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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00094
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: November 1951
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00094
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


CANAL


=


Vol. 2, No. 3 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, NOVEMBER 2, 1951 5 cents


FLUORIDATION


OF


CANAL


ZONE


WATER


TO


BEGIN


SOON


AFTER


THE


FIRST


OF


THE


COMING


YEAR


Canal


Officials A
Disaster


Attend
Contr


Army
ol Exercise


Supply
Zone,


Will


Pan.


Serve
ima, Colon


The use o
as a partial
begin early
A year's
ordered and
flobres and
will begin si
necessary c
January.
The cost
approximate
mill per the
Water so
population
of Colon an
urbs as far
Approval
local water
experiment


f fluoride in Canal Zone
control for dental deca
in the coming calendar
supply of fluoride has
its use in water at the
Mount Hope filtration
shortly after the arrival
chemicals, probably by


of the fluoi
ily $12,000 r
usand gallon
treated will
of the Canal
d Panama C
is Juan Diaz.


of the
supply
byE.


the Municipal Divi
oratories Branch, ai
staff as to what ch
suited for Isthmian


OBSERVERS AND ADVISERS at the engineering table for the recent Army exercise were three
Panama Canal Division Chiefs. Frank Lerchen, Municipal Engineer, center, facing the camera, is look-
ing over the situation map. Facing him is Harry Metzler of the Building Division, while J. B. Smith, of


the Electrical Division, has his back to the camera, f
Bureau and Division Chiefs of the Pan-
ama Canal Company and Canal Zone
Government whose organizations would
* * * . I . 1 .1 i


ing, and care of refugees from such
disaster.
Colonel Mial explained that it is
. . .. 1 ii J1 1 i 1 I | '1 1


ment of the me
ing thehe chemic
Of the $5,001
experiments t(
type of chemic
of applying it
tion, sufficient
cost of manufa
ing the small
quired for the
The method
i' 1- *1'


* 1


Sautt
o det
ial to
and
fund


water
y will
year.
been
Mira-
plants
of the
mid-


ridation wil
ier year, or
s of water.
serve the er
Zone, plus
ity and its


use of fluoride in the
concluded months of
W. Zelnick, Chief of
sion's Water and Lab-
nd by members of his
emicals would be best
use and the develop-
litable method of add-
the water.
horized to conduct the
ermine the particular
be used, the method
the point of applica-
s are left to cover the


cturing locally an
amount of equip
fluoridation.
to be used calls fi
I - i 1 * 1


d install-
)ment re-
or the use
1i


1 a





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 2, 1951


New


ousin


A


RE VIEW


Preview


Ten new housing designs for U. S.-rate


quarters have been
being developed by
sion for construction
meant housing areas
designs are revision
to three of the mi
cently built in Dia


approved and are now
the Engineering Divi-
n in new and replace-
. Included in the ten
ns and improvements
ore popular types re-


On the other end of the living space is
the service wing, which consists of kitchen
maid's toilet, storage space, a clothes dry-
ing area, and a car-port. The plan for this
type is illustrated below. This general
scheme is also adapted to three-bedroom
single apartments and two-bedroom two-
family houses.









DINING
* * ^

CAR PoUaT


Sa
. t


*n~iMntaSMnl QW~tiTOMCl
ARCH yURv*AL
SeeamihE4t4r or4i0�0*
*BHIBC-B-^ Bt^


WITH THE addition of new designs to the Housing Project, employees will have the choice of eleven
masonry and six composite off-the-ground types. Above is one of the smaller 3-bedroom houses with several
new features. The lower plan is another new type, providing outdoor living space on a covered terrace.


7 .-. --if -


large covered


porch


opening from


living room area, covered service space,
and a collapsible partition between two
small bedrooms which may be opened to
permit this space to be used as one extra-
large bedroom. The plan and elevation of
this house is illustrated to the left, above.
Another three-bedroom house has the
living and dining space combined for
thorough circulation of air. In this house,
however, the dining space is in an alcove
at one side. The bedroom wing has two
small and one large bedrooms and two
baths. The kitchen can be reached from
the car-port. The car-port and the cov-
ered service area are somewhat larger
than in earlier types.
Quarters in the four-bedroom group are
a modification of the three-bedroom
"breezeway" houses recently built in
Diablo.
Some innovations, such as the use of
natural-finished native woods, for exposed
ceilings in living rooms and other suitable
spaces, and the possible use of some cer-
amic materials are proposed.
Canal Zone housing, the designers point
out, is too often thought of only in terms
of arrangement, size, and appearance of
rooms.
These are, of course, the ultimate object
of the designs, but costs cannot be ignored
especially since in any housing project
these costs are reflected eventually in
rents paid by the individual occupying
the quarters.
In some of the new houses, the design-
ers have reduced the area to keep rentals
within the financial limits of the average
Canal Zone employee.
Several of the newly approved quarters
have been reduced in size for this reason.
This is particularly true of some of the
three-bedroom types and special thought
has been given to providing some "min-
imum-standard" houses to fit the needs
of the younger employees living on a re-
stricted budget with younger, growing
families.


FLUORIDATION OF C. Z. WATER
Continued from page 1) device consists
of a drum holder, mounted on a horizontal
rotating axis inside a small, dust-proof
- . . - I 1, i I


GRfAPMIC SAct





November 2,1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Office Management

Course At College
Draws 39 Isthmians

Twenty-three employees of the Panama
Canal Company are being trained in
office management in a 17-week course
which is being given at the Canal Zone
Junior College. The Canal employees are
a majority of the 39 students who enrolled
for the 34-hour course.
Statistics compiled by Richard R. Saul,
of the Accounting Policies Division, Office
of the Comptroller for the U. S. Army
Caribbean, instructor for the course, show
that the Canal Company enrollees predom-
inate in the middle-age bracket of the stu-
dents taking the office management course.
The main objective of the course is to
give an over-all view of the entire field
of office management, with the idea that
those taking the course will develop
enough interest in their own special fields
to continue in further specialization.
Mr. Saul is conducting the course in
the forum-seminar type of teaching, to
bring forward as much class discussion as
possible.
He plans to use such visual aids as flow
and distribution charts and task analyses
and will bring in outside speakers when
it is possible.
During the 17 weeks the course is in
progress the students will cover such sub-
jects as: forms and form designs, work
simplification, organization, administra-
tion and management, office layouts, busi-
ness machines, and work measurements
and supervision.
Meets Twice Weekly
The class is meeting twice weekly,
Monday and Thursday evenings, at the
Junior College building in Balboa.
Ten of the Canal Company's employee-
students are between 30 and 40 years of
age, 12 are in the 40-50 year age bracket,
and the other is over 50.
Daytimes they work in the Health,
Personnel, or Finance Bureaus, the Store-
houses, Terminals, Electrical, Locks, or
Housing Divisions, the Records or the
License Sections.
Taking the class as a whole, 10 of the
students are women. Seven of the 39 are
from the Air Force, one from the Navy,
throo frnm the Army nno wunrkira in nri-


Pay


Raises


, Income Tax, Houses
At Employees Conference


No consideration is being given to
closing the Gamboa shops, Governor
F. K. Newcomer told the Governor-
Employee Conference August 26. The
Governor's statement came as an answer
to a question raised by Walter Wagner of
the Central Labor Union-Metal Trades
Council.
The conference, which lasted beyond
the usual adjournment time, took up sub-
jects which ranged from housing assign-
ments, the date on which employees
would receive the pay increases recently
authorized by Congress, dispensaries,
fading license plates, post offices, com-
missary prices, and the overall subject of
organization.


The first question
Lovelady of the A.
the date on which
could expect to rece
voted by Congress
Dunsmoor, Executi
Governor, told the
hoped that the pay
fleeted in the period


n, raised by Rufus
F. G. E., concerned
classified employees
ive the pay increases
last month. F. G.
ve Assistant for the
conference that it is
increases can be re-
which began October


28 and for which payment is di
November 20. Retroactive payment
follow soon after.
Payment of the retroactive pay,
ever, Mr. Dunsmoor said, presents
tional difficulties, in that each empl


back pay must be corn
This is especially comn
employees such as nu
inspectors who have
work during the nine p
by the retroactive clau
lation. He added that
could be simplified b
chines which, however,
York by the shipping s
As far as income tax
pay is concerned, with
be made effective Nove
moor said that income
have as yet received n
the procedure to be fo
as that of last year w.
was made effective tow


puted indiv
iplicated f
irses and
perform
ay periods
se of the p;
This comic
j -


dd
or
cu
d
cc
ay


ue on
ts will

how-
addi-
oyee's
[ually.
those
stoms
night
vered
legis-


)utation


y computing ma-
are held up in New
trike.
on the retroactive
the tax increase to
mber 1, Mr. Duns-
tax personnel here
1o instructions. If
allowed is the same
hen a tax increase
'ard the end of the


year, the tax for the entire
fixed by a computation


Visits


The


will be
Spage 18)


Zone


J


Discussed


President


B





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 2,1951


Travellers


Return


From


South


Seas


C. Z. Hobby Groups Urged to

'Register' with New Employees
Hobby groups and similar organiza-
tions in the Canal Zone have been urged
to provide information concerning them-
selves for distribution among newly-
arrived U. S.-rate employees, in order


SOI'TH SEA islanders have nothing on this Zone trio. Just back from the Marquesas and Society
Islands are Lee Rigby, 14, Richard Harris of the Communications Branch, and Lee's father, Edwin ligby
of the Storehouses Division. Lee is wearing the grass skirt and what goes with it; Mr. Harris has on shell


heads and a South Sea "Panama,
is a sarong in its natural form.


