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DLOC PCANAL



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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00024
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights, Republic of Panama
Publication Date: July 1964
Copyright Date: 1960
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
sobekcm - UF00097366_00024
Classification: lcc - HE2830.P2 P3
ddc - 386/.445
System ID: UF00097366:00024
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES




















Digitized by the Internet Archive


University


in 2010 with funding from
of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrevie1412pana








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Vol. 14., njt


JULY 1964


FOURTH OF JULY-CRISTOBAL, 1914


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ROBERT J. FLEMI\(I.. Jr., Governor-President a

DAIv S. PARKEn, Lieutenant Governor


FRANK A. BALDWIN
Panama Canal Information Offic


RICHA


EW L6 V 11. VT
Official Panama Canal Publication Eu
er Published monthly at Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Printed at lth Printing Plant, La Boca, C.Z.
Distributed free of charge to all Panama Canal Employees.


f f


ROBERT D. KERR, Press Officer
Publications Editors
RD D. PEACOCK and JULo E. BRICEFO
Editorial Assistants
NICE RICHARD, TOBI BITTEL, and
TOMAS A. CUPAS


I N 6_


MEN WITH PULL-Despite automation and the steady forward march of science, there remain certain tasks that are done today much
as they were a century ago, 10 centuries ago, or in the time of the Phoenicians. This is one of them, and these men who pull the lines of
the great ship Canberra form a graceful picture at the Balboa Dock. Watching a ship dock, with the lines tossed in an are from ship to
shore and the vessel inching its way to dockside, always attracts onlookers. With a nod to the past, there are many who hope that
automation doesn't catch up to take away the charm of this particular operation or similar operations that are literally centuries old.



I I Index


Independence Day, 1914._-

Canal Apprentice Graduation

Promotions and Transfers __-


The Dry and Wet of It


3

--- 4


-_ 7


- 8


Canal History


From France to Tahiti


- 10


-.- -- 11


Anniversaries -

Shipping News


.----- 12

JULY 1964


bout Our Cover
THERE WAS a whale of a time at the Fourth of July
celebration in Cristobal 50 years ago. Seems that everyone
was there except the photographer. Or, if he was there, the
pictures he took no longer survive. With a submarine
poppil up and down, a fire in addition to fireworks and a
list of games as long as your arm, there is no question that
this old fashioned celebration holds a lesson or two for the
mild. r events that are now commonly held to celebrate the
tr, iI dja. Of course, one of the lessons is to be careful that
the fun doesn't turn into a four alarmer. The cover sketch,
done in a primitive lh.., pretends in no way to portray
the panorama of that eventful dl.. Rather, it nudges the
ro,'l.ilt;.i and lets the reader imagine a thing or two. What's
L.,,inri on in the picture? Well, the details are on the f.icing
pI"'.I Read it for a gl.itc(. back at the merrmaking of
that long atin day.







"ben in the course of buman ebent ...


VW-uW8E VI 0- uW T W..


~1113 BIEIAIII


AS AMERICANS in the Canal Zone
and throughout the world prepare to
celebrate the 50th anniversary of the
Panama Canal this month, they think
back to construction days, to disease
and death.
There was, however, a lighter side of
the Panama Canal story. This came each
July 4 as patriotic American citizens in
the Zone brought out the firecrackers,
the sparklers, and the red, white, and
blue to whoop it up.
Although the picture above is for
July 4, 1915, the spirit was the same.
It was a Fourth of July to remember,
the kind of day Grandma and Grandpa


sit back in their rocking chairs and
relive.
Independence Day, 1914, dawned
sunny and pleasant in Cristobal, where
a variety of athletic events, tournaments,
fireworks displays, and patriotic exer-
cises were carried out "according to
program." The day's celebration began
with a reading of The Declaration of
Independence by Judge William Jack-
son, and proceeded through everything
from picnics and athletic events, in-
cluding an "aquatic wrestling match"
which ended in a protest and a "90-
pound girls' relay," to a very unusual
fireworks display at pier 8 which ran
smoothly until a stray spark set off a


pile of unexploded fireworks inside the
dock and treated the holiday crowd to
an unprecedented climax. The Cristobal
fire department dampened the unruly
fireworks (and the spirits of the majority
of the crowd).
Perhaps the most interesting feature
of the day's program was the submersion
of one of the newest in navy vessels,
submarine C-l, which submerged twice
for the thrilled audience.
Grandma and Grandpa finished their
Fourth of July celebration by dancing
the night away at the gaily decorated
and %rtll-hilled dancing pavilion at
pier 9, which was effectively hung with
hundreds of bright Japanese lanterns.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW





































The entire group of 131 apprentices-minus 4-are shown here at the Administration Building, Balboa Heights. The picture in the
chart on page 5, taken at graduation ceremonies, shows the graduates on the stairway, with Panama Canal officials standing below.


ANOTHER CLASS GRADUATES FROM


CANAL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM


\\()HK ING IN THE Canal organization today are hundreds
of nmplh'. _i many of them in high supervisory positions, who
owe much to the Panama Canal apprenticeship program for
their training and advancement in their jobs.
Thanks to recent developments in the apprenticeship
pritr .m there are now more young men than ever with
.rtilh. jt.l, lltsting to the fact that they are full-fledged
journeymen in a variety of crafts. Increasing numbers of them
are Panamanian citizens.
This year the largest number of Panamanian apprentices
ever to be grall.at, d from the Panama Canal apprentice
Iprgra.m received their diplomas. Filfte ie of the eighteen )',nig
men gr.d l.l. rl from apprenticeships into full craft journeymen
status were Panamanian citizens.
The apprenticeship program is not a new development in
the Canal organization set-up. For the Canal, it had its begin-
iiie almost when construction of the waterway was begun in
1904 when it was realized that job opportunities should be
provided for the sons of the men and women working for
the Isthmian Canal Commission.


Although the first apprentice training was approved April 12,
1906, formal apprenticeship rules were not adopted until
June 1914 and schooling or class instruction was not started
until February 1915 when shop foremen in the Mechanical
and Building Divisions were appointed as instructors. The
first machinist apprenticeships were patterned after railroad
apprenticeships in the United States.
The apprentice program in the Mechanical Division almost
lapsed during the early 1920's because of lack of work and
reductions in force. Schoolwork was discontinued in 1925,
but in 1933, more apprentices were being employed and the
whole program was revived and reorganized. Formal school
training was started in 1935 under the direction of Philip
T. Green, who was apprentice coordinator and now is industrial
coordinator of all school training.
Class hours average well over the 144 per year minimum
stipulated by the U.S. Department of Labor for apprenticeship.
The type of instruction which supplements the on-the-job
traiiiing. recently received high marks from a visitor from the
(See p. 6)


JULY 1964







-y


. .-q uN


Also a former apprentice, Daniel George, U.S. citizen, will work as
an electrician for the Electrical Division, Balboa, for 1 year and
then for the Locks Division, Pacific, for 2 years. George, shown
with Emmett O. Kiernan, his supervisor, completed his apprentice-
ship in 3 years. He was given a 1 year reduction of apprenticeship
for credits earned in 2% years at Virginia Polytechnic Institute.
10


ENROLLMENT BY FISCAL YEAR

Fiscal year 1964 totals include 5 U.S. citizens and 4 Panamanians employed by Army and attending Panama
Canal Company Apprentice School.


Donald L. Greaves, Panamanian, operates a lathe under the direc-
tion of John F. Frost, his supervisor. A machinist in the Industrial
Division, Mount Hope, Greaves is slated to graduate in July 1966.
4E





Already a graduate of the apprentice program, Rugico E. Rocha Q.,
Panamanian (left), does boiler repair work on the SS "Flamenco"
at the Mount Hope Industrial Division. Providing tips is C. B. Wood.

4M


The scheduled graduation date for Alfred J. Graham, U.S. citizen,
is July 1966. Graham is an apprentice electrician in the Locks
Division, Pacific. Looking on is his supervisor, K. L. Middleton.


Robert Flumach, U.S. citizen, already has graduated from the ap-
prentice program. An electrician, he will work for 2 years in the
Electrical Division, Balboa, and then another 2 years for the Locks
Division, Pacific. Giving pointers is James M. Slover, supervisor.


(Continued from p. 4)
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training of the Department
of Labor.
The apprentice program is notable for the variety of craft
traiiiirin it provides. As early as 1918, training was offered in
13 trades. Today there are apprenticeships offered in more
than a score of standard crafts.
Pay has gone from 10 cents an hour to a scale now geared
to journeymen rates. Both the United States and Panamanian
citizen apprentices receive the same basic pay for the same
apprenticeships.
The number of apprentices r giisttrd in the program has
varied widely over the years. Both the smallest and the largest
enrollment occurred during World War II when the number
of apprentices soared to 150. Draft and enlistments soon took
all but four.
As a result of President Eisenhower's Nin.-polnt program
for improvement of relations between the United States and
Panama" ,icn, d in 1960, the number of apprentices being
trained increased sharply. The program provided that 25
Panamanian apprentices be employed each year. As a result,
after 4 years of operation under the dir L ti et. the total number
of apprentices has now leveled off at from 130 to 140 students.


A graduate of Rainbow City High School, Arthur Trottman, Pana-
manian, is scheduled to complete his apprenticeship as a pipefitter
in the Industrial Division, Mount Hope, in July 1966. Giving
instructions is Trottman's supervisor, Edward W. Donohue.


JULY 1964







PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


EMPLOYEES promoted or transferred
between May 5 and June 5, 1964,
(within grade promotions and job re-
classifications are not listed):
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
Victorio R. Delgado, Laborer (Cleaner) to
High Lift Truck Operator, Printing Plant,
La Boca.
Luz A. de Pulido, Clerk-Typist, Gorgas
Hospital, to Personnel Bureau.
Internal Security
Thomas J. Burbine, Guard Supervisor, Ter-
minals Division, to Security Specialist.
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Schools Division
Theo. F. Hotz, Director (U.S. Secondary
Schools), to Director (Assistant Superin-
tendent and Director, U.S. Schools).
Priscilla M. Lane, Clerk-Typist to Super-
visory Clerk-Typist.
Constance H. Fyfe, Elizabeth Tapiero, El-
vira Bradfield, Millicent F. Forcheney,
Janet A. Marshall, Ruby A. Bryan, Con-
stance A. Gallop, Florence G. Cobham,
Eudora T. Toppin, Myrtle L. Gibbs,
Marianela Martinez A., Substitute Teach-
ers, Latin American Schools to Ele-
mentary Teachers, Latin American
Schools.
Juan L. Smith, Winifred M. B. de Wilson,
Luis P. Sealy H., Substitute Teachers
Latin American Schools to Junior High
Teachers, Latin American Schools.
Juan Nacrur, Extension Class Teacher, U.S.
Schools to Teacher, Junior High Latin
American Schools.
Fulvia E. Escobar P., Ariosto E. Ardila,
Allan B. Forte, Charlotte T. Phillips,
Cedric L. Bailey, Sergio A. Ruiz, Alcides
Bernal D., Shailer J. Yearwood, Ruben
Martin, Isolda I. Rodriguez P., Col6n
Guardia, Substitute Teachers, Latin
American Schools to Secondary Teachers,
Latin American Schools.
George H. Sylvester, Hoaglan A. Maynard,
Leader Labor (Cleaners) to Maintenance-
men.
Patrick J. Russell, Andres G6mez, Laborer
(Cleaners) to Grounds Keepers (Sports).
Bestee Burke, Laborer (Cleamer) to Leader
Laborer (Cleaner).
Ira N. Hinkson, Laborer (Heavy) to Leader
Laborer (Cleaner).
John L. Thompson, Laborer (Heavy) to
Grounds Keeper (Sports).
Gonzalo L6pez F., Laborer (Cleaner) to
Laborer (Heavy).
Louisa A. Craig, Laborer (Cleaner) to
Dressing-Room Attendant.
Police Division
Hollis Griffon, Police Private to Detective.
Jerry L. Carlton, Signalman, Navigation
Division to Police Private.
Mary W. Hall, Telephone Operator, Elec-
trical Division to Telephone and Radio
Dispatcher.
William R. Steele, Guard, Terminals Divi-
sion, to Police Private.
Jerry Ransom, Guard, Locks Division, to
Telephone and Radio Dispatcher.
Barbara H. Geoghegan, Telephone Oper-
ator, Electrical Division, to Telephone
and Radio Dispatcher.


Anita B. Collins, Clerk, Coco Solo Hospital,
to Telephone and Radio Dispatcher,
Cristobal.
Julian J. Hoyte, Oiler (Floating Plant)
Dredging Division, to Detention Guard.
Postal Division
Patricia A. Finneman, Office Machine Oper-
ator, Gorgas Hospital, to Window Clerk,
Substitute, Cristobal.
Andres Griffin, Guest House Clerk, Supply
Division, to Distribution Clerk, Substi-
tute.
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
DIVISION
Electrical Division
Peter E. Reuben, Laborer (Cleaner) to
Helper Electrician (Power Plant).
Dredging Division
Medardo Quiroz J., Navigation Aid Worker
to Maintenanceman (Distribution Sys-
tems).
Maintenance Division
Ernest L. Oaks, Sanitary Engineer, Water
and Laboratory Branch, to Supervisory
Sanitary Engineer (Superintendent Mira-
flores Filter Plant), Miraflores.
Carl T. Tuttle, Plumber to Leader Plumber.
Jerry D. Roswell, Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Mechanic to Leader Refrig-
eration and Air Conditioning Mechanic,
Cristobal.
Frederick Johnson A., Oiler to Refrigera-
tion and Air Conditioning Plant Oper-
ator.
Marcelino Llontop, Asphalt or Cement
Worker to Plasterer, Tile, and Block
Setter (Maintenance).
Samuel N. Haywood, Warehouseman to
Field Tractor Operator.
Norbert L. Buchanan, Leonard F. Foster,
Helpers Refrigeration and Air Condi-
tioning Mechanics to Maintenance Refrig-
eration and Air Conditioning Mechanics.
HEALTH BUREAU
Coco Solo Hospital
Mary R. Smith, Staff Nurse (Medicine and
Surgery), Gorgas Hospital, to Nurse
Anesthetist.
Office of the Director
Alvis B. Carr, Administrative Services Offi-
cer to Hospital Administrative Director
(Assistant to Health Director).
Gorgas Hospital
S. Lynn Parsons, Staff Nurse to Staff Nurse
(Medicine and Surgery).
Edward Sealey F., Shipment Clerk, Rail-
road Division to Clerk.
Edwardo A. Reefer, Linehandler, Locks
Division, to Ward Service Aid.
Hector G. Scott, Utility Worker, Supply
Division, to Food Service Worker.
Corozal Hospital
Edgar Reid, Walter J. St. Louis, Food
Service Workers to Nursing Assistants
(Psychiatry).
MARINE BUREAU
John G. Boswell, James M. Zelsman, Leader
Lock Operators (Machinists) to Lead
Foremen (Locks Operations), Miraflores.
Howard E. Robinson, Lock Operator (Ma-
chinist), to Leader Lock Operator (Ma-
chinist).


Joseph C. Merritt, Paul E. Howard, William
Foster, Electricians to Lock Operators
(Electricians).
Alejandro Gerald, Timekeeper to Teletypist.
Industrial Division
Louis E. Palmer, Sheetmetal Worker to
Leader Sheetmetal Worker.
Navigation Division
John W. Farmer, Pilot, Probationary to
Pilot.
George G. Goddard, Teletypist, Locks
Division, to Clerk.
Angelo Stefani, Timekeeper, Locks Divi-
sion, to Clerk.
Office of the Comptroller
Jolie A. Seeley, Clerk-Stenographer to
Statistical Clerk (Stenography).
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICES BUREAU
Office of General Manager
Roberta J. Paterson, Accounting Clerk
(Typing), Motor Transportation Division,
to General Supply Assistant (Typing).
Supply Division
Betty J. Slaughter, Retail Store Department
Manager to Retail Store Department
Manager (General), Coco Solo.
Joseph Roberts, Clerk, Service Center
Branch, to Cash Clerk, Retail Store
Branch.
Ana Bowen, Sales Clerk to Sales Section
Head.
Edith L. Simpson, Counterwoman to Sales
Clerk.
Jos6 G. Rodriguez, Milker to Leader Cattle
Attendant.
Dem6stenes Murillo, Laborer (Cleaner), to
Laborer (Heavy).
Mavis V. Miller, Grocery Attendant to
Stock Control Clerk.
Reyes Rodriguez, Laborer (Heavy) to
Laborer (Heavy-Cold Storage).
Sime6n N. Sobers, Utility Worker to Serv-
ice Station Attendant.
Valentin Diaz V., Laborer to Laborer
(Heavy-Cold Storage).
Philip Bartley, Utility Worker to Laborer
(Heavy).
Gordon A. Graham, Assistant Retail Store
Manager to Supervisory General Supply
Assistant, Storehouse Branch.
Harold Johnson, Clerk to Inspector (Gen-
eral Equipment).
Santiago Rivera, Laborer (Heavy) to Scrap
Material Sorter.
Roy Dickens, Laborer (Heavy) to Ware-
houseman.
Joseph E. Flemmings, Utility Worker to
Laborer (Heavy).
Community Services Division
Geniniano Aguilar, Laborer to Garbage
Collector.
Hernin A. Herrera, Laborer (Cleaner) to
Laborer.
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Motor Transportation
George G. Mandeville, School Bus Driver
to Truck Driver (Heavy Trailer).
Alejandro Blanco, Truck Driver to School
Bus Driver.
(See p. 9)


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW







One inute JtJ a y, the Jext


LESS RAINFALL,

MORE HEAT IN

FISCAL 1964


AVERAGE RAINFALL in the Canal
Zone during fiscal year 1964 amounted
to 90.45 inches or approximately 4.92
inches below normal, according to the
annual report released by the Mete-
orological and Hydrographic Branch.
The fact that less rain than usual fell
during the 12-month period is attributed
to the early dry season which began
November 24 and ended April 23, 1964,
a period of 152 days. It was not only
the earliest dry season on record but
was 7 days longer than the average
dry season.
The wettest month of the past fiscal
year was November 1963 during which
an average of 16.99 inches of rain
was recorded. The driest month was
February with only .35 of an inch.
Average air temperature was 80.6
degrees or 0.5 of a degree above normal.
Relative humidity was 84.1 percent or
1 percent above normal. The highest
temperature was 95 degrees reported at
Balboa Heights February 23. The
lowest was 65 degrees at Madden Dam
January 25.
These figures were provided by a
network of 20 rainfall recording stations
and six strtam-g.igiilg stations operated
on the tributary rivers and drainage
areas of the lakes to provide records and
data that affect the water supply of
the Canal.
Catun Lake elevations ranged from
a maximum of 87.01 feet on December 1
to a minimum of 83.78 feet April 21.
Madden Lake ranged from 250.7 feet on
December 6 to a minimum of 207.76 on
Ma\ 21.
There were almost as many seismic
disturbances recorded at Balboa Heights
during the year as there were days. In
fiscal year 1964 the total came to 352
earthquakes of which 166 were within
.3ill miles of Balboa and 5 were felt
locally.
One of the most unusual storms of
the fiscal year developed over Madden


--'. .'-


//


/ /


S .' / .


: /


Lake about noon on Saturday, August
17. It brought a torrential downpour of
4.11 inches of rain in the hour and a
half period between 11:45 a.m. and 1:15
p.m. Accompanying the heavy rain was
a line-squall type of windstorm which
flattened the roof of a raft anchored in
Madden Lake.
Several people occupying the raft at
the time were thrown off with minor
injuries. A motorboat tied to the float
was sunk. Several trees on the shore
nearby were blown down. The hydro-
graphic station at Madden Dam esti-
mated a wind velocity of 23 miles per
hour with higher momentary velocities.
The storm later moved down the
Chagres River striking the Gamboa area
between the golf club and the railroad
bridge. Trees were uprooted on both
banks of the river and several people
were knocked off a floating raft by a
falling tree limb which injured one
person and damaged a motorboat.
Other rare weather phenomena re-


ported during the year was a fall of
hailstones of to % inch in diameter
along the Transisthmian Highway be-
tween milepost seven and nine. This
occurred September 23, at 3 p.m. and
lasted 10 minutes. A waterspout was
observed at 3:10 p.m. November 21,
about 5 miles north of the Cristobal
breakwater. It lasted for about 10
minutes and caused no damage.
Total runoff from the Gatun and Mad-
den Lake Basin for fiscal year 1964 was
one percent below normal and amounted
to 4,685,789 acre-feet. Of this amount,
26 percent or 1,826,262 acre-feet was
derived from the basin above Madden
Dam.
The maximum runoff during the year
was on November 15, when the 24-hour
runoff amounted to 47,819 acre-feet or
24,104 cubic-feet-per-second, This was
no record, however, since maximum 24-
hour runoff on record since the formation
of Gatun Lake is 372,011 acre-feet or
187,600 cubic-feet-per-second.


