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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00089
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: February 1951
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00089
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text
Gift of the Panama Can


PANAMA 9


CANAL


Vol.1, No. 4 BALBOA, HEIGHTS. CANAL ZONE, FEBRUARY 2,. 1951 5 cents


BOARD


DIRECTORS


WILL


EXAMINE


NEW


CANAL


COMPANY


ORGANIZATION


BEFORE


FINAL


ACTION


TAKEN


JULY


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Committee


Selected


By Governor Newcomer

To Study Overall Plan

The intricate problems involved in
the fiscal arrangements for the Panama


Canal Company after next July


face the Canal


I which


Administration,


Bureau of the Budget, the Secretary of
the Army, and, for that matter, the
President of the United States, will be
scrutinized by the Board of Directors
of the Panama Railroad Company prior
to a final settlement.


The problems


of establishing


Panama Canal Company and consti-
tuting the Canal Zone Government


PROBLEMS concerning the formation of the new Panama Canal Company next July will be studied
here this month by a committee from the Board of Directors of the Panama Railroad Company. Gen.
R. A. Wheeler (left) and Gen. Julian L. Schley, shown above, are members of this committee. The third
member will be T. Coleman Andrews, President of the American Institute of Accountants, who was recently
appointed to the Board of Directors. General Schley is spending the winter in the Canal Zone, while General
Wheeler and Mr. Andrews are scheduled to arrive February 12 to begin their deliberations.


Plans


For


Being


defense


Developed


effective July 1, 19
with Public Law 841


51, in compliance
. were discussed in


some detail in the previous issue of
"The Panama Canai Review." As was


indicated


in that article,


the issues


involved are fundamental ones which
vitally affect future Canal operations.
The complete future picture of what
is now The Panama Canal and the
Panama Railroad Company probably
will not be known for another two or


three months,


either


publicly


or to


those most closely connected with the


deliberations.


This is true, not because


the deliberations and discussions are


cloaked in


but by reason of the


For the second time within a decade
the problem of civilian defense has been
brought to the forefront in the news and
in the minds of Isthmian residents.
It was just ten years ago that the first
concerted effort was begun to provide


fullest extent in civilian


defense work


which is presently being done and which
may be required in the future. In his
statement the Governor stressed the im-
portance of education.
Governor's Statement


fact that final decisions have not been
reached.
The layman in this fiscal wonderland
can perhaps best grasp the importance of
the problems in establishing the new com-
pany to operate the Panama Canal and
all ifQ hImInnfte irr onnclm-minar th hiah"


Y-/


- /�-.


Civil D

Rapidly


secrecy,




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


Plans


Lease


Are


Tivoli


Recalled


30


By


ears


Hotel's


Ago

New


Status


,Few hotels in the world have a more
romantic glow about them than the
three-story frame structure which stands
on the east side of Ancon Hill and is
known as the Hotel Tivoli. Yesterday
its 43-year life as a commercial establish-
ment came to an end and it became a
"Government guest house."
It began life in a blaze of glory with its
first guest being "Teddy" Roosevelt. The
President and his party came to the Isth-
mus in November 1906 during the heavi-
est part of the rainy season to see the
Canal work under the worst possible con-
ditions. One wing of the new building
was rushed through to completion for its
distinguished guest under the insistent
prodding of John F. Stevens, then Chief
Engineer of the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission.
The lore of the Tivoli and its guests,
which have included the entire scale of


society from royalty
will live long since i
hostelry has spread
globe.


down, undoubtedly
its fame as a public
to every part of the


on the grounds that they were too low.
Andrew Johnston, then manager of the
Hotel Tivoli, offered to buy the equip-
ment of the Tivoli for $31,655 and lease
the building for $1,248 a month.
Frank Martin, a former employee in


was then in Washington.
Among those who were interested in
the proposed leasing of the two hotels
was John McEwen, well-known hotel
manager with two year's experience as
manager of the Washington and six years
as manager of the Tivoli before Mr.
Johnston took charge. He wrote a
lengthy letter to Secretary of War Weeks,
in which he suggested closing the Tivoli.
(He was then the proprietor of the 40-
room Hotel International).
Hotel Manager Enters Objections


After
the Tib
tinued
nessme
said in
back n
It was
open al


r outlining all the disadvantages of
roll and complaining that its con-
operation would be unfair to busi-
n in the Republic of Panama, he
part: "As a modern hotel it is a
umber and a veritable fire trap.
said years ago that it was kept


1 thc


no other h
to live in.
because we
more capac
rAtionn o


e year round because there was
hotel in Panama fit for a man
This could not be said today
have a hotel in Panama with
ity and just as good accommo-
hin Th nl; na nffor" * l-


New and lower rates have been
announced for the Hotel Tivoli by P.
S. Thornton, Manager, effective with
the change on February 1 from a
commercial hotel to a Government
guest house for those with Canal
Zone privileges.
Single rooms with bath range
from $3.50 to $5; double, $5 to $7;
suites, single $7 and $8, double $9
and $10; single rooms without bath,
$2.50 and $3, double $3.50 and $4. All
rates quoted are for European plan
guests.
Discounts of 25 percent are
granted on one month's basis, and
50 percent on two months or longer.
Table d'hote meals range from 50
cents for the lowest-priced breakfast
to $2 for the most expensive dinner.
Detailed information on rates
and reservations should be obtained
from the hotel management.





February 2,


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


C.Z.


Civil Defense
Being Rapidly


Plans
Developed


(Cuntinued from page 1) commands in the
Canal Zone, the Republic of Panama, the
United States Embassy, and The Panama
Canal. Several meetings of this advisory
committee have already been held to plan
coordinated civilian defense measures on
an Isthmus-wide scale. Members of this
committee, of which Mr. Walker is Chair-
man, are Governor Antonio T. De Reuter,
of Panama, Director General of Civil De-
fense in the Republic of Panama; Albert
E. Carter, First Secretary of the U. S.
Embassy; and Lt. Col. Russell K. Brock,
representing the Armed Forces.
During the latter part of 1950 both
Mr. Walker and J. P. Smith, Sanitation
Engineer of the Health Bureau, were
given official assignments in the United
States to familiarize themselves with the
civilian defense programs.
Booklets Distributed
As a means of educating the general
public on atomic warfare and the pro-
tective measures which may be taken


Melvin E. Walker, Civil Defense Advisor
among civilians, the Office of Civil De-
fense reprinted and distributed to all
employees the booklet Survival Under
Atomic Attack. This information book-
let tells in lay terms the dangers and best
means of protection in atomic warfare.
Two other important steps have been


To The En
The past year was, without doubt, one
of the most eventful and significant in the


history of the Panama Canal since its com-
pletion. It was a year signalized by major
changes in the Canal-Rail-
road organization; the ,..
enactment of legislation of o '* j
far-reaching importance to
the Canal and its users; /
and world events which . :,
had a profound effect on


the average individual in
the Canal Zone.
Under such conditions
it was natural to expect
that the organization and
the employees individually
would be subject to stresses
much greater than usual.
I have not been unaware
of these conditions nor of


ilo eno C


* a
.. I
ju m j j�jht jX Mi i


the extra effort which has been required of
the majority of our employees.
It has been a source of great satisfaction
to me to have had loyal cooperation during
this period.
Under world conditions we face at the
outset of 1951, the responsibilities which we
will be called upon to bear will be greater
than ever before. Because of these conditions
it is a matter of utmost importance that each
employee fully realize the importance of his
or her job. In an organization as complex
as The Panama Canal the daily work ac-
complished by each employee becomes an
important factor in the efficient functioning
of the waterway itself, which is the basic
reason why we all are employed here in the
Canal Zone.
Those in supervisory positions of what-
ever nature have an additional responsibil-
ity. Aside from their own work they are
directly responsible for those whom they
supervise, whether it be one, ten, or a hun-
dred. This additional duty does not always
begin and end with the accomplishment of
the job itself. It is entirely possible for a
group of workers to perform a certain task
efficiently and well and yet have cause for
complaint.
her to reinstall the general air raid siren
system used during World War II.
Approximately 25 sirens are to be placed
at strategic locations in the various Canal
Zone communities and this work is now
being done by the Building and Electrical


f, . ^Y ,".. 0 . 0
The foreman or supervisor who fails to
head off and rectify, whenever possible, a
justifiable complaint on the part of any of
his employees fails in the qualifications for


a supervisor. By and large
Sthe average employee be-
. lives he has a just cause
when he complains or
..- seeks an adjustment of any
* nature. Even if the alleged
wrong is fancied the em-
ployee has the right to
expect a sympathetic
understanding from the
man he calls "the boss."
There are comparatively
few grievances which can-
not be satisfactorily
adjusted at the source. In
many instances the lack


4 V*


sympathetic
V t 11


under-


standing on the part of tne supervisor
becomes more important than the original
grievance. An attentive ear and sympathetic
attitude are the best antidotes for wrongs,
fancied or otherwise. The employee with
a real grievance has every right to expect
the support of his superior in righting the
wrong since the supervisor is the guiding


factor in his daily work.


