• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Section I: Canal operation and...
 Section II: Business operation...
 Section III: Government
 Section IV: Administration
 Section V: Financial and statistical...
 Back Cover














Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097365/00010
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
Alternate Title: Report of Governor of the Panama Canal
Physical Description: 36 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Canal Zone -- Office of the Governor
Publisher: U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Washington
Washington
Publication Date: 1925
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: June 30, 1915-June 30, 1951.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Some vols. issued in the congressional series as House document.
General Note: Reports for 1914/15-1915/16 each accompanied by portfolio of maps and diagrams.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00097365
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02454300
lccn - 15026761
oclc - 2454300
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report of the Isthmian Canal Commission for the year ending ...
Succeeded by: Annual reports of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government for the fiscal year ended ...

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Section I: Canal operation and trade via Panama
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Section II: Business operations
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Section III: Government
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Section IV: Administration
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Section V: Financial and statistical statements
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Back Cover
        Page 119
        Page 120
Full Text










UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY









ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE


GOVERNOR OF

THE PANAMA CANAL

FOR THE

FISCAL YEAR
ENDED JUNE 30

1925


WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1925


..I . ..




















ThN


ADDITIONAL COPIES

OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM

THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTOND. C.

AT

15 CENTS PER COPY


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
Introduction------------------------------------------------------ 1
Net revenue of the canal and its auxiliaries ---------------------- 1
Service rendered by the canal to shipping ------------------------ 2
SECTION I.-CANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAMA

Traffic in 1925-------------------------------------------------- 3
Nationality of vessels----------------------------------------- 5
Vessels entitled to free transit and launches of less than 20 tons net
measurement----------------------------------------------- 6
Trade routes and cargo--------------------------------_------- 6
Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year
1925, classified by leading trade routes------------------------- 7
Principal commodities --------------------------------------- 8
Classification of vessels- ---------- -------------------- ------- 9
Details of the trade------------------------------------------ 10
Dual measurement system------------------------------------------ 10
Hours of operation--------------------------------------------_ 10
Lockages and lock maintenance------------------------------------- 11
Power for canal operation------------------------------------------ 13
Water supply----------------------------------------------------- 14
Maintenance of channel-------------------------------------- --- 14
Slides---------------------------------------------------------- 15
Improvement projects--------------------------------------------- 15
Aids to navigation------------------------------------------------ 16
Accidents------------------------------------------------.---.... 16
Salvage operations---------------------------------------------.. 18
SECTION II.-BUSINEss OPERATIONS
Mecchanical work-------------------------------------------------- 19
Marine work-----------------------------_----_------------_- 20
Other work---------------------------_--------------------- 21
Dry docks----- -------------------------- 21
Plant---------------------------- ------------------------- 21
Financial---------- -.---.------------ ----------------__ 21
Coal ---------------- ---- .__.----------------_-----------._ --.-- 22
Fuel oil, Diesel oil, gescline--- -----------_-___---------., -...-_ 22:
Ship chandlery and other suppl:es-i4L.oronous opet-r.tons..-_----,;-- 23-
Native lumber operate ions- ----- ----------------------------_i -- 24
Harbor terminlp--------___________------------------------_--------------- 24
Commissary system---------------------_----.---------------___. 24
Purchases--------------------------------__--_.-----------.. 25
Sales----------------------------------------.. ------------ 25
Cattle industry ---------------------------------_. ----------- 26
Dairy farm--------------------------------------------_________ 26
Plantations----------------------------------------------- 26
III

'L 7/(J J.







IV CONTENTS

Page
Hotels and restaurants--------------____-----------------_ ------------26
Building construction and repairs---------------------------------- 26 ,
Printing ------------------____--_---------------------------------_ 27
Panama Railroad -----------------------------------------____----- 27
Telephones-------------------_-------------------_------------ 28
Lands and buildings ------------------ ----------------------________ 29
Clubhouses- ---------------------------------------------- 29
Panama Railroad Steamship Line ----------------------------______-- 29

SECTION III.-GOVERNMENT
Population-------------_---__--------------------------------- 31
Public health------------------------------___--_---------------__ --__ 31
Malaria------------------------------------------------- 31
Canal Zone-----------------------------------------------___-_ 32
Panama_--------------------------------------%------------ 32
Colon---------------------------------------------------------32
Canal hospitals---------------------------------------------___ 33
Quarantine------------------------------------------------.. 33
Municipal engineering---------- ---------------------------------_ 34
Water supply---------------------------------------.----------_ 34
Sewers------------------------------------------------------- 35
Roads, streets, and sidewalks- ---------------------------------- 35
Garbage disposal------ --- ---------------------------------.._ 35
Cities of Panama and Colon----------------------------------_ 35
Miscellaneous work -----------------------_------.__ --.-- 34
Public order---_------------------------------------------------- 35
Office of district attorney ------------------- ----------------------_ 37
District court ----------- ------------------- ----------------___ 37
Marshal t-------------------------------- --------------------'- 38
Magistrates' courts----------- ------------------------------------ 38
Balboa .---------------------------------------------------- 38
Cristobal -------- ----------------- ------------------------- 38
Fire protection --------------------------------------------------- 38
Public-school system --------------------------------------------- 39
Postal system.---------------------------------------------------- 40
Customs -------- ----------------------------------------------- 41
Shipping commissioner-seamen ---------------------------------- 42
Administration of estates- ---------------------------------------- -- 43
Immigration visas------ ----.------------------------ ------------- 43
Relations with Panama --------..----------------------------------- 43

S SPCIION I.--ADMINISTRATrIow

Changes in organization and personnel------------------. .---------- -- 44
Increase of fore----.--.-- .-.,-- ---------------- ------------ 44
Wage adjustments: ,
Gold employees------------------------------------------------ 46
Silver employees --_------------------------------------------- 47
Grievance board------------------------------------------------- 47
Public amusements and recreations--------------------------------- 47
Recruiting, purchases, and sales in the United States------------------ 48

SECTION V.-FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS
For list of tables see------------------------------------------------ 50




















APPENDIXES NOT PRINTED


REPORTS OF HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS

Reports for the fiscal year 1925 have been made as follows and may be con-
sulted at the Washington office of The Panama Canal or at the office of the
Governor, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone:
Engineer of maintenance:
Assistant engineer of maintenance, report of.
Pacific locks, report of superintendent.
Atlantic locks, report of superintendent.
Electrical division, report of electrical engineer.
Municipal engineering division, report of municipal engineer.
Dredging division, report of superintendent.
Office engineer.
Meteorology and hydrography, report of chief hydrographer.
Surveys, report of assistant engineer.
Gatun dam and backfills, report of general foreman.
Marine division, report of superintendent.
Mechanical division, report of superintendent.
Supply department, report of chief quartermaster.
Executive department:
Division of civil affairs, report of chief division.
Police and fire division, report of chief of division.
Division of schools, report of superintendent of schools.
Bureau of clubs and playgrounds, report of general secretary.
District. attorney, report of.
Accounting department, report of the auditor.
Land agent, The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad Co., report of.
Purchasing department, report of-the general purchasing officer and chief of
Wa.shington office.














































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ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


THE PANAMA CANAL,
September 14, 1925.
The honorable the SECRETARY OF WAR, September 14, 1995.
Washington, D. C.
SIR: I submit herewith a report covering the operation of The
Panama Canal during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1925.
Respectfully,
M. L. WALKER,
Governor, The Panama Canal.


INTRODUCTION
NET REVENUE OF THE CANAL AND ITS AUXILIARIES
For the fiscal year 1925 the net income from tolls and other miscel-
laneous receipts grouped under the head of "transit revenue" was
$13,465,924.72, as compared with $16,307,948.50 in 1924 and $10,001,-
066.50 in 1923. The net profits on auxiliary business operations
conducted directly by The Panama Canal, of which the most im-
portant are the mechanical shops, material storehouses, and fuel-oil
plants, totaled $765,916.85, as compared with $901,624.12 in 1924
while those conducted by the Panama Railroad Co., exclusive of the
Panama Railroad Steamship Line, but including commissaries, docks,
coaling plants, and cattle industry, showed a profit of $1,525,910.13,
as compared with $1,044,8.87.04 in 1924. The total net revenue of
the year from all sources, exclusive of the Panama Railroad Steam-
ship Line, was $15,757,751.70.
In tabulated form the financial results of the operation of the
canal and its auxiliaries on the Isthmus were:

1 925 1924

Net transiL revenue. .................................................. $13, 4I5. 924. 72 $16, 307, 94& 50
Net revenue on Panama Canal business operations ..................... 765, 916. B 901, 624.12
Total net revenue, Panaina Canal................................. 14, 231, 841. 7 | 17, 209, 572.11 2
Net revenue on Panama Railroad business opralt ions................. 1,525,910.13 I 1,04,887.04
Combined net revenue............................................ 757, 751. 70 1.254,459. 60

1







2 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


SERVICES RENDERED BY THE CANAL TO SHIPPING


In terms of service to shipping the main items in the record for the
fiscal year 1925, compared with 1924, were:


1925 1924


Transit of the canal by ships paying tolls....-.. ....--------.. .-.----..
Free transits ..----------..-.. ...--- -... .....---.-......------.-. ...--..--
Calls at canal ports by ships not transiting the canal.-...-..-- ..-------------..-.
Cargo handled at ports (tons)....------.......... ... ....------------------.....
Coal sales and issues (tons)-,..--------....------.. ----------------..--------
Coal, number of ships served other than Panama Canal.....................
Fuel oil pumped (barrels)........----......................--......-------------------
Fuel oil, number of ships served other than Panama Canal....-.......-.....
Ships repaired, other than Panama Canal equipment..-----..-----..-.........---
Ships dry-docked, other than Panama Canal equipment ---------..--------
Provisions sold to ships (commissary sales)----------------------------------
Chandlery sold to ships (storehouse sales)......--...--....--.....--- .--..---


4,673
386
791
994, 245
340,966
755
11,142,357
1,908
874
97
$932,471.30
94, 898.67


'5,230
420
739
933,002
222,734
722
13,790,823
2,177
510
85
$801, 886.30
$85, 340.42















SECTION I



CANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAMA

TRAFFIC IN 1925

The Panama Canal did less business during the fiscal year 1925
than during 1924, a record year. The number of vessels in transit,
exclusive of public vessels of the United States and others exempt
from the payment of tolls, declined from 5,230 to 4,673, and gross
revenue from tolls fell from $24,290,963.54 to $21,400,523.51. This
decline, which was anticipated, was due entirely to the slump in oil
shipments from California. Slight, losses elsewhere were counter-
balanced by more than equivalent gains. With oil excluded the 1925
traffic shows normal growth over 1924. Cargo intransit, deducting
the tanker cargoes summarized in the table on page 5, aggregated
17,933,468 tons in 1925, as compared with 17,081,824 tons in 1924.
There was an increase of traffic over all the important trade routes,
excepting the intercoastal, in which oil was a principal factor, and
from the Atlantic coast to the Far East, where the relatively unim-
portant decline may be attributed to disturbed political conditions.
Traffic figures for each fiscal year since the canal was opened to navi-
gation are shown in the table below:


Fiscal year ending June 30-


1915 '........................................
19162.....................................
1917..........-....-.....--...--..-...--
1918..........................................
9191 ............................... ..........
1920 ..........................................
1921.......... .................. .. ...........
1922............... ........... ....................
1923.....................................
1924 ....................... ...... ........... ...
1925............... ...........................


Number of Panama
N brn of Canal net
transit tonnage

1, 075 3,792. 572
758 2,396.162
1,803 5, 79. 557
2,069 6,.574.073
2,024 124, 990
2,478 I 54K.,044
2,802 11.415,870
2,7311 I 11,417,459
3, 967 18, 605, 786
5. 230 26, 148, 878
4.673 22,855,151


Total.................................. 29,705 123.675,548


Tolls Tons of cargo


$4,367,550.19 4,888,454
2. 408, 089. 62 3.094, 114
:. 627. 463. 05 7, 058, 563
ti, 438, 853. 15 7,532,031
6. 172. 88. 59 6.,91f, 621
.,513,933.15 9,374,499
11,276.889.91 11,599,214
II. 197, 532 41 10,884.910
17,508,414.85 19,567,875
24, 290, 93. 54 26ai, 994, 710
21, 400. 523. 51 23.958.836
119,203,341.97 131.869.827


I Canal opened to traffic Aug. 15, 1914.
I Canal closed to traffic approximately 7 months of fiscal year hb slides.

The record by months shows a fairly uniform shrinkage from 422
transits in July, 1924, to 368 in June, 1925. At the end of the fiscal
year there was some evidence that the bottom had been reached and
that the monthly totals would begin to climb again. However, it is
61696-25t- 2 8


I








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


quite possible that the recovery may be so gradual that the totals for
1926 will be lower than those for 1925. The record for the past fiscal
year, by months, is shown below:


Month


1924
July.................................
August.............................
September..........................
October.............................
November...........................
December.........--................
1925
January -....---.............-.......)
February............................-
M arch.. ....... -........... ........I
A pril.............. .............-.. -
M ay..............- .................-
June..............................-..
Fiscal year 1925...............