" and Mr. Rigbv sp


"Sure, I'd like to go back to Tahiti,"
14-year-old Lee Rigby of Amador Road
in Balboa told THE PANAMA CANAL RE-
VIEW. "It's cool there."
With his father, Edwin, of the Division
of Storehouses, Richard Harris of the
Electrical Division's Communications
Branch, and John McDaniel of the Canal
Zone police force, Lee sailed from Balboa
May 21 on the 72-foot ketch Palmosa.
Lee was signed on, according to the
yacht's papers, as a cabin buoy," his
father as first mate (he d(lid the cooking,
too) while the other two were able sea-
men. Later, after Lee had climbed 40


orts his hrst mate s cap. The material they


are holding


July 27, the yachting party found that
the July 14 Bastille Day celebration was
still going on.
Mr. McDaniel continued on with the
Palmosa, which is owned and skippered
by Captain Henry V. Hudson, a retired
British Naval officer, but the other three
waited in Papeete for the French Line's
Saqittaire for their homeward passage.


loaded


parents (the


same


I with
things


grass
Doroth


skirts,
v La-


I

4<


Young Zonian Gets Ham License


feet into the rigging to rescue a halyard
which was about to be carried away in a
squall, he was promoted to able seaman.
Except for the first part of the trip in
the Bay of Panama the weather was good
all the way to the Marquesas Islands,
which they reached July 13. The early
part of the voyage, however, was unpleas-
ant enough to make up for the later per-
fect weather. The yacht was beset by
rain squalls and storms for the entire first
week out. and the Palmosa did not sight


'a


. . ., ,,


that the new arrivals may associate them-
selves easily with Isthmians of longer
standing who are interested in pastimes
similar to their own.
The information is to be included in a
"List of Organizations" .churches, fra-
ternal groups, social organizations, and
the like to be issued to each new U. S.-
rate employee at the time of employment
processing in the Personnel Bureau.
Officers of all such employee groups are
invited to provide their organizations'
proper names, addresses, and telephone
numbers for the list by telephoning Em-
ployee Relations, 2 1525, during business
hours.
It is hoped that all phases of organized
hobby and pastime activity represented
in the Canal Zone will be represented by
the time the list goes to the printer.
A few such organizations are: The C. Z.
Natural History Society, Orchid Society,
and the stamps and photo groups.

mour wears as sarongs), beads, hats of
palm leaves, grass mats, and other South
Pacific curios.
Mr. Rigby, who had drawn the mid-
watch on the Palmosa was tired out and
thin when the yacht reached the Society
Islands, but after several days rest he
began to regain his lost weight and more.
Yachting, the Zonians agree, is the way
to spend a vacation. Like Lee, they are
all ready to go again, somewhere.


I .
'-.4


-


"--^
4 .







November 2,1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR INTER


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENTION


ex\


The Panama
)vernment ex
for the morn
40 disabiin
posure of 2,8


The Civil -
Honor Roll A\w
ord for the me
of a Freiluenc\
tons to a four
this year.


ITh
Hone
ablin
Build
and a
itv, t


e fol
ir Roll
g Injur
ing, \I
newco
he Con


Canal
:perien
ith of
g inju
21,013


t\fairs
ardil cei
nth of
R' ate
-time


owing
.\Awar.
ies for


inicipal
mer to t
untissar


(
5
r
I.


y-Cani
unency
er as a
a mai


l Zone
rate of
result
n-hour


Bureau will receive
rtificates for Best Rec-
September by virtue
of Zero. Congratula-
winner of this Award


Divisions
certificat
he month


tenan-e,
Fratern-


\Ve take this means to
members to the Panama
Canal Zone Governmen
they are: Lt. Comdr.
I'SN, representing the In
and Charles A. Dubbs,
Personnel I director .


L. W. Cham
the position of
ILocks Division,
nation of Jack I


welcome two new
Canal Company-
t Safety Board;
W. M. Vincent,
dustrial I )irecior.
representinL the


bers has been
Acting Safe
made vacant
F. Paterson.


Max R. Hlart has
position of Safety In
portation DI)ivision a
houses, made vacant
E. F. Rvan.


ppointedl
Inspect
v the "res


been ap
spector,
nd Divi
by the


UNLABELED POISON
LURKS IN HOMES
AS CHILD DANGER


Paint thinners and removers-most
are harmful if swallowved, including linseed
oil, tung oil, turpentine, banana oil, acetone,
alcohol, benzine, and others.
Extracts and flavorings - the strong al-
coholic solutions make 1hese dangerou-.
although oil of wintergreen and oil of pep-
permint are basically poisonous.
Antiseptics and disinfectants-these
include tincture of iodine, cresol prepara-
tions (usually sold under a trade name),
phenol or carbolic acid, bichloride of mer-
cuvy, ammoniated mercury, potassium per-
mianganate, hydrogen peroxide, etc.
Laxatives and cough syrups-not all
are harmful, but to be safe they should never
be left within the reach of children.


Alcohols -
pounds, and
adhesive tape


beverages,
special subs
removers ar


ubbing
needs s
danger


American workers were safer in 1050, the


HONOR ROLL
Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
September

CIVIL AFFAIRS


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR


Civil Affairs .. .. . . .
Industrial- -.......
Engineering and Constru
Health .... .
Community Services -
Supply and Service._
M arine . . .. .. . .
Railroad and Terminals


action -


YEAR
4
S- 3
2
1
1
0
0
0


Division Award For
NO DISABLING INJURIES
September

BUILDING DIVISION


The skull-and-cro


bottle has become
danger in most ho
many unlabeled poise
that are commonly
A few of these c
stances which hav
principally among c
not always repelle


)ones o0
familiar
holds, b
killers ir
night to


commonn ho
e claimed
children bec.
d by an


the iod


r symbol of
ut there are
n every home
be harmless.
usehold sub-
many lives,
cause they are
objectionable


taste or odor, are as follows:
Kerosene-one of the commonest causes
of poison deaths among children.
Sleeping tablets-usually contain a de-
rivative of barbituric acid, and in sufficient
Quantity can be fatal.
Rat, bug, and fungus poisons-such
poisons usually contain highly dangerous
chemicals.
CLEANERS CALLED RISK
Caustic cleaners-ammonia, lye, wash-
ing soda, and trisodiumn phosphate cause
dangerous membrane burns when taken in-
ternally.


National Safe
Industrial in
leased by the C
edition of its s
Facts, show a s
the frequency a
as compared w
Twenty-nine
classifications r
and 23 reduced


Council reports.
rv tales for last
inmil in advance of
tistical yearbook,
bstantial reduction
1 severity of 1950
h 1949.


of the
duced th
severity


year, re-
the 1951
Accident
n in both
accidents


40 basic industry
cir frequency rates,
rates.


RATE DOWN 8 PERCENT


The accident freque
in all industries sulbmi
to the Council, based
abling injuries per 1,0(
9.3 in 1950-a reduct
the year before.
The accident sever
tries reporting to the
number of days lost
was .94 last year --a1ls
cent from 1949.


ncy rate for employees
tting company reports
on the number of dis-
00,000 man-hours, was
ion of 8 percent from

it' rate for all indus-
Council, based on the
per 1,000 man-hours,
o a reduction of 8 per-


nI


(
L





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November 2, 1951


THE PERMANENT collection of the Canal Zone Museum has recently Hospital recall that the model was displayed for many years in the hospital's


been increased by the addition of the model, above,
Its origin has been lost with the years, but long-tim


Zone


Museum


Report


-A Progress


The Canal Zone Museum, now in its
second year and growing fast, occupies
the first-floor lobby of the Civil Affairs
Building and overflows into the rotunda
overlooking the Air Field. The original
collection, the property of The Panama
Canal for many years, was transferred
from the Administration Building late in
1950. It included beautiful scale models


of Canal construe
going dredges, a 1
a track shifter an
from the French
items, including a


action equipment-sea-
ocomotive and tender,
d flatcars; many relics
Company; and several
ruler and level which


were the property of G. M. Totten, Chief
Engineer of the Panama Railroad Com-
pany in 1855. These articles plus the 24-
foot foam rubber relief map of the Canal,
which was prepared under the direction
of the Special Engineering Division,
formed the nucleus of the collection.
Late in 1950 several cases of stuffed
local animals and birds were moved from
the La Boca Occupational High School,
where they had been stored for many
years, for addition to the Museum. After
careful selection, treating, and rearrang-
* 1--* ji


of old Ancon Hospital. library, until the library
ie employees of Gorgas way for technical books.
Lake watershed; a collection from the
San Bias Islands; relics from the renova-
tion of the White House, Washington;
cannon balls found near Las Cruces ceme-
tery; and three rifles used in Panama's
Revolution for Independence.
Patron-donors include: The Panama
Canal Society of Florida; the Commission
on Renovation of the Executive Mansion,
The White House, Washington; the Pan-
ama Society for Advancement of Archae-
ology and Natural Sciences; Maj. Gen.
George W. Rice, Health Director; Philip
L. Dade; Fritz Marti; B. T. Carr; Miss
Dora Ponevacs; James L. Price; Mrs.
Donald T.Baker; John Gough,and others.


Items
complete
clude a
the Mu
ment; a
to the


still
;ion o
large
seum
relief
Libra


American Ge


under repair, or awaiting
f suitable display cases, in-
Sstone metate presented to
by Ernst Erbe on his retire-
map of Venezuela presented
iry-Museum by the Inter-
eodetic Survey; a collection


of articles from the Darien, including a


nine-foot bl
from James
ball League
Garlington,
the Museun
workers in t
These ite.


are awaiting
1vn-rrrn Ininbir


ow gun,
L. Price;
loving cu
pitcher,
m by M
he Electr
ms. which


an indefinite loan
and a Balboa Base-
p presented to A. C.
1917-18, sent to
r. Garlington's co-


'1
h


cal Division.
for the most


g the conversion of one o
h n^aoh hn^-n on avhilf.i


,..-J UL.


became crowded and the model was removed to make
The model was reconditioned by students in La Boca.
and Mrs. George Lowe from General
Goethals "on S. S. Advance to test the
Canal," on August 9, 1914, as well as
early Canal employee's metal check iden-
tifications, Society of the Chagres memen-
tos, and a Roosevelt Medal, sent to the
Museum by Jack E. Pearson of Gatun.
The glass-doored display shelves in the
left wing of the lobby now are showing a
group of reproductions from famous art-
ists which were given to the Library
recently by Christopher C. Bennett.
Work For The Future
There is still much work to be done.
The brief descriptive notes included with
each article in the permanent Museum
Collection are to be expanded eventually


to
stn
ion
wo:
bra
Ion
dul


include a short history
action item, and its sign
g job of building the
rk, which must be don
ry's research specialists,
g and must be worked
ties. A large plaster-of-pa


of each Con-
ficance in the
Canal. This
e by the Li-
is necessarily
in with other
iris relief map


showing the plan of the projected Canal,
made in 1909, which had been gathering
dust in the old License Bureau Building
on the Prado, has now been washed clean,
but must be mended with plaster and re-
painted with oil paint in the newly-
mended spots. This work will be done
by the members of the Library Staff on
1 I 1 1 1 1


Canal






November 2, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


N^1 L
%tAI____


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Panama Canal Press
Mount Hope. Canal Zone
F. K. NEWCOMER
Governor


HERBERT D.