Under present conditions everyone has
burden enough from the strains and stresses
imposed by world conditions. It is unrea-
sonable to expect to find loyalty and esprit
among those who fail to find sympathy and
understanding from their supervisors.
I have requested the various Bureau and
Division heads to give particular attention
to the attitude of the supervisors toward
their employees. It is an essential require-
ment in any good organization. Its impor-
tance in the Canal-Railroad organization


cannot


be overstressed.


77. //


Governor


are many phases of a civil defense pro-
gram which are peculiar to the Canal
Zone. We have few massive structures,
subways, basements, or other normal
underground shelters here which can be
quickly converted into places of refuge.
j. 4 *- 4r S


. . T - -.; .
-fit *^;,-^ -.- "
Vfy -. - '- -..
r" * . /


--


'





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


Plans For New Canal Company
Studied By PRR Directors


FORTY


YEARS


AGO


(('tonhiued
through


(Go
ernor

Chief
have
heart
simple


Panama Canal?
Simple Arithmetic


vvicnor Newco
II. D. Vogel,
r of Finance,
of the Mana
been closest
ily agree that
e arithmetic.


locked


Imer, Lieutenant G(
Arnold Bruckner, i
and W. H. Dunhi
gement Division, w
to this problem,
it is not a matter
So will a battery


Budget officials and representatives of the
Office of the Secretary of the Army who
have a part in the question and answer
session.
The $64 question remains.
Anyone with a simple answer accept-
able to all interests concerned can become
a hero overnight. In making the simple
answer, however, he must be prepared to
juggle many millions of dollars in one
hand while tracing a clear, simple pattern
with the other which can be used perhaps
for the next half century to lock ships
through the Canal; provide schooling,
police and fire protection, and health serv-
ices for the Canal Zone community; filter
and furnish a pure water supply; build
and maintain roads; construct and rent
houses; generate and supply electricity;
buy and sell supplies; finance and accom-
plish major improvement projects; and do
the other odd chores presently required in
administering the present Panama Canal
and its sister organization, the Panama
Railroad Company.
These problems were discussed in great
detail by the Governor and his advisors
with Bureau of the Budget officials on
their trip to Washington, D. C., in De-
cember. However, in accordance with the
law, the Board of Directors of the Pan-
ama Railroad Company, which will be-
come a dominant factor in future Canal-
Railroad operations, must have an oppor-
tunity to consider the many questions
posed prior to the submission of the
answers and an overall plan to the Presi-
dent for his decision, which will be final.
As a result, Governor Newcomer, as
President of the Panama Railroad Com-
pany, has appointed a committee of three
to study at first hand here in the Canal
Zone the problem.
Committee Is Appointed
This committee will be composed of
Gen. Julian L. Schley, former Governor


October


Col. George W. Goethals, Chairman
and Chief Engineer of the Isthmian Canal
Commission, returned to the Isthmus
early in October 1910 after attending the
wedding of his son, Lt. George R.
Goethals, in the United States.

"The esprit that one finds among the
Canal employees and the enthusiastic,
intelligent and patriotic leadership that
Colonel Goethals and his assistants show
at every turn and under every emer-
gency, leave no doubt that the Canal will be
fully completed within the time guaranteed,
to wit. th first of January 1915, and within
the estimate made by Colonel Goethals in
1908 of $375,000,000."
This quotation was a part of a prepared
statement by President William Howard
Taft upon his departure after a two-day
visit in November 1910. The President's
visit was one of the notable events of the year
in the Canal Zone.

The ordinance providing for'the licens-
ing and regulation of motor vehicles in
the Canal Zone became effective 40 years
ago. It was issued by the Isthmian Canal
Commission. It described motor vehicles
as being any vehicle "drawn or propelled
by means of steam, gas, naphtha, fluid,
electricity, or any other similar motor
power."
Although the license plates cost only
$1 each, a tax of $25 a year was estab-
lished for privately-owned cars, $150 for
commercial vehicles, and $10 a year for
motorcycles.

Three large landslides occurred in the
Canal prism during the last quarter of 1910.
They occurred at the famous Cucaracha
slide, on Contractor's Hill, and on the east
bank of the Canal opposite Las Cascadas.
The latter carried away all the track on the
east side of the new channel along the break


Truman's action in transferring certain
facilities of the present Panama Canal to
the new company.
In choosing the members of the com-
mittee from the Board of Directors to
_iLU . - 11 - - . - � -i 1._.. _ U -.. _ /i .. . � .


December


and some of the material extended past the
middle of the Canal. Several drill rigs were
wrecked when a portion of the north shoulder
of Contractor's Hill broke away and covered
about �80 feet of the main track.

The wreck of an old ship, believed to
have been a Spanish galleon, was dis-
covered buried in about 20 feet of sand
at Nombre de Dios where dredging opera-
tions were in progress to supply aggregate
for the construction of Gatun Locks.

The fall meeting of the Canal Zone Fed-
eration of Womens' Clubs was held in Gor-
gona. Among other business, the federation
adopted a resolution to ban the common
drinking cup in the Canal Zone.

A Tea Room on the south veranda of
the Hotel Tivoli was formally opened in
October.


An official notice was issued in December
1910 that employees could again take vaca-
tions in Costa Rica as a result of improved


sanitary conditions there. To
quarantine in Cristobal on
however, they were required
from the train to the steamer
in Port Limon and to furnis
from the American Consul
showing that they spent the
of their vacation in that city.


avoid a 5-day
their return,
to go directly
upon arriTal
h a certificate
in San Jose
last five days


Ancon Quarry was placed on a two-
shift, 12-hour working day basis in Dec-
ember to speed up production of aggre-
gate for the concrete operations at Pedro
Miguel and Miraflores Locks.

A survey for the relocation of the Pan-
ama Railroad between Gamboa and
Pedro Miguel sufficiently east of the
Canal not to be affected by slides was
begun in December 1910.


CAMP BIERD CLUBHOUSE
MANAGER SETS RECORD


...... *:2 �
k ^ 'y*,:j�^ ^^ ^
:^:i'^^^^^^^


November


'i


mW~


-- .


* ^ ** ; .
."'-^ -1. .





February 2, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Funds


Asked

Next


For


ear


Building


otal


Program


Over


$11,000,000


ONE OF THE MOST extensive grading projects the area. They are: (1) Annex to Gorgas Hospital indicate the new alignment of streets in the area.


in this fiscal year's quarters construction program
will be done in Ancon. The above aerial view gives
a perspective of the extensive work to be done. It
is a comparatively simple project in comparison with
site work which will be required during the coming
fiscal year when it is planned to spend over $11,000-
000 in the development of new townsites or the ex-
tension of some of the existing towns. The circled
numbers indicate some of the well-known features of


Nurses Quarters; (2) Old Corral Area; (3) Motor
Transportation Division; (4) Section E of Gorgas
Hospital on Roosevelt Avenue which is now being
dismantled; and (5) the low service reservoir on Res-
ervoir Hill. A considerable amount of grading will
be required and this will be started soon by Munici-
pal Division forces. The solid white line at the left
shows the extent of the excavation required on the
south side of Ancon Boulevard. The broken lines


Ancon Boulevard will be slightly realigned and the
grade lowered. Chagres Street in the center will be
practically a new thoroughfare. Venado Street, upper
right, will be extended to provide a new thoroughfare
between Ancon and Balboa. Reservoir Road, with
the traffic circle superimposed on the existing
women's bachelor quarters, will be a straight street
connecting with Ancon Boulevard.


