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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00088
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Creation Date: November 1950
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
System ID: UF00097366:00088
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Full Text
S1- 6


7 -(


ca. )


CANAL


Vol. 1, No. 3 BALBOA, HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, NOVEMBER 3, 1950 5 cents


INCORPORATION
I


LAV

FOR


Y REQUIRES BASIC

CANAL-RAILROAD


C


ALTERATIONS

ORGANIZATION


JULY


1951


Employee's


In


Red


Actual


With


Income


axes


Expenses For Family Of Four With Above Average
Salary Show Deficit After Inexpensive Vacations


In addition to offering the fascinating
game of identifying prominent Zonians
(See page 11), this issue of The Panama
Canal Review offers another game at
which most employees can and will
while away many an evening in coming
months. It can be played every eve-
ning, once a week, once a month, or at
longer intervals. It must be played,
however, once a year.
The game presented below, judged to
be about as welcome to the average em-
ployee as a tast game of Russian rou-


Food and household supplies .................
Rent, light, care of grounds, etc. ............
Clothing .... .. - - - - - - - - - - - -
Insurance- ..........-..... ........ .. ..
Retirement (Civil Service). ................ .
Transportation (Isthmus only) ........_.
Personal services (maid, laundry, etc.)-
Amusements including books, periodicals, entertain-
ment, movies, gifts, drinks, tobacco, lottery,
hobbies, etc.. .... .... .... . ....
Church, charities, and fraternal ......
Health services ...... .......
Education .......
Miscellaneous expenses ...........


INCOME TAX
TOTAL .... . - ... .--
Adjusted to annual salary of $5,406 .....
The first column presents the actual
budget of an employee whose salary
/flnCt A(Ic^ tr n r mow inn n ilfliirrt-r-rr -rji


lette, is known as the Income Tax
Puzzle. While the game offers any
number of variations, beginners should
start by trying to match or better each
item in any one of the columns they
may select. More details are given be-
low in this chart of figures which repre-
sents one actual and two hypothetical
annual budgets of a married Canal or
Railroad employee with two children
whose salary is $5,406.25 (GS-7e or GS-
8b).


Actual
Budget
$1,530
530
420
350
325
755
100

420
190
73
287
125
$5,105
478


$5,583
($177)


Pinch-
Penny
Budget
$1,500
530
420
275
325
350
300


$4,


Spend-
thrift
Budget


$2,000
530
750
275
325
500
600

750
50
180
280
300


$6,540
478


$7,018
($1,612)


The food bill shown was based on one
month's actual record which came to
(1? C n / n-


With a few short months The Panama
Canal with the capital "T" will become
a matter of history.
Whatever good or ill effects the change
may have is still a matter of some con-
jecture but it will put an end to one
embarrassing situation which few, if any,
Canal employees have not at sometime
encountered. They will be able to say
who they work for and not be immedi-
ately forced into a long explanation.
What Canal employee has not had the
misfortune to encounter on one of his
return trips home some old friend who
wants to know whom he is working for
after all these years? More often than
not the conversation follows this pattern:
"Why, I work for The Panama Canal,"
the employee replies proudly.
"I know," the friend counters conde-
scendingly, "that you work on the Panama
Canal but who do you work for down
there?"
Somewhat in anguish the hapless indi-
vidual attempts to explain. Moments
later a pitying look comes over the old
friend's face as he suddenly realizes that
John has gone a little daft after a few
years in the tropics.
Those who return ,to their homeland
after next July 1 need have no fear of
being damned by his own words in such
a fashion. They can say, as the case may
be, that they work for the Panama Canal
Company or the Canal Zone Government,
both full, round terms the average Ameri-
can can understand. He may never
have ventured far from (See page 3)
I--I


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


PANAMA


Income




PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW,


November 3,-1950


ew


Are


owns


and


New


In


Zone


ypes of H

Building


housess

Program


r---


--1


Ancon, Balboa Heights, and La Boca.
Secondary only to the main problem of
finding available land for the new towns
will be such questions as the most econ-
omical use of the areas in the provision
of such public utilities as roads and
streets, sewer and water lines, and the
necessary electrical facilities at the lowest
possible cost. Since both towns will neces-
sarily be located at some distance from .the
employment centers a comparatively large
segment of Canal-Railroad employees


will become, by Isthmian
commuters between their
places of employment.


standards,
homes and


142 Houses Will be Built


-I


FLOOR PLANS for one of the two new types of masonry houses included in this year's building pro-
gram are shown above. The three bedrooms are completely separated from the living quarters by the wide
porch which forms a breezeway for both units. The porch will have a tiled floor and a masonry wall up to
window-sill height with screening above to the flat roof. Plans also provide for a rearrangement of the space
to the right of the car-port to provide for maid's quarters. The broken lines indicate the roof extension.


With plans already well formulated for
the expenditure of nearly $3,000,000 on
housing replacement by The Panama
Canal this fiscal year, intensive studies
are presently being undertaken to solve
one of the primary problems of the
$80,000,000 program.
This problem-how to provide suffi-
cient houses to keep ahead of the major
demolition program-is most acute on the
Pacific side where large areas in the towns
of Ancon, Balboa, and La Boca must be
cleared before rebuilding can be under-


one to accommodate those who must be
moved out of La Boca and other local-
rate communities and one for U. S.-rate
employees who must move ahead of dem-
olition squads, probably will be made
within the next few months. Following
a selection of the areas, detailed surveys
of the terrain and town planning on a
comprehensive scale can be undertaken
soon thereafter.
Building Sites Are Scarce
The necessity of selecting new townsites
at some distance from the Canal terminal


The development of new residential
sites on the Atlantic side is of major im-
portance in the long-range program but
present plans call for the extension of
existing townsites of Margarita, Gatun,
and Silver City during the early stages.
Until a sufficient number of new houses
have been provided to accommodate those
employees and their families now living in
quarters which are to be torn down, the
demolition program on both the Atlantic
and Pacific sides will be on a moderate
scale.
In all, 142 houses are to be built with
funds available this fiscal year. These
will provide 182 apartments for local-rate
employees and 77 apartments for U. S.-
rate workers. The principal construction
area on the Pacific side will be in Diablo
Heights with two houses to be built in the
old Corral area in Ancon. Practically all
of the construction activities on the At-
lantic side will be centered in Gatun,
Margarita, and Silver City.
The site preparation for construction
planned in the existing towns during the
coming fiscal year will require little dem-
olition on the Atlantic side. Two areas
have been designated for clearance on the
Pacific side this year, one of which in-
volves the removal of the entire block of
old-tvype quarters on Reservoir Road and


along Ancon Boulevard and Chagres
Street to the beginning of the old Corral
residential section. The second and smal-
ler area to be cleared will be the section
on Pvle Street and the end of Morgan


Planned


- L





November 3, 1950


PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


Incorporation Law


Basic


Alterations


Requires
For Canal


(Continued from page 1) the bounds of his
home county nor have the faintest idea of
the location of the Panama Canal but he
knows there is a Panama Canal and a
Canal Zone and to him it will be only a
logical step forward to understand that
the former is operated by a company and
the latter run by a government.
Organization Lines Clear
Another petard with which the average
employee will not be hoist in the future
he will not have to explain to himself or
othersthe differences and lines of demarca-
tion among such entities as the Panama
Canal, The Panama Canal, the Panama
Railroad, the Panama Line, and the Pan-
ama Railroad Company.
In relation to his work, where he buys
his food, who rents him the house he lives
in, and who furnishes his light and water,
the Canal-Railroad employee will learn
some new terms. The Canal Zone Police-
man can still be called a Canal Zone Cop
in all correctness after next July, but in
nine cases out of ten the employee will
have a company president as the big boss
instead of a Governor. It is unlikely that
the spoken title of Governor will change
since he will continue as Governor of the
Canal Zone but in most cases the written
title in official language will be another
matter.
These many inconsequential adjust-
ments which employees will experience
in their day-to-day life are by no means
indicative of the profound change which
will come with the incorporation of the
Canal-Railroad enterprise.
No piece of legislation since the passage
of the Panama Canal Act of 1912 com-
pares in significance for the Canal and
Railroad with Public Law 841, entitled
"An Act to authorize and provide for the
maintenance and operation of the Pan-
ama Canal by the present corporate ad-
junct of The Panama Canal, as renamed;
to constitute the agency charged with the
civil government of the Canal Zone, and
for other purposes."
Technically, the law provides for the
transfer of all functions of the operation
and maintenance of the Canal and any
related business operations to the Panama
Railroad Company, and changes the
name of that company to the Panama
Canal Company. The remaining units,
f/oi0 onr ornn mA oiuil amronwnmonf- nul_


To


The


.-a.a L N


WASHINGTON, D.C.:--No Congress since
the establishment of The Panama Canal
has produced so much legislation of far-
reaching consequences to the organization
and of vital interest to the employees as
the 81st. Of the legislation enacted, the three


measures of greatest interest
were those providing for the
all Canal-Railroad oper-
ations except civil govern-
ment and public health
services; extension of the
Income Tax to the Canal
Zone; and the appropria-
tion of $2,500,000 to initi-
ate an $80,000,000 housing
program.
Of the three major pieces
of legislation, by far the
most consequential from
an Administration view-
point is the measure for
providing a corporate body
to operate and maintain
the Panama Canal and its


various adjuncts.