United States
u sips equivalent
net tonnage


422
372
:395
393
384'
407

401
379
398
382
372 1


1, 623, 826
1. 508,656
1,561.734
1,.523,804
1.481,736
1,582,933

1. 561, 007
1, 407, 862
1.567,581
1,462,344
1,458,467


368 1,384,203
- I67 18, 127, 153
4.673 18p 127 153


'The tanker traffic, including tankers engaged in carrying oil from
Peru to the Atlantic and from Mexico to the Pacific, as well as those
in the California trade, is shown in the first of the two tables below
in comparison with the general traffic. The second of the two tables
shows the tonnage of oil shipped through the canal in tankers from
California, Mexico, and Peru. Attention is called to the fact that
while the average daily transits by tank steamers declined from 4.6
in 1924 to 2.9 in 1925, other transits increased from 9.6 to 9.8 per
diem.


Proportion of tankers to total traffic


Total commercial transits


July-----..............
August------..........
September.............
October--..............
November---....-------........
December----..........-------
January................
February -.............
March.................
April...................
May. -..---............
June--------------..............-

Fiscal year 19256.
Fiscal year 1924. -
Fiscal year 1923-.


Average daily transits


Tankers General Total Tankers General Total


120 302 422 3.8 9.7 13.6
116 256 372 3.7 8.3 12.0
113 282 395 3.7 9.4 13.1
80 313 393 2.6 10.0 12.6
74 310 384 2.5 10.3 12.8
79 328 407 2.5 10.6 13.1
78 323 401 2.5 10.4 12.9
80 299 379 2.8 10. 7 13.6
92 306 398 3.0 9.9 12.9
82 300 382 2.7 10.0 12.7
84 288 372 2.7 9.3 12.0
81 287 368 2.7 9.6 12.3


1,079
1,704
913


3,594
3.526
3,054


4,673
5,230
3,967


Panama Canal net tonnage Tolls

Tankers General Total I Tankers General Total


Fiscal year 1925 ---.-----.. 6,424,622 16,430,529 22,855,151 $6,5.728,302.26 $15,672,221.25 $21,400,523.51
Fiscal year 1924...------- 10,212,047 15,936,831 26,148,878 9,071,835.65 15,219.127.89 24,290, 963.54
Fiscal year 1923...------. 5,374,384 13,231,402 18,605,786 4,769,324.63 12,738,874.94 17,508,199.57


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


2, Q36. 097
1, 01, 895
1,976,213
1.923,950
1, 872,531
1,989. 196

1,960,015
1,789,447
1,964.106
1,840,692
1, 847. 682
1.753,327
22, 855, 151


Tolls


$1,935,296.43
1, 769,999. 94
1, 832, 935. 33
1,706,255.77
1, 750,937. 00
1, 893, 495. 04

1,832.024.35
1,648,964.88
1.810,103.14
1,735.429.37
1, 705, 592. 20
1,659.490.06
21,400,523.51


Tons of
Cargo


2,097, 164
1,958,479
2, 112,264
2.017,980
1,961,590
2, 265,687

1,907,469
1, 839,619
2.104,324
1,950,902
1, 823,042
1,.920,323
23, 958,836









REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Tanker cargoes t


Californian


Crude I


-...................................... 463,444
st................--------------...-----...........------------.... 378, 684
mber................----------------------------.............. 551,421
er--------....----....-----------..........-------........ 385.318
m ber................................. 323,731
nber.--.....--...---------....-------.........--------- 383,925
.ry................................... | 206,425
lary................................... 262,290
b..... .......................... ..... 232,601
....................................... 292,360
............ ......................... 182.308
....................................... 177,840
Fiscal year 1925.................. .... 3.840,347
Fiscal year 1924...................... 8,501,010
Fiscal year 1923.................... 3,689,049


Refined


80,196
199,259
9b,966
100.835
45,519
99,769
89,436
128, 586
195,811
14J3,119
124,027
265,022
1,570.545
782,.588
249,840


Peruvian Mexican Total
crude crude


81,904 38,302 663,846
76. 800 26. 250 t;80, 993
9,247 8, 85s 68,492
20.6E8 ............ 5061,821
33,168 7,800 410,218
15,744 18,068 517,506
41,765 8,704 346,330
37,691 9,464 438,031
56,770 ----------.. 485,182
23,838 8.600 467,917
55.744 8, I00U 370,079
15,591 11,500 469,953
468,930 145, 54i' 6, 025, 368
371,512 257, 776F 9.912.886
239,751 261.877 4. 440, 517


1 This table shows the important oil shipments in tank i-teamers through the canal, but it is complete
only for die headings shown. Occasional shipments of reflued oil from Peru and or other tanker cargoes of
miscellanluiis origin are not included.


NATIONALITY OF VESSELS

Tliere were 24 flags represented in the traffic through the canal,
with the American and British predominating. In terms of cargo

carried, American vessels accounted for 54.5 per cent of the whole,

and British vessels 24.6 per cent. Japan followed with 3.9 per cent,
Norway 3.5 per cent, Germany 3.4 per cent, Holland 2.5 per cent,

and France 2 per cent. The cargo in American bottoms showed an
absolute decline of 3,574,235 tons, as compared with 1924, and cargo
in British bottoms a decline of 134,784 tons. Japan, Norway,

Germany, Holland, France and all other nations combined registered
absolute gains. The flags of Argentina, Belgium, Ireland, and
Nicaragua, which were not seen at, the canal in 1924, appear in the

1923 traffic tables, and the flag of Ecuador, represented by one vessel
in 1924. was absent. in 1925.
The complete figures for 1925 appear in the table below.

Traffic of the fiscal year 1925, ,segregated by flags


N lia ionality


Argentne........ ......... .. .
Bpliiinn....................
British......................
bic.iien ..........................
Colonibin ............ .
Danish...........................
Danzig..........................
Dutch... ..................... ..
Finnish. .....................
French..............................
G erm an ... ...................
Oreek...
Irish ....
Italian...............................
Jnpnnewt ........................


Number
of
ships


2
4
1.211
19
23
42
10
102
3
105
163
3
8
57
172


United
States
eiU -&lcnt
net tonnage


4,101
11. 12
4, 722. M.X3
97.361

54,41in
393. 59i1
7.:W47
401.778
30U. 248
9.448
24.5214
207. 89'
7ili,$U97


Panama
Cnniil net
tonnage


4.,727
12,.25
.#.49).391
129,1 K3
1.7'92
100. 2901
W, 164
5.31. 251
%. 145
480, 806
2:1. Oh7
11. 545
29.17(6
241.1054
,%M,810 .


Tolls



$111,W%7.-41
13. W97 :.11
5, 7:4. 039 l
121,Q1w. 2",
1,758.77
1.,2. f141. 74
111. 9214. 213
41,614.29
8,974 0101
491.1 42 27
CCU1, 8ti' 1-i
11.810 I110 )
25.,833 317
2.7.K881 2S
A3, 199W 19


Tons of




2. 259
(I 17.058
tmi, 369
1. 563
201.577
54.U07

12.,192
411, 520
K111, 512
18.82:3
24. 26
180. 062
94'..916l


July.
Augu
Septe
Octob
Nove
Deceo
Janus
Febru
Marc!
April
May.
June.


I






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Traffic of the fiscal year 1926, segregated by flags-Continued

Number United Panama
Nationality of States Canal net Tolls Tons o
ships equivaleon tonnage cargo
net tonnage

Mexican........................... 2 3,245 4,291 $4,056.25 2,401
Nicaraguan-------..... ------......... -----------........... 1 341 125 306.00 .
Norwegian.......................... 192 535,108 672,663 619,403.58 842,709
Panaman....... ...... .......... 36 42,333 68,656 51,844.12 53, tB
Peruvian............................ 73 101.735 188,784 126,985.45 101,000
Spanish............................ 43 123,191 159,579 147,985.73 72,011
Swedish............................. 4 155,694 225,593 186,404.82 282,447
United States....................... 2,326 9,805,552 12,271.387 11,302,031.19 13,080,200
Yugo-Slav .......................... 17 51,521 07,519 64.401.25 115,971
Total.......................... 4,673 18,127,153 22,85.5.151 21,400, 523.51 23,958,883

VESSELS ENTITLED TO FREE TRANSIT AND LAUNCHES OF LESS THAN
20 TONS NET MEASUREMENT

Naval vessels and other public vessels of the United States, Panama
and Colombia, and vessels sent through t(he canal for repair at the
Balboa shops are exempt from the payment of tolls, and such vessels
are not included in the transit statistics of the preceding sections.
They accounted for the following additional transits: Public vessels
of the United States, 378; public vessels of the Republic of Panama,
2; vessels for repair, 6; or a total of 386. Launches of less than 20
tons net measurement are also excluded from the traffic statistics,
although they are not exempt from the payment of tolls. They
numbered 115 during the fiscal year 1925, and paid tolls aggregating
$468.53.
TRADE ROUTES AND CARGO

The table next below shows the year's traffic segregated by principal
trade routes. The most important of these is the United States
intercoastal. In 1924 it accounted for an even 50 per cent of all the
cargo moving through the canal, more than 13,500,000 tons. It is
still the most important trade on the list, but in terms of cargo it
declined in 1925 to 9,500,000 tons and 39.6 per cent of the whole traffic.
Of the 4,000,000 tons lost, half a million was in westbound and three
and one-half millions in eastbound cargo, the latter accounted for
by the shrinkage in oil shipments previously explained. No other
important trade shows lower cargo figures in 1925 than in 1924,
except the trade between the east coast ofthe United States and the
Far East. The decline here was from 1,798,278 tons to 1,500,877
tons. It is true that there was also a slight falling off in the trade
between Europe and the west coast .f the United States, but this is
more than offset by an increase in the trade of Europe with western
Canada, and these two trades, which are served by the same steam-
ship lines, are really a unit, and should be lumped under the heading,
"Europe and North Pacific." Exports from western Canada to







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAAT. ('ANAL 7

Europe would have been materially greater in the past fiscal year, if
it had not been for the partial failure of the Canadian wheat crop, of
which an increasing share is now being shipped vIL Vancouter and
The Panama Canal.
Expressed in terms of percentages, the following trades declined in
1923: United States intercoastal, 29 per cent; United States and
Far East, 16 per cent: miscellaneous minor trades, 2.3 per cent.
On the other hand, the following t grades expanded: EMst coast of the
United States and west coast. of South America, 12 per cent; Europe
and west coast of South America, 23 pei cent; Europe and North
Pacific, 5 per cent; east coast of the United States and Australasia,
S per cent; Europe and Australasia, 15 per cent; east coast of the
United States and west. coast of Canada, 30 per cent.
Of the total westbound cargo 64 per cent was shipped from United
States ports and 36 per cent was consigned to United States ports.
Of the total eastbound cargo 54 per cent was shipped from United
States ports and '64 per cent was consigned to United States ports.

Commercial traffic lihriugh The Panama Canal ilririol the fiscal yviar 19.9, ilrasijied
by leading trade routes


Nunibel Pa1n:a
ou s (p'sinmn neriI Tons of cargo
tonnage


Percentage
of totil
cargo


United States inerrroastil.
Atlanlic to Pacific ..................... ....... 34 4.615.015 2, 213, A03 9.2
Pa'cifc lo .\ll:lnt .......... .................. 8s 4, 603. 542 7, 22,656 30.4
Total 1925..... .... ......................... I. 662 9. 21 t. 590 9, 49F, 259 39.6
Total 1924.......... ......... .......... .....2.3. 13. (U0 557 13. 527, 378 50.0
Brl iween east coast of United tate-cs and west coast of
('iinada
Atlantic to Pacifc ...................... ...... 39 18.572 17, 110 .7
Pacifcl to ilantic ...................... ...... 75 334, 116 .01,623 2.1
Toal 1925...... ................ .. ..... 114 522.688 679, 733 2.8
Toil 1924-----------------------------------................................... 99 483,118 486. 587 1.7
Between oust coast of United States and Far East.
A lantic to Pacific........ ....................... 202 1, 112.024 1, 4. G00 5.2
Pacific to Atllnnlic.......... .................... 47 | 252, 928M i, 219 1. 1
TotHl 192-------------------------------------- 249 I. :164. 952 1,50), 477 6.3
TotlI 1924............ ..................... 29 1.496, 11952 1,7980077 6.
Bet ween cast coast of United States rand west coast of I
Soullh Amnerica: i
Atalnnir to Pacific........... . ... ............ 22 1. 1176.0 :77.864 1.6
Pacific to Atlantic........................ .... 322 i1,3w2.I16 2, 661ti756 11.
S Total 1925............... .................. .514 2. 499,1i91 3,03), 6i2ii 12.7
Total 1924.............. ... ................... 533 2,278,395 2, 702,629 10. 0
Between Europe and west coast of South America:
Atlantic to Pacific........ ......... ........... 244 1.' l ,li.>3 776.3MH 3.3
Pacifcl to Allantic. ........................... 274 I 1,242. 103 1.7Ux. i2d 7. 1
Total 102. ...... ...... ... ... .. ... .. ..... 518 2. 33 1 7.51f 2, 4 .5. 014 10.4
Total 1924............ ........... . ... .... 440 1,1973,332 2. 005. 57 7.4
Between west coast of unitedd Stale. andn Europe-
Atlantic to Pacific............................. 150 739.059 334,7 61 1.4
Pacific to Atlantic................ ........... 147 1 .77 1,157,.55 5.0
Total 1925........... ................... ... . 297 1. 4315. 7. 1.402.317 6.4
Total l924.................................... 352 1.720,154 1,659,222 6.1
J -







8 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 195, classified
by leading trade routes-Continued


Number
of ships



116
180
296
240

121
17


Between west coast of Canada and Europe:
Atlantic to Pacific.....--.--..............-....-..
Pacific to Atlantic....----------........--......-.
Total 1925...........................-...---.-
Total 1924......................................
Between east coast of United States and Australasia:
Atlantic to Pacific....------.... ..--............---
Pacific to Atlantic.......................... ------

Total 1925..............................-...- ..
Total 1924..................... .................

