Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrevie145pana















SI ~ F\ 1! L.\(


IN THIS ISSWU
Panamr. L
Shristmt I5h t Irr,
.I [Lily BinF r'IH
DIVC


*p ~1







riOBERT J. FLEMING, JR., Governor-President
DAVID S. PARKER, Lieutenant Governor
FRANK A. BALDWIN
Panama Canal Information Officer


Official Panama Canal Publication
Published monthly at Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Printed at the Printing Plant, La Boca, C.Z.
Distributed free of charge Co all Panama Canal Employee,


ROBERT D. KERR, Press Officer
Publications Editors
ROBERT D. KERR and JULIO E. BRICENO
Editorial Assistants
EUNICE RICHARD, TOBI BITTEL, and TOMAS A. CUPAS


Sx



a a

, AS THE YEAR draws to a close and the holiday
; season approaches, I wish sincerely to thank all the ;
Smen and women of the Company/Government
I organization for a job well done. and to extend .
i holiday greetings.

%, My very best wishes go to each member of the
SCanal family on the Isthmus, and in the United
s States, and to the thousands of retired employees, 2
wherever they may be, whose devoted services 2
H made possible the record we are all so proud
s of today.

V On behalf of the Panama Canal I offer warmest
. holiday greetings to members of the Armed Forces, s
Sto the employees and families of auxiliary agencies M
i in the Zone, to our neighbors in the Republic of
| Panama and to our friends throughout the world.

SAirs. Fleming joins me in wishing all of you a "
a truly Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.
H We sincerely hope that 1964 will bring the best of M
" good health, happiness and prosperity to you and g
3 to your loved ones.






SCGovernor of the Canal Zone.


.. .* ...:9;, r",:w 77 7"'y /''. .. . .... ... S. e .. .
/~ Se


"MERRY CHRISTMAS" is the greeting of our cover
picture of the center circle at the top of Summit Drive
in Curundu Heights. The greeting is the same, spoken
and unspoken, throughout the Canal Zone, the Republic
of Panama, and the world. Spoken, it's in many tongues.
Unspoken, it gleams from thousands of homes on the
Isthmus in many more thousands of lights and ingenious
decorations. Persons on transiting ships have often
expressed gratitude for the effort put forth on decorations
"to make it a Merry Christmas for people they would
never see"-people far from home. These efforts, and
their success, are evident in decorations at the locks, at
points along the Canal, and in gaily decorated homes
in townsites visible from the Canal. For a close-up of
some of the home decoration highlights of the last holiday
season, see pages 4 and 5.


Index


Panama's Natural Bridge_ ---___------------- 3
Helping Santa Claus ----------------------- 4
Binational in Name, Practice_ _------- --------- 6
Dry Season's Coming ------------------------ 8
Promotions and Transfers --------- ---------- 10
Canal History, Retirements-------------------- 12
Anniversaries ---------------------------- 13
Shipping Tables ------------------------- 14
Shipping-- ----------------- ------ -- 16

2 DECEMBER 1963





























JI






This natural bridge near Calzada Larga is about 250 feet wide, arches 40 to 50 feet above the water at low water, and has a span of about
50 feet across the open area.


THE MEN who trod the old Panama-
Portobelo gold trail knew about El
Puente or El Puente Natural, Panama's
Natural Bridge over the Rio Puente.
But few today, outside of geologists and
Boy Scouts, ever hike down an old
logging road in the vicinity of the
Panama town of Calzada Larga which
leads to Panama's Natural Bridge, larger
and wider than its namesake in Virginia
that attracts thousands of visitors each
year.
Robert H. Stewart, chief geologist of
the Panama Canal Engineering Divi-
sion, estimates that Panama's Natural
Bridge is about 42 to 45 million years
old. The bridge is the remains of an
old limestone cave whose roof, along
with the rest of the cave, collapsed,
causing the stream to flow in a canyon
exactly in the same manner as at the
Natural Bridge of Virginia.
The limestone is identified as of the
Eocene age. Back in the beginnings of
history this was a living coral reef in
a shallow sea, similar to the coral reefs


of the San Bias Islands today. Backing
up this theory is an abundance of fossil
coral and shells embedded in the rock.
The bridge originally was over the
Rio Puente, but with the formation of
man-made Madden Lake following
completion of Madden Dam, the
Natural Bridge now crosses an arm of


Panama's


Natural


Bridge

the lake which is part of Madden Lake
when the lake is full.
The Natural Bridge itself is about
250 feet wide, with the stream flowing
in a slight curve beneath it. Beautiful
stalactites and stalagmites are in the
cave. On one side is a sort of dome-like
flow stone, deposited by flowing ground
water. When the lake is high, the top


of the bridge is between 40 to 50 feet
from the waterline.
Panama's Natural Bridge has been
used as a point of interest by Boy
Scouts in past years and is a favorite
objective for hikes and campouts.
Long before the Boy Scouts started
coming, the bridge was used as a shelter
by Indians, and Pre-Colombian artifacts
have been found beneath it. Pre-Colom-
bian cookouts quite possibly were held
here, too, for pots and an old stone
grindstone have been uncovered.
How does one reach the Natural
Bridge of Panama? Drive to the Pan-
ama town of Buenos Aires, turn east
and go approximately 6 miles. This
route is about a half mile east of the
town of Calzada Larga, where an old
logging road branches off a right angle
turn on the road to the air strip. Park
the car and trudge about a mile on an
old logging road. The vigorous effort is
worthwhile if one like stalactites, stalag-
mites, and the thrill of walking over a
branch of an historical gold prospectors'
trail.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW

























A huge Christmas card shares top billing with a huge lighted tree. Artistic balance plus
a framework and background of candy canes and hundreds of lights make this display all
but overwhelming. There are huge bows on the big canes, an elfin-angelic musical group
near Santa and the traditional reindeer and sleigh near the base of the tree.


4-

A Canal theme: A model
"mule" with line attached
to a small boat transiting
Santa, an elf and a bag
of toys.


Cltristmad lights

don't create much heat.

Just enough

to warm hearts.



There's no snow on the Isthmus, so
our snowmen are synthetic, but not our
sentiments.
Deer are natives here-not the North
Pole breed of reindeer-but models of
reindeer are familiar holiday sights.
So are elves and gnomes, native to
all parts of the world as Santa's helpers,
and they make their own welcome.
Newcomers or visitors to the Canal
Zone often express amazement at the
elaborate Christmas decorations at
many homes. And are surprised and
warmly pleased to find that quite a few
residents keep festive lights in patio
and carport areas the year 'round.
On these pages are views of some of
the decorations that bring oohss" and
"ahs" from small fry and adults alike
as they tour Zone residential sections
at holiday time.


Traditional characters, the elves, and a
traditional winter scene at top right share
chilling with the most modern of touches,
a missile complete with lighted nose cone
tip. And presents are being loaded aboard
for delivery someplace in outer space.






Floodlighting and lights only half con-
cealed in shrubbery, trees and other growth
lend a classic-modern touch to some homes.
And somehow, at this season, those model
snowmen at right don't seem out of place
at all on the Isthmus.











Weary as he must get filling all those
stockings on Christmas Eve, and with all
that ice and snow on some rooftops, it's
no wonder Santa has problems. We never
did find out how he got out of this: head
first onto a small porch. No chimney.


Icicles (what are they, Daddy?) form a
back drop for an angelic choir. Santa,
seeing the snowdrifts ahead, whips up his
steed who responds with such a burst of
speed he almost blurred himself right out
of the picture.


Ever thoughtful and considerate, three
elves ponder what to do about a fallen-
and broken-star while a pair of reindeer
prance in from stage left to see if they
can be of assistance.


Again, floodlighting combined with spot-lighting in shrubbery are specta-
cular, with the traditional stars above sharing attention with the modernistic
all-light Christmas trees in the yard.




































BInAfTOnAL


North American students and
* teacher discuss a point-in
Spanish.

"F1
Am
nim
of
Chi
the
In Name voi
bus
Chi
and Ch
Am
Cei
Practice Cit
Practice the


t Panamanian students con-
centrate on English tenses
and pens and pencils fly as
notes are taken for further
study.


SLICES PASCUAS," cheery North
erican voices sing out in greeting as
ible fingers arrange lovely figurines
the traditional Nacimiento, the
ristmas tableau so much a part of
holiday scene in Latin America.
Merry Christmas," Panamanian
ces gaily call out, as another group
ily decorates an equally traditional
ristmas tree.
The scene: The Panamanian-North
erican Association, the Binational
enter at 66 Peru Avenue, Panama
y. On the Atlantic side of the Isthmus
scene is repeated at the Panama-
n-North American Cultural Institute
Colon.
The centers are binational in name
1 practice. North Americans attend
sses in Spanish. Panamanians attend
sses in English. All join in one


Decorating the Christmas
tree is serious business.


The association, for the first time, awarded its Certificate of Proficiency in English to nine
persons who last September successfully completed the regular course of study and passed
the required written and oral examinations. From left: Nicanor Solbs, Ida Calvet, Yolanda
Calvet, Maria Sanjur, Gladys Urefia, Ana Cardoze, Nereida Mendez, and Luis Calder6n.
Second from right is Elizabeth McCauley, director of courses, and Sybil Markun who
played several harp selections during the program. Rita Fonseca, also awarded the
certificate, was unable to attend.


Jilt I






another's holiday celebrations, art exhi-
bits, concerts, round table discussions, .'
and dance classes. There's always some-
thing doing at the Binational Center
Monday through Saturdays every
week of the year except for two holiday '
periods, from December 20 to January 6
and 1 week in July, including July 4.
The association in Panama City was
founded 5 years ago to provide a meet- "-"
ing place where Panamanians and
North Americans could come together --
on a friendly, informal basis. Two years -' .-"
ago the Panamanian-North American
Cultural Institute in Colon was opened.
The organization is completely self-
supporting. Any resident of the Isthmus
can become a member and thus aid in
carrying out an expanding program of
activities.
Opening of an art exhibit attracts art-lovers, young and old, diplomats and business people.
The most important activity of the And none more serious than the jeans-clad lad caught by the camera as he earnestly
association in its academic program in- scanned the program.










Classes over for the evening, students pour
P- out of the Binational Center's doors.







