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DLOC PCANAL



Panama Canal review
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00025
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights, Republic of Panama
Publication Date: August-September 1964
Copyright Date: 1960
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
sobekcm - UF00097366_00025
Classification: lcc - HE2830.P2 P3
ddc - 386/.445
System ID: UF00097366:00025
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Back Matter
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text




















I.


UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES




















Digitized by the Internet Archive


University


in 2010 with funding from
of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrevie1512pana







PANANIx14 -CAN.N
-4,tC\\. ~


1914
1964


~i





ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr., Governor-President


DAVID S. PAUKER, Lieutenant Govei

FRANK A. BALDWIN
Panama Canal Information (Ofi.<


rnor


cAROERET D. KERR, Press Officer
Publications Editors
RICH Iuo D. PEACOCK and JULIO E. BRICE o


Official Panama Canal Publication E
t-r Published monthly at Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Printed at the Printing Plant, La Boca, C.Z.
Distributed free of charge to all Panama Canal Employees.


Editorial Assistants
NICE RICHARD, TOBI BITTEL, and
TOM'S A. CUPAS


PIGGY-BACK TREES-One of Nature's oddities can be found
right here in the Canal Zone. This tree-within-a-tree rarity has been
seen by many but probably few realized that a royal palm was
grim ine out of what we have tentatively identified as an Enter-
lhiiiun cyclocarpum, or corotu tree. If anyone knows for sure what
kind of tree is housing the parasite-palm, please let us know.


Vol. 15, Nos. 1-2

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964


Index

$1.2 Million Tuna Boat

New Hospital Annex .--.

RR Car Display

Port of Hampton Roads

Message Week __.. ------ .

Cl Oil's 50th Anniversary ..- ---_ _.______

How to Order Anniversary Book___- ___

At the Fair

Canal History ......

Slipping Charts __............. _______.

Anniversary Luncheons ...----- ..
Letter from Former Lieutenant Governor Paxson

.\inni\ ert aries -.. ..


Promotions and Transfers

Shipping News .._


AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964


cAbout Ute Covei
ROOSEVELT, GOETHALS, GORGAS, AND STEVENS.
It is i.rpi,,,l, to talk about the Panama Canal without
these names coming forward from history. As the Canal
reaches its 50th birthday this month, it is to these men, and
thousands of others who labored for the realization of their
ideals and plans, that thoughts are turned. They launched
a project that the world had called impossible. They brought
to it a combination of leadership and talent that could lead
nowhere except to success. Their energies and determina-
tion left the world with a great waterway that has made
life better for people everywhere. They represented that
toughness of spirit and will to succeed that Americans have
demonstrated in meeting (c.111l, ni.s everywhere. These men
of the past, then, offer an inspiration to the present. Their
accomplishments still shine brightly after half a century;
the greatness in them has made a mark that time will not
erase.


~







4Aw, jive 'cm a Chance


THE POOR FISH doesn't have a chance
these days.
The men who go down to sea in ships
have equipment that would make their
grandfathers green with envy. And after
hours, such luxuries as air conditioned
cabins, television, and gourmet food.
Such a fishing ship arrived in Balboa
recently on her maiden voyage from the
west coast of the United States. It was
the $1.2 million tunaboat, City of
Tacoma, which incorporates many inno-
vations for hunting tuna, from masthead
maneuvering controls, to a 50-knot
aluminum speedboat for rounding up
the fish, to a 15-ton skiff which holds
the net while the boat plays out a 680-
fathom-long nylon net called a seine.
The nylon seine which operates like
a huge purse when it is drawn around
a school of tuna, gives the vessel its
name "purse seiner." It is 4,180 feet
long and is buoyed by 3,800 plastic
floats. Within 5 hours of sighting a school
of tuna, it is possible for the crew on
the City of Tacoma to surround, bring
in, and load 100 tons of fish-a slight
improvement on the system which called
for men to bring in the big fish one by
one on hooks.
The ship was designed and built this
year by Arne Strom, former fisherman,
who now owns the Tacoma Boat Build-
ing Co. of Tacoma, Wash. He also built


the C'jrbii ian, a sister ship of the City
of Tacoma now operating out of Puerto
Rico.
The vessel has a 1,600 horsepower
Fairbanks-Morse diesel engine which
drives it at 14 knots, a fuel capacity
which could take the ship around the
world and three 200 horsepower gen-
erators to produce power for the ships'
refrigeration and the power operated
fishing gear. The tanks can hold a total
of 800 tons of frozen tuna, more than
twice as much as the older ships.
Proud and happy with the sleek new
fishing ship, is Capt. Louis Sitta, 38,
master and part owner of the City of
Tacoma. He is assisted by fishing master
Gaetano Giacalone and a crew of 16,
many of whom were taken on in Panama.
Most are skilled in the operation of the
mechanized fishing gear.
After taking on water, fuel, and
supplies in Balboa. the City of Tacoma
sailed on her maiden fishing trip in the
Pacific, and when loaded will take her
catch to The Starkist, a tuna canning
plant in Puerto Rico. Her sister ship,
the Caribbean, also built by Strom, has
been operating out of Puerto Rico for
the past 6 months.
Agents for the vessel at the Canal
is Agencia R. C. Worsley, S.A. of
Panama.


Climbing aloft to look for tuna fish is
Gaetano Ciacalone, Captain Sitta's assistant.



The "City of Tacoma" lies moored to Pier
18 in Balboa during a recent stopover here
on her maiden voyage from the States.






-\


Capt. Louis Sitta, part owner, mans the controls of the $1.2 million tuna boat.


CITY TACOMA










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nUE AnnEX


IS ALmTOST


FINISHED




THE II (r. ES l and the newest build- .
ing in the Canal Zone is the new eight-
story Gorgas Hospital annex now nearing
completion in Ancon. Follow the num-.
bered photographs for a step-by-step .
rundown of the new annex's construc-
tion from the artist's drawing in 1961 to _
the nearly completed job in 1964.
Built on what was formerly a parking Ai-
lot near the sprawling Gorgas Hospital "
complex, the handsome new building
is on a par with the most modern strue-
tural standards of similar institutions in
the United States. Its completion at the "
end of this year will result in a complete
I-.lr.pinll of the entire hospital plant.

Houses Surgical Services
\i n llt all surgical services at
Gorgas will be consolidated in the new
annex under one roof. All clinics, with
the exception of the medical clinics, will
be on one floor and the eighth floor will
be devoted to an obstetrical ward, the' .....
delivery rooms and the newborn baby
nursery. Medical clinics will remain in
the -.\ioilci, Section B. "
In addition to the clinics, the main "-'
floor will include the .Almittirig office,
a general information center where
patients and visitors can obtain direc-
tions, business offices, medical records,
an emergency suite, and the pharmacy.
Suricital patients will receive all treat- I
ment and care in the new annex. A sur- J I





gical suite consisting of six operating i
rooms and a recovery room will be -.
directly above the main floor in an area
which will include laboratories, X-ray
department, central sterile supply, and
a new section called the intensive care
suite, where patients who are seriously
ill can be kept under constant attention.

