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Panama Canal review
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00090
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: May 1951
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00090
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum

SPANAMA


==


Vol. 1


BALBOA


HEIGHTS


CANAL ZONE


MAY


5 cents


PANAMA


CANAL


COMPANY


AND


GOVERNMENT


SUPPLANTS


ORGANIZATIONS


102


AND


YEARS


HISTORY


JULY


Three Categori

In Company

The Panama Canal Company and the
Canal Zone Government, terms soon to
become household words on the Isthmus,
will come into being within less than two
months.
They will replace the organizations now


known
Panama
which I


as The Panama Canal and the


Railroad
re, respect


Company
ively, 47


F,


entities
and 102
'he meta-
1, 1951,


r


years of distinctive history. T
morphosis will take place July


by an Executive Order issued by President
Truman implementing Public Law 841.
Like all Gaul, the Panama Canal Com-
pany will be divided into three parts,
which will be known in administrative or
fiscal parlance as activities.
The Canal Zone Government will be
composed of those component parts which
are generally recognized as functions or
activities of a sovereign governing body.
These are separately listed in the chart.
This basic description for the future
operations of the interoceanic waterway,
its many interrelated activities of a com-
mercial or pseudo-commercial nature, and
a government of the people participating


Income


Units


in these affairs is, in fact, an over-simplifi-
cation of a complex pattern.
Basic Objective Explained
The basic purpose of the change in July
is to provide a single, business-type finan-
cial and administrative structure for the
operation of the Canal and Railroad. The
administrative framework for this new


structure


the reorganization became effective and
relatively few other changes of this nature
will be required.
As indicated in the chart below, the
Panama Canal Company will be divided
into the following main categories:


Canal Activity.


This will comprise the


work and functions directly related to the
operation of the Canal as a waterway.
They include, in the main, the transiting
of vessels between the Atlantic and Pa-
cific Oceans; maintenance of the water-
way and its navigation aids; operation
and maintenance of the locks and their
machinery; and those engineering services
pertaining to these activities.


Commerical Activity.


This will consist


chiefly of those functions already familiar


to the average Canal-Railroad employee
under terms shown in the chart. They
include, somewhat in their relative im-
portance for employees, the commissaries,
clubhouses, public utilities such as light,
water, and telephones, the Panama Rail-


Panama


hotels,


Handling Plants, Industrial Bureau, real
estate operations, and allied or related
activities.


This pertains to the


design, construction, upkeep,
of employee quarters.
Since Public Law 841 r


and rental


requires


Panama Canal Company to be self-sup-
porting, plus paying the net cost of the
Canal Zone Government and interest on
the capital investment, this division of the


company's activities which
come is of great importance.


possible


the adjustment


provide in-
It makes
(See page 3)


CANAL


ZONE


GOVERNMENT


PANAMA


CANAL


COMPANY


CANAL


7y-


SCi


Planned


Housing Activity.


was established last July when


SPECIAL FEATURES
* THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW will be-
come a monthly publication with the next
issue. The special announcement on this
appears on page ".
* Progress of plans for the conversion of
electric power in the Canal Zone to 60-
cycle frequency is described on page 5.
* Two of the best known employee organi-
zations in the Zone are described in this
issue. Read the story of the American Fed-
eration of Government Employees and the
Silver Employees Death Benefit Association
on pages 2 and 9.
* See pages 10 and 11 for a picture story of
the quarters construction program this year.


II


I


---.


I





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 4, 1951


A.F


.G.E.


Conducts


Vigorous


Program


For


Members


Nationally


And


Locally


Lodge No. 14 Chartered

In 1932 Now Largest Of

1,300 In National Body

Probably because of the diversity of
their work and interests white collar
workers have been generally recognized to
be among the most lackadaisical employee


groups everywhere about labor union
matters.
Despite this fact, the largest and gen-
erally the most vociferous of the employee
unions in the Canal Zone is Lodge No. 14,
of the American Federation of Govern-
ment Employees, which is made up
almost exclusively of white collar employ-
ees. Not only is Lodge No. 14 the largest
but it is one of the youngest locals among
the American workers here.
It was born nearly 20 years ago and
only the wheel of fortune kept it from
being No. 1 lodge. By the same token,
however, it might have been No. 39 for
there were 38 other lodges of the national
organization born on the same day. The
numbers were drawn from a hat in Wash-
ington, D. C., and the charter for the
Canal Zone group happened to be among
the lowest numbers drawn.
Lodge Started With 143 Members
Although it started with only 143 char-
ter members, Lodge No. 14 now boasts an
active membership of 1,060. Its officers
and members proudly lay claim to being
the largest union or local in the Canal
Zone and to having the highest member-
ship of any of the 1,300 A. F. G. E. lodges
which have been chartered since the Fed-
eration was formed with the 39 charter
lodges in August 1932.
Despite its comparative youthfulness as
labor unions go, Lodge No. 14 is, in a
manner of speaking, the proud parent of
two other lodges, which are No. 88 for
A. F. G. E. members on the Atlantic side,
and the Army and Navy Lodge No. 974 at
Coco Solo. The former was granted its
charter in January 1934 and now has 125
members, while the Army and Navy
Indct rt* hnrtrd in Maroh 1t4. hn a


OFFICERS OF THE A. F. G. E. above are David Kaplan, President of the Army and Navy
Lodge No. 794, H. J. Chase, National Vice President, and Rufus M. Lovelady, President of Lodge
j No. 14. Sherman Brooks, President of Lodge No. 88on the Atlantic side, was ill in the hospital when
this picture was taken in the offices of Lodge 14, upstairs in Balboa Clubhouse.


This distinction is not accorded to other
lodges outside the continental United
States, all of which are in Districts with
headquarters in the States.
Because of the large membership in the
Canal Zone and the vigor with which the
three lodges have promoted the Federa-
tion's overall objectives, additional recog-
nition was given three years ago when the
election of a national vice president from
the Canal Zone District was authorized.
This position has been held since 1948 by
H. J. Chase, himself a member and
former officer of Lodge No. 14.
Members Mostly White-Collar Workers
Membership in the A. F. G. E. is com-
posed mainly of clerical, professional, and


The


Problem


other Federal employees in the so-called
white collar occupations. Its constitution
provides, however, that any Federal
employee of United States citizenship
who is a member in good standing of any
other union affiliated with the American
Federation of Labor is eligible for mem-
bership.
The A. F. G. E. is what might be
termed a depression baby, being born out
of the turmoil created by the economic
crash of 1929. Very few of the local
members, including those who joined at
the start, now have but a hazy idea of
what caused the formation of the
A. F. G. E.


union


Cancer in


came


(See page 14)


Women


rPrh. x m ontn Am n Anrnnmrmnn,+nr- hMoxrnan fbhi


1 ._,:,, c- 4,-1,, ,,,. . ,I- +f,,i, ir,,,++,-l 4-hr Awn ,m, ,+onM


I





May 4, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Canal Company
Divided Into


Activities
Three Parts


(Continued from page I) of rates in a
single group without disrupting those of
the other two.
No Increase In Rents Seen
Of major significance to Canal-Railroad
employees is the plan to maintain the


present policy


quarter
lated t
and m;
expect
rents o
This
been a
tions v
barring


wxitI


rs, which is 1
;o cover all
maintenance.
id that their
n existing h
policy on
adopted in c
vhich preva


employeess


h regard to empl
to charge rentals


oyees
calcu-


expenses of operation
Simply said, it is not
re will be any raise in
housing.
Housing Activity has
consideration of condi-
Ail in the Canal Zone
from providing or ac-


quiring their own homes or securing
equity by rental payments. The expe


other than operation and ma
quarters will be allocated t4
Commercial Activities, and
Zone Government proporti
cupancy of quarters by empl
of the three categories.


To avo
separate
Governm
general se
much the
ThL Pan
Railroad
The expe
shared pr
and Gov(
will be in


lintenance on
o Canal and
to the Canal
onate to oc-
ovees in each


id a duplication of functions and
staffs for the Company and
ent, both administrative and
trvices will be provided jointly in
same manner as heretofore to
ama Canal and the Panama
Company units on the Isthmus.
rnses for these services will be
'oportionately by the Company
?rnment under a formula which
Lcorporated into a formal agree-


ment between the two organizations.
Both the administrative and general
expenses will be charged into the corpora-
tion's accounts.