VOGEL


Lieutenant Governor
E. C. LOMBARD
Executive Secretary
J. RUFUS HARDY
Editor


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters containing inquiries, sugges-
tions, criticisms or opinions of a general
nature will be accepted. In all cases
possible, letters to THE REVIEW will be
answered individually. Those of suffi-
cient general interest will be published
in this paper. Letters must be authen-
tic and be signed although signatures
will not be published unless requested
and names of authors will be kept con-
fidential. Return address should be
given but THE REVIEW will not under-
take to return correspondence of any
nature.


NEW EMPLOYEES, and older ones, too, are all benefiting from a new manual ofjnformation,
LIVING AND WORKING IN THE CANAL ZONE, which has been prepared by the Personnel Bureau in coopera-
tion with other offices of the Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government. Edward A. Doolan,
Personnel Director, and Charles A. Dubbs, Training Officer, look over one of the second printing, in the
hands of E. C. Cotton of the Panama Canal Press where the booklet was published.


SUBSCRIPTIONS


Yearly
PANAMA


subscriptions


CANAL


REVIEW


address in the Postal Union:
$1.00


Postal


money


orders


should


made payable to the Treasurer, Pan-


ama


Canal


Company,


and mailed


to the Editor, THE PANAMA
REVIEW, Balboa Heights, C.


CANAL
Z.


SINGLE COPIES


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW is o
sale at all Panama Canal Compan


Clubh


ouses,


Commissari


Hotels for ten days after publication
date for:


5 Cents a Copy


Single
general


copies


the close


sales and individual copies


Sailing schedules of the three Pan-
ama Line ships were upset by the
unauthorized longshoreman's strike
which tied up New York harbor late
last month.
The SS "Panama" was delayed five
days in her sailing from New York,
finally leaving on October 22 with 70
passengers and practically no cargo
aboard. The advance passenger list
indicated that 113 persons were to have
sailed.
Northboundsailingofthe SS"Ancon"
was also delayed, this ship leaving Cris-
tobal northbound on October 21, two
days late. At the time of sailing, her
destination was indefinite, with plans
made to put her into Philadelphia,
Norfolk or Baltimore if the strike was
still in effect in New York. But with
the spread southward of the strike, this
plan was abandoned and the ship put
into Charleston, S.C., to discharge pas-
sengers, mail, and bananas.
The SS "Cristobal" meanwhile, was
held at her berth in New York. She
had arrived two days after the strike
broke out.
Pay raises have been made effective, or


The use of cash was extended Novem-
ber 1 to three more Panama Canal com-
missaries: Gatun, Cocoli, and Pedro
Miguel.
All commissaries eventually will go
on the cash system, the dates of the
change-overs depending on the arrival
of the necessary cash registers.
Ancon commissary has been operat-
ing on a cash system since last March.
Cash has been used in the Curundu
commissary since June.

Members of organized employee groups
on the Canal Zone are planning a gala wel-
come this month for Representative Daniel
A. Reed of New York, sponsor of the Reed
Bill which killed retroactive income tax for
the Canal Zone.
The Congressman and his wife are due
November 26 for an 18-day visit to the
Canal Zone.
A member of the Congress since 1918,
Representative Reed is the ranking Repub-
lican member of the House Ways and Means
Committee. It is estimated that the Reed
Bill saved Canal employees at least
$2,750,000 in back taxes.


OF CURRENT INTEREST






THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November 2, 1951


Canal's


Motor


transportation


division


Replacing


orn-Out


Official


vehicles


An extyn.iv. vehicle' replacement pro-
rram is u nier v;iy in the Panama Canal
( tmpaiy'v s Mtor Transportation Divi-
>ion, b>ut the resultant change will be al-
most unnoticed by the average Zonian.
If funds are approved as they are now
set up, the MTD)'s fleet of approximately
S()) vehicles within three to four years will
be "up to standard and of the proper aver-
age age, as is the practice in commercial
companies in the United States,' accord-
ing to B. 1. Elverson, Superintendent of
the Division.
The replacement program began in the
fiscal year 1950, with the expenditure of
$225,000 to replace over-age vehicles. In
1951, $325,000 was allocated for new ve-
hicles and the last of the vehicles purchased
under this requisition has only recently
been received on the Isthmus.
During the current fiscal year, the
Motor Transportation Division will re-
ceive 73 new vehicles at a total cost of
about $200,000.
Among the vehicles on order for this
year are six sedans, which most people
consider the only type of official cars in
use, three cablesplicers, 24 pickups, a spe-
cial surveyor vehicle, and two of the huge


garbage load packers, which cost over
$12,000 apiece, as well as other assorted
vehicles for various purposes.
Bureau of the Budget requirements,
Mr. Everson explained, call for retirement
of the smaller vehicles, such as the sedans,


when they are six years old or have run
60,000 miles. Large and heavier vehicles
may be operated six to ten or more years,
provided they are in good condition.
There is a longer life-span for less fre-
quently-used vehicles and a much shorter
period for the heavily used cars.
The Port Captain's station wagons,
which make at least two round trips
across the Isthmut nightly, have a usable
life of only about three years.
"Owns" All Official Vehicles
With the exception of Police and Fire
Division vehicles, Health Bureau ambu-
lances and hearses, and a few special pur-
pose vehicles (heavy cranes, etc.) used by
other Divisions, every official vehicle used
by tho Panama Canal Comnanv and the


quires, on established tariff rates which
are reviewed and revised from time to time.
There are now more of these MTD
special-purpose vehicles in service than
ever before on the Canal Zone, Mr. Ever-
son pointed out the other day.
"It is the practice of the Motor Trans-
portation Division," he said, "to purchase
and operate the best type of equipment
for each job, as far as is reasonable and
proper. At present, special type vehicles
are used for garbage collection, wrecking
service, trash collection, etc.
"The Electrical Division is now sup-
plied with special-duty trucks for the use
of their linemen and cablesplicers and
plans call for special type trucks for tele-
phone repairmen. Special purpose vehi-


cles have recently been assigned to the
Municipal Division for their engineering
and surveying parties."
Until recent years, the Motor Trans-
portation Division had no funds, other
than those accumulated from "deprecia-
tion accruals," with which to replace
over-age vehicles in the motor fleet. As a
result many of the vehicles still operating
are long past their economical age.
Inflation Jumps Prices
This replacement through accrued de-
preciation worked satisfactorily in normal
times, but not in periods of inflation. Of
recent years, the MTD has found that a
vehicle would build up depreciation funds
totaling $1,000, which equalled the origi-
nal purchase price. But when time came
to replace the vehicle in question, the pur-
chase price had jumped over 100 percent.
Now, under the reorganization, funds
can be made available by the Company's
Board of Directors, to make up this gap
between the funds accrued and the pur-
chase cost of the new vehicles.
Since July 1949 a program of preven-
tive maintenance has been in effect at the
MTD. Vehicles which have been used for
approximately two years are removed
from service and given a thorough engine
overhaul, a brake overhaul, and necessary
body repairs.
As a result of thi. nln Mr Evnronn


on


Mr. Everson has two major jobs which,
the surface, are contradictory. His


MTD position


requires


that he keep


transportation operating. On the other
hand, he is Mileage Administrator, and as
such he must keep to a minimum the
mileage of the official vehicles, especially
on the Trans-Isthmian highway. The high-
way is used by such vehicles as tractor-
trucks which haul mash from breweries in
Panama City to the Mindi Dairy, by re-
frigerated trailers which make deliveries
from the Cold Storage plant at Mount
Hope to the various line stores, and by a
number of other vehicles on more or less
regular runs.
Organized in 1921, the Motor Trans-
portation Division was originally called
the "Animal and Motor Transportation
Division." That is why the two main
shops are commonly known as "corrals."
Force Totals 537 Employees
The Division is now part of the Supply
and Service Bureau. It operates the two
large garages at Ancon, on Gaillard High-
way, and Mount Hope, not far from Silver
City. There are four other, smaller ga-
rages at Gamboa, Cocoli, Pedro Miguel,
and Gatun. In October of this year, the
Division's force totaled 537 employees, of
whom 133 were on the U. S.-rate rolls.
Of this latter group 60 were the chauf-
feurs who handle all of the Division s
heavy equipment.
Last August, 296 of the Motor Trans-
portation Division chauffeurs won awards
for driving one to five years without
accidents. A total of 3,760,176 miles was
driven without accident or conviction for
traffic violations. This averaged more
than 11,000 miles of safe driving for every
chauffeur in the Division.
Every Division has its heroes, suting and
unsung, and the Motor Transportation


Division has one to whom a monument
was erected. This is the Richard T. Per-
rott Memorial, on Balboa Road just be-
low the Balboa Union Church. Perrott
was killed on a Sunday morning, Febru-
ary 8, 1920, when the brakes on his ice-
truck gave way. The truck plunged down
San Pnhlo Strppt nut of eonftroln and






November 2, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Teaching, Learning, Mean Busy

For Longtime C. Z. Cabinet


Emile
penny h
the first
And he
purchase
"Mr.
his frien
Boca Ju
well as
with hin


- -- -- C] w---


Life


naker


Benjamin doesn't have the first
e ever earned, but he does have
carpenter's tool he ever bought.
still uses that sturdy chisel he
d many years ago.


Ben,
ids an
nior a
those
Sin n


as he is known to all
d his students at the
nd Senior High School
who study cabinetmak
ight classes-has one o\


whelming pride. Like all real
he values the tools of his trade
thing else. He will lend any


of
La
-as
ing
7er-


craftsmen,
over any-
money he


may happen to have; his tools are never
lent to anyone.
His big, metal-bound tool box occupies
a place of honor, in a room which can be
locked, in the airy workshop under the
La Boca Junior High School. Many of
the tools he made himself.
One of his favorites is a screwdriver
with a handle of orange wood, from a tree
from a grove which once stood where the
Governor's house is now located. Other
items of special pride are beautifully-made
wooden planes. Some of them are for
molding, some for beading, and others for


special job
Mr. Be
ever know
he has ma
this belief
High Sch


IS.
n firmly believes that no one
's enough about his trade and
naged to communicate some of
to the 45 Senior and Junior
ool pupils and the 20 or so


adults he teaches.