Carnival's coming, and therefore a demonstration of bailes tipicos, the dances of Panama, eludes complete courses of study in
is watched closely for pointers on fancy footwork. Spanish and English. Like Topsy, the
classes have grown. Eight students
O .. attended the first language class 5 years
"-ago. Since then more than 13,000
-" adults and children, representative of
.:. many nationalities, have studied in the
A association's classes. The association
r has awarded over 400 full and partial
: |- scholarships to high school and Panama
07 hUniversity students for language study.
The association is the representative
P r in Panama of the Institute of Interna-
tional Education, an organization which
administers an extensive worldwide
program of scholarships for under-
@ mrcngraduate and graduate students to study
in North American colleges. It also
.assists the American Field Service
which yearly offers opportunities to
Panamanian high school students to live
with North American families while
attending secondary school in the
United States.
Since the Binational Center opened
its doors, the social and cultural activi-
ties have been attended by nearly
(See p. 11)


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW





























There 'l be more sightseeing


And more fishing


And thal dry season rb only weks away. lens ol thousands oi lsthmians will
be traveling hundreds of thousands of miles to see new sights, revisit favorite
haunts. Many regard this as one of the most beautiful views on the Isthmus.
At left the Chagres River wends its way northeast to Madden Dam. At right
it nears the Camboa bridge and its outlet into the Canal channel at the
southeast end of Gatun Lake. That's part of the Gamboa Golf and Country
Club course stretching along the near bank of the Chagres. The picture was
taken from the Camboa club porch.





And more golfing









/~ / /~i


ep,
o -re
'Ce


. V*-








PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


EMPLOYEES promoted or transferred
between October 5 and November 5
(within-grade promotions and job re-
classifications are not listed):
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
John W. Hare, Supervisory Realty Spe-
cialist (Chief, License Section), to Pro-
gram Manager (Special Services Officer),
Office of the Director.
Edna L. Tipton, Clerk-Typist, from Serv-
ice Center Branch, Supply Division, to
License Section.
Betsy R. Hloenke, Office Services Supervisor
(Stenography), Water and Laboratories
Branch, Maintenance Division, to Ad-
ministrative Services Assistant, Police
Division.
Postal Division
Frederick L. Dunlap, Recreation Assistant
(Sports), Division of Schools, to Distribu-
tion Clerk, Substitute.
Cecil W. Williams, Timekeeper, Locks
Division, to Window Clerk, Substitute.
Division of Schools
Howell W. Atwell, Elementary School
Teacher-Principal, to Elementary School
Principal.
Edward A. McFarland, Teacher (Elemen-
tary, U.S. Schools), to Elementary School
Teacher-Principal.
Vera C. Phillips, Substitute Teacher, to
Teacher (Elementary, U.S. Schools).
John L. Thompson, Laborer (Cleaner), to
Laborer (Heavy).
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Milton W. Canham, Supervisory Electrical
Engineering Technician (Drafting), to
Electrical Engineering Technician.
Dredging Division
Edward T. Mulroy, Cable Splicer, Elec-
trical Division, to Leader Electrician
(Lineman).
Julian J. Hoyte, Seaman, to Oiler (Floating
Plant).
Ira A. Bailey, Laborer (Heavy), to Helper
Welder.
Jorge A. N6fiez, Laborer (Heavy), to
Helper (General).
Maintenance Division
Sherman A. Hammond, General Foreman
(Public Works) to Chief Foreman (Public
Works).
Fredrick S. Baumbach, General Foreman
Painter, to General Foreman (Hospital
and General Maintenance).
William C. Williford, General Foreman
(Buildings Maintenance), to General
Foreman (Buildings).
Charles J. Hinz, Shcetmetal Worker, to
Leader Shcctmetal Worker.
Louis E. Martin, Inspector (Painting), to
Lead Foreman Painter.
Frederick McClure, Maintcnanccman, to
Carpenter.
Fidel C. MacKay, Meter Repairman, to
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Plant
Operator.
Enrique A. Jaen, Laboratory Helper, to
Meter Repairman .
Reinaldo Avila, Laborer, to Cement
Finisher.
Juan P. Pacheco, Laborer, to Helper
(General).


Gregorio Ortega, Laborer (Cleaner), Com-
munity Services Division, to Laborer.
Pedro Hurtado, Linehandler, Locks Divi-
sion, to Helper Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Mechanic.
Robert C. Husband, Messenger, Office of
General Manager, Supply Division, to
Laboratory Helper.
HEALTH BUREAU
Lenard F. G. Nelson, Guard, Navigation
Division, to Hospital Guard, Corozal
Hospital.
Gorgas Hospital
Anna NI. Taverna, Staff Nurse (Medicine
and Surgery), to Nurse Supervisor
(Tuberculosis).
Margaret L. Whitmore, Staff Nurse, to Staff
Nurse (Medicine and Surgery).
Nada I. Durham, Clerk-Typist, to Clerk.
David E. Mitchell, Hospital Food Service
Worker, to Assistant Baker.
Roberto N. Niles, Sales Clerk, Retail Store
Branch, Supply Division, to Nursing
Assistant (Medicine and Surgery).
Coco Solo Hospital
Dr. Caspar F. Rea, Medical Officer (Gen-
eral Surgery) (Assistant Chief, Surgical
Service), Gorgas Hospital, to Chief, Sur-
gical Service.
Dr. Roger A. Franz, Medical Officer, to
Medical Officer (General Practice).
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
John B. Morton, Jr., Accountant, to Sys-
tems Accountant, Accounting Policies
and Procedures Staff.
Rolanda NM. Dahlhoff, Clerk-Typist, Budget
and Rates Division.
MARINE BUREAU
Navigation Division
Wilfred A. Campbell, Chief Engineer,
Towboat, from Dredging Division.
John A. Conn, Engineer, Dipper Dredge,
Dredging Division, to Chief Engineer,
Tomboat
Franklin S. Stabler, Guard, Wholesale
Branch, Supply Division, to Signalman.
Bertram E. Brandford, Leader Line Han-
dler (Deckhand Boatswain), to Launch
Dispatcher.
Byron S. Barriteau, Linehandler (Deck-
hand), to Launch Dispatcher.
James N. Linton, Messenger, to Launch
Dispatcher.
Industrial Division
Franklin S. Ford, Storekeeping Clerk, to
Accounting Clerk.
Martin Griffith, Oiler, to Preservation
Mechanic.
Herman Small, Laborer (Cleaner), to Clerk.
Locks Division
Paul W. Bramlett, Leader Lock Operator
(Electrician), to Control House Operator.
Elmer J. Hack, Telephone and Radio Dis-
patcher, Police Division, to Supervisory
Clerk (Typing).
Roger C. McGough, Guard, to Administra-
tive Services Assistant, Office of the
Chief.
Robert B. Thompson, Machinist (Mainte-
nance), Dredging Division, to Lock
Operator (Machinist).
Dale J. Fontaine, Thomas L. O'Flaherty,
Machinist, to Lock Operator (Machinist).


George B. Bennettt, Ralph N. Parker, Jr.,
Electrician, to Lock Operator (Electri-
cian).
George Albert, Reginald H. McBean, Cirilo
Timana, Linehandler, to Helper Lock
Operator.
Frederick R. White, Cargo Marker, Ter-
minals Division, to Linehandler.
Harold Irvin, Clerk, Dredging Division, to
Linchandler.
Dodson Hinds, Messenger, to Timekeeper.
Clifford A. Rogers, Laborer, Maintenance
Division, to Laborer (Cleaner).
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICES BUREAU
Supply Division
Wilfred V. Bartley, Stock Control Clerk,
to Clerk.
Lionel R. Worrell, Stockman, to Stock
Control Clerk.
Roy A. Carter, Storekeeping Clerk, to
Clerk.
Mildred R. Henry, Grocery Attendant, to
Sales Clerk.
Percival U. Johnson, Richard E. Ottey,
Guard, from Navigation Division.
Hasborn J. Lindo, Warehouseman, to
Leader Packager.
George S. Anderson, Waiter, to Sales
Checker.
Rodriguez S. Burke, Utility Worker, to
Messenger.
William Clark, Warehouseman, to Stock-
man.
Doris S. Kelly, Utility Worker, to Counter-
woman.
May A. Morgan, Presser (Flatwork), to
Marker and Sorter.
Herman A. Jarvis, Food Service Worker,
to Assistant Cook.
Francisco Barrios, Laborer, to Laborer
(Heavy).
Ricardo J. Romero, Laborer, from Main-
tenance Division.
Bonnie L. Crowell, Usher (Theaters), to
Usher, Chief (Balboa Theater).
Albert R. Smith, Usher (Theaters), to
Doorman (Theaters).
Community Services
Hurbert Clarke, Gardener, to Tree Trim-
mer.
Reine Peters, Grounds Maintenance Equip-
ment Operator (Small) to Grounds Main-
tenance Equipment Operator.
Carlos A. Nelson, Laborer, to Grounds
Maintenance Equipment Operator
(Small).
Arturo De Los Rios, Laborer, to Laborer
(Pest Control).
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Motor Transportation Division
Luis A. Len, Apprentice (Automotive
Mechanic) (3d Year), to Automotive
Mechanic.
Pedro Aguilar, Truck Driver, to Truck
Driver (Heavy).
Percival Griffith, Stockman, to Storekeep-
ing Clerk.
Terminals Division
Mike Kandrin, Donald R. Rathgeber
Liquid Fuels Gager, to Leader Liquid
Fuels Wlarfman.
Francis E. Reardon, Clerical Assistant, to
Supervisory Clerical Assistant.