Plans for the $80,000,000 quarters con-
struction program during the next seven
or eight years will be sufficiently trans-
posed from paper into actuality within
another year to give Canal employees
some idea of the "new look" which the
Canal Zone will have ten years hence--
providing all goes well.
The building program actually sprang
to lifp atl thfh hbainnn of this vpar as


ments and will affect the living and work-
ing conditions of a large segment of
Canal-Railroad employees for perhaps
another half century, many other factors
are involved. Of these, the problem of
accessibility is one of the most important,
aside from costs.
The average employee 25 years from
now may fly to and from his job in the
Adminimtratinn Ruilid in r at, thP Ralhna


been started by contractors or Panama
Canal Divisions responsible, and good
progress is being made.
Among the units which have an impor-
tant part in the planning and prosecution
of the program from designing to renting
houses are the Engineering, Municipal,
Building, and Electrical Divisions, and
the Engineering and Construction, Com-
miinityv SPrvies. Finnnce and Sunnlvand





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


Internal


Revenue

Complete


Office


Service


Provides


on


Income


axes


All

To


Employees

Present I


Ta:


Urged

Problems

x Matters


Canal and Railroad employees got the
full impact and significance of income
taxes when they received their two Janu-
ary pay checks with the withholding tax
deducted from them.
Academic discussions about readjusting
the household budgets were transformed
into actualities after the first pay receipts
were cashed on January 16. Such terms
as withholding tax, exemptions, estimated
tax declarations, and final returns became
familiar and household words in the aver-
age Canal Zone home.
While most employees have resigned
themselves to the requirement of paying
ing the 1951 income tax, the great major-
ity are hopeful that the retroactive taxes
for 1950 will be revoked by Congress.
Bills for revoking the retroactive feature
were introduced in both Houses of Con-
gress before the close of the 81st Session
and have since been introduced in the 82d
Congress.
Branch Office Established
A branch office of the Internal Revenue
Bureau was established in the Canal Zone
at the beginning of the year to assist local
residents with their income tax problems.
Miller T. Hollingsworth, Chief Field Dep-
uty Collector of Internal Revenue in the
Florida District, accompanied by Harry
L. Pressly, Deputy Collector Instructor,
and John A. Phillips, Deputy Collector,
arrived in the Canal Zone on New Year's
Day to open the new office.
Mr. Hollingsworth returned after a few
days and the office is presently headed
by Mr. Pressly who has had many years
of service with the Bureau. The Pacific
side office is located on the second floor of
the Balboa Clubhouse and is open daily
from Monday through Friday. Office
hours are from 8:30 until 5 o'clock, with
a 30-minute period for lunch from 11:45
until 12:15 o'clock.
Cristobal Office Hours


........ -......... .....
INCOME TAX problems can be taken to Harry L. Pressly, Deputy Collector Instructor, and John A.
Phillips, Deputy Collector (right), who were assigned to the Canal Zone from the Florida District. They are
shown above in their office on the second floor of Balboa Clubhouse which is opened daily from Monday
through Friday. The Atlantic side office, in Room 300 of the Cristobal Administration Building, is open
every Monday.


later formalized by a Treasury Depart-
ment decision, No. 5825, which extended
the due date for filing such declarations.
This decision, however, applies only to
the 1950 income tax. Canal and Railroad
employees, in certain categories, who are
subject to income tax are required by law
to file a declaration of estimated tax for
1951 by March 15.
Estimated Tax Declarations
Generally, those required to file an esti-
mated tax declaration include the ones
who have an income outside their salaries
amounting to more than $100 a year and
those whose income from wages exceed
$4,500 annually after subtracting all their
exemptions at $600 each.
Those employees who are in doubt con-
cerning this and other provisions of the
law have been urged to consult Mr.
Pressly or Mr. Phillips.
Although March 15 is the date for filing
final income tax returns, employees in the
Canal Zone have an extra three months
in which to file their returns providing
LL1-- ..n�� A n i: � - ,T- :�Tn�^PT ,.r�wm ffny


final returns for the taxable year of 1950
in hopes that the retroactive feature will
be eliminated or at least materially
altered. Mr. Pressly has urged that all
employees fill out their income tax return
forms for 1950 on or before March 15
even though they elect to delay filing the
final returns until June 15.
The required forms for final income tax
returns and estimated tax for this year
are available at the Internal Revenue
offices or at the various Canal Zone Post
Offices. Employees have been requested,
however, not to make inquiries concern-
ing income tax matters at the post offices.
In event the retroactive feature of the
law is not repealed or is altered to include
the last three months of 1950, employees
will be furnished a statement of their
earnings by the Finance Bureau, accord-
ing to a recent announcement by Arnold
Bruckner, Finance Director. These state-
ments will be furnished employees indi-
vidually early this month in ample time
for them to file their final returns by
March 15 in event, thyv dn not elect to





February 2, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


PANAMA


Committee


Chairman


Visits


Governor


An Official Panama Canal Publication
Published Quarterly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Panama Railroad Press
Mount Hope, Canal Zone
F. K. NEWCOMER
Governor
HERBERT D. VOGEL
Lieutenant Governor
E. C. LOMBARD
Executive Secretary
J. RUFUS HARDY
Editor
On sale at commissaries, clubhouses
and hotels in the Canal Zone at five
cents a copy.
The printing of this publication has
been approved by the Director of the
Budget on March 9, 1950.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters containing inquiries, sugges-
tions, criticisms or opinions of a general
nature will be accepted. In all cases
possible, letters to the Review will be
answered individually. Those of suffi-
cient general interest will be published
in this paper. Letters must be authen-
tic and be signed although signatures
will not be published unless requested
and names of authors will be kept con-
fidential. Return address should be
given but the Review will not under-
take to return correspondence of any
nature.


UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE Donald L. O'Toole (right), Chairman of The Panama Canal
Subcommittee of the House Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee, conferred with Governor Newcomer
on various Canal matters during his visit to the Isthmus last month. He visited the Isthmus on official busi-
ness during the latter part of 1949. Mrs. O'Toole and his secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth McGee, were visitors to
the Canal Zone early in December.


-,


Editor's Note


YOUR HEALTH, published month-
ly and distributed to thousands of
Canal-Railroad employees, makes
its first appearance as a regular fea-
ture of THE PANAMA CANAL RE-
VIEW in this issue. The publica-
tion, written in a down-to-earth
style, has been published since Sep-

MODERN M
The present outlook concerning the
understanding care of the expectant
mother has evolved from the "Dark
Ages," and society has advanced appre-
ciably from the time when women expect-
ing to bear children accepted pregnancy
and its attendant discomforts and haz-


TITM WFAMDOY


) YDOCITD0


member 1944. Credit for the found-
ing and editing of the popular
health periodical is due Dr. Ken-
neth 0. Courtney, Chief of the Divi-
sion of Preventive Medicine, who
recently submitted his resignation
after many years of outstanding
service in the Health Bureau.


OTHERHOOD


ards of childbirth


as a "natural" event.


In the old days, fortunately past,
woman's acceptance of these discomforts
and her blind faith in an ultimate, happy
solution of her pregnancy made her un-
aware of the many detectable minor pre-
liminary symptoms of some approaching
difficulty. In many instances she found
herself in desperate straits when it was
frequently too late to undo permanent
damage.
Obstetrics, as a science and a specialty,
has had a slow-growing, painful, step-by-
step evolution over many generations. It


Canal Review Envelopes
and Binders Now on Sale
Special envelopes for mailing THE
PANAMA CANAL REVIEW are on
sale in all commissaries, clubhouses,
and the two hotels. Three different
Canal Zone scenes are used for your
choice. The use of the attractively
printed envelopes permits the mailing
of the CANAL REVIEW for three cents
a copy to any address in the Postal
Union. The envelopes sell for three
cents each or two for five cents. Fold
your copy once, insert in envelope with
string fastener, and mail unsealed.
Copies of THE REVIEW mailed to
r~mr 11m n TnTlr vr mrla n o �rT nloh lofn-


^[^d ^l


JLfe




8 THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2,


CL


UBH


the


your


Un


Convene


6
It
a


JSE


Serv


DIVI


Ce


enu e:


Soda fountain


RES


TAURAN


& CAFETERIA


GOOD


THEATER


FOOD


REASONABLE
pRices


SWIMMING


MOTION


PICTURES


POOLS


LITTLE THEATER
THEATER CUILD
SCHOOL PLAYS


EXERC


CREATION


YOUR
The


COMMUN


CLUBHOU
hub of


FE!


of


for


Bureau


offer


I


: r




/





February 2, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


ROTC


Program


In


Canal


Schools


Supported


By


Parents


And


Students


No single phase of the Canal Zone
school program has been more heartily
endorsed and supported than the Junior
Reserve Officer Training Corps program
which was initiated in the Fall school term
of 1948 at Balboa High School.
The ROTC program was extended last
September to the students of Cristobal
High School and the response exceeded all
expectations. More than 90 percent of
the eligible boys, or 115 students, enrolled
for the training with the entire freshman
class joining.
According to the officers in charge of
the training, this enthusiasm on the part
of the Cristobal cadets has been reflected
in the training periods and drills and they
give promise of providing strong compe-
tition when drill awards are made on the
first joint Field Day, to be held in April.
Junior ROTC training met with an
enthusiastic response when it was first
offered in Balboa High School and the
enthusiasm has not lessened. During the
first year about 200 cadets enrolled from
the four high school classes. The enroll-
ment dropped the following year when
the training was limited to the sophomore,
junior, and senior classes, but the present


corps has 16


CADET OFFICERS of Balboa High School Junior ROTC present a brisk, military appearance.
Above in the back row, left to right, are Cadet Officer.s: First Lt. Romas Paisamante, First Lt. Richard
Abbott, Second Lt. Robert Blakely, Second Lt. Kenneth Pitman, Second Lt. William Altman, First Lt. Miguel
Burst, Second Lt. Jacob P!icet, and Second Lt. Thomas Thompson.
Ranking officers in the front row, left to right, are: Capt. Thomas Tucker, Capt. Louis Celerier, Capt.
William Joyce, Lt. Col. Frank Mayo, Maj. Edward Browder, Capt. Richard Maguire, and Capt. Sam Maphis.
Missing from the group of cadet officers when this pecture was taken was Second Lt. Michael McNevin.


student members.


