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DLOC PCANAL



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Panama Canal review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097366/00020
 Material Information
Title: Panama Canal review
Physical Description: v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Publisher: Panama Canal Commission
Place of Publication: Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Balboa Heights, Republic of Panama
Publication Date: March 1964
Copyright Date: 1960
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: PANAMA CANAL ZONE   ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body: Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: "Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note: Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01774059
lccn - 67057396
issn - 0031-0646
sobekcm - UF00097366_00020
Classification: lcc - HE2830.P2 P3
ddc - 386/.445
System ID: UF00097366:00020
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama Canal review en espagñol

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES



















Digitized by the Internet Archive


University


in 2010 with funding from
of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrevie148pana








ON THE INSIDE


PANAMA CAN AL


More Electric Power
A Summit Meeting
At the Races


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Vol. 14, No. 8
MARCH 1964

s1.30 05





ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr., Governor-President PA k ROBERT D. KERR, Press Officer
DAVID S. PARKEa, Lieutenant Governor A Publications Editors
FRANK A. BALDWIN W RICHARD D. PEACOCK and JuLIO E. BRICErO
FRANK A. BALDWIN ra.___ _....


Panama Canal Information Offic


Official Panama Canal Publication EU
Published monthly at Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Printed at the Printing Plant, La Boca, C.Z.
Distributed free of charge to all Panama Canal Employees.


Editorial Assistants
NICE RICHARD, TOBI BITTEL, and
TOMAS A. CUPAS


Covet Vleme: VUanspotlatlion is


oul Principal Buslneki

THIS MONTH'S REVIEW cover theme-transportation-reflects the principal
business of the Panama Canal organization.
The ship at the bottom is symbolic of the great flow of world commerce through
the Canal. Statistics on pages 4 and 5 tell the story in numbers and tons, but not in
terms of people. Without question, millions the world over enjoy a higher standard
of living, brought about in part by the more rapid and less costly transit of raw
materials and finished products through the Panama Canal.
The continuation and improvement of Canal efficiency is the main purpose of
those who operate it, which is another way of saying "transportation is our business."
And the ship also represents the many smaller boats-launches, tugs and even
rowboats-that serve the Canal, directly and indirectly, in aiding the larger ships
in transit.
In the center is the historic Panama Railroad and at the top is the Las Cruces, the
familiar tour boat.

THE PANAMA RAILROAD, rich in the fabric of Canal history and a vital link
across the Isthmus for more than a century, continues to provide a daily service
linking the Atlantic and Pacific sides of the Canal Zone.
The route of the railroad is through a verdant, water-dappled countryside. Often
it parallels the Canal. Through the windows of the rattling train on the 90-minute
trip the traveler sees a panorama of beauty-streams, wooded glens, Gatun Lake
dotted with arching tree limbs, and great expanses of the Canal. The train carries
out its vital function of transportation along one of the most scenic routes to be found.

AT THE TOP is the familiar tour boat, Las Cruces. It has carried thousands of tour-
ists, visiting officials and area residents on trips through Gaillard Cut and into Gatun
Lake since the little boat began operation in 1961. It has proven a success in familiar-
i'in c people, during partial Canal transits, with the overall operation of the Canal and
the relationship of various parts of the Canal. Its passengers have ranged from high
ranking diplomats and officials to groups of school children. Thousands of tourists
from over the world have taken home with them the story of the Panama Canal
after a Las Cruces trip and a locks tour. This helps to create an understanding of
the Canal and its service to peoples throughout the world.


Index


Meet the Captain ----.----
Canal Tr.iffh Transists, Trade
Curundu's New School -----
At the Races ....--------
A Summit Meeting..-------.
More Electric Power ------
Port of Baltimore -------

Anniversaries ....
Promotions. Transfers --------
Canal History ...- -.-- -...-


----- --------- 3
--------------- 4
----..- ...--- .--- 6
-------------.. 7
----------..-- 8
--------------- 10
-----------.-.. 11
--------------. 12
-.-- .-----.. -.. 13
..---------. 14
.- -----------. 15


The British Royal Yacht Britannia, shown
in Miraflores Locks on her trip early this
month through the Canal. The 412-foot
luxury vessel, accompanied by the Royal
Navy tanker Wave Prince, was on her way
from the South Sea Islands to Jamaica
where she is expected to meet the Queen
Mother Elizabeth. The Britannia docked
in Balboa in 1959 when Prince Phillip
visited the Isthmus. She went southbound
without stopping in 1962 and again in
January. She carries a crew of 275.


MARCH 1964







The Hand at the Helm


Of World's Longest Liner


CAPTAIN JOSEPH ROPARS, com-
mandant of the SS France, the longest
liner in the world, is no stranger to the
Panama Canal. He made his initial
Panama Canal transit 27 years ago on
his first assignment with the French
Line. Many transits followed over the
years. Now with promotion to the helm
of the France he can only sit aboard his
ship and look at the Canal. His ship,
1,035 feet long and with a 110-foot
breadth, is too big to squeeze through
the locks. The SS France even extends
beyond the Cristobal docks by a number
of feet-and the Cristobal docks are
more than 1,000 feet long.
Although he now treads soft carpets
and is commandant of one of the most
magnificent liners afloat, Captain Ropars
vividly recalls his initiation in a sea
career. A yen for travel, he says, led
him to sign on the SS Madonna bound
for the west coast of Africa, out of
Marseilles, some 35 years ago. Hard
work on deck and in the cargo holds
awaited him, instead of the sightseeing
he had envisioned. After a year he
transferred to another vessel that trav-
elled to South America and then to the
Far East.
In October 1931, at the age of 20,
he entered the French Navy to comply


with the compulsory military training
required of every boy in France.
Eighteen months later, and now a
licensed mate, he landed a job on a
freighter bound for the Far East. In
between watches he studied for a radio
operator's certificate, which he received
in 1934.
At the age of 25 he obtained his
Master's ticket and a few months later,
in 1937, he joined the French Line.
His first assignment took him through
the Panama Canal to the west coast
of the United States.
He was a junior mate on the
SS Normandie when World War II
erupted. He left that ship tied up in
New York and worked through the war
as second mate or chief mate on a series
of freighters. His luck held, for he was
never torpedoed, but he doesn't even
want to think about the bad times of
1943 nor the many convoys in which
he traveled.
Home ashore beckoned after the
war days. He had been away from his
wife and two children for 5 years and
a teaching position was attractive. He
asked for a professorship in hydrog-
raphy and taught for 2 years in the
Merchant Marine Academy at Nantes,
France.