DECEMBER 1963






Hugh C. Cole, Edgar S. Shaw, Jr., Sales
Clerk, Supply Division, to Cargo Marker.
Andres Cerrud, Bolivar Ja6n, Dock Worker,
to Stevedore.
Paulino F. Abrahams, Leader Laborer
(Heavy), to Clerk.
Alfred R. Evans, Pinsetter, Service Center
Branch, Supply Division, to Cargo
Marker.
OTHER PROMOTIONS which did not
involve changes of title:
Charles W. Hummer, Architectural Engi-
neering Technician, Engineering Divi-
sion.
Peter T. Corrigan, Maintenance Repre-
sentative (Building and Utilities), Office
of the Chief, Community Services Divi-
sion.
Victor H. May, Jr., Robert G. Orvis, Marine
Traffic Controller, Navigation Division.
Joseph M. Daly, James V. Higgins, Jr.,
John Y. Wagner, Admeasurer, Naviga-
tion Division.
A. Paul Jones, Jr., Chief Engineer, Tow-
boat, Dredging Division.
Rodolfo F. Abbott, Launch Dispatcher,
Navigation Division.
Enid G. Kandrin, Snack Bar Operator,
Service Center Branch, Supply Division.
Dorothy I. De Creque, Sales Clerk, Retail
Store Branch, Supply Division.
Joscelyn H. Evering, Clerk, Wholesale
Branch, Supply Division.
Benito Lucero, Calixto Villarreal, Survey-
ing Aid, Engineering Division.
William A. Violette, Admeasurer, Naviga-
tion Division.
William M. Brown, Marine Traffic Con-
troller, Navigation Division.
Frank T. Willoe, Chief Engineer, Towboat,
Navigation Division.
Roger R. Toledano, Mechanical Engineer,
Engineering Division.
Dianne NM. Barnes, Clerk-Typist, Industrial
Division.
Preston W. McBarnette, Supervisory Clerk,
Supply Division.
Edgar F. Bascombe, Arturo F. Smith,
Clerk, Navigation Division.
Clarisa C. Lee, Clerk-Typist, Division of
Schools.
Edgar W. Best, Timekeeper, Terminals
Division.
Linnett M. Turner, Clifford Rose, Clerk,
Supply Division.
Gilberto A. DaCosta, Sales Clerk, Supply
Division.
Yuda Morhaim, Teacher (Junior High,
Latin American Schools).


~-~ss=S- I~,


The Panamanian-North American Association, the Binational Center, 66 Peri Avenue,
Panama City.


Binational
(Continued from p. 7)
200,000 people. The library facilities,
which include a music room where
members and students may listen to
their favorite selections from the record
collection, have been used by more
than 32,000 people.
The-Binational Center has a 10-unit
electronic teaching laboratory used ex-
tensively with Spanish and English
courses for improving the student's
pronunciation and intonation, accom-
plished by recording phrases on a
master tape which the student then
repeats into a microphone.
North Americans and Panamanians
pool their philatelic know-how in the
Center's philatelic society. Those inter-
ested in photography have their own
photography club. Panamanians who
studied in colleges and universities in
the United States, many who studied
through scholarships offered through
the association, also have their own
organization.
Who are the students? Mostly adults
who work during the day and study
evenings. Classes for children also are
held, however.
Charles R. Meyer is director on the
Pacific side of the association's aca-
demic, cultural and scholarship pro-
grams. Paul Johnson directs the North
American Cultural Institute in Colon.


ORDERS FOR BOUND

COPIES OF REVIEW

DUE BY JANUARY 1


THE DEADLINE FOR orders for
binders and bound copies of volumes
12 and 13 of THE PANAMA CANAL
REVIEW in English is January 1. These
volumes cover the period August 1961
through July 1963.
Low cost binders of board and Linson
cloth, in light blue only, are available
at $4.25 per set. Heavier binders of
board and fabrikoid, in black, green,
and red, are $5 per set. Neither includes
copies of the REVIEW.
De luxe binding for the bound copies
will be fabrikoid, with gold stamping
on the cover, similar to previous bound
copies. Colors available are black,
green, and red. The price will be $23.50
for each book containing both volumes
(24 issues), including cost of the
REVIEW copies.
Orders addressed to Superintendent,
Printing Plant, Box M, Balboa Heights,
should be accompanied by a postal
money order or local check payable to
the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW









































RETIREMENT certificates were pre-
sented at the end of October to the
employees listed below, with their
positions at time of retirement and years
of Canal service:
Frank 1t. Blakey, Senior Operator (Gener-
ating Station), Electrical Division, Atlan-
tic Side; 13 years, 2 months, 6 days.
William Burgess, Helper Lock Operator,
Locks Division, Pacific Side; 39 years,
11 months, 28 days.
John 11. Childress, Leader, Refrigeration
and Air Conditioning Mechanic, Main-
tenance Division, Atlantic Side; 18 years,
6 months, 15 days.
Harry II. Corn, Assistant Postmaster, Postal
Division, Atlantic Side; 31 years, 24
days.
Samuel R. Cunningham, Accounting Assist-
ant (Steamship Clearances), Acenunting
Division, Pacific Side; 35 years.
John F. Droste, Automotive Machinist,
Motor Transportation Division, Atlantic
Side; 16 years, 9 months, 4 days.
Gerald A. Dutton, Deckhand, Navigation
Division, Atlantic Side; 39 years, 3
months, 28 clays.
Jos6 J. Estrada, Warehouseman, Supply
Division, Atlantic Side; 22 years, 7
months, 27 days.
Pastor Godoy, Surveying Aid, Engineering
Division, Pacific Side; 33 years, 29 days.
Juan M. Hudson, Fireman (Floating
Plant), Dredging Division; 11 years, 8
months.
Llewelyn C. Jolliffe, Automatic Platen
Pressman, Printing Plant, Atlantic Side;
40 years, 6 months, 24 days.
Dolores Lara, Railroad Trackman, Rail-
road Division, Atlantic Side; 43 years,
23 days.


CA


50 ?/e.,r i go
COIMMUNITY Christmas celebrations
were held for the 8th year by residents
of the Canal villages up and clown the
"line." Prior to 1906, when Canal forces
were still being assembled, the Christ-
mas holidays were observed more pri-
vately. Programs and children's enter-
tainments were held in the Isthmian
Canal Commission clubhouses and
social halls complete with gifts and
treats, with an average of 1,200 boys
and girls participating. Distribution of
gifts and food was made to poor
families in Colon and Panama.
Construction of the first permanent
4-family concrete quarters was started
in the town of Balboa. These were 10
buildings located on the south spur of
Sosa Hill. Town plans for Balboa in-
cluded other quarters along the Prado
at the foot of the Administration Build-
ing and a civic center type of arrange-
ment of commissary, post office, club-
house and dispensary at the other end
of the Prado.


25 1/-urir c4go
A PROMINENT visitor in the Canal
Zone 25 years ago this month was
Cordell Hull, U.S. Secretary of State,
who arrived aboard the Grace liner
Santa Clara on his way to Lima, Peru,
to attend the Pan American Conference.
While here he issued a statement to the
effect that the U.S. Administration was
solidly in favor of the new treaty
between Panama and the United States
and that every endeavor would be made
to have the pact ratified.

A report was received on the Isthmus
from Washington, D.C. that the U.S.
War Department was considering con-
struction of a third set of locks for the
Panama Canal, designed to handle
larger ships than the existing locks.
The sources said that the Government
was prepared to start construction
immediately.


10 tears c4go
QUEEN ELIZABETH II of England
and the Duke of Edinburgh paid a visit
to the Canal Zone 10 years ago. They
arrived aboard the Royal Yacht Gothic
and spent some of their time in the
Canal Zone. During their visit, they
were taken on a tour of the Panama
Canal locks at Miraflores and were
entertained at a formal luncheon given
by Gov. John S. Seybold and Mrs.
Scybold at the Governor's House at
Balboa Heights.
Also visiting the Canal Zone during
the month was a group of U.S. Con-
gressmen, most of them members of the
House Interstate and Foreign Commerce
Committee.
December 1953 was the final year of
operation by the U.S. Government or
its agencies of the historic Hotel Wash-
ington in Colon. A contract was signed
with the Inversiones Motta, S.A., which
would operate it as a private enterprise.
The hotel remained the property of the
Panama Canal.

One Year c4'go
ALBERT H. OSHIVER, a 42-year-old
oceanographer from Washington, D.C.
completed a 29-hour swim through the
Gatun Lake section of the Panama
Canal. In recognition of his feat, Gov.
Robert J. Fleming, Jr. presented him
the Master Key to the Panama Canal in
the grade of "Self-Propelled Navigator
(Honorary Pilot)."
A bid of $1,018,000 was made by
the Isthmian Constructors for construc-
tion of the Canal Zone's new College,
located in the townsite of La Boca.


Herbert A. Lord, Deckhand, Navigation
Division, Atlantic Side; 25 years, 2
months, 18 days.
Carlos Menchaca, Laborer (Heavy) Pest
Control, Sanitation Division, Atlantic
Side; 19 years, 9 months, 17 days.
Esteban Nifo, Deckhand, Navigation Divi-
sion, Pacific Side; 14 years, 8 days.
David O. Reid, Hospital Guard, Corozal
Hospital; 10 years, 3 months, 7 days.
Vernon B. Smith, Clerk, Maintenance Divi-
sion, Atlantic Side; 36 years, 4 months,
29 days.
Felix Villarreal, Helper Lock Operator,
Locks Division, Pacific Side; 30 years,
4 months, 27 days.
Mrs. Eldica Cumberbatch, Assistant Baker,
Supply Division, Atlantic Side; 20 years,
0 months.


-ACCIDENTS


FOR

THIS MONTH

AND

THIS YEAR


OCTOBER

ALL UNITS
YEAR TO DATE


QUIET
FIRST AID 1 HOSPITAL
ZOE


DAYS
CASES CASES ABSENT

'63 '62 '63 '62 '63 '62
243 234 15 7 6266 288
2401(36) 2451 161(9) 103 24013(998 8516
() Locks Overhaul Injuries Included In total.