Value of ROTC Recognized


Many civic leaders of the Canal Zone
have long recognized the value and desir-
ability of Junior ROTC training. The
program was finally initiated in 1948 by
Canal Zone school and local military
authorities.
With the Junior ROTC firmly estab-
lished in both Balboa and Cristobal High
Schools, the students have an opportunity
to receive valuable training which will be
highly beneficial if they are called into
service. This training is available in only
a relatively few high schools in the United
States.
A cadet who completes three years of
Junior ROTC training may be given
credit for the first year of his Senior
ROTC work in any college or university
where he enrolls.


CRISTOBAL JUNIOR ROTC cadets have entered into their training with great enthusiasm since the
unit was organized last Fall.
Shown above in the front row, left to right, are: Patricia Geddes, Unit Sponsor; Cadet Second Lt. Richard
L. Sullivan; Paul L. Beck, Principal of Cristobal High School; Cadet First Lt. Richard Ducote; Cadet Second
Lt. Raymond Pinto; and Helen Kissam, E Company Sponsor.
Back row, left to right, are: Cadet Sgts. Isaac Ostrowiak, Henry Wachtel, John Townshend, John Dum-
bauld, Andrew Lim, Francisco Wong, and Carl Pinto.
Not present when this picture was taken were Cadet Capt. Edward Bringas, Second Lt. Thomas Kelley,
and Sandra Hammond, Sponsor of D Company.


Clubhouses


Zone Boys Are Apt Pupils


The local students have shown remark-
-. 1 . ... _ ,-'L_-.1 T ^r.. l m~l~ i i�


Give
And


An additional recreation
nml;,. t bm an nr c. I v hi ;nl


Prizes
Color


nal facility for
1 Cn Cr b*X* i Irf


For Best Name
Scheme Of New


house and will be


T 1 ^^ * /^ l^ r1l h�~ rf-v I-^


Recreational


separated by


Spot


wood par-
ril. ...


..


I � I �


I 1


1





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


Many


Employees


Pay


Scant


Attention


Complexities


of


Retirement


Plan


Retirement annuities


-one of the


most important but least understood
phases of Federal Government serv-
ice--is a baffling problem to the
average employee who attempts to
wade through the mass of retirement
regulations.
Most employees become enmeshed
by the legal phraseology and give up
before arriving at an answer to the
vital question of how much they will
receive after they retire from service.
In most instances, younger employ-
ees put aside the question until some
more convenient date and those
approaching retirement become agi-
tated or concerned about how much
they will have to support them after
it is too late to supplement or alter
the results.
The overwhelming majority of
Canal and Railroad employees retire
because of age or disability, and the
computation of their annuities are
the same. In fact, all retirement
annuities are computed under a basic
formula. They are based on the
average basic salary earned in the
highest five consecutive years. If


this average is $5,000 or below, at
one percent of the average ($50.00 if
$5,000) plus $25.00, this sum is then


multiplied by
service. If the
the annuity i
one-half perc
for $6,000) m
of years of s
annuity can
percent of th
The Civil
plan, under
road employee
vides that er


I the nun
average


iber of years of
is above $5,000
i I ,


.s computed at one ana
ent (as example, $90.00
ultiplied by the number
service. The maximum
not be more than 80
,e five-year average.
I Service Retirement
which Canal and Rail-
;es are now retired, pro-
nployees may accept a


lower retirement annuity which will
be paid to them or to their husbands


or wi
riage
these
by 5
($75.4
$1,50
$2,50
be $1


a until th
� the surv
ises, the
percent o
'and 10 l
Thus, if
the redu
00 a vear


I,1


eir Leatn or remar-
'ivor annuitant. In
annuity is reduced
*f the first $1,500
percentt on all above
the full annuity is
ced annuity would
less.


There is a further reduction if the
designated survivor annuitant is


under 60 years of a
the employee retires.


e at the time
This amounts


to three-fourths of one percent of
the annuity multiplied by the num-
ber of years under 60 the designated
survivor annuitant is at the time the
employee retires. However, the total
reduction in no case is more than 25
percent of the annuity.
The accompanying table will pro-


vide a convenient
tically all employ
the exact amount
when they leave tl
statutory age limi'
because of disabilil
total service years
shown in the cha:
multiply the number
ice by the basic
shown in the top
their full annual an


In a
CANAL
printed
technic
particu
ing to
ployees
or und


later i;


issue


means for prac-
ees to calculate
of their annuity
ne service at the
t of 62 years or
:y. Those whose
differ from those
rt need only to
r of years of serv-
annual annuity
line to compute


mnuity.
of THE


PANAMA


REVIEW, an article will be
discussing some of the more
al aspects of retirement and
larly the regulations pertain-
that small minority of em-
whose retirement is optional
er the discontinued service


retirement plan.


Highest Average
Five-Year Salary


Basic Annual
Annuity


5 Years.
10 Years.
15 Years.
20 Years.
25 Years.
30 Years_
35 Years.
40 Years..


$4,000.00


$65.00


Full
Annuity


$325.00
650.00
975.00
1,300.00
1,625.00
1,950.00
2,275.00
2,600.00


Reduced
Annuity*
$308.75
617.50
926.25
1,235.00
1,537.50
1,830.00
2.122.50


2,415.00


$5,000.00


$75.00


Full
Annuity


$375.00
750.00
1,125.00
1,500.00
1,875.00
2,250.00
2,625.00
3,000.00


Reduced
Annuity*
$356.25
712.00
1,068.75
1,425.00
1,762.50
2,100.00
2,437.50
2,775.00


$6,000.00


$90.00


Full
Annuity
$450.00
900.00
1,350.00
1,800.00
2,250.00
2,700.00
3,150.00
3,600.00


Reduced
Annuity*
$427.50
855.00
1,282.50
1,695.00
2,100.00
2,505.00
2,910.00


3,315.00


$7,000.00


$105.00


Full
Annuity
$525.00
1,050.00
1,575.00
2,100.00
2,625.00
3,150.00
3.675.00


4,200.00


Reduced
Annuity *
$498.75
997.50
1,492.50
1,965.00
2,437.50
2,910.00
3,382.50


3,855.00


$8,000.00


$120.00


Full
Annuity
$600.00
1,200.00


1,800.00
2,400.00
3,000.00
3,600.00


4,200.00
4,800.00


Reduced
Annuity*
$570.00
1,140.00
1,695.00
2,235.00
2,775.00
3,315.00
3,855.00


4,395.00


* If the designated survivor annuitant is 60 years of age or older.


*





February 2, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Make


These


Simple


Rules


Instinctive


Like m
live with
In any
occur, the
thousand;
precautio
An ato
a tremen<
wide area
instant bi
you must
Expert:
explosion
the explo:
one-half a


ost of the civilized world elsewhere, Isthmian residents must
the knowledge that atomic warfare is a possibility.
heavily populated area where an atomic explosion might
)usands of serious casualties could be minimized and many
s of minor injuries could be avoided completely by simple
ns.
mic explosion begins-for the person at some distance--by
dous flash of light. This is followed seconds later over a


by
etwe
act


heat and shock waves of great violence. In
en your view of the flash and the shock or
instantaneusly and instinctively to protect


s generally
are only a
sion. You
and one mi


rapidly but you
simple precautio
missaries or club]


sti
ns
hou


agree that your ch


1 1


� |


bout one in ten in
have about a 50-5
le away. Beyond (
11 may be badly
possiblee in your hoi
ses, walking along


Remember, blast and heat
weapons outside a one-mile
powers in slightly less than a
A pretty young woman em
acted out a few of the simple
Zone. Study the pictures an


THROW AWAY food or
water in open containers after an
atomic explosion because of the
possibility of contamination by ra-
dioactivity. Water from your fau-
cet and food in your refrigerator
generally will not be affected. If
any doubt exists about food or
water, use bottled water or canned
goods.