That corporation


known as the Panama Canal Company.
Although a FederalGovernment corporation,
it will operate as a strictly business enter-
prise within certain statutory limits. The
key requirement will be that the new Com-
pany pay its own way.
The proposed change from a Government
agency to a corporation has long been advo-
cated for the Canal by the Bureau of the
Budget. The enabling legislation was intro-
duced in the 81st Congress at the instance
of the President who has now directed that
the change be made effective July 1, 1951.
The transformation will require a com-
plete change in our administrative and fiscal
processes. Fortunately, as a result of the
Canal-Railroad reorganization last July,
the change will be of a routine nature for
the vast majority of our employees and I
anticipate no serious adverse effects to the
welfare and general living conditions of our
employees as a group or individually.
It will be a matter of some months yet
until the full pattern of this intricate pro-
cedure has been determined. Even at this
stage, however, I am fully confident that no
existing rights of Canal-Railroad employees
will be abrogated or materially altered, or
that any new or undue burden will be placed
unnecessarily upon them. I feel equally
sure that the chance, when it is effected next


The application 'of income tax to the
Canal Zone has been a matter of concern to
Congress (and budgetary officials) over a
period of many years and it was to be ex-


peteed that, sooner or later,
would be taken.


such


As for the provision of the new law pro-
viding for a payment of the tax retroactively


. 4 f h
-
-.4-.
-.----
"f~- -- -


to the beginning of 1950,
the Canal administration
has voiced its strongest
dissent. Legislation is
being introduced to eli-
minate this unjust feature


: and any proper means
� "will be taken to have its
provision stricken.
Adequate and comfort-
able housing for all of our
employees has been a
matter of grave concern to
the Canal administration


over a period


many


*II UK years. Congress has now
authorized funds to ini-
tiate a comprehensive program designed to
end this serious problem. Apparently, only
a worsening of world conditions will prevent
the uninterrupted prosecution of this pro-
gram. I have no doubt that every employee
shares my feeling of deep satisfaction that


the solution appears at hand.
Perhaps partly as a result of the


drastic


changes being required within our com-
munity within a short period and partly by
reason of world tensions generally, an un-
reasoning and mass feeling of impotence
and fear seems to have gripped many em-
ployees and with them their families.
Evidence of this condition has been the


many completely unfounded rumors which
have been circulated. I can not too strongly
condemn participation in this practice. It


constitutes a serious impediment
Canal administration and serves
stampede many into hasty action
they otherwise might not take.
However much our daily lives
Isthmus may be affected by actions


to the
nly to
which


on the
of local


importance, it must be recognized that world
events, already shaped, are of such serious
consequence that none of us, whether we live
on the Isthmus of Panama, in the United
States, or in any other part of the world
where free people live and democratic prin-
ciples prevail, can shirk a burdensome re-
snonsibiliti for many ears to come. The


m nl r oo c


and importance
incorporation of
"-" U .f


will be




PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


November 3, 1950


Zone


School


System


Will


Observe


45th


Birthday


In


February


With


Many


All-Time


Peaks


View


The Canal Zone school system which
celebrates its 45th birthday next January
2 is presently well into one of the peak
years of its history.
While the school system of today com-
pares favorably with the best in any met-
ropolitan area in the United States, it had
its beginning on January 2, 1906, as a
one-room affair at Corozal with about
seven pupils, some borrowed desks and
chairs, and a few sample textbooks.
This year's total enrollment from kin-
dergarten through junior college will
about equal or slightly exceed the high
record set last year, according to Dr.
Lawrence Johnson, Superintendent.
The one-room schoolhouse of 45 years
ago has now grown to a plant worth about
$3,500,000 with 16 kindergartens, 17 ele-
mentary schools, seven junior high schools
four senior high schools, and two junior
colleges. The few borrowed desks and
chairs of 45 years ago have been changed
for modern educational equipment valued
at over $530,000 and consisting not only of
desks, chairs, and textbooks, but of spe-
cialized machinery for vocationaltraining,
,gymnastic and playground equipment,
visual education aids, reference libraries,
equipment for military training, and a
vast store of other materials required in
the modern schoolroom.
September Enrollments High
Although the September enrollment in
the schools was approximately equal to
that of last school year, the figures were
from four to five hundred less than ex-
pected. The decrease in anticipated enroll-
ment was caused chiefly by the transfer
of service units and their families away
from the Isthmus and a continued mod-
erate decline in the civilian population of
the Canal Zone.
The September enrollment in the white
schools this year was 5,182, or 310 less
than September 1949, according to Doc-
tor Johnson. Comparative figures on the
September enrollment of the colored
schools, which include the La Boca Junior
College this year, showed an increase of
246 students, with a total of 4,042 en-
rolled in September of this year which is
a npw hirth renrdi


r. SCHOOL'OPENING, alike the world over. presented this scene early in September in front of Balboa
elementary school when children and parents gathered for the big'day. As usual, confusion reigned as pupils
got their classroom assignments and slyly judged the temper of their new teachers. More than 5,000 pupils
from kindergarten through junior college, a near record, entered school on the opening day.








.+
--









CANDIDATES for La Boca Junior College are shown above on the opening day, busy with registrations
and consultations with teachers. Forty-eight of the 100 candidates examined were admitted to the junior
college which opened for the first time this year. Up to this school term, educational facilities were available
in local-rate communities only through the twelfth-grade level.


Perhaps the least publicized but most
important among the advancements this
year is the continuation of the curricula
revision inaugurated three years ago.
This program, originally designed as a


three-year
altered to a
modernizat
ricula. Thf
has been co


study and change, has been
continuing, departmentalized
ion of school methods and cur-
e basic work originally planned
impleted and in the future the


but never used as a school building until
this year, were delayed by late deliveries
of materials.
Forty-sight students, selected by exami-
nation from approximately 100 appli-


cants, were enrolled in
ior College which wa
September. Formerly,
ties were provided in t
munities only through


the La Boca Jun-
s opened early in
educational facili-
th3 local-rate com-
I the twelfth-grade


_ __ I � �





November 3, 1950


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


SPORTS SPECTACLE of the year for Canal Zone
football fans is scheduled for Friday night, November
24. when Balboa High meets Miami Jackson High, of
Miami, Fla., in the first intersectional scholastic event
ever held in the Canal Zone.
The Balboa team has rung up an amazing record
of victories since tackle football was introduced in
Zone schools last year. Coach John Fawcett will


have his charges in tip-top condition for th< Thanks-
giving game in Balboa Stadium which is expected to
be packed to capacity. Tickets are now on sale for
$2 each and no seats will be reserved.
Coach Fawrett presently plans to use the players
shown above in the starting lineup.
In the back row, left to right, are: Coach Fawcett;
Ray Nickisher, quarter; James May, half; Sam


Maphis, full;
backfield coacht
line coach.
Front row,
Carl Meissner,
Hulls, center;
tackle; and Bil


3


Dick Johnson, half; Walter Nolan,
; and Master Sergeant George Wood,


left to right, are: Leon Herring, end;
, tackle; Dick Dillman, guard; Ralph
Irwin Frank, guard; Clair Godby,
11 Forbes, end.


THE STARTERS in th? Balboa-Miami game will have ample support on the bench waiting to ge
the game. These members of the varsity squad have had plenty of experience in interschclasti: games this
In the back row above, left to right, are: Frank Mayo, Student Association President: T. F. Hotz. P
pal of Balboa High School; Paul Jamesson, half; Dave Schorr, half; Bcb Morris, full: Charles Updike, qu
Bob Preacher, half; and Elmer Powell, financial adviser to the student association.
Front row, left to right, are: Ray Davidson, end; Kenneth Garrison, tackle; Frank Bryan, guard; Ed
. T , m i t - - t_.- . T - . I - I I .- T .


t into
xyea'.
'rinei-
arte, ;

Coe,


onry cottage which embodies new ideas
in the utilization of floor space.
In addition to these two new types, of
which only a few are to be built the first
year, it is planned to confine the U. S.-
quarters construction this year to the one-
story, two-apartment mason-y houses
now in use in Diablo Heights and Mar-
garita, and to the composite one-family
cottages and duplexes built this year in
the San Juan area in Ancon.
Present plans for local-rate quarters are
for the construction of only masonry build-
ings at grade level. Standardized floor
plans of the most desirable types already
developed in the Camp Coiner and Parai-
so masonry houses will be used.
Composite and Masonry Houses
Forty-seven of the units to be built this
fiscal year for U. S.-rate personnel will be


composite-type houses. I
houses will be one family
others will b3 twin-apart
Five of the houses will
Hains Street, Diablo H
Guayacan Terrace in the
in Ancon; five in Gatun
area to b? developed south
.-


Eleven of these
cottages and the
ment buildings.
be located on
eights; two on
old Corral area
in a residential
of Schoolhouse


Bulldog Starters Against Miami High . . .


...nd Their Helpers



i ,




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 3, 1950


The Wise Owl


says:


"'Let'


have


another


"That's


where


the money


goes!"


cuppa


cawf ee "


above


invitation


is almost


national chant in the United States,
whether one be in New York or Califor-
nia, North Dakota or Louisiana. It is true
that coffee differs in consistency in vari-


ous parts of


the country,


some


commu-


cities preferring one blend and some
another, but most Americans drink coffee.
whether it be a daily ration of one cup of
hot milk slightly flavored with coffee or
the 30 to 60 cups of black coffee con-
sumed daily by Oscar Levant, the famous
pianist. With this in mind, we hope that you
costs the Clulbhouse Division to place a cup of


will be interested to learn a little about what it
fragrant, steaming-hot coffee before you.