DECEMBEII 1963


RETIREMENTS


1`4 A L H CST 0 k








ANNIVERSARIES

(On the basis of total Federal Service)


MN ORTA O
FINAL BUREAU \
J n J< yner
Cen al Fore n
( to tive q 'pment
A 7nai


ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
Harry F. Butz
Superintende c a a,
\Vater and Labora rir
Branch
George V. Allen
Oiler
Feliciano Ramirez
Maintenancemao
(Distributi e
Mauricio Santa a
Surveying Aid
Adolphus A. Weeks
Sheetmetal Worker


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Sigurd E. Esser
Di Schools

SPROT ION AND
STERMINAIS UREAU
ntly B. Murph
Laborer (Hea)

P~~ N COMMUNITY
RCE BUREAU
Purcell H. Marshall
Cook (Short Order)


OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR
PRESIDENT
Phillip J. McKenzie
Cook


COMPTROLLERS OFFICE
Edna P. Reilly
Time, Leave, and
Payroll Clerk


ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
DIVISION
William F. O'Sullivan
Translator


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Luis C. Barrios O.
High Lift Truck Operator
John H. Blades
Maintenanceman
Francisco A. Bravo
Accounting Clerk
Caswell L. Bruce
High Lift Truck Operator
Carlos Coto R.
Utility Worker
Cecil A. Diaz
Laborer (Heavy)
Amalia GonsAlez
Pantrywoman
Agustin Gordon A.
Utility Worker
Grendeline Grant
Warehouseman
Thelma A. Maynard
Sales Clerk
Normand McDonald
Laborer
TomAs Molinar
Laborer (Heavy)
Raymond A. Weeks
Grounds Maintenance
Equipment Operator

THIE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


MARINE BUREAU
Theodore F. Babich
Lock Operator
(Iron Worker-Welder)
Charles L. Banton
Seaman
Alberto Barrera
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Robert F. Boyd
Pilot
Marcos Darkins
Oiler
Ewart D. Drayton
Launch Operator
Jose M. Guardado
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Rosendo Hebbard
Line Handler (Deckhand)
SKee
Laun Operato
SA Yavall e
Lock perato (M chinist)
Eliseo e s n






Lock Operator (Machinist)
Francisco Russo
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Egbert A. Saums
Helper Lock Operator
Barrington A. Smith
Launch Operator
John A. Wray
Helper Shipwright

ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
Laureano Castillo
Helper Machinist
(Marine)
Hugh M. Thomas, Jr.
Shift Engineer (Mechanical)
Ernesto Trottmen
Helper Cable Splicer


TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Alfred A. Donaldson
Helper Liquid Fuels
WVharfman
Jose G6mez
Truck Driver
Wilfred P. Leslie
Helper Electrician
G. O. M. Pallares
Line Handler
Rupert A. Vaughn
Truck Driver (Heavy)
Enos Williams
Boiler Tender

CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
William G. Bowen
Swimming Pool Operator
Avanso A. Farrell
Swimming Pool Operator
Percival S. Plummer
Laborer (Cleaner)
Thomas N. Stewart
Fire Sergeant
Clarence R. Vosburgh
Instructor

HEALTH BUREAU
Josephine Clarke
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Herbert WV. Dena
Hospital Attendant
Manuel Labastid
Truck Driver
Irene A. Ladrach
Nurse Supervisor
(General Medical and
Surgical Hospital)
Biviano Marciaga G.
Leader Laborer
(Heavy-Pest Control)
Vicencio Quintero
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Aileet Walker
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)






TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES
The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:
First Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964
Avg. No.
1964 1963 Transits
1951-55
United States intercoastal- - ------- ----- 97 113 178
East coast of United States and South America.----_ 605 599 387
East coast of United States and Central America - 124 118 113
East coast of United States and Far East- ---- 562 536 239
United States/Canada east coast and Australasia ----- 97 82 49
Europe and west coast of United States/Canada 211 227 167
Europe and South America ------- _______-- 312 321 111
Europe and Australasia_---------____________ 81 90 83
All other routes-__ _____ __________ -_____ 724 751 353
Total traffic_ _____-_ _------ 2,813 2,837 1,680

MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
(Fiscal Years)
Transit Gross Tolls *
ransts (In thousands of dollars)
Month
Avg. No. Average
1964 1963 Transits 1964 1963 Totls
1951-55 1951-55
July 1963-------- 944 978 557 $4,898 $4,980 $2,432
August -- ------ 946 950 554 4,842 4,926 2,403
September - - 923 909 570 4,837 4,617 2,431
October- -__ -_- 607 2,559
November_ --- 568 2,361
December 599 2,545
January 1964 ----- 580 2,444
February -- 559 2,349
March _____ 632 2,657
April 608 2,588
May--___ 629 2,672
June -___ 599 2,528
Three-month --
total _-_ 2,813 2,837 1,681 $14,577 $14,523 7,266
Total for year_ --_ ______ 7,062 ._- --_ $29,969
SBefore deduction of any operating expenses.

CANAL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC BY NATIONALITY

First Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964
1964 1963 1951-55
Nationality
Number Tons Number Tons Average Average
of of of of number tons
transits cargo transits cargo transits of cargo
Belgian------ 11 51,774 20 26,376 1 2,307
British------- 343 2,180,398 314 2,012,718 286 1,753,044
Chilean - 29 210,282 36 203,165 15 67,567
Chinese- --- 19 147,205 28 183,627 3 28,206
Colombian 60 100,482 70 115,063 35 40,056
Danish- -- 71 343,951 78 398,827 60 220,751
Ecuadorean--- 10 16,507 16 13,642 34 20,882
French--___.. 34 193,548 26 204,148 31 129,938
German 269 856,355 300 876,260 38 85,956
Grcek 154 1,775,356 162 1,572,161 28 221,195
Hlonduran----. 58 40,819 34 32,653 93 131,492
Israeli--___. 13 59,526 27 44,776 ._- -- __-
Italian--. 44 287,638 49 238,172 30 146,915
Japanese--- -_ 212 1,248,627 235 1,256,617 57 367,978
Lebanese -- -__-- 15 132,047 5 46,969 ---- --
Liberian - 179 2,175,301 207 1,611,840 31 189,420
Netherlands-- 174 757,288 164 841,287 28 131,769
Nicaraguan 19 26,332 14 13,536 4 3,288
Norwegian --_ 352 2,689,547 366 2,313,389 189 723,252
Panamanian 127 338,800 122 413,107 96 548,900
Peruvian---.. 36 166,060 21 127,445 5 13,392
Philippine-..-. 15 55,044 18 53,257 6 30,561
Swedish _____ 89 558,149 95 577,583 48 183,337
Unitcd States -_ 422 2,698,730 411 2,290,839 538 3,364,851
All others_ 58 157,233 19 126,336 24 97,633
Total_.. 2,813 17,266,999 2,837 15,593,793 1,680 8,502,690


New Ocean Giants
SOMETIME within the next few years,
the Panama Canal probably will receive
a visit from two new cruise ships which,
at the moment, are but a gleam in their
owners' eyes. One will be a 58,000-ton
ocean liner to be built by the Cunard
Line at a cost of more than $61 million
and the other a 24,000-ton passenger
ship ordered by the Swedish American
Line for delivery late in 1965.
Owners of the two new vessels have
stressed the idea that both will be used
in the North Atlantic trade as well as
the winter cruise business. The new
Cunarder is being designed so that it
will be able to pass through the Panama
Canal, which neither the Queen Eliza-
beth or the Queen Mary can do, and
enter harbors now too shallow for the
Queens. It will have a draft of about
31 feet, will be 960 feet long and have
a beam of 104 feet. The new ship will
be able to carry 2,000 passengers and
a crew of 1,000. It will be equipped
with stabilizers and be air conditioned
throughout.
The new $21 million Swedish Amer-
ican liner is to be built by John Brown
& Co. of Clydebank, Ltd. It will be
slightly larger than the Gripsholm and
Kungsholm, both well known Canal
visitors.

Normal Service
THE PANAMA CANAL can and does
accommodate most customers so long
as they float and can fit into the locks.
Recently a 143-foot ocean-going tug
radioed her impending arrival from the
west coast but failed to mention that
she had a 400-foot dry dock in tow.
Canal port authorities took the arrival
of the unexpected customer in their
stride. While the tug was placed on the
regular transit schedule for the day
following her arrival, a Panama Canal
tug was lined up to tow the big drydock
through the Canal to Cristobal. Both
joined forces again in Cristobal and con-
tinued their journey to Vcra Cruz,
Mexico.

Big Wheat Cargo
ONE OF THE largest single shipments
of bulk wheat was brought through the
Canal November 12 aboard the tanker
Ionian Challenger, a jumboized super-
carrier which was carrying 33,555 long
tons of wheat from Vancouver, British
Columbia to Poland. According to
reports from Canada, the cargo was the
largest of its kind ever to be loaded on
one ship in Vancouver.
The Ionian Challenger, according to
C. Fcrnie & Co., agents at the Canal, is
a former standard type tanker which

14 DECEMBER 1963






was "jumboized" recently in Japan
where 123.5 feet were added to her
length. The ship, now 702.5 feet in
length and with a 90-foot beam, arrived
in Balboa early November 12 and made
the Canal transit immediately to Cris-
tobal. After taking on bunkers on the
Atlantic side, the vessel sailed for
Poland. She is owned by the Petroleum
Transport Co. Ltd., operated by the
Universal Maritime Agencies of New
York and flies the Liberian flag. This
was her first trip through the Canal
since being rebuilt.


Maiden Voyage
THE SWIFT new Danish flag cargo
vessel Tobias Alaersk made its maiden
voyage through the Panama Canal
October 22 on its first run on the New
York to Far East service via the U.S.
west coast. The new vessel, which can
make the trip from the Canal to Cali-
fornia in 5 days and from the Canal to
New York in less than 3, has a speed of
21 knots and is fully air conditioned.
In addition to eastern United States
ports, the Tobias Maersk and her two
running mates, the Trcin Maersk and
Tomas Maersk, are scheduled to call at
Montreal, Three Rivers, and Baie
Comeau, Quebec.
Although the three new additions to
the Maersk Line fleet do not carry pas-
sengers, everything has been done to
cater to special cargo, such as strong
rooms, silk rooms, reefer chambers and
deep tanks for vegetable oil, liquid
latex and molasses. The vessels also
carry containers. Agents C. B. Fenton
& Co. reported that on her maiden
voyage the Tobias Macrsk docked in
Cristobal to discharge cargo and take
on bunkers.


TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING
VESSELS IN OCTOBER


Commercial ..............
U.S. Government..........
Free ....................


Comm
U.S. C



Comm
U.S.GC
Free. .


Total..............
TOLLS*
ercial. $5,170,034
government. 159,175
Total.... $5,329,209
CARGO*0
ercial. .. 5,926,145
government. 112,494
. ....... 8,175
Total .... 6,046,814


1963 1962
980 882
30 17
6 9
1,016 908


$4,412,721
56,964
$4,469,685


4,890,308
19,973
51,676
4,961,957


Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and
small.
*0Cargo figures are in long tons.