AN OPEN DITCH offers good refuge if you are
in the open. A curb along the street where you may
be walking will offer some protection. Protect your
face and neck to the greatest extent possible.


are the t


circle.


ances of survival
you are within a
0 chance of surv
ne mile your cha
hurt if you fail
ae, at your office
;he street, or drive
vo great dangers


Radioactivity los


C

I
n
t

ii
f
;e


the fleeting
heat waves
yourself.
)f an atomic
half mile of
val between
ces increase
o take the
in the com-
ng your car.
rom atomic
s its lethal


mile.
ployee in the Administration Building
precautions you can take in the Canal
d instructions. Fix in your mind now


ou would do to protect yourself in


event of


an atomic attack


without warning.
Do them instinctively. The one or two precious seconds you have
could mean the difference between death or comparative safety.


CROUCH UNDER a table or bed at home, or
a desk at your office. They will provide protection
from heat and shock and help prevent injuries from
falling debris.


FLATTEN YOURSELF
against a concrete wall if no
better protection is quickly ava-
ilable. Bury your face in one arm
and cover the exposed part of
your neck with the other. Such


position


lessen serious


injury from shock or intense heat.
Act without hesitation for you
will have only a moment's time.


FALL PRONE on the Commissary or Clubhouse
floor if you are shopping and have no time to take
other refuge. A handbag held over your neck will
give protection from heat or falling objects.


-31 - -&~n�nlinill-~-~anv :


j





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


NEWS


OF


YOUR


COMMISSARY


STORES


DISTRIBUTION OF COMMISSARY SALE


DOLLAR-FIRST 5 MONTHS,


FISCAL


YEAR


75FARMER* MANUFACT


ONE SALE


VESTMENT 11 WAREHOUSES-RETAIL STORES

S DOLLAR


AND


OTHER


LOCAL


EXPENSES (EtCIanR-ICITWATttr PiPRtECATIOM EL.)


INTEREST ON INVESTMENT


COMMISSARY PRICE COMPARISON


mmissary


Although the Co
adjust local prices
nevertheless there
price trends, in the
ing in touch with t
possible to gauge ti
quantity purchases
stands furnishes a


very valuable


rom an unbiased


prejud
Index,
which
of the
The
pers fr
the U


ice,


is the U


Division has


to those of any
is constant obse
retail as well as
he wholesale mar
ie proper time a
at best values;
check on the re


source


agency


wh


. S. Depa


" published monthly 1
is now used as the b
larger labor unions in
Department of Labor
om a number of store
united States (Atlant


Bridgeport, Buffalo, But
Chicago, Cincinnati, Cle'
troit, Fall River, Houst
Kansas City, Knoxville,
Manchester, Memphis, M
New Haven, New Orlean
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh,
dence, Richmond, Roches
San Francisco, Savannah
ington, I). C., Wichita,
wide index figure.
Individual city prices
some instances are much
cases considerably less.


:te,
vel
on,
L
lilw
IS,
P
.ter
.S*


never


FOOD AND UNIT


made an effort


particular area in the States,
ervation.of States markets and
s the wholesale markets. Keep-
ket is vital in that it is thereby
It which to make seasonal large
knowing how the retail market
lative efficiency of local opera-


comparative


price information,


which merely records the acts without
rtment of Labor's "Consumers' Price
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and
asis for wage contracts by a number
the States.
figures are collected by regular shop-
s in each of 56 large cities throughout
a, Baltimore, Birmingham, Boston,
, Cedar Rapids, Charleston, S. C.,
and, Columbus, Dallas, Denver, De-
Indianapolis, Jackson, Jacksonville,
little Rock, Los Angeles, Louisville,
vaukee, Minneapois, Mobile, Newark,
New York, Norfolk, Omaha, Peoria,
ortland, Me., Portland, Ore., Provi-
, St. Louis, St. Paul, Salt Lake City,
cranton. Seattle S Snrinfield, Wash-


Winston-Salem


averaged for a nation-


not furnished in the report
eater than the average and


An impor tan


prices is, of course, the fact that most
reasonably close to the producing .are;
is over 2,000 water miles away from t
of what this means to the consuming
averaging 14.5 cents a head in the 56 (
here, while bananas can be had for 4
retail stores but cost three times as m
� I t


1r


actor in comparing
of the States retail
as whereas the Canal


h


e market. As ar
onian, lettuce is
. S. cities against
cents in the Co
ch in the States


1 ex,


ample


shown as
t 18 cents
mmissary
(10 cents


States
Average
Price
11-15-50


Cereals and Bakery Products:
Flour, wheat, 5-lb. (Comsy., 4-lb. sack basis)..
Corn flakes, Il-oz ... ...- .---
Corn flakes, 8-oz. (see foot-note)
Cornmeal, Ib. ----. .


Rice, lb. (Comsy.,
Rolled oats, 20-oz.
Rolled oats, 20-oz.
Bread, white, lb. (
Vanilla cookies, lb


4-lb. sack basis)
paper pack .
tin----.------...
Comsy., 14-oz. loaf basis) - - - -


(Comsy., 7-oz.


pack basis)


Commissary
Price
11-15-50 1-15-51


$0.495 $0.438
S180* Not
Not priced .22*
.04 .09
.175 ,108
.167* Not
Not priced .23*
.147 .126
.474 .457


Meats:
Beef: Round steak, lb ...,. .
Rib roast, lb. (Comsy., first 5 ribs)
Chuck roast, lb ....... ......--.-.---
Hamburger, lb.. � � � , � � �� , � �
Veal: Cutlets, lb. .....
Pork: Chops, center cut (Comsy., loin chops) _
Bacon, sliced, Ib. .................._.
Ham, whole, lb. (skinned, smoked, tenderized).
Salt pork, lb. (dry salt belly) .....
Lamb: Leg, Ib... .....
Poultry: Fryers, N. Y. dressed (undrawn)
Fryers, dressed and drawn
Fish: Salmon, pink, 16-oz., can
Dairy Products:
Butter, lb...--- --..... ...-..---
Cheese, lb. (processed Cheddar) ......._
Milk, fresh (del.), qt.....-.-.- .-....--_-
Milk, fresh (groc.), qt.-
Milk, evaporated, 14-oz. can.
Eggs, fresh, doz. (States: Size and grade sold in
volume; Comsy., Consumer Grade A, large) -
Fruits and Vegetables:
Fresh: Apples, lb...._._.._..
Bananas, lb... ... ... .. . � � ..
-'< * .I h*- * *- --


$0.438
carried
.22*
.09
.115
carried
.24*
.126
.434

.41
.35
.33
.38
1.44
.62
56
65
36
.52
46
carried
,57

.66
.46
.25
.22
.14

.88

.15
.045


.


_ r J- *








February 2, 1951


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


PEOPLE


YOU


KNOW


GROWN-UP


CANAL


ZONE


GIRLS


Many of the girls who grew up and are
educated in the Canal Zone elect to re-
main on the Isthmus and make their
careers in Government service, in the
business world, or as housewives. The
wives of many top Canal-Railroad execu-
tives were born here or have spent most
of their lives in the Canal Zone.
In a previous issue of THE CANAL RE-
VIEW, the pictures and brief biographical
sketches of three well-known grown-up
Canal Zone boys were presented. This
issue of PEOPLE YOU KNOW is
devoted to three attractive members of
the other sex who grew up in the Canal
Zone. They are:

VIRGINIA KEENAN, Physical Edu-
cation Teacher in Cristobal, and one of
the leading woman golfers on the Isthmus.
Born at Colon Hospital, Virginia spent
her early life in Gatun where her father,
William H. Keenan, was employed for
more than 35 years at the Atlantic Locks
before his retirement in 1946. Her father
and mother have made their home at
Santa Clara since his retirement.
Although Virginia is best known for her
ability in several different athletic fields,
she is also an accomplished musician and
helped pay her own way during high
school and college days by playing the
piano in dance orchestras.
She attended Gatun elementary school
and finished Cristobal junior and senior
high schools, and the Canal Zone Junior
College. Her education was completed
with two years atV Colorado State College.
She showed her aptitude in athletics all
during her school days on the Isthmus.
Aside from being one of the outstanding
swimmers and divers among the girl stars
of several years ago, she was adept enough
at bowling to play in the adult leagues
while still in high school.
Virginia has won an armful of trophies
in golf since her return to the Isthmus
after finishing her college education.
Among other titles and trophies, she won
the Isthmian women's championship in
1948 and again last year. She was also
crowned the Panama Women's Golf
Association handicap champion in 1950.
She manages to crowd into her full
Lf.l, J<1. At.."_ ^ t . -. - - * NXT ^__1 fl -