Like ever


thing else, the cost to produce a cup of


coffee has risen and is still


rising.


instance, the coffee urn that cost $276 in 1940 costs $610 today; the Glendale cup and saucer
that cost 39 cents in 1940 costs $1.17 today; the pound of coffee that cost 22 cents in 1941 has
increased in price to 76 cents; a can of evaporated milk from 9 cents to 14 cents; 5 lbs. of sugar
from 18 to 54 cents. Labor costs have risen locally in excess of 200% since 1940.


The only price that has remained the same over the years is the
FIVE CENTS paid for a cup of coffee at your favorite Clubhouse


The composite figures below are based on
Clubhouse Division to produce a cup of coffee:
MATERIALS:


Coffee, 50 cups per lb. @ .6732 per lb.
2� gallons heated water
Sugar @ .0742 lb. and evaporated milk @ .1284
per can, 1 oz. portion, assuming that 20% of
patrons drink black coffee . .
Shrinkage and waste amount to 7%
Material cost per cup
LABOR COSTS:


Preparing coffee - . .
Serving coffee
Bussing, washing and
hnndllino- cn annd nriier


.15 3
1.044/
207d


what it costs the


per cup
1.346/
.007/

.722d
2.075/
.145/
2.220/






November 3, 1950


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


The


r L _ . j


"Chief


Quartermaster


Leaves


An Official Panama Canal Publication
Published Quarterly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Panama Railroad Press


Jinders


Hope, Canal


NEWCOMER
Governor


HERBERT D.


VOGEL


Lieutenant Governor
E. C. LOMBARD
Executive Secretary
J. RUFUS HARDY
Editor
On sale at commissaries, clubhouses
and hotels in the Canal Zone at five
cents a copy.

The printing of this publication has
been approved by the Director of the
Budget on March 9, 1950.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters containing inquiries, sugges-
tions, criticisms or opinions of a general
nature will be accepted. In all cases
possible, letters to the Review will be
answered individually. Those of suffi-
cient general interest will be published
in this paper. Letters must be authen-
tic and be signed although signatures
will not be published unless requested
and names of authors will be kept con-
fidential. Return address should be
given but the Review will not under-
take to return correspondence of any
nature.


Envelopes


I
I


Tale
THE


L. W. LEWIS, Supply and Service Director, shown in a familiar pose at his office at Balboa Heights,
leaves this week following his retirement at the end of October. He and Mrs. Lewis will make Henderson-
ville, North Carolina, their future home. Known to thousands of Isthmians for the past 36 years as "Duke."
Mr. Lewis is the last Bureau Director of the Canal-Railroad organization who entered the service during the
Canal construction period. One of the outstanding achievements of his 36-year service with the Canal was
the successful prosecution of the $80,000,000 housing program which is being initiated this fiscal year.


Three letters of more than passing inter-
est to Canal-Railroad employees and Canal
Zone residents generally, giving helpful
suggestions or criticisms, are presented in
this issue of THE CANAL REVIEW. Two free
tickets to their favorite Clubhouse theaters
will be sent to each of the three letter-
writers. Their letters follow:


Sir: There are many small parks or grassy plots
in the Canal Zone which lend themselves admirably
to the planting of colorful native shrubs and flower-
ing plants. Among those which come to mind are those
in front of Ancon Commissary, in front of Balboa
Clubhouse, the parkway along La Boca Road, the
circular plot around the flagpole in Pedro Miguel,
and many others. Why not demonstrate a little civic
pride and beautify these area3?-A. L. T.


once a month or once a week and done outside of
business hours. I know the commissaries do not buy
a new supply of canned beans or what have you every
dav.-L. A, M.
EDITOR'S NOTE--Both of the above sug-
gestions have been referred to the proper
Canal-Railroad authorities and steps have
already been initiated to effect the changes
suggested.


Three letters
Canal officials, r
in part below:


from former


ecen


well-known


tly received, are quoted


"I want to thank you for sending me THE REVIEW
and to say how much I appreciated reading it through.
Those of us who are retired but who still retain the
greatest interest in everything about the Canal will
- - r


Now


Special envelopes for mailing


PANAMA CANAL REVIEW are now on
sale in all commissaries, clubhouses,


and the two hotels.


Three different


Canal Zone scenes are used for your


choice.


The use of the attractively


printed envelopes permits the mailing
of the CANAL REVIEW for three cents
a copy to any address in the Postal
Union. The envelopes sell for three


cents each or two for five cents. Fold
your copy once, insert in envelope with
string fastener, and mail unsealed.
Copies of THE REVIEW mailed to


vour family or friends


save much let-


Mofunl
F. K.


Canal

and E


Review


THE EDITOR'S MAIL


I





PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


November 3, 1950


Passengers


Feel


At


Home


On


Cristobal


Crew


Resembles


With


Happy


Homelike


Family


Atmosphei


Aboard

re For


Liner

Travellers


An officer of the S. S. Cristobal called
her "a happy ship." "Some are born that
way," he said.
If the character is a birthright, it prob-
ably was inherited from the crew, sev-
eral of whom have been aboard since the
Cristobal came out from the Fore River
Yards in 1939 and on the former Cristobal
and other Panama Line ships before that.
Captain Erik J. Eriksen, full of conver-
sation and pride in his ship and family,
counted off some of the Panama Line old-
timers on the Cristobal.
Mrs. Louise Kirchner, Stewardess, now


73 and the great grandmother of five, is
"the most important person on the ship,"
according to the Captain. She and the
other Crisiobal Stewardess, Mrs. Frances
Daniels, a comparative newcomer, take
care of the women Dassengers and the


children. Other crew members character-
ized Mrs. Kirchner as "everybody's
mother" and "the Pied Piper of Pier 64
and Cristobal docks" because of her habit
of feeding the cats, dogs, and pigeons on


both ends
William
Room Ste
perfect Je
personality


of the run.
M. Jones, long-time Cristobal
ward, was described as "the
leves" with a "Cunard Line
r" because of his habit of


"knowing what passengers want before
they know they want it."
Then there is the popular Chief Deck
Steward, Henry Kenny, who is "full of
stories and wrong information for the
children," according to shipmates.
Many Old-Timers in Crew
Other old-timers who contribute to the
Cristobal's composite personality are:
Manuel Coutinho, Carpenter, whose serv-
ice dates back to 1931; August Manno-
nen, Quartermaster, who has been with
the line for 31 years; Dave Hook, Room
Steward, another veteran of 26 years;


Martin Bugalski, Second Assistant Engi-
neer, whose service began in 1924; and
Joseph Carl Volk, Steward Department
Storekeeper, who is Mrs. Kirchner's
brother and joined the Panama Line
soon after her.
Captain Eriksen first went to sea at the
age of 14 on a Norwegian barkentine. He
has been with the Panama Line since 1927
when he began his service as First Officer
on the S. S. Guayaquil.
The other officers are:
First Officer Charles L. Foley, who


came to the Cristobal in February 1947
from the Trial Board Section of the U. S.
Maritime Commission.
Chief Engineer Edward Carlson, origi-
nally from Sweden, has been with the
Panama Line 23 years. He says the cap-
tain's Norwegian blood and background
cause no trouble between them.
Purser Helped Build Ship
Chief Purser Lambert W. Gustafson,
like the Cristobal, was born at Quincy,
Massachusetts. He obtained his first sea-
going job on the maiden voyage of the
present Cristobal after working on con-
struction of the ship while employed in
the Fore River Yards of the Bethlehem
Steel Corporation.
Chief Steward Marcello Facchina was
employed in 1939 to standardize the food


and service on the three Panama Line
ships, all of which were new at the time.
He came to the Panama Line after the
war following a year-and-a-half vacation
taken to recuperate from the wartime
tribulations of managing the La Salle du
Bois Restaurant in Washington, D. C.
Chief Cook William G. Mauss, who has
"revolutionized the horsd'oeuvres depart-
ment and is a first-rate baker," came to
the Cristobal in April following his retire-
ment as Chief Commissary Officer at the


('aptain Erik J. Eriksen

Merchant Marine Academy at Kings
Point, New York.
In design and mechanics, the Cristobal
is nearly identical to her sister ships, the
Ancon and Panama. Designed for cargo
and passenger service between New York
and Cristobal, the vessels cost $5,000,000


each, are 492 feet long with a beam
64 feet, have a maximum speed of
knots, and displace 14,200 tons. Aut]
of the vessel's sleek, modern design \
Raymond Loewy, one of the forem
United States industrial designers.


hor
vas
ost


Many Served During War


Captain Eriksen and several other
present members of the Cristobal crew
remained on the ship throughout her four
years and five months of service as an
army transport during World War II. One
of her last Army assignments (See page 18)


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NL
+, +:
*. "*


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b., -thObP ^^-*^K---M->'

I


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November 3, 1950


THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


Canal


In


1950


As


Employees


Backs


Fight


On


1951


axes


Budget


INCOME


WITHHOLDING


T


Employees concerned with the amount of m
to be taken from their check every pay period


ABLES
on ey
may


use the income tax withholding tables shown below
if they are paid biweekly, as are the great majority
of Canal and Railroad employees, or they may com-
pute their own withholding by the percentage
method.
The-computation by the percentage method can
be made by the following process: Subtract from
the annual salary the number of exemptions multi-
plied by $667.00. The annual amount to be with-
held for the entire year will be 18 percent of this
amount, which can be divided on a weekly, biweekly,