TIIE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15


CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U.S. GOVERNMENT

First Quarter, Fiscal Year


Commercial vessels:
Ocean-going-_______________
Small *------------------
Total commercial_- - _
U.S. Government vessels: **
Ocean-going- ----____- ______
Small *--__--------------
Total commercial and U.S. Gov-
ernment _______


1964 1963
Atlantic Pacific
to to Total Total
Pacific Atlantic

1,487 1,326 2,813 2,837
79 79 158 111
1,566 1,405 2,971 2,948

37 26 63 65
19 23 42 43

1,622 1,454 3,076 3,056


Avg. No.
Transits
19QS-SS

Total


1,680
304
1,984

201
89


2,274


*Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
**Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES SHIPPED THROUGH THE CANAL

Pacific to Atlantic

(All cargo figures in long tons)


Commodity


Ores, various_ -------------------
Lumber-- -___-_-____ ______- __-
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt) -
Wheat- ----------------------
Sugar -- -- --------------
Canned food products- - - -
Nitrate of soda - - -
Barley- -- ----------------
Bananas -- ---- -- -- -
Metals, various -------------------
Food products in refrigeration (except fresh
fruit)-------------_________
Coffee -
Fishmeal _-- _--- ___ ___
Iron and steel manufactures -- --
Pulpwood - - -
All others-- --- ------
Total ---------------------


First Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964


1964

1,960,324
892,440
661,494
153,974
784,926
242,402
154,072
45,495
276,024
248,194

226,134
127,903
253,531
254,198
122,261
1,264,811
7,668,183


1963

1,744,426
846,560
423,933
101,464
539,182
257,815
154,428
119,884
260,739
259,404

214,947
131,022
211,528
179,013
147,650
1,158,907
6.750.902


Average
1951-55
987,567
798,109
339,598
473,208
346,218
309,830
250,093
25,235
155,958
175,110

142,823
60,065

39,171
44,248
722,517
4,869,750


Atlantic to Pacific

First Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964
Commodity
1964 1963 Average
1951-55
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt) 2,632,073 3,235,828 709,710
Coal and coke - - ------ 1,485,974 1,363,624 539,013
Iron and steel manufactures- - -- --339,895 345,803 376,917
Phosphates----- - - - 459,546 379,159 156,591
Sugar - - - 230,849 481,555 99,311
Soybeans ----------------------- 387,736 189,419 43,705
Metal, scrap- ------------------- 1,002,214 402,243 10,321
Wheat __-------- ------------ 257,742 175,917 49,017
Cotton ---- ---------_ ----83,020 76,384 72,834
Paper and paper products ------------ 110,330 85,887 90,900
Ores, various -__-_---- --------- 266,460 140,991 53,676
Machinery_--- ------------- 96,033 107,231 66,690
Corn _____-- ..________----- 375,630 234,562 12,729
Chemicals, unclassified --------------- 133,400 144,080 45,236
Fertilizers, unclassified- ------------- 117,325 101,065 35,221
All others __ --------- ----- 1,620,589 1,379,143 1,271,029
Total -------- ----------- 9,598,816 8,842,891 3,632,900






Shipping


STATISTICS PAINT

COMMERCE PICTURE


A RUSTY tramp steamer with a cargo
of odds and ends picked up in steamy
little ports in the Far East nudges its
way into the Panama Canal channel
and takes on a pilot. Behind it lumbers
a huge supercarrier loaded with thou-
sands of tons of iron ore from Peru.
As the two ships pass through the
Canal, they become two pieces in the
jigsaw puzzle which, when assembled,
makes a general picture of world com-
merce. This picture is of interest not
only to the Panama Canal authorities,
but to men all over the world who
engage in trade.
The term "Funnel for World Com-
merce" is not just a catchy slogan for
the Panama Canal nor words on a Canal
Zone license plate. It refers to the
never-ending stream of commercial car-
riers, often called "bottoms," which
make their way from all parts of the
globe to pass through the Panama
Canal.
These ships carry everything from
lumber and oil to bananas and barley.
They come from busy ports like San
Francisco and New York and may be
on their way to Indonesia or British
Guiana. They represent nearly every
nation in the world and may be regular
customers of the Canal or may be
making a single trip on an irregular
schedule.


The Pacific Steam Navigation Co.'s transatlantic liner Reina del Mar docked in Balboa on
a recent visit to the Isthmus. The ship was sold recently and will be converted to a full
time cruise vessel. She will make her last voyage through the Canal on her present
Liverpool to Valparaiso service in March 1964. The ship has been on this service with
PSNC since her construction in 1955.


Whatever country they represent,
whatever their cargo or destination,
when they transit the Canal these ships
become part of the statistical pattern
put together by Panama Canal Econ-
omist Hugh Norris and members of
his staff. They emerge in the form of
the monthly traffic figures and the
quarterly shipping tables that are used
by THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW and
are included in the Panama Canal
annual report.
The shipping statistics recorded in
the economist's office are obtained
mostly from the recently consolidated
shipping information and quarantine
declaration and the cargo declaration
filled out by the master of every ship
using the Canal.
The first form yields such informa-
tion as the amount and nature of cargo,
the trade route on which the ship runs,
the date of its Canal transit, nationality
and size of the vessel and the amount
of tolls paid.


- II 1
1963

964 4








--(AVERAGE 1951-1955- -
-(AVERAGE 1951-1955)-

t I I I I I M


I100


N
U
1000 M
M
B
900 E
R

800 0
F
T
700 T
R
A
600 N
S

0 T
S
N


The second breaks down cargo infor-
mation on each ship as to amount and
nature, origin and destination. It may
concern anything from a ton of ma-
chinery being transported from Galves-
ton to Hawaii to a half million tons of
coal going from Newport News to
Japan.
The figures are recorded daily and
the basic facts coded. At the end of the
month, the whole record is sent to the
IBM unit in the Administration Build-
ing at Balboa Heights, whence it
emerges as the monthly summary of
shipping information.
From this Norris and his staff are able
to make up tables which show the traffic
movement over the main trade routes,
the monthly or quarterly commercial
traffic and tolls, the Canal commercial
traffic by nationality, the principal com-
modities shipped through the Canal in
both directions and the total tonnage of
the ships using the Canal.
What do Norris and his staff do with
all this information?
For one thing, it takes out of the
crystal ball department the solving of
such problems as the amount of traffic
which can be expected through the
Canal in the year 2000, for instance. It
makes it possible to give a good guess
with a fair amount of accuracy on the
ships which may be arriving for transit
in 1980.
When compared with figures assem-
bled and filed by this office in the past,
a comprehensive picture of the general
trend in the movement of commodities
and the future needs and conditions
can be presented.
And, Norris points out, the Panama
Canal traffic figures go back not only to
the time the Canal started to do busi-
ness but to a period before it opened-
officially that is.


DECEMBER 1963


JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUF
MONTHS
































t




I


IUNIVERSIYF FLnOrIDA

3ATU 12201004


LATIN AMER"~







Full Text

PAGE 2

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES

PAGE 3

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrevie145pana

PAGE 7

^ P ANAMA ||Mi|a JZjdp~*ra~h IN THIS ISSl Panama's Christmas Truly Birv Dry Seas' DEC 16 19P2 iral Bridge eti ti n's Cor SCIENCES

PAGE 8

Kobert J. Fleming, Jr., Governor-President David S. Parker, Lieutenant Governor Frank A. Baldwin Panama Canal Information Officer Official Panama Canal Publication Published monthly at Balboa Heights, C.Z. Printed at the Printing Plant, La Boca, C.Z. Distributed free of charge to all Panama Canal Employees Robert D. Kerr, Press Officer Publications Editors Robert D. Kerr and Julio E. Briceno Editorial Assistants Eunice Richard, Tobi BnrEL.and Tomas A. Cupas I SMibap (greeting* i AS THE YEAR draws to a close and the holiday sg season approaches, I wish sincerely to thank all the i men and women of the Company /Government vs Ss organization for a job well done, and to extend 4. holiday greetings. My very best wishes go to each member of the |j Canal family on the Isthmus, and in the United % States, and to the thousands of retired employees, H wherever they may be, whose devoted services made possible the record we are all so proud of today. > I y 1 i On behalf of the Panama Canal I offer warmest holiday greetings to members of the Armed Forces, to the employees and families of auxiliary agencies in the Zone, to our neighbors in the Republic of Panama and to our friends throughout the world. Mrs. Fleming pins me in wishing all of you a § ft? 2S f-, truly Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, j* We sincerely hope that 1964 will bring the best of & good health, happiness and prosperity to you and % sa to your loved ones. -/ Governor of the Canal Zone. "MERRY CHRISTMAS" is the greeting of our cover picture of the center circle at the top of Summit Drive in Curundu Heights. The greeting is the same, spoken and unspoken, throughout the Canal Zone, the Republic of Panama, and the world. Spoken, it's in many tongues. Unspoken, it gleams from thousands of homes on the Isthmus in many more thousands of lights and ingenious decorations. Persons on transiting ships have often expressed gratitude for the effort put forth on decorations "to make it a Merry Christmas for people they would never see"— people far from home. These efforts, and their success, are evident in decorations at the locks, at points along the Canal, and in gaily decorated homes in townsites visible from the Canal. For a close-up of some of the home decoration highlights of the last holiday season, see pages 4 and 5. Index Panama's Natural Bridge 3 Helping Santa Claus 4 Binational in Name, Practice 6 Dry Season's Coming 8 Promotions and Transfers 10 Canal History, Retirements 12 Anniversaries 13 Shipping Tables 14 Shipping 16 2 December 1963