Miss Virginia Keenan, Physical Education Teacher


L--


- h




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


Pedro


Miguel


Clubhouse,


Landmark


Since


1914,


Soon


Be


Demolished


One of the most familiar features of
Pedro Miguel, the rambling, two-story
Clubhouse which stands on an eminence
looking down the Prado in the Pacific
Locks town is soon to be demolished.
The building was opened with a formal
program just 35 years ago, January 27,
1914, which was attended by more than
400 residents of Pedro Miguel and Par-
aiso, with a sprinkling of people from
other Pacific side towns. The feature of
the program was an address by the Hon-
orable Herman A. Gudger, then Chief
Justice of the Canal Zone.
Although the building was then already
seven years old, having been built in
Gorgona in 1907, its removal and reopen-
ing in Pedro Miguel was an extra special
occasion for the residents. It was one of
several buildings originally erected in
Gorgona which were dismantled and re-
built in Pedro Miguel.
The old landmark will not entirely be
removed from its present site although
the main building will be torn down. It is
planned to move the essential Clubhouse
services and facilities, including the bar-
ber shop, to the building now occupied
by the Post Office and Housing Manager.
The swimming pool, bath house, and a
tailor and shoe shop will be retained at
the present site and considerable altera-
tions are planned to improve the bath
house facilities.
Location Never Popular
The location of the Pedro Miguel Club-
house was never a particularly popular
one with the townspeople, and a protest
as to the location was voiced even before
the building was rebuilt there. That pro-
test was lodged by W. G. Comber, Resi-
dent Engineer of the Sixth Division, who
later became head of the Dredging Divi-
sion. He stated that the location would


PEDRO MIGUEL CLUBHOUSE, one of the oldest public buildings in the Canal Zone, will soon be
demolished. It stands on a hill at the eastern end of the Pacific Locks town. The building was originally
erected in 1907 in Gorgona and was moved to Pedro Miguel and reopened in January 1914.


be inconvenient for residents of Pedro
Miguel but especially residents of Par-
aiso, which was then being established as
a permanent headquarters for the Dredg-
ing Division.
Another protest on the location was
made by the residents of Pedro Miguel
in 1925. This resulted in a study to de-
termine the cost of relocating the club-
house on the site of the baseball park.
The project died a sudden death when
an estimate of $40,000 for the relocation
was given to C. A. McIlvaine, then Exec-
utive Secretary,, who penciled a curt
"nothing doing" across the face of the
written proposal.
Although the Pedro Miguel Clubhouse
is one of the most imposing of all the
older Clubhouse buildings, it has been a


"white elephant" in many respects during
most of its history since its removal from
the rousing shops town of Gorgona.
Even the addition of the swimming pool,
at about the time the proposed transfer
of the Clubhouse was disapproved, failed
to make it an overwhelmingly popular
spot.
The Clubhouse had a sort of revival
during the early part of World War II
and shortly before the outbreak of war
an expenditure of $60,000 was authorized
to construct and equip a kitchen and
otherwise modernize the building.
Since the end of the war the Clubhouse
business has dwindled back to its former
lethargic state and late last year it was
agreed to consolidate the principal facili-
ties at the new and more central location.


November


Dr. Arnulfo Arias took oath of office as
President of Panama ten years ago in
October in an impressive and colorful
1 i ti I w * * /*i -


AGO


December


The old sister ships Ancon and Cristobal
were sold to the highest bidder, the Per-
manente Company, of Oakland, Califor-
* 1 * IT 1~ j 'h ann Alr A-.l PI


a two-story frame nurses quarters, at
Gorgas Hospital. The first patients were
moved into Section E during the latter
part of the year.
Isthmian visitors during the last three
months of 1940 included Secretary of Navy
Frank Knox; Senator Robert M. LaFollette,
Jr., of Wisconsin; Governor Sam Houston,
., * j"h j4 I ji� J'%. . . . . f 'u*"J772 , ..,. * fM/.,k fk f [' , f.,


TEN


October


YEARS





February 2, 1951

October


THE PANAMA


November


CANAL REVIEW


December


950


In a year filled with happenings of
great local interest, the last quarter of
1950 produced its full share of headline
news for the Isthmian press. Following
the precedent set at the very beginning
of the year, not all of the news was good.


The first of several
Canal-Railroad
unced by Governor


pay razs
employee
Newcom


'e
*e


1. It was a pay increase for
more than 50 postal employ
same date it was announced
probationary policemen were to
ed as a result of the establish
40-hour work week for the
Police.


*s for groups
s was an-
r on October
a group of
ees. On the
that 18 new
'be appoint-
Iment of the
Canal Zone


A reminder of income tax was given
during the first month of the quarter
when withholding exemption certificates
were distributed. Income tax continued
uppermost in most employees' minds
throughout the three-month period and
ended on the doleful note that Congress
had failed to take action on a measure
to kill the retroactive tax for 1950.

The Canal's $80,000,000 building pro-
gram was in the news throughout most of
the quarter. Bids were opened on all of the
major projects for this fiscal year during
the latter part of December. Meanwhile,
the large residential area bounded by
Chagres Street and Ancon Boulevard was
being cleared for the coming year's program.
Old houses which have stood for 30 years or
more were being torn down and by the close
of 1950 the area was a beehive of activity.
The Housing Division was able to announce
shortly before the turn of the year that the
restrictions on family quarters' assignments
were lifted. Grading and site work in the
area will be done during the present dry
season by the Municipal Division.
Senator Richard B. Russell, of Georgia,
Chairman of the Senate Finance Com-
mittee, spent several days' vacation on
the Isthmus during August. Several Con-
gressional parties were entertained during
the last three months of the year while


Miss Beatrice H. Simonis, Assistant
Nurse, became Chief Nurse at Gorgas
pital, and Miss Lucille Hearn was
moted to Assistant Chief Nurse.


Distinguished former empl


oyees


Chief
Hos-
pro-

made


news of much local interest during the
past three months. Former Governor
Julian L. Schley, T. H. Rossbottom, re-
tired Vice President of the Panama Rail-
road Company, and former Police Chief
Guy Johannes, all arrived in December
for a visit. Mrs. Dove L. Prather, retired
school teacher was given a formal fare-
well and a word of praise for her dis-
tinguished record as a teacher and public
spirited citizen by Acting Governor Her-
bert D. Vogel in December.
*~ *
Announcement of the formal agreement
between Panama and Canal Zone authori-
ties that only one license plate would be
required on automobiles in 1951, pro-


Boy And

Serves


duced a series of stories for the local press
in December.

Governor Newcomer made his sixth trip
of the year to Washington during the last
month of the year. The frequency of his
visits to the national capital was indicative
of the extensive legislative program affecting
the Canal-Railroad which was before Con-
gress. He had a double-barrelled objective
on his last trip-to straighten out the com-
plexities of the incorporation of the Canal
operations next July and to appear before
the Bureau of the Budget on financial
arrangements for the coming fiscal year.
A Christmas present in the form of a
two-cent-an-hour raise for about 1,500
truckers and stowers in the Terminals
Division was announced during the holi-
day season.


even the oldest


employees


Administration Building and other Canal-
Railroad offices could remember the Christ-
mas gaiety which prevailed at the 1950
Yuletide season. Office parties were the rule
as employees counterbalanced depressing
news from Korea, the income tax, and the


polio outbreak, with old-fashioned Christ-
mas good cheer.