The Canal Zone resembled nothing less
than a well colonized ant hill with the
entire top suddenly removed on Septem-
ber 22 when residents read the startling
headlines in the daily press that they
already owed Uncle Sam sums ranging up
into the hundreds of dollars as income tax
for 1950.
Lulled by assurances that "Congress
can't do this to us," the news came as a
shock of the first magnitude to the aver-
age Government worker who was already
scratching his head over the problem of
his 1951 income taxes. Angry nonconstit-
uents gathered in knots and tight circles
throughout the day to discuss the situa-
tion.
Action was not long delayed.
Before the ink was barely dry on the
first newspaper to carry the news, Gov-
ernor Newcomer dispatched a radiogram
to Washington strongly protesting the
action. Meanwhile, he instructed the
General Counsel's Office to prepare legis-
lation for introduction in Congress to
strike the retroactive provision of the tax
measure.
Representatives of the various labor


111 11


EMPLOYEES


BIWEEKLY


semi-monthly, or monthly pay period basis. Canal
employees paid semi-monthly, for example, would
divide the result obtained in the computation by 24
to obtain the correct result.
It is to be noted that this method of computing
the income tax withholding and the table given be-
low for those paid on a biweekly basis are both
based on the assumption that no more than about
10 percent of an employee's salary is spent for those
items which may be deducted in the final income tax
returns, such as contributions for charity, interest,
taxes, casualty losses, medical bill, and other such
items.


And the number cf withholding exemptions claimed is-


The amount of income tax to be withheld shall be-


5.S0
6.10
6.50
6.90
7.20

7.60
8.10

9.60
10.30

11.00
11.70


nn nh ri nA i i ir~rf rir I 1 i *i1 ' I1


$.40
.SO

1.20
1.50
1.90
2.20
2.60

3.00
3.50
4.20
4.90
5.70

6.40
7.10(
7.80O
8.50
9.30

10.00(
10.70
11.40
12.10


$0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
.30
1.00


3.20
3.90
4.60

5.40
6.10
6.80
7.50
8.20

9.00
9.70
10.40
11.10
1r,1n


$0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
o




0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0





.50
1.20
1.90
o
0
0


I *i lI


$0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
O
0

0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0


$0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


$0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0


Administration


Figure


SOCIAL SECURITY
EXTENDED TO C. Z.

Social Security benefits will be ex-
tended to about 400 Canal-Railroad
employees effective January 1 as a
result of the provisions of the Social
Security Act Amendments of 1950.
Employees to be affected are gen-
erally those United States citizens
who are not included in other gov-
ernment retirement systems, in-
cluding part-time and temporary
personnel, those who are paid on a
contract or fee basis and other small
groups excluded by other legislation.
As in the case of deductions for re-
tirement, the deductions for Social
Security will be in addition to the
income tax withholding.
The Social Security tax to be paid
by these employees after January 1
will amount to 1% percent on the
first $3,600 of salary received and will
be paid by payroll deduction. The
employer contributes an equal
Amount. The rate of 1% percent
applies through the calendar year
of 1953 after which it increases to


~


I


I


I


If the
wages are-


I





PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


November 3, 1950


Employee's
In Red \


Actual


1ith


Income


Taxes


(Continued from page 1) insurance for
himself, $1,000 for his wife, and policies
of $250 each for the children.
His transportation costs, which may
appear high to the average employee,
were figured in detail as follows: Depre-
ciation, $500; operation, $177; insurance,
$75; and licenses, $7. He stated that he
buys an expensive-make car every two
years, and figures the depreciation at
$500 annually.
Health and Education
Most families would be extremely lucky
or healthy, or both, to escape with an


annual health bill for four of only $73.
His medical services included $18 for X-
rays, $15 for medicine, $32 for dental
bills, and $7.50 in dispensary fees.
The money he spends for "education"
includes the cost of violin lessons for both
children, cornet lessons for the boy, and
dancing lessons for the girl. Some fami-
lies undoubtedly spend more than $287
for lessons outside of normal school activ-
ity but the majority probably spend
much less.
The employee and his family spend
$210 of the amount listed under enter-
tainment for gifts within the family and
to outsiders, in about equal proportions.
The remainder is divided as follows:
Movies, concerts and plays, $100; hob-
bies of stamps and photography, $65;
and periodicals, $45. The family sub-
scribes to a local daily newspaper, the
Reader's Digest, American Home, Holi-
day, Alumni Bulletin, Good Housekeep-
ing, National Geographic, and Coronet.
Listed by him under the item of mis-
cellaneous expenses was $75 for interest
on car and personal loans.


for


Vacation Budget in Red
It will be noted that he listed nothing
r vacation. He submitted a separate


budget and statement on this. He and
his family take a vacation every two
years, visiting their families in New York
and Boston with only a few side trips.
These vacations cost: Transportation,
$280; automobile freight, $180; travel in
the States, $300; luggage, $75; and tips,
$30, a total of $865.
His budget showed that he has about
$300 a year difference (se a me i3)


Pairs


Free


Movie


Clubhouses


Here's an opportunity to test your
knowledge of the Canal-Railroad organi-
zation and your acquaintance with the
men and women who help run the Canal
and Railroad.
Here is also an opportunity to win two
free tickets to your favorite Clubhouse
theater.
Fifteen pairs of free tickets to any reg-
ular movie program are being offered by
the Clubhouse Division to the first 15
persons to identify the 21 well-known
Canal and Railroad employees whose pic-
tures are carried on the opposite page,
and tell where they work.
The contest is open to everyone with
Panama Canal Clubhouse privileges,
young and old, U. S.-rate and local-rate
employees and their families, both men
and women. Two tickets good for any
regular Clubhouse movie program will be
mailed to each of the first 15 to identify
the employees and name the bureau, divi-
sion, or branch in which they are em-
ployed.
The contest will close at midnight
Thursday night, November 9, and no
entries postmarked after that hour will
be considered. All entries must be mailed
at a Canal Zone post office since the time
of mailing will be the determining factor
in cases of ties.
Here's how to fill out your entry: Sup-
pose No. 10 is John W. Doe (which it
isn't) and he is employed in the Com-
munications Branch of the Electrical Divi-
sion, Engineering and Construction Bu-
reau. Enter the name, John W. Doe, as
indicated and immediately below write
Communications Branch, Electrical Divi-
sion, or Engineering and Construction
Bureau. It is necessary to name only
one of the three units and it will not help
your score to name more than one.
The rules of the contest are simple.
Here they are:
1. Use the opposite page of this
issue of the CANAL REVIEW as your
entry blank. None others will be
considered. Write your name and
mail address in the upper left-hand
corner where indicated and fill in the


Tickets

Novel


Offered

Identity


Contest


numbered spaces to correspond with
the pictures.
2. Typewrite or print your answers
in ink. Those entries with illegible
writing will be automatically elimi-
nated.
3. Mail your entry or entries to the
Contest Editor, THE PANAMA CANAL
REVIEW, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone.
Entries will not be accepted unless
mailed at a Canal Zone Post Office.
4. Mail your entry before midnight
of Thursday, November 9. The
earlier you send your answers the
better will be your chance for winning
two free movie tickets, since only the
first 15 correct or most nearly correct
answers will win.
5. Anyone may send more than
one entry but only two tickets will
be awarded any one contestant.
6. Either given names or initials
may be used in identifying the em-
ployees whose pictures are shown.
Names must be spelled correctly. If
initials are used, both initials must
be used. The correct answer in the
example given above would be John
Doe, John W. Doe, or J. W. Doe.
However, the answer of J. Doe or
W. Doe would be marked as incor-
rect unless it so happened that John
Doe had no middle initial.
7. Identify the unit for which the
employee works on the line imme-
diately below his or her name. Use
the bureau, division or branch, but
not more than one. It is as impor-
tant to have the name of the unit
correct as it is to have the name of
the employee correct.
8. For scoring purposes each cor-
rect name will be scored two points
and each correct unit will be scored
one point.
9. Winners will be decided on the
total number of points and ties will
be decided by the hour of mailing or
the time stamp used when received.
10. No changes will be permitted
in entries after they have been mailed
and the decision of the Contest Edi-
tor will be final.


Income


V ' tv */







November 3. 1950


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Your-- - - - - - a - Name Name
Your Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Bureau, Division or Branch


Post Office Box Address


*:. C .- .
r '"'f "-


Bureau, Division or Branch


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name

Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division, or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Bureau, Division oriBranch


Name


Bureau, Division or Branch


Name


Name





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


November 3, 1950


NEWS OF YOUR COMMISSARY STORES


TIIANKSGIVING DAY is traditionally a day for a bountiful feast to
celebrate, as our ancestors did, the reaping of a harvest sufficient to provide an
existence until the approaching winter had passed and new crops would again be-
come available. In keeping with our heritage, although we
are far from home and with no harvest to place in barn


and cellar, most of us nevertheless pause on that day to re-
count our blessings and to partake generously of the good
food so closely associated with the old-time New England
harvest. All of the traditional foods have been ordered
and, as November 23d approaches, the shelves in the com-
missaries will be found to be literally bulging with delectable
names of which occasion nostalgic mouth-watering. First, of
planned Thanksgiving Day menu, is that noblest member i


kingdom, Sir Thomas Turkey, and to fill the spots around him on the festive
board, olives, pickles, and relishes, fresh crispy celery and lettuce, cranberry


sauce (either


Sir THOMAS TURKEY


foods, the very
course, in any
of the feathered


that will be
could have as


out of a convenient tin, or the old-fashioned kind made with
fresh berries), fresh, frozen or canned vegetables, fruits
of a great variety, pumpkin and mincemeat for the
pies (or delicious pies fresh from the oven in our Pastry
Sections), fruit cakes, cheeses, mints, and other candies
and nuts. Topping off with a cup of your favorite
blend of freshly roasted and ground Commissary coffee,
yoa will have consumed a meal from your own kitchen
unrivalled by any that the gourmet monarch of an earlier day
isembled.