Between Europe and Australasia:
Atlantic to Pacific....--------..-...--- -----------
Pacific to Atlantic...---------.......----..---------.
Total 1925......-----....-----.... --------------
Total 1924------------------...........-- --------
Between east coast of Mexico and west coast of South
America:
Atlantic to Pacific.........................
Pacific to Atlantic..-......-------------.....-------......--.---
Total 1925...........- ............- ...-- ..---
Total 1924............................ ...... .
Between Cristobal, Canal Zone, and west coast of
United States:
Atlantic Lto Pacific...................-....--.-----
Pacific to A lantic............--.....-----........
Total 1925......................................
Total 1924................................ ..
Between Cristobal, Canal Zone, and west coast of
South America:
Atlantic to Pacific.-....-.-.---......-...........-
Pacific to Atlantic.-...----..---.......---.......--
Total 1925......................................
Total 19-------..----..---..--................................------
Between Cristobal, Canal Zone, and west coast of
Central America:
Atlantic to Pacific.----..------..-.----.---------.
Pacific to Atlantic.....--.............-- --...---
Total 1925......................................
Total 1924......................................


Miscellaneous routes and sailings:
Atlantic to Pacific....---------------...---------- 246
Pacific to Atlantic....---------------------------- 169
Total 1925.... ---------------------------------- 415
Total 1924...................................... ----------------------------------392
Total Atlantic to Pacific-------.----...--------------- 2,413
Total Pacific to Atlantic.---.---.-----..--------------... 2,260
Total commercial traffic 1925--------------................... 4,673
Total commercial traffic 1924..----------------- 5,230


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


580,604
938,386
1,518,990
1,200,831


622, 392
78,903


Percentage
Tons of cargo of total
cargo


361,792 L6
1,409,277 5.9
1,771,069 j 7.4
1,453,814 5.4

663,619 2.8
28,195 .1


138 701,295 691,814 2.9
138 689,834 635,258 2.3

90 642,319 518,406 2.2
69 482,047 420.356 1 1.8
159 )1,124,366 938, 762 4.0
140 966,926 813,847 j 2.9


15
8
23
45


22
23
45
51


39
* 69


72,583 119,157 .5
39,226 ..............--------------.0
111.809 119,157 .5
219,645 258,206 I .9


61, 659; 33,877 1
60,382 59, 372 .2
122,041 93,249 .3
121,567 82,985 .3


44,824 14.966 .0
99,112 59,655 .2


108 143,936 74,621 1 .2
129 198,838 115,946 1 .4


33 22,515 30,820 .1
32 21,186 20,683 .0


43,701 51,503 .1
47,959 48,472 1 .2

973,134 540,426 2.3
735,461 984,415 4.1
1,708,595 1,524,841 6.4
1,697,603 1,406,231 5.2
11,889,036 I 7,398,397 30.
10,966,115 16,560,439 69.1
22,855, 151 23.958,836 100.0
26, 148, 878 : 26,994,710 100.0


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES


The commodity statistics of The Panama Canal are not compiled
from complete manifests but from summary cargo declarations sub-
mitted by the masters of vessels in transit. They are not precise
except for items like crude oil, wheat, nitrate, and lumber, which are






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 9

commonly carried in bulk. There is a natural tendency to lump
any small miscellaneous shipments under the head of "general
cargo." Subject to errors arising from this source, the following
table shows the commodities shipped through the canal during the
fiscal year 1925 in quantities aggregating more than 50,000 tons:
FROM ATLANTIC TO P.\WIFIC
Tons Tons
Manufactures of iron and steel........... 1,416,135 Automobiles-----------.------------------ 1124, 972
Refined petroleum------------------..................... 60,770 Paper.................................... 1 101,827
Cement................................. 1359,831 Coke------------------------------ 114
Crude petroleum.----..--..-------..-...-------.... 182, 632 Textiles-.................................. 1 94, 132
Sulphur................................. 1 165,925 Sugar .................................... 91,461
Coal......................... ....... ..... 159,231 Am m onia................................ 8h, 199
Cotton--.................................. 145, 604 Lubricating oil.------------------.. ------ 75,049
Tin...................................... 145,188 Tobacco.. .------ ----. -- --.... -..- 68, 472
Railroad materials..................-- ..... 139,740 Phosphates. ........................ ..... 167,206
Machinery..--------..--...---............-------------.......... 133,024 Iron -.------------------------------. 51,867
FROM PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC
Tons Tons
Crude petroleum....................... 4, 311,411 Dried fruitr........... ...... .....- ..... 1 135,832
Lum ber...................... .......... 2.255,421 Lubricating oil.................. ......... I 104,781
Nitrates................................ 2, 155, bl4 Beans............----..------......---............. ----------------- 101,218
Refined petroleum .-----------------................... 1 573, 430 Copper ore.......------......-------........----..-------.. 1100,289
W heat.................................. 1,078,844 W ool.........................-- .........---- 91,586
Irono re ---------------------------- 1 1,045, 3.3 Copra..........................-----.......----. 90, 125
Copper ................-...- ...... ...- 1 300,465 Flour..................................... 182,402
Canned fruit.............------------............---------- 1255, 686 Collee.................................... 81,881
Barley---................................--. 236, 11-5 Lead ------------------------------- 176, 343
Sugar--------------------............................... 211, 168 Cotton...........--....................... 75,358
Food products in cold storage -......... 202,781 Borax .................................... 50,428
Canned fish....------..---.-------------.....--... 165, 071

The items in the list of westbound commodities aggregating more
than 50,000 tons each are the same as in 1924, with the addition of
sugar and phosphates. In the similar list of eastbound commodities
two items, rice and skins and hides, which figured in the 1924 list,
did not reach a sufficient tonnage in 1925 to be included, but four
new items appear, lubricating oil, flour, lead, and borax.
Of the 20 items in the westbound list for 1925, 11 show an increase
and 9 a decrease as compared with 1924. Of the 23 items in the
eastbound list 18 show an increase and only 5 a decrease.
The greatest decrease is in crude petroleum eastbound, which
contributed 8,872,540 tons to canal traffic in 1924 and only 4,311,411
tons in 1925. Eastbound lumber increased from 1,824,438 tons in
1924 to 2,255,421 tons in 1925, nitrates increased from 1,744,580
tons to 2,155,814 tons, and iron ore from 888,19S tons to 1,045,383
tons. There was a decrease in wheat eastbound from 1,352,388
tons to 1,078,844 tons, but this is an item which -with normal crop
conditions in western Canada is expected to show a material increase
in the near future.
CLASSIFICATION OF VESSELS

Of t.he 4,673 vessels which made the transit of the canal during the
fiscal year 1925, 4,300 were steamers, 282 were motorships, 50 were
motor schooners, and 41, including sailing ships, tugs, etc., were

I Indicates increase over 1924.
I Does not include fruit.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


classified as miscellaneous. Of the 4,300 steamers 2,984 burned oil;
1,296 burned coal, and 20 were reported as fitted for either fuel.

DETAILS OF THE TRADE

Further details of the trade through the canal will be found in the
following tables in Section V of this report:
Table 59: Summary of commercial traffic, 1915-1925.
Table 60: Commercial traffic by nationality, 1915-1925.
Tables 61-A and 61-B: Origin and destination of cargo, 1925.
Tables 62-A and 62-B: Commercial traffic by nationality, ships;
tonnage, and cargo, 1915-1925.
Table 63: Commercial traffic by nationality, ships, tonnage, tolls,
and cargo, 1915-1925.

DUAL MEASUREMENT SYSTEM
At the last session of Congress a bill to provide for the measure-
ment of vessels using The Panama Canal, which would have made
the Panama Canal measurement rules the sole standard and abolished
the present cumbersome and vexatious dual system, passed the House
of Representatives, but was not. reported from the Senate Committee
on Commerce.
Efforts have been made for 10 years to have the Panama Canal
rules made the sole standard of measurement. Should these rules
be applied without any change in present toll charges, the result
would be a considerable increase in tolls collected, and shipping
would be subjected to a heavier burden. Realizing the objection
to this increase, it is proposed that, if the bill adopting the Panama
Canal rules as the sole basis of measurement becomes a law, the
President will be asked to issue an Executive order reducing the
rates to 81 per net ton on loaded vessels and 60 cents per net ton on
vessels in ballast. The general effect upon shipping will be a slight
reduction in tolls paid, although it is true that some individual ships
will pay slightly higher tolls than they do now. It is believed that
the opinion of shipping men, as a whole, if they will inform them-
selves as to what is proposed, will be favorable to the legislation
asked.
HOURS OF OPERATION

There appears to be a wide-spread belief that vessels were once
dispatched through The Panama Canal upon arrival at either terminal
at any hour of the day or night, and that some four years ago, to
reduce the expenses of operation, the night shift was taken off, so
that vessels are now frequently delayed from 8 to 16 hours awaiting
transit. This is erroneous. Under present schedules a northbound
vessel arriving at Balboa anchorage prior to 2 p. m. or a southbound






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA ('ANAL 11

vessel arriving at the Cristohal breakwaters prior to 1.30 p. im. can
proceed through the canal on tlhe same day. Vessels arriving later
in the afternoon or during the night are held over until the following
morning. Approximately the same rule-has applied ever since the
canal was opened to navigation. Economy is not the only or the
principal reason for this restriction. Constant dredging is still
required to maintain a channel through the Gaillard Cut, and this
work can not be carried on without clo-iing the cut to commercial
traffic during at least hours in the 2-1. Even ]when the maintenance
problem has become less difficult than it now is, the passage of
vessels through the cut, which is nine miles long and only 300 feet
wide, will still be more difficult and hazardous at night than in day-
light. It is true that. the cut has been lighted for night operation,
which will eventually become necessary, but it seemed preferable to
avoid such operation until the increase (of traffic made it inevitable.
In NMarch, 1925, Mr. Winthrop L. Marvin, vice president and
general manager of the Americin Steamship Owners' Association,
addressed a letter to the governor on this subject, pointing out the
loss incurred by vessels through delays at the canal awaiting transit,
and urging continuous operation. This has been given careful study,
an effort has been made to ascertain the approximate amount. of this
loss, and an estimate has been made of the additional personnel and
equipment. that will be required by the canal if the present, hours are
extended. As already pointed out, continuous operation is still
impracticable owing to the requirements of the dIredging division;
but it may be possible to permit the transit of vessels arriving at a
later hour in the afternoon thin is stipulated under the present rules.
Arrangements were made for a conference in New York between
Mr. Marvin and the Governor of The Panama Canal in September,
with the expectation that the subject might then be discussed in all
its phases and a satisfactory agreement. arrived at.

LOCKAGES ANDI LOCK MAINTENANCE
At the Gatun Locks there were. no changes in the operating schedule,
three shifts being employed to cover the hours from 7 a. m. to 11
p. m. mand overlap during the period of heaviest traffic. At the
Pacific Locks there were minor changes. The Pedro NMiguel Lock
is now operated with two overlapping shifts from 7.30 a. m. to 9 p. im.
and the Miraflores Locks with three overlapping shifts from 11.5"0
a. m. to 10.30 p. M.
The authorized force at all locks remained the same as at the close
of the last fiscal year, and there were very few changes in personnel.