Kitchen and Cafeteria
The hospital's main kitchen and food
supply rooms will be on the fourth floor.
This floor also will have a cafeteria type
dining roorn for ambulatory patients
with a seating capacity for 90 persons.
The location of the kitchen has been
chosen in order to simplify food service
to other parts of the hospital and is on
the same level with the bridge and
tunnel leading to the older buildings.
In the new annex, there will be no
such thing as a ward in the sense it has
been used. Rooms will be for 1, 2, or 4 ai- r
beds, arranged to permit patients to be
grouped more effectively than in the
old section either by service or by type
of illness. Nearly 20 percent of the beds
in the new annex will be in single
rooms.

Patient-Nurse
Communication
Patients may communicate with the
staff by means of a 2-way patient-nurse
communication system. Rooms will have
large picture windows and the entire
hospital will be air conditioned.
Remodeling of the older sections of
Gorgas will follow the move into the
new annex. Section A will house the
housekeeping functions, the brace shops,
the Red Cross room, the medical library,
and a snack bar. Section B will be
devoted to the medical clinics, the chest
clinic, and the ward for chest patients.
In Section O will be the children's ward
and all of the wards for medical patients.

Parking Problem Eased
One highlight of the new building
completion will be the relief of the acute I
parking problem that has plagued
patients, staff, and visitors during the
3 years of construction. The ground floor
of the annex will provide parking for
about 90 vehicles and will be augmented
by a 31-car parking lot now being con-
structed across the street from the new
annex. It is planned that the great
majority of the parking under the build-
ing will be for the use of patients and .|
visitors.


J,1


owl, Im W S S



S_,..,n- miIsan -rar
~- m,,~uvuiUU~8bI~a~i


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW












The first of the Canal's construction-day railroad dump cars, the
American-made Western type, is placed on display at the railroad
station in Balboa Heights. A mule has now joined the display.


Maintenance Division workmen prepare the exhibit ramp for a construction-day mule.


Construction men use a crane to lift rails onto the elevated ramp.


AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964


CONSTRUCTION


DAY RR CARS


STILL IN USE

AS WE THIN K about the first 50 years
of the Panama Canal, we also think
about the construction of this world
wonder. Seldom thought of in con-
nection with the construction is the
equipment used to carve the water-
way through solid rock and other
diTiculties presented by nature.
On this and the following page are
pictures of the mounting of the first of
the old construction-day railroad dump
cars, the American-made Western type,
at the railroad station in Balboa Heights.
At the site of the mounting is a glass-
enclosed series of construction-day
photographs showing the American- and
French-made railroad cars in use.






The first railroad cars used by the
French for removing excavated material
from the cut were small "Decauville"
cars, each holding less than 1 cubic yard.
After the French were forced to abandon
construction, the Americans took over
the project and used some of the
"Decauville" cars in addition to their
own railroad cars. (The cars also were
used during World War II for tunnel
excavations and other such uses.)
The standard French dump cars held
about 10 cubic yards when fully loaded
and were used until almost the end of
the dry cut excavation. They were well-
made, but their small size greatly
reduced their production capacity.
Another difficulty was that they could
be dumped on one side only.
The American-made Western railway
dump cars, the kind seen in the display
at the railroad station, were among the
earliest items of earth-moving equipment
brought in by the United States.
Their 18-yard capacity, general rug-
gedncss and maneuverability were
ideally suited to the cut-widening work.
Many of these cars still are being used
by the Panama Railroad.










SJ


Mule 645 is hoisted onto the ramp.


Finishing touches are added to the old mule before lifting the car into place.


The rails are connected.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


rt~''f-r;.~. TE ~;; .t t;TPC~rC:






WORLD PORTS






ietwT ime Come


To Country's


olbest Hjarbor





HAMPTON ROADS ports (the Port of
Newport News and the Port of Norfolk,
the latter comprising the cities of Nor-
folk, Chesapeake, and Portsmouth) are
ideally situated as the southernmost of
the North Atlantic ports. Located a short
distance from the Atlantic Ocean with
wide navigable channels 40 feet deep,
Hampton Roads' natural harbor serves
many areas of the United States and
many ports throughout the world. More
than 100 r-gllall\ scheduled steamship
lines connecting more than 350 world
ports serve Hampton Roads. During
1962 more than 5,800 ships called on
the oldest harbor in the United States.
The Hampton Roads area is served
by more than 50 motor carriers and a
lugle- network of railroads, the major
two being the Chesapeake & Ohio Rail-
way Co. and the Norfolk & Western
P,.ih., a% Co.
Construction of a new $25 million
coal pier was completed at Lamberts
Point last year. \\'ith two 17-story high
shiploading towers, the pier has a load
rate of 16,000 tons an hour. Electronic
machinery is available for the custom
lIl.kiding of coal. Backup storage yards
have a capacity of 21,400 coal cars, with
two other coal piers available.
The two general cargo piers at
Sewells Point, Norfolk, have ware-
I,,iiL, between the piers to save time
and material handling costs. Located
near the piers is a modern grain elevator
with a capacity of 25,000 bushels an
hour.
In December 11-4i, the V'rginli State
Ports Authority purchased the five
, \istin. t. i,. rI 1c.ir~: -piers and support-
ini" t1.k l~lri .at Lamberts Point and
Sewells Point, Norfolk, Va., as the first
phase of a 71-1i, ra.ini General C.rgo
Facilities Expansion and Improvement


_ .~ &*;


Piers at Newport News, owned and operated by the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway. Among
C. & 0. facilities are a modem ore pier, coal piers, merchandise piers and storehouses.


Program in Hampton Roads, and at the
same time awarded a contract to con-
struct a new 5-berth general cargo pier
at Lamberts Point. The ultra-modern
pier will have 320,000 square feet of
covered storage space where general
cargo will be loaded into trucks or rail
cars for immediate delivery to one of
the two backup warehouses.
A number of ideas are new. For one
thing, the designers have incorporated
combination hatch-skylights in the tran-
sit shed. These will open like ships'
hatches to permit containerized cargo
to be lifted by crane directly into the
shed on trucks. And two 25-ton gantry
cranes for the lifting are based on a new
concept. Each will be mounted on a
semi-circular track. The inner rail will


be mounted on the pier's shed roof, the
outer rail on the pier itself. This is to
permit the cranes to move freely to
either side of the pier and to keep their
inside legs from blocking the cargo doors
of the shed.
In addition, there will be a refriger-
ator warehouse with four 25,000-cubic-
foot storage cells equipped for chilled or
frozen storage. A transfer bridge de-
signed to serve a 4-track carfloat is also
in the plans. Expansive open storage
area will be provided inshore for storage
of containerized cargo or other items not
requiring covered storage. The Authority
says consultants have estimated the
immediate effect of the improved cargo-
handling installations will be 500,000
more tons of general cargo a year.