The SS France is the world's longest liner and one of tthe most luxurious passenger ships
ever built. It measures 1,035 feet in length and has a 110 foot beam. Though too wide for
Canal Transit, it recently docked at Cristobal for a visit to the Atlantic-side terminus.


:1
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Captain Ropars aboard the SS France.

But in 1947 he went to sea again and
in 1952 he became a captain.
In 1961 he was assigned to supervise,
as staff captain, the completion of the
SS France and he has sailed this vessel
since she was commissioned. He was
staff captain and relief captain until
September 1962 when Capt. Georges
Croisile retired and he was given
command of the SS France.
"I still like teaching," he admits and
owns to authorship of three textbooks
on radar, the gyrocompass, and the
stability of merchant ships.
Captain Ropars' daughter, Lydia, 13,
wanted to follow in her father's foot-
steps and be captain of a ship. Con-
vinced finally that she should choose
another career, she's studying in France
to be a pediatrician. His son, Alain,
turned to mathematics instead of the
sea and now is studying for his doctorate
at the Sorbonne.
Superlatives are easily employed
when speaking of the SS France, for
the vessel has the largest theater afloat
the largest dining room on the high seas,
and the longest air-conditioning cable
and conduit network.
Some of the requirements for a round
trip transatlantic crossing are, for
instance: 15 tons of meat, 5 tons
of poultry, 5z tons of fish, 30 tons of
potatoes and vegetables, 15 tons of fresh
fruit, 70,000 eggs, 3 tons of cheese,
254,000 napkins and 94 tons of linens.
The SS France is the third trans-
(See p. 12)


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW










Nationality


Belgian ------..
British_
Chilean -- ----
China, Nat.----
Colombian .- -
Danish ......-
Ecuadorean. -
French -------
German ..--..
Greek - -
Honduran - - -
Israeli -- -
Italian -- --
Japanese ------
Liberian ------
Netherlands - -
Nicaraguan - -
\N-rwegar -- _ _
Panamanian -.
Peruvian -......
Philippine- -
Swedish --
Swiss --------
United States- -
All others- - -
Total--- -


Month


July 1963- - - - -
\ii'st - -- -- - -
' Ipr,.mher- - - - -
October -_ ------
November -- - - -
December- - - - -
January 1964 - - -
February-- --_---
March------ -- --
Aril -- -- - - -
May- -
June- - - - - -
Totals for 6
months --
Fiscal year -


1964
Number Tons
of of
transits cargo
13 69,880
332 2,124,142
35 254,547
17 219,968
60 84,005
66 360,351
11 9,903
27 113,140
266 814,518
167 1,638,377
61 46,513
24 41,748
44 243,177
212 1,175,542
232 2,486,072
178 638,315
19 21,648
340 2,788,728
132 521,019
33 177,655
16 72,951
103 534,110
20 28,354
421 2,398,060
55 241,964
2,884 17,014,687


Number
of
transits
9
308
31
24
63
72
16
37
280
122
79
26
39
221
192
169
16
366
104
17
18
91
1
419
33
2,753


1963
Tons
of
cargo
21,279
2,117,230
174,882
185,755
91,331
397,934
12,890
189,364
1,000,528
1,180,611
53,146
57,516
166,776
1,333,398
1,653,114
586,005
18,358
2,314,623
452,875
91,168
55,523
534,860
12,170
2,622,577
164,664
15,488,577


Transits (In th
Avg. No.
1964 1963 Transits 1964
1951-55
944 978 557 $4,898
946 950 554 4,842
923 909 570 4,836
980 882 607 5,154
946 924 568 4,879
958 947 599 4,897
580
559
632
608
629
599
5.697 5.590 3.455 .29.506
------- I 11.017 7.062 --


1951-55
Average Average
number tons
transits of cargo
1 477
301 1,874,647
11 66,740
6 38,938
38 46,028
58 213,240
36 24,934
33 147,569
44 92,509
26 219,932
96 120,854
36 185,937
67 406,764
43 260,602
32 151,485
6 4,648
193 747,864
115 604,619
7 13,512
5 28,915
43 175,551
2 19,650
539 3,225,627
36 126,082
1,774 ~ 8,797,124


Gross Tolls *
ousands of dollars)


1963

$4,980
4,926
4,617
4,411
4,684
4,983





$28 601
$56,368


Average
Tolls
1951-55
$2,432
2,403
2,431
2,559
2,361
2,545
2,444
2,349
2,657
2,588
2,679
2,528
$14.731
$29,969


Before deduction of any operating expenses.
TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES
The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:
Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964


United States intercoastal. ----- 7__- - -
East coast of United States and South America - -
East coast of United States and Central America --..
East coast of United States and Far East ---....-......---
United States/Canada east coast and Australasia ... -
I ',"., and west coast of United States/Canada -
Europe and South America --------.----_----
Europe and Australasia --------- - - - ---
All other routes ..-.-- ..- --- - -
Total Itrafi,- -------- --..-.. .. --


1964

100
637
141
574
102
234
306
78
712
2.884


1963

101
621
112
531
81
232
300
92
683
2.753


Avg. No.
Transits
1951-55
162
427
143
257
55
160
116
80
374
1,774


CANAL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC BY NATIONALITY

Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964


MARCH 1964


Question:




What is Daily



Capacity of



Panama Canal?


HOW MANY ocean-going ships can
pass through the Panama Canal in
24 hours?
How has the long-range Canal im-
provement program helped the Panama
Canal handle more and bigger ships?
FIRST, the accomplishment of the
first 5 miles of the widening of Gaillard
Cut from 300 to 500. feet permits large
ships to pass in the Cut and speeds
Canal transits by increasing flexibility
to scheduling operations.
SECOND, the lighting of the Cut and
Locks permits night transit of ships that
would have been restricted to daylight
transit a few years ago.
THIRD, the new towing locomotives,
6 of which have been delivered, will
increase the speed of movement of ships
through the Locks.
FOURTH, the major improvement,
one that will almost double the depend-
able capacity of the Canal, is the de-
velopment of overhaul techniques and
Locks modifications that will reduce
lane outage time during Locks overhauls
from a period of several weeks to ap-
proximately 24 hours. The modifications
that are necessary to permit this revol-
utionary change are scheduled for
accomplishment during the next 2 years.
The Canal organization has run tests
and is making a study of the ultimate
capacity of the Canal when all of
these improvements have been accom-
plished. The organization has also en-
gaged the Stanford Research Institute
to make a long range forecast of Canal
traffic. When these studies are completed
the management of the Panama Canal
will be in a position to assess the present
Panama Canal's capability to handle its
probable future workload.


MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
(Fiscal Years)







Answer:


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES SHIPPED THROUGH THE CANAL
Pacific to Atlantic
(All cargo figures in long tons)


It Depends



On a Number



Of Factors



No figures have been released, but it
is an accepted fact that a dependable
capacity of 43 ships per day, which was
stated in the organization's 1960 study,
is substantially below the capability of
the Canal when planned improvements
are complete. In other words, the over-
all plan started approximately 10 years
ago to increase the dependable capacity
of the Panama Canal has paid off.
The experts also say that the Canal
has not yet reached its development and
therefore has not had its maximum
capacity tested. A periodic capacity
reappraisal is made, however, to deter-
mine the effects of physical change to
the Canal, new operating equipment,
increase in personnel efficiency, and
other factors.
The problem of increasing the capac-
ity of the Panama Canal is not new. It
was considered when the Canal was
under construction and again in the
1920's. It demanded more serious atten-
tion shortly after World War II when
huge super tankers began arriving at
the Canal for transit.
The long-range Canal-improvement
program started approximately 10 years
ago was designed to solve some of the
more pressing problems.
The initial feature was planning for
speedier locks overhaul, followed by the
widening of Gaillard Cut to 500 feet,
lighting of the locks and Gaillard Cut
and the purchase of new and more
efficient towing locomotives.
Water supply to operate the Canal's
locks also affects the capability of the
Canal to transit larger vessels.
Experienced personnel has been one
of the major factors in the Canal ability
to handle efficiently the increasing
traffic. The capacity reappraisals have
shown that the bigger ships are spend-
ing less time in Canal waters as pilots
and lock operators develop speed by
acquiring greater familiarity with large
vessels during repeat transits.


Commodity


Ores, various -- ------------------
Lumber- -- ------------------
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt) -- -
Wheat- ------_-----------------
Sugar- ----------------- -- -
Canned food products- --------------
Nitrate of soda - - - - - - - - -
Fishmeal- ----------------------
Bananas - - - - - - - - - - - -
Metals, various -_--------------- -
Food products in refrigeration (except fresh
fruit) - - - - - - - - - - -
Coffee- - - - - - - - - - - - -
Pulpwood------
Iron and steel manufactures -
Coke- --------------------
All others- --- - - - ------
Total- ------------


Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964

1964 1963 Average
1_ 951-55


1,600,191
914,935
521,041
479,875
494,633
264,466
191,175
246,685
326,387
280,395
228,413
94,245
117,408
240,090
93,097
1,381,084
7,474,120


1,845,254
875,659
575,719
113,073
598,046
264,583
168,545
252,397
249,480
276,307
224,456
98,424
102,450
216,169
1,528
1,370,832
7,232,922


1,033,433
880,696
149,132
439,626
205,431
327,338
327,635
199,495
184,663
125,660
55,757
46,525
47,896
767,095
4.790.382


Atlantic to Pacific

Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 1964
Commodity
1964 1963 Average
1951-55
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt)- - 2,424,702 2,573,482 901,706
Coal and coke -- -- ---------- 1,510,316 1,204,084 594,946
Iron and steel manufactures ----------- 341,831 315,295 415,441
Phosphates- - - - - - - - - - - 639,281 505,660 181,170
Corn ------------ ---------- 639,739 352,986 31,270
Soybeans- - - - - - - - - - - - 396,946 539,320 128,551
Metal, scrap ----------------- 815,676 369,570 13,654
Sulphur -------- ------------ 115,399 68,861 89,389
Metals, various---------------------- 112,821 128,044 42,135
Paper and paper products- ------------ 111,743 96,737 97,333
Ores, various------------- --------- 277,545 186,129 17,271
Machinery -- --- ---------- 109,539 116,912 74,768
Wheat- - - - - - - - - - - - - 152,466 159,931 26,711
Chemicals, unclassified --------------- 157,669 126,187 44,132
Automobiles and parts ---------------- 106,960 75,364 68,824
All others ---------------------- 1,627,934 1,437,093 1,279,440
Total ------------------------- 9,540,567 8,255,655 4,006,741


CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U.S. GOVERNMENT

I Second Quarter-Fiscal Year


Commercial vessels:
Ocean-going --------------
Small* ------------------
Total commercial_ ---------
U.S. Government vessels: @0
Ocean-going ---------------
Small -------------------
Total commercial and U.S. Gov-
ernment _______-------


1964
Atlantic Pacific
to to Total
Pacific Atlantic ITt


1,492
76
1,568


1,392
72
1,464


42 34
14 8


1,624


1,506


0 under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.


SVessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
0"Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July
ships transited free.


2,884
148
3,032

76
22

3,130


1963

Total


2,753
88
2,841

95
39

2,975


Avg. No.
Transits
1951-5s

Total

1,774
267
2,041

148
71

2,260


1, 1951, Government-operated


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW
































A model of the Curundu School, with the geodesic dome at the left.


Curundu's School of Tomorrow


A GEODESIC dome will be part of the new multimillion
dollar school plant to be built in Curundu next year by the
Panama Canal.
A modern architectural form originated by the noted U.S.
architect R. Buckminster Fuller, the dome will house the
cafetorium, one of the units of the new Curundu Junior High
School complex, designed to accommodate 2,200 students.
The cafetorium also is something new for the Canal Zone.
It will be a combined cafeteria and auditorium having kitchen
and dinii,, room facilities for 700 students. \ l,, n used as an
auditorium, it will seat 1,000 students on the main floor and
450 more in the balcony, built over the kitchen area.
Because of the ti i.iulh, *-i.d .1 pyramid shape and thin sides,
the inside of the dome will be covered with sprayed-on
gypsum acoustical and thermal insulation to make air condi-
tioning of the modern shaped building feasible. The dome
will be 140 feet in diameter and will rise 46 feet over the
cafetorium area.
The school plant will be contemporary in design and con-
cept, involving many of the latest construction techniques. It
will consist of five separate b1,ildiihz joined by covered pas-
.,0 .V. P,.% These include two identical classroom buildings,
a combination administration-academic building, a g, mnasium
and the cafetorium.
The two academic bldihhrigs will have.48 standard class-
rooms, two study rooms, 24 laboratories for general science,
chemistry, art, l.,n'zu.I.,l household arts and shop. Between
the two academic, biiildmii, v. ill be a combination administra-
tive s'ilt a health suite, teachers' Liiiig, two audio-visual
rooms, a library, and i ilil standard classrooms.
gymnasium m facilities will be at the west end of the school
complex. The gym forms an interior court with the academic