12 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

The average number of lockages per diem was 12.7 at Gatun,
13.6 at Pedro Miguel, and 13.3 at Miraflores. The total number of
lockages at all locks was 14,480, as compared with 16,352 in 1924,
a decrease of 11.4 per cent.
There were no accidents of any moment to vessels in the locks
and no serious delays due to faulty operation or mechanical defects.
At Miraflores the periodical overhaul of submerged parts was
completed between January 5 and March 7, 1925, the east chamber
being out of commission for 25 days, and the west chamber 34 days.
At the other locks only routine maintenance work was undertaken,
and all chambers were available for use throughout. the year. For
the Miraflores overhaul a temporary force of 64 skilled mechanics
was assembled by transfer from other divisions or requisition on the
United States, and approximately 500 laborers were employed.
With the passage of the British battle cruisers Hood and Repulse
through the canal on July 23 and 24, 1924, new records were estab-
lished for size of ships handled. The Hood, which is the larger of
the two, is 860 feet 7 inches long, has a maximum beam of 105 feet
2 inches, and her displacement at the time of transit was 44,799
tons. As her greatest beam was below the water line, outriggers,
consisting of poles attached vertically to booms, were placed on
either side to indicate to the pilot the full beam of the ship, and
seamen were stationed opposite the outriggers with signal flags to
give warning if the vessel should approach closer to the lock walls
than 2 feet. Although the clearance on either side was less than
2 feet., all lockages were made without incident and apparently
without difficulty.
On March 18, 1925, Gatun Locks handled 26 toll-paying ships
besides one United States cruiser and one small cutter belonging to
The Panama Canal. The 26 toll-paying ships constitute a record
for one day's commercial traffic.
An automatic safety device for towing locomotives, intended to
prevent these machines from coasting down the steep inclines out of
control, as has occurred in the past through negligence of the opera-
tors, with resulting damage to equipment and in some cases loss of
life, was designed and tested, and it is now being installed on all
locomotives. It consists of an interlocking system on the traction
clutch mechanism, which will prevent the operator from shifting
clutches between any designed points above and below the inclines,
and tn automatic wedge brake which will stop the locomotive if it
runs by these points with the traction clutch in any but the two-mile
position. The brake can also be operated manually if necessary.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 13

Lockages during the year are summarized in the following table:

Ualun Pedro Migiprl Mirainure's Totil
Month
Lockages Vessels Lockages V i Lockags Loages Vssls Loclages Vessels

July----.................. 414 460 4i51 496 449 496 1,314 1,458
August...... --..... 375 4.30 I 198 I 440 392 429 1,165 1,209
September...........-j 4000 4h9 424 474 419 468 1.243 1,411
Oclober.............. 3mU 43.3 40' 454 405 446 1, Wm 1,333
November 374 419 10ti 451 401 460 1,181 1,320
December............1 407 474 450 517 448 510 1,305 1,501
1925
January ........... .. 405 494 420 510 395 519 1,220 1,523
Februry-------..... --....... ------ 372 506 408 509 368 504 1,148 1,519
March............... 397 463 438 507 426 511 1,261 1,481
April................. 368 458 389 454 380 457 1,137 1.J3t
May................. 369 441 390 455 383 460 1,142 1. 35;
June....-..------.------.. 374 432 394 4386 393 439 1,161 1,307
Fiscal year: 1925..- 4. 644 5,485 4,977 5,703 4,859 5,689 14,480 16, 877
1924.... .5, 260 6. 205 5,572 !., 297 5,520 277 Iti, 352 18,779
1923-...., 4,011 4. 638 4. 27 5. 017 4,273 4, 9.. 12, 551 14,613


POWER FOR CANAL OPERATION

The power system, based on a hydroelectric pfant at Gatun and
a reserve steam generating plant at Miraflores was operated through-
out the year with an average combined generator output of 5,409,357
kilowatt-hours per month, as compared with an average combined
generator output of 4,688,472 kilowatt-hours in 1924. There was an
average of 4,235,057 kilowatt-hours per month distributed from
substations in 1925, as compared with a corresponding average of
3,982,224 kilowatt-hours in 1924. The above figures indicate a
transmission and distribution loss of 21.7 per cent in 1925 and 14.5
per cent in 1924. The increase in system losses is due in great part
to current consumed by the electro-steam boiler installed at Mira-
flores during the latter part of 1924 and kept in service during practi-
cally the whole of 1925. The use of this equipment has reduced tile
consumption of fuel oil at Miraflores from 1,000 barrels to 306
barrels a month.
The Miraflores reserve plant, was maintained in standby service
during the year and was required to carry load on two occasions.
As there was an abundance of water available during the 1925 dry
season, the extended use of the plant to reduce water consumption
at Gatun was not required.
There were no interruptions to service at the MiraHores power
plant, and only one at Gatun. The latter was of short duration, and
was indirectly caused by failure of tie-line feeder. There were seven
interruptions to service on the 44,000-volt transmission line system,
aggregating 25 minutes in duration. No interruption was deter-
mined to have been caused by insulator failure.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


During the year award was made for the three Diesel engine
driven generators and auxiliary equipment that will be installed to
replace the obsolete steam generating station at Miraflores. None
of this material was received prior to July, 1925, with the exception
of the foundation bolts, but complete delivery of one unit is expected
about January 1, 1926.
WATER SUPPLY

The following table shows the inflow of water into Gatun Lake
from all sources, utilization, and losses during the year:

Billion
Per cent cubic feet

Rui-oif above Alhajula. .-------------------------------------------- 35.4 69.54
Yield from land area below Albaiuela ........................................... 45.5 89. 24
Direct rainfall on lake surface ..................................................i 19. 1 37.49
T otal..................................................................... 100.0 196.27
Evaporation from lake surface... .. .... ................................... 9.4 18.35
(alun Lake lockages.. .......................... --......... ..... --.... .... 1.0 31.30
11 vdroelectric power ....................................... ... ...... ... 24. 48.96
Spillw ay w aste............ ..................................... ...... .. 53. 1 104. 31
leakage and municipal walter-.................................................... .8 1.61
Decrease in storage.. ..--.... ..... .... ----- ..... -4. 2 -8.26
Totl-------------------------------------------100.0 96.2
T otal ............................ ......... ..... ....... .. 100.0 196.27

The 1925 dry season began about January 7 and ended bout
April 23, with a transition period of approximately one month's
duration on either side, during which time considerable dry weather
was experienced. As regards water supply, the season was the
fourth driest since the formation of the lake. The lowest lake level.
82.37 feet, was reached on May 17.
The hydroelectric plant at Gatun carried a full power load during
the dry season, no attempt being made to economize water except
at the locks, where the saving through short chamber lockages,
cross filling, etc., aggregated the equivalent, of 0.45 feet of water
in the lake.
MAINTENANCE OF CHANNEL

To maintain and improve the channel approximately the same
dredging equipment, was used as during the previous year; i. e.,
three 15-yard dipper dredges and two 20-inch pipe-line suction
dredges. Of the three dipper dredges two were kept in service,
with the third in reserve or undergoing repair. Of the two suction
dredges one lost 15 days, and the other 47 days, for repairs. A ladder
dredge was held in reserve throughout the year. Auxiliary equip-
ment included five tugboats, of which four were commissioned, with
a fifth in reserve or undergoing repairs, two 250-ton floating cranes
commissioned alternately, except when emergencies required that
both be used, two drill boats, an air compressor mounted on a barge,







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA C('ANAL


a relay pump similarly mounted, a hydraulic grader, a crane boat,
13 launches, of which 10 were constantly in service, and the scows
required to handle excavated material from the dipper dredges to
the dumps.
The following is a statement of all dredging during the fiscal year:
From the canal prism: Cubic yards
Atlantic entrance----------------------------------------- 221, 450
Gatun Lake --------------------------------------------- 19, sou
Gaillard Cut (maintenance) ------------------------ ------ 1, 437, 900
Gaillard Cut (La Pita Point iunprovenciit project )------------ 203. 500
Pacific lentranice (maintenance) ------------------------------ 530, 800
Pacific entrance iinIprIIoveilent project No. 1) ---------------- 437, (U00
Total -------------------------------------------------- 2, 50, 450
Auxiliary: =
Balboa inner harbor (inainiteunaie) ---------------------------120, 00o
Balboa inner harbor (i niproveni'ent project (1o. 1)------------- 194, 700
Fills for the Army and Navy ----------------------------- 787, 400
Tutal ------------------------- ------------------- 1,103,000

Grand total---------------------------------------------- 3, 953, 450
Of the grand total, 1,257,30( cubic yards were classified as rock
and 2,696,150 cubic yards as earth.

SLiDES

Slides occurred during the year at Lirio, Culebra, Cucaracha
signal station, Cucaracha village, and Cartagena, all in the Gaillard
Cut, necessitating the removal of 6056.300 cubic yards of material:
but they were of minor importance and did not interrupt or delay
navigation. The relative quiescence of the slides may be attributed
in part to the improvement of drainage conditions in areas adjacent
to the banks. This work was continued during tlihe year; 23,7063
lineal feet of ditches were dug by drag-line excavator or by hand
labor, and 507,385 cubic yards of material were placed in fills or
moved in slope work or grading. the greatermpart of it by the suction
dredges assisted by relay pumps.

IMPROVE ENT PROJECTS

The removal of La Pita Point for the improvement of the channel
through the Gaillard Cut was completed in December, 1924. Work
on this project had been under way since July, 1922. The material
removed aggregated 1,244,700 cubic yards, of which 203,500 cubic
yards were handled during the fiscal year 1925.
In July, 1924, work was started on the deepening of the inner
harbor at Balboa and the channel from the Pacific entrance to the
Miraflores Locks to a ruling depth of 50 feet below mean sea level.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


A suction dredge and two dipper dredges were employed'atlintervals,
and removed 631,700 cubic yards of material charged to this project.
A suction dredge working in Manzanillo Bay filled in for the Army
an area of 86.5 acres of swamp land adjoining France Field with
507,400 cubic yards of sand and coral. The same dredge made a
24-acre fill for the Navy at Coco Solo, handling 280,000 cubic yards
of material.
AIDS TO NAVIGATION

The maintenance of established lights, buoys, and beacons in the
canal and adjacent waters has been continued. The arrangement
with the Bureau of Lighthouses, United States Department of
Commerce, whereby the lighthouse tender Favorite, on loan to The
Panama Canal from the United States Navy Department for custody
and use, makes periodical visits to the unwatched lights at Roncador,
Serrana, and Quita Sueno in the Caribbean Sea, has been continued
during the fiscal year. Through the cooperation of the commandant
fifteenth naval district a radio compass station has been established
at Toro Point. A station building and barracks for the operating
personnel were completed and the radio compass placed in operation
on May 18, 1925. This station is manned by Navy personnel.
That it contributes materially to the safety and facility of approach
of vessels entering the Atlantic terminal of the canal is evidenced
by letters already received from the masters of vessels who have
availed themselves of its aid during the short time it has been in
operation. Plans are under way for the establishment of a similar
station to serve the Pacific approach to the canal. In February,
1925, the installation of a printing telegraph system was completed
to provide direct connection between the port captains' offices at
both terminals, between port captains' offices and all locks, and
between the port captain's office at Balboa and the Balboa radio
station. This system, since it has been placed in operation, has
been of material assistance in expediting and controlling the move-
ment of vessels through the canal.