Accounting Procedures
The administrative fun'
lose of the President of
Id his staff. Expenses in
ureaus of Finance and Per
ie Administrative Branch
,"general expenses." E
iged in all these activities


Simplified
actions include
the Company
curred by the
�sonnel and by
will be listed
employeess en-
will be carried


on the Company rolls and the units will
be shown in its organization chart.
This inter-agency arrangement will per-


mit a simplification and impro
the accounting system which
would require a tangled mass of
intra-agency charges.
Unlike the Panama Canal
tuhioh will nnprnt^ an itQ nnrn


vement of
otherwise
individual


Company,
rPuvnnhnQ


To


The


Preparations for the
Canal organization to a c
presently nearing a con-
clusion. In many respects
the change will be the
most significant since the
construction of the Canal
was formally undertaken
by our Government just
47 years ago today.
The plans, which have
been under consideration
for many months, will be
made public in detailed
form after their final ap-
proval which will be in
the very near future.
They are discussed at
some length in their tenta-
tive form elsewhere in this


transition
corporate fo
* r''i


representatives
Budget, the 0
Army, and th
The Canal ha
caution of sec
of one of the
firms of the U
versant with th


tions, for advice on the fiscal
It is of great importance for
to acquaint themselves fully wit
which will take place in July
Law 841 becomes effective.
comprehension of the organizat
they will work, whether it be
(I ' f ^ / � I F 1 .A k /,t M f 4 '.. I i ( Y , - I


problems.
all employees
h the changes
when Public
A thorough
ion for which
the Panama
7 n. AlA(* Ifl ,lA.TV


employee
venient m


.$~~e-�


4 :- '


. ^
-* * *

W


While it i
employee will
study require
and administ
nation of the
establishment
next July, I
ployees have.
fundamental


. . .


organizations,
ethods.


con-


Consideration is pres-
"' ently being given to the
desirability of holding one
or more public meetings
in the Canal Zone to
provide an information
forum on the incorpora-
tion. The objective would
be to provide an open
question and answer ses-
sion which would give
the general public an
opportunity to become
thoroughly informed on
any and all phases of
the changes which will
take place.
is apparent that the average
not care to devote the time and
d to follow the intricate fiscal
trative procedures in the for-
Panama Canal Company and
of the Canal Zone Government
consider it essential that em-
a clear understanding of the
features.


re


The changes required by the enactment of
Public Law 841 of September 26, 1950,
pertain primarily to thefiscal policies under
which the Panama Canal will be operated
in the future. By and large, they affect the
conduct of the business operations of the
Canal-Railroad rather than the individual
employee and his general welfare.
The most salient fact about the incorpora-
tion of the Canal operations ts that the
action is required by a law which also es-
tablishes the basic framework for the change.
The plans which are now in their final
stage have been the subject of long and care-
ful consideration -consideration not only of
the legal aspects by which we are bound but
of the future effect on the employees and
their living and employment conditions.
Aside from those of the Canal organization
who have taken part in the discussions, we
have had advice and counsel from highest
governmental sources. These have included


While the incorporation of Canal opera-
tions will bring little change to the daily
lives of the employees, the relationship be-
tween the management and employees will
perhaps be on a closer basis than has been
possible under the present organization.
For this reason every endeavor will be made
for improved liaison through a wider dis-
semination of information about the com-
pany's activities.
Two steps were initiated just a year ago
to provide employees with a better under-
standing of the affairs of The Panama
Canal and the Panama Railrtoad Company.
These were the publication of this periodical
and the monthly conferences between ad-
ministrative officers of the Canal and repre-
sentatives from various employee groups.
The results have been highly satisfactory
from the administration's viewpoint and I
judge, by the popular response, from the
viewpoint of the employees.
Both of these means of acquainting
employees with the Panama Canal Company
and its activities will be continued and
expanded. Plans have been approved for
the publication of THE PANAMA CANAL
REVIEW on a monthly basis which will
greatly increase its value as a source of
i ^-m�v^ *lnlM (n . nnr nr 4 f\ f\/\ i) n'n rm ^rl t iit 9T- t h/V/


from the Bureau of the
fice of the Secretary of the
e General Accounting Office.
s taken the additional pre-
uring the consulting services
leading private accounting
united States, thoroughly con-
e operation of large corpora-


Employees


and by other


k





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 4, 1951


NEWS


OF


YOUR


COMMISSARY


STORES


REGARDING THlE SUPPLY OF WOMEN'S DRESSES
As in most manufacturing of consumer goods, the garment makers' calendar
for cutting dresses of various weights for the different seasIms is sharply at
variance with the seasons themselves. In Octobe r, when the Autumn chill is
setting in and most women in the States are thinking of buying woolen things or
how to get, a new fur coat out of their budget, dress manufacturers start showing
their spring and summer lines of dresses, for delivery to the buyers between
February and May. At the end of May and until October, the heavier weights
and darker shades, generally suitable only for the more northerly latitudes, are
the only dresses produced, except for the very limited "Cruise" lines, consisting
mostly of sports outfits.
The result of this seasonal manufacture of dresses, as far as the Isthmian
woman is concerned, is that for about one-third of ea:+h year the Commissary
stores have attractive assortments of summer dresses in a wide varityv of styles
and price ranges, and for the remainder of the year very few are available to the
buyer that would suit the local needs. In our stores now the hbt assortments of
the year are available, and our buyers can re-order lines with a reasonable as-
surance that our orders will he filled.
Whether or not a States vacation is planned this year, it is our earnest
suggestion that our women customers anticipate their needs of dresses for the
period from about early June until the beginning of next February, and purchase
such additional dresses now as will be required during the months when our dress
racks will not, and cannot because of the dress manufacturers' calendar, provide
the wide choice of dresses that they now do. In other words, we recommend that
you borrow from your future clothing budget to establish for yourself a "dress
bank" to be drawn against at a later date when suitable garments just cannot
be had.
Incidentally, although there has been no spot-lighted publicity given the
matter, we are certain that our interested customers are by now aware that we
have been getting regular shipments of limited number's of attractive suits and
dresses as currently advertised in the nationally distributed magazines, su"h as
Charm, Glamour, Seventeen. Harper's and Vogue. Many of these dresses and suits
have been tagged with a note as to the magazine and month of issue in which
they are to be illustrated and our customers will have undoubtedly noticed that,
except for the classic suits and tailored dresses, there has usually been only one
of a given color or style. We know you haveliked our selections of dresses because
of the large numbers you have purchased almost as soon as they were displayed,
and we plan to keep in stock the widest possible variety of dresses during the
short period when summer styles are available. We repeat the suggestion, how-
ever, that you purchase an entire year's supply during the present season.

NOTES FROM RETIRED OLD TIMERS
Each year, shortly before Christmas, we send out to all retired Zonians the
latest Commissary calendar, with a little note of greeting from those of us who
remain on the Isthmus to keep the ships moving through the "Big Ditch."
This past year nearly 1,500 were sent out, resulting in the return of many in-
teresting letters, nearly all of which contained general greetings to the writers'
friends and acquaintances who are stilt in the service.
While the letters are still coming in, and space limitations prevent printing
the text of any of them, here is a sampling of the names of those who have written
so far: from St. Petersburg, Fla.: Charles E. Hutchison, Henderson C. Smith,
Mary L. Stakeham, Joseph McIntosh, Edward F. Hewitt, W. S. Essex, M. A.
Colston, T. M. Drake, W. J. Bartlett, Robert W. Glaw, Arthur W. Luther,
Otto Kozak, William H. Ward, Jr., Charles T. Smithies, and Charles D. Hummer.
From other Florida addresses: Bradenton: Wallace Dunham; North Miami:
Robert G. Howe; Bostwick: R. W. Grabhorn; Tampa: Charles H. Beetham; New
Port Richey: F. H. Smith; Zephyrhills: Herman and Marie Wulff; Lutz: W. B.
McCombs; Pinellas Park: Louis Warner. California was represented by letters
and cards from: Monrovia: Ellis D. Stillwell and W. H. Neadham; San Diego:
0. T. Marstrand, E. C. Dunkle, Marshall J. Steele and James C. Willson; San
Francisco: Isaac H. Andrews; Los Angeles: James R. Robson and Joseph L.
Welch; Oakland: H. R. Pickens and Verner B. Dingledine; Pasadena: 1H. F.
Bevington; Altadena: Gertrude A. Murray; Alhambra: Florence N. Miller; San
Mateo: Robert F. Lawrence; Sacramento: Leroy D. Shuler; Whittier: Carl P.
Wanke; Palo Alto: J. II. Stevenson; Santa Barbara: A. Mundberg; Compton:
Ildege J. Langlois; and Coronado: H. L. Ferguson.
The other communications received were scattered over the entire width
and breadth of the United States, as follows: Topeka, Kan.: B. R. Betz, Sr.;
Norfolk, Va.; Hezekiah P. Forrest; Iillsboro, Tex.: Beulah N. Eidman; Houston,
Tex.: J. H. Orr; Bellaire, Tex.: A. S. Brown; San Antonio, Tex.: W. M. Niendarff;
TQnrr*r;lln T .v * Ifn 1? 17 A 44n*��.,,. Th�lln,. m ... :! 1) t it


COMPARISON OF COMMISSARY RETAIL PRICES WITH AVERAGES
IN 56 LARGE U. S. CITIES (from Consumers' Price Index and Retail Food
Prices published by BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, U. S. DEPART-
MENT of LABOR. For detail of cities involved and other explanatory material,
refer to THE REVIEW, issue of February 2, 195!, page 12).
States Commissary


FOOD AND UNIT


Average
Price
2-15-51


Cereals and Bakery Products:
Flour, wheat, 5-lb. (Comsy., 4-lb. sack
basis) .. .---------............
Corn flakes, 11-oz....i..........
Corn flakes, 8-oz. (see foot-note) .....
Cornmeal, lb . ... ._._...
Rihe, lb. (Comsy, 4-lb. sack basis) ...-
Rolled Oats, 20-oz, paper pack .... ....
Rolled Oats, 20-oz. tin ....


white, lb.


(Comsy,


14-oz. loaf


basis) ---
Vanilla cookies, lb. (Comsy, 7-oz. pack
basis) .... .......
Meats:
Beef: Round steak, lb.
Rib roast, lb. (Comsy, first 5 ribs).
Chuck roast, lb.
Hamburger, lb.
Frankfurters, Ib.
Veal: Cutlets, lb.
Pork: Chops, center cut (Comsy, loin
chops).
Bacon, sliced, lb.. .... . .... . .
Ham, whole, lb. (skinned, smoked,
tenderized) --. --...-..
Salt pi/k, lb. (dry salt belly)
Lamb: Leg, b......
Poultry: Fryers, N. Y. dressed (undrawn).
Fryers, dressed and drawn
Fish: Salmon, pink, 16-oz. can ...
Dairy Products:
Butter, lb..-......
Cheese, Ib. (processed Cheddar) .
Milk, fresh (del., qt .
Milk, fresh (groc.), qt. ......
(Comsy makes a flat delivey c':a ge of
75 cents a month, regardless of num-
ber of quarts delivered)


Milk, evaporated, 14%-oz. can
Ice Cream, pt.. .
Eggs, fresh, doz. (States: size
sold in volume; Comsv.