PAGE 9

This natural bridge near Calzada Larga is about 250 feet wide, arches 40 to 50 feet above the water at low water, and has a span of about 50 feet across the open area. THE MEN who trod the old PanamaPortobelo gold trail knew about El Puente or El Puente Natural, Panama's Natural Bridge over the Rio Puente. But few today, outside of geologists and Boy Scouts, ever hike down an old logging road in the vicinity of the Panama town of Calzada Larga which leads to Panama's Natural Bridge, larger and wider than its namesake in Virginia that attracts thousands of visitors each year. Robert H. Stewart, chief geologist of the Panama Canal Engineering Division, estimates that Panama's Natural Bridge is about 42 to 45 million years old. The bridge is the remains of an old limestone cave whose roof, along with the rest of the cave, collapsed, causing the stream to flow in a canyon exactly in the same manner as at the Natural Bridge of Virginia. The limestone is identified as of the Eocene age. Back in the beginnings of history this was a living coral reef in a shallow sea, similar to the coral reefs of the San Bias Islands today. Backing up this theory is an abundance of fossil coral and shells embedded in the rock. The bridge originally was over the Rio Puente, but with the formation of man-made Madden Lake following completion of Madden Dam, the Natural Bridge now crosses an arm of Panama's Natural Bridge the lake which is part of Madden Lake when the lake is full. The Natural Bridge itself is about 250 feet wide, with the stream flowing in a slight curve beneath it. Beautiful stalactites and stalagmites are in the cave. On one side is a sort of dome-like flow stone, deposited by flowing ground water. When the lake is high, the top of the bridge is between 40 to 50 feet from the waterline. Panama's Natural Bridge has been used as a point of interest by Boy Scouts in past years and is a favorite objective for hikes and campouts. Long before the Boy Scouts started coming, the bridge was used as a shelter by Indians, and Pre-Colombian artifacts have been found beneath it. Pre-Colombian cookouts quite possibly were held here, too, for pots and an old stone grindstone have been uncovered. How does one reach the Natural Bridge of Panama? Drive to the Panama town of Buenos Aires, turn east and go approximately 6 miles. This route is about a half mile east of the town of Calzada Larga, where an old logging road branches off a right angle turn on the road to the air strip. Park the car and trudge about a mile on an old logging road. The vigorous effort is worthwhile if one like stalactites, stalagmites, and the thrill of walking over a branch of an historical gold prospectors' trail. The Panama Canal Review

PAGE 10

A huge Christmas card shares top billing with a huge lighted tree. Artistic balance plus a framework and background of candy canes and hundreds of lights make this display all but overwhelming. There are huge bows on the big canes, an elfin-angehc musical group near Santa and the traditional reindeer and sleigh near the base of the tree. A Canal theme: A model "mule" with line attached to a small boat transiting Santa, an elf and a bag of toys. ChriAtmaA ligltt* don 't create muck neat. JuJt enough to warm heart i. There's no snow on the Isthmus, so our snowmen are synthetic, but not our sentiments. Deer are natives here— not the North Pole breed of reindeer— but models of reindeer are familiar holiday sights. So are elves and gnomes, native to all parts of the world as Santa's helpers, and they make their own welcome. Newcomers or visitors to the Canal Zone often express amazement at the elaborate Christmas decorations at many homes. And are surprised and warmly pleased to find that quite a few residents keep festive lights in patio and carport areas the year 'round. On these pages are views of some of the decorations that bring "oohs" and "ahs" from small fry and adults alike as they tour Zone residential sections at holiday time. J ^ Traditional characters, the elves, and a traditional winter scene at top right share billing with the most modern of touches, a missile complete with lighted nose cone tip. And presents are being loaded aboard for delivery someplace in outer space.

PAGE 11

Floodlighting and lights only half concealed in shrubbery, trees and other growth lend a classic-modem touch to some homes. And somehow, at this season, those model snowmen at right don't seem out of place at all on the Isthmus. Weary as he must get filling all those stockings on Christmas Eve, and with all that ice and snow on some rooftops, it's no wonder Santa has problems. We never did find out how he got out of this: head first onto a small porch. No chimney. Icicles (what are they, Daddy?) form a back drop for an angelic choir. Santa, seeing the snowdrifts ahead, whips up his steed who responds with such a burst of speed he almost blurred himself right out of the picture. Ever thoughtful and considerate, three elves ponder what to do about a fallen— and broken— star while a pair of reindeer prance in from stage left to see if they can be of assistance. Again, floodlighting combined with spot-lighting in shrubbery are spectacular, with the traditional stars above sharing attention with the modernistic all-light Christmas trees in the yard. The Panama Canal Review 5

PAGE 12

North American students and teacher discuss a point— in Spanish. Panamanian students concentrate on English tenses and pens and pencils fly as notes are taken for further study. BinflTionfiL In Name and Practice "FELICES PASCUAS," cheery North American voices sing out in greeting as nimble fingers arrange lovely figurines of the traditional Nacimiento, the Christmas tableau so much a part of the holiday scene in Latin America. "Merry Christmas," Panamanian voices gaily call out, as another group busily decorates an equally traditional Christmas tree. The scene: The Panamanian-North American Association, the Binational Center at 66 Peru Avenue, Panama City. On the Atlantic side of the Isthmus the scene is repeated at the Panamanian-North American Cultural Institute in Colon. The centers are binational in name and practice. North Americans attend classes in Spanish. Panamanians attend classes in English. All join in one Decorating the Christmas tree is serious business. The association, for the Erst time, awarded its Certificate of Proficiency in English to nine persons who last September successfully completed the regular course of study and passed the required written and oral examinations. From left: Nicanor Sob's, Ida Calvet, Yolanda Calvet, Maria Sanjur, Gladys Ureiia, Ana Cardoze, Nereida Mendez, and Luis Calderon. Second from right is Elizabeth McCauley, director of courses, and Sybil Markun who played several harp selections during the program. Rita Fonseca, also awarded the certificate, was unable to attend. it

PAGE 13

another's holiday celebrations, art exhibits, concerts, round table discussions, and dance classes. There's always something doing at the Binational Center Mondays through Saturdays every week of the year except for two holiday periods, from December 20 to January 6 and 1 week in July, including July 4. The association in Panama City was founded 5 years ago to provide a meeting place where Panamanians and North Americans could come together on a friendly, informal basis. Two years ago the Panamanian-North American Cultural Institute in Colon was opened. The organization is completely selfsupporting. Any resident of the Isthmus can become a member and thus aid in carrying out an expanding program of activities. The most important activity of the association in its academic program inOpening of an art exhibit attracts art-lovers, young and old, diplomats and business people. And none more serious than the jeans-clad lad caught by the camera as he earnestly scanned the program. Carnival's coming, and therefore a demonstration of bailes tipicos, the dances of Panama, is watched closely for pointers on fancy footwork. **>*?m r W&& n Classes over for the evening, students pour out of the Binational Center's doors. eludes complete courses of study in Spanish and English. Like Topsy, the classes have grown. Eight students attended the first language class 5 years ago. Since then more than 13,000 adults and children, representative of many nationalities, have studied in the association's classes. The association has awarded over 400 full and partial scholarships to high school and Panama University students for language study. The association is the representative in Panama of the Institute of International Education, an organization which administers an extensive worldwide program of scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students to study in North American colleges. It also assists the American Field Service which yearly offers opportunities to Panamanian high school students to live with North American families while attending secondary school in the United States. Since the Binational Center opened its doors, the social and cultural activities have been attended by nearly (See p. 11) The Panama Canal Review

PAGE 15

COMING I .riffc * There'll be more sightseeing And that dry season is only weeks away. Tens of thousands of Isthmians will be traveling hundreds of thousands of miles to see new sights, revisit favorite haunts. Many regard this as one of the most beautiful views on the Isthmus. At left the Chagres River wends its way northeast to Madden Dam. At right it nears the Gamboa bridge and its outlet into the Canal channel at the southeast end of Gatun Lake. That's part of the Gamboa Golf and Country Club course stretching along the near bank of the Chagres. The picture was taken from the Gamboa club porch. more FJk* \> v an Sri 5&*5 *vVl V^v 1p wmm <