JULY 1964


. .


j I /


,* /,
S/'


*







CANAL HISTORY


50 year, cgo
THERE WAS a bang-up Fourth of July
celebration in Cristobal 50 years ago.
The firc\eorks display held on Pier 8
Sas disrupted a half hour after it started
when a spark set off a pile of unexploded
fireworks inside the covered dock area.
Losses caused by the explosion were
confined principally to the fireworks
and to some canvas and rope belonging
to the dock. See page 3 for further
details about the Fourth of July half a
century ago.
There was another more serious
explosion and fire on the Atlantic side
50 years ago this July. A watchman was
killed when the Mindi powder and
dynamite magazine located at a point
near the Gatun-Colon wagon road about
5 miles from Colon, blew up Sunday
morning, July 5, 1914. Stored in the
magazine maintained by the Supply
Department under the direction of the
Depot Quartermaster at Mount Hope,
were 435,525 pounds of dynamite, and
15,394 pounds of Trojan powder.
The occupation of the permanent
Administration Building at Balboa
Heights was begun Wednesday, July 15,
with the moving of the chief time-
keeper's office from Culebra and the
district timekeeper's offices from Cris-
tobal and Balboa. The consolidated force
included about 50 employees.

25 Years d4go
THE PANAMA CANAL was too well
armed to fear attack by surface vessels
alone but was vulnerable to sabotage,
op-n to air raids and vulnerable to land
attack if the enemy landed forces with
a short distance of the Canal Zone,
Brig. Gen. George V. Strong, U.S. Army
Assistant Chief of Staff in the War Plans


Division of the War Department, said
in a speech before the Public Affairs
Institute of the University of Virginia
25 years ago. Particular attention was
being paid to possible attack from the
Orient, he said.
After considerable deliberation, the
U.S. Senate voted 64 to 15 to ratify the
Panama-United States general treaty
and the convention providing for the
construction of a highway across the
Isthmus of Panama. Panama celebrated
the ratification and President Juan D.
Arosemena of Panama said that the
principal grievances which have dis-
turbed Panama-United States relations
for many years have been adjusted. The
pact would mean a new era of frank
relations between the two countries.

10 years 4go
THE BIGGEST bank slide in almost
23 years eased into the Panama Canal
channel in Cucaracha Reach near
Paraiso July 12, 1954. Two ships
completing southbound transits were
delayed for about 1 hour while sound-
ings were made. The entire east side of
the channel was closed at the slide area.
Canal officials estimated that approxi-
mately 30,000 cubic yards of material
moved into the Canal prism and that
it would take about a week for the
dipper dredge Cascadas to clear it away.
It was emphasized that the earth slide
had no relation to Contractors Hill on
which earth moving work had been
started earlier in the month.
In Washington it was announced that
the House of Representatives had passed
a provision for payment of transporta-
tion expenses for Federal employees and
their immediate families from post of
duty outside of the continental United
States for leave.


-ACCIDENTS
FOR

THIS MONTH Q
AND FIRST AID HOSPITAL nLEAE L N

THIS YEAR

DAYS
MAY CASES CASES ABSENT
'64 '63 '64 '63 '64 '63
ALL UNITS 219 228 20 21 481 741
YEAR TO DATE 1233 1266(36) 99 92(10) 1786 2761(998)
Locks Overhaul Injurles Included In total.


One year c4o
PAY INCREASES ranging from 7 cents
an hour to 19 cents an hour went into
effect last year for 1,232 Canal em-
ployees in the manual category. These
'increases were in addition to those
announced earlier for 9,500 other Canal
employees in connection with the in-
crease of the minimum wage to 70 cents
an hour and the wage curve adjustment.