$0.514
,207*
Not priced
.096
,182
. 171*
Not priced

.157

.495

1 074
.850
.730
.666
.642
1.235

.779
679

675
396
805
.488
620*
620

.824
598
227
.214



143
.314


Price
2-15-51 4-1


$0. 463
Not carried
,220*
.090
115
Not carried
.240*

.126

.480

.410
.350
-330
S380
.380
1.440

.600
.600

.650
.360
.500
.460
Not carrie
.590

.660
.460
.25)
220



.140
.190


5-51


$0 463

.220*
.090
115

.240*

.126

480

.410
,350
.330
.380
.380
1 440


and grade
Consumer


Grade A, large) ..
Fruits and Vegetables:
Fresh: Apples, lb.----------
Bananas, lb .
Oranges, size 200, doz. (Comsy, Boquete
small)
Beans, green, lb.
Cabbage, Ib... ...............
Carrots, bunch (Comsy, pound price)__


Lettuce, head
Onions, lb....
Potatoes, 15-lb..
Sweet potatoes, Ib. ....
Tomatoes, lb.....
Frozen: Peas, 12-oz..
Strawberries, 16-oz.. .
Orange juice, 6-oz.....
Canned: Peaches, halves,
(States: Grade B, Ch


No. 2d4can
oice; Comsy:


Grade A, Fancy) ....._....
Pinonnnrp t\n 9I/ ein


.628

110
165

.494
-263
.159
.141
.157
.072
.648
.098
.333
,250
.594
.240


.332
18QI


� -Ihll ilc'


*


�- *





May 4, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Plans


For


Power


conversion


In


Zone


May


Be


Laid


Aside


For


Several


ears


Groundwork Of Project

On 60-Cycle Frequency

Practically Completed
Problems of money, manpower, and
materials will probably require the post-
ponement of plans for the conversion of
the Canal Zone power system from 25 to
60 cycles for a period of several years.
While plans already made will not be
relegated to the dead files, Canal officials
realize that it would be all but hopeless
to expect that the project could be prose-
cuted expeditiously-if at all-under ex-
isting world conditions. Under national
defense plans already outlined the pro-
curement of restricted materials and man-
ufactured electrical equipment in the
amounts required during the next two or
three years is expected to be practically
impossible for any purposes not urgently
required or directly related to the mobili-
zation program.
The conversion project is not one which
lends itself to a piecemeal schedule and
when the work is once begun it should,
for economy and other reasons, be com-
pleted as rapidly as possible. Among the
reasons other than economy would be the
inconvenience for residents moving from
a community with 25-cycle current to one
with 60-cycle frequency and vice versa.
Since there is a constant shifting of per-
sonnel among Canal and other Govern-
ment workers in the Canal Zone the in-


convenience and
prove intolerable.


expense


would


soon


Time Schedule Not Set
While no time schedule has been set
for beginning the project, Canal authori-
ties believe, from statements by those in
charge of the national mobilization pro-
gram that conditions may permit the pur-
chase of some materials and equipment
within about two years. Tentative plans
on this basis, however, are subject to
change as dictated by world conditions.
Practically all of the investigation and
groundwork of the conversion project


have been


completed up to the point


MADDEN HYDROELECTRIC PLANT under construction in 1934. The giant, worm-like steel tube
is known as a scroll case and contains the turbine runners which turn the generators to make electricity. The
speed and winding of the generators determine the frequency of the current. In converting the Canal Zone
power system from 25-to 60-cycle frequency it would be necessary to rewind or replace the generators in the
various power plants.


Clubhouse


In


Inte


Changes

rest Of I


Several changes are being made by the
Panama Canal Clubhouses to increase the
economic and operating efficiency of some
Clubhouse units and at the same time
extend and modernize as much as possible
the public services provided by the or-
ganization as a whole.
The changes represent one phase of the
general Clubhouse policy of returning
earnings to the public in the form of addi-
tions and improvements of existing
facilities, according to W. H. Crook, Gen-
eral Manager of the Clubhouse Division.
The relocation of the Pedro Miguel and
Chagres Clubhouses and the change to
self-service in the dining room of the
Cristobal Clubhouse are some of the
recent moves made in the interest of
economy. Others of the same type which


Planned

efficiency


"idea-ed" and opened a new dine-and-
dance spot at the Diablo Clubhouse,
which bases its appeal primarily on low-
cost entertainment of a type which has
not been available before. It has been
planned to fit the purses of teen-agers and
income-tax conscious adults. The entire
idea has been executed with more in-
genuity than expense and the students
who are expected to make up its main
patronage have served as active partners
in the planning and decoration of the
room.
On the economy side of the ledger,
several moves have been made by the
Clubhouse Division to offset the loss in
revenues which has been experienced
since the war years and other economy
measures are now under consideration.




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 4, 1951


Logging


Operations


Prove


Successful


Canal


Enterprise


For


Past


Five


ears


Quality Native Hardwood

Is Procured At Low Cost

From Stands Within Zone


The Panama Canal has just completed
its fifth successful season of logging opera-
tions in the Canal Zone during which
approximately 172,000 board feet of fine-
quality native lumber, mostly mahogany,
was felled and shipped to the mill of the
Industrial Bureau in Cristobal.
The finished mill product will be
stocked by the Storehouse Division and
issued during the coming months to the
several units of the Canal and Railroad
which use native hardwoods for one pur-
pose or another. It will supplement the
large stock of native woods bought annu-
ally by the Canal from commercial lumber
firms in the Republic of Panama.
Logging operations in the Canal Zone
are conducted on a limited scale jointly
by the Storehouse and Municipal Divi-
sions. The successful prosecution of the
activity during the past five dry seasons
has been made possible only by close
cooperation and coordination of work in
the two units.


Work Done With No Fanfare


The work has been carried forward
with little fanfare and the average Zone
resident would be no more astonished to


hear the call of "mush" to a dogsled team
than to hear the cry of "timber" a short
distance from his home.
The operations have been centered for
the past three dry seasons in the tropical
forest of the Curundu Military Reserva-
tion, which has a heavy stand of large
mahogany trees. Arrangements for cut-
tinm and hauling the timber, made in


'-- CL,


advance between the Army and the
Canal, provided for the former agency to
share in the finished product.
The logging during the past dry season
was done near the Canal Zone boundary
line and resulted in the cutting and haul-
ing of approximately 850 cuts of mahog-
any, amarillo, cedro amargo, cedro espmo,


PLOWING ITS WAY through dense tropical forests and undergrowth, this bulldozer is making a new
but rough road over which logs can be hauled to mill. After cutting roads, bulldozers generally are used to
skid the tree trunks to selected bucking yards where they are cut to desired lengths.


felling, sawing, and hauling crews begin
their work.
Cruising of the forest areas has been
done largely by or under the immediate
direction of H. G. Robinson, Lumber
Advisor of the Storehouse Division, who
later acts as coordinator and general


FORTY


January


The Boy Scout movement was born in
the Canal Zone 40 years ago in January


when an organization of 16
boys was formed at Gorgona
Booz, W. H. Stevens, Harry
Samuel Paulus as members of
Council. Jess T. Hopkins was
Scoutmaster for the troop.


American
with R. S.
Otis, and
the Scout
chosen as


The Canal Zone was at one of the busiest
-narinds of the construction dams during the


supervisor of operations when Municipal
Division crews move in their heavy
equipment.
Work of Municipal Division
The work of felling the trees, cutting
them into desired lengths, and hauling
them out of the jungle is (See page U1S


YEARS


February


AGO


March


A Board headed by Lt. Col. H. F. Hodges
unanimously recommended the construction
of a bridge across the new Canal channel
near Empire at a sufficient height to clear
all shipping. The report noted that the
S. S. Olympic and the S. S. Titanic-were
then the highest vessels afloat and both
measured 175 feet from keel to smokestack
top.


Most of the. nresent-dav town of Bal-


,





May 4, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


An Official Panama Canal Publication
Published Quarterly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE


Printed


Panama


Railroad


Press


Mount


Hope, Canal Zone


F. K. NEWCOMER
Governor


HERBERT D.


VOGEL


Lieutenant Governor
E. C. LOMBARD


Executive


Secretary


J. RUFUS HARDY
Editor


The printing of this publication has
been approved by the Director of the
Budget on March 9, 1950.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters containing inquiries, sugges-
tions, criticisms or opinions of a general
nature will be accepted. In all cases
possible, letters to the Review will be
answered individually. Those of suffi-
cient general interest will be published
in this paper. Letters must be authen-
tic and be signed although signatures
will not be published unless requested
and names of authors will be kept con-
fidential. Return address should be
given but the Review will not under-
take to return correspondence of any
nature.