HOME MAKERS HOLIDAY
The line of Royal Haeger table lamps which we have been carry-
ing has met with such favorable reaction from our customers who
are interested in fresh, modern styles at budget prices, that we
have continued to reorder in additional smart designs and colors.
Naturally the home-maker who is first to see the new selections
when they arrive will be accorded the best choice, but the late-
comer is likewise certain to find one or a matched pair that will
be exactly right for brightening up the living room.
The wise shopper will keep a close watch on the housewares
section of her commissary for items now on sale or expected in the
near future, such as: l)elfibre textured rugs; Aldon quality-crafted
cotton rugs with the Alanized non-skid backing which is guaran
teed for the life of the rug. Of special interest, and expected soon,
are new Simmons lounges and matching upholstered club chairs,
beautifully tailored and luxuriously comfortable.
In the drygoods departments, watch for new chenille and woven
bed-spreads, new curtain materials, damask linen table sets, and a
special purchase of printed lightweight plastic material, suitable for
making curtains, table covers and light duty upholstery purposes.
Prices of the last-named material, which comes in 36-inch and
54-inch widths, have not been set yet but will be astonishingly low.
The representatives of our drygoods and housewares departments
have just recently returned from their buying trips to the New
York markets, and are enthusiastic in their reports of the compre-
hensive selections of special gift merchandise which have been
purchased for the approaching holiday season, and at such reason-
able prices. A few of the outstanding lines we'll be able to offer
in the near future are: boxed jewelry for men, women, and teen-
agers, dresser sets, atomizers, toiletry sets of nationally advertised
brands and the new fashion accessories. We believe our women
customers will be pleased with our selection of lingerie, purchased
just before recent price increases. In our efforts to improve our
lines of women's and girls' dresses in ample time before the holi-
days, we are pressing manufacturers for delivery of selections made
from the holiday lines, which contain styles and materials suitable
for our perpetual hot climate.
In this connection, possibly many of our customers have in the
past overlooked the fact that many manufacturers of better dresses
do not make summer-types of dresses throughout the year, the
remainder of the year being devoted to making heavier weight and
darker garments which would be unsuitable locally. The problem
is that we wouldn't care to take one large lot of the same style of
dress for sale for an entire year due to the certainty that styles
will change within a short time. Then, when we go back into the
market for further supplies, we confirm our knowledge, gained
over a period of many years, that we either have to select from
the so-called cruise lines, accept limited assortments or, as has
happened in the past during difficult times, do without fresh stocks.


GOOD


NEWS


FOR REFRIGERATOR BUYERS


distribution to proud owners of the new Westinghouse electric
refrigerators was begun about three weeks ago, and is continuing
as rapidly as our Service Mechanics can make installations. Orig-
inally priced attractively, the first purchasers were very agreeably
surprised to be informed a little later that there was a reduction in
price and that those who had already acquired (and paid for) the
boxes were to receive a refund. Those who arranged for the deferred
payment plan will find monthly payroll deductions proportionally
smaller than had been anticipated.
Reason for the reduction is that the supplier found his manu-
facturing costs to be less than had been previously calculated,
thereby enabling us very happily to pass on the saving to our
customers.


CHRISTMAS IS IN THE OFFING ONCE AGAIN


Santa's
was an


first official
outstanding


visit to the Zone this year, on October 22d,


success


with the


youngest


generation


Zonians, who had been eagerly anticipating his arrival, and again
convinced not a few slightly skeptical elementary school children
that this business about there being a Santa Claus might not be
as much of a myth as they perhaps thought. From the quantity
of toys purchased two days later at the Toy Sale, it can be ex-
pected that all Zone children will have as merry and complete a
Christmas this year as they have ever had.
Lionel trains and accessories, which were not offered with the
general and complete line of toys last month, will be placed on
sale on Tuesday, November 14, and will consist of many items
of interest to local operators of "tin-plate" railway systems, as
well as to the children and their parents. Christmas cards and
gift wrapping materials will go on sale the same date as the model
trains and accessories. On December 5th, a complete assortment
of Christmas tree ornaments and Yule-tide decorations will be
offered for sale.
Christmas trees, the large natural kind that smell so Christmas-y
and the miniature chemi-colored table size in both green and sil-
ver, have long since been ordered and will be on hand in plenty
of time for the decorating to be completed a few days before
Christmas. Detailed announcements with regard to dates of
taking tree orders, and delivery to Canal Zone residences, will
appear in the bi-weekly trade circular at a later date.


INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY


Although the Commissary Division operates a number of manu-
facturing plants, such as the Bakery, Coffee-Roasting Plant, Ice
Cream Plant, Sausage Factory, and Ice Plant, the Industrial Labo-
ratory, which is one of the group, is possibly the mcst unusual
because of the multiplicity of operations which are conducted by
,_-- s .- *-. - . .


reasons for us to carr} individual stocks of containers for specific
items; instead we try to use inexpensive containers that can be
adapted to more than one item. In the eyes of most glass manu-
facturers, our requirements of bottles are relatively small and in
many instances less than the minimum quantities that will be
I - I 1 * I I . .t �1 � . . �* * * .


I





November 3, 1950


PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


Repatriations


Bring


Painful


Separations


Repatriation, whether to New York
City, Kokomo, Indiana, St. Kitts, or
Guadeloupe, is much the same for the
individuals concerned.
The last few days or weeks, depending
upon the orderliness of those leaving, are
usually spent in packing and crating
household furnishings, sorting out me-
mentos accumulated over the years, say-
ing goodbye to long-time friends, and
otherwise painfully severing the ties of a
half a lifetime of work.
The Panama Canal has long main-
tained a general policy, first established
at the beginning of the Canal construc-
tion, of returning its employees to their
homeland free of charge upon retirement
unless they desire to make their future
home on the Isthmus and comply with
the necessary formalities. Repatriation
has always been provided for employees
under contract when they leave the serv-
ice whether they were employed in the
United States or elsewhere.
Less publicized than the return of
American employees and their families to
their former homes in the United States
are the hundreds of repatriations in recent
years among local-rate workers after re-
tirement.
Two groups of repatriates left the Isth-
mus during August and September for
their homes in the West Indies and
another group of about 25 will sail this
month on the S. S. Reina del Pacifico for
Jamaica.
Repatriation to West Africa
Among the group leaving this month is
perhaps the most unusual case among re-
patriates ever handled by the Canal. The
individual concerned is Joseph Allen who
found his way to the Isthmus in 1906
from his native home in Sierra Leone,
West Africa.
According to the story related to Per-
sonnel Bureau officials, Allen, now 66
years old, was employed on a ship on a
run between Freetown, West Africa, and
Bridgetown, Barbados. He left his ship
upon its arrival in Bridgetown and either
stowed away or paid his own passage on
a ship coming to the Isthmus with thou-
sands of natives of Barbados then being
recruited for Canal work.
His trip will be one of the longest ever
made by a repatriate from Government
Jl. e


TYPICAL of the average Cahal-Railroad employee
upon packing for the trip home, after retirement are
Bernard Paul and his wife who were among the group
repatriated to the West Indies in September. Both
were engaged in packing when they were visited by
the Official Photographer. The couple, who lived in
Caledonia, were in a welter of boxes, packing cases,
scattered household goods, and keepsakes gathered
during their many years on the Isthmus. They will
make their home in St. Lucia where Mrs. Paul was
born.

mus on their own responsibility and who
could show a period of service equal to
that stipulated in labor contracts.
Of the 45,000 contract laborers brought
to the Isthmus between 1904 and 1914,
by far the largest group, approximately
20,000, were natives of Barbados. The
second largest group came from Spain.
Mostly European labor was imported
after the first few years of the Canal work
and nearly 12,000 were brought under
contract from Spain, Italy, Greece, and
France.
Despite the comparatively large per-
centage of West Indians now on the Isth-


$50,000 was made this fiscal year for a
continuation of the program.
Repatriation is voluntary on the part
of U. S.-rate and local-rate employees and
many of both groups prefer to make their
home on the Isthmus after so many years
because of family ties and other reasons.
In the case of local-rate employees, a


liber
free


goods.
a cash
return
their h
cently


al weight allowance is made for the


transportation of their h(
They are also generally
allowance at the time
to help them get reestabl
homeland. Governor Newci
authorized the increase


cash allowance from $2


to $40


household
granted
of their
ished in
omer re-
of this
for each


employee. The first group to receive the
increased allowance was those who sailed
in September aboard the S. S. Leme.