Humorist

Ancon C(


If R. L. Sullivan, General Manager of
the Commissary Division, could staff all
of his retail stores with help of the same
caliber of Santos Secaida, who works in
the Ancon Commissary, many of his pub-
lic relations problems would be solved and
he could devote his time to worry about
spiraling food prices.
Santos, now 17 years old, is package
boy, philosopher, and humorist.
He began work at the Ancon store four
years ago when he was first employed by
J. L. Evans, then manager in Ancon.
Since that time the Ancon customers have
become accustomed to Santos' ready
smile and helpfulness with packages,
prices, and location of items in the store.
Santos is a native-born Canal Zonian,
his home town being Frijoles, although he
presently lives with his family in Gamboa.
His father, Ernesto Secaida, has been em-
ployed for the past 20 years as a section-
CV n r wn n ~nn ri r�T 44, n\ P n n Ln/ nm P n 1 n. jA


Combined

immissary


Customers


*Z IrbP~ iB . XPzfltL VLfl


in the


Package





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


ew


Silver


City Swim

Is Rapidly


ming


Pool


N hearing


Completion


Rapid progress is now being made on
the construction of a swimming pool at
Silver City, which with the adjacent bath-


house and luncheonet
come and attractive a
It is expected that
facilities can be opei
few weeks, although
been experienced in
the luncheonette equ
eonette, bathhouse,


tte, will prove a wel-
iddition in the town.
the new recreational
ned within the next
some difficulty has
delivery of some of
ipment. The lunch-
and swimming pool


are being constructed by the Isthmian
Constructors, Inc., bids for this work hav-
ing been opened several months ago.
Electrical and municipal work is being
done by Panama Canal forces.
Conveniently Located
The new facilities are conveniently
located in the playground area immedi-
ately east of the Vocational School. The
pool, 60 by 100 feet, is somewhat larger
than the Pedro Miguel pool. It is being
constructed of reinforced concrete and
will be lined with ceramic tile. It will be
surrounded by a concrete platform and
seats for spectators will be provided along
one side.
The luncheonette building is now prac-
tically completed. The work was done in
two phases with the luncheonette being
built first. When the above pictures were
taken in the middle of January, the exca-
vation for the pool was nearing comple-


SILVER CITY SWIMMING POOL is now being
rushed -to completion. The picture above shows the
progress of its construction in mid-January. It and
the adjoining bathhouse and luncheonette will prove
a welcome addition to the town's recreational facili-
ties. A front view of the luncheonette is shown at
the right.
tion and much of the reinforced concrete
had been placed.
The luncheonette and bathhouse, im-
mediately adjacent to the swimming pool,
are of concrete block construction. The
luncheonette is 26 by 72 feet and has a
tiled floor. Space is provided for a soda
fountain, kitchen, merchandise and pas-


try cases, and about ten tables. The side
of the building facing the swimming pool
is open to permit a partial view of the
pool.


Over $11,000,000 Requested
For 1952 Building Program
(Continued from page 5) Ancon Theater
to the old Corral area, and the site prep-
aration and construction of four com-
posite-type apartments on Guayacan Ter-
race.
BALBOA, grading and site preparation
on Morgan Avenue and Pyle Street.
DIABLO HEIGHTS, site work and
construction of ten apartments of the
composite type.
GATUN, site work and construction of
eight composite-type apartments.
MARGARITA, site preparation for the
building program in the fiscal year 1952.


S- -

B- !ib-i i tw r -J -- -


FRONT VIEW of the new three-bedroom masonry quarters. This is one of two new type houses which
is included in the permanent quarters construction program which began this fiscal year. The house has a
ranch-type appearance from the front. Floor plans were shown in a previous issue of THE CANAL REVIEW.
The living and sleeping quarters are joined by a wide porch or breezeway.


quarters construction since that time
having been done by the Building Divi-


wings erected 30 or more years ago are
being demolished. This work is scheduled


V::: ] :7 .'


.---- -- ---~
--


~_____~__I~
~Ic





February 2, 1951


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


STATISTICS


CANAL


TRAFFIC


For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace-time than those for 1939.


Overhaul


w


ork


At


Gatun


Locks


Begins


Nearly 1,000 extra workers swarmed into the
Gatun Locks enclosure early in January to begin
the quadrennial overhaul-the Canal's biggest and
most spectacular maintenance job.
An overhaul of the Panama Canal Locks, Atlantic
or Pacific, nowadays costs more than a million dol-
lars and under normal operations each of the three
sets is given a thorough going-over once every four
years.
The gigantic task is made to look relatively easy
and simple by the Locks Division employees who
have had long experience in doing the work.
This year, four of the miter-gate leaves at Gatun
Locks which weigh 735 tons each will be unhinged.
The lifting job is done by 12 hydraulic jacks of 100


tons capacity each. The lifting of the big gate leaves
off their nickle-steel pintles is now a comparatively
routine operation but when one of the leaves was
first unhinged at Pedro Miguel Locks in 1929 many
weeks were spent by the engineering forces, both
office and field, in preparing plans and actually doing
the job.
The first real overhaul of the Canal Locks was
done during the early 1920's although the lock cham-
bers at both Miraflores and Gatun Locks were
emptied in 1915 to make an inspection of any under-
water damage to the parts and machinery. The
same was done at Pedro Miguel two years later.
The above picture of the gates in the lower, west
chamber of Gatun Locks was taken in mid-January


before all of the water had been pumped out.
Any person dissatisfied with his present job could
doubtless make an even swap with any one of these
chippers shown scaling the accumulation of sea shells
and marine life from the lock gates. The work being
done by the men shown on the scaffolding is one of
the least complicated jobs. The gates will be re-
painted after the scaling work is completed.
The work at Gatun is being done this year on a
six-day week basis and the overhaul of the west
chambers is expected to be completed during the
latter part of this month. The entire overhaul job is
scheduled for completion before May 1 after which
two-lane ship traffic through Gatun Locks will be
resumed.


Movements


Through Canal Below

Figures of Year Ago

Commodity shipments through the Panama Canal


occurred in ammonium compounds. Shipments of
ammonium compounds from the Atlantic to the
Pacific were third on the list with over 265,000 long
tons in the last quarter of 1949, while this commodity
was tenth on the list for the last quarter of 1950
with shipments totaling slightly less than 60,000 tons.
Sugar Shipments Increase


Sugar
Atlantic


shipments through the Canal from the
to the Pacific have grown in importance


during recent years and during the last three months
of 1950 they totaled nearly 140.000 tons. as com-


last quarter of 1938.
Comparative figures for the last quarter of 1949
and 1950 commodity shipments showed decreases in
the tonnage of sulphur ores and various metals, while
increases were shown in coal and coke, canned food
products, automobiles and parts, machinery, cement,
tinplate, paper and paper products, phosphates, and
raw cotton.
The tonnage of most of the leading commodity
shipments through the Canal from the Pacific to the
Atlantic was lower during the last quarter of 1950
than the last three months of 1949. Increased ton-


Commodity




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


Canal


Zone


Museum


Established;


Many


Historical


Items


On


Display


A ('anal Zone museum--subject of sug-
gestion and discussion for many years-
has finally become a reality.
Young visitors in the lobby of the Civil
Affairs Building in Ancon, where the
museum is located, display their interest
in the new institution with pertinent and
impertinent questions and remarks, espe-
cially about the animal exhibits. They
dub the ocelot a "big pussy cat," want to
know if sloths have tails, ad infinitum.
Their elders, many of whom have been
Canal Zone residents for many years, re-
mark that they learn a lot of things about
the Isthmus they didn't know before
when they visit the museum.
Other visitors, age and identity un-
known, just have to try out the ship's
bell in the museum which came from the
original S. S. Ancon. Office workers in
the building who are jarred by the bell's
clang, vow there is no sound like it.
Various Models Displayed
Two types of material are included in


the new museum. Artifacts
local and historical interest
been collected from various
the Isthmus are on display
of the building. On the sec
The Panama Canal Library,


and items of
which have
locations on
in the lobby
ond floor, in
is a notable


collection of documents and maps which
form the Panama Collection.
Mrs. Eleanor Burnham, as Librarian,
has supervised many of the acquisitions
which form the Panama Collection of the
Library, and the museum materials have
been assembled over a period of many
years.
Probably the single most important
event in the series of little noticed discus-
sions and happenings which led, over a
period of years, to the establishment of
the museum was the move of The Panama
Canal Library and other offices included
in the new Civil Affairs Bureau to the
former air terminal building in November
1949.


Display Area Is Provided
The new building, vacated when com-
mercial air operations were transferred to
Tocumen Airport, provided for the first
time sufficient space and a good location
for a museum. Soon after the move was
made, the transfer of various small his-
. _- _ -1 . 11 . A- P 1*lt i 1 *"


A TREASURED ADDITION to the new Canal Zone museum is the flag shown above which was used
to cover the caskets of those Americans who died during the early Canal construction period. It contains
only 45 stars. Until about two years ago when it was presented to The Panama Canal Society of Florida the
flag had been in possession of Miss Anna R. Turner, of Carbondale, Pa., one of three nurses who came to the
Isthmus during 1904 and were thus eligible as members of the famous Inca Society. The flag was presented
to the museum by W. C. Haskins, himself an Inca and the oldest ex-employee of the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission in point of service, now living on the Isthmus. The flag was accepted by Col. Richardson Selee (right),
Civil Affairs Director.


models
former
Diablo


Priva
large
expected
cal was


which were transferred from the
Special Engineering Division at
Heights.
Private Donations Help
Xte donations have already en-
the original collections and are
d to increase in the future. Typi-
the presentation to the museum