Special Notice
Beginning with the next issue, THE
PANAMA CANAL REVIEW will be published
monthly and will include THE SAFETY


ZONE,
Branch.


monthly publication of the
The publication date will


first Friday of
The more fr
will make oes


the pri
which,
year agi


In


zary


each month.


equent
msible
object


Zssue
a near
ve of


as announced in
o, is to give all em


derstanding of problems
siderable number.
This will be achieved


much wit
employees,
day lives
publication


Safety
be the


of THE REVIEW
�er attainment of
the publication


the first issue


.ployees
affecting


by


ler variety of
their families, a
than is possible
n'


a better un-


con-


the coverage of a
news affecting


nd their


day-to-


by a quarterly


The more frequent publication u
-i Ji, .- - a7 _ _-� - - .


oill also
i'.: . '


AN EXPERIMENT begun 30 years ago to develop agriculture in the Canal Zone sufficiently to supply
part of the fresh fruit and vegetables required by the residents is being brought to a close. Notices to vacate
have already been sent to a number of holders of agricultural land licenses. Holders of non-indemnity licenses
will be the first to move and later the indemnity licenses will be cancelled when funds are available to reimburse
the licensees.
The grand experiment never proved successful and has been a losing proposition for the Canal now for
many years. Although many of the licensees greatly improved the property and erected substantial houses,
others used the land only to raise a few chickens and enough vegetables and fruits for themselves. In many
cases rude shacks, like the one shown above, made of palm leaves and galvanized iron served as shelters for
the licensees or caretakers of the property.


CLOSE FARFAN PAVILION
The Clubhouse Division will cease its operation of
facilities and general supervision of both Farfan and
Hideaway Beaches at the first of June.
Neither of the two beaches is to be closed to the
general public but the operation of Facfan Beach
Pavilion, including the lifeguard service, will be dis-
continued on that date. Caretaker duties only are to
be provided after June 1 by the Grounds Maintenance
Division.
Another curtailment of recreation service at the
same time will be the closing of the Camp Coiner
recreation building. Efforts are being made to in-
terest some civic group of that community in assuming
responsibility for the building so that it can be kept
open for public use by the residents there.

INCOME TAX RETURNS
Not that anyone wants to be re-
minded of the fact, but June 15 is the
deadline for those Canal and Railroad
employees who have not already done
so to file their final income tax returns
for 1950. Those who did not file by the
March 15 deadline are now paying six
* - 4 - -


SUMMER RECREATION
Training courses are to start this
month for volunteers in the 1951 Canal
Zone Summer Recreation program
which opens early in July. Coordinators
of the program are Mrs. G. O. Parker
for the U. S.-rate communities and
E. Stanley Loney for local-rate
communities.
The program this year is under the
direction of a newly-formed Canal Zone
Recreation Board composed of repre-
sentatives from the various towns, the
Division of Schools, and the three
armed services. It will be financed pri-
marily by Community Chest Funds
raised in the successful drive last Octo-
ber. While the Summer Recreation
program is a civic affair, it will be closely
coordinated with the sports and re-
creational activities offered during the
vacation season by the Physical Educa-
tionand Recreation Branch.


NEW CANAL


TOWNSITES


Inmtrii amrp afill in nrrnwpr.q on the two new town-


OF CURRENT INTEREST


_-'^Li


i





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


May 4,


Panama


COMING


Canal Clubhouse Theatres


SOON


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May 4, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Association


For


Provides


Local


Low


-Rate


Insurance


Employees


In


Zone


Few, if any, employee organizations in
the Canal Zone have lived down dire pre-
dictions of failure at their inception in a
more satisfactory manner than the Silver
Employees Death Benefit Association.
Today the association has 3,260 mem-
bers and its financial status, while not
impressive in size, is nevertheless sound.
Its annual report for the last year showed
that the organization paid out nearly
$15,000 in 35 death claims. Since the
association was founded January 1, 1933,
more than $185,000 has been paid to 485
beneficiaries. Individual claims last year


ranged from $275 to $600 each.
The financial report of the past year
showed that the net worth of the associa-
tion, after meeting all liabilities, is now
slightly over $115,000, of which $100,000
is invested in U. S. Savings Bonds.
Members Run Organization
The Silver Employees Death Benefit
Association, similar in all respects to the
Mutual Benefit Association of U. S. rate
employees, is entirely run by its members
although a representative of the Canal
administration is appointed by the Gover-
nor to act as examiner for the association.
Although the books of the association are
audited at regular intervals by outside
accountants, the position of examiner
provides a reassuring factor for the rank
and file membership that the officers will
not be led into unwise financial byways.
The examiner not only is required to
countersign all checks but acts in an ad-
visory capacity on all financial matters.
The financial soundness of the associa-
tion at present may be attributed pri-
marily to the integrity of its officers from


the founding to the present. Almost
without exception the officers chosen
during the 18 years of the organization's
existence have been leaders in their com-
munities whose honesty and interest in
furthering the association's good have
been beyond question.
Prospects Were Bleak


Before the association was founded in
1933 the prospects for a going organiza-
tion on a sound financial basis were so
bleak that the first committee, appointed
by Governor Harry Burgess to investigate
the possibilities of a death benefit associa-
tion among local rate employees, recom-


. -I . � I � I "1�


ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS of the Silver Employees Death Benefit Association, organized 19 yearn
ago, are conducted by this group. Seated, left to right, are: E. A. Robertson, General Secretary; A. B. Williams,
President; and A. V. Dalby, Treasurer. Standing, left to right, are A. L. Wright, Examiner; S. A. Campbell,
C. W. Bruce, and H. Bayne, Trustees. Not present at this gathering were R. S. Chilcott, First Vice President,
and N. H. Hawkins, Second Vice President.


With the backing of the Canal adminis-
tration, the PCWIEA entered vigorously
into an organization campaign during the
latter part of 1932 and by the first of
January 1933, the organization was form-
ally established with 999 members. Since
that time a program of education among
local rate employees has been energetic-
ally carried forward both by officers of the
association and the general membership
on the advantage of this employee group
activity.
While the Silver Employees Death
Benefit Association has attained a high
reputation over the period of years, the
response to its appeal for membership has
been disappointing since the potential
membership is several times over its pres-
ent size. As in the case of all mutual
benefit societies, the larger the member-
ship the greater are the benefits enjoyed
by individual members either by lower
dues or larger claims.
Membership Dues Are Low
. ^. :. L� , Ct Ci tt +- C' . n


It
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4
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. -4


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Samuel H. Whvte


living in all parts of the West Indies and
in the United States.
fnc'nt. -b a j'fl1Qt irnnrrit !1 ninn& Vw rno r-





I


...... -- .. . . . -


1� 1


a





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


May 4,


Atlantic


Side


Quarters


Construction


Sidewalk superintendents are having a
Roman holiday on both sides of the Isth-
mus this year with the $3,000,000 quarters
construction program in full swing.
THE CANAL REVIEW presents on these


two pages a picture story of the progress


of the work at mid-April.


Views of all


areas where building or site preparation is
in progress are shown with the exception
of Endicott Street in Diablo Heights


Sir t1
^S S g^"'M'lfJiT'W d i- M*>^i^^^


where two masonry duplexes have just
been started.
The quarters building program this year
is but a foretaste of work planned for the
next few years when the Canal will spend
upwards of $80,000,000 to provide ade-
quate housing for its employees. Next
year's budget calls for the expenditure of
slightly over $11,000,000. Most of this
will be spent in the development of two
new townsites, one of which will be at
Summit, but considerable sums have been


earmarked


new .houses


in Ancon,


Margarita, Silver City, and Paraiso.
The most extensive grading projects
this year are Silver City, Margarita, and
Ancon. The site work at Silver City is a


part of
there.


this year's


site work


building


program


in Ancon


Margarita is preparatory to the quarters
construction program for the coming year.
Uppermost in the minds of most Canal-
Railroad employees is the question: How


'-".a~rra~~ � w ^ ^ ..,6,^ ifl
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_ ~~~~ \A*f?- I ! ^ESC^^ ^'^


BUSY AREAS are the sites of the two principal housing projects in Margarita which are on an ex-
tension of Sixth Street (above) and a new loop street from First Street (below). In all, 17 composite
type houses are being erected in the two areas. Both site work and construction are being done under
contract by the Panpacific Construction Company for $343,645. Four cottages and four duplexes are
being built on the Sixth Street extension, while five cottages and four duplexes are located in the
other area. Both of these views were taken during the lunch hour and belie their usual appearance
of beehives.


SITUATED on the arm of Manzanillo Bay which bends back between Colon and Coco Solo, this
Silver City development is the site of the largest single quarters construction project of this fiscal year.
Mmonnr lnnAid 1 QO r v nnn 4M . 1-^ La..a i-QL? -. mi.. ; ,.A


FOUR :MASONRY TYPE duplexes will be
erected by the Building Division on this site now
being developed on the high ground east of Jadwin
Road in Gatun just north of Gatun Commissary.


-. s- ^<-^-.tji^


A $60,000 SAVINGS made by the Building
Division on the quarters built in Camp Coiner this


r :; -�a ^ ^^ I


" : ,'"�.: ','. . ,:
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May 4,


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Buildings
much rent am I going to have to pay for
one of the new houses?


answer to


this question


is also


uppermost in the minds of those Canal
officials who have the responsibility of


and
them.


Sites
Canal officials


standardization of design and "


duction"


possible


Pacific


that the
mass pro-


the $80,000,000


building program will permit the estab-
lishment of rental schedules for both


owns


composite and masonry houses very close
to or lower than the existing rates for new


quarters,


provided


and building


material costs do not rise above present
levels.


fixing rent schedules.


It is presently under


study and it is not expected that exact
rates can be announced for another few
weeks.
The composite type houses being built
this year are of the same size and design
as those built in the San Juan area in


Ancon


year.