PAGE 16

PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS EMPLOYEES promoted or transferred between October 5 and November 5 ( within-grade promotions and job reclassifications are not listed): CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU John W. Hare, Supervisory Realty Specialist (Chief, License Section), to Program Manager (Special Services Officer), Office of the Director. Edna L. Tipton, Clerk-Typist, from Service Center Branch, Supply Division, to License Section. Betsy R. Hoenke, Office Services Supervisor (Stenography), Water and Laboratories Branch, Maintenance Division, to Administrative Services Assistant, Police Division. Postal Division Frederick L. Dunlap, Recreation Assistant (Sports), Division of Schools, to Distribution Clerk, Substitute. Cecil W. Williams, Timekeeper, Locks Division, to Window Clerk, Substitute. Division of Schools Howell W. Atwell, Elementary School Teacher-Principal, to Elementary School Principal. Edward A. McFarland, Teacher (Elementary, U.S. Schools), to Elementary School Teacher-Principal. Vera C. Phillips, Substitute Teacher, to Teacher (Elementary, U.S. Schools). John L. Thompson, Laborer (Cleaner), to Laborer (Heavy). ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Milton W. Canham, Supervisory Electrical Engineering Technician (Drafting), to Electrical Engineering Technician. Dredging Division Edward T. Mulroy, Cable Splicer, Electrical Division, to Leader Electrician (Lineman). Julian J. Hoyte, Seaman, to Oiler (Floating Plant). Ira A. Bailey, Laborer (Heavy), to Helper Welder. Jorge A. Nunez, Laborer (Heavy), to Helper (General). Maintenance Division Sherman A. Hammond, General Foreman (Public Works) to Chief Foreman (Public Works). Fredrick S. Baumbach, General Foreman Painter, to Ceneral Foreman (Hospital and General Maintenance). William C. Williford, General Foreman (Buildings Maintenance), to General Foreman (Buildings). Charles J. Hinz, Sheetmetal Worker, to Leader Sheetmetal Worker. Louis E. Martin, Inspector (Painting), to Lead Foreman Painter. Frederick McClure, Maintenanceman, to Carpenter. Fidel C. MacKay, Meter Repairman, to Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Plant Operator. Enrique A. Jaen, Laboratory Helper, to Meter Repairman Reinaldo Avila, Laborer, to Cement Finisher. Juan P. Pacheco, Laborer, to Helper (General). Gregorio Ortega, Laborer (Cleaner), Community Services Division, to Laborer. Pedro Hurtado, Linehandler, Locks Division, to Helper Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic. Robert C. Husband, Messenger, Office of General Manager, Supply Division, to Laboratory Helper. HEALTH BUREAU Lenard F. G. Nelson, Guard, Navigation Division, to Hospital Guard, Corozal Hospital. Gorgas Hospital Anna M. Taverna, Staff Nurse (Medicine and Surgery), to Nurse Supervisor (Tuberculosis). Margaret L. Whitmore, Staff Nurse, to Staff Nurse (Medicine and Surgery). Nada I. Durham, Clerk-Typist, to Clerk. David E. Mitchell, Hospital Food Service Worker, to Assistant Baker. Roberto N. Niles, Sales Clerk, Retail Store Branch, Supply Division, to Nursing Assistant (Medicine and Surgery). Coco Solo Hospital Dr. Caspar F. Rea, Medical Officer (General Surgery) (Assistant Chief, Surgical Service), Gorgas Hospital, to Chief, Surgical Service. Dr. Roger A. Franz, Medical Officer, to Medical Officer (General Practice). OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER John B. Morton, Jr., Accountant, to Systems Accountant, Accounting Policies and Procedures Staff. Rolanda M. Dahlhoff, Clerk-Typist, Budget and Rates Division. MARINE BUREAU Navigation Division Wilfred A. Campbell, Chief Engineer, Towboat, from Dredging Division. John A. Conn, Engineer, Dipper Dredge, Dredging Division, to Chief Engineer, Tomboat Franklin S. Stabler, Guard, Wholesale Branch, Supply Division, to Signalman. Bertram E. Brandford, Leader Line Handler (Deckhand Boatswain), to Launch Dispatcher. Byron S. Barriteau, Linehandler (Deckhand), to Launch Dispatcher. James N. Linton, Messenger, to Launch Dispatcher. Industrial Division Franklin S. Ford, Storekeeping Clerk, to Accounting Clerk. Martin Griffith, Oiler, to Preservation Mechanic. Herman Small, Laborer (Cleaner), to Clerk. Locks Division Paul W. Bramlett, Leader Lock Operator (Electrician), to Control House Operator. Elmer J. Hack, Telephone and Radio Dispatcher, Police Division, to Supervisory Clerk (Typing). Roger C. McGough, Guard, to Administrative Services Assistant, Office of the Chief. Robert B. Thompson, Machinist (Maintenance), Dredging Division, to Lock Operator (Machinist). Dale J. Fontaine, Thomas L. O'Flaherty, Machinist, to Lock Operator (Machinist). George B. Bennettt, Ralph N. Parker, Jr., Electrician, to Lock Operator (Electrician). George Albert, Reginald H. McBean, Cirilo Timana, Linehandler, to Helper Lock Operator. Frederick R. White, Cargo Marker, Terminals Division, to Linehandler. Harold Irvin, Clerk, Dredging Division, to Linehandler. Dodson Hinds, Messenger, to Timekeeper. Clifford A. Rogers, Laborer, Maintenance Division, to Laborer (Cleaner). SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU Supply Division Wilfred V. Bartley, Stock Control Clerk, to Clerk. Lionel R. Worrell, Stockman, to Stock Control Clerk. Roy A. Carter, Storekeeping Clerk, to Clerk. Mildred R. Henry, Grocery Attendant, to Sales Clerk. Percival U. Johnson, Richard E. Ottey, Guard, from Navigation Division. Hasbom J. Lindo, Warehouseman, to Leader Packager. George S. Anderson, Waiter, to Sales Checker. Rodriguez S. Burke, Utility Worker, to Messenger. William Clark, Warehouseman, to Stockman. Doris S. Kelly, Utility Worker, to Counterwoman. May A. Morgan, Presser (Flatwork), to Marker and Sorter. Herman A. Jarvis, Food Service Worker, to Assistant Cook. Francisco Barrios, Laborer, to Laborer (Heavy). Ricardo J. Romero, Laborer, from Maintenance Division. Bonnie L. Crowell, Usher (Theaters), to Usher, Chief (Balboa Theater). Albert R. Smith, Usher (Theaters), to Doorman (Theaters). Community Services Hurbert Clarke, Gardener, to Tree Trimmer. Reine Peters, Grounds Maintenance Equipment Operator (Small) to Grounds Maintenance Equipment Operator. Carlos A. Nelson, Laborer, to Grounds Maintenance Equipment Operator (Small). Arturo De Los Rios, Laborer, to Laborer (Pest Control). TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS BUREAU Motor Transportation Division Luis A. Len, Apprentice (Automotive Mechanic) (3d Year), to Automotive Mechanic. Pedro Aguilar, Truck Driver, to Truck Driver (Heavy). Percival Griffith, Stockman, to Storekeeping Clerk. Terminals Division Mike Kandrin, Donald R. Rathgeber, Liquid Fuels Gager, to Leader Liquid Fuels Wharfman. Francis E. Reardon, Clerical Assistant, to Supervisory Clerical Assistant. 10 December 1963

PAGE 17

Hugh C. Cole, Edgar S. Shaw, Jr., Sales Clerk, Supply Division, to Cargo Marker. Andres Cerrud, Bolivar Jaen, Dock Worker, to Stevedore. Paulino F. Abrahams, Leader Laborer (Heavy), to Clerk. Alfred R. Evans, Pinsetter, Service Center Branch, Supply Division, to Cargo Marker. OTHER PROMOTIONS which did not involve changes of title: Charles W. Hummer, Architectural Engineering Technician, Engineering Division. Peter T. Corrigan, Maintenance Representative (Building and Utilities), Office of the Chief, Community Services Division. Victor H. May, Jr., Robert G. Orvis, Marine Traffic Controller, Navigation Division. Joseph M. Daly, James V. Higgins, Jr., John Y. Wagner, Admeasurer, Navigation Division. A. Paul Jones, Jr., Chief Engineer, Towboat, Dredging Division. Rodolfo F. Abbott, Launch Dispatcher, Navigation Division. Enid G. Kandrin, Snack Bar Operator, Service Center Branch, Supply Division. Dorothy I. De Creque, Sales Clerk, Retail Store Branch, Supply Division. Joscelyn H. Evering, Clerk, Wholesale Branch, Supply Division. Benito Lucero, Calixto Villarreal, Surveying Aid, Engineering Division. William A. Violette, Admeasurer, Navigation Division. William M. Brown, Marine Traffic Controller, Navigation Division. Frank T. Willoe, Chief Engineer, Towboat, Navigation Division. Roger R. Toledano, Mechanical Engineer, Engineering Division. Dianne M. Barnes, Clerk-Typist, Industrial Division. Preston W. McBarnette, Supervisory Clerk, Supply Division. Edgar F. Bascombe, Arturo F. Smith, Clerk, Navigation Division. Clarisa C. Lee, Clerk-Typist, Division of Schools. Edgar W. Best, Timekeeper, Terminals Division. Linnett M. Turner, Clifford Rose, Clerk, Supply Division. Gilberto A. DaCosta, Sales Clerk, Supply Division. Yuda Morhaim, Teacher (Junior High, Latin American Schools). The Panamanian-North American Association, the Binational Center, 66 Peru Avenue, Panama City. Binational (Continued from p. 7) 200,000 people. The library facilities, which include a music room where members and students may listen to their favorite selections from the record collection, have been used by more than 32,000 people. The 'Binational Center has a 10-unit electronic teaching laboratory used extensively with Spanish and English courses for improving the student's pronunciation and intonation, accomplished by recording phrases on a master tape which the student then repeats into a microphone. North Americans and Panamanians pool their philatelic know-how in the Center's philatelic society. Those interested in photography have their own photography club. Panamanians who studied in colleges and universities in the United States, many who studied through scholarships offered through the association, also have their own organization. Who are the students? Mosdy adults who work during the day and study evenings. Classes for children also are held, however. Charles R. Meyer is director on the Pacific side of the association's academic, cultural and scholarship programs. Paul Johnson directs the North American Cultural Institute in Colon. ORDERS FOR BOUND COPIES OF REVIEW DUE BY JANUARY I THE DEADLINE FOR orders for binders and bound copies of volumes 12 and 13 of The Panama Canal Review in English is January 1. These volumes cover the period August 1961 through July 1963. Low cost binders of board and Linson cloth, in light blue only, are available at $4.25 per set. Heavier binders of board and fabrikoid, in black, green, and red, are $5 per set. Neither includes copies of the Review. De luxe binding for the bound copies will be fabrikoid, with gold stamping on the cover, similar to previous bound copies. Colors available are black, green, and red. The price will be $23.50 for each book containing both volumes (24 issues), including cost of the Review copies. Orders addressed to Superintendent, Printing Plant, Box M, Balboa Heights, should be accompanied by a postal money order or local check payable to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company. The Panama Canal Review 11