Modern Motherhood
(Continued from page 7) changes in either the
child or the mother, and symptoms
occur-sometimes with tragic sudden-
ness-which, when diagnosed early and
properly interpreted, may be corrected
and the child delivered normally at term.
The proper evaluation of these abnormal
signs and symptoms during the prenatal
period is the basic reason for obstetricians
insis.tingr unnn frpnieln.T visits hv their


of a flag with 45 stars used to drape the
caskets of construction workers, a gift
from The Panama Canal Society of Flor-
ida. Another presentation of Isthmian
artifacts was made by Fred W. Morrill,
President of the Panama Society for the
Advancement of Archaelogy and Natural
Science.


ment given early will almost invariably
assure the delivery of a healthy child.
At each visit the weight is taken, for a
sudden increase in weight may be the
first evidence that the kidneys are not
eliminating certain poisonous substances
This might indicate a condition which


previously
of many m4
but which
treatment i
S.*j i


has caused
others and e
now can be
s received.
1 *


premature deaths
even more infants,
corrected if early
Likewise, at each
e . I


I





February 2,


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Canal


Traffic


Affected


By


Tanker


Trade


Both ocean-going commercial traffic and tolls of
of the Panama Canal during the first half of this
fiscal year exceeded comparative figures in the fiscal
years 1938 and 1950 despite a considerable drop in
tanker traffic through the Canal from the west coast
of the United States.
Statistics for the entire calendar year of 1950 show
that Canal business was at the highest level since
1930. During the 12-month period ending in Decem-
ber the net tonnage of commercial vessels was re-
ported as 28,742,568 as compared with 28,013,236
net tons during the fiscal year 1950, which was a
record high in Canal operations.
Tolls collected during the past calendar year
amounted to $25,124,000 or nearly three million dol-
lars over the amount in 1949, but short by about one
million dollars of the figures for the calendar year
1930 when Canal traffic was at a high peak.
Cargo shipments through the Canal during the
past 12 months were near the all-time records set
during the peacetime operations in the late 1920's.
A total of 29,962,896 tons of cargo were shipped
through the Panama Canal during the past calendar
year, as compared with slightly over 30,000,000 tons
in the calendar year 1930.
Tanker Trade Drops
Most notable feature of Panama Canal traffic dur-
ing the past year was the drop in the tanker traffic
from the west coast of the United States. This was
revealed in the comparative figures of the intercoastal
trade for the last quarter of 1949 and 1950. There
were 253 large commercial vessels listed on this trade
route in the last quarter of the calendar year 1949,
largely the result of heavy oil shipments from the
west coast. During the last three months of 1950
there were only 168 ships on the intercoastal run
through the Canal.
This considerable drop was partially offset by an
increase in traffic from the east coast of the United
States to South America. The number of large com-
mercial vessels in this trade increased from 229 dur-
ing the last quarter of the calendar year 1949 to 296
during the quarter ending last December.
There were no significant variations in traffic over
the other main trade routes through the Canal in
these two periods.
. High Traffic Expected
Unless there is a serious disruption of traffic through
the Canal during the coming six months, the figures
on tolls, number of transits, and cargo probably will
be about as high as any fiscal year since 1930. The
number of transits for the first half of this fiscal year,
beginning last July, totaled 2,790 while the amount
of tolls was nearly $12,500,000. These figures were
slightly ini excess of the comparable figures in the


Gen.


William C.


Gorgas


Elected To Hall Of Fame


first half of the fiscal year 1938, the last year of nor-
mal peacetime operations of the Canal before the
beginning of World War II.
This trend in commercial traffic was shown in com-
parative figures for October, November, and Dec-


ember of the past two years despite the virtual dis-
appearance of tanker traffic. This traffic which was
heavy irom September 1949 through last July
dropped from 55 last July to only four each in the
months of November and December.


CANAL TRANSITS-TOLLS PAYING AND FREE

October-November-December
1950 1949 1938
Atlantic Pacific
ttoto Total Total Total
Pacific Atlantic
Tolls-paying vessels:
Ocean-going 706 672 1,378 1,367 1,508
*Small 121 98 219 280 225
- -- --
Total, tolls-paying- ----- ----__ 827 770 1,597 1 ,647 1,733
**Free transits---------. 77 82 159 251 104

Total tolls-paying and free------- 904 852 1,756 1,898 1,837


* Vessels under 300 net tons or


500 displacement tons.


** Exclusive of Panama Canal equipment.

TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES


The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial


vessels


(300 net


tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:


United Stat
East Coast
East Coast


es


Inter


coast


of U. S. and South America_
of U. S. and Central America_.


East Coast of U.


and Far


U. S.-Canada east coast


Europe and


East


and Australasia


west coast of U. S.-Canada


Europe and South America_
Europe and Australasia
All other routes


Total traffic


October-November-December


60
331


153 130
40 43
126 211
80 163
53 53
297 460
1,367 1,508


MONTHLY


COMMERCIAL


TRAFFIC AND TOLLS


Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


II


Ylh~y ~II*- -�


I






THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 2, 1951


Park


Dedicated

To George


p*
~S- '''
1)IPP :^


Erbe,


Green

" ir



'S .
* ,**
Imm
:::


A WAYSIDE PARK located on the Madden Road
which was built under his direction, was dedicated
last month to George W. Green, Municipal Engineer
of The Panama Canal for more than 25 years. The
ceremony was attended by people from all walks of
life and were representative of every major unit of the
Canal-Railroad organization. The park is at the site
of the waterfalls on Madden Road. The monument
to Mr. Green, built of stone from the Sosa Hill
Quarry, was unveiled by Governor Newcomer after an
address by Frank H. Lerchen, who succeeded Mr.
Green as Municipal Engineer. The ceremony was
opened and closed by the Very Reverend Raymond T.
Ferris, Dean of St. Luke's Cathedral in Ancon.


To


Executive


The


Governor,


Assistant


Retires


'.4
- V' l- -,~ c ~ ~ ^
**
* :>c* i _
'. * . *-4 ' *%
* . . w1%


ERNST A. ERBE, Exe:utive Assistant to the
Governor, ended more than 36 years of service with
the Isthmian Canal Commission and The Panama
Canal at the end of January. Except for his service
in the Army during the first World War, Mr. Erbe
had served continuously since June 1, 1912. He has
had an important part in forming the administrative
policies of the Canal for many years. Aside from his


0)
0 -

G --
P



h)
0>^^
g^
<
O


important Canal duties, Mr. Erbe, a native of
Altoona, Kansas, took an active part in community
affairs of the Isthmus. He and Mrs. Erbe have not
definitely chosen their future residences in the United
States and do not plan to leave the Isthmus until
sometime in March. Mr. Erbe has been succeeded in
his position by Forrest G. Dunsmoor, who has had
many years Canal service.


Cash


Sales


To Start


In Ancon Commissary

Customs sometimes change and one of
45 years' standing in the Canal Zone-
use of coupons for purchases in the Com-
missary Division's retail stores-is to be
altered in one store on an experimental
basis early next month.
Ancon Commissary has been selected
for the trial balloon and during the next
few weeks it will be rearranged and re-
fitted for cash sales, thus modifying a
practice which began August 21, 1905,
when the use of coupon books was first
inaugurated.
The plan for cash sales in the Commis-
sary stores has been a subject of discus-
sion and debate for many years and has
been under serious consideration for sev-
eral months. The trial in Ancon is being
made principally as a customer conven-
ianFa and fAnmmiqarv Divhiinn nffrial.n


Principal commodities shipped through the Canal
(All figures in long tons)
Figures in parenthesis in 1938 and 1949 columns indiCate
relative positions in those years


ATLANTIC TO


Commodity


Mineral _ .
Manufactures of
Coal and coke_
Sugar__ _-
Paper and paper
Sulphur_ .
Raw cotton
Phosphates
Automobiles and


iron and steel__


product


parts.


Ammonium compounds


Metals, var ious .
Machinery ....
Tinplate .. .
Cement ..
Canned food nrodu


L I


PACIFIC


Last Quarter, Calendar


1950


416,682
410,886
216,151
139,782
104,888
84,634
82,597
82,313
62,271
59,646
53,326
52,261
48,019
45,757
32.924


1949
331,669 (1)
242,914 (2)
59,866 (7)
8,214 (12)
94,751 (5)
95,506 (6)
33,723 (8)
42,437 (4)
54,975 (11)
268,482 (3)
12,646 (15)
46,591 (9)
36,808 (10)
32,105 (13)
27.788 (14)


Year


254,647 (3)
377,601 (1)
47,897 (14)
1,855 (31)
110,130 (5)
68,649 (7)
68,593 (13)
39,235 (6)
52,273 (9)
12,811 (22)
145,664 (4)
42,390 (10)
51,796 (8)
40,285 (11)
34,640 (15)


, ," ,,, "
*, ",%'


______/


)__It_


s


I