Chesapeake & Ohio Railway's modem ore pier at Newport News. Conveyor systems have
a capacity of 7,200 tons per hour. The pier is 1,191 feet long, 82 feet 4 inches wide.






Ham Operators Set for "Message Week"


Canal and Amateur

Radio Operations

Mark 5oth Birthday


MESSAGES received by amateur
radio operators in the Canal Zone will
have a special meaning the week of
August 8 through 16. As part of the
celebration of the Golden Anniver-
sary of the Canal, commemorative
cards and certificates will be issued
to amateur radio operators who make
contact with Zone stations.
The special commemorative cer-
tificates will be presented, courtesy
of the Panama Canal, by Governor
Fleming to any operator who makes
five contacts with KZ5 during the
special "Message Week," and thus
receives 5 QSL cards. KZ5 is the call
number of all private Canal Zone
stations. QSL cards are sent to the
radio operators to confirm contacts.
There are two radio clubs operat-
ing in the Canal Zone. The Canal
Zone Amateur Radio Association,
whose president is Paul Runnestrand,
Executive Secretary to the Governor,
operates on the Pacific side. The
Crossroads Amateur Radio Club,
under president Bruce G. Sanders,
Chief Inspector of Cristobal Customs
Office, operates on the Atlantic side.
Regulating and licensing of the
approximately 200 operators in the
Canal Zone is administered by the
Coordinator of Amateur Radio Activ-
ities, Lt. Col. Henry W. Hill, USA.
Amateur radio operators in the
Zone perform an important public
service by regularly engaging in
emergency communications. During
the January disturbances they han-
dled over 5,000 personal messages
between persons in the United States
and the Canal Zone. The operators


kM:


f


i)4


Ralph E. Harvey, one of about 200 amateur radio operators in the Zone, operates the Civil
Defense Control Station, KZ5BH. The station in the Administration Building, Balboa Heights.


also cooperate with, and are part of
the communications plans of the
Canal Zone Civil Defense Program.
It is worth noting that the Golden
Anniversary of the Panama Canal is


also the 50th Anniversary of Amateur
Radio Operations in the United
States. The United States boasts
280,000 amateur radio operators,
more than all other nations combined.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW







MODERN WONDER OF TH


AUG(I 1 T 15, 1'114 dawned gray and warm. In the quarters
of a certain engineer, the li; ts were already on, for he
had a reason for arising early. He ate a hurried breakfast
and left the house.
For the first time, after more than 6 years of labor and
problems, Col. George Goethals was going to his post as
the chief of an operating enterprise. For this day marked
the official opening of the Panama Canal.


ANCON READY TO GO
The SS Ancon was in readiness to make the historic
journey. The locks were ready, they had been tested. The
locomotives were operating properly. Everything seemed
right. Nouhiig, had been left to chance.
But would the great day pass without mishap? Colonel
Goethals had been plagued with problems by the thou-
sands. But he had managed to solve them all and bring
the great project to completion. He was calm, but no man
who had traveled such a long road, or who stood at the
brink of a test with the world looking over his shoulder,
could be unconcerned.
But there was no cause for concern. Headlines the next
day proclaimed to the world that the Panama Canal was
open. The journey of the SS Ancon was without incident.
Had it not been such an important trip, it could have been
compared to one of the ordinary transits that followed it
by the thousands.


MORE THAN 345,000 SHIPS
That was 50 years ago. Since then, more than 345,000
ships have transited the Canal.
During the 50 years, the transiting of ships has held the
constant attention of those who are charged with the
operation of the Canal. But this month, they will pause
for a day to mark half a century of service to world
commerce. The transit of ships will not be interrupted in
any way.


GOVERNOR TO CANCEL STAMPS
Early in the day Canal Zone Governor Fleming will
cancel the first stamps of the special six-stamp issue that
commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the Panama Canal.
First Day covers of the stamp will go on sale that day at
the Balboa, Cristobal, and Balboa Heights Post Offices.
The stamps were featured in the May issue of the REVIEW
and orders for them have been pouring into the office of
the Postal Director. There are six stamps, ranging from
6 to 80 cents in value. Each of the air mail stamps has a
different Canal scene as its central point of interest and
the set is being sold in an attractive folder for $2. The
folder contains information on the Canal and on the
postal service.
A special medallion on the 50th Anniversary has been
ordered by the Canal organization and will be on sale
in all retail stores and service centers this month.


N


St C A t 1 4
The Ancon transiting the Canal August 15, 1914.


AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964


HOW TO ORDER
YOUR BOOK
"THE PANAMA CANAL-50th An-
niversary" volume can be mailed to
you by the Panama Canal organiza-
tion. State your preference for Eng-
lish or Spanish copies. Simply enclose
a check or money order for $2.95
with the request and mail to: The Pan-
ama Canal Information Office, Box
M, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone. BE
SURE to include your return address.
The $2.95 covers postage and mailing
to any address in the United States.
Handling of requests will begin Au-
gust 15 and orders will be filled as
long as the supply of books lasts.







WORLD MARKS 50 YEARS


50TH ANNIVERSARY BOOK
Another highlight of the celebration is the publication
of a book, in English and Spanish, by the Information
Office of the Canal. It contains hundreds of pictures,
along with special artwork. The text is not long, but is
sufficient to give continuity to the photos.
Two colors and black are featured on the inside of the
book. In its 128 pages can be found a condensed history
of the Canal. This begins with the coming of the French
in 1880 and carries the story through the completion of
the project by America in 1914.
The book has a section on life today in the Canal Zone.
It also has a special section on the Republic of Panama.
The section on Panama has a complete but condensed
history of the Republic, plus pictures.
The book begins with a section on the leadership and
responsibility aspects of the Canal.
Many of the pictures used in the book are published
for the first time. These historical photographs were made
from some of the thousands of glass slides in the Panama
Canal archives and hold a special interest for the
historically minded.
Other photos were taken by the Graphic Branch of the
Panama Canal. The Library-Museum furnished reference
books from which was drawn material used in writing
the text.


w1~


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'


The book has a hard cover, is embossed in gold and a
colorful cover protects it. It will be on sale in all retail
stores and service centers for $2.75 a copy. A special
instruction on how to order the book accompanies this
article.
The book has been printed in a limited edition; there
will be 6,500 copies available for sale in English and 3,500
in Spanish. The advance order pace is brisk. The book
also will be available at outlets in Panama City.
In addition to the medallion of the Canal organization,
there is a special memorial medal ordered by the Republic
of Panama.


ANNIVERSARY SIGNS AT LOCKS
The passengers and crews of all ships transiting the
Canal for the remainder of the year will know that the
Canal is 50 years old. Two huge signs will proclaim it.
One is at Miraflores Locks, the other at Gatun Locks and
the signs, featuring a giant 50th Anniversary seal in
combination with the message, are to be lighted at night.
A special ceremony has been arranged for the gift of
an old locomotive to the National Museum of Transport,
St. Louis, Mo. On the morning of August 15, Governor
Fleming will formally release the locomotive for transport
to the museum. Officials will also attend this meeting.
Captains of ships transiting on August 15 will be
awarded a unique honor. Each will be presented with
a special certificate to mark the transit of his ship through
the Canal on its 50th Anniversary.
It is inevitable that the thoughts of the present genera-
tion will be turned back to that day 50 years ago when,
through the efforts of thousands of men bent on a single
task, a great victory over nature was achieved with the
opening of the Panama Canal.