PAGE 18

CANAL HISTORY 50 If ear J cAgo COMMUNITY Christmas celebrations were held for the 8th year by residents of the Canal villages up and down the "line." Prior to 1906, when Canal forces were still being assembled, the Christmas holidays were observed more privately. Programs and children's entertainments were held in the Isthmian Canal Commission clubhouses and social halls complete with gifts and treats, with an average of 1,200 boys and girls participating. Distribution of gifts and food was made to poor families in Colon and Panama. Construction of the first permanent 4-family concrete quarters was started in the town of Balboa. These were 10 buildings located on the south spur of Sosa Hill. Town plans for Balboa included other quarters along the Prado at the foot of the Administration Building and a civic center type of arrangement of commissary, post office, clubhouse and dispensary at the other end of the Prado. 25 XJeari c4go A PROMINENT visitor in the Canal Zone 25 years ago this month was Cordell Hull, U.S. Secretary of State, who arrived aboard the Grace liner Santa Clara on his way to Lima, Peru, to attend the Pan American Conference. While here he issued a statement to the effect that the U.S. Administration was solidly in favor of the new treaty between Panama and the United States and that every endeavor would be made to have the pact ratified. A report was received on the Isthmus from Washington, D.C. that the U.S. War Department was considering construction of a third set of locks for the Panama Canal, designed to handle larger ships than the existing locks. The sources said that the Government was prepared to start construction immediately. RETIREMENTS RETIREMENT certificates were presented at the end of October to the employees listed below, with their positions at time of retirement and years of Canal service: Frank H. Blakey, Senior Operator (Generating Station), Electrical Division, Atlantic Side; 13 years, 2 months, 6 days. William Burgess, Helper Lock Operator, Locks Division, Pacific Side; 39 years, 11 months, 28 days. John H. Childress, Leader, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic, Maintenance Division, Atlantic Side; 18 years, 6 months, 15 days. Harry H. Corn, Assistant Postmaster, Postal Division, Atlantic Side; 31 years, 24 days. Samuel R. Cunningham, Accounting Assistant (Steamship Clearances), Accounting Division, Pacific Side; 35 years. John F. Droste, Automotive Machinist, Motor Transportation Division, Atlantic Side; 16 years, 9 months, 4 days. Gerald A. Dutton, Deckhand, Navigation Division, Atlantic Side; 39 years, 3 months, 28 days. Jose J. Estrada, Warehouseman, Supply Division, Atlantic Side; 22 years, 7 months, 27 days. Pastor Godoy, Surviving Aid, Engineering Division, Pacific Side; 33 years, 29 days. Juan M. Hudson, Fireman (Floating Plant), Dredging Division; 11 years, 8 months. Llewelyn C. Jolliffe, Automatic Platen Pressman, Printing Plant, Atlantic Side; 40 years, 6 months, 24 days. Dolores Lara, Railroad Trackman, Hailroad Division, Atlantic Side; 43 years, 23 days. Herbert A. Lord, Deckhand, Navigation Division, Atlantic Side; 25 years, 2 months, 18 days. Carlos Menchaca, Laborer (Heavy) Pest Control, Sanitation Division, Atlantic Side; 19 years, 9 months, 17 days. Esteban Nino, Deckhand, Navigation Division, Pacific Side; 14 years, 8 days. David O. Reid, Hospital Guard, Corozal Hospital; 10 years, 3 months, 7 days. Vernon B. Smith, Clerk, Maintenance Division, Atlantic Side; 36 years, 4 months, 29 days. Felix Villarreal, Helper Lock Operator, Locks Division, Pacific Side; 30 years, 4 months, 27 days. Mrs. Eldica Cumberbatch, Assistant Baker, Supply Division, Atlantic Side; 20 years, 9 months. 10 y[eard c4go QUEEN ELIZABETH II of England and the Duke of Edinburgh paid a visit to the Canal Zone 10 years ago. They arrived aboard the Royal Yacht Gothic and spent some of their time in the Canal Zone. During their visit, they were taken on a tour of the Panama Canal locks at Miraflores and were entertained at a formal luncheon given by Gov. John S. Seybold and Mrs. Scybold at the Governor's House at Balboa Heights. Also visiting the Canal Zone during the month was a group of U.S. Congressmen, most of them members of the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee. December 1953 was the final year of operation by the U.S. Government or its agencies of the historic Hotel Washington in Colon. A contract was signed with the Inversiones Motta, S.A., which would operate it as a private enterprise. The hotel remained the property of the Panama Canal. One year c4go ALBERT H. OSHIVER, a 42-year-old oceanographer from Washington, D.C. completed a 29-hour swim through the Gatun Lake section of the Panama Canal. In recognition of his feat, Gov. Robert J. Fleming, Jr. presented him the Master Key to the Panama Canal in the grade of "Self-Propelled Navigator (Honorary Pilot)." A bid of $1,018,000 was made by the Isthmian Constructors for construction of the Canal Zone's new College, located in the townsite of La Boca. ACCIDENTSFOR THIS MONTH AND THIS YEAR OCTOBER FIRST AID CASES ALL UNITS YEAR TO DATE '63 243 '62 234 2401(36) 2451 GASES •63 15 161(9) •62 7 103 DAYS ABSENT •63 '62 6266 288 24013(998, 8516 ( ) Locks Overhaul Injuries Included In total. 12 December 1963

PAGE 19

ANNIVERSARIES (On the basis of total Federal Service) ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Harry F. Butz Superintende: Water and Labor, Branch George V. Allen Oiler Feliciano Ramirez Maintenancem (Distribute Mauricio Santai Surveying Aid Adolphus A. Weeks Sheetmetal Worker CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Sigurd E. Esser tv-PP*-"nf Schools spoirryfriON and terminals bureau COMMUNITY BUREAU Purcell H. Marshall Cook (Short Order) OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR PRESIDENT Phillip J. McKenzie Cook COMPTROLLERS OFFICE Edna P. Reilly Time, Leave, and Payroll Clerk ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION William F. O'Sullivan Translator SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICE BUREAU Luis C. Barrios O. High Lift Truck Operator John H. Blades Maintenaneeman Francisco A. Bravo Accounting Clerk Caswell L. Bruce High Lift Truck Operator Carlos Coto R. Utility Worker Cecil A. Diaz Laborer (Heavy) Amalia Gonsalez Pantrywoman Agustin Gordon A. Utility Worker Grendeline Grant Warehouseman Thelma A. Maynard Sales Clerk Normand McDonald Laborer Tomas Molinar Laborer (Heavy) Raymond A. Weeks Grounds Maintenance Equipment Operator MARINE BUREAU Theodore F. Babich Lock Operator (Iron WorkerWelder) Charles L. Banton Seaman Alberto Barrera Line Handler (Deckhand) Robert F. Bovd Pilot Marcos Darkins Oiler Ewart D. Drayton Launch Operator Jose M. Guardado Line Handler (Deckhand) Rosendo Hebbard Line Handler (Deckhand) • Kee Laun?^Operat ^aval Irato; Eliseo JLemps team Mac iian (Laurf liball tal Lock Operator (Machinist) Francisco Russo Line Handler (Deckhand) Egbert A. Saums Helper Lock Operator Barrington A. Smith Launch Operator John A. Wray Helper Shipwright ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Laureano Castillo Helper Machinist (Marine) Hugh M. Thomas, Jr. Shift Engineer (Mechanical) Ernesto Trottmen Helper Cable Splicer TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS BUREAU Alfred A. Donaldson Helper Liquid Fuels Wharfman Jose Gomez Truck Driver Wilfred P. Leslie Helper Electrician G. O. M. Pallares Line Handler Rupert A. Vaughn Truck Driver (Heavy) Enos Williams Boiler Tender CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU William G. Bowen Swimming Pool Operator Avanso A. Farrell Swimming Pool Operator Percival S. Plummer Laborer (Cleaner) Thomas N. Stewart Fire Sergeant Clarence R. Vosburgh Instructor HEALTH BUREAU Josephine Clarke Nursing Assistant (Medicine and Surgery) Herbert W. Dena Hospital Attendant Manuel Labastid Truck Driver Irene A. Ladrach Nurse Supervisor (General Medical and Surgical Hospital) Biviano Marciaga G. Leader Laborer (Heavy-Pest Control) Vicencio Quintero Nursing Assistant (Medicine and Surgery) Aileet Walker Nursing Assistant (Medicine and Surgery) The Panama Canal Review 13

PAGE 20

TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes: First Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964 United States intercoastal East coast of United States and South America. East coast of United States and Central America. East coast of United States and Far East United States/Canada east coast and Australasia. Europe and west coast of United States/Canada. Europe and South America Europe and Australasia All other routes Total traffic. 1964 97 605 124 562 97 211 312 81 724 2,813

PAGE 21

was "jumboized" recently in Japan where 123.5 feet were added to her length. The ship, now 702.5 feet in length and with a 90-foot beam, arrived in Balboa early November 12 and made the Canal transit immediately to Cristobal. After taking on bunkers on the Atlantic side, the vessel sailed for Poland. She is owned by the Petroleum Transport Co. Ltd., operated by the Universal Maritime Agencies of New York and flies the Liberian flag. This was her first trip through the Canal since being rebuilt. Maiden Voyage THE SWIFT new Danish flag cargo vessel Tobias Maersk made its maiden voyage through the Panama Canal October 22 on its first run on the New York to Far East service via the U.S. west coast. The new vessel, which can make the trip from the Canal to California in 5 days and from the Canal to New York in less than 3, has a speed of 21 knots and is fully air conditioned. In addition to eastern United States ports, the Tobias Maersk and her two running mates, the Trein Maersk and Tomas Maersk, are scheduled to call at Montreal, Three Rivers, and Baie Comeau, Quebec. Although the three new additions to the Maersk Line fleet do not carry passengers, everything has been done to cater to special cargo, such as strong rooms, silk rooms, reefer chambers and deep tanks for vegetable oil, liquid latex and molasses. The vessels also carry containers. Agents C. B. Fenton & Co. reported that on her maiden vovage the Tobias Maersk docked in Cristobal to discharge cargo and take on bunkers. TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING VESSELS IN OCTOBER J 963 J. 962 Commercial 980 882 U.S. Government 30 17 Free 6 9 Total 1,016 908 TOLLS* Commercial $5,170,034 $4,412,721 U.S. Government. 159,175 56,964 Total $5,329,209 $4,469,685 CARGO" Commercial 5,926,145 4,890,308 U.S. Government. 112,494 19,973 Free 8,175 51,676 Total 6,046,814 4,961,957 Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and small. Cargo figures are in long tons. CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U.S. GOVERNMENT

PAGE 22

Sh ipping STATISTICS PAINT COMMERCE PICTURE A RUSTY tramp steamer with a cargo of odds and ends picked up in steamy little ports in the Far East nudges its way into the Panama Canal channel and takes on a pilot. Behind it lumbers a huge supercarrier loaded with thousands of tons of iron ore from Peru. As the two ships pass through the Canal, thev become two pieces in the jigsaw puzzle which, when assembled, makes a general picture of world commerce. This picture is of interest not onlv to the Panama Canal authorities, but to men all over the world who engage in trade. The term "Funnel for World Commerce" is not just a catchy slogan for the Panama Canal nor words on a Canal Zone license plate. It refers to the never-ending stream of commercial carriers, often called "bottoms," which make their way from all parts of the globe to pass through the Panama Canal. These ships carry everything from lumber and oil to bananas and barley. Thev come from busy ports like San Francisco and New York and may be on their way to Indonesia or British Guiana. They represent nearly every nation in the world and may be regular customers of the Canal or may be making a single trip on an irregular schedule. The Pacific Steam Navigation Co.'s transatlantic liner Reina del Mar docked in Balboa on a recent visit to the Isthmus. The ship was sold recently and will be converted to a full time cruise vessel. She will make her last voyage through the Canal on her present Liverpool to Valparaiso service in March 1964. The ship has been on this service with PSNC since her construction in 1955. Whatever country they represent, whatever their cargo or destination, when they transit the Canal these ships become part of the statistical pattern put together bv Panama Canal Economist Hugh Norris and members of his staff. They emerge in the form of the monthly traffic figures and the quarterly shipping tables that are used by The Panama Canal Review and are included in the Panama Canal annual report. The shipping statistics recorded in the economist's office are obtained mostly from the recently consolidated shipping information and quarantine declaration and the cargo declaration filled out by the master of every ship using the Canal. The first form yields such information as the amount and nature of cargo, the trade route on which the ship runs, the date of its Canal transit, nationality and size of the vessel and the amount of tolls paid. ^19

PAGE 27

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 07150 0341

xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EKLZO6J6V_04EJIZ INGEST_TIME 2011-06-09T03:10:21Z PACKAGE UF00097366_00078
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES