(
of course, is in addition


from


passengers


stores.,


shopping


payments o
nents to th>
handling, C
and repairs
Lch year.
nlan merch
endered to
Panama ,
00 annnalli
to the direct


in the R


f nearly
e Canal
ommis-
am ount

ants for
vessels
agenciess
*. This,
income
ioublic's


Oil, Lumber Handled


activities of Panama Agencies
handling of fuel and Diesel
n affiliated company, Arrow


Company, with
and Balboa. Th
considerable qua
construction finr
Panama. Steamsl
to practically ev
vessels handled I
The present bu
require the servi
three offices. T
Deisz, whohas b
years and has h;
with the Grace oi
New York, and


assistant, D
corner to the
June with se
ence behind
vice president
years. The I
tion of Arthu
license and w
at sea for th(


storage tanks in
rough the Panam
entity of lumber i
ms and lumber
hip passage can be
rery part of the
bv Panama Atenc


siness
ces of
he m.
een in


ad
rg


aultoi
Isthi
veral
him.
it of
Balbo;
r E.
hose
e Gra


iv sites
) emplo
ger is
Canal


Cristobal
a office a
s sold to
yards of
arranged
world on
ies.
f this firm
ees in its
Ubert G.
one for 11


I over 20 years of service
anization's San Francisco,
Canal Zone offices. His
n Mann, Jr., is a new-
mus He arrived here last
years of shipping experi-
His father was executive
the Grace Line for many
a office is under the direc-
Erb who holds a Master's
background includes time
ce Line.


The earliest Isthmian
Grace Line were with t
Steamship Company and
that time-W. R. Grace an
acquired an interest in P
they did serve to establish
in the affairs of commerce


this area for W.


R. Grace and


contacts of the
he Pacific Mail
were indirect at
d Company later
acific Mail-but
a lasting interest
and industry in


omoanv


C1 l1


A LANDMARK on Steamship Row in Old Cristobal is the Panama Agencies
Agencies' Balboa office is on the second floor of the Port Captain's Building. The
was built in 1931, 20 years after the Panama Agencies Company was established on
a direct subsidiary of W. R. Grace and Company.


Taboga Was Water Supply


During
property
mainly fo


this early
on Taboga
r supplying


Mail vessels. TI
water supply .
Panama Canal.
area was a U. S.
became a recreat
of the Panamani
Between 1911
Panama Canal
duties of the PI
were the hand
"Grace" lumber
the Isthmian Cai
and white colors
the same as the g


Line stacks.
Four of the
on August 16,
commercial ti
American-Hay
now handled
first shins w


period,


about


Island was a
water to the
)perty was us
the opening
r this same
il base and st
trea under the


and the Mi


1850.,
acquired
Pacific
ed as a
of the
general
11 later
control


in Government.
and the opening of the
n August 1914 the main
.nama Agencies Company
ling of vessels bringing
for the building program of
tal Commission. The green
on these old quarters were


reen


and white of the


Grace


vessels put through the Canal
1914, the first day for actual
ransits, were owned by the
vaiian Line whose ships are
by Panama Agencies. These
ere the Pennsvlvanian and


ssouran


Building. The
Cristobal office
the Isthmus as


and the Nebraskan,


from New York to the Pacili
shio of the American-Hawaiia
Sevadan, won the distinction
of being the 150,000th shio tc
Canal.) Another early transit
was made a few days after the
the Grace Line's Santa Catalina


(Anot
Line,
t April
ransit
the Ca
opening


Handles Large Percentage


Since


opening


of the Panama


Panama Agencies Company has consistently
handled a large percentage of its commercial
traffic. For instance, in 1918 approximately
20 percent of the overall Canal traffic was
handled by Panama Agencies.
During World War 1, the agencies handled
at the Canal all Grace Line and Johnson
Line vessels and many smaller lines, in addi-
tion to the many ships operated by WV. R.
Grace & Comnanv for the United States


Shipping Board.
In the next two decades,
Company steadily grew,
sentatives here for manv


Panama Agencies
becoming repre-
of the important


STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC

For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1939.