buildings and includes two separate gym units, one for boys
and one for girls, together with a center gymnastics room.
Present plans call for a standard softball diamond and a
standard baseball diamond, with a football or soccer field
and running track to be built in an area near the gymnasium.
The design for the school classrooms has provided for the
reduction in the window area together with special glass and
window overhangs to eliminate excessive sun glare. All of
the buildings will have air conditioning provided by a central
chilled water system located in the 73 mirasium building.
The school complex will be on a 25-acre site in the Curundu
military reservation between the two main Curundu housing
areas at Curundu and Clayton Roads.
When completed, the new school plant will provide educa-
tional facilities for all U.S.-citizen-school students on the
Pacific side for grades 7, 8, and 9. Students in grades 7 and 8
presently attend classes in Diablo Junior High School and
those in grade 9 are part of Balboa High School.
Work on preparation for the site, utilities and foundations
was started this month by Foster-Williams Bros. who submitted
a low bid of $ liV- 5( 0 when bids were opened in January.
Drawings and specifications for the construction of the
academic bitild ?ing and the gymnasium are scheduled for
completion in March and bids will be opened in May. The
construction of the cafetorium and the athletic fields will be
carried out during the fiscal year 1965.
The design of the school is by the Architectural Branch,
Engill LI 11i14 )'. 'Itll, of the Panama Canal organization; with
Crabtree, Dawson, and Michaels of Belmont, Mass. as equip-
ment consultants; and Duffer and Associates of Miami, Fla.
doing the consultation on the boiler facilities.


MARCH 1964






These "Sailsmen"


Work on Weekends

The Anchor Heaves, the ship swings free,
The sails swell full. To sea, to sea!

-Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849)
Sailor's Song. Stanza 2

ALMOST ANY WEEKEND or holiday, a group of sailboat
racing enthusiasts can be found at the Cristobal Yacht Club
warming up for a tooth and nail contest.
A majority of them are Panama Canal pilots on a busman's
holiday but-pilot or clerk-they all have salt water in their
-veins when the day comes for the big race.
The boats start from the Cristobal Yacht Club and take a
course which is mapped out according to the weather condi-
tions. The racing season usually extends from January 1 until
Memorial Day when the stiff trade winds and relatively dry
weather produces perfect racing weather.
Contestants race according to the North American Yacht
Association racing rules. The sailboats are listed in three
classes: the handicap or miscellaneous class; the Mercury class
and the cruising class.
Two of the racing boats were built in Hong Kong by the
well-known Chinese sailboat builder Choy Lee. At least four
others were built by their owners from imported kits.
The Chinese built craft are the Mistress, a 28-foot fiberglass
boat owned by Capt. William Gillespie and the Maria II,
a 40-foot teakwood craft, owned by Capt. Kenneth Orcutt.
The Mistress won the cruising class contest during the
Washington Birthday Regatta held this year.


V





'I -


I.


-- -
- ,- ." "-. '/-""- -. -. -" .


Sweeping gracefully across Limon Bay is the Maria II with owner
Capt. Kenneth Orcutt aboard. This craft later developed rudder
trouble and dropped out of the Washington Birthday Regatta.


-.-. -...~.. -
0~ -*.. -


Three Cristobal Yacht Club sailboats race around a buoy in Cris-
tobal Harbor. In the foreground left is the A. J. Maru, a Mercury
class boat owned by Capt. A. J. McLean. At the right is the
Susannah, owned by Capt. Norman Hutchinson with his wife and
son David aboard. The other is a Star-class owned by William Wirtz.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


p.







Jfut for Jun, Row about a JAeeting


A '*Il MMIT MEETING," in the usual
sense, is a serious event. But not when
it's a meeting at Summit Garden, a
center of recreation for Canal Zone area
residents.
And anyone can participate in the
"big four" activities at this Summit
meeting. Because dancing, picnicking,
playing games, and barbecuing are the
four items that will take up most of the
time on a weekend at this delightful
spot.
Children might have the edge in the
fun department. There are the little
burros, which jog along with a young-
ster perched atop the saddle, with a


guide to show the way. In the play-
ground area, there are swings and a
merry-go-round, always loaded to ca-
pacity. The zoo is full of interesting
animals, particularly the zany monkeys,
and there are popcorn machines and
trees that make dandy hide-and-go-seek
cover, not to mention the music for the
older children who like to dance.
For adults there are barbecue pits for
the weekend outdoor chefs, and there
is the pleasure of a picnic among friends
in the shade of tall trees.
Summit Garden offers an ideal setting
for carefree relaxation for the whole
family and its popularity increases
every year.


These boys find it fun to take a jaunty ride along the trail on a

L- 1


burro, a favorite pastime.


AO-i
7. -
.. ---**.-;



Owl
. ..--P v
*- ..w -. -

k :* .' 4 ,- i.-:. -
-'.* ,* .' .

r * - 'q -* "- '^ ." .- .
I :. .'.'' J* -. -,:i -, .*

...,.' ... .^ . ;, .'-.
.* .*" .*. =.-. .f^ 'S


MARCH 1964







the Summit?


Before the afternoon is over, there will be the scent of barbecued chicken, hamburgers,
hot dogs and other delicacies in the air. These picnickers have an ideal spot for a feast.


"People is the craziest monkeys" might be what these Summit Garden simians are thinking
as they swing about and watch the boys, who do a less graceful imitation on the fence.