~PZ~~ W

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The cover for the 50th Anniversary book.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


First Day cover to be sold at the World's Fair.

































Skyscrapers and automobiles and automobiles and skyscrapers-that's only part of the story of the bustling, ever-moving metropolis of
New York City, where Lucho Azcarraga and his conjunto will play at the World's Fair August 15 and 16. The group will perform in
connection with the Fair's tribute to the 50th Anniversary of the Panama Canal. If you're looking for landmarks (the Fair is out of the
picture at the left)-at far left center is the United Nations Building; the Empire State Building is far right center of this aerial view
looking south from Manhattan. The 128-page 50th Anniversary book and a 'older of special commemorative stamps will be sold at the Fair.



Panama Canal is Spotlighted


Aug. 15-19 at N.Y. World's Fair


NEXT V. EEKEND, August 15 and
16, Lucho Azcarraga and his con-
junto, sponsored by the New York
World's Fair Corp., will play at the
fair in commemoration of the 50th
Anniversary of the Panama Canal.
Lucho will perform in the area of
the Pan American Gardens near the
Eastman Kodak exhibit
In addition to the music of the
popular Panamanian ,rCanist two
Canal Zone employees will travel to
the fair to coordinate and undertake
the ,I llini of 50th Anniversary books
and souvenir stamp folders.


STAMPS, BOOKS,

AND CONJUNTO

ARE FEATURED


Joe Kozlowski, supervisor in charge
of the Canal Zone Philatelic Societ 's
activities, and Willh.n E. Dolan,
Philatelic clerk, leave August 13 to
set up their display. The stamps and


books will be sold from August 15
to August 19.
Also a feature at the special kiosk
for the Canal tribute will be an
automatic slide projector, which will
flash pictures of the Canal on a
screen for the Fair's many visitors.
Copies of the 50th Anniversary
book will be presented to Fair offi-
cials, including Robert Moses, pres-
ident of the New York World's Fair
Corp., and former Canal Zone
Gov. \\ iliim E. Potter (1956-60),
now executive vice president of the
Fair Corporation.


AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964







CANAL HISTORY


50 yearo ago
EVERYTHING DURING the month
of August 1914 was tied in with the
opening of the Canal. When the month
ended, 18 vessels had transited from
Atlantic to Pacific and 23 had gone from
Pacific to Atlantic through the newly-
opened waterway.
While the SS Ancon had the honor
of making the first official trip on
August 15, she had been preceded by
other ships. The SS Cristobal took
11 hours to travel from Dock 9 in Cris-
tobal to Balboa Harbor on August 3; the
SS Advance went through the Canal
August 9 and the SS Panama on
August 11. All of these ships carried men
and women who had helped to build
the Panama Canal.
There a number of "firsts" during the
month. The first vessel of war to transit
was the 460-ton Peruvian torpedo des-
troyer Teniente Rodriguez on August 18.
The first foreign cargo vessel was the
Daldorch on August 22, a cargo ship
owned by J. & M. Campbell of Glasgow,
loaded with wheat bound from Tacoma
to Limerick. The trip through the Canal
saved the ship about 40 days.
The outbreak of World War I in
Europe had its effects in the Canal Zone.
Four German ships remained in Cris-
tobal Harbor rather than venture to sea.
The Hamburg America Line temporarily
suspended its services through the
Caribbean to New York.


25 Years 4go
THOUSANDS OF Isthmian residents
on both sides of the Isthmus joined
August 15 to celebrate the 25th anni-
versary of the opening of the Panama
Canal to the traffic of the world. The
principle ceremonies were held at the
Balboa Stadium with President Juan
D. Arosemena and Gov. Clarence S.
Ridley heading a long list of official
guests from Panama and the Canal Zone.
The old SS Ancon repeated its original
trip through the Canal from Cristobal
to Balboa with 800 guests aboard. An
official holiday was declared in Panama
and the Canal Zone.
The work of clearing the ground for
a small part of the proposed new town-


site at Diablo, which was to be used as
the Pacific side headquarters for the
work involved in the construction of the
third locks, was begun by the Municipal
Division.
The outbreak of World War II in
Europe September 1, 1939, had an
immediate effect on Panama Canal ship-
ping. As in World War I, the German
flag ships were the first concerned. The
SS Cordillera of the Hapag Lloyd
skipped her regular call at Cristobal and
sailed directly for Hamburg. The
Leipzig of the same line arrived from
Germany en route to Valparaiso with
her colors and her name painted out.


10 year a4go
THERE WAS no official celebration in
the Canal Zone to mark the 40th anni-
versary of the opening of the Panama
Canal on August 15, 1954. It was esti-
mated that since the Canal opened to
operation nearly 300,000 vessels of all
types and nationalities had transited.
These included 173,300 large commer-
cial vessels of 300 Panama Canal net
tons or more. During the fiscal year of
1954 more large commercial ships
passed through the Canal than in any
other year of its history. There was a
decrease in the number of U.S. Govern-
ment ships because of the cessation of
hostilities in Korea.
The vacation travel bill which would
grant authority to pay travel expenses


-ACCIDENTS.
FOR
THIS MONTH
AND
THIS YEAR


JUNE

ALL UNITS
YEAR TO DATE


of certain civilian employees and their
families stationed overseas in connection
with periodic leaves of absence in the
United States, was passed by the U.S.
Senate in August, 1954 and went to the
President for signature.


One year c4a o

THE PANAMA Government Tourist
Bureau took over the ownership of the
Taboga launch service last August,
acquiring title to the launches Runner
and Swallow from the Panama Canal.
The two 50-passenger craft had been in
operation on the Taboga service for
some years.
Canal capacity tests completed last
year showed that vessels spent less time
in Canal waters than ever before. A long-
term analysis of the tests was started.
Panama Canal Hydrographer W. H.
Esslinger and Geologist Robert H.
Stewart went to Chiriqui Province in
cooperation with local authorities to
explain the underground disturbances
which had been taking place in that
area and which had caused concern
among the residents.
The contract for the construction of
20-inch water mains at Balboa and
Ancon was awarded to Cecil A. High
of Panama whose bid of $187,960 was
low. The mains were to run from Balboa
to the Chorrillo Reservoir and from the
Balboa Pump Station to the Tivoli
Crossing.