ACCIDENTS

Investigations were conducted and reports submitted by the board
of local inspectors on 50 accidents to vessels in transit through the
canal or using its terminal ports. The majority of these accidents
were trivial. They are classified as follows: Collisions between ships,
6; grounded in the canal, 3: struck bank, 10: struck lock wall, 5;
docking accidents, 13; miscellaneous, 13. The following is a brief
description of the more serious of the accidents of the year:
On December 22, 1924, the steamship Anglo Egyptian northbound
through the canal with a cargo of 10,000 tons of wheat struck the






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


bank in the Gaillard Cut, with serious damage to plates and frames
in the fore tank and No. 1 hold. A part, of the cargo was spoiled,
and the remainder was temporarily discharged to permit the dry-
docking of the ship at Balboa for repairs estimated to cost $50,000.
The accident. was due to the heating of a main bearing of the steering
engine, causing the steering gear to bind. It was held that The
Panama Canal was not responsible.
The steamship Bethelridge northbound through the canal on
August 7, 1924, went ashore in Gatun Lake, when the master, who
was under the influence of liquor, took the wheel and, disregarding
the advice of the pilot, steered the ship out of the channel and into
shallow water. The damage to the ship was estimated at $624,
including tug hire.
On July 31, 1924, the steamship Tistvmin southbound through the
canal and tied up to the approach wall at the Pedro Miguel Lock was
rammed astern by the U. S. S. Curlew, a Navy tug, which was tying
up behind her. The accident was due to confusion in the engine room
of the Curiezi, the engines being worked full speed ahead in response
to a signal from the bridge calling for full speed astern. Damages
to the steamship Tustern were estimated at $10,325 plus demurrage.
The tug was only slightly damaged. The Panama Canal was not
responsible.
The steamship Havre Maru southbound through the canal on
May 23, 1925, struck the bank in the Gaillard Cut, and later struck
the Peruvian cruiser Coronei Bolognesi, which was lying at the repair
dock at Balboa. Defective steering gear was responsible for both
accidents, and no responsibility attached to The Panama Canal.
The cost of repairing the Havre Maru. was estimated at $1,800,
exclusive of the expenses of dry-docking, and damage to the Coronel
Bolognesi was estimated at $300.
The steamship Half Moon, southbound through the canal on July
12, 1924, grounded in Gat.un Lake. The damages, including demur-
rage, tug hire, and incidental expenses, were estimated at $1,."21.58.
The accident was due to failure of the steering gear. The Panama
Canal was not responsible.
The steamship Lillian Luckenbach, southbound on March 4, 1925,
struck the bank in the Gaillard Cut. Repairs, exclusive of dry-
docking, were estimated to cost $3,000. The ship steered badly and
was proceeding at greater speed than permitted by the regulations.
It was held that The Panama Canal was not responsible for the ncci-
dent.
On July 18, 1924, the U. S. Army transptirt St. Milhicl south-
bound was in collision in the Gaillard Cut with the steamship David
McKelvy northbound. The collision was due to confusion following
a change of signals instituted by the St. 'Mifi irl, which vessel was held






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


responsible. Subsequent to the original error both vessels were
skillfully handled, and the effects of collision minimized. Repairs to
the St. Mihiel were estimated to cost $1,850, and to the David McKelvy
$800. The Panama Canal was not responsible.
The steamship North Anglia northbound on December 31, 1924,
struck the bank in the Gaillard Cut. The accident was due to poor
steering qualities, and The Panama Canal was not responsible.
Damages were estimated at $600 plus the cost of dry-docking.
On July 6, 1924, the steamship Steel Worker southbound collided
with The Panama Canal's dredge No. 86, when the steamer's steering
gear broke. Repairs to the ship were estimated to cost $1,500 plus
demurrage and tug hire and repairs to the dredge $677.69. The
Steel Worker was liable.
The steamship Victorious, southbound on July 3, 1924, brought up
against the center wall when approaching the Gatun Locks. Dam-
ages were estimated at $1,000. The accident was considered due
to poor judgment on the part of the pilot, and The Panama Canal
assumed responsibility.

SALVAGE OPERATIONS
At the close of the fiscal year 1924 The Panama Canal's wrecking*
tug Favorite was assisting the steamer Sisak, aground on the coast of
Ecuador. The Sisak was not refloated until July and was then towed
to Balboa, arriving there on July 14, 1925. In December, 1924,
The Panama Canal's tug Tavern illa went to the assistance of the motor
schooner Arabia, aground on the San Bias coast east of Colon, and
pulled her off. On November 27, 1924, the Favorite was dispatched
to St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, to raise a floating dry dock, which
had sunk in the harbor. It was found that this dock, which was
nearly 60 years old and had not been properly maintained, could
not be raised at a cost commensurate with its value, and the Favorite
returned to the canal, arriving there on December 15, 1924. Panama
Canal salvage equipment was used in assisting the steamship Anglo
Egyptian, which struck the bank in the Gaillard Cut while in transit
through the canal on December 22, 1924, as described in the preceding
section. The Favorite and the floating cranes Ajax and Hercules
raised the Navy tug Sciota, which sank in Balboa Harbor on March
8, 1925.












SECTION. II


BUSINESS OPERATIONS
A detailed statement of the expenses (including depreciation),
revenues, and profit or loss on the various subsidiary business opera-
tions conducted by The Panama Canal will be found in Table No. 26
in section V of this report.. The total net profit on these operations
was $765,916.85. The Panama Railroad Co.'s business operations
on the Isthmus yielded an additional net revenue of $1,525,910.13.
The results of the major business operations of both The Panama
Canal and the Panama Railroad Co. are summarized in the following
paragraphs.
MECHANICAL WORK
During the past fiscal year there has been at all times a substantial
volume of mechanical work, and it has been well balanced. The
reconstruction of two Peruvian cruisers, which in succession were at
the shops during the greater part of the year, served to equalize the
inequalities between crafts customarily employed on marine repairs,
which might otherwise have created an acute problem. The night
shift at the Balboa shops was again established in October, 1924.
The work of repairing and reconditioning the wrecked steamer
Colombia required more men than were available from the force then
employed, so a sufficient temporary force was imported for the job
and subsequently discharged. With the last quarter of the fiscal
year there began a decline in volume of work, which, if it continues,
may complicate the problem of maintaining a force in all trades
sufficient. to care for the needs of the Government and to make ade-
quate and prompt. repairs to commercial shipping using the canal.
The total value of work done in 1925 was $3,620,218.63, as compared
with $2,951,791.25 in 1924. It was distributed as follows:

Clss .I mount Perretage

Marine................. ............................................ ., $2,. 24-., 22. 56 A2. 03
R railroad ................. ................. .................. ...... ... ... .. 526. 1 75 14.
Sudr ..................... .. ................ ......... ........... .. i 14.69
Stock materials.. .... .. .. ... .... .... .. .. .......... ,787.36 8.75
Total........... ....... .............. .. ...... ...... .. 3. 20. 218. 63 100. 00

Of the total work done during the year, $1,229,868.37 was done fuo'
individuals and companies, including the Panama Railroad Steamship
Line, $1,481,476.19 for The Panama Canal, $516,156.08 for the Pan-





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


ama Railroad Co., and $392,717.99 for other departments of the
United States Government.
Marine work.-The most extensive marine repair job of the year
was on the steamship Colombia, which was wrecked on Caflo Island off
the Pacific coast of Costa Rica June 20, 1924. The ship was
brought to Balboa on July 17, 1924, and dry docked with some
difficulty. A general list of repairs included the renewal of the entire
bottom and inner bottom underneath holds 1 and 2, renewal of keel,
vertical keel, floors, margins, lower parts of frames and lower bulk-
heads in the same location. All of the operating and deck machinery
was opened up, examined, and repaired. Passenger and crew accom-
modations were cleaned, repainted, and revamped. The work was
completed in a time period of 80 days.
The steamship Sisakc, which had been wrecked off the coast of
Ecuador, was dry docked at the same time as the steamship Colombia,
but the damages proved greater than was at first thought, and it was
finally decided that the ship was not worth repairing. Only such
work was done as was necessary to put the vessel in condition to be
towed to the United States for breaking up.
Heavy operating repairs to the machinery and in the deck and
steward's departments were undertaken on the steamship Invincible,
the steamship Toco, the steamship Talaralite, the steamship locoma,
the steamship W. J. Hanna, and there were numerous smaller jobs.
In all, work was done on 1,175 marine units belonging to commercial
shipping companies, The Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad Co.,
and the United States Army and Navy.
The principal work on combatant naval vessels was the conversion
from coal to oil and general overhaul of the Peruvian cruisers
Almirante Grau and Coronel Bolognesi. The latter vessel was still
at the repair cdock at the close of the fiscal year, but it was expected
that the work would be completed about September 1, 1925.
Periodical overhaul, docking, cleaning, and painting of submarines,
mine planters, and Navy tugs was performed as requested by the
commandant, fifteenth naval district, and minor repairs were made
for the special service squadron stationed at Balboa. The Navy tug
Sciota, sunk at Balboa, was raised by the salvage section of the
marine division, assisted by the dredging division's floating cranes
Ajax and Hercules. After the tug had been lifted from the bottom
it. was towed into the dry dock suspended partly submerged between
the two cranes in tandem. Subsequently it was towed to the sub-
marine base at Coco Solo and then returned to Balboa, where it was
redocked, repaired, and reconditioned for service.
. One 1,000-yard dump barge was completed for The Panama Canal,
and work was started on two others of the same type; two Panama
Canal tugs were reboilered and overhauled; gantry frames and sta-






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


bilizing pontoons were manufactured and installed on three dipper
dredges; the hull of a new derrick barge was completed; and other
miscellaneous work was done for the dredging division.
The Panama Railroad Steamship Line's collier Achilles was recon-
ditioned and returned to service; the passenger steamer Anco0n of the
same line was prepared for a voyage to the United States for altera-
tions; and miscellaneous voyage repairs were made on other Panamn
Railroad steamers.
Other work.-A great number and variety of spare parts were nmanu-
factured for use in tile overhaul of the locks, and much shop work was
done on lock parts removed and replaced. Dredge pipe was manu-
factured for Thie Panama Canal and also for interests in Colombia.
There was the usual heavy run of work on dredge buckets, spuds and
dipper sticks. A steam weed killer was manufactured for the
Panama Railroad. The program of new 61-foot passenger coaches
was completed, and as fast as the old poplar-sided bodies show up
beyond repair they are rebuilt with mahogany, which is more durable
and at the present time cheaper. A number of parts were manufac-
tured for sugar mills in Panama. Structural steel and plate work was
done for the local gas company and for the brewery. Two new towing
locomotives for the locks were completed, and work was started on
four more. A sufficient. stock of hardwoods for fenders was accumu-
lated, as well as an adequate supply of general purpose woods and of
mahogany and cedar for coach work.
Dry docks.-Tllere was a total of 140 dry dockings during the year,
71 at Balboa and 69 at Cristobal. Of those at Balboa, 24 were of
Panama Canal or Panama Railroad equipment and 47 of other vessels
At Cristobal the corresponding figures were 19 and 50.
Plant.-New roofs were applied to the boiler shop and planing mill,
at Balboa to replace the concrete tile roofs installed in 1913 which
had become unserviceable, and an extraordinary reserve of $100,000
was created out of profits to replace other concrete tile roofs at Balboa
which are showing marks of deterioration. The new roofs are of
corrugated asbestos, the same material applied last year on the forge
shop and foundry. Other minor repairs and improvements were
made about the shops. From the special funds set aside during the
preceding year and the year just closed for new and replace tools a
number of new machines have been purchased and installed or are
under contract. Every effort has been made to bring plant main-
tenance to the highest standard, so that it may be possible to get
trough the forthcoming year, which may be a very lean one. with as
little burden of plant maintenance as possible.
Financial.--Tlie mechanical idivision earned net profits of
$87,054.37, after providing funds for extraordinary repairs and
emergency needs totaling $152,791.67. Net profits in 1924 totaled
$171,737.06. Local reserves as of June 30, 1925, including reserve
for employees accrued leave, totaled $616,427.32.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA OA-SAL


COAL

The sales of coal from the plants at Cristobal and Balboa operated
by the Panama Railroad Co. increased from 222,734 tons in 1924
to 340,966 tons in 1925. The latter total includes 46,000 tons in
wet storage and sold to the Navy for reserve stock. A study of
operating costs, which was started toward the close of the fiscal
year 1924, was completed. and the necessary changes in operation
and reductions in force were made to conform to changed conditions.
Operating expenses, which had reached a total of $608,087.51 in
1924, were reduced to $429,237.29 in 1925, and net profits were
increased from 8161,502.28 to $510,108.27. Effective September
1, 1924, prices were reduced from $9 a ton at Cristobal and 812
a ton at Balboa to $8.50 a ton at Cristobal and 511.50 a ton at
Balboa. The value of coal in the pile, which had been carried at 57
per ton throughout the fiscal year, was reduced to $6.50 per ton on
June 30, 1925, and the resulting loss of approximately $20,000 was
absorbed in profits from operation. The cost of overhauling the
collier Achilles, amounting to $60,000 was also written off against
the profits for the year. Monthly sales averaged 28,414 tons, as
compared with 18,645 tons in 1924. While reduced prices have
resulted in increased sales, the coaling plants are still operated at
less than half of their rated capacity. They were designed on the
assumption that, vessels using The Panama Canal would normally
burn coal, whereas approximately 70 per cent of all vessels in transit
are now using oil fuel, either under steam boilers or in internal com-
bustion engines.
Coal received during the year was handled by Panama Railroad
'colliers and barges operating between Norfolk and Cristobal, with
the exception of one cargo delivered by the Steamship Chilore of the
Ore Steamship Co. at a flat freight rate of $1.15 per ton plus port
charges at Cristobal. This was an experiment to determine the
cost of transporting coal by outside lines. A study of these costs
was still in progress at the close of the fiscal year, and two more
cargoes in vessels of the Ore Steamship Co. were expected in July.
Sufficient data will then be available to determine whether Panama
Railroad ships should be continued in this service, or laid up, subject
to emergency call in case of failure on the part. of outside carriers.

FUEL OIL, DIESEL OIL, GASOLINE

During the year one new fuel oil tank with a capacity of 80,000
barrels was erected at Balboa by the Asiatic Petroleum Storage Co.,
and erection of another tank of the same capacity was started by
the Arrow Oil Co. On June 30, 1925, there was tankage at The
Panama Canal for fuel and Diesel oil aggregating 1,986,040 barrels.