Employee's Actual Income
In Red With Income Taxes
(Continued from page 10) between his salary
and living expenses for vacation, which
------1 < 1. 1 . i i'- tfln * ii


__


tr





PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


November 3, 1950


w


world


Famous


Listed


as


w


ashington


Guests


The Washington


recently


underwent


Hotel at Colon


a minor


lifting. Its potential tourist lure was
reassessed and a modest advertising
campaign, the first since 1938, was
started to acquaint the traveling
public with some of the facts about
this long-standing Isthmian institu-


other movie star members of USO
troupes who entertained troops in
the Canal Zone during World War
II.


prominent


name


in Isthmian


circles was added to the register in
February 1916 when Captain C. B.
Fenton checked into Room 323, one


that four parties


turned


only three were expected.


up when
On that


occasion, a golden wedding anniver-
sary celebration went on in the gold-
decorated main dining room, known
to employees as the "a la carte


room


; a high school party was held


in the grand ballroom; a large tea


of the three


Hotel Washington signs


on the porte-cochere have been re-
gilded and matched by a new sign
over the entrance gate from Second

S- . . .: *

.C4LbK -fUttU
?A~AMA nm ace


suites


in the hotel,


which he has occupied ever since.
Charles S. Hardy, who recently
returned as Manager following sev-
eral years of previous service with


party was held in


the lounge; and


another smaller group gathered in
the Fountain Room, off the main
dining area.
First Built in 1870


The origin
built about
Panama Ra
ployees, diff


several other


lal Washington Hotel,
1870 as a residence for
ilroad Company em-
ered very little from


quarters


buildings in


the same area, all of which were
named for United States presidents.
Two of the latter, the McKinley and
Garfield Houses, are still in use as


^.^ 1 .3'


Street


encourage


passersbys to


come in and sample the hospitality.
Inside the garden wall separating
the hotel grounds from the City of
Colon, the lawns and gardens have
been reseeded and before long, bou-
gainvillea will enclose three sides of
the lawn, the so-called "city, church,
and ocean sides."
The stately coconut palms along
the sea wall on Manzanillo Bay,
battered by near-constant trade
winds, and the orchids on the hotel
grounds, collected and nurtured by
a former employee, now provide
justification for the belief of the origi-
nal planners that the Washington's
park-like grounds would offer one of
the hotel's main attractions.
Tennis and handball courts near


the hotel swimming


pool, recently


acquired from the Army, have been


readied for use by hotel guests. The
interior of the building has been
repainted, some new furniture has
been added and several small refine-


ments in service have been made.
The roof of the building, recently
furnished with walkways, will be
opened to guests who want a rooftop
_.: ..... t . . ..-. . artn9-,rrnA tbho hntcI


women's bachelor quarters.
Originally a two-story building,
the old Washington Hotel was in-
creased considerably in size about
1905 when a third floor was added.
In 1908, the Washington was taken
over by the Isthmian Canal Com-


mission and in


MIay


1910, sleeping


accommodations there were opened
to the public. The following year,
the ground floor of the Bennington
House which adjoined the old Wash-


Ington


was also turned into rooms


tor transient guests.
"The lack of suitable hotel accom-
modations in the vicinity of the
Atlantic terminus of the Canal" was
brought to the attention of President
William Howard Taft when he spent
three days on the Isthmus in No-


Above:
Below:


Vincent Astor was first guest.
The Hotel's famed entrance.


the Washington, and H. O. Gran-
berry, Assistant Manager, are new-
comers as compared with Captain
Fenton, who likes to reminisce about
the changes in the physical plant
and social customs which have
taken place in the years of his resi-
dence.
"First Class" Hotel
TT ^ -,,-_11_ L1L �t. ^. -- ,r' _.


vember
authorize


1910 and he subsequently
td the construction of a


suitable fireproof hotel on the site
of the old Washington. The hotel
was to be built by the Panama Rail-
road both to supply the need for
hotel facilities and as a source of
revenue. He specified that it would


be built
modified
would b
and wo


in Spanish


local


e located on


uld


cost


colonial


conditions,
Ion Beach,


Co


more


$500,000.
Toft Cnh e Arrhit ct t


tlon.
The old


/ ,! s


I


__


**,





November 3, 1950


PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


PEOPLE


YOU


KNOW


GROWN-UP


CANAL


ZONE


BOYS


In the Canal-Railroad organization of
today there are many local boys and
girls who grew up and received most
of their education on the Isthmus. Not
only is their influence felt in the business
and community life, but they form a liv-
ing link with the colorful and stirring
events of the Canal construction period.
In the second appearance of the feature
People You Know, the pictures and bio-
graphical sketches are presented of three
of the several hundred grown-up Canal
Zone boys who now help run the Canal
and Railroad. They are:

PHIL THORNTON, leading hotelman cf
the Isthmus, who has catered to the
whims of the traveling public from royalty
on down the social ladder for the past 25
years. It was not long after he had grown
enough to see over the hotel counter that
he took his first job as a clerk at the
Hotel Tivoli which he now manages. He
was first employed in September 1924 but
left a year later to enter the University of
Pennsylvania for a course in accounting
at the Wharton School of Business and
Finance. He returned to his old job after
a year at the university but has since
furthered his formal .education as a hotel
executive by courses at Cornell University.
Phil was born in Haymarl-et, Virginia,
and came to the Isthmus when five years
old with his mother and his sister, Fran-
ces, who now live in Curundu, to join
his father, the late S. G. Thornton who
was employed as an accountant through-
out most of the construction period. Phil
attended grade school first at Gorgona and
was graduated from Balboa High School
in the class of 1924. His rise to the top in
hotel business in the Canal Zone has been
steady and has included several years at
both the Hotel Washington and Hotel
Tivoli. He became Manager of the Hotel
Washington in 1945 where he served until
last August when he was transferred back
to the Pacific side to take over the man-
agement of the Tivoli.

ALTON WHITE was a classmate of Mr.
Thornton in the Balboa High School
class of 1924. He was born at Pasca-
Foula. Mississinni. on the Gulf Coast,


Philip S. Thornton, Htel Tivcli Manager


P. Alton White, Chief, D)redging


Division


. - <


*..
* V


F -= * -


-IFF ,-- -.- - -


i
SL ''"


_umi





PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


November 3, 1950


July


August


September


Years


Ago


Years


Ago


This


Year


The work of building the Panama Canal
had reached a crescendo forty years ago
and new records were being set, but the
work was going so smoothly that a slide
at Cucaracha was about the most conse-
quential news item of the months of July,
August, and September, 1910.
Road building was occupying much atten-
tion at that time and there was serious talk
of the trans-isthmian highway. This kind
of talk was engendered principally by the
opening of the link between Empire and
Paraiso and the initiation of the work on a
paved highway between paraiso and Pedro
Miguel. The traveling public was informed
that a person would be able to drive about
halfway across the Isthmus, as far as Gor-
gona, when the Corozal-Pedro Miguel


stretch was finished.


Impatient transcon-


tinental travelers were to wait more than 30
years before they could drive with ease
across the Isthmus.
An important Canal Zone publication
made its first appearance 40 years ago.
It was the Commissary Bulletin, first
issued monthly, with shopping news of
general interest to housewives and other
customers.
There were 39 churches in the Canal Zone
in 1910. Of these, the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission owned 26 buildings and the others
were the property of various denominations.
Church work was first authorized by the
I. C.C. in October 1904 and the first church,
a Catholic chapel in the Ancon (now Gor-
gas) Hospital grounds, was approved the
following year. Many of the chaplains
serving Canal Zone churches 40 years ago
were directly employed by the Commission.
The work of building the Canal was
six years old but restrictions on the
amount of ice a family could buy were
not lifted until August 1910.
Prime rib roast of beef could be bought
for 20 cents a pound in September 1910
while sugar-cured ham sold for 27 cents a
pound, fresh eggs for 29 cents a dozen, and
sliced bacon at 31 cents a pound.


Colonel Glen Edgar Edgerton, now a
retired Major General, took the oath of
office early in July 1940 as eighth Gover-
nor of The Panama Canal. He succeeded
Brigadier General Clarence S. Ridley, also
now a retired Major General. Among
those witnessing the brief ceremony were
Colonel M. C. Stayer, Chief Health Offi-
cer, F. H. Wang, Executive Secretary,
Roy R. Watson, Chief Quartermaster,
and Wilson H. Kromer, Comptroller.
The third quarter of the calendar year
1940 was one of the busiest periods in the
Canal's history. Appropriations for the fis-
cal year which became available in July
amounted to more than $44,000,000, the
highest mark since 1912. The major part of
the money was appropriated for S. I. P.
(Special Item Projects or Canal protective
works) and the Third Locks project. Actual
construction work on the Third Locks proj-
ect was inaugurated that month although
the work had been in the planning stage for
more than a year.
An announcement was made that the
Export-Import Bank had granted a $2,-
000,000 loan for the construction of the
long-awaited Transisthmian highway.
The last of the new concrete road between
Arraijan and Chorrera was poured, the
completion of the important highway proj-
ect being witnessed by Panama President
Augusto S. Boyd and members of his cabi-
net.


'-
A sign
Panama


of the times 10 years ago:
Railroad Company raised


ocean freight rates for employees' private
cars from $45 to $51.75 one way between
New York and Cristobal.
The smallpox vaccination campaign for
the Canal Zone and the terminal cities of


Panama and


Colon


was in full swing


throughout the quarter.


George R. Goethals, II, and Thomas Goe-
thals, grandsons of the famous Canal builder
were visitors to the Canal Zone for several
days and were given every opportunity to
see the work of their famed forebear.


Canal Zone residents had so many
things outside their bailiwick to occupy
their attention during the third quarter
of this year that they may have over-
looked many events on the Isthmus which
normally would have attracted much


more attention.


Korea and Washington, D. C., held the
spotlight throughout July, August, and
September. Most Zone residents centered
most of their attention on what was hap-
pening in Washington because much of
what was occurring there was happening
to them personally. No session of Con-
gress had ever before brought forth so
many big packages for the Canal Zone
people as the income tax, the Canal incor-
poration legislation, and the initial appro-
priation for the $80,000,000 housing pro-
gram, not to mention the heavy cuts in
Canal appropriations for this fiscal year.


Some of the things right


here at home


were important and newsworthy, too.
A formal start on a civilian defense pro-
gram was made by the appointment of Mel-
vin W. Walker, Assistant General Manager


of the Clubhouse Division, to take charge oj
plans on a full-time basis ... J. P. Smith,
Jr., left for a radiological health training
course of the U. S. Public Health Service
in Cincinnati, and was followed a few days
later by Mr. Walker for a study' of the
oroaram in the United States . .. ciaa-


rette prices went up a p
if~ ni r * r * ' '


tny a package ...
I fn


the rtectrncat vuzston recezvea 65U new
electric stoves for replacements in Canal
quarters . . . a unit of the Junior R. 0.
T. C. was organized at Cristobal high
school . . . La Boca Junior College opened
September 7 with 48 students, 15 of whom
were women ... Isthmian Constructors,
Inc., was awarded a contract to modernize
Balboa swimming pool.

Because of the large number of reserve
members of the armed forces who are
Canal and Railroad employees, a general
policy statement was issued late in July
rplaivP t t their entrv nn active dutyv. An


el


1___


_____ff


I





November 3, 1950


PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


Many Outside


Activities


Help


In


Canal


w


ork


American Bureau


Performs


Important WorkIn C. Z.

Many important activities closely related to the
main business of the Panama Canal-that of shut-
tling ships between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans-
are carried on day-by-day in the Canal Zone and
are little known to the general public or to a ma-
jority of Canal employees.
Tucked away in a corner of the second floor of the
Terminal Building in Balboa is an office which is the
headquarters for one such activity, the American
Bureau of Shipping. The average resident of the
Isthmus, except those immediately engage in ship-
ping activities, would be surprised to learn that this
office and the work of its staff have been in existence
in the Canal Zone for the past 27 years.
The American Bureau of Shipping, with head-
quarters in New York City and branches in the
principal ports throughout the world, established the
Balboa office in 1923 when traffic through the Canal
reached such proportions that it became desirable
from the standpoint of shipowners and underwriters
for a Bureau Surveyor to be permanently stationed
at this focal point to conduct surveys for "mainte-
nance of claas" of vessels suffering marine damage.
War Increased Work
The work of the American Bureau of Shipping in
Canal waters increased tremendously in amount and
importance during World War II when maritime
traffic reached a peak and Balboa Harbor became
the home port of more than a hundred tankers oper-
ating in the Pacific. During that period it became
necessary to open a branch office in C istobal and
keep Surveyors on constant duty in both terminal
ports.
Since the end of the war the Cristobal office has
been closed and al1 of the ship survey work locally
is now handled by Laurence M. B;eece, Surveyor, of
the Balboa office. Mr. Breece was assigned to the
local office in 1945 following his release from active
duty with the U. S Naval Reserve, succeeding Ralph
C. Christensen who was assigned to the Newport
News, Virginia, office.
The Balboa Survey District also includes the ports
of Barranquilla and Cartegena, Colombia, where an
Acting Surveyor does the Bureau ship survey work.
First Organized in 1860
The American Bureau of Shipping had its incep
tion in the American Shipmasters' Association, which
was first organized in 1860 and incorporated two
years later by the State of New York. The corporate
name was changed to its present form in 189S and
since that time its activities have been greatly ex-
panded by acquiring or consolidating with other regu-
latory bodies of the shipping industry. The Bureau,
as nrfa~nflv rn titfitpd. was nfficiallv rernmcnized by


AMERICAN BUREAU OF SHIPPING residence on La Boca Road, Balboa. This attractive build-
ing, home of the American Bureau of Shipping Surveyor in the Canal Zone, was completed in 1939. It was
one of the first of such permanent-type residence built in this area by private organizations.
ery. This is done by surveyors while the ship is still .
in the blueprint stage and while it is under construe-
tion. When the complicated shipbuilding factors '
have been determined to be satisfactory and the ship
is ready to put to sea, it is given a certificate to this.: ,. i
effect and thus becomes what is known as a "clasped" '- ; .:.
vessel.
After a ship leaves its home port on its maiden
voyage and throughout its entire service life, the
Bureau maintains a close watch to determine that it
is kept "in class" or in a seaworthy condition. This
is done by periodic inspections of the hull and machin- -
ery by qualified surveyors.
Damages Require Inspections I.


Inspections are also required when a ship suffers
damage to its hull or machinery or when structural
changes or major refittings are made. Ship owners
and builders may also request special technical inves-
tigations relating to the structural design, construc-
tion, and maintenance of merchant vessels.
Most of Mr. Breece's duties in the Canal Zone per-
tain to injuries to vessels. In most instances periodic
surveys, which are made about once a year, are made
by Bureau surveyors in a vessel's home port because
of the delays required and the consequent increase in
cost to the shipowner to have a routine survey made
elsewhere.
In those cases where vessels come into one of the
Canal terminal port with damages suffered en route,
it becomes Mr. Breece's duty to determine the extent
of the damage and the amount of repair work neces-
sary to permit the vessel to proceed. In instances
where a vessel has been grounded in Canal waters or
en route to the Canal, it often becomes necessary to
have an underwater inspection made of the hull by
expert divers.
When a vessel has been damaged it is said to be


L. M. Breece, Surveyor
lation. In some cases only minor repairs may be
required; in others, temporary repairs may be author-
ized for the vessel to proceed to its next port of call,
or at times a surveyor may determine that permanent
repairs requiring the drydocking of the ship are neces-
sary before a certificate can be issued.
The Surveyor often issues temporary certificates
which will permit a ship's continued operation until
its next regular drydocking schedule.
Full-Scale Inspectlions Made
Aside from the inspection of ships which have been
damaged. Mr. Breece is occasionally called on to
make a full scale periodic insoection of a vessel.


STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC
For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war tarffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace-time than those for 1939.


Shipping





PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


November 3, 1950


Passengers


Feel At


Home on


S. S.


Cristobal


,, " . " "[�i :
':~~i~> ++=,= :I:':j=i::l; � > = {:
6 i ,=0. +


WI


7t
' XAf^ *
+,u2 ?^l ^i

* ' '^ 'ft3 J .

3"
- .4


OFFICERS OF THE "CRISTOBAL," left to right, are: Chief Steward Marcello Facchina; First Officer
Charlek L. Foley; Chief Purser Lambert W. Gustafson; and Chief Engineer Edward Carlson. All four have
had several years of service with the Panama Line.


(Continued from page 8) was service in the
bride and diaper trade, following her par-
tial reconversion in January 1946. Brides
and children of 17 different nationalities
were brought to their new homes in the
United States from England, France,
Egypt, and Germany on the Cristobal.
Captain Eriksen was born in Norway
and spent his first five years at sea on
Norwegian and British sailing ships. He
obtained his chief mate's and master's
licenses after attending the official Nor-
wegian government navigation school.
Starting late in 1913, he spent 18 months
in the Norwegian Navy, after which he
shipped out on vessels carrying munitions
and war supplies between United States
and Europe.


He joined the Ui
1918 and became a
entering service.
private six months
World War I career
his United States
served one year as


united States Army in
citizen ten days after
'In a private, out a
later," he says of his
r. He then obtained
master's license and
first officer and seven


CANAL ADMINISTRATION


years as master of American Cuban Line
ships.
His Panama Railroad service began on
the S. S. Guayaquil in the New York-west
coast South America trade started after
the first World War with German ships
interned in the Canal Zone.
Captain Eriksen was made master of
the Guayaquil in 1930 and was transferred
to the old Cristobal as captain in 1935.
He became captain of the Panama when
she came out April 20, 1939, and remained
on that ship until June 1941 when the
Panama was taken over by the U. S.
Army Transport Service. He was then
transferred to the Cristobal as captain and
has remained there since that time.
Taken altogether, the people, the serv-
ice, and the ship itself explain why tour-
ists, Canal-Railroad employees, most
numerous among Panama Line passen-
gers, service personnel and other govern-
ment employees seem to find no fault
with the Cristobal. According to Chief
Steward Facchina, most of them say or
imply, "home was never like this."