DAYS
S CASES ABSENT
'63 '64 '63 '64 '63
32 9 13 3894 12486
98(37) 112 105(10) 568015247(1067)
Locks Overhaul injuries Included in total.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW






CANAL COMM ERCIAL TRAFFIC BY NATIONALITY OF VESSELS
SFourth Quarter Fiscal Year 1964


Nationality



Belgian -----
British __
Chilean ----
Chin.,, N3t
Colonmhi.rn _
Ddrish . .....
Fruinh ------
German ---
Greek -----
Honduran .
Israeli -
Italian - -
Japanese ----.
Liberian
\Meican
Nerherlands -
Nicaraguan -- -
Norwegian - -
Panamanian ---
Peruvian --___
Philippine -_
Soviet (USSR)___
Swedish -_ -_
Swiss ____
United States
All others
Total


1963


r-1111


11
321
34
24
85
78
48
292
128
60
17
46
204
262
13
192
18
384
140
35
19
10
100
21
440
40
3,022


.ril, N mlllltn 'l
lf I f
I irc I rr'ii iln
21,165 8
1,933,448 355
233,420 35
224,149 14
107,559 55
428,554 85
154,633 29
818,827 270
1,348,116 147
23,597 55
59,378 14
259,521 44
1,247,562 202
2,750,368 234
15,267 7
645,960 172
37,032 17
3,071,018 353
-15.574 138
133,566 23
70,735 17
36,923 5
693,302 80
7,339 7
2,988,987 425
217,879 35
17,981,179 2,826


1951-55


i..l

35,318
2,074,923
242,528
93,406
86,787
365,303
193,814
911,852
1,547,707
40,210
52,438
254,143
1,178,847
2,134,795
30,019
750,307
26,006
2,637,979
626,773
79,038
64,956
45,655
466,713
11,731
2,448,114
161,214
16,560,576


Average
number
transits
1
299
16
9
38
65
31
57
28
114

36
70
51

31
24
206
108
5
5

50
1
546
44
1,835


Average
tons
of cargo
5,129
1,812,242
88,080
72,660
43,967
245,718
134,662
146,661
249,194
130,927

197,097
497,278
333,268
----------
160,545
24,894
916,735
596,566
10,626
37,985

196,815
10,493
3,536,809
92,493
9,540,844


Month


July------------
August __-_
September -----
October __
November - -
December -
January -____
February
March
April - -
May___ __..
June- -
Totals for 6
months


1964

944
946
923
980
946
958
1,015
997
1,077
1,011
1,012
999


Transits

1963

978
950
909
882
924
947
769
841
991
919
988
919


Gross Tolls *
(In thousands of dollars)


Avg. No.
Transits
1951-55
557
554
570
607
568
599
580
559
632
608
629
599


1964

$4,898
4,842
4,836
5,154
4,879
4,897
5,140
5,193
5,480
5,202
5,355
5,222


1963

$4,980
4,926
4,617
4,411
4,684
4 9R3
3,871
4,313
5,084
4,761
4,991
4,747


Average
Tolls
1951-55
$2,432
2,403
2,431
2,559
2,361
2,545
2,444
2,349
2,657
2,588
2,672
2,528


Fiscal year___- 1 iI 11.1 17 7,062 .61.'I8 456.3Fi. $29 %9
o Before deduction of any operating expenses.
TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES
Thr. Fr ll.'~ ..n e i ,hl. 0,'..... il., ....i l,.. r .f Ir irril- t retL.t. l i llnt.,, ich tr.hl- rin lt.


Trade routes


United States intercoastal ..------.. -----___
East coast of United States and South America --___-
East coast of United States and Central America - _
East coast of United States and Far East- -___
United States Canada east coast and Australasia - -
Europe and west coast of United States/Canada -
Europe and South America --.. -_____.._.-__
Europe and Australasia - - --_.....______
All other routes -. ... ._ _ _______
Total traffic --------_... ___.__.. .-


Fourth Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964
Avg. No.
1964 1963 Transits
1951-55
125 100 170
625 584 458
129 144 123
512 520 271
76 85 52
262 218 182
363 334 124
118 98 83
812 743 372
3,022 2,826 1,835


Anniversary





Highlighted




By Luncheons





REPRESENTATIVES of the steamship
companies, which by using the Panama
Canal during the past 50 years have
saved thousands of dollars and thousands
of travel miles, will be guests at a
luncheon to be given aboard the
SS Cristohal Friday, August 14.

Another luncheon honoring Governor
Fleming, Lieutenant Governor Parker,
and a group of former Canal Zone Gov-
ernors and officials will be held Satur-
day, August 15, aboard the SS Santa
Maria in Balboa by the Grace Line.

The two luncheons commemorating
the 50th anniversary of the opening of
the Canal to traffic, will be attended by
Panama and Canal Zone officials from
both sides of the Isthmus in addition to
the seven former Governors visiting the
Canal Zone to take part in the Golden
Anniversary events.

The former Governors expected to
attend are Gen. Julian Schley, Gen. John
S. S:ybold, Gen. Glen E. Edgerton,
Gen. F. K. Newcomer, Gen. William A.
Carter, Gen. C. S. Ridley, who was
Governor of the Canal Zone during
the 25th anniversary celebration, and
Maurice H. Thatcher, only surviving
member of the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion, who held the honorary title of
"Governor."

The luncheon aboard the Cristobal
will be held in Cristobal where the ship
will be docked following her regular
\%,\.itL from New Orleans.

At the Cristobal luncheon, a special
certificate will be presented by Governor
Fl-rning to the United Fruit Co., top
user of the Panama Canal.

The luncheon sponsored by the Grace
Line \ ill be held in Balboa where the
Santa Maria will be bil itlht d The Santa
Maria, which was dedicated to Panama


AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964


MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
(Fiscal Years)






when she was launched, has been
passing through the Panama Canal since
October 1963 on her regular run
between New York and Valparaiso,
Chile. Wilfred J. McNeil, president of
the Grace Line, is expected to be present.
The Santa Maria is the third new
addition to the Grace Line Santa fleet
of four to be placed in service recently
between New York, the Canal Zone, and
the west coast of South America.



In connection with the 50th Anni-
versary of the Panama Canal, the In-
formation Office received the follow-
ing letter from Harry O. Paxson, who
served as the Zone's second lieutenant
governor, from 1952 to 1955. Lieu-
tenant Governor Paxson's tribute to
the Canal and its employees is carried
to all Canal employees through this
reprint:
The Panama Canal Review
Balboa Heights,
Canal Zone
Gentlemen:
Mrs. Paxson joins me, upon the
occasion of the 50th birthday of the
Panama Canal, in congratulating all
of the wonderful people of the Canal
Zone upon their dedication to the
important task of expeditiously pass-
ing the commerce of the world from
ocean to ocean.
The American people reflect with
great pride upon the ingenuity and
technical skills of the Canal em-
ployees at a time when a steadily in-
creasing amount of traffic taxes the
finite capacity of the waterway. Each
improvement in operation, resulting
in "one more ship through today,"
bespeaks a loyal, devoted organiza-
tion, rising above the problems and
doubts of the moment and uniting to
get the task well done.
My wife and I lovally follow life
on the Zone through the pages of
THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW, to
which we regularly subscribe. Having
partaken of the Chagres water, it is a
foregone conclusion that our thoughts
often turn to the lovely Isthmus and
our many friends still on active duty
in the Zone. We regret that we'll be
unable to be with you in person on
August 15; in our hearts we will be.
Most sincerely,
s/Harry 0. Paxson,
(Former) Lieutenant Governor,
Canal Zone.