A piggyback ride, the favorite form of
small fry transportation. And what could
be more fun on a sun-splashed dry-season
weekend afternoon at Summit Garden.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW







New Generator Unit Will



Increase Power For Canal


'(CONTRACTS TOTALING more than
81' ,illi.ii have been awarded by the
Panama Canal to Westinghouse Elec-
tric Corp. and to the Foster Wheeler
Corp. of New Jersey for the furnishing
and installation at Miraflores of the
major components of a steam turbine
generating unit which will add 22,000
kilowatts to the electrical power gen-
eration potential of the Canal's power
system.
The Westinghouse Electric Co. made
a bid of 8787,000 on the design, manu-
facture, and installation of the steam
turbine generator. The Foster \\ 1, hi].i
Co. bid 8843,950 on the manufacture
and erection of a complete weather-
proof outdoor type steam boiler.
The new steam turbine generating
unit, due to be completed and installed
by January 1966, is to be used in con-
junction with the g-, turbine generators


installed last year at the Miraflores
Generating Station. The steam boiler
was designed to employ the waste heat
from the gas turbine supplemented by
oil-firing as required when the gas tur-
bines are operating, or fired entirely by
oil when the gas turbines are idle. This
steam ill provide the motive power to
drive the 22,000 kw. steam turbine
generator.
Bids on the new units were opened
at Balboa Heights in January and the
award made, following evaluation of the
various offers.
The gas turbines installed at Mira-
flores in 1962, were the first of their kind
to be purchased by the Canal organiza-
tion. They increased the power genera-
tion potential of the Canal Zone by
approximately one-third and are being
used in conjunction with the present
electrical power generators to supply the
steadily increasing power load. During
the dry season months, when hydroelec-
tric generation from Gatun Station has
to be curtailed in order to conserve
water, they are used continuously.


The gas turbines and the new steam
turbine generator are part of a long-
range plan to increase the power poten-,
tial of the Canal Zone and a direct result
of continuing surveys initiated in 1960.
Officials of the Electrical Division, top
men in the Engineering and Construc-
tion Bureau with R. A. Kampmeier, then
with the Tennessee Valley Authority,
determined in 1961 the need for
increased generator capacity to meet
predicted increased power loads.
At that time studies were made of
the power needs of the Canal organiza-
tion and problems connected with the
production of electrical energy which
the Panama Canal organization fur-
nishes for all Government installations
in the Canal Zone including the Canal
locks.
Except for the installation of auxiliary
diesel power stations, used principally
for conservation of water and during
emergencies, the power supply of the
Zone had not been increased up to that
time since the construction of Madden
Dam in 1935.


Excess heat from these two gas turbines will be used to provide power for the new unit being installed at Miraflores Generating Station.


MARCH 1964






W od Pot t


Baltimore, Eastern



Key to the Midwest


BALTIMORE, port with a historic
past, is shaping its dynamic future.
Linking much of America to ,the rest
of the world for over two and a half
centuries, Maryland's major world ship-
ping center today is playing an even
greater role in international commerce.
Boasting the advantages of year-
round shipping, almost no tidal varia-
tion, and ample anchorage of 1,589
acres of sheltered waters, the Port of
Baltimore has been a "safe haven for
ships" since 1706, when it became an
official port of entry in Maryland.
Since then, well over 1 billion tons
of cargo from all over the world have
crossed its 82 piers and wharves for
oceangoing vessels in a constant flow.
These facilities include 80 general
cargo, 43 specialized cargo, and 28
public coal, grain, and ore berths.
Deepwater sea lanes connect the city
of Baltimore with over 300 world ports.
Some 5,300 ships, representing 120
overseas steamship lines, come and go
each year, c.irr'. inr an annual average
of 23 million tons of foreign trade.
Baltimore has been the second largest
foreign trade port of the United States
for 7 out of the past 10 years. Her total


waterborne commerce, foreign and
domestic, produces an annual cargo of
over 45 million tons valued at $2.2
billion.
Situated 150 miles from the ocean,
Baltimore is the only U.S. port served
by two routes from the sea: south, via
the Chesapeake Capes, and north, via
the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal.
A $36 million Federal channel dredg-
ing program was initiated in 1960 by
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and
now gives inbound fully loaded deep-
draft vessels including supertankers
access to the Port of Baltimore. Dredg-
ing of the channel's outbound side is
scheduled for completion by 1966.
Saving is a key factor in the Balti-
more picture. The port is 50 to 200
miles closer than any other east coast
port to the industrial and commercial
centers of the great Midwest.
The port today is moving forward
with a far-reaching, multi-million-dollar
building program to provide unexcelled
facilities for the handling of all types
of cargos, and is developing services and
rate structures that will assure its
competitive position.


Looking southward toward the entrance to the famous Chesapeake Bay, this aerial view
of the Patapsco River shows Baltimore Harbor's 43 miles of waterfront. The older port
facilities, now being improved, are those nearest the heart of the city, foreground.



W_ 4p ..!


Baltimore, at the hub of a wide range of
transportation facilities, is served by three
major trunk-line railroads, 165 common
motor carriers and 13 air cargo lines. Pic-
tured here are tracks of the rail car holding
and support yards at the Western Mary-
land Railroad's Port Covington terminal.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW








Si-I
0


More Grace Liners
THE (.li \C E LINE recently added two
more container cargo ships to its original
order of four being constructed at the
Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. The
order added $25,250,000 to the original
fi.iir for a total of $77,850,000.
I he new ships, which are expected to
use the Panama Canal as soon as they
are completed, have a deadweight ton-
nage of 13,800 and will be excep-
tionally fast with a top speed of 24
knots. They will have space for 104
containers, ~ ill be air conditioned
throughout and have space for 12
passengers.
Mn,.:rv lile the Grace Line's pas-
senger cargo ship Santa Mercedes, last
of the four new liners on the west coast
of South America run, is being com-
pleted and is scheduled to arrive at the
Canal on her maiden voyage on April 17.
This ship has been dedicated to Peru.
San Juan Pioneer
THE GIANT ore-oil carrier San Juan
Pioneer, a sister ship of the San Juan
Pr.,,.,itor, which broke all Panama
Canal records in January, made her first
trip through the Canal March 12 on
her way from Trinidad to San Juan,
Peru. The Pioneer and the Prospector
are two of the biggest ships to use the
Canal and are given daylight clear-Cut
preference and assistance from tugs
when passing through Gaillard Cut. The
two ships and another sister called the
San Juan Pathfinder were built at Mitsui
Shipyard in Japan as combination ore
carriers and bulk oil tankers suitable
for t irr'. iit either iron ore or grade "A"
or lower grade petroleum-or for carry-
inhi these two types of cargo simultane-
ously. They have a length of 835 feet
and a beam of 106.3 feet which makes
them a tight fit in the Panama Canal
locks. The San Juan Pioneer arrived in
ballast and was scheduled to take on a
load of iron ore in Peru for Japan.
Volkswagen Carrier
(" \R ,.0 ( \RBIERS get more special-
ized every day. One of the Canal's
best customers ru.i ntr is the Johann
Schulte, a 23,000 'deadweight-ton
motorship, reportedly the world's largest
,n j.i, .1i imiii.,l.ilr carrier. The
vessel came southbound through the
Canal March 11i on her %,ax to Los
.\ihil.s with 1,71ll Volkswagens on