Two-family masonry


houses under construction are also of the
same design and size as those built in
Diablo Heights and Margarita.
The masonry houses now in use in these
towns were built two or three at a time on
an experimental basis and therefore have


a somewhat made-to-order price


tag on


WORK IS well advanced on two
on Guayacan Terrace in Anaon. TI


sion is doing this work.


slated to be


These


duplex


build


he Building Divi-


are the last houses


constructed in the old Corral Area.


ANCON'S FACE is being rapidly changed by the charging bulldozers and other heavy earth-
moving equipment of the Municipal Division. Reservoir Hill is rapidly being trimmed down as
Bishop's Hollow, between Ancon Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue, is brought up to desired grade.
The top picture shows the work in progress on Reservoir Hill and the bottom view shows the fill area


along what formerly


was Chagres Street.


In ad litioa to the work as shown in these views, other heavy


grading will be done along An-oa Boulevard. Tre area will provide sites
struction during the coming fiscal year.


for 70 houses slated for con-


A NAKED appearance is presented by the site
along Morgan Avenue and Pyle Street in Balboa
recently cleared of old quarters dating back to the
Canal construction period. The site is to be graded


FIVE NEW DUPLEX houses on Hains Street in Diablo Heights constructed by the Building
Division are nearing completion. These will be the first U. S.-rate quarters in this year's program ready
for occupancy. The Quarters are similar to those erected last year in the San Juan area in Aneon.


in
believe





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 4,1951


THE


CANAL-RAILROAD


HONOR


ROLL


"Yesterday morning Lieu-
tenant Brooke, nephew of Gen-


eral Brooke, . S. A., i n
accordance with instructions
of the united States Govern-


meant took possession of the
New Panama Canal Company's
property on the Isthmus and
OLD GLORY was hoisted at the
central office of the extinct
French Company in this city,
thus publicly demonstrating
that the transfer had taken
place.
"The old employees of the
Company have been requested
to continue in their present
positions until further notice."


.Stur C


Herald,


5, 1904.


This brief notice was the only descrip-
tion or explanation of this historic event
of 47 years ago today, marking the start
of the greatest single enterprise of its
nature ever undertaken up to that time
by the United States Government. The
same amount of space was devoted to
the event in the Spanish language section
of Panama's oldest newspaper, while only
one paragraph was used to tell the story
in French--the paper then being trilin-
gual.
Oddly, another name now featured in
world news appeared side-by-side with the
Canal story. It was a column-length
story describing the crossing of the Yalu
River by the Japanese in the Russo-


Japanese War.
The ceremony marking the


transfer of


the second French Canal Company's
rights and properties occurred at 7:30
o'clock on the morning of May 4, 1904.
It took place at the Company's head-
quarters located in the building then
known as the Hotel de la Compagnie
which is now the Panama Post Office
Building.
Lieutenant Mark Brooke was selected
to represent his Government in the ab-
sence of Maj. William M. Black, then in
charge of an engineering party on the
Isthmus, who had just sailed for New
York. The formal transfer was somewhat
hastily arranged after clearance in Paris
of the final legal technicality of approval
by the stockholders in the New French


FORMAL TRANSFER of the second French Canal Company's properties took place 47 years ago today
in this building which is one of the best known landmarks of Panama City. It was then headquarters of the
Canal Company and was known as the IHotel de la Compagnie. It now houses the Panama Post Office. This
picture was taken some four years after the $40,000,000 transfer was accomplished during a visit of the Pacific
(Fleet) Squadron. The old iron picket fence around Cathedral Plaza has long since disappeared.


Canal Company.
The famous forty-million-dollar receipt
was signed in English, French, and
Spanish by Lieutenant Brooke and the
resident director of the French Canal
Company.
The simplicity of the ceremony which
launched the Canal work contrasted
sharply with the scenes of feverish activity
soon to take place on the Isthmus. It was
much the same as if a monument had
been placed on time itself to mark the
beginning of a decade of almost unbeliev-
able man-made miracles.
There were more doubters than be-


lievers then about the Panama Canal.
The initiation of the project had even
been in doubt up until a short time before
the young Second Lieutenant of the
Corps of Engineers signed the $40,000,000


receipt.
Few


believed


that fellow fever and


other pestilences endemic to the Isthmus
could be eradicated; that a 50-mile trench
wide and deep enough for ocean liners


could be dug through treacherous muck
and hard rock; that an earth dam could
be safely built to hold back the largest
artificial lake then ever planned; that
steel and cement could be fashioned into
monumental locks for the waterway; that
steel plates and girders could be pieced
together into gate leaves weighing several
hundred tons.
These things, never before seen, re-


quired men of vision. They required men
and women who were not faint-hearted.
They were found.
They came from many nations, from
the United States and Panama, from
Jamaica and St. Kitts, from Barbados


and Guadeloupe, from France and Eng-
land, Italy, and Spain, the Philippines and
Alaska, China and India, and from the
countries of Central and South America.
The names of 69 of those from the
United States are listed below in an honor
roll of the Canal-Railroad organization.
They are still working for the enterprise
which they helped to build (See pag 1s3)


*


_� I


I


L


_ I � 1�*





May 4, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


PEOPLE


YOU


OLDEST


KNOW

OLD


TIMERS


Only a few years ago it was possible to
get from some Canal or Railroad employee
an eye-witness account of almost any
occurrence in the Canal Zone back to May
1904 when the United States undertook
to build the Canal. Another few years
will see the last of those employed before
the waterway was opened in August 1914
retired from active duty.
This issue of PEOPLE YOU KNOW
presents the two oldest old-timers among
the Americans who came to the Isthmus
during those early construction days-one
with the earliest service date and the
other with the longest continuous service.
They are:
JAMES RANDOLPH WILLIAMS,
Chief Inspector in the Finance Bureau,
who will observe the 42d anniversary of
his Canal service on May 14. He is one of
the very few who have rolled up so many
years of service on the Isthmus. He
succeeded to his present longevity title by
the recent retirement of Thomas J. Ebdon
of the Locks Division, and Joseph H.
Stilson, Jr., of the Panama Railroad
Company.
Mr. Williams, a native of New Albany,
Ind., is known to hundreds on both sides
of the Isthmus and on both sides of the
Canal Zone boundary line as "Jack"
instead of the usual nickname of "Jim."
The nickname was given soon after his
arrival on the old United Fruit steamer
Parismina from New Orleans.
He was first employed in the wholesale
drygoods department of the Commissary
Division. Within a few months he had
served in a half dozen of the better known
construction towns. After a year and a
half with the Commissary Division he
applied for a transfer to the office of the
Examiner of Accounts as Time Inspector
and all of his service since has been with
what is now the Finance Bureau.
Mr. Williams was promoted to Assist-
ant Chief Inspector in May 1937 and
became Chief Inspector in February 1941.
HAROLD A. SHAFER, Storekeeper in
the Storehouse Division, was born in Bay
St. Louis, Miss., and he, too, arrived from
New Orleans on one of the veteran United
Fruit Company steamers, the Heredia.
nt.L .tnJr-k TX fl Qb.,tnn mTcv 4in1tn rtni


boys up to their late teens, when he
stepped from the gangplank in Cristobal
45 years ago. His first job as messenger
lasted only four months. After that he
was reemoloved and left the service


severe


Stimes d
il times d


during


the construction


period, generally to take jobs at higher
pay. Among his other jobs, he recalls
starting apprentice machinist training
while Vincent G. Raymond, Leadingman
Machinist in the Industrial Bureau, the
only other 1906 employee still in service,
was learning the trade. He left that to
become a Lidgerwood car operator while
work on Culebra Cut was along the 95-
foot berm.
Most of his service both during and
since the construction period has been as
machinist or locomotive crane operator, a
job he now holds at the Cristobal Store-
house. His service has been continuous
since June 1924 and all of his work since
that time has been with the Storehouse
Division.




. * I



p -.


CANAL


Harold A. Shafer, Storehouse Division
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THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 4, 1951


A.F.G.E.


Conducts


Vigorous Program In Interest


Policies


C('mtinued from page 2) being as a result
of a conflict within the National Federa-
tion of Federal Employees (also known as
the F. E. U. or Federal Employees Union)
over the relative importance of the prob-
lem of classification of Federal employees
and other provisions of the Economy Bill
in 1932. The N. F. F. E. advocated em-


phasih on the classification of employees
while its parent body, the American
Federation of Labor, considered that


Own Membership


the Canal Zone has enjoyed a steady and
encouraging growth. Its membership
more than doubled within a year after it
was organized and the total membership
now is nearly 900 percent of that in
August 1932.
This amazing growth may be attributed
largely to the aims and ideals of the na-
tional organization which, by its constitu-
tion, set improvement of efficiency in the
Federal Service and advancement of the


of National


all of which provided


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR H. D. VOGEL is congratulated by Rufus M. Lovelady, President
of A. F. G. E. Lodge 14, on a talk recently given to its members on Canal policies.


question only one phase of a fight to
repeal or soften several features of the
Economy Act of 1931 which, among
other things, cut Government workers'
salaries 15 percent and seriously reduced
leave privileges.
Secedes From A. F. of L.


th.
th
16


The net
e disaffil
eA.F.
,000 to 1


result of the controversy was
iation of the N. F. F. E. from
of L. by a referendum vote of
2,000 taken in December 1931.