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAAMA CANAI.


At Balboa there were 19 tanks with a capacity of 871,540 barrels
and at Cristobal 22 tanks with a capacity of 1,114,500 'barrels. The
Panama Canal owned 11 tanks rated at 444,040 barrels, the United
States Navy 6 tanks rated at 300.000 barrels, and eight oil companies
24 tanks rated at 1,242,000 barrels.
The Panama Canal continued to maintain central pumping plants
at either terminal and handled all oil in and out of storage. The
oil pumped for all interests during the year, including receipts,
issues and miscellaneous transfers, totaled 11,142,357 barrels, as
compared with 13.790,823 barrels in 1924. A pipe line for the
delivery of fuel oil was extended to Dock 8 at Cristobal, where this
business can be more conveniently handled than at Dock 6, which
was formerly used for the purpose. Fuel can now be supplied at
Docks 6, 8, 13, and 16 at Cristobal, and Docks 2, 4, 6, and 7 at
Balboa.
There is a total storage capacity for bulk gasoline of 2,089,590
gallons. The Panama Canal has two tanks at Balboa rated at
394,590 gallons and a tank at Cristobal rated 225,000 gallons. The
West India Oil Co. has one tank at Balboa rated at 1,470,000 gallons.
The oil and gasoline business of the year is summarized in the
following table:

Balboa Cristobal Total

Fuel oil sold to steamships by The Panama Canal tbarrels)........ 3.061 1.f it I 4.727
Fuel oil sold to steamships by companies .barrels-------------.......--.......... 1.75, 29 3.037,567 4, 122., b-2
Number of ships supplied by The Panama Canal................... 3 3 6
Number of ships supplied by companies.-----------.. --------. 639 963 1,602
Bulk gasoline sold to ships by The Panama Canal (gallons)....-..-- 0 1,569 1, 569
Bulk gasoline sold to ships by companies (gallons)................... 0 0 0
Number of ships supplied by The Panama Canal.................... 0 1 1
Number of ships supplied hy companies-............................ 0 0 0
Diesel oil sold to ships lby The Panama Canal (barrels)............. 0 3,4:31 3,431
Diesel oil sold to ships by companies (barrels).................... 2(6,070 1,662 267,732
Number of ships supplied by The Panama Canal.................. 0 66 66
Number of ships supplied by companies............................ 117 122

As compared with the fiscal year 1924, sales of fuel oil show a
decrease of 21 per cent, while Diesel oil sales show an increase of 103
per cent..


SHIP CIIANDLERY AND OTHER SUPPLIES-STOREHOU-SE OPERATIONS
The general storehouse at Balboa and the dependent stoi rellhouses
at, Cristobal and Paraiso carried stocks of materials for issue us
required to the various departments and divisions of The Prinamnn
Canal and for sale to vessels. Inventories and issues for 1924 aind
1925 are summarized in the following table:


On hand June 30, 1924. --------- ....--......-.....-------
On hand June 30, 1925--------- ...- -.-,, -...-- --- -------
Issued 1923-24------------ -
Issued 1924-25--.....----. ............ ........


419, 674. 34
773, 489. 30
468, 971. 97
003, 285. 40


Sales to steamships totaled $94,X98.67, local sales $212,062.90, and
so-called credit sales, which included material issued on foreman's







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


orders for the Army and Navy and for jobs ordered by individuals
and companies, $833,058.22, or a total of sales from the storehouses to
other than The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad of $1,140,019.79.
The corresponding figure for 1924 was $1,051,844.07.
Sales of obsolete material and scrap realized $61,853.25.

NATIVE LUMBER OPERATIONS

Operations were conducted in the Gatun Lake area under the super-
vision of the general storekeeper to procure native hardwood logs to
be used in substitution for high-priced northern hardwoods. A total
of 707,175 board feet was obtained, of which 682,856 feet cost $35
and 24,319 feet cost $20 per thousand board feet in the log.

HARBOR TERMINALS

The net revenue from harbor terminal operations in 1925 was
$320,742.76, as compared with $294,089.88 in 1924. Tons of cargo
stevedored showed a decrease from 334,242 tons to 327,237 tons, but
cargo handled and transferred increased from 933,092 tons to 994,245
tons. The work of the past two years is compared in the following
table:


Tons of cargo stevedored ........................ ..-- ...... ----------
Revenue per ton stevedored................. .......................
Cost per ton stevedored.---....------------------------------------
Tons of cargo handled and transferred---.......-------------.........-......---.-------....
Revenue per ton handled ....................................................
Cost per ton handled ..................... .............................--
Gross operating revenue......... .. .......... ...............
Gross operating expense.................................................
Net revenue ......................................................---- ......--
Per cent of expense to gross revenue.......------------------.............--.....----.---..


1925 1924

327,237 334,242
O. 3504 $ 50.3543
$0.2345 30.2265
M94,245 933,002
0. 9630 $0.9904
$0.6812 $1 0.6890
$1,233,984.77 $1,161,839.34
$913,242 01 $867,749.46
$320.742.76 $294,089.88
$74.01 574.69


The number of ships handled in 1925 was 2,227, as against 2,205
in 1924. Of the total for 1925, 1,507 were handled at Cristobal and
720 at Balboa. Agency service was also performed by the Panama
Railroad Co. for 488 ships in transit through the canal. The dis-
tribution of business between Cristobal and Balboa is further indi-
cated in the table below:


Number of ships discharging or taking cargo..........------------------ ---------
Tons of cargo received (ex cargo)-..------------.......--..............-----------..------------.....
Tons of cargo delivered (per cargo)-----...-..--.......-----.. -------------------
Tons of cargo stevedored by Panama R. R..............--......----............
Tons rehandled by Panama R. R..----..--------..........-----...--...-------------


Balboa Cristobal

720 1,607
77,782 503.793
22,982 3865,744
34,113 293,124
12,782 10,172


COMMISSARY SYSTEM

The Panama Railroad commissary system, including five wholesale
units, nine retail stores, seven manufacturing plants, two electric
refrigerating plants, and an industrial laboratory, was operated as in


--







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 25


previous years. Gross receipts from sales amounted to $7,944,101.65,
the amount paid for supplies purchased totaled $6,334,714.38, and
the value of the stock at the close of the fiscal year was $1,401,376.69.
Profits amounted to $392,070.48, as compared with $409,248.86 in
1924.
A new retail commissary building of reinforced concrete was con-
structed at Cristobal to replace an old wooden and corrugated-iron
building that had become unserviceable, extensive improvements
were authorized for the retail store at. Balboa, and plans for new
buildings at Pedro Miguel, Ancon silver market, and La Boca were
under consideration at the end of the year.
The following table shows by classes the value of supplies purchased
during 1924 and 1925:


1924 1925 Increase


Groceries.................-------------------------------------- $1,165,601.38
'Hardware........................................... 349. 166.82
Dry goods...........-.. .. 843. 994. 34
Shoes.................................................. 169,517.15
Cold Storage......................................... 1, 121. 741.11
Tobacco................................................ 366,643. 95
Cattle and bogs ..... ......................... ........ 4:0.463.47
Milk and cream........................................ 88.025. 31
Eggs.......................... 172. hI8 22
Butter. -.-.......... ............. ................ ... 171,539.20
Raw material ... .......... ......... .... .. ......... 280. 218.72
Total. ........... .................... 5, 159, 529. 67
. . . .


$1,331,059. 33
586,436.39
1.134,196.45
245, 272.02
1,250.231. 94
412,5(67.67
473,229. 49
98,027.88
249.398.85
230,415.72
303,878. f4


$185, 457.95
237, 269. 57
290, 202. 11
75, 754. 87
128,490.83
45, 923.72
42,766.02
10,002.57
76.780.63
58. 76. 52
23. 659. 92


i, 334, 714.38 1. 175.14.71


During 1925 purchases were made as follows: In the United
States, $4,763,216.95; in Europe and the Orient, $555,602.69; in
Central and South America, $146, 306. 10; from the cattle industry on
the Isthmus, $521, 793. 75; from The Panama Canal storehouses,
$112,353.77; other local purchases, $235,441.12.
Sales were made as follows:


Unite
The F
Steam
Panat
Indivi
Empl

Less


SuppI

P


Loss I
Loss


1924 1925 Increase

d States Government, Army and Navy....... ... $1,001.572 10 $1,062,589.02 $61.016.92
anama Canal.................................... 767,026. M8 743.594.24 2 23,432. 59
iships.................. ........... 468.291 M68 604, 65f.09 136,364.41
na Railroad & Steamship Line................... 230, 285. 10 249. 774. 4 19,489.54
iduals and companies ........................... 598, 40. r9 731,675.58 133, 12.5 89
oyees............................................. 4,410,007.40 4.909.983.00 4y0,975.60
Total sales.................................... 7,484.732.80 8. 302. 272. 57 817,539.77
liscounts, credits, etc............................ 110.529.04 358. 170. 92 197.h41.88
Revenue from sales......................... ... 7.324, 203. 76 7.944. 101.65 619. 807. 89
lies for expense and eqluipient:
detail commissaries and warehouse................. 100. 4W59. U 43.070.90 Z7, 389. 08
eneral........................................... 1.429. 1.4234 149 93 70.59
lants................................... 19.005 5X 20, I5.80 1.160.22
Total... .................................. ..... 120,894.90 6 4,736. 3 ; 56. 158.27
by condemnation, shrinkage, etc................. 63.252.00 79.297.88 16. 045 88
by clerical errors, pilferage. etc .................... 40,00-3 97 48. 934.72 8. 930.75
Total.......................... .......... ...... M103.25w. 128.232.60 24.976.63
Orand total....................... ......... 7.54 4 .:54 63 S8,137.070.88 5aM.716.25


I Decrease.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


. Cattle industry.-On June 30, 1924, there were 4,260 head of cattle
in the pastures. During the year 6,199 head of lean and 6,349-head
of fat cattle were purchased, and 284 calves were born. Cattle to
the number of 7,461 head were turned in to the commissary for
slaughter, and 40 were sold to individuals and companies. There
were 1,266 deaths during the year, and 230 cows were transferred to
the dairy farm, while 10 head of dairy stock were transferred to the
pastures, leaving 8,105 head of cattle on hand on June 30, 1925.
The general health of the stock during the year was excellent, and no
deaths from anthrax occurred. The number of deaths from othet
causes is apparently large, but it is really an adjustment of the death
rate for several years on the basis of an inventory taken during the
past year. The revenue from sales to the commissary and other
purchasers was $482,211.24, and operating expenses totalled $465,-
239.77, resulting in a net profit of $16,971.47, as compared with
$25,437.39 last year. There was no new clearing of pastures, but
5,987 acres were recleared at an average cost of $2.95 an acre, and the
condition of the pastures is greatly improved.
Dairy farm.-The herd at the dairy farm was reduced from 663 to
629 head. Income from sales of milk, livestock, hides, etc., was
$59,140.99, and the expenses of operation were $60,577.77, resulting
in a net, loss of $1,436.78.
Plantations.-The Frijoles and Juan Mina plantations were con-
tinued during the year under the supervision of the superintendent of
the cattle industry, while the smaller plantations and gardens were
operated under contract. Revenue from the sale of products was
$9,362.29, while operating expenses were $11,427.02. The net result
was a loss of $2,064.73.

HOTELS AND, RESTAURANTS

The Hotel Tivoli at, Ancon made a net profit of $6,075.66 and the
Hotel Washington at Colon lost $5,196.98. This is a material im-
provement over 1924, when the two hotels were operated at a com-
bined loss of more than $25,000. The restaurants and laborers'
messes were operated under contract, and satisfactory service was
rendered by the contractor to all employees at fair prices.

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS

A number of important construction projects, which were author-
ized and commenced during the preceding year, were completed in
1925. These included the new reinforced concrete commissary at
Cristobal, the three new telephone exchange buildings at Cristobal,
Gatun, and Pedro Miguel, and 15 new cottages at Cristobal. Other
projects of relative importance which were authorized during the year
4 *





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


included the removal of a moving picture hall from Cristobal to Ancon,
the construction of 30 new garages at Pedro Miguel and 77 at Balboa
for rental to employees, the construction of a concrete dock at Cris-
tobal, the conversion to family quarters of two houses at Gatun and of
the old Lincoln House at Cristobal, the reroofing of all gold quarters
at Balboa, Gatun, Cristobal, and Pedro Miguel, interior painting of
gold quarters at Balboa, Gatun, Cristobal, and Pedro Miguel. There
were many smaller items of maintenance work, and some construction
work was done for the United States Army and Navy on the Isthmus.