Promotions and Transfers
(Continued from p. 7)
Eugene C. Babb, Warehouseman to Supply
Clerk.
Osmond P. Brown, Service Station Attend-
ant to Chauffeur.
Railroad Division
Franklin A. Balmas, Electrician to Super-
visory Equipment Specialist (Railroad).
Vido O. Chase, Clerk (Checker) to Super-
visory Clerk (Checker).
Eric E. Glasgow, Clerk to Clerk (Checker).
Terminals Division
Samuel Roe, Jr., Police Private, Police Di-
vision, to Guard.
Peter Hotsko, Purchasing Agent to Clerical
Assistant, Cristobal.
Dorothy G. McLain, Freight Rate Assistant
(Typing) to Accounting Clerk.
Efrain Scott, Guard to Guard Supervisor,
Cristobal.
Ithran T. Stewart, Cargo Checker to Lead
Foreman (Materials Handling).
George L. White, Detention Guard, Police
Division, to Guard.
Charles A. Sloke, Truck Driver, Health
Bureau, to Guard.
James H. Hackman, Cargo Marker to Clerk
(Checker).
OTHERS
Wesley H. Townsend, Supervisory Civil
Engineer, Engineering Division.
Whitney E. Smith, General Attorney, Office
of General Counsel.
Fred A. Cotton, General Claims Examiner,
General Audit Division.
Ruth A. Fishbough, Medical Records Li-
brarian, Gorgas Hospital.
Albin D. Johnson, Sanitary Engineer, Main-
tenance Division.
Florence E. Mallett, Time, Leave, and Pay-
roll Clerk, Payroll and Machine Account-
ing Branch.
Malcolm J. Stone, Admeasurer, Navigation
Division.
Elizabeth I. Brown, Supervisory Clerk,
Gorgas Hospital.
Rosanne Fulop, Clerk-Stenographer, Ac-
counting Division.
Carlos Ramirez, Autopsy Assistant, Gorgas
Hospital.
Woodrow L. Lungrin, Clerk, Navigation
Division.
Jeannette G. Manning, Library Assistant,
Canal Zone Libraries.
Byron J. Atherley, Clerk-Typist, Supply
Division.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW















































FROm FRAnCE TO TAHITI


A 3,500-TON French floating drydock which transited
the Canal recently on its way to Tahiti. saved approxi-
mately 2,300 nill's hv t.',inr through the Canal. The dock,
400 feet long and 100 feet wide, left the naval base in
Toulon, France, early in \prl. The drydock is shown


here transiting Miraflores Locks, with the aid of four
towing locomotives and a tugboat. Two French Fleet tugs
are making the trip with the dock, which is destined
for use in French Polynesia, France's future H-bomb
testing center in the Pacific.


JULY 1964







ANNIVERSARIES
(On the basis of total Federal Service)


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU

Raymond V. Walters
Milk Plant Worker
G. R. Will
Leader
Scodie E. Andra
Packager
Ika A. Myers
Baker /
Joslin N. s
Cook
George Parris
Guard
Ismael M. Soto
Garbage Collector


MARINE BUREAU
Emilio H. Archer
Clerk
Henry Trotman
Leader Linehandler
hand Boatswain)
." ixon
SHe L o Operator
Nicanor S z
Crane H ok an
lEdgar L.Lwj
Painter I tenance)


GINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
C. J. de Dios Smnchez
Oiler
Stanton C. Boxen
Painter


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU

Leonor Castro
Presser (Shirts)

Leticia GonzAlez
Presser (Garment)

C6sar A. Martinez P.
Assistant Baker

Alethea F. McPhun
Sales Checker

Ivy May DaCosta
Sales Checker



MARINE BUREAU

Herbert Cumberbatch
Seaman (Launch)

Alberto N. Biggs
Clerk

Maximino B. Delgado
Linehandler (Deckhand)

Corad D. Taylor
Linehandler (Deckhand)

Joseph Kelly
Linehandler (Deckhand)

Vernal St. C. Sealey
Linehandler (Deckhand)

Eugenio Moran
Helper Lock Operator

Antoni R. Doughty
Timekeeper

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Jonas P. Archibold
Helper Lock Operator

Isaac Barrios
Painter

Charles R. Francis
Maintenanceman (Boats)


ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU

Robert Bell
Seaman









S los Rios
Maintenanceman (Distribution
Systems)
Juan Barreno
Surveying Aid

Jorge A. Rivas
Joiner

Gilberto Simancas
Asphalt or Concrete Mixing
Plant Operator

Robert A. Chambers
Quarryman

Jose Gregorio Cosio
Blaster


TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Grimaldo G6ndola
Stevedore
Daniel Recard
Carpenter (Maintenance)
Frederick Samuel
Guard
Marshall J. Herbert
Guard
Jorge Solano A.
Automotive Equipment
Serviceman

CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Jos6 A. Orozco
Utility Worker
HEALTH BUREAU
Gladys M. Moulton
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Juan L6pez
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Joe Alleyne
Hospital Attendant
Antolino de Le6n
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Violet Thompson
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
Juan A. Salazar
Laborer (Heavy, Pest Control)
Arquimedes Diaz
Laborer (Heavy, Pest Control)









SH I PPI


Japanese Training Ship
A TRIM 331-foot motor vessel (see
picture below) <.,,\iiig 92 Japanese
merchant marine cadets went through
the Canal July 27 on her way home to
Japan after a training cruise which took
her to ports on the east coast of the
United States. It was the Shintoku Maru,
operated by the Japanese Ministry of
Transportation and under the command
of Capt. Isao Ikeda. Her first visit to
the Canal was made early in July when
she arrived from Japan, made the Canal
transit and was berthed in Cristobal for
2 days. The United Fruit Co., acting as
agents for the vessel, planned a tour of
points of interest in the Canal Zone and
Panama for the cadets.