welfare of Federal employees as its main
goals.
The success in attracting members to
Lodge 14, however, must be largely cred-
ited to the vigorous leadership it has had
since its formation plus its willingness to
wade into a fight in the interest of its
members or Government workers gener-
ally. Its officers say that no question is


substantial in-


creases in compensation.
"In the meantime, numerous other ob-
jectives, both legislative and administra-
tive, were being achieved. Among these
were the overtime and night differential
pay for classified employees; a basic 40-
hour work week; recognition of employees
rights to join or refrain from joining
employee unions loyal to the United
States Government; establishment of
grievance appeal procedures for Federal
workers; and the law making it manda-
tory for classified employees wrongfully
suspended or removed from service to be
paid for the time they are not permitted
to work upon the resumption of their
duties."
Retirement Act Merger
Aside from these activities, A. F. G. E.
lodges here are particularly proud of their
success in legislation for the merger of the
Canal Zone Retirement Act with the Civil
Service Retirement Act which was passed
in the 81st Congress. Except for the
present Congress, the A. F. G. E. has kept
a legislative representative in Washington
for the past four years and has waged a
relentless fight on the (See page s0)


-a--___ ____~I~RIR~III


too small for investigation when the facts
so warrant nor is any fight too big to
tackle if justified.
President Outlines Accomplishments
The following brief outline of the A. F.
G. E. on local and national problems was
furnished at the request of THE CANAL
REVIEW by Mr. Lovelady:
"The American Federation of Govern-
ment Employees has played a prominent
role in influencing the enactment of most
of the beneficial legislation for Federal
employees which has been passed by Con-
gress since 1932. One of the first major
items upon which the A. F. G. E. con-
centrated was repeal of the Economy Act
under which salaries of employees were
reduced by 15 percent.
"After this came the Leave Act of 1936
which was a long step forward in bettering
the working conditions of Federal employ-
ees. This was followed by the Mead-
Ramspeck Act of 1941 providing auto-
matic within grade salary increases for
employees in positions subject to the
Classification Act of 1923; the Federal
Employees' Pay Acts of 1945 and 1946;
the Federal Employees' Salary Act of
1948: and the Classification Act of 1949;






May 4,1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Canal Conducts Logging
Operations With Success
(Continued from page 6) done under the
supervision of Elwin Feliz, Municipal
Division Foreman, who is an experienced
woodsman.
One of the worst jobs of logging in
heavy tropical jungles must be accom-
plished before the first tree is felled. This
is the clearing of trails and building rough
roads through the general area at grades
to permit the movement of heavily loaded
trucks and trailers. Certain areas along
these roads are cleared of underbrush and
established as temporary mill sites to
which the entire tree trunks are skidded
or snaked by bulldozer or heavy tractor
for cutting into usable lengths.
This clearing and road building opera-
tion this season was especially bad be-
cause of the hilly terrain where the logging
was done. Some of the best mahogany
trees in the area had to be left standing
because they were located where it would
have been too costly to haul after felling.
At one location tractors had to make a
wide circle around a hill to snake the
heavy trunks only a short distance to the
Bucking Yard because of the precipitious
grade.
Felling Requires Experience
The felling of the trees is done by ax
and power saw. The trees are first
notched by ax to guide their fall and small
power saws are used to complete the job.
An experienced workman in felling trees
can all but hit a dime with the tree top.
This can be done by properly judging the
line of the tree trunk, the relative weight
and pulling power of its branches, and the
notch cut in its trunk.
After a tree is felled, it is cleared of
limbs and foliage and is then snaked or
pulled to the prepared logging site. Often
the tractor has to bulldoze its own way to
the tree and thus clear a path for its
return.
Each length or cut from the tree trunks
is inspected by Mr. Robinson before it is
ready for hauling. The general practice
is to complete all felling and cutting before
hauling operations start near the close of
the dry season.
Logging Begun in 1946
Logging operations were initiated by
the Canal in the 1946-47 season primarily
as an pnnnnn mv manr_ Itf was aqt imrtaftd


ROUGH TERRAIN doe3 not bother this bulldozer in skidding a large mahogany tree to the
bucking yards. It is not uncommon for the bulldozer to cut itself a new trail through the under-
growth when skidding a tree from where it was felled to the bucking yard.


SUPERVISING THE cutting of prime mahogany logs into proper lengths for hauling to the
mill are Elwyn Feliz, Municipal Division Foreman in charge of logging operations in the field, (left)
and H. G. Robinson, Lumber Advisor of the Storehouse Division (center) who superintends and
coordinates logging operations. The work is a joint operation of the two divisions and requires co-
operation and coordination to make logging in the Canal Zone a success.


A.., .&,. -. i n * . - * ' w w y ~y -'.v






16 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


May 4, 1951


Canal Company Activities

cContinued from page 3) Company, is
considered directly applicable to the
waterway.
The decision of how to divide and allo-
cate the expenses of what is now The
Panama Canal and Panama Railroad
Company has a direct relation to the cost
of services provided by the Panama Canal
Company in the future, whether these
services are to be for shipping, company
and government employees, other Govern-
ment agencies, or other interests.
Officials Have No Leeway
Public Law 841 makes no provision for
the operation of the Panama Canal Com-
pany as a benevolent institution. Its
officers, under the law, will have no leeway
to circumvent the provisions prescribed.
This phantom strait jacket is already
evident in the announcement of increased
charges for services rendered to individ-
uals or agencies not a part of the Canal
organization. These include tuition rates
for school students residing outside the
Canal Zone District, rentals on quarters
occupied by nonemployees, and rentals on
lands, offices or property of the Canal-
Railroad.
In the past these charges have been at
nominal rates which would roughly re-
cover administrative costs. Under the
changed conditions after next July they
must be established on a basis to recover
all costs plus their proportionate share of
civil government and interest on the
United States' capital investment in the
Canal and its appurtenances. If this were
not done, the losses would have to be met
by revenues derived from tolls on shipping
or commodities and services provided for
the Canal-Railroad employees and others.
Plans Nearing Completion
Although the basic framework has been
erected for the new fiscal structure of the
Panama Canal Company and the Canal
Zone Government, not all the planks have
been laid. Plans are nearing their final
form and Governor Newcomer announced
last week on his return from the meeting
of the Board of Directors of the Panama
Railroad Company that the completed
picture is all but ready for a public
unveiling.
Any revision in the tolls rate structure
as determined by the formula prescribed
in Public Law 841 will be announced
V 1 j-tIi < m * *


Employee

Is


Who

Aided


Survived


Relative contentment and
mind have come to Egbert I.
after four years of determined
his part, aided by the sympathet
standing and help of the men for
works in the Municipal Divisior


Ancon.


Less than
Board of Tl
the opinion
practical p
totally disab
of both legs
scar tissue c


P
e
ti


Finding Co

,eace of
Williams
effortt on
c under-
vhom he


ntentment


Work


1 yards in


two years ago the Injury
he Panama Canal expressed
that Williams was, for all
purposes, permanently and
)led. Today, despite the loss
below the knees and rolls of
coveringg the right side of his


body and right arm, he is handling his job
of running the oil rack and gas pump in
the Municipal Division's heavy equip-
ment section in a satisfactory and com-
petent manner.
His case, recently reviewed by the In-
jury Board, created such a favorable
impression on the members that they
recommended official commendation for
the Municipal Division for its help in
reestablishing him in some useful occupa-
tion.
Life Miraculously Saved
Williams' life was miraculously spared
in a blinding flash of electricity from the
44,000-volt transmission lines across the
Isthmus on the afternoon of April 21,
1947. The accident occurred while he
was working as an oiler on a truck crane
engaged in some Municipal Division work
near Gamboa.
Williams says he remembers being
called by the crane operator to catch a
wire cable swinging from the crane boom
which was perilously near the overhead
high tension wires. Just as he grasped the
cable the boom touched the wires or came
close enough to cause the electricity to
arc down the cable and through Williams'
body to the ground.
He lay unconscious in Gorgas Hospital
for two weeks thereafter and remembers
nothing from the time the "boss" called
him until he was told what happened 15
days later on his hospital bed. A week
after regaining consciousness, the doctors
told him it would be necessary to ampu-
tate both legs below the knees to save
his life.
m. . * J 11 1 I - 1


Egbert I. Williams


examination as to his fitness for work.
Despite the opinion of all members of the
Board that he was permanently and
totally disabled he was given additional
time to readjust himself.
Gradually, with the help of his imme-
diate supervisors, Williams became better
adjusted to his work and today has a
comparatively cheerful outlook on life.
With the aid of a cane he has learned to
walk with comparative facility and in


addition to
gasoline an
records and
to engage in
He now do
holstery wo
ment of the


his regular duties dispensing
d motor oils, and keeping
stocks properly, he finds time
his old trade of upholsterer.
es many small jobs of up-
rk on the motorized Qquip-
Municipal Division.


rr 11"r I - -I- .- -_ _ ...- 1_ . . ,,---


44,000-Volt


Shock


rr


..





May 4,


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


STATISTICS


CANAL


TRAFFIC


For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for


the fiscal year 1938 are used in this


section, as being more nearly normal for peace-time than those for 1939.


Canal


oils


Decline


This


Fiscal


ear


Commercial


This


Year


May


Figures


Equal

i1950


150,000th


COMMERCIAL


+-"--�


TRANSIT


-^ - AK^ _-4,__ -,^.^^- ,-*
' . C' ;,?; ; '||S ^ |
* ' *' . - - - - ' - -^ 7 -*- - '^ * \ * ^ � . * ^ y ' - ' A ^ ^ ' . v ': ^ -- - > -- - ^ ^ ^ -


Present prospects are good for commercial traffic
through the Canal by ocean-going vessels this year to
equal or better last fiscal year's figures although tolls
collected during this fiscal year which ends in June are
now expected to be well under the 1950 totals.
This apparently incongruous situation stems from
the loss of tanker trade from the west coast to the east
coast of the ULnited States since the beginning of this
fiscal year. The loss in the tanker trade has been
somewhat overcome by increased numbers of tran-
siting freighters which have much less tonnage per
ship than the big tankers and therefore pay less tolls.
The total number of transits for the first nine
months of this fiscal year was reported as 4.160 as
compared with 4,048 during the same period of the
1950 fiscal year. There has been, however, a steady
decline during the past few months in ocean-going
traffic but the trend appears not to be sufficiently
drastic to bring the number of this year's commercial
transits below the 1950 figures which were higher than
any year during the 1940's.
The amount of tolls collected for the first three-
quarters of this year stands at $17,596,00U. approxi-
mately $300,000 under the total collected in the
comparable period last year. This decline has been
particularly noticeable since last November. The tolls
from last July through October were considerably in
excess of those in the first four months of the .previous
fiscal year.
INTERCOASTAL SHIPPING DROPS
Comparative figures on the ('anal traffic over the
main trade routes during January, February, and
March of this year and last year show the biggest
drop occurred in the United States intercoastal run,
the figures being 126 this year and 300 in 1950.
This heavy loss was partially overcome by increased
movements over the routes between the east coast of
the United States and the Far East., and between
Europe and the west coast of the United States and
Canada. The increase over the latter route was indi-
cated by the substantial number of British and
Norwegian vessels counted in the transit lists for the


two periods. The number of vessels flying the British
flag increased from 224 to 2f64, while Norwegian ships
numbered 140 last quarter as compared with only 116
in the comparable three-month period in 1950.
Other major variations occurred on the trade routes
between Europe and South America, and the east
coast of the United States and Central American
ports. Both routes showed a definite slackening of
shipping.
The decrease in the east coast United States-
Central America route was attributed primarily to a
decline in the banana trade. While the tonnage of


A MILESTONE IN the steady procession of ships of all maritime nations which has moved through the
Panama Canal was set April 26th when a certificate of the 150,000th transit by an ocean-going commercial
vessel was presented to the S. S. Nevadan, 7,500-ton freighter of the American-Hawaiian Steamship Company.
The certificate was presented in a brief ceremony aboard ship in Balboa Harbor by Lieutenant Governor
Vogel to Capt. F. H. Roberts. Master of the Nevadan. The Lieutenant Governor was accompanied by Capt.
Robert M. Peacher, Marine Director.
The American-Hawaiian line is one of the Canal's oldest customers and four of its ships were waiting in
line on August 15, 1914 when the Canal was opened to commercial traffic. They transited the day after the
Canal was officially opened by the S. S. Ancon, of the Panama Railroad Company Steamship Line.


Canal statistics on the amount of cargo handled in
Balboa and Cristobal showed a substantial increase
last quarter over the first three months of last year.
The total tonnage handled and transferred in the first
three months of 1950 was 278,000 tons, as compared
with 329,000 tons last quarter. The increase was
principally due to the amount of transfer cargo
received.


MONTHLY


COMMERCIAL


The heavier shipments of cargo for transfer, prin-
cipally in Cristobal, and the increasingly infrequent
sailings from the Canal Zone to Central American
ports caused a congestion on the local piers which
resulted late in April of the Panama Railroad Com-
pany placing a temporary embargo on incoming
transfer cargo for Central America which was lifted
May 1.
. TRAFFIC AND TOLLS


Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


Tolls


Transits


.


.


I





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 4, 1951


Power


Conversion Plans


Delayed


(Continued fronm p'ue ')


Several


Years


electric refrigera-


tors, fans, clocks, washing machines, and
other appliances with moving or timing
devices will not be required to bear the
cost of converting such motors or equip-
ment. In cases where equipment is too
old to warrant the expense of conversion
adjustments will be made in lieu of con-
version.
Many residents have been reluctant
about buying new 25-cycle home appli-
ances in view of the proposed conversion
plan. While full details on the policies
governing conversion of privately-owned
equipment will be widely publicized in
advance, assurances have been given that
the plan proposed makes provision to
cover thes? costs in the overall budget.
The proposed conversion of the electric
power system in the Canal Zone from 25
to 60 cycles is not a new subject nor are


the present studies, which be
two years ago, the fir4t e
although they are by far the
prehensive.


,gan about
ver made,
most cornm-


At the time the Madden Dam hydro-
electric plant was projected during the
early 1930's the topic was under serious
consideration but the proposal to convert
the system then was rejected for various
reasons. Plans looking to the eventual
adoption of 60-cycle current in the Canal
Zone were incorporated in the Third
Locks project and the two large Diesel
plants, designed to furnish power for the
new locks, have 60 - cycle generating
equipment. Both plants were equipped
with converters to permit the furnishing
of either frequency.
Conversion Plans in 1947
All plans made in connection with the
Isthmian Canal Studies of 1947 contem-
plated the conversion to 60-cycle fre-
quency throughout the Zone and final
recommendations of Governor J. C. Me-
haffey contained this feature.
While the question of 25-cycle versus
60-cycle current is an old and somewhat
controversial subject, it doubtless would
not be under serious consideration even
now if new 25-cycle equipment and re-
placement parts were readily obtainable.
The key to the Canal Zone's 25-cycle
power system is the Gatun Hydroelectric
Plant and electrical engineers readily ad-


enced the decision, among these being the
higher power losses in the transmission of
60-cycle current. In addition, it was un-
likely that anyone in 1905-06 could forsee
that their children and grandchildren
would use electricity to beat eggs, cook


food, sweep floors, keep time, heat water,
cool houses, wash clothes and dishes, chill
food, and do many other household chores
all of which have now been standardized
for 60-cycle motors.
Old Canal records reveal no arguments
on the subject of 25-cycle versus 60-cycle
current and apparently at no time during
the design of the Gatun Hydroelectric
Plant did any of the designers feel it nec-
essary to put down in writing why 25-
cycle generating equipment was selected.
Since this plant became the main power
source for the entire Canal Zone after its
completion shortly before the Canal was
opened, its design actually set the pattern
for 25-cycle electric current throughout
the Zone.
The present urgency in converting the


power system comes not from poor judg-
ment of the Canal builders but because
the Canal Zone within recent years has
become a 25-cycle island in a sea of 60-
cycle current. Manufacturers have vir-
tually ceased making 25-cycle electrical
equipment of all nature with the result
that any frequency-sensitive equipment
ordered by the Canal today comes with
almost a tailor-made price tag on it.
60-Cycle Adopted in U. S. After 1914
The standardization of 60-cycle current
throughout the United States came about
well after the Canal was completed. Dur-
ing the construction period there was no
standard frequency and the power system
in the United States today evolved from
isolated systems in all parts of the country
with power frequencies ranging from 15
up to 133 cycles. As the use of electrical
power and the requirement of interchange
of service between towns or systems in-
creased there arose a tendency to stand-
ardize on one frequency which proved to
be 60 cycles.
The patchwork pattern of the power
systems in the United States and else-
where during the early 1900's was also
evident in the Canal Zone and the inte-
grated power system of today was not a
reality until after the Canal was com-
pleted in 1914.
Towns during the construction period
were served by individual generating
plants and generally 25-cycle current was


the conversion project as
planned are still to be made, it
roughly calculated that the pr
cost upwards of $10,000,000 an


presently
has been
oject will
id require


from five to ten years for completion.
Some better idea of the scope of the proj-
ect can probably be better obtained by
the average resident by the rough esti-
mate of engineers that some 35,000 fre-
quency-sensitive electric appliances and
motors in the Canal must be converted,
replaced, or discarded by the time any
and all Canal Zone housewives can buy
new 60-cycle eggbeaters in their nearest
Commissary store as standai d equipment
for their kitchens.


The Problem Of


Cancer In


Women
1 *1


(Continued from page 2) takes over the
tissue. In this wild growth, fragments
invade the blood vessels and the lymph
channels and are carried elsewhere in the
body where they proceed to grow again.
Other cells are sloughed off and appear in


the vi
cancer.


various


local seer


etions near the


In women the generative organs are
readily accessible to examination and
direct visual inspection, so that early


changes in the organs may be detected far
earlier than in such organs as the stomach
or intestines. Therefore, secretions from
the generative organs are likewise more
available for laboratory study than the
abdominal organs. For instance, some of
the cells which are sloughed off from a
cancer can be collected in the discharges
from the genital tract and examined in
the so-called "cancer smear test," or a
small portion of the tissue can be pain-
lessly snipped off and examined, or the
womb may be painlessly and quickly
scraped for an even more reliable diag-
nosis than from the smear alone.
But, it always takes two persons, an
alert patient and an alert doctor to detect
and interpret the early signs and symp-


very unlikely that the average layman
will understand many of the technicali-
ties. It is not presently contemplated to
convert the operating machinery at the
Canal Locks in the program. The Locks
will continue on 25-cycle operation and
power will be supplied through large fre-
quency converters which will change the
60-cycle current from the generating
plants back to 25-cycle frequency.
While detailed estimates on the cost of






May 4, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Febr


The New Year opened with the news
that the Internal Revenue Collectors had
arrived, that the Hotel Tivoli would soon
be closed as a public hostelry, and that
Canal-Railroad employees had a new per-
formance rating system.
Of the three, the information about the
new rating system was, by far, the most
cheering news. While there was no cheer-
ing and throwing of hats into the air, the
average employee had reason to feel that
the new system with ratings only of out-
standing, satisfactory, and unsatisfactory,
was far better than the efficiency rating
with five different descriptive words for
his work. Too often, he felt, the fine dis-
tinction between a rating of, say excellent
or very good, depended too much on the
digestion of the boss on the day he made
up the ratings. Rating officers also could
breathe easier with only three ratings to
hand out, since there would be fewer
challenges of their judgment on the work
performance of the employees they sup-
ervise.