PRINTING

The Panama Canal Press carries in stock and manufactures such
necessary stationery as is required on the Isthmus in connection with
canal operations, besides printing the weekly Panama Canal Record,
pamphlets and folders, and miscellaneous job items. The manu-
facturing output of the plant was valued at $155,645.51. Issues and
sales from the stationery section aggregated $122,060.14. The in-
ventory value of all stock on hand at the end of the fiscal year, in-
cluding stationery and forms, was $89,560.54. The year's operations
showed an excess of revenue over expenses and fixed capital charges of
$2,035.20.
PANAMA RAILROAD

The financial returns from the operation of the Panama Railroad
show a decided improvement over 1924. The gross revenue was
$1,508,501.69, as compared with $1,418,652.48 in the preceding year,
an increase of $89,849.21. The operating expenses amounted to
$1,326,433.41, as compared with $1,341,954.31, a decrease of
$15,520.90, resulting in a net revenue of $182,068.28 in 1925, as against
$76,698.17 in 1924. The gross revenue from freight traffic was
$791,719.91, and from passenger traffic $393,506.49.
The trackage maintained aggregated 160.26 miles, divided as fol-
lows: Main line, yards and sidings, 107.48; Panama Canal tracks,
42.38; United States Army tracks, 10.40.
The following table shows the number of passengers carried and the
passenger revenue for the fiscal years 1924 and 1925:

Number of passengers Passenger revenue

1025 1924 1925 1924

First-class passengers------.. -----.. --....................... 163, 688 170,058 $213,667.38 $20. 743. 25
Second-class passengers.............................. 291,678 248,315 179, 839. 11 172, 165.22
Total.............----------------------------- 465, 266 418,373 393, 506. 49 378, 908. 47

61696-25t -3






28 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

The average revenue per passenger per mile in 1925 was $0.0242,
compared with $0.0253 in 1924. The gross revenue from the treai-
portation of passengers shows an increase of $14,598.02, and the num-
ber of passengers carried an increase of 36,893.
The following table shows the general operating statistics of the
Panama Railroad for the fiscal years 1924 and 1925:

1925 1924

Average miles operated---......----...-- -------------------.. ------------ 47. 61 47.61
Gross operating revenue-----------------................--------------...--------- $1,508,501.69 $1,418,652.48
Operating expenses...-----.--.----------......-----------.-----------........... $1,326,433.41 $1,341,954.31
Net operating revenue.--------------------- --------...-.. ... ....------------- $182,068.28 $76,008.17
Per cent of expenses to revenue-..----------------------------------........ 87.93 94. 59
Gross revenue per mile of road.-----. -----------. ----------------------- $31,684.56 $29, 797.36
Operating expenses per mile of road-..-----.----.---.------.---.------- $27, 860.39 $28,186.39
Net revenue per mile of road..-.......--- .....-----.-.-...-.-...--...--.. 3,824. 17 $1,610.97
Revenue per passenger train-mile.------------------------.----------- $4.76 $4.32
Revenue per freight train-mile---....-..-------------------------------- $12.08 $10.43
Total revenue train mileage.-------.. -----------------------------.......178, 524 174,694
Railroad revenue per train-mile--.-------.......-----------------------... 8.45 88.12
Railroad operating expense per revenue train-mile-.----.-------. --. ---- $7.43 $7.68
Net railroad revenue per revenue train-mile-------------------.-------- $1.02 $0.44
Freight, passenger, and switch locomotive mileage----....-..---.----..--------- 297,433 278,384
Work-train mileage--------.--------..---..--- --..-..--..--...---.-------------- 1,992 3,754
Passenger-train mileage---------------------------------------------- 105,259 103,624
Freight-train mileage-.--------------- ----------------.--------------- 73, 265 71, 070

TELEPHONES

The number of telephones installed in the Canal Zone on June 30,
1925, was 2,836. The average number of calls during the eight-
hour business day, as determined by peg count, was 24,186, or at
the rate of 3,023 an hour. The revenue from telephones and elec-
tric clocks and typewriting machines was $210,407.47, and the
operating expenses $206,723.21, resulting in a net revenue of $3,684.26.
The system includes 36 miles of pole line, 249 miles of underground
conduit, 136 miles of cable, 13,774 miles of wire, 960 miles of phantom,
and 414 miles of simplex circuits. There are 25 exchanges, of which
22 are manual and 3 automatic. Automatic equipment ordered for
the four main exchanges at Balboa Heights, Cristobal, Gatun, and
Pedro Miguel began to arrive on the Isthmus during the month of
March, and had all been received prior to June 1, 1925. By the end
of the fiscal year approximately 50 per cent of the work of installation
had been completed. New telephone. exchange buildings were erected
at Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel, and the alterations to the
exchange at Balboa Heights were practically finished and ready for
the installation of the new equipment. Nine sets of printing tele-
graph equipment mentioned in last year's report were installed during
the year in the offices of the port captains and at the locks for use in
the dispatch of ships, and three more sets have been ordered.
The telephone system is owned by the Panama Railroad Co., but
is operated by the electrical division of The Panama Canal.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


LANDS AND BUILDINGS

Panama Railroad lands in the cities of Panama and Colon and
public lands in the Canal Zone are administered by a joint land
office. Rentals for quarters occupied by employees are collected by
pay-roll deductions.
The Panama Railroad Co.'s gross revenue from real estate opera-
tions during the year was $163,189.15, against which expenses were
charged totaling $59,955.25, leaving a net revenue of $103,233.90.
The number of Panama Railroad leases in effect at the close of the
year was 1,265, and of revocable licenses 9.
On June 30, 1925, there were 2,112 licenses in effect covering 7,111
hectares of agricultural land in the Canal Zone, to which the United
States holds title. Since July 1, 1924, rental charges have been col-
lected on all of this land at the rate of $5 per hectare per annum.
The amount collected on these and other Government lands aggre-
gated $49,850.20, and the greater part of this sum was expended for
for the maintenance of an agricultural experiment station. Bananas
are still the only important crop raised in the vicinity of the canal,
and exports from Cristobal increased from 576,297 stems in 1924 to
1,313,281 stems in 1925. This is not all Canal Zone production, but
includes some bananas grown in the Republic of Panama.
The Panama Canal collected from employees and others the sum
of $584,641.63 in rental charges for quarters, which were maintained
at an expense of $582,896.98.

CLUBHOUSES
To the maintenance of clubs and playgrounds for American and
West Indian employees and their families The Panama Canal con-
tributed $100,000. The additional expenses defrayed from surplus
or current revenue were $498,333.84, and the income from moving
pictures, soda fountains, cigar counters, etc., was $481,358.38. The
accumulated surplus of clubhouse funds held by the collector on
June 30, 1925, was $148,628.05.

PANAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LINE

The gross operating revenue of the steamship line for the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1925, amounted to $1,985,767.61 and the total
operating expenses to $2,184,335.61, resulting in a net deficit from
operations of $198,568. This operating deficit compared with that
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1924, of $558,637.05, shows a
decrease in deficit, of $360,069.05.
The steamship line carried all freight and passengers for account
of the United States Government during the year at material reduc-
tions from regular tariff rates which amounted to the important
o






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


sumvof $490,717.28. If tariff rates had been received by the line for
such services, its operating deficit of $198,568 would have been
reversed, and a gain of $292,149.28 shown.
The tonnage carried for the year ended June 30, 1925, amounted
to 221,999 tons as against 256,395 tons for the previous year, a
decrease of 34,396 tons. Despite the lesser tonnage transported and
the maintained high costs of all foodstuffs and supplies, the favorable
result of the steamship line as compared with the prior year was
directly attributable to economies effected in operation.











SECTION III


GOVERNMENT

The civil government of the Canal Zone has been conducted as
prescribed in the Panama Canal act of August 24, 1912, and other
acts and Executive orders made applicable to the Canal Zone.
Wherever it has been found practicable to assign governmental
functions to department heads in the organization for the operation
and maintenance of the canal and to the personnel under them, this
has been done. Complete cooperation as well as greater economy
and efficiency is thus assured.
From the financial statements in Section V of this report data on
the cost and revenue of various branches of the government may be
obtained.
POPULATION

A census of the civil population of the Canal Zone was taken by
the police force during the month of June, 1925, a summary of which
is given below:

Americans All others
''Total
Total Em-l Em- Total Em- Chil Total Em- Tal Em- Chil-
men ploy- wom- ploy- ploy- wom- ploy- dren
ees en ees ees en ees

Balboa district .--...... 1,742 I 1,492 1,723 289 1,667 3 645 2,290 2,667 183 4,703 16, 129
Cristobal district--..... 555 497 690 26 732 3, 174 2,132 1,893 8 3,844 10,888
Prisoners--. .... 22 .----------------.......--------- 109 3 --....--------- 134
Total............ 2,301 1,989 2,413 315 2,399 6, 28 4,322 4,563 191 8,547 '27,151

I Includes 160 civilian employees of the Army and Navy.

In addition to the civilian population the military population in
the Canal Zone in June, 1925, numbered 9,860, making a grand total
of 37,011.
PUBLIC HEALTH
.1alaria.-The total number of malaria cases reported from the
Canal Zone and terminal cities during the year, compared with the
four previous years, is as follows:

1921 1922 1923 1924 I 1925

Employees-......-----------.......-..------....--------------... 325 176 216 208 180
Military and naval personnel.-----------------------..................... 810 828 870 894 762
Nonemployees........---------------------------------- 459 243 657 521 494
Total.............----------------- -- ---- --------- 1,594 1,247 1,743 1,623 1,436






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Canal Zone.-The average population (civil and military) for the
fiscal year 1925 was 34,440, and this figure -has been used as a base
for vital statistics. From this population 293 deaths occurred
during the year, 247 of which were from disease, giving a rate of 7.17
for disease alone, as compared with 7.48 for 1924, and 7.42 for 1923.
There were 652 live births reported during the year, and 40 still-
births. Including stillbirths, this is equivalent to an annual birth
rate of 20.09 per 1,000 population. The infant mortality rate, based
on the number of live births reported for the year, was 62.78 for white
children and 102.56 for colored children, with a general average of
90.49. Of the total births reported 6 per cent were stillbirths. Of
the total deaths reported, 30 per cent occurred among children under
five years of age.
The maternal mortality rate (from conditions due to the puerperal
state) was 10.12 per thousand births, stillbirths included.
Panama.-The population of the city of Panama for the year was
59,635. From this population, 1,128 deaths occurred during the
year, of which 1,088 were from disease, giving a rate of 18.25 for
disease alone, as compared with 19.75 for the preceding year.
The principal causes of death, compared with last year, were as
follows:

Number of deaths

1924 1925

Tuberculosis (various organs)..---------- ---- ------------- ---... -------.------ 193 201
Pneumonia (broncho and lobar)---...--------.. ----.--------------------- 276 187
Diarrhea and enteritis--..-.---.-----... ------------------------------ 121 90

There were 2,161 live births reported during the year and 121 still-
births. Including stillbirths, this is equivalent to an annual birth rate
of 38.27 per 1,000 population. The infant mortality rate, based on
the number of live births reported, was 124.06. Of the total number
of births reported 5 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths
reported 33 per cent occurred among children under 5 years of age.
The maternal mortality rate (from conditions due to the puerperal
state) was 6.14 per thousand births, stillbirths included.
Colon.-The population of the city for the year was 31,285. From
this population 450 deaths occurred during the year, of which 432
were from disease, giving a rate of 13.81 for disease, as compared
with 12.92 for 1924.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


The principal causes of death, as compared with last year, were:

Number of death hs

1924 1925

Tuberculosis (various organs)....------------............----------.....--------..----............-----------........--57 87
Pneumonia tbroncho and lobar)...........------------------------.................------.............-------...--........ ---------2 5
Diarrhea and ententis.....------------------------.......--...........---------------........................----------......-- 33 27

There were 713 live births reported during the year and 35 still-
births. Including stillbirths, this is equivalent to an annual birth
rate of 23.91 per 1,000 population. The infant mortality rate, based
on the number of live births, was 116.41. Of the total births reported
5 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths 28 per cent occurred
among children under 5 years of age. The maternal mortality rate
(from conditions due to the puerperal state) was 5.33 per thousand
births, stillbirths included.
Canal hospitals.-Patients treated in Panama Canal hospitals, fiscal
year 1925:

Number in Remaining
hospital Admitted Died Discharged Transferred June 30,
July 1, 1924 1925



Ancon....------------....------ 183 195 4,342 3,451 65 147 4,248 3,230 32 75 180 194
Colon.........-----------...--------. 20 20 916 1,202 15 51 756 86 153 279 12 26
Corozal:
Insane...---------------............. 81 204 92 73 5 16 64 52 3 2 101 297
Cripples............-------------- 2 24 0 4 00 0 0 0 0 2 28
Chronics.....-......--- 2 24 3 19 0 2 2 9 0 1 3 31
Palo Seco leper colony-.... 6 86 1 12 1 4 0 5 0 0 6 89
Total-----.....--------- 294 643 5,354 4,761 86 220 5,070 4, 162 188 357 304 665

Quarantine.-An efficient quarantine was continued throughout
the year with the usual minimum delay to shipping and it is worthy
of note that no maritime quarantinable disease escaped the vigilance
of the quarantine officers. Quite a number of communicable dis-
eases such as measles, mumps, and chicken pox among the recruits
of the Army and Navy were detected and were sent to Ancon Hospital
for isolation and treatment.
It is a notable fact that of the total number of ships calling at
Canal Zone ports only one was detained for quarantinable disease
and this vessel was held solely for the purpose of completing the num-
ber of days of incubation required for craft from yellow fever ports.
Dr. C. P. Knight, chief quarantine officer, made two official .trips
during the year, one to the west coast of Central America for the
purpose of studying an outbreak of yellow fever in San Salvador and
the other one to the west coast of South America in order to make an






34 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

inspection of sanitary conditions of the ports and other towns and
to promote friendly relations with the sanitary authorities of these
countries.
It was necessary to maintain a quarantine against San Salvador
on account of yellow fever and against the Stanncreek district in
Honduras for the same reason. A quarantine on account of foot and
mouth disease was also maintained against most of the countries of
South America.
The amount of fumigation for the destruction of rodents increased
somewhat over that of previous years and on account of the efficiency
of the methods employed in the Canal Zone, requests are made from
time to time by merchant shipping interests and by officials of the
United States Navy that such work be done for them.