Other
elude th
through


s





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


February 1, 1952


Canal Company To Go On Break Even Basis


(Continued from paje IS)
a break even basis.
This means, in effect, that
eggs in the Commissaries
affected by any change in
Canal tolls.
Groups On Individual


Whilk
Comnme
stand o0
the unil
are not
for exa
some un
to meet
be offset
This
cance in
some ui
eIent ad
economy
share of
Unde
is not e
shipping
budget
The
Service
ments
amount
increase
fiscal ye
Revel
Activity


Sea(
rcia
n its
ts c(
reqi
mpl
mit f
all
t by
con'
the
nits
diti
y in


ch of the mai
1, and Service
own feet, final
omposinmg the
uired to do so
e, within the
ails to collect
its expenses,
* income from
edition is of p
SCommercial
are unlikely
onal revenue
operations t


on at least

the price of
will not be
+he rate of


Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All figures in long tons)
Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1951 columns indicate
relative positions in those years
PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC


Commodity


Basis


i groups -Canal,
s is required to
ncially speaking,
three categories
individually. If,
Services group
enough revenue
this deficit must
Sthe others.
articular signifi-
Activities where
to produce suffi-
or effect enough
o meet their fair


expenses.
r present operating conditions it
expected that the rate of tolls on
g will have to be increased to meet
obligations.
additional revenue required by
Activities to meet budget require-
in the coming fiscal year will
to slightly over $700,000. The
s for the last four months of this
'ar are estimated at $150,000.
nue of units in the Commercial
es will be increased by an esti-


mated $1,814,100 next year, and $400,000
between March 1 and July 1 of this year.
Results Are Estimated
These figures are estimates based on the
judgment as to business which may be
anticipated and to which increased rates
will be applied after March 1. There is no
assurance that the indicated goals will be
met and this condition is indicated in the
Panama Canal Company's budget as
transmitted to Congress.
Careful consideration was given by
the Board of Directors at the last meeting
to the bypes of adjustments in the various
rates necessary to meet the new operating
conditions and place the Canal Company
on a break-even basis.

FINANCES AND QUARTERS
(Continuedfromp ge 3) in matters of
supervision and who attended the Confer-
ence, was holding "conferences with a
great number of employees at different


Ores, various------- .
Lumber ..-------.
Wheat---------.-..
Nitrate ----. ----..
Canned food products
Metals, various....----.-
Bananas---------.
Mineral oils--------
Sugar ...-------_ .
Refrigerated food prn
cept fresh fruit).
Copra -----.. . . .
Coffee ----
Dried fruit ....-
Raw cotton -----
Scrap metal
All others . .. .---...


Total


Second Quarter, Fiscal Years


1952


95,533
66,016
44,176
38,963
38,368
7,517
779,083
4,616,237


1951
897,932 (1)
831,250 (2)
195,103 (4)
342,214 (5)
320,969 (6)
159,754 (8)
135,714 (9)
251,930 (3)
151,442 (7)
92,358 (10)
74,618 (11)
40,206 (12)
41,807 (19)
42,089 (15)
38,842 (23)
638,865
4,255,093


1938
524,191 (3)
671,973 (2)
217,658 (7)
306,890 (5)
303,166 (6)
179,591 (8)
4,911 (29)
665,884 (1)
302,617 (4)
64,079 (10)
33,454 (18)
33,884 (16)
120,664 (12)
32,369 (20)
1,928 (*)
920,582
4,383,841


* Not ranked in 1938-included in "all others."
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC
Second Quarter, Fiscal Years
Commodity -----
1952 1951 1938
Mineral oils ----------------. 909,773 416,682 (1) 287,537 (3)
Coal and coke--- ----------- 410,689 216,151 (3) 37,108 (14)
Manufactures of iron and steel 381,639 410,886 (2) 479,661 (1)
Phosphates---------------- 187,657 82,313 (4) 71,763 (6)
Sugar . .--------------------.. 124,311 139,782 (7) 971 (31)
Paper and paper products . 107,185 104,888 (5) 94,572 (5)
Raw cotton--.---------- ----- 98,985 82,597 (6) 18,155 (13)
Automobiles and parts. 97,693 62,271 (10) 81,751 (9)
Machinery ... ..--------.---------- 70,287 52,261 (11) 40,773 (10)
Sulphur . -----------------68,856 84,634 (9) 101,599 (7)
Tinplate ......-------------------- 67,395 48,019 (13) 54,507 (8)
Cement...----------------------- 57,850 45,757 (15) 37,256 (11)
Metals, various-..... -------------36,957 53,326 (12) 118,833 (4)
Ammonium compounds 30,964 59,646 (14) 15,806 (22)
Canned food products 26,810 32,924 (17) 38,451 (15)
All others-.-------------------. 922,321 782,257 807,657
Total----------------- 3,599,372 2,674,394 2,286,400

Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels
Second Quarter of Fiscal Years
1952 1951 1938
Nationality ~~ .~
Nationality Num- Num- Num-
ber of Tons her of Tons ber of Tons
transits of cargo transits of cargo transits of cargo
Brazilian . .....- 3 1523 � ....__ _ __ __
British--------- 297 1,871,704 258 1,677,177 297 1,447,720
Chilean--------- .. 11 50,899 11 57,079 1 6,127
Chinese.--------- 5 40,252 2 15,750
Colombian .. 25 29,926 19 17,263
Costa Rican .. 3 16,676 2 594 .. . . . .. .. . .





February 1, 1952


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Upset


w


world


In


Conditions


Canal


Traffic


Reflected


Of


Past


Quarter


Commercial


Shipping


Tourist


Season


Opens


Highest In December

Since Pre-war Period


Unsettled world conditions were re-
flected in Panama Canal traffic during the
second quarter of this fiscal year, ending
December 31, by fluctuations in ship


movement o\
trade routes.
cial traffic in
strike at east c
_ .LL 1- A1 - - T:


rer some of the principal
Factors affecting commer-
cluded the longshoremen's
oast ports in November, un-
1 - t IA -l Cl 1-i 1 ^


deleueu conditions at me Suez uanai, and
the disruption of Iranian oil production.
Commercial traffic through the Canal
in December showed an upsurge following
settlement of the strike with 550 transits
by ocean-going vessels, the highest num-
ber in any one month since March 1939.
December was the fourth consecutive
month in which commercial transits


exceeded the 500-mark.
The level of commercial shipping for
the first half of this fiscal year, as meas-
ured by net vessel tonnage, was 5.1 per-
cent greater than that min the corre-
sponding period in the previous fiscal
year. The gain in number of ships was
275, although tolls for the six-month
period were not correspondingly high due
chiefly to fewer large tankers in operation
over the United States intercoastal run.


TOURISTS, 361 of them, arrived in Cristobal
new Ryndam, to open the 1952 tourist season. The s
322 passengers, on her second cruise of the season.
Navigation Company.
Launched December 17, 1949, the Ryndam mad
Atlantic route. Second of her name, she is 503 feet o
tonnage of 15,014.91. She is equipped with radar ai
The Ryndam was built for the tourist trade and
a few first class cabins and public rooms. The ship h
lounges, two dining rooms, a Palm Court, a gymna
playroom which has a piano mounted on a turntab
An outstandingly noticeable feature of the liner is he


January 11 aboard the Holland-America Line's
hip put into Cristobal again on January 26, with
Local agents for the ship are the Pacific Steam
e her maiden voyage July 16, 1951, on the trans-
verall, has a 69-foot beam, and a registered gross
nd Loran and is air-conditioned throughout.
her accommodations are tourist class, except for
has eight decks and the public rooms include two
sium, barber and beauty shops, and a children's
le which may be concealed behind the paneling.
r specially designed funnel which is so planned


as to cause a "top whirl," which prevents unwelcome deposits of soot and ash on the after-decks.


Intercoastal Traffic Down


Comparative


figures


on commercial


traffic for the second quarter of this year
with that of the fiscal year 1951 showed
increased traffic movement over all of the
eight main trade routes, with the excep-
tion of the United States intercoastal.
The disruption of oil production in the
Iranian fields has resulted in considerable
gain in the tanker traffic through the
Canal within recent months, despite the
loss of the intercoastal tanker trade.
In the second quarter, shipments of
mineral oils from the Atlantic to the
Pacific were more than double those of the
corresponding period of a year ago. The
tnfoal shinmAntq fnr fhn thrnn mnnt.hl in


quarter of this fiscal year fluctuated
widely from the commodity shipments of
a year ago. Shipments of coal and coke
from the Atlantic to the Pacific were al-
most twice as high this year, and increases
were shown in phosphates and cement.
Substantial losses were reported in ship-
ments of manufactures of iron and steel,


ammonium compounds.
Variations in cargo shipments from the
Pacific to the Atlantic in the second quar-
ter of the two fiscal years were: Gains in
various ores, wheat, bananas and various
metal shipments, and losses in tonnage of
canned food products, copra, scrap metal,
and raw cotton.


MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC A
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


Transits


ND TOLLS


Tolls
(In thousands of dollars)


., . 1


,






THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 1


1952


Panama






.: ./ .. * *
*. 4
A" -:


Agencies







".
*I l ,-


Predates


Canal


Opening


crews


of several torpedoed


bv Panama


Agencies


tobaljlby the U. S.
Panama Agencies Ic


vessels


handled


Were brought to Cris-
Navy. The staff of
idged these seamen in


barracks at Fort Gulick, provided for medi-


services,


outfitted


the crewmen with


clothes, and took care of their other needs


until repatriation could be arranged.
At one time, there were at least 100


ves-


sels anchored in Limon Bay in addition to
those occupying all berths at the Cristobal


piers.
During this
home port for
stituted the f
the Pacific


same
scores


period Balboa


-a
I.. -

N�--
O, -

0
!CA,


was the


of tankers which con-


uel supply for the Navy


It was undoubtedly the most hectic and
exciting period in the shipping history of
the Panama Canal and the Panama Agencies
Company was handling as high as 25 percent
of the shipping activities of the Canal at


peak periods.


During the war


years


Agencies also stevedored approximately
750,000 tons of cargo for War Shipping Ad-
ministration and U.S. military cargo vessels.


(AGOO


PASSENGER ships like this Grace Line


"Santa ship" make weekly trips through the


l'anama ('anal from New York to the West Coast of South America. Nine of these n


ew air-c


onditioned


have been added to the Grace Line fleet since the end of World War II.


LOW INCIDENCE OF TUBERCULOSIS


(Continued from


has been inau-


continued d from page
tho>te represented


Iln S,


merican


Ilawainan Steamship


ship Co., Grace
ship Co., Ore Ste
Steamship Co. (
original Pacific
United States Lin


companies.


Among


were American President
Pioneer Line, American-


Calmar


Line, Lvkes Bros.


Steam-
Steam-


amship Co., Panama Mail
'a direct off-shoot of the
Mail Steamship Co.) and


The arrival


of vessels


innumerable problems


in convoys


created


for all the shipping


agencies in the Canal Zone as
Panama Canal Ships would
large requisitions for ship st<
dlery in addition to repairs w
be made.


well as for the
d arrive with
,res and chan-
hich needed to


Subs Sank Ships


Also during this period, a new head-
quarters building was constructed-in 1931,
in the heart of steamship row in Old Cristo-


bal. This building


office


for Panagra


a{s< .eca�e h frc ed


American-Grace


In 1942


the Caribbean


ground for Nazi submarit


stretch some 17


vesse


was the hunting
ies. In one short
ere stink between


the Yucatan peninsula and Panama.


gurated at Gorgas and Colon Hospitals.
Another important feature of the tuber-
culosis control program just inaugurated
was the employment of Melida Tack, a
specially trained public health nurse. She
devotes all her time to visiting the homes
of patients, giving advice in regard to pro-
tection for other members of the family,
arranging for special clinic and X-ray
examinations, and helping in the follow-up
of cases after discharge from the hospital.


.\irwxays).
service t(
quarters


After the airline expanded


SArgentina,


Panagra


head-


were transferred to a more central


at Lima, Peru.


CANAL


TRANSITS


-COMMERCIAL AND U


S. GOVERNMENT


Feeder Service Established


Som
feeder


e years
service


ago the Grace Line
for trans-shinment


set tip a
of cargo


to and from the oorts on the west coast of


Central America.
managed by Panama
Line and is compa
company within a st


service


Agencies


rable


has been


for the Grace


to a steamship


eamship company.


By this service cargoes are brought to the
Canal for trans-shipment to ports in the
United States, South America, the Carib-


bean Islands,


Orient.
from all


England,


Europe, and


On the outward voyages


over the world


Central American


Commercial


vessels:


Ocean-going
*Small-- .-..------


cargoes


are loaded for the


west coast.


W\Vith the entry of the United States into
World War II, the U. S. shipping industry
was taken over completely and operated by
the War Shipping Administration, a spe-
cially set-up U. S. Government Agency.


'otal, commerciaL


**U. S. Government
Ocean-going .
*Small _


vesse


Total commercial and U.


S. Government_


Second Quarter-Fiscal Year


Atlantic
to
Pacific


.046


Pacific
to
Atlantic


Total


1.596


258

1,854

152

84

2,090


1951

Total


1,378

219


Total


1.335


* Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
** Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.


ft-- V.1*


vessels


.
. .
. .


m