TRANSITS BY OCEANGOING
VESSELS IN JANUARY


Commercial ..............
U.S. Government. .........
Free .......... ....... .
Total ...... ...... .
TOLLS*
Commercial .... $5,144,472
U.S. Government. 136,705
Total.... $5,281,177
CARGO**
Commercial . 5,833,165
U.S. Government. 85,416
Free .......... 34,896
Total.... 5,953,477


1964 1963
1,015 769
33 20
7 7
1,055 796

$3,872,855
87,142
$3,959,997

4,118,440
62,340
39,785
4,220,565


0 Includes tolls on all vessels, oceangoing and
small.
**Cargo figures are in long tons.

board, each compact little car carried
snug as a bug in separate stalls. The
ship makes a trip through the Canal
approximately once each month or 6
weeks. On her return voyage from the
, West Coast to Europe, she carries bulk
cargo. On her last eastbound voyage,
the Johann Schulte was transporting
12,069 tons of borax for Rotterdam.
C. B. Fenton & Co. are agents at the
Canal.
Yugoslav Line
THE YUGOSLAV shipping company
called Splosna Plovba recently beefed
up its round-the-world service with the
addition of a seventh ship. The Meto-


hija, coming northbound through the
Canal in January, enabled the company
to operate on a 25-day frequency. The
Metohija is one of three sister cargo
carriers built in Rijeka, Yugoslavia espe-
cially for this service. Wilford & McKay
represent the line at the Canal.

Hand at the Helm of World's Longest Liner
(Continued from p. 3)
atlantic liner to carry this name. The
first, built in 1864, was 5,800 tons. The
second, built in 1912, was 28,000 tons
while the present pride of La Com-
pagnie G4nerale Transatlantique has a
gross tonnage of 66,000.
La Compagnie G64nrale Transatlan-
tique was founded in 1855, the year
the Panama Railroad went into opera-
tion, under the name Compagnie G6n6-
rale Maritime. In 1864 service to New
York was inaugurated with the Wash-
ington which made its first crossing in
14 days. In 1888 this shipping com-
pany's La Bretagne set a transatlantic
Le Havre to New York record and in
1935 the French Line's Normandie
received the blue ribbon crossing
record. Between 1939 and 1945 the
French Line lost by war two-thirds of
its tonnage. From 1947 to 1952 the
French Line constructed 40 ships and
modernized 19 others, and then topped
its shipping efforts on May 11, 1960
when the SS France was launched,
destined to enter transatlantic service
in 1962.


N
1000 U


-,900 E

800 0

,700 T
-- --- --- -- -- ^ ^ _* --- --..o o A


-(AVERAGE 1951-1955) 600 N
S
14 I
JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN S


MONTHS


MARCH 1964


PPI


N


G








ANNIVERSARIES
(On the basis of total Federal Service)


ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
IVISI





T TA
TERMINALS BU REAU
Egbert A. Williams
Helper Locomotive Engineer


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY


ENGINEERING AND


SERVE ACTION BUREAU
Luther A. C a ur t
Grocery Attenda aster, e e Dredge,
Daniel B. McFarla ame Bu n
Field Tractor Opera Oiler (Floan lant)

MARl BUR U Meteoro ic Technician
ra
Santiago Sal ert rner
Helper Loc e foreman Pipefitter
TRANSPORTATION AND
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU TERMINALS BUREAU
Marcella G. Green Walter R. Fender
Clerical Assistant (Typing) Liquid Fuels Dispatcher


COMPTROLLERS OFFICE
Felix Ciril Louis
Bookkeeping Machine
Operation Supervisor

Helen D. McKeown
Supervisory Accounting
Assistant

SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICE BUREAU
Florencio Akins
Laborer

Manuel Bernal
Assistant Meat Cutter

Antonio Chifundo
Garbage Collector

Veronica M. Church
Laborer (Cleaner)

Secundino Diaz
Helper (General)

Ceyon Jemmott
Laborer (Heavy)

Doris Smith Kelly
Counterwoman

Maximino Medianero
Dairy Worker

Mark R. Perkins
Laborer

Winnifred H. Turner
Counterwoman

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


MARINE BUREAU
David Aparicio
Boatman
Armando Cruz
Boilermaker
Ricardo Espinoza
Line Handler (Deckhand)
C6sar C. Linero
Helper Lock Operator
Salustiano Martinez
Helper Lock Operator
T. N. McPherson
Line Handler (Deckhand)
Kenneth P. Scanlon
Lock Operator (Machinist)
Jos6 M. Silvera
Line Handler (Dec


Bertr ing g
L*e nd r ( eckhand)

er Loc rator

INEE 0A
IRUCTIO
Joseph W. Casey
Leader Armature Winder
Lydia Czapek
Physical Science Technician
(Geology)
Eustace J. Hurley
Seaman
Victor Manuel Mite
Leader Seaman
Thomas C. Robertson
Leader Electrician
(Lineman)
Gregorio Ruiz
Surveying Aid
Hugh L. Shannon
Helper Electrician
(Power Plant)


TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Roscoe S. Burgess
Inspector (Carman,
Wood and Steel)
E. E. Corpas
Tire Rebuilder
E. H. Lippincott
Guard Supervisor
Ildefonso Rosas
Laborer (Heavy)


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
H. W. Dempsey, Sr.
Police Private
James L. Dunn
Police Private
Edith M. Mathieson
Clerk-Stenographer
Eva M. Tait
Elementary Teacher,
Latin American Schools


HEALTH BUREAU
Naahon Goffe
Storekeeping Clerk
Alfred Hibbert
Medical Technician
(General)
Carlos B. Moreira
Food Service Worker
Pascual Santamaria
Nursing Assistant
(Medicine and Surgery)
K. F. Taliercio
Staff Nurse
(Operating Room)







PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


E I PLOYEES promoted or transferred
between January 5 and February 5,
FI414 (v. ithin-ir.,1'. promotions and job
reclassifications are not listed) :
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
DIVISION
Richard Shapiro, from Guard, Locks Divi-
sion to Passenger Rate Assistant.
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Reinaldo Archibold, Utility Worker to
Clerk, Customs Division.
Schools Division
Worden E. French, Jr., Student Aid to
Recreation Assistant (Sports).
John P. Manning, Recreation Assistant
(Sports) to Swimming Pool Manager.
Elsie G. de Vega, Substitute Teacher, U.S.
Schools to Teacher (Senior U.S. High
School).
Josephine A. Morris, Substitute Teacher,
U.S. Schools to Teacher (Junior High,
U.S. Schools).
Ida L. J. Kane, Substitute Teacher U.S.
Schools to Teacher (Elementary, U.S.
Schools).
Mildred S. Rowe, Substitute Teacher, U.S.
Schools to Teacher (Junior High, U.S.
Schools).
Robert W. White, Teacher-Principal Ele-
mentary School to Elementary School
Principal.
Police Division
Hollis Griffon, Police Private to Detective.
Edmund S. Coe, Police Private to Police
St rei .Itl
Mary J. Lavallee, Extension Class Teacher,
U.S. Schools, to Clerk-Stenographer.
Lillian J. Dombrowsky, Substitute Teacher,
U.S. Schools to Clerk-Stenographer.
Postal Division
Junie N. Scott, Truck Driver to Window
Clerk, Substitute.
Moisis de la Pefia, Finance Branch Super-
intendent to Foreman, Mail Handling
Unit.
Milton J. Halley, Finance Branch Super-
intendent to Relief Supervisor, Balboa.
Fduear S. Shaw, Jr., C.,rc, Marker, Ter-
minal Division to \\ iiidu Clerk, Sub-
stitute.
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Electrical Division
Glyndon M. Worrock, Edward T. Paine,
Machinist (Marine) to Shift Engineer
'".h .: inri. I1l,
Bernice R Finle'. Clerk-Typist to Clerk
(Typing).
Ricardo A. Honeywell, Clerk, Railroad Di-
vision, to Clerk, Electrical Division.
Roy A. Dudley, Arthur C. Hubert, Alejan-
dro Sheperd. I elper Machinist (Main-
Joseph A. Reid, \1. i-..r..l..i 1 Technician
to '.M I' .i.. T. I huIc, in (General).
Robert \V \d.ims, -.pri uitii Cable-
splicer, (2d year) to .'Apr rti ., Cable-
splicer (3d year).
Phyllis D. Perry, C1..rL.Sln.,vr.iplcr to
Clerk-Typist.
Maintenance Division
Lloyd A. Perkins. \ppri ni. r' Carpenter,
2.1 year) to \.nr, nril. C' irpenter (3d
year).
Rafael A. del Cid, Laborer (ll.:..'\ to
Helper (General).


Alexander James, Jr., Apprentice, Painter,
(2d year) to Apprentice, Painter (3d year).
Dredging Division
Frederick L. Walton, Chief Engineer,
Towboat to Chief Engineer, Dipper
Dredge.
Conrad 0. Beckles, Leader Laborer
(Heavy) to Leader (Core Drilling).
HEALTH BUREAU
Coco Solo Hospital
Patricia D. Hunt, Staff Nurse (General)
to Staff Nurse (Medicine and Surgery).
Gorgas Hospital
Dr. Wilmer C. Hewitt, Jr., Medical Officer
(Pathological Anatomy and Clinical
Pathology) to Medical Officer, (Chief,
Pathological Anatomy Section).
Joseph A. Owen, Hospital Resident, 4th
year, to Medical Officer, Pathological
Anatomy and Clinical Pathology (Assist-
ant to Chief, Laboratory Service).
Marie K. Corrigan, Staff Nurse (Obstetrics),
Coco Solo Hospital to Staff Nurse (Ob-
stetrics), Gorgas Hospital.
Charles H. Jordan, Pharmacist to Super-
visory Pharmacist.
Jose B. Barria, Laborer (Cleaner) to Hos-
pital Attendant.
Jose C. Quir6s, Utility Worker, Supply Di-
vision to Hospital Attendant.
MARINE BUREAU
Navigation Division
Albert L. Guinn, Pilot, Probationary, to
Pilot.
John W. Meeker, Jr., Pilot-in-Training to
Pilot, Probationary.
Richard M. Andrews, Master, Towboat
(Pilot Trainee), to Pilot-in-Training.
John L. Fischer, Supervisory Clerical
Assistant to Supervisory Administrative
Services Assistant.
Mauricio Quir6s, Laborer (Cleaner) to
Laborer (Heavy).
Industrial Division
Albert J. Wanner, Machinist (Marine) to
Instrument Mechanic (Mechanical).
Gilbert A. Campbell, Machinist (Marine) to
Toolmaker.
Keith D. Bowen, Clerk to Timekeeper.
Dimas Cornejo, Jos6 M. Yanguez, Helper
(General) to Maintenanceman (Boats).
Julian W. Crouch, Apprentice (Machinist)
to Machinist (Marine).
Locks Division
Richard J. Danielsen, General Engineer to
Supervisory General Engineer (Super-
intendent, Atlantic Branch).
Donald R. Chaney, Electrician to Lock
Operator (Electrician).
Ernesto M. Weeks, Line Handler to Helper
Lock Operator.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
Chiquita C. Cassibry, Clerk-Stenographer
to Management Technician.
General Audit Division
Rose M. Monzon Clerk-Stenographer,
Accounting Division, to Internal Audit.
Carolyn L. Hoeerson. Clerk-Stenographer,
General A,di t D1 i,i,,n to Clerk-Stenog-
rapher, Office of the Comptroller.
Accountinc Division
Frances J. Ponder. Cl. rk-Typist, Commu-
nity Sern s D. .r in. to Clerk-Typist.
Maritza K. de Oranges, Accounting Clerk
(T" piri 'i t., Clerk-TF .pit
Sylvia I. Staples, nI nn,. Leave and Payroll
Clerk to Supervisory Accounting Assist-
ant (Machine).