There were ample local news items
throughout the first quarter of this year to
remind Zcne residents of the critical world
situation. Governor Newcomer announced
at the beginning of the year that the World
War II air raid sirens would be taken out
of mothballs and reinstalled. On the same

Canal Conducts Logging
(Continued from page 15) amarillo, cedro
amargo, cedro espino, ceiba, espave, and
guayacan.


Report Indicates Success
An indication of the success of
operations in the Canal Zone wa
in a formal report of the Local Coi
on Wood Utilization at the concl
the third year of operations. It
part, as follows:
"Since its initiation late in 19
Panama Canal has completed th


logging
Is given
nmittee
usion of
read, in

46, The
ree sea-


sons of logging, yielding well over one-half
million board measure feet logs at an
average logging cost of $60.14 per thou-
sand feet, as compared with an average
a 1 1 1 1 P ~ - -r


YEAR


January


CANAL


TRANSITS-TOL1


The overhaul of Atlantic Locks was
completed in record time this dry-season
and normal traffic through the Canal was
resumed March 27. The job cost about
$1,200,000.


increases were given
house employees who
)bery there early in
7ipients, E. A. Rol:-
!on E. Drew, Stew-
Holder, Attendant,
yards by Lieutenant
office. At the same


"uary - March

day, MelviMn E. Walker, Civil Defense Ad-
visor, made public his program for first-aid
training of Zone residents by which he hoped
to have 5,000 trained first-aiders within six
months. Late in February, Canal officials
received word that the request to establish a
draft board in the Canal Zone had been
approved. Shortly thereafter the Governor
announced his nominations for the board,
with A. C. Medinger, Deputy Marine Dir-
ector, as State Director.

The price of gasoline, once bought by
Zone motorists for as little as eight cents
a gallon, inched up to 15 cents a gallon
in February.


Atlantic Pacific
to to
Pacific Atlantic


Tolls-paying ve
Ocean-goin


ssels:
g..-------


*SmalL ..-.....
Iotal, tolls-paying-


**Free transit
t ranlSi


ts_ .__


TIotal, tolls-paying and free ..


677
137
814
130
944


693
127
820
143
963


Total


1,370
264

1,634
273

1,907


1950

Total


1,462
307
1,769
287

2,056


1938


Total


1,386
219

1,605
139

1,744


* Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
** Exclusive of P'anama Canal equipment.


CARGO HANDLED OVER PIERS
(In short tons)


First Quarter,
Calendar year 1951


Local
Local


received ..


forwarded


Transfer cargo received _
Total incoming cargo handled_
Rehandled cargo. ._. ..__._
Transfer cargo forwarded.....


Cristobal
61,719


13,935
112,419
188,073
3,983
103,129


Balboa


24,745
7,018
929
32,692
218
1,026


Total

86,464
20,953
113,348
220,765
4,201
104,155


Average
quarter,
1950
All piers


92,898
25,221
88,581
206,700
3,021


88,068


Average
quarter,
1938

All piers
87,968

9,388
138,386
235,742
1,584
136,127


THIS


time they were handed letters of commenda-
tion signed by the Governor.

Regulations barring the importation of
live animals and meats from countries
infested with hoof-and-mouth disease be-
came effective in the Canal Zone March
15.

LS PAYING AND FREE

January--February--March ]


Meritorious salary i
to three Paraiso Clubh
thwarted an armed rot
February. The three rec
ertson, Manager, Hylt
ard, and Ovira Jules de
were presented the aw
Governor Vogel in his


i


- - ! -


I


I


I


I


E





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


May 4,1951


of the wide interest


circular


town f residence


in the subject,


amending the regulations


I'- S.-rate employes iu
"ffectiVve this date,


dated I ecember ; I, �17,
i.2 Twn fi - e ncn>


[Town of ilrts


required to res
except Iins to
than the town


and payment


Section


pertaining
� moves of


behlw in full:
1.2 of Circular 62- 62,


is amended as follows:


and Paymenit


ii lence: In general
in the vicinity of t


this policy,


resident


ce i


for Moreas-
employees a


:heir work. As
in towns other


of employment may be authorized:


lh When the employee presents


a meritorious


ca-e which in the judgment of the Community


Services


Director warrants the exception;


(2) Upon an application by an employee who


unable to obtain an assignment in the town where


he is employed:


In such cases the application must


be approved by the head of the employee's bureau
or division and the assignment may be made only
after all resident applicants of equal or higher


standing
quarters:


for quarters purposes have been tendered


(3) When an employee is transferred within
either of the official stations designated in para-


graph 3.3 of Circular No. 733-6 and
division head does not certify that


necessary


residence is


his bureau or
a change of


and primarily for the con-


venience and benefit of The Panama ('anal;


(4) In any oth
munity Services
The Panama Can


er case determined by the Corn-
Director to be in the interest of
al.


broad


Transfer


issues


affecting


the welfare


employees generally, they do not neglect
the small services they can perform for


members,


groups.


individually


Such services may consist of aid


in the preparation of appeals on ratings
to the Civil Service Commission; informa-


tion services of a various nature;


assist-


ance in obtaining employment elsewhere
in event of a reduction in force; advice on
job problems; and help in the preparation
of official papers which involve techni-
calities.
As an aid to its members, Lodge 14 has
secured a complete set of Federal regula-
tions, including Classification Specifica-
tions, which may be used by its members


who call at the office.


In addition, the


Lodge will provide advice and assistance


members


who desire


solving their particular problems.


Compensation


Case


Settled


A recent example of this type of help
was the case of a Federal employee whose
claim for injury compensation had run
afoul of red tape in Washington. Because
of the long delay, he and his family were
desperately in need of funds. He appealed
for help to Lodge No. 14 of which he was
a member, and through the A. F. G. E.


headquarters in V
ident of the Lodge


the claim.


Shortly


Jashington,


the Pres-


was able to untangle


thereafter,


settled and the employee received a cash
settlement of several hundred dollars.


Officials
exceptional


of Lodge


14 attribute


large membership


to the


broad policies of the A. F. G. E. but they
also recognize that the small services to


individual


tising


members


value.


Other


stimulants


been used to attract


adver-
which


Regulation


and hold


membership in the lodge are occasional
social events and special speakers at the
regular lodge meetings.
Lodge No. 14 maintains offices on the


second


floor of Balboa


Clubhouse and


observes regular office hours from 7:15
until 10:00 o'clock on Tuesday, Wednes-
day, and Thursday nights, and from 8:00
o'clock until noon on Saturdays. Lodge
meetings are held on the third Wednesday
night of each month at 7:30 o'clock up-
stairs in the Balboa Clubhouse.


Lodge


No. 88


the fourth


meets at 7:30 o'clock on


Wednesday night of each


month upstairs in Margarita Clubhouse,
while Lodge No. 974 meets in the same


place at the same hour on
Friday night of each month.


the fourth


(b) Payment for Moves:
(1) When an employee is transferred perma-
nently to another official station within the meaning
of the regulations governing such transfers, or when


a change


of residence within an official station is


ordered by the head of an employee's bureau or


division


as being necessary


and primarily for the


convenience and benefit of The Panama Canal, the
employee's household goods and personal effects
shall be moved by The Panama Canal at its ex-
pense, to be charged to the bureau or division
concerned.
(2) If a transfer of official station within the
meaning of the regulations governing such transfers
is not involved, but a change in residence is certified


Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All figures in long tons)

Figures in parenthesis in 1938 and 1950 columns indicate
relative positions in those years


ATLANTIC TO


PACIFIC


First Quarter,


Calendar


Commodi tv


hv the Community


Services


Director to be pri-


marily for the convenience and benefit of the
Housing Division's quarters operations, the em-
ployee's household goods and personal effects shall
be moved by The Panama Canal at its expense, to
be charged to U. S.-rate quarters operations."


(Continued from page 14)


income tax and


against the revocation of the 25 percent
differential. Its present big fight is
postponement of the effective date of the
I i. t- _ 1 in-i


income tax here until January


for which it has


1, 1Y1o,


a cheering section of


several thousand Government workers in
the Zone.
In addition to its affiliation with the
American Federation of Labor, the A. F.
G. E. is among the 24 member organiza-


tions


of the Government


Employees'


Mineral oils_ _
Manufactures of
Coal and Coke
Phosphates
Raw cotton


iron


and steel .-


Paper and paper products.. -
Automobiles .....
Cement ,..... .
Machinery _..
Sulphur ____.... . ..
Tinplate ...------------..
Sugar .... _.. . .
Canned food products
Ores, various_ .u..-....
Ammonium compounds .. -
All others �.... . . .--.----.
Total .....-------.


501,657
388,345
377,347
128,577
87,922
79,796
73,920
67,196
61,629
49,543
44,723
43,521
36,582
23,923
23,168
920,866

2,908,715


2,407,702


32,587
32,162
7,809
10,409
881,216


2,049,654


S- n� & ri r� n^ r- rn r n n *n imr *n -


... mmIIIII IIII I ..............
W


Of Quarters Is Changed


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