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES SHIPPED THROUGH THE CANAL

Pacific to Atlantic

(All cargo figures in long tons)

Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 1964


Commodity


Ores, various -____---------_______-
Lumber___--- __----------___ ______
Petroleum & products (excludes asphalt) ---
Wheat ___-------------_
Sugar __--__-___--- _--------_-----
Canned food products-----------__-
Nitrate of soda---------------
Fishmeal
Bananas ------ ____ --
Metal, various__ ___-- ____----_
Food products in refrigeration (except fresh
fruits) --__----------- _
Coffee_____-------------------__
Pulpwood _____----- __ __________----
Iron and steel manufactures-- ----
Fresh and Dried Fruits .-----
All others---- ------
Total ---------------


1964

1,822,186
1,277,473
636,853
223,193
577,223
222,151
157,881
392,476
334,442
328,321

264,444
120,846
158,380
329,553
126,858
1,583,738
8,556,018


1963

1,882,633
1,122,819
459,035
211,437
567,101
253,825
192,842
254,893
298,231
296,770

228,309
104,377
126,214
241,691
98,825
1,415,983
7,754,985


Atlantic to Pacific


Commodity


Petroleum & products (excludes asphalt)_
Coal and coke --..-------- _...---
Iron and steel manufactures -----_ --_
Phosphates -_- _____ __---------__
Sugar ------___ --_-__ ____-
Soybeans ----------
Metal, scrap----------
Sulfur __ ----
Ammonium compounds -- ---
Paper and paper products ------
PBauxite
Metals, various __ _---------
Corn-------- --
Chemicals unclassified-----------
Wheat -- -- --
All others _------------


Total


Fourth

1964
S 3,071,090
S 1,483,182
356,555
510,236
121,761
221,031
585,215
139,071
119,210
152,792
159,092
124,775
273,647
208,919
---- 153,858
1,744,727
9,425,161


Quarter Fiscal Year 1964


1963
2,796,725
1,361,950
375,427
418,072
165,526
312,977
583,196
63,023
67,381
94,646
129,924
94,650
476,850
174,881
163,648
1,586,715
8,805,591


CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U.S. GOVERNMENT

Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 1964


Commercial vessels:
Ocean-going _- -------
Small - ----
Total commercial _-----
U.S. Government vessels: **
Ocean-going -------
Small *---- -----
Total commercial and U.S. Gov-
ernment _ ______-_ _-


Atlantic
to
Pacific

1,494
79
1,573

33
16


1,622


Pacific
to Total
Atlantic _


1,528
86
1,614

37
12

1,663


3,022
165
3,187

70
28

3,285


Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
*Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Average
1951-55
999,938
1,014,773
229,177
437,251
351,696
269,073
319,896

200,684
191,913

142,423
61,185
56,464
59,091
95,284
694,792
5,123,640


Average
1951-55
1,075,363
703,397
461,804
180,384
190,966
119,263
12,985
106,086
35,655
107,964
38,838
27,073
25,146
51,553
35,034
1,221,074
4 1.2 585


1963

Total


2,826
130
2,956

76
21

3,053


Avg. No.
Transits
1951-5 5

Total


1,835
381
2,216

166
75

2,457


__







ANNIVERSARIES
(On the basis of total Federal Service)




30 YEARS


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Ignatious F. Prince
Stockman


MARINE BUREAU

George A. King
Line Handler (Deckhand)
George Bernard
Leader Seaman


ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
Fidel Terin
Cement Finisher
Ivanhoe Archer
Laborer (Hr ,.N i
Julio Fontalbo
Warehouseman
Reginald Howard
Seaman


20 YEARS


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU

Ruben Olmos B.
Food Service Worker
Pablo A. L6pez
Laborer Cl. iner)
Ethelin O. Jules
Counterwoman
Clifford Rose
Clerk
Manuel Martinez
Millk Plant Worker
Juan A. V. Platero
Meat Cutter
Eladio Cordoba
Grounds Maintenance
Equipment Operator
B. Saavedra
Garbage Collector


MARINE BUREAU

Belford A. Alleyne
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Leroy C. Springer
Seaman
Fermin Rodriguez
Line .I In.ll'r (Deckhand)
Frank S. Wason
Clerical Assistant
Alejandro Garces
Line Handler (Deckhand)


David A. Kerr
Line Handler
Samuel Gomez O.
Helper Lock Operator
Jorge Roy Atkins
Helper Lock Operator
William Joseph
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Jorge Tufion
Painter
Juan Arbai
Boatman
Juan A. Allen
Clerk
Woodrow A. Sjogreen
Line Handler (Deckhand)

ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU

Juan Perea
Pipelayer
Pablo Clet Petit
Boatman
Atilano Vergara
Seaman
Catalino Ruiz R.
Seaman
Julio B. Pinillo
Maintenanceman
George Murray
Maintenanceman
(Distribution Systems)


Agustin Carrera A.
Cement Finisher
Luther Smith
Oiler
TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Granville Eversley
Leader (Dock Stevedoring)
Jose F. Quiiionez
Clerk Checker
Pablo Santamaria
Truck Driver
Henry G. Ledgerwood
Materials Handling
Equipment Repairman

CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Basilio H. Cragwell
Teacher (Junior High-Latin
American Schools)
HEALTH BUREAU
Albert H. Wardrope
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Alicia May Pomare
NurisinI Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Eugenio Garcia
Ward Service Aid
Randolph Wellington
Admlttinc Service Aid
Jose A. Matos
Medical Aid (Ambulance)



AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964







ANNIVERSARIES
(On the basis of total Federal Service)


40 YEARS

SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Ethelina M. Brown
Marker and Sorter
Maud R. Regist
Marker and Sorter
Ivanhoe C. Tovaris
Leader Bell Boy
MARINE BUREAU
Arthur E. Johnson
Leader Maintenanceman
(Rope and Wire Cable)
ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
Anderson G. Dow
Procurement Clerk
TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Lionel J. Duncan
Leader (Dock Stevedoring)


COMPTROLLERS OFFICE
Joseph C. Turner
Disbursing Officer
(Treasurer)
MARINE BUREAU
Arthur A. Albright
General Foreman (Lock
Operations-Electrical)
Clarence A. Sisnett
Motor Launch Captain
ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
Justiniano Herrera
Seaman
William M. Kosan
Shift Engineer
(Mechanical)
Stanwood O. Specht
Supervisor (Mechanical-
Power System)


Juan Rodriguez
Leader Quarryman
TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Harry V. Cain
General Foreman
(Ship ,l-'. d ,ri. L
Parker P. Hanna
Lead Foreman (Fuel
Operations)
Louis W. King
Motor Vehicle Dispatcher
Joseph W. Farquhar
Clerk

CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Thora M. Baublits
Teacher (Elementary-U.S.
Schools)


20 YEARS


OFFICE OF THE
GOVERNOR-PRESIDENT
Elsa E. Watson
Security Clerk
COMPTROLLER OFFICE
William Goldfein
Systems Accountant
Johnny Vaucher
Systems Accountant
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Lester A. Ferguson
Supply and Community
Service Director
Silvano Batista
Assistant Baker
Benigno Gondola
Leader Dairy Worker
(Field)
Agnes B. Whittingham
Clerk
Belen D. Guerrero
Supply Clerk
Grace F. Hayles
Utility Worker
Carlos A. Gonzalez
Assistant Cook
Leonardo L6pez
Utility Worker
Matthew Simpson
Leader Bell Boy
Sixto Madariaga
Stockman
Eleuterio Grajales
Leader Garbage Collector
Manuel Barrios
Garbage Collector

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


MARINE BUREAU
Evans Cecil Riviere
Motor Launch Captain
Prince Albert Bowen
Launch Operator
Silbert C. Ellis
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Felix Aleman
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Winston Thomas
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Juan Rodriguez
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Oscar Villalta
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Marcelino Quintero
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Naphtali E. Reid
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Theodore R. Yost
Guard Supervisor
Camilo Polanco F.
Truck Driver
Juan Diaz N.
Line Handler
Raul Calderon M.
Helper Lock Operator
Francisco Etienne
Helper Lock Operator
Ezekiel Beckles
Helper Lock Operator
Miguel Prestan
Line Handler
Harold B. Cover
Helper Lock Operator
Alfred C. Mullennax
Leader Machinist (Marine)
ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
Rodolfo Flores
Boatman


Norris A. Brown
Helper Machinist
\,1 n '.rn,-h ii ...u i
Fletcher R. Gregory
Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Mechanic
Gladston C. Rodney
Laborer (Heavy)
TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
George Gibbons
Stevedore
Carl DaCosta
Timekeeper
Gabriel Correa A.
Cargo Checker
Zephaniah Antonio
Railroad Trackman
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Paul R. Walker
Fire Sergeant
Demetrio F. Cabal Q.
Laborer (Cleaner)
Dayle Norton T.
Customs Inspector
HEALTH BUREAU
Mary H. Edds
Staff Nurse (Medicine
and Surgery)
C. A. Castillero
Pharmacy Assistant
Jose A. Peralta T.
Admitting Service Aid
Marion D. Stephens
Nursing Assistant (Medicine
and Surgery)
Silvia A. Pinder
Cook
Alberto J. Howell
Medical Aid


30 YEARS










PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


EM PLOYEES promoted or transferred
between June 5, 1964 and Jul-. 5, 1964
v withincrarle promotions and job reclas-
h]fik.stiris .ie not listed).

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
Elvera N. Breakfield, Supervisory Clerical
Assistant to Office Services Supervisor,
Printing Plant.
Jerry R. Fleming, PIhti..er.qi.h.:r tl ill to
Supervisory rFl ir.t r.,phI. r Iitsll
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Schools Division
David S. Salamin, Jr., Substitute Teacher,
Latin American Schools, to Secondary
Teacher, Latin American Schools.
Eudora T. Toppin, Substitute Teacher,
Latin American Schools, to Elementary
Teacher, Latin American Schools.
Edna O. Wilson, Recreation Assistant
(Sports) to Recreation Specialist (Sports).
Postal Division
J. D. Barnes, Distribution Clerk to Clerk,
Mailing Unit.
Police Division
Robert B. Mills, Police Private to Detective.

ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Electrical Division
Edwin R. Malin, Mechanical Engineer
'I.'li'itale. Maintenance Division, to Me-
chanical Engineer (Power Plin~rl. Elec-
trical Division.
Frederick A. Ebdon, Lead Foreman Elec-
trician to General Foreman Electrician.
John W. Huson, Electronics Mechanic to
Lead Foreman Electronics Mechanic.
John A. Everson, Electrician to Lead Fore-
man Electrician.
William W. Good, Radio Mechanic to
Electronics Mechanic.
Dredging Division
George \ McArthur, Mechanical Engineer
it..r-nerall to Supervisory Mechanical
Engineer (General).
Francesco Vigletrt. Master, Small Tug to
Master, Towboat.
Norberto L. Herrera, Leader Laborer to
Leader Labor II,-.Ij%
Westly H. Cummings. Seaman to Cook
SFlh,a mi Pl.i ri,'l
Leslie A. Hurdle, Seaman to Cook Flh~iltri
Plant).
Stanley E. Grant, Seaman to Steward
Fl,'.iitiL Pl rti
Alexander T. Jacks, Leader Laborer to
Leader Laborer He.'.. %,
Eric I. Jordan, Preston Primus, Seaman to
Cook (FI...,Iue Plant).
Maintenance Division
Joseph S. Leiby, Machinist to Leader Ma-
chinist (Maintenance).
Ignacio Soto, Launch Operator (Siill, to
Surveying Aid.


HEALTH BUREAU
Coco Solo Hospital
Norma C. Belland, Supervisory Clerk (Med-
ical Records) to Medical Record Li-
brarian.
Division of Sanitation
Hector Henningham, Laborer (Heavy Pest-
Control) to Truck Driver.

Division of Preventive Medicine
Patricia D. Hunt, Staff Nurse (General) to
Head Nurse (General), Cristobal.

Gorgas Hospital
Kenneth W. Bloomberg, Daniel Gruver,
William F. Short, Hospital Resident, 2d
year, to Hospital Resident, 3d year.
Eduardo A. Concan, Jaap J. Lind, Harold
L. Albert, Marshall R. Jelderks, Carlos
R. Guerra M., Hospital Resident, 1st
year, to Hospital Resident, 2d year.
Robert L. Wenninher, Intern to Hospital
Resident, 1st year.
Dorothy L. Beauchamp, Accounting Clerk
to Voucher Examiner.
Nellie T. Morgan, Clerk-Typist to Clerk-
Stenographer.
Ashton L. Wilson, Utility Worker, Supply
Division to Hospital Attendant.

NMA.RI E BUREAU
Navigation Division
Rafael J. Amato, Distribution Clerk, Postal
Division, to Admeasurer, Cristobal.
Marcy H. Carpenter, Police Private, Police
Division, to Marine Traffic Controller
Assistant.
Robert Peterson, Supervisory Administra-
tive Services Assistant to Supervisory
Administratives Services Officer.

Industrial Division
Carl H. Starke, Boilermaker to Lead Fore-
man Boilermaker, Mount Hope.
Leodrick Perch, Laborer to Helper Ma-
chinist.

Locks Division
Denton W. Broad, Control House Operator
to General Foreman (Lock Operations).
Robert Kennedy, Linehandler to Time-
keeper.
Ernesto M. Weeks, Helper Lock Operator
to Timekeeper.
Wilfred L. McQueen, Helper Lock Oper-
ator to Oiler.
Julio Macia, Alfredo Coco, Oiler to Main-
tenanceman (Rope and Wire Cable).

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
Elizabeth Sudron, Travel Expense Claims
Examiner, General Audit Division, to
General Claims Examiner.
Carrol E. Kocher, Accounting Clerk to
Accounting Technician.
Zoraida H. Chitwood, Clerk-Typist, Divi-
sion of Preventive Medicine, to Clerk-
Typist, cI ,idUlinig Division.


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES
Community Services Division
James R. Shirley, Housing Project Assistant
(Assistant Manager, Balboa Housing
OlFiLhi, to Housing Project Manager
NM.-iiii:.r. Balboa Housing Office).
Richard S. Brogie, Housing Project Assist-
ant, Crist6bal Housing Office, to Admin-
istrative Services Assistant, Office of the
Chief.
Supply Division
Alberto D. Long, Supply Clerk to Clerk,
Storehouse Branch.
John R. Hall, Assistant Baker to Cook,
Service Center Branch.
Alfonso T. Shaw, Laborer (Heavy) to High
Lift Truck Operator, Storehouse Branch.
Dcm6stenes Murillo, Laborer (Heavy) to
Laborer Hi -Cold StorageI
Philip Bartley, Laborer (Heavy) to Laborer
(Heavy-Cold Storage), Wholesale Branch.
Baldomero Castillo, Laborer to Milker,
Wholesale Branch.
Enrique Williams, Utility Worker, Service
Center Branch, to Laborer (Heavy),
Storehouse Branch.
Ernesto Cedefio, I tllt, Worker, Service
Center Branch, to Cash Clerk.
Elizabeth A. Bryant, Usher (Theaters) to
Usher, Chief (Balboa Theater).
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Motor Transportation
Cleveland A. James, Laborer (Heavy),
Maintenance Division, to Helper Tire
Rebuilder.
Charles G. Parris, Automotive Equipment
Serviceman to Mobile Equipment Me-
chanic (Organizational).
Leonardo Goldburn, Service Station Attend-
andt to Automotive Equipment Service-
man.
Noel V. Daley, Automotive Equipment
Serviceman to Truck Driver.
Railroad Division
Franklin A. Balmas, Electrician to Lead
Foreman Electrician.
Terminals Division
I'r% ille W. Wallace, Clerk-Typist to Time-
keeper (Typing).
Seymour A. Greenidge, Linehandler to
Guard.
OTHERS
Edward B. Webster, Housing Project
Assistant, Community Services Division.
Gerald H. Halsall, Hl.iiinri Project Assist-
ant, Community Services Division.
William G. Bingham, \l.inagment Analyst,
Office of the Comptroller.
William JI \MLauehlin. Chief Foreman
(Lolk Op.( r inl nii L',Lk. Division.
Fred Miller. \I irir. T.-wboat, Dredging
Division.
June Stevenson, Secretary (Stenographer)
Locks Division, Office of Director.
Claude P. Swaby, Cargo Clerk, Terminals
Division.


AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1964








SH i


PPI


New Towing Locomotives
THE OLD Panama Canal "mules"
are fast disappearing from the Pan-
ama Canal locks. They are being re-
placed at a steady rate by the new
Japanese manufactured towing loco-
motives, 32 of which will have arrived
on the Isthmus by the middle of
August. This number includes the 6
test locomotives, 4 of which will be
remodeled to conform with the newer
production machines and 2 to be kept
for spare parts. One of the three loco-
motive cranes included in the con-
tract has arrived and is being used
at Gatun.
As the machines arrive from Japan,
they are unloaded at Gatun Locks to
be put in operating condition and
tested. Gatun Locks received its full
complement of 19 new towing loco-
motives in May. Since then the ma-
chines have been sent to Pedro
Miguel as they are assembled and
tested at Gatun. Pedro Miguel started
full operation with the new mules
on the east lane July 27. When the
required 19 are delivered to Pedro
Miguel, the remaining 19 will go to
Miraflores. Each set of locks is to
have 16 locomotives in maximum use
and 3 undergoing maintenance.
The Locks Division expects that
at the present rate of delivery, all of
the 59 locomotives and 3 locomotive
cranes will be delivered to the Canal
by April in 1965 and be in operation
shortly after.

British Skipper Honored
AN HONORARY marine license
making him a pilot in all Canal Zone
waters was presented recently to
Capt. Albert Hocken, Commodore of
the combined fleets of the New Zea-
land Shipping Co. when he made his
117th and final trip through the Canal
as master of the New Zealand Line
Ruahine. The presentation was made


TRANSITS BY O
VESSELS I

Commercial-__-
U.S. Government__
Free ---------___
Total.--_
TOLL;
Commercial $5,2
U.S.Government_ 1


CEANGOING 1942 when he took command of the
N JUNE Samkey. With the exception of the
1964 1963 World War II years when he was
999 919 sent almost anywhere, all of his serv-
2530
9 6 ice was on ships which made regular
13 955- transits through the Panama Canal.


SO
26,972 $4,749,8(
42,517 112,84


Total -- 3 36-' 489
CARGO"0
Commercial -_ 5,904,706
U.S.Government_ 126,694
Free- __- 53,469


Total


)6
43


$4,862,649

5,462,322
79,962
35.613


6,084,869 5,577,897


Includes tolls on all vessels, oceangoing and
small.
0 Cargo figures are in long tons.


by Capt. Chester Briggs, Chief of the
Navigation Division, aboard ship as
she passed through Miraflores Locks
on her northbound transit.
Commodore Hocken was to have
left his ship when it arrived in Eng-
land later in the month and will retire
from active service. He probably will
make his home in New Zealand. He
had been with the New Zealand Ship-
ping Co. since 1919 when he signed
up as a cadet on the old Devon. He
had served as a master of a ship since


Master Mariners
POTENTIAL Panama Canal cus-
tomers are three new deluxe 13,000-
ton cargo liners called Master Mar-
iners, now being built for the Amer-
ican President Line in California.
The three ships, of an advanced Mar-
iner design, are being constructed at
the same time for a total cost of $37
million. The first, to be named the
President Polk, is scheduled to be
launched in November of this year.
The keels of the second and third
ships, to be named President Monroe
and President Harrison, will be laid
this year. According to Panama Agen-
cies, which represents the American
President Line at the Canal, the three
new ships probably will be put on
either an east coast of the United
States to Orient run or on the round-
the-world service. In either case they
would be making regular transits of
the Panama Canal.


1100
N
1000 U
1964 M

-.00 900 E
1963 R
17 800 0
F

/....700 T

(AVERAGE 1951-1955)- 600 N

S
JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN S


MONTHS


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


N


G















A

CO 4p
al' 0AM
3 ANN qt



h n












Date Due

Due Returned Due Returned
J. .________________
AUG U3 4m __93_____













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LATI AVurPI


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 04820 5131