Came To Zone In 1906
A good part of Mr. Ben's skill and en-
thusiasm he credits to his first teacher, a
Mr. Wellington from London, who migra-
ted to St. Lucia in the West Indies where
Mr. Ben was born August 11, 1887.
"The only thing he couldn't do," Mr.
Ben remarks, "was to put life into a
wooden bird he had carved and to make
it fly."
Mr. Ben had worked six years with his
British teacher when other Saint Lucians
returned from Panama with stories of the
building of a Canal. Mr. Ben paid his
own way to Panama on the Royal Mail
Packet Trent, and got a job at once,
building a hotel min Gorgona. This was
April 1906.
He could handle tools-that was what
he had worked six years to learn-but he
wanted to know how to care for them.


cabinetmaking in night school.
Recently they reconditioned the old
model of Ancon Hospital which is on
display at the Civil Affairs Building. This
job won a commendation from Col. Rich-
ardson Selee, Civil Affairs Director.
Mr. Ben is married and lives in Panama
Citv. One of his sons, whom he himself
taught and then apprenticed to a crafts-
man in Panama, has a good job with the


Building


Division


His free evenings Mr. Ben
devotes to cabinetmaking as
Occasionally some years ago,
do a little private, after-hours
his days and evenings, too, aren
School teaching is a 24-hour jol
figures, what with planning
ordering materials. But it's a
the educational process and Mr


siders that he still has


no longer
a hobby.
he used to
work. But
full now.
, Mr. Ben
[head and
ull part of
. Ben con-


a lot to learn.


Anniversaries


Employees who observed im
versaries in the lUnited States
service during the month of
listed alphabetically below. T
years incluiles all Government
the Canal or other agencies.
continuous Canal or Rajlroac
indicated by (*).


EMILE BENJAMIN

concern, he learned to sharpen saws
properly-but he used up three in the
process of learning!
Later, Mr. Ben learned to read blue-
prints and diagrams and for five years,
with no grade under an 85, he took a
correspondence course in contracting and
building and engineering mathematics
and drafting. Since then he has com-
pleted a dozen extension courses, among
them Educational Psychology and Teach-
ing Technique, at the La Boca Junior
College.
Before he went to the Schools Division
in 1933-he was on a three-month trial
and is still there-he had worked on about
every important carpentry job min the
Canal Zone. Woodwork in the Hotel
Tivoli dining room is his; so are the
beautiful balustrades on the staircases in
the Administration Building. He helped
with the carDentrv at the Colon and Pan-


portant annt-
G(;overnment
October are
he number of
service, with
Tho-e with
i service arc


40 Years
George E. Matthew, Chief Hydrog-
rapher, Meteorological and Hydrographic
Branch.
35 Years


Charles F. Stevens,
Pedro Mliguel Station.


Fire Lieutenant,


30 Years
William H. Casswell, Fire Captain,
Cristobal Station.
*Kathleen T. Baxter, Teacher, Ancon
Elementary School.
Clara E. Neville, Clerk-Stenographer,
Law Division.
August T. Schmidt, Administrative
Assi-tant, Supply and Service Bureau.
25 Years
Antonio Orsini, Surveying and Carto-
graphic Engineer (Supervisor), Surveys
Branch.
Archie W. French, Jr., Electrical Wel-
der, Building DI)ivision.
John T. Dillon, Dipper Dredge Engineer,
I)redging Division.
Whitman P. Garrett, Policeman, Gatun
Station.
20 Years
Russell L. Gallaher, Accounting Clerk,
Municipal Division.
*Bernardine U. Hanna, Teacher, Ancon
Elementary School.
*Jeanne E. Brown, Teacher, Cristobal
High School.
A--^ rt T C'*1 " -


;
I
I


-- v --


I





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 2, 1951


Piloting Ships Through

Requires Skillful,


Panama

Precise


Canal

Handling


strain on the towing
have been too great an
and tear caused both
chinery and wires.)
The Parismina was
stems of bananas, a
heavy cargo, and the


the lock culverts
slightly as she rose.


locomotives would
td unnecessary wear
to locomotive ma-

loaded with 68,000
bulky but not a
water rushing from


caused


Radio Sets Provide Contact


While she was still moving up
chamber a handline was tossed
and a portable radio receiving an(
ing set was hauled from the lock
the ship. This was to replace th
brought aboard earlier, which w
working properly. These radios,


ing on a special wave length,


Canal. The pilot-in-charge remains on the ship's bridge; the others, one at each corner of the flight-
deck. The two forward pilots help guide the carrier, which has very little clearance, into the locks; the
two aft pilots try to prevent her from scraping or touching as she leaves the lock chambers.


Telephones ring as early as 3:30 o'clock
some mornings for Panama Canal pilots.
The calls are the pilots' advance notice
that they are about to go to work.
Captain Robert F. Boyd was lucky one
day last month. His telephone didn't ring


until 6:30 o'clock. He
up in half an hour, th
him. He was to go to th
where he would board
Company's Parismina
route from Seattle to
7,067 gross ton ship, 4


was to go through the
dock at Cristobal. The
be No. 5 on the north
The sea "outside" wa


would be picked
ie dispatcher told
te outer anchorage
the United Fruit
, which was en
New York. The
55 feet in length,
Canal and would
Parismina would
ound schedule.
s rough, and for a


rush out. In addition the fresh water is
lighter than the sea water. This all tends
to set up a strong current in the jaws of
the lock and presents a handling problem
to even the most maneuverable vessel.
Suction Pulls Water Down
When a ship leaves the locks, suction
caused by the ship itself pulls water down
from the sides of the locks as the ship
begins to move ahead. This forces the
ship's stern to "go for the wall" and care-
ful rudder and engine movements are
needed to keep the ship moving straight
ahead and off the wall. And in the nar-
rowest reaches of the Canal, especially in
the Cut, the moving ship pulls water
down from the bank and sets up hard-to-
deal-with currents.
As Captain Boyd and the Parismina
, I.I


h wi
s. 0
sibili
gatic
forw
the
be,
the


th his dispatcher
ver them he can
ty is so bad he
'n signals.
ard towing loco-
center pair tow
and the last pair
end of their run


in the
aboard
d send-
wall to
e radio
as not
operat-
iable a


nbers, a signal was
ismina's whistle, the
and the Parismina


started the 0.85-mile crossing of Mira-


flores Lake.
The Dota Alicia, No.


4 northbound,


had been ordered into the Pedro Miguel
west chamber, so Captain Boyd, in an-
swer to the signal of the arrow, swung the
Parismina over to the lock's east cham-
ber. Another half hour, more or less, and,
with a tricky and sudden south wind, he
started the Fruit ship into the 6.7-mile
long Cut, the narrowest stretch of the
Canal.
In the Cut, Captain Boyd held the


to the prescribed six
for the signals on the
?re sharp bends obscure
At each, however, he
d ball on the east yard-
that he could go ahead.
light over a white one
the proceed signal, and


in heavy rain or fog he would have got-
ten the order by radio.)


her to rock


CARRIERS LIKE the U. S.


pilot to keep in touc
and with other ship
receive orders if vi
cannot see the navi|
At 10:45 the two
motives-they tow,
or brake as the need
brake-had reached
along the two chat
sounded on the Par
lines were cast off


S. Randolph, above, have five pilots aboard when they transit the


time
be do
down


t looked as if boarding would have to
ne by tug. But the weather calmed
and the pilot was able to board


Parismina down
knots, watching
three stations whe
the view ahead.
found the cone an
arm, which meant
(At night a red
would have been


en






November 2, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Meeting ships head directly for each
other; a few hundred feet from the meet-
ing point each eases over to her starboard
side, the bow swings out sharply as the
ships pass and the stern keeps pulling
toward the bank. Each pilot must act
quickly to work his ship against currents
set up by his own and the other ship, in
addition to watching for the bank suction
which tends to pull the stern onto the
near bank.
The Parismina met two ships in the
Cut. One of them was another United
Fruit craft, the Hibueras, and each of the
Fruit ships set up a great greeting din
with its whistle.
A huge waterfall spilled down the east
bank of Empire Reach and on the west
bank hydraulic sluicing sent spray high
into the air.
Past Gamboa and into the channel,
which had widened to 500 feet, Captain
Boyd opened the Parismina up. In the
500-foot Gamboa Reach, a ship's speed
can be increased to as high as 10 knots;
in San Pablo Reach, beyond Gamboa
where the channel is 800 feet wide, the
speed can rise to 12 knots, and in the
1,000-foot-wide winding channel which
follows the old bed of the Chagres River
through Gatun Lake, Captain Boyd could
get up to 15 knots.
Pilots Don't Steer
People who have lived on the Isthmus
for years and who have seen countless
ships go through the Canal, still think
that a pilot actually handles the wheel of
the ship. He never touches it, as a wheels-
man cannot see enough of the ship to
handle her. Instead, the pilot gives his
orders to the able seaman or quarter-
master on duty. These men stand shifts
of two hours each at the wheel and each
repeats the pilot's order as it is given, to
prevent error.
An officer is also on duty in the wheel-
house and he answers the pilot's order for
engine movements as he rings these orders
to the engine room by the ship's telegraph.
The Parismina's bridge also had tele-
phone connections to the engine room.
By Canal regulations, the ship's master,
in this case Captain Carl Christiansen,
remains on the bridge when his ship is in
the locks, the Cut, or when it is docking.
At 1:40 p. m., the Parismina eased
around the last bend in the crooked,
island-bordered channel through the


Lake, and Captain Boyd could see Gatun
Locks, still three miles ahead. For early
northbound ships, Gatun Locks are usu-
ally the bottleneck of the transit, just as
Pedro Miguel Locks are for the first of
the southbound vessels. Late-comers may
still be locking up, and those completing
the transit must wait.
Captain Boyd and the Parismina were
moderately lucky. No. 3 northbound, a
lumber ship, was just pulling into the east
side of Gatun. The Dota Alicia, which
had been ahead of the Parismina all the
way through, was signalled into the west
chamber. Captain Boyd was reasonably
sure that the use of both sides at Gatun
meant that the southbound traffic had


cleared for the day and
would not be long.


that the wait


Down Lockage Begins
Following instructions relayed by the
arrow signal, he brought the Parismina
up to the center approach wall and tied
her up. For the next 45 minutes he could
stretch out in a deck chair, the first time
he had been off his feet during the entire
transit. He had even eaten his lunch
from a tray, while he was standing.
Soon after 3:00 o'clock the preceding
ship's locomotives started back to pick
up the Fruit ship. Her engines were
started, her rudder thrown hard over to
bring her away from the lock wall and at
3:15 p. m. she began to move into the
first chamber. The 86-foot lockage down,
in the three chambers was uneventful and
took just 55 minutes. In the center cham-
ber, while the ship was dropping, the
pilot received, by handline from the lock
wall, his docking orders. They are writ-
ten to prevent any confusion- written in
numerals and letters, then spelled out:
He was to go to 6-C, or Six Charley.
Down the last stretch of the Canal the
Parismina moved into Limon Bay. About
4:30 the tug Alhajuela, with her gaily-
shirted Master, came alongside and got
ready to assist her into her berth.
When the Parismina was only half a
length from the end of the pier, a small
harbor craft began to cut across her bow,
between ship and pier. For a moment it
was touch-and-go. The boat showed no
sign of turning from her path. Captain
Boyd ordered both the Parismina's en-
gines half speed astern and then, a second
later, full speed astern. He grabbed for
the whistle and blew three sharp blasts,


HAND SIGNALS are most frequently used by
Canal pilots as they direct a ship's transit. Experi-
enced travelers have expressed surprise at the little
conversation necessary between pilot and the lock or
dock personnel. But a megaphone, like that which
Pilot Robert Boyd is holding, comes in handy'from
time to time.

which said: "My engines are going full
astern." To a landlubber that meant
that he had the ship braked as much as
he could.
But the operator of the small craft
appeared to be completely oblivious to
the danger of being rammed by the Par-
ismina or ramming her. He continued on
his course, those aboard his boat waving
to the Fruit ship.
Half an hour too late for Captain Boyd
to catch the 4:30 train back to Balboa,
the Parismina was tied up and the pilot
had finished another transit. Dinner at
the Hotel Washington (pilots are allowed
$2 for dinner when they are on duty) and
a trip back across the Isthmus by car
(two station wagons run; one at 7:30, the
other at midnight; later comers can spend
the rest of the night at the hotel but most
prefer to take a special car trip if trans-





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 2, 1951


TIME


W

The


y ^


Are


Days


IS F

All

to


'LYING!


Counting

Christmas J


p)llng


le a p


measure


if you


to vour favorite Clubhouse


Record


Section and bro


through our large


selection of phonograph records.


We have a wide choice of Christmas records,


as well as


records for children and


adults-from


bedtime stories


to swing and symphony.


also have record stora


ge albums that would make very suitable gifts.


Your Christmas shopping


problems v
throughout


solved


y giving


phonograph


records-a


that


asting pleasure


year.


CHRISTMAS ALBUMS AVAILABLE
78, 45, 33-1/3 rpm
"Carols for Christmas"
"Merry Christmas" Bing Crosby
"Under the Christmas Tree"
by Jan Garber's Orchestra
"Christmas Greetings" Bing Crosby
"Carols" by St. Luke's Choristers


Ethel Smith,


s^^M E y


"Christmas Music"


"Night Before Christmas"
by Fibber McGee
"Twas the Night Before Christmas"
by Fred Waring's Orchestra
"A Visit from St. Nicholas"
"Christmas Cheer" Andrews Sisters
"Music for Christmastide"
by the Rome-Vatican Choir


"Christmas Favorites"
and Frankie Lane


"Christmas Music and Stories"
by Two-Ton Baker


Damone


sit s~ sic


SINGLE RECORDS AVAILABLE


78 and 45 rpm
"Christmas Carols by the Old Corral,"
Tex Ritter
"Jingle Bells" J. Mercer
"Little Town of Bethlehem"
"Frosty the Snowman"
"Rudolph the Rednosed Reindeer"
Crosby "Christmas"
"Silent Night" Fred Waring
"The First Nowell" Fred Waring
"White Christmas" by Crosby, Cavallaro
and other artists
"Santa Claus is coming to Town"
Bing Crosby
"Joy to the World"
"Hark, the Herald Angels Sing"
"Santa's Toy Shop"
"Night Before Christmas"
by Arthur Godfrey
"Hymns for Children"
Brahms "Lullaby"
"Mother Goose Songs"


wse


ag


-r







November 2,1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


P s * 1 -**r ^T. /
4�! ' - , A


S . L

s -
am,






. *
* ;.


BALBOA'S "BULLDOGS" are the largest and heaviest, per man, of the
Zone's school football squads. Twenty-six players have just returned from
Miami where they put up a good, if losing fight to Miami Jackson's unde-
feated team. Left to right above are: Back row: Tom Jenkins, Francis Boyd,
Andy Wright, Bill Riley, Frank Bryan, Dave Sundquist, Bob Carroll, Bob
Morris, Bill Elton, Cleveland Soper, Ronnie McConnell, Carl Meissner, Bill
Altman, Charlie McConnell, Irwin Frank, Sam Maphis, Clair Godby, George
Dansby, Coach Paul Dreska; Middle row: Coach John Fawcett, Manager

,* .


Jim Scogno, Jim Jones, Ray Nickisher, Dan Gresang, Everett Stacy, Bob
Coleson, Jerry Fox, Joe Oliver, Jim Fulton, Jim May, Bob Peacher, Dick Dill-
man, Bob G(lud, John Albritton, Tom Davidson, L. W. lHearn, Bill Underwood,
Manager Bill Yerkes; Front row: Manager Ray Tucker, Jerry Halman, Ken
Knight, Bob Ranson, Dave Henderson, Ted Norris, Bill Dawson, Charlie
Smith, Walt Benny, Bill Fu!lertmon, Frank Smith, Bob Dolan, Marc McKee,


Lambert Montovani, Lee
Jeff Goodin.


M vers, Fred Cotton, Dick Ostrea;


Sitting, Mascot


COLLEGE'S "GREEN WAVE" is the smallest of the football squads.
For at least half of the players this year is their first at football. Left to right
they are: Front row: Charles Becktell, Alexander McKeown, James Neabrey,
Alfred Aleguas, George McArthur, Frank Robinson kCaptain), William Ma-
loney, Bob Sievers, Jess Kruse, Manuel Roy; Back row: Roger Hackett, Dean


JS 1 R __^B &ffX -� *ff -*::* ZJtf:,- f. ?


of the Junior College, Paul Karst, Assistant Coach, Jack Alexaitis, Wendell
Spreadbury, Richard Hopiak, Arturo Cermelli, William Stevenson, Henry
Phillips, Nick Gorham, Nick Stokes, Jack Morton, Elias Entebi, Ralph Huls,
Robert Mower, Coach. Not pictured are: Tom Crawford, Roy Hohmann,
Felix Larrinaga, Luis Tremblay, and Anton Pedersen.


�3~ ~ P- ; R * a.. 'W� f L





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November 2, 1951


The


EGG


and


YOU


WE DO NOT BUY "just eggs," even though you might
pay less for them if we did, because we tried that once and


learned our lesson.


Maybe you remember, too, the period in


which .


We believe the "just


eggs"


of that period didn't please


you any more than they pleased us.


AN EGG is NOT just


an egg,


any more than a customer


After the explanation,


maybe you still believe the Com-


just a customer.


Both come in many sizes and varieties.


Maybe you prefer the finest, largest


eggs regardless of


missary should handle bigger or better eggs,
more, or "just eggs," which might cost less.


even if they cost


you believe the Commissaries should handle


smaller or lower quality eggs at a lower price.


To tell you about the


eggs


in the Commissary,


quality they are, and why we buy them, we want to tell you
first about eggs generally.


Eggs are


classed


first as Specials,


Extras,


Standards,


Trades, Dirties, Checks, and Clots.


Then they are graded


as "Consumer AA," "A," "B," or


"C." according to the percentage of specials, extras, stand-
ards, etc., in the lot.


These grades are based primarily on freshness.


The fresh-


ness is determined by the over-all care with which the egg is
handled, not the amount of time from the day it is laid by a


Undoubtedly, eggs, like everything else these days, cost
more than we would like to have extracted from the family
exchequer. In which case, we suggest that there may be
economizing possibilities in powdered whole eggs, which might
be used without breaking up the family circle.
Even if there is a former GI in the family, powdered eggs
might be used -and without serious repercussions-in mix-
tures such as pastries, meat loaf, codfish cakes, and puddings.
They also work up into beautiful appearing custards although
the flavor is not the same as in custards made with whole eggs.
Powdered whole eggs cost 44 cents for an eight-ounce tin,
which is the equivalent of one-and-a-half dozen whole fresh
eggs. That makes the cost about 30 cents per dozen.


hen in Missouri or


Kentucky until it is purchased by the


consumer.


Turkey


Talk


Eggs are also classified


as "Extra Large"


or "Jumbo,"


"Large," "Medium,"


or "Pullet"


in size.


A wholesale price


differential of 30 cents a dozen between pullet and large eggs
of the same quality is not unusual, and a differential of 10
cents to 15 cents a dozen is normal between storage and fresh
eggs of the same size and type.


THE EGGS YOU BUY IN


THE COMMISSARY


graded "Consumer Grade A, Fresh, Large."
These eggs are produced in specialized egg "factories" or


large cooperatives near New


York City with the result that


they are less than two days old when delivered to the steam-
ship.
When you buy them at your local commissary, they are


well within the specifications for "fresh"


eggs, are in excellent


condition, and have had special and careful handling at every


point in shipment.


The Commissary


Division


has had no


VT ~1) WE'\'C ~rA nln.,f., S +bnr., nro nn r fun flnn~n~nnndnn Ira.


NEWS OF YOUR COMMISSARY STORES


price or maybe





November 2, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOUR/ I

(THE REVIEW begins this series with
Dr. Gilbert M. Stevenson, Chief of the
Department of Internal Medicine at Gor-
gas Hospital.)


There aren't many
Zone who don't know
son-"Dr. Steve" to
person, by sight, or 1
pite a schedule which
steadily five and a ha
and not infrequently


people on the Canal
Dr. Gilbert Steven-
many of them-in
y reputation. Des-
Skeeps him moving
If days each week-
Sat night-he has


managed to get to know hundreds of
people on both sides of and from the
center of the Isthmus.
Because Gorgas Hospital is a teaching
hospital and because he is on its teaching
staff, he has the duties of instructor as
well as of physician and consultant.
As Chief of the Department of Internal
Medicine, Dr. Stevenson is responsible
for Wards 3, 4, 11, 12, 21, and 22, as
well as for the Pediatrics Service. With
one or more of his staff members he makes
regularly scheduled rounds on each of the
wards, and every Tuesday morning meets
with his entire staff of 14 doctors.
On Wednesday afternoons he sits as a
member of the Tumor Board which con-
siders all cases in this field for diagnosis


and treatmer
Rounds, at w
sidered in great
every Thursda
tends a clinic


it. He co
which a few
at detail by t
ty morning,
al session e


nducts Grand
cases are con-
he entire staff,
and always at-
very Saturday


morning. At this session doctors min the
medical service discuss cases of special
interest. Working with Dr. Stevenson
are several men who have already made
names in their particular fields, and a
number of younger residents or interns
who have shown great promise.
Dr. Merrill C. Davenport is Assistant
Chief of the Department and Chief of the
section for white patients. Dr. Richard
T. James heads the section where the
cases of the colored patients are handled.
Dr. John R. Mitchell is Chief of the Pedi-
atrics Section, and Dr. Louis S. Leland
heads the Dermatology Section.
Four Residents, doctors who have com-
pleted their internships and are serving
one to three years in a specialized field,
are assigned to the Medical Service. They
are Dr. James B. Hampton, Senior Resi-
dnnt Dr Juan R. Martin_ Rsifdnnt. and


Dr. G. M. STEVENSON


American College of Physicians (with ex-
tra duty as Governor of the College for
the Canal Zone and Panama since 1942),
a member of the Association of Military
Surgeons, and a member of the Academia
Panamefia de Medicina y Cirugia.
Dr. and Mrs. Stevenson, the former
Nedelca Jude, who married in 1929, have
an 18-year-old son, William George, who is
a student at the Canal Zone Junior College.
Dr. Stevenson has always been proud
of Gorgas Hospital and the place it has
occupied in Canal Zone life. It has been
not only a facility where thousands of
patients have received excellent care, he
points out, but also a place where impor-
tant research has been done, as well as a
fine training place for young doctors.


YOUNG ZONIAN GETS HAM LICENSE


lEA'


L


TH


She took her examinati(
tember in the Army Sign
office at Corozal and on
awarded her license.
She had been waiting f
had passed her examinat
know that her father ha


of her success
operating permi
four o'clock that
certain that she
like, broke into
arrived from woi
Personnel Office


and had
t earlier
afternoon
had fail
tears w
rk at the
and her


on early in Sep-
al Department's
October 12 was

or word that she
ion and did not
d been informed
picked up her
that day. By
n she was almost
ed and, woman-
hen her mother
Army's Civilian
parents together


presented her with her license.
Four days after her license was issued
Carol had talked to stations in the Canal


Zone,
Japan
Her
tholon
Austinr
andwl
out th
to get
she w(
printed
made


n
1

(


18 of the United
Canada, Brazil,
first contact was
lew, who is Vice
National Bank
o operates station
Summer he had
her license and


States, Panama,
and Argentina.
with E. C. Bar-
President of the
in Austin, Texas,
W5GQ. Through-
been urging Carol
was so sure that


)uld qualify that he had 1,000 cards
d with her call letters, KZ5GQ, and
a trip to the Canal Zone to deliver


her cards to her about a week before she
took her examination.
For the time being, Carol is operating
her family's station, a Globe Champion
transmitter, running 200 watts on all
bands, and a Collins receiver.
Her father is building a transmitter for
code which he will install in her bedroom
but she will be permitted to operate the
larger voice station whenever she likes.


OUR


OUT-OF-DOORS


(EDITOR'S NOTE: the material for this
column has been prepared by Walter R.
Lindsay, Chief of the Grounds Maintenance
Division who is also in charge of the Canal
Zone Experimental Gardens.)
Many chemicals have been used to con-
trol ants, but one of the most effective
and economical used to date is Chlordane.
Unlike the chemical, carbon disulphide,
which has been effectively used in the past
to control leaf-cutting ants (atta sp.),
Chlordane is non-explosive and is safe for
use by even the most inexperienced
gardener.
Chlordane may be absorbed by insects
through their mouths, feet. and bodies.






THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 2, 1951


lil - ;^ '-r> \ 't[]
� .ll\ -Eon tn,
Ek l in <*s iirr
h]it i -alc i,

II& jitri 110101 l


arbara
ur,. .\
outraph


Mrs.
tcrgart


Teacher
Ray
to PI'os
and In
Olive
((Oiiyb
(Gaumb
and In
Jam
Electric
man, P
Mrs
Stenog
Stenog
Mrs
Cottre
School
Ray
nance


Division.
Donald R. Jones,
rundu) to Postal Cl


I num
ichar
, fro
sectorr
DI)ivi:
oberi
h Sch
ctor,


ig
rd
m,


Francis E. Re
to Clerk, Housinm
Mrs. Rebecca
phone Operator
Housing Division
P. Byrne Hu
Manager, Balboa
ger, Gamboa Ho
vision.
VISIlOfl.
Harry C. Egol
Housing Office tc
boa Housing Offi(


ration Plant
criones Brand
Jos6 R. (
Cartographic
iartographic
engineering
Paul W.I


Tr,
ni4
til
unn
1111
er
God
1ll1
'es


IAlinl- m1(e nanr1m
re ir. islrre(l irn
Or frInu one 0lp" iy
not contain wirh
ra( inl >.


Barlow, from ('lerk-
flstr live Branch, to
Polhe I )i\ ision.
Longeway, from Kin-
to E'leinenitary School
Shoolsl
bor. fromI Postal Clerk


Customs,

'ostmaIIster
, Customln,


rent lee
Police-

Clerk-
Clerk-


rk. Fi-
Police


) "
from PIostminaster (Cu-
erk, Postal, Customs,


Division.
vato, Robert P.
oims Guard to


O'Con-
Customss


rdon, from Clerk- Typitl
Division.
L. Hlatten, from Tele-
Typist) to Clerk-Typist,


things, from
Housing Office
using Office, H


f,
e.
ce


from Ma
Assistant
, Housing


Assistant
to Mana-
using IT-


nager, Gam nboa
Manager, Bal-
)Division.


to Fil-
to Fil-


Operator, \Vater and Labora-
, Municipal Division.
otter, David Ramos, from
Survey Aid to Surveying and
Engineer, Surveys Branch,
visiono.
lohl, Murrel L. Dcdd, Earl


E. Mullins, and Proctor G. Duelle, frc


Ilical Techni-
hnician (Gen-
ealth Labor-

dical Techn i-
ii Technician
ard of Ilealth


INDUSTRIAL BUREAU
Richard H. Jenks, from Wireman to
Wireinan Lead(ler, Industrial Biruau.
Sydney S. Albritton, from Locomotive
Machinist, Railroad I division . to Machinisi,
Industrial Bureau.
Gust E. Rosene, from Lock Opeiator,
Atlantic Locks, to Machinist, Industrial
Bureau.


Lock Op-
c Locks.
J. Sorell,
Operator-

son, Wil-
arning to
division .
SCashier,
ypist, Aids

r to Senior


Control House Op
John J. Tobin,
tor, to Junior Con
lantic Locks.
John M. Klavo
tor to Senior Lc
A\tlantic Locks.


erator, Atlantic L
from Senior Lock
trol House Operat


)cks.
Opera-
or, At-


Wilbert L. Ney, fro
keeper, Pacific Locks t
Locks.
Lawrence W. Jenki
A\tlantic Locks, to Gen
Pacific Locks.
James G. Slice, from
Tran -portation D division
I division .
Ernest M. Kieswettei
ervi or to Senior Forcma
-ion.


m C
o C

ins,
ieral


jenera
lerk,


reman


I Store-
Atlantic


from Guard,
Storekeeper,


Chauffet r, Motor
to Guard, Locks


r,I
1n


front Guard Sup-
, Dredging DI)ivi-


THIS


Bu
ica
oiln,
ers


MONTH'S


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


NOVEMBER


2d American Legion, Post
(;amboa Iegion liall, 7:30
Panama's Memorial Day
3d Panama's Independence
th Masters, Mates, and Pilo
27., (Gambloa Clubhouse, 9) a.
th Postal Employees, No. 231
boa LodIge Hall, 8 p. nm.
American Legion, Post
Gatutin I.egion Hall, 7:30 p.
Pedro Miguel Civic C
Ilnion Church, 7 p. m.
Cristobal-Margarita Civic


cil, Marg
V. F. W.
ton, 7:30
V. F. W.
Road. 7:3
6th -Gamboa
itv Cente


Gatu
house
V. F.
C. Ha
Armi
Legal
(for A
Elect
b)oa L
Amer
1, Bal
V. F.
Scout
Amer
Cla t<
Paint


14th


arita C
, Post
p. m.
, Post
0 p. im.
Civic
r. 7:30


lu 1h
No.

No.


Day.
ts, No.
nm.
60. Bal-


TI.
council,


C


se, 7:30
7, Fort


3822


Council,
p. m.


Curundu


"mmun-


n Civic Council, Gatun (
, 7:30 p. m.
W., Post No. 40, Balboa
ll, 7:30 p. m.
stice Day.
I Holiday in the Canal
rmistice I)ay).
rical Workers, No. 397,
odge Hall, 7:30 p. inm.
ican Legion Auxiliary,
boa Legion Home, 7:30 p.
W., Post No. 100. Old


il{inig,
n Legi
7:3(0 p.
, No.


Ballboa, 7 p. m.
Pacific Civic Council, J.
7:30 p. m.
American Legion, Post N


gion Home, Old Crist
15th American Legion
6, Gamloa Legion H
18th C. L. U.-M. T. C.,
Hall, 8:30 a. m.
19th- Electrical Workers,
Masonic Temple, 7:3


oba l,
Auxil
all, 7
Balb


20th- Operating Engineers,
Margarita K. of C. Hall,


lnub-


K.


0 p. m
7, For

e 0838

\V. B.


iary,


Gatun

. 595
m.


American Legion Auxiliary, No.
3, American Legion Hall, Gatun,
7:30 p. m.
A. F. G. E., No. 14, Balboa Club-
house, 7:30 p. Im.
V. F. W., Post No. 40, Balboa K. of
C. Hall, 7:30 p. m.
-Thanksgiving Day.
V. F. W. Auxiliary, Post No. 3822


Secre-
rector,
Direc-


CALENDAR


From September 15 through October 15


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU


HEALTIII BUREAU
Harry A. Dunn, from Me<
cluan (General) to 1Medical Tec!
cral-Supervisory), Board of H
a l ory.
Kurt F. Menzel, Ifrom lMe
cian (Bacteriology) to Metdica
(Bacteriology-S pervisory) Bo.
Lal)oratory.


r (G(;amboa). Postal
lion 1 division .
SRiesch, from 1
Postal Clerk, Postal
lion division.
Fraser, Jr., from .


cian, Terminal. IMi vision, to
policee Division.
. Grace M. Lindberg, from
rapher, :\udit I)ivision, to
rapher, Police division .
. Mary E. Soper, Mrs. Nat
ill, from Substitute Teacher t
Teacher, Division of Schools.
B. Wells, from Payroll Cle
Bureau, to Clerk (Typist),


MARINE BUREAU
Raymond J. Kielhofer, from
erator to Tunnel Operator, Pacifi
Preston M. Trim, Charles
from Lock Operator to Tunnel
\Vireman, pacificc Locks.
Roy Hi. Rice, Irving H. Ander
liam J. Cronin, from Pilot-in-T
Probationary Pilot, Navigation I
Mrs. Ruth II. Powell, fron
Commissary D)ivision, to Clerk-TI
to Navigation Section.
William C. Smith, from Junto


, Postal, Customs, and Immigra-
sion.
t H. Beecher, from Occupational
ool Teacher to Junior College In-
D)ivision of Schools.


COMMUNITY SERVICE BUREAU


sky, from Tunnel Opera-


Operator,


William J. McLaughlin, Ji., from Lock
()Operator to Tunnel Operator, \Vireman,
Atlantic Lock-.
Carter M. Houston, from PIrobationary
Pilot to Pilot, Navigation division.


Robert


ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU


C. Smith, from Pumpman


PERSONNEL BUREAU
Mrs. Mary B. Friedman, from
tary, Office of Supply and Service I)i
to Secretary, Office of the 1 personnel


tor.
Russell S. Johns, from Junior College
Instructor, divisionn of Schools, to Position
Classifier, Personnel Bureau.
RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU
William D. Goodwin, front Yard and


Post Home, 7:30 p-. m.
27th--V. F. W. Post No. 100, Old
Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30
American Legion, Post No. 7,
Clayton, 7:30 p. nm.
Operating Engineers, No.
U . I .... 1 , <- .� ... 1.1i-i ,11 '7 I, . i -.


I


. .





November 2,1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


STATISTICS


CANAL


TRAFFIC


For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace-time than those for 1939.


COMMERCIAL


BUT


TRANSIT


TOLLS


ARE


UP


FOR


LOWER


FIRST


THAN


QUARTER

I PREVIOUS


YEAR


Intercoastal

Down; U. S.

Lead By


Trade

Ships


Hold


Nationality


Transits of commercial vessels through
the Panama Canal during the first quarter
of the present fiscal year were up by more
than 100, including both small vessels and
ships of 300 or more tons, Panama Canal


measure:
During
lotal nur
pared to
of fiscal
Of th
were fro
Pacific t


ment.
g the
mber o
1,675
year 1
e 1,77
m Atla
o Atlai


283 governme


quarter just concluded, the
f transits was 1,770, as com-
for the corresponding quarter
951.
0 commercial transits, 871
ntic to Pacific, and 899 from
ntic. During the same period
nt vessels made the Canal


transit.
During this period
year tolls totaled $6
to $6,449,000 in the
previous fiscal year.
The quarter began
mercial transits in J
July of fiscal year 1I
the present fiscal ye
compared to $2,373,0
\ious fiscal year.
During the early pa
losses were indicated
\Vest Coast Canada
Coast South America
a drop was reported
East Coast of the Lo


in the present fiscal
,272,000 as compared
same quarter of the
slowly, with 463 com-
uly, as against 513 in
951. Tolls for July of
ar were $1,981,000 as
00 for July in the pre-
irt of July rather heavy
1 in the Europe-U. S.
and the Europe-West
trades. Later in July
for trade between the
cited States and Asia.


C. Fernie
Traffic Increase Befiins


FOUR. CATCHERS from the most recent whaling fleet to transit the Canal were
locked down together through Pedro Miguel on their way to the Antarctic. The fou
fleet and their 22,000-ton mothership, Thorshordi, transited October 17. All of them ar
try with Sanefjord as their home port. This fleet carried a total of about 550 men; th
or mothership, was 285 and each catcher had a crew of about 20.
In the past five months, three large whaling fleets have gone through the Canal
were out of Europe to the Antarctic. The first was an Anglo-Norse group, on its first
two years. This included a large factory ship and nine catchers. They went south in
already shipped one load of oil back through the Canal.
The second fleet, out of Kiel, Germany, but with its vessels registered under the
flags, arrived late in September. This group was headed by the factory ship, Olympi
sisted of 13 catchers, all of which are former Canadian corvettes. Joining the fleet in P;
of highly skilled Norwegian harpoon "gunners," who take over command of the catc
the whaling grounds. These men are highly skilled. One of them on the Olympic's groin
credited with killing over 280 whales. Like the other two whaling fleets, the Olympic v
500 and 600 men. One more of the catchers, bringing the total to 14, was a latecomer.


the others. This last catcher did not reach the Canal on


& Co. are agents


its way


south until late last


photographed as they
rteen catchers of this
e of Norwegian regis-
e crew of the factory,
southward. All three
visit to the Canal in
June. This fleet has
Panama or Honduran
c Challenger, and con-
anama were a number
hers when they reach
up last trip south, was
essels carried between
following well behind
Month.


for all three of the whaling fleets.


Increase in


early in
were 490,
August of
began an
of the Un
Europe ai
States am
fice began
Europe ai


traffic be


August (August's t
an increase of 37
the previous year)
upswing between th
ited States and Asia
nd the West Coast c


d Canada.
to increase
nd Australas


a to be noted
otal transits
vessels over
when traffic
e East Coast
and between
)f the United


Later in August, traf-
temporarily between
sia, but this trend was


short-lived and had begun to decrease, again
- __- 1 - A---- A,- * t.! A~/, ->C i -L _ , -. -.1,


MONTHLY


COMMERCIAL


TRAFFIC AND TOLLS


Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


Month


Transits


(In


TFolls
thousands of dollars)





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Winning
Iwrizv


Prize v

the . ntl ;
* , r
priin^. /winn
l llN I ^-Ill h ' It'
n i ion with
Ilian tC


dlents w(
which i
ides; II, I
d 10; and
Judges fo
illiams,
ath Bene
Shirley,
urch in


ro awarded


Essays

recently by Dr.


mhnson, Superintendent of the
schools, to four students of
Zone colored schools for their
ng essays, submitted in con-
the August issue of the West
mmemorative stamp. The
re divided into four groups:
ndcluded the fifth and sixth


I


des 7 and
), grades 11


; C, gr
and 12.


r the contest were: A. B.
of the Silver Employees
*fit Association; the Rev. L.
of St. Peter's Episcopal
La Boca; Luis Noli, of the


Star and Herald: Nathan Reid


at
and
sion
Cor
T
Ma
sion


,Supervisor


the Rodman Naval Establishment,
A. E. Osborne of the Schools Divi-
[, Chairman of the Essay Contest
mmittee.
. .


'he
ria
A


Tank ,
$15; 1
Occup
$20, an
patio
gold p


winners and


Ramnirez, of Santa Cru
, $10; Francisco Rodrig
Junior High School, for
arion Thomas, of the
national High School, for
id Roy Bryce, of the La
al High School, for Di


en and pencil set.


given by the West
ciation Committee.
follow:


The


prizes


were:


z, for Divi-
uez, of Red
Division B,
Silver City
Division C,
Boca Occu-
vision D, a
prizes were


ndian Stamp Appre-
The winning essays


Why We have A Special
West Indian Stamp
We have a special W\Vest Indian Stamp in
honor of those West Indians who gave their
lives in the construction of the Panama


Canal.
A great many
malaria, yellow
Others, who were
work so that thi5
be completed.
For their faith
ingness to work i
the sacrifices they
shown by them in


of these workers died of
fever, and pneumonia.
very ill, still reported for
s important project could
fulness, loyalty, aid will-
n all kinds o& dangers, for
made, and for the courage


sence


gers from dynamite explosion, land slides,
and diseases, the Government of the United
StatesissuedthisSpecialWest Indian Stamp
to honor these men and to show the world
that it will always appreciate the work they
did and i he sacritices they made.
Division A
Maria Ramirez
Grade 6
Santa Cruz Elementary School
The Meaning of a Special Stamp in
Honor of Our West Indian Workers
The stamp made for the West Indian
workers was issued in order to honor them


I| -- AL . . . - -. *l_ --- - _ - _1 . . . 1 1 -


Bring


major role in the s
the Panama Canal
issuing of the West
Stamp.


This Corn
tant event ii
The Stamp !
meritorious
Indian labor
difficult task
It is a trit
able value ir
mav mark t


Awards


To


successful completion of
were honored b'y the
Indian Commemorative


mnemorative Stamp is an impor-
n the history of the Canal Zone.
las been issued in recognition of
service rendered by the West
-ers during the ten years of the
of building the Panama Canal.
)ite which brings us immeasur-
n prestige and at the same time
he beginning of more concrete


and material tributes in appreciation for
faithful service rendered by the West Indian
workers.
We can hope that the offspring of these
West Indian pioneers who made sacrifices
in the construction of the Panama Canal
will benefit more from the profits brought to
the I'nited States through the Panama
Canal.
Division C
Marion Thomas
Grade 10
Silver City Occupational
___ High School
The Significance of the West Indian
Commemorative Stamp
What's in a stamp? The story it relates,


PAY RAISES, INCOME TAX


(Continued from pages 3)
an average of old
sideration. If thi
date of payment
increase will hav
the overall tax to
Considerable a
followed introduce


and
s is
of t
Sno
be p
nd
tion


table which takes
new rates into con-
true this year, the
he retroactive pay
material effect on
aid during the year.
lengthy discussion
of a question as to


the locations where an employee may re-
side. For the record, the following housing
regulations were added to the minutes of
the meeting:
"Employees are required to reside in


the 'district' in which they arn
and, in general, the towns in
work. Residence outside of ti
which the employee works
authorized:
"(a) When the employee
meritorious case concurred in
vision chief and approved by
munity Services Director;
"(b) When an employee's wo
is changed within either the N
Southern district and his div
does not certify that a change c
is necessary. Under the latt
stances the employee will be p
remain in the quarters to wh


Employed
which they
he town in
may be

presents a
by his di-
the Com-


rk location
northern or
vision chief
)f residence
er circum-
ermitted to
ich he has


Zone


November 2, 1951


Students


the purpose of its creation, the people with
whom it communicates, the profit from its
use-these are the qualifications which de-
termine the value and significance of a
stamp.


The picture painted o
Commemorative Stamp
the heroic and sacrificial
tributions of the West Ij
accomplishment of a wor
ing feat-the Panama C
of constant struggle for d


gotten


n have


n th
tell
deed
ndiai
ld-fa
ana
lecer


West Indian and


seen omens


e West Indian
s the story of
Is, and the con-
n Negro in the
lined engineer-
1. After years
it survival, the
his offspring
encouragement.


On this occasion it is the tribute paying
West Indian Commemorative Stamp, a
symbolic example of recognition, apprecia-
tion, and gratitude. Through this stamp
the world can be educated on the important
role played by the "Old-Timers." No
greater profit could there be than the dy-
namic response of the democratic people to
the West Indian Commemorative Stamp for
what it stands -the birth of a demanding
and deserving campaign for justice and
equality.
Division D
Roy Bryce
Grade 12
La Boca Occupational
High School


badly this year. This question was to be
given post-conference consideration and,
meanwhile, the conference was told that
steps are being taken to prevent a similar
fading of plates for the coming year.
In answer to a question as to whether
the local postal service was to be taken
over by the United States Posts, the
Governor said that this plan is not re-
ceiving any active consideration although
such a recommendation is to be made in
the General Accounting office report on
the audit of Company activities.


Attending t
the Governor
Mr. Dunsmoc
Director; Mr.
Mr. Tobin, W
for the Centra


he October conference were:
and Lieutenant Governor,
)r, E. A. Doolan, Personnel


Il
1


Wagner, C
R. Howe,
Labor Uni


Council; Mr. Lovelady fo:
R.C. Daniel, Railway Coi
Lord, Marine Engineers;
C. A. Garcia, J. H. Jones
and R. F. Ralph for the


. W. Hoffmeyer,
E. W. Hatchett
on-Metal Trades
rtheA. F. G.E.;
nductors; GuyR.
; M. S. Goodin,
, Timothy Ladd
Civic Councils;


James Boukalis for the Machinists, and
C. A. Luhr for the Pacific Side Lock
Operators.

A PRESIDENT VISITS

(Continued from page 3) three days varied


e


t


P






November 2, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Oil,


Phosphate


Increase


and


In


An increase in the amounts of oil, phos-
phates, coal and coke shipped from the
Atlantic to the Pacific was noted during the
first quarter of the fiscal year, according to
- .1 fl * ^>


reports of the Management LiVlsion.
The oil shipments, which were reported
as 754,261 long tons for the July-August-
September quarter of the current fiscal
year, had almost doubled from the 368,019
long tons shipped in the Atlantic-Pacific
trade during the same quarter of the pre-
vious fiscal year.
On the other hand, oil shipments in the
opposite direction, from Pacific to Atlantic,
had decreased considerably. During the
first quarter of fiscal year 1952, only 121,470
long tons of mineral oils passed through the
Canal from Pacific to Atlantic, as compared
with 1,207,428 tons during the same period
in the fiscal year 1951. This latter figure,
however, was artificial, in that during the


corresponding three months of fiscal year
1951 there was a short but intensive ship-
ment of oil between the east and west coasts
of the United States.
Much of the heavy Atlantic-Pacific oil
shipments of the current fiscal year are
originating in the West Indies, with both
South America and Australasia as their des-
tinations. This situation, which developed
during the latter part of the quarter, was
attributed to the Near East oil situation.
The heavy phosphate shipments, 212,696
long tons for the quarter just ended as com-
pared to 67,963 long tons for the correspond-
ing quarter in fiscal year 1951, are destined
primarily for Japan from the United States
east coast.
Also up, in the Atlantic to Pacific trade,


were


long tons of manufactured iron and


steel, paper and paper products, sulphur,
cement, sugar (of which 108,161 long tons
were shipped during the first quarter of fis-
cal year 1952 as against only 23,547 long
tons for the corresponding quarter last year),
machinery, and automobiles.
The Atlantic-Pacific trade showed de-


creases


in ammonium compounds, raw cot-


ton, tinplate, ores, and canned food prod-
ucts.
In the Pacific-Atlantic trade, ore ship-
ments were up by almost 100,000 long tons
for the first quarter of fiscal year 1952, as
compared to the first ouarter of last year.
Wheat shipments were 542,707 long tons,
as compared to only 297,372 long tons for
the corresponding period last year.
Other cargo showing increases in this
trade were sugar, refrigerated food products,
lumber, bananas, and other fresh fruit.
Cargo items showing decreases in this quar-


Local cargo received _..
Local cargo forwarded
Transfer cargo received . ..


Total incomingn


cargo


handled


Rehandled cargo. _
Transfer cargo forwarded..
Total cargo handled and
- . A


Coal


Atlantic-Pacific


Trade


ter as compared to the corresponding three
months last year were: nitrates, canned food


products, metals, coffee, wool,
and dried fruit.


raw cotton,


Total cargo handled and transferred over
the Canal Zone piers during the first quarter
of the current fiscal year was 349,194 short
tons, as compared with 333,066 tons for the
average quarter min fiscal year 1951 and
373,453 tons in an average quarter of fiscal
year 1938.


CANAL


Commercial


TRANSITS-COMMERCIAL AND


vessels:


Ocean-going . ..
*Small . .....
Total, commercial -
**L. S. Government vessels:
Ocean-going.....
*Small -....


Total commercial and U.


* Vessels
** Vessels


S. Gover


nment


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW has
made the pages of the Congressional
Record. The Appendix to the Record
carries an extension of remarks made
in the House of Representatives Octo-


ber 1 by Congressman
Thompson of Texas. Re
Thompson calls the Th:


presentative
Ltcher Ferry


a
"one of the most important projects
d engised to serve the Canal Zone and


the Republic of Panama."


As his con-


clusion, he adds the article carried in
the August 3, 1951, issue of THE RE-
VIEW: "Ten Millionth Car Crosses
Canal By Thatcher Ferry."


U. S. GOVERNMENT


First Quarter-Fi


Atlantic
to
Pacific


1.000


Pacific
to
Atlantic


Total


1,770


scal Year


Total


Total


under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated


transited free.


CARGO HANDLED OVER PIERS
(In short tons)


First Quarte
Fiscal Year 19


Cristobal
79,790
18,566
84,660
183.016


99,854


1o0 '7n0


Balboa
33,429


20,014


58,459


i43 AAC


r
52

Total
113,219


38,580
89,676
241,475


104,678


2i1n IA


Average
quarter,
1951
All piers


96,005
25,810
105,137
226,952


102,562


f2l fAA


Average
Quarter,
1938
All piers


87,968


138,386
235,742


136,127


373 A45


tran oreme , . . . , . .


Shipments


- - - -


(




,�I-(-


20


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

11 I1 I III II II II
3 1262 08542 7549


HE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


November 2,195


PILOTING SHIPS THROUGH


" page i1)


first as a pilot-in-


train . later as a probationary pilot,
and now as a full pilot.
This is only a fraction of the transits
chalked up by the senior men. The
Canal's two senior pilots, Captain Henry
Falk for Balboa and Captain Charles S.
Townshend for Cristobal, have over 3,000
transits apiece to their credit. Both first
served as towboat masters and both have
�~ 9
been pilots since 1926.
Five Are Pilots' Sons
Captain Falk, like four other pilots, is
the son of a former pilot. The others are
Captains G. F. Kariger, S. W. Peterson,
T. C. Makibbin, and A. G. Terwilliger.
Not all of the Canal's pilots, however,
are full-fledged and able to take any ship
through the Canal. Sixty-three are full
pilots, 11 others are in their probationary
period, and 3 others are pilots-in-training.
At the present time the Marine Bureau
has a list of 25 applicants who are fully
qualified to be hired as pilots-in-training.
Unless conditions change, however, Ma-
rine officials think that the present force
will be sufficient for some time to come.


PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS
(Continued from page 16)

SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU
Mary N. Orr, from Clerk-Stenographer,
Division of Storehouses, to Secretary, Office
of the Supply and Service Director.
Michael G. Letchko, from Machinist to
Plant Engineer and Machinist, Commissary
Division.
Mrs. Gretchen E. Melanson, from
Commissary .Assistant to Cash Accounting
Clerk, Commissary Division.
Mrs. Melba M Heintz, from Cashier,
to Commissary Assistant, Commissary Di-
vision.
Mrs Hazel E Currier, from Assistant
Dry Cleaning Foreman to Dry Cleaning
Foreman, Commissary Division.
Mrs. Alice O. Eaton, from Transporta-
tion Rate and Audit Clerk to Supply Clerk,
Division of Storehouses.
Mrs. Alicia M. Castro, from Clerk-
Typist to Transportation Rate Audit Clerk,
DI)ivision of Storehouses.
Mrs. Edna E. Grandin, from Clerk-
Typist to Property and Supply Clerk, Divi-
sion of Storehouses.
Margaret L. Csighy, from Clerk-Typist
to Procurement Clerk, Division of Store-
o -


Nationality


British .. .
Chilean__ �


Commodity


Mineral Oils.
Coal and Cok
Manufactures
Phosphates .
Paper and Pa
Sugar ... .
Sulphur ..
Automobiles -
Machinery
Cement ..
Raw Cotton_
Ammonium C(
Tinplate
Canned food
Ores, various-
All others. -


e _ -~~ ~ ~ - - - - - - �
e
of iron and steel
per Products ..





impounds
products ...


Total _


First Quarter, Fiscal


1952
754,261
417,534
408,242
212,696
120,818


3,444,963


PACIFIC TO


Commodity


Ores variousi


Lumber ..- -
Wheat_
Nitrate
Sugar
Canned food
Refrigerated
cept fresh
Metals, vario
Bananas
Mineral oils_
Coffee


products_
food prod
Fruitt.
is-----


Wool...
Fresh fruit (except b
Raw cotton
Dried fruit - -
All others_


nanas)


Total_


1951


368,019
15,550
355,337
67,963
90,189


2,256,116


First Quarter, Fiscal Years
1952 1951 1938


13,723
83,244
42,707
75,531
72,828
03.582


186,782
164,810
136,785
121,470
49,185
45,137
39,336
31,308
21,195
624,942
S- 4,612,565
4,612.565


19,960
74,990
97,372
80,143
41,749
38.633


126,950 (10)
167,146 (8)
111,806 (9)
1,207,428 (3)
62,896 (12)
46,325 (13)
25,252 (17)
33,866 (15)
47,694 (19)
626,912
5,400,122


497,627
706,187
171,632
254,890
344,233
313.906


89,037 (10)
159,361 (8)
11,441 (20)
780,126 (1)
42,507 (16)
21,890 (21)
81,617 (9)
32,920 (20)
73.151 (12)
760,225
4,340,750


First Quarter of Fiscal Years


Num-
ber of
transits
286
12
1


Tons
of cargo


1,967,618
50,668
on,;A


Num-
ber of
transits
215
10


Tons
of cargo

1,311,546
42,336


1938
Num- Tons
ber of of cargo
transits
292 1,667,795
2 10,096
1 12 112


Years


1938
225,362 (3)
30,444 (14)
336,634 (1)
6,435 (6)
108,492 (5)
8,250 (31)
53,868 (7)
48,161 (9)
31,778 (10)
29,326 (11)
57,694 (13)
11,976 (22)
28,887 (8)
31,935 (15)
16,431 (18)
829,375
1,855,048


(i( inu "


Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All figures in long tons)
Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1951 columns indicate
relative positions in those years
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC


ATLANTIC


Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels


. .


i