and explanations of income tax, it is ob-
Tf IS1 T � . S--


1;


mine whether an employee has claimed
the correct number of exemptions. How-
ever, the regulations state that an em-
ployer should inform the Collector when
there is cause to believe an employee has
claimed an excessive number of exemp-
tions.
The withholding exemption certificates
carry the necessary instructions for com-
pleting the forms together with pertinent
information as to who may be claimed as
dependents and the requirements for filing
new certificates when changes in the num-
ber of exemptions occur.
They also carry the following warning:
"Penalties are imposed for willfully sup-
plying false information or willful failure
to supply information which would reduce
the withholding exemption."
Those who fail to file withholding ex-
emption certificates will be presumed not
to claim any exemption and the with-
holding tax will be so computed. When
a husband and wife are both employed,
he may claim both exemptions but the
wife is then not entitled to an exemption
for herself on her salary.
Since the amount of money to be de-
ducted is dependent on the number of
exemptions claimed, employees have been
cautioned to read carefully the instruc-
tions on the subject which are printed on
the back of each withholding exemption
certificate.
In cases where employees are in doubt
as to an exemption to be claimed, the
matter should be submitted to the Col-
lector of Internal Revenue in Baltimore,
Maryland, for decision since his office is
the collection agency for income taxes
from the Canal Zone. Other questions of
a complicated or doubtful nature should
also be referred to that office for final
decision.
No further action about their income
taxes for the calendar year 1951 will be
required of employees until next March
15 when those in certain categories will
be required to file declarations of their
estimated income for 1951. Those re-
quired to do this are the ones who have
an income outside of their salaries of
more than $100 for such sources as rents,
interest on savings bonds, etc., and those
whose income from wages exceed $4,500
a year after substracting their total ex-
emptions at $600 each. If, for example,
an employee is married and has no de-
pendents other than his wife and his out-
.:a. :.an.,n AM .,M- j ti Afl hu


~____~
~--��~





November 3, 1950


Incorporation Law Requires Basic Alterations


(Con tnued from paue 3) way, a condition
which the Senate report termed unique
in Government annals.
Unlike the present unwieldy method of


operating th? Canal on appropriated
funds and returning tolls and other reve-
nue into the Treasury, the new company
will be permitted to use the income it
receives from Canal and other operations
to meet its current expenses. The ex-
penses of the new company, as provided
in the law, will include not only those for
currant operations, including depreciation,
but the interest on the net direct invest-
ment, the annuity payments of $430,000
to the Republic of Panama, and the net
costs of the Canal Zone Government.
In effect, the change next July will be
much the same as if some company were
formed to purchase and operate the Canal
and Railroad as a purely business enter-
prise. Without finances, it would borrow


the money to make the purchase -in this
case about $459,000,009 and agree to
pay 2.3 percent interest on the loan
which will amount yearly to approxi-
mately $10,350,000.
As a part of the bargain, the new com-
pany would agree, in lieu of taxes, to
furnish police and fire protection, schools,
health services, and other governmental
necessities of a normal community.
These additions to operating expenses
do not mean that an entirely new burden
must be met by revenues since not all
these items are new factors. Under nor-
mal operating conditions the Canal-Rail-
road has always paid its own way, which
has included the cost of civil government,
and has returned to the Treasury some
profit in the way of interest on the capital
investment.


PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


pay the Canal Company for services it
renders to them, including those of civil
government. Since the Panama Canal is.
in a large measure, a service agency, it
now provides many services to other agen-
cies, primarily the Army, Navy, and Air
Force. Charges are made for some of
these while others are rendered free since
costs are presently met by appropriated
funds.
Costs To Be Proportionately Shared
It will be necessary to determine first
what the proportionate share of the agen-


cies may be for such services.


In some


instances, schools as an example, this can
be determined with fairness and with
comparative simplicity by the use of a
per capital formula. The answer will be
far less simple in the case of questions as to
what will be a fair proportionate cost to
be assessed for police and fire protection,
sanitation, and other similar services ren-
dered on a blanket community-wide basis


Having solved


this knott


y problem,


those charged with preparing the new
fiscal plan will come to the meaty part
of the main question-how much of the
remaining costs of civil government must
be borne by Canal tolls and how much
must be shouldered by business opera-
tions. The law makes only general pro-
visions for the determination of these fac-
tors and a detailed study is now in prog-
ress to arrive at an equitable division of
these costs.


REVIEW


into Congress containing the
of the original legislation
dropped during passage of
841. These deal principally


ten sections
which were
Public Law
with techni-


cal details required to establish proper
authority of the new company to conduct
its business.
The other formal action to be taken is
the issuance of an Executive Order by
the President making the legal transfer
of the various properties and functions to
the company. It is expected that the
Executive Order will be issued some weeks
prior to July 1. 1951.


Principal commodities shipped through the Cana
(All figures in long tons)
Figures in parenthesis in 193S and 1949 columns indicate
relative positions in these years


ATLANTIC TO


PACIFIC


Current Income Insufficient


However, under the new fiscal arrange-
ments, revenues from tolls at current
rates, and business operations will not be
sufficient to pay all operating costs, net
costs of civil government, the annuity
payments, and interest on the capitalized
investment.
Plans for future operations must be
made to meet these new conditions pre-
scribed by law.
These are the plans which the Governor
termed complicated. They are now in the
course of being formulated and it now
seems unlikely that even the foundations
for the new fiscal structure will be in
i fl � 1


Commoditv


Third Quarter, Calendar Year


Mineral oils ..- -
lanufactures of iron and steel
RIaw cotton .


Ammonium compounds_.
Paper and paper products
Sulphur . ..
Phosphates_ _ __
Automobiles and parts __


Metals, various__
Machinery _
Tinplate
Canned food produ
Fertilizers--
Cement n t
Chemicals, unclassi
All others ...


cts


hied,


90
67
64,
45,
43
39,
38,
37,
.34,
33,
.. . 697,


I I


19

It will be only after these factors have
been determined that new tolls can be
computed since they must be established
at rates to pay their proportionate share
of these expenses. The Governor has
announced that it will probably be about
the first of the coming fiscal year before
the new tolls rates have been determined
and a public hearing can be called for all
interested parties.
Toll Rates To Be Set
The conclusions reached on the new
rate of tolls as a result of the public hear-
ing will be presented to the Board of Di-
rectors of the Panama Canal Company
who will su mit their recommendations
to the President of the United States for
final approval.
Two other formal steps are to be taken
between now and the next July 1 with
regard to the incorporation. Legislation
has been prepared and will be introduced






PANAMA


CANAL


REVIEW


November 3


1950


Familiar


Flag


In


Canal


Waters


-


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I-SI
0 -gg"
-R^^S
O' Si-
M -=fl


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�"l ::i �
-' "^^"t-P^ ^nB:BP"OO flrf Eifd �i -
-* -,iiii i g ,:* .| ^ ,:,+,i+ 4, + ,,,,,, ,


t ^-"-' -"^
'A 'V -i - Bf'^B^ii^iLftt ll5- - Ir4Afle


W~o^^W^^-..rQ,'**W* * *-1-,
-, ^^^-^ -:^;teS^'* r~~


- . . .
v-- , , , ,l--
k V. f


No line flag is better known among the steady flow
of ships through the Panama Canal than the familiar
blue and yellow flag of the Johnson Line.
Latest ship to fly the flag in Isthmian waters was
the motorship Lions Gate which returned through
the Canal, October 12, on its maiden voyage between
Europe and north Pacific ports. It was approximately
the 1,300th voyage of Johnson Line ships through
the Canal, the first trip having been made October
18, 1914, two months after the waterway was opened,
by the Kronprinzessin Margareta en route to Malmo


from Chile with a load of nitrates. The present serv-
ice of the Johnson Line was established two months
later when the Kronprinz Gutaf Adolf transited on
a run between San Francisco and Swedish ports with
general cargo.
The Lions Gate, shown above in Balboa Harbor, is
the fourth of a new series of fast, modern motor
vessels built especially for the trade. The others,
M. S. Golden Gate, M. S. Seattle, and M. S. Los Angeles
entered the service since the war. The ships make
nearly 20 knots on their fortnightly runs. The John-


son Line vessels have long been popular with Isthmian
travelers to the West Coast ports for their luxurious
passenger accommodations and excellent cuisine,
The Lions Gate and its sister ships have a gross
tonnage of 6,900 tons and belie their size by the trim,
yacht-like lines. The Lions Gaze is named for the
Port of Vancouver, British Columbia, entrance which
is also soetmes referred to s referred to a the "First Narrows."
Agent for the Johnson Line on the Isthmus is the
Panama Agencies Company.


CANAL ADMINISTRATION


MONTHLY


COMMERCIAL


TRAFFIC AND TOLLS


BACKS FIGHT ON TAXES


Vessels of 300 tons net or over


By fiscal years


(Continued from


page 18j


One of these


copies will be furnished the Collector of
Internal Revenue in Baltimore. Two cop-
ies are furnished employees, one for their
personal receipt and one which must be
attached to the income tax return when


it is filed.


Those employees who termi-


nate their services will be furnished with-
holding statements showing the amounts
of deductions up to the date of their
termination.
The withholding tax table in this issue
is based on the premise that po more than
about 10 percent of the income shown is
spent for charitable contributions, inter-
est, taxes, casualty losses, medical expen-
ses, and other allowable miscellaneous
items. The table, therefore, is indicative
of the total amount of income tax which
must be paid only by those employees in
this category.
Those employees claiming more than
10 percent of their income as exempt ex-
penditure and those with outside incomes
of more than $100 in 1951 must show
tL - . i f. a .. .. i . . * *A-..-. . . .


Month


July ...____
August- -. ...---.. .
September_ _.
October . ..... ..... .. .
November _..... __.�..
December .....
January_. ........ _
February ...._. ... _.
March _..
April ... ......
M ay... . . . . . .
June .... .......
Totals for first three months
of each fiscal year ......-


Transits


457


440
439


522


Tolls
(In thoi sands of dollars)


$2,373


$b,448


1950

$1,891
1.733


1938

$2,030


2,185 1,845

2,207 1,838
2,121 1,787


$5,419


$6,161


L- � I


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