Record Breaker
A NEW RECORD was achieved re-
cently by the SS Gulf Farmer, first of
the five new Gulf and South American
Steamship Co. replacement vessels, on
its \,w.aize' between Cristobal and the
mouth of the Mississippi River. The
Gulf Farmer, on the return trip of her
maiden \ovar.e to Valparaiso, Chile,
made the run from Cristobal in 2 days
and 18 hours at an average of 19.65
knots, her normal operating speed.
The new vessel, of the Gulf Andes
class, went to Chile by way of Canal
ports, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and
Chile loaded with chemicals, foodstuffs,
machinery, oil, rubber, and general
a.iri" Shi. and others of this class have
air-conditioned accommodations for 12
passengers.
The Gulf Farmer was followed by the
Gulf Banker, which made the Canal
transit on her maiden voyage south-
bound July 13. The Gulf Banker passed,
on her way to V.lp.ir.ii,. the old Gulf
Banker of the %.unI line- which went
northbound lthronih the Canal July 19
en route to New Orleans and retirement.
The five new vessels of the $48 million
replacement fleet were built In the
A\ondale Shipyards in New Orleans.
Panama .\A n iii which represent the
line expect two ships of this line to use
the Canal each month.

Super Fruit Ship
THE REFRIGERATED ship Minden,
one of the .1 1, -t German fruit ships in
service, made a southbound transit of


TRANSITS BY OCEANGOING
VESSELS IN MAY


1964
Commercial .............. 1,012
U.S. Government ......... 22
Free.................... 7
Total.............. 1,041
TOLLS*
Commercial. .... $5,360,415 $4,9(
U.S.Government. 139,646 11
Total.... $5,500,061 $5,11


Commercial. .
U.S. Governmei
Free........
Total..


CARGO*
S. 6,167,82V
nt. 164,340
35,534
6,367,70'7


S5,7;

45
5,8(


1963
988
24
8
1,020

)3,868
17,173
11,041

22,353
1,452
19,264
3,069


Includes tolls on all vessels, oceangoing and
small.
**Cargo figures are in long tons.


the Canal recently on her way to Guaya-
quil, Ecuador, to pick up a load of
bananas. The vessel was making her
maiden voyage from Europe and since
she is fitted to carry refrigerated cargo
of all types as well as fruit, may make
only occasional trips through the Canal.
She was built by the Richmers Werft in
Bremerhaven and has fo'ii holds lined
with plywood covered with glass re-
inforced plastic, which provides a
smooth hygenic surface that requires no
painting. The walls of the fruit bins and
gratings are made of aluminum.
The Minden is not only an up-to-date
refrigerated cargo ship of 469 feet, but







.o




.!


has been fitted with extensive automatic
and remote controls for her propelling
and auxiliary machinery. The main
engine can be controlled from the bridge
and is automatically monitored. The
electric generating and refrigerating
plant is automatic in operation. The
United Fruit Co. represents the ship
when it uses the Canal.

Tug Plus Dredge
A 158-FOOT sea-going tug, with a280-
foot suction dredge in tow, arrived at
Cristobal in June on its way from U.S.
gulf ports to Botany Bay, Tasmania,
which is a "fur" piece in anyone's lan-
guage. The tug, a brand new Dutch
built vessel called the Gelderland, had
been sent to the United States to pick
up the dredge Ham 208. When under
way on the high seas, the tug was
manned by 20 crewmen who lived in
air conditioned comfort while three
other men remained aboard the dredge.
At the Canal, the two craft were
separated with the tug going through
the waterway on her own and the dredge
being towed through by Panama Canal
equipment. The Gelderland is owned by
the N. V. Gureau Wijsmueler of Wy-
muiden, Holland, the same company
which owned the tug William Barendz,
which passed through the Canal in
February on her way to Brisbane,
Australia, with a suction dredge Jamaica
Bay in tow. They are all handled by
C. B. Fenton & Co. at the Canal.







o.'ne ,


JULY 1964


N


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