Edgar R. McArthur Payroll Systems Assist-
ant to Supervisory Accounting Assistant
(M\.lhIFit I
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES
Office of General Manager
Margaret M. Larrison, Voucher Examiner
to Freight Rate Assistant.
Gertrude M. Patten, Clerk-Typist to
Accounting Clerk.
Margaret M. Nash, Clerk (Sales Promotion
Circulation) to Clerk (Advertising Cir-
cular Writer).
Henrey H. Lee Jr., Supervisory Storekeep-
ing Clerk to Accounting Assistant.
Fisher M. Oltenburg, Leader Motion Pic-
ture Projection Equipment Mechanic to
Equipment Specialist (General).
Supply Division
Lemuel C. Pryce, Warehouseman to Stock-
man.
Edward W. Howell, Clerk to Accounts
Maintenance Clerk.
Herman G. Nelson, Leader Laborer
(Cleaner) Division of Schools, to Laborer.
Susanah L. Hawkins, Counterwoman to
Sales Checker.
Mary I. Griffith, Utility Worker to Counter-
woman.
Mileano Carr, Meat Cutter Assistant to
Meat Cutter.
Community Services Division
Griceldo E. de la Cruz, Hospital Attendant,
Gorgas, to Laborer.
Ovidio GonzAlez, Laborer (Cleaner), Divi-
sion of Schools, to Laborer.
Alfredo Vargas, Laborer to Garbage
Collector.
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Railroad Division
Garfield Brown, High Lift Truck Operator
to Automotive Crane Operator.
Luis A. Naar, Laborer (Heavy) to High Lift
Truck Operator.
Motor Transportation Division
Roberta J. Patterson, Clerk- Typist, Main-
tenance Division, to Accounting Clerk
(Typing).
Jasper L. Myers, Automotive Machinist to
Lead Foreman (General Equipment
Repair).
Terminals Division
Ralph McD. Smith, Laborer, Maintenance
Division, to Guard.
Arnold C. Sandiford, Hugo Salazar, Cargo
Marker to Clerk (Checker).
Raymond D. Simons, Cargo Marker to
Helper Liquid Fuels Gauger.
Samuel Bradiel, Helper, Liquid Fuels Dis-
patcher, to Heating Equipment Me-
chanic (Maintenance).
Steadman C. Lumbsden, Medical Aid
(Ambulance), Coco Solo Hospital, to
Guard.
OTHERS
Ernest Oliver, Physical Security Specialist,
Internal Security Office.
Kerry B. Magee, Industrial Engineer,
Executive Planning Staff.
Jack E. Van Hoose, Graduate Intern (Ad-
ministrative Services).
Mercedes T. Palomeras, Passenger Rate
Assistant, Administrative Services Divi-
sion.
Juanita M. Karst, Clerk-Typist, Engineer-
ing and Construction Bureau.
Hiram D. Hunter, Timekeeper, Transporta-
tion and Terminals Bureau.


MAnCH 1964




















PLEASURE PANORAMA-This striking view of Balboa Harbor and the hills beyond is one many boatmen eye with pleasure. Their boats,
dotting the waters of the bay, await the weekenders who look forward to hours of fishing and cruising. At right is Thatcher Ferry Bridge.



CANAL HISTORY


50 year c4o
THE END of the construction era was
in sight in the Canal Zone 50 years ago
this month and the permanent organiza-
tion for operation and maintenance of
the Panama Canal was under considera-
tion. Many employees were uncertain
as to whether they would be employed
in the new organization. The first
announcement of assignments of duty
was made in the Canal Record of
March 18. Among them was Lt. Col.
Charles F. Mason, Chief Health Officer;
C. A. Mcllvaine, then Chief Clerk to
the Chairman, as Executive Secretary;
H. A. A. Smith, Auditor; J. H. McLean,
Paymaster; Capt. Hugh Rodman, Ma-
rine Superintendent; Comdr. Douglas
E. Dismukes; and Lt. Comdr. H. V.
Butler, Port Captains at the terminal
ports of Cristobal and Balboa.
The first towing locomotive of the
40 ordered from the United States was
being tested on the west side of the
centerwall at Gatun Locks. A second
machine also was unloaded at Gatun
Locks and four more arrived March 15
with four to be delivered about the
middle of each month until all deliveries
are completed.
25 Year, 'A4o
THE U.S. FLEET war games held in
the Caribbean and Atlantic areas clearly
demonstrated that the Panama Canal
was vulnerable to enemy attack, news
reports from Washington said 25 years
ago this month. Brazil and all countries
to the south along the east coast of
South America also are vulnerable, the
reports said.
As World War II approached, the
House Merchant Marine Committee
announced it had started a study to
determine the need for the construction


of auxiliary locks for the Panama Canal
to be used as bypasses through which
U.S. warships could be moved in time
of war if existing locks should be des-
troyed. A bill was introduced author-
izing the expenditure of $277 million
for their construction.
George W. Green, municipal engineer
for the Panama Canal reported that the
concrete runaways being constructed at
Albrook were 50 percent complete. The
work was being done by the Municipal
Division of the Panama Canal at an
estimated cost of $500,000. Upon
completion Albrook would be on a par
with the finest military aviation fields
in the United States.
President Roosevelt approved the
elevation of the U.S. Legation in Pan-
ama to the status of an embassy and
Panama likewise raised the status of its
legation in Washington.

10 yIearo l4go
HUNDREDS of Canal Zone oldtimers
arrived in the Canal Zone 10 years ago
this month to attend the dedication of
the memorial in Balboa built to honor


,.-ACCIDENTS -


FOR

THIS MONTH
AND
THIS YEAR


FEBRUARY

ALL UNITS
YEAR TO DATE


CA
'64
233
480


Col. George W. Goethals, one time
Chief Engineer and Chairman of the
Isthmian Canal Commission and the
first Governor of the Canal Zone. The
ceremony included the unveiling of the
monument by the sons of the Colonel
Goethals, an address by Sen. Alexander
Wiley of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee and the presentation of
prizes to essay contest winners by
Maurice H. Thatcher, only sur-
viving member of the Isthmian Canal
Commission.

One year dgo
AFTER 20 YEARS of wearing the same
style headgear, the Canal Zone Police
last year got new distinctive Milan straw
sheriff-style hats. The hats were of
police blue or a near navy blue, with
silver cord and accessories for police-
men and gold-colored cord and
accessories for officers.
Governor Fleming announced last
March that the minimum wage levels
in the Canal Zone would be increased
to 70 cents an hour in July and to
80 cents an hour in July 1964.


DAYS
SES CASES ABSENT
'63 '64 '63 '64
242(11) 9 14 139 1
510(23) 30 29(2) 228 2
() Locks Overhaul Injuries inc uded in total.


'63
98
71(7)


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW







































































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