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING
Water supply.-There was the usual maintenance work on pipe
lines, reservoirs, filtration plants, and pumping stations. The water
main between Gamboa and Miraflores, supplying the southern
district, which had been leaking badly, was recaulked with lead at
an expense of $51,002.72, and this has cut the maintenance cost of
the line in half. Location survey was started and plans were pre-
pared for the improvement of the Gatun and Cristobal-Colon water
systems at an estimated cost of $400,000, and requisitions for material
needed in this work, amounting to more than $100,000, were pre-
pared and forwarded to the United States for purchase. The con-
struction of a new concrete water tank at Paraiso, costing $4,303.04,
was completed. Large compound meters were installed at France
Field, Fort Randolph, Cristobal coaling station, cold storage plant,
Fort Davis, New Cristobal, Silver City, and on the Fort Sherman
line at a cost of $9,526.20. The water consumption at those places
varies so greatly that a Venturi or single meter will not register the
minimum as well as the maximum use. The compound meters will
accurately register all use. Work was started on improvements in
the water system at the Balboa docks to permit the more rapid
delivery of water to ships. This job is estimated to cost $4,500.
The electrical installations at the Gatun and Mt. Hope pump stations
were renewed at a cost of $19,224.77. In order to provide better
access to Venturi meters, manholes were constructed at Corozal,
Red Tank, Miraflores, La Boca, and Balboa at a cost of $2,151.97.
The amount of water consumed was:
Gallons
Canal Zone ------------------------.------. ------------ 3, 140, 009, 765
City of Panama-------- ------------------ ------------ 1, 117, 982, 000
City of Colon------------------------------------------ 586, 325, 000
Sold to ships.------------------------------------------- 132, 942, 685

Total------------------------- -------------------- 4, 977, 259, 450






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Sewers.-The usual maintenance work on the sewer systems of
the Canal Zone was attended to. Two new sewage pumps were
installed at the New Cristobal sump at a cost of $6,786.30, replacing
two that were worn out. Additional catch basins were installed in
the southern district and other improvements made to prevent the
flooding of streets during heavy rains.
Roads, streets, and sidewalks.-Ordinary maintenance required the
repairing of 10,643 square yards of various classes of roads and streets
and the chipping and asphalting of 19,866 lineal feet of cracks in
concrete roads. Other large items of maintenance were the cutting
of grass along roads and streets, street sweeping, and the cleaning
of roadside ditches. Due to the gradual increase of automobile
traffic it was necessary during the year to construct a number of
parking spaces, improve sharp intersections, and build sidewalks
for the safety of pedestrians, at a total cost of $12,340.58. The sum
of $15,278.11 was spent on other miscellaneous improvements. Due
to heavy traffic, sections of the Bolivar Highway between Mindi
and Fort Davis failed, necessitating complete reconstruction. This
work was in progress at the close of the fiscal year, and $12,693.73
had been expended on it, approximately one-third of the total
estimated cost.
Garbage disposal.-The incinerator at Mount Hope was operated
throughout the year and burned 21,116.57 tons of garbage. In the
southern district garbage was dumped on waste land and buried.
Cities of Panama and Colon.-The water and sewer systems and
the streets of Panama and Colon were maintained, and various
items of construction work were undertaken at a cost of $57,223.28.
Water rentals collected in the two cities are applied to meet bills
arising out of the maintenance of the streets, sewers, and water
mains, and if there is a deficit it is billed against the Republic of
Panama.
Miscellaneous workc.-The municipal engineering division also
handled various jobs for the Army, the Navy, the Panama Railroad
Co., the Republic of Panama, and various departments of The
Panama Canal.
PUBLIC ORDER
Serious crimes are of comparatively rare occurrence in the Canal
Zone and misdemeanors are infrequent in the resident population,
which is composed almost entirely of employees of The Panama
Canal and Army and Navy personnel, but both Balboa and Cristobal
are seaports frequented by transient seamen and travelers, and the
adjacent cities of Panama and Colon have a mixed, cosmopolitan
population, including a disorderly element, which makes work for
the zone'as well as for the Panaman police. However, public order
is maintained at a high standard.
61696-25t --4






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


The number of arrests in 1925 was 3,269, the lowest figure re-
corded in 20 years. The average number of prisoners in the common
jails at the close of each month was 58, compared with 63 in 1924,
and 73 in 1923. The improvement may be accounted for in part
by economic conditions; work has been plentiful, and there has been
little if any unemployment.
The more common charges preferred against persons under arrest
were: Violation of the motor vehicle regulations, with 781 cases;
violation of traffic regulations, 220; disorderly conduct, 362; viola-
tion of immigration regulations, 279; loitering, 231; petty larceny,
137; violation of the national prohibition act, 130; violation of the
tariff regulations for public vehicles, 127; assault and battery, 114;
violation of license regulations, 99; malicious mischief, 76; drunk
and disorderly, 75; intoxication, 62; trespassing, 62; fighting, 56.
The persons arrested included representatives of 45 nationalities and
164 trades or professions.
Under the narcotic drugs import and export act, 6 arrests were
made, of which 4 resulted in conviction and 2 in dismissal. There
were no arrests under the white slave act.
There were two homicides during the year. On December 1, 1924,
Witt Talmage Dawson, a private in the United States Army sta-
tioned at Camp Gaillard, Canal Zone, was stabbed and killed in a
waiting shed on the west side of the lock at Pedro Miguel. The
assailant in this case could not be identified, although extensive and
thorough investigations were made by the Canal Zone police and by
the Army. On January 3, 1925, Saturnino Ruiz, a Colombian, was
shot from ambush while he was ascending the Chagres River in a
dugout. Teofilo Vasquez and Milciades Mena Moya were convicted
of this crime and sentenced to be hung, but the sentence was com-
muted to life imprisonment. There were four suicides during the
year.
There were 177 men employed on the police force on June 30, 1925,
the same number as on the corresponding date in 1924. The distri-
bution of the force between headquarters, the Balboa and Cristobal
central stations, the Gamboa penitentiary and outposts at Ancon,
Pedro Miguel, San Juan, Gatun, Monte Lirio, and Gamboa was also
substantially the same.
A continuous patrol of the harbors at Balboa and Cristobal was
maintained for the enforcement of the navigation laws and regula-
tions and the prevention of smuggling. A police launch was main-
tained at Gamboa for the patrol of the Chagres River and the nearby
parts of the canal, and another launch was maintained at Gatun for
the patrol of Gatun Lake. Motor cycle patrols for the enforcement
of the vehicle traffic regulations were maintained at Balboa, Pedro
Miguel, Cristobal, and Gatun. Monthly patrols of the interior sec-






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


tions of the Canal Zone were made to prevent unauthorized clearing
and cultivation. Four arrests were made for trespass on public lands,
numerous trespass signs were posted, and warnings given.
At the Canal Zone penitentiary 55 convicts were received during
the year with sentences aggregating 101 years and 3 months, and
fines totalling $10,000. The number of convicts discharged at the
completion of their terms of imprisonment was 54. Included among
these were 6 pardoned and 1 paroled by the governor. Three con-
victs escaped from the penitentiary, but they were recaptured.
There were 76 convicts in custody at the close of the year.
Common jail prisoners were employed on janitor work about
police stations, public improvements, and miscellaneous jobs, and
their labor at current rates was valued at $21,141.33. The value of
labor by convicts aggregated $24,756.94. They were employed on
municipal improvements and road work, for the maintenance of the
penitentiary buildings and grounds, the cultivation of the peni-
tentiary farm, police and fire division improvements, and the clearing
of trails. The total cost of subsisting, clothing, and guarding convicts
amounted to $43,945.28.

OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY

The district attorney prosecuted 178 criminal cases before the dis-
trict court, 35 more than in the preceding year, with 131 convictions,
18 acquittals, 7 cases nol pressed, 21 dismissed, and 1 otherwise dis-
posed of. There were 10 criminal cases pending at the close of the
year. Of the criminal caseslprosecuted 61 were for violations of the
national prohibition act.
The district attorney represented The Panama Canal, the Panama
Railroad Co., or the United States Government in four civil actions,
of which three were still pending at the end of the year.
DISTRICT COURT

The district court held sessions at Ancon and at Cristobal and
transacted the following business:
Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Civil, 30; probate,
38; criminal, 6. Cases settled during the year: Civil, 70; probate,
160; criminal, 151. Cases pending at the end of the year: Civil, 47;
probate, 64; criminal, 18.
Of the civil cases settled, 53 were decided and 17 dismissed. Of
the criminal cases settled, 13 resulted in acquittal, 116 in conviction,
16 were dismissed, 2 were nol pressed, and 4 were transferred.
Number of marriage licenses issued, 584; number of deeds recorded,
12; total collections, $3,482.21.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


MARSHAL

Writs of process received, 783; served, 645; parties not found, 138;
fees collected, $287.45; fees paid to witnesses, jurors, interpreters,
etc., $220; total trust funds handled during the year $39,469.02.

MAGISTRATES' COURTS

Balboa.-Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Civil, 4;
criminal, 1. Cases disposed of during the year: Civil, 43; criminal,
1,786. Of the criminal cases disposed of, 41 resulted in acquittal,
1,398 in conviction, 272 were dismissed, and 75 held to the district
court. Cases pending at the end of the fiscal year: Civil, 3; criminal,
9. Total collections, $11,095.50.
As provided in the Executive order of May 10, 1911, petitions were
made to the district judge for the commitment of 55 persons to the
insane asylum for observation.
Cristobal.--Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Civil, 2;
criminal, 3. Cases disposed of during the year: Civil, 38; criminal,
1,179. Of the criminal cases settled, 138 resulted in acquittal, 907
in conviction, 39 were dismissed, and 97 held to the district court.
Cases pending at the end of the year: Civil, 5; criminal, 5. Total
collections, $8,915.15.
FIRE PROTECTION

No changes were made in the number or location of fire stations,
and there were no changes in the organization of the fire force, except
that two positions of sergeant were created, which reduced the num-
ber of fireman positions by two. The authorized force at the end of
the fiscal year was 44, with 42 men actually employed.
Additions to apparatus and equipment included 8 chemical en-
gines, 100 fire extinguishers, 4,000 feet of fire hose, and 2 smoke
helmets. The greater part of this represented replacements.
Periodical inspections of all Government buildings, docks, store-
houses, and yards were made during the year; fire hose and fire
extinguishers were maintained in good condition at all locations
where such equipment was installed for special protection, and
changes and new installations were made where necessary.
In addition to the paid fireman, 18 companies of volunteers were
maintained and drilled monthly. Volunteers are compensated with
one round-trip pass a month over the Panama Railroad either for
themselves or members of their families.
There were 90 fires, 1 emergency call, and 3 false alarms during the
year. Of the fires 63 occurred in property of The Panama Canal,
11 in Panama Railroad property, 2 in United States Army property,
3 in United States Navy property, and 11 in private property. In-






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


eluded in the total were 27 fires in grass or rubbish. Fire losses aggre-
gated $22,437.14, distributed as follows: Panama Canal, $1,862.64;
Panama Railroad, $55; United States Army, $30; United States Navy,
$80; private property, $20,409.50. The total value of the property
involved was 55,608,444.39.
PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM
Two high schools and six grade schools for white children, with a
total of 75 rooms, were maintained, the same number as in the pre-
ceding year. One new two-room school for colored children was
opened at Gamboa and six rooms were added to the existing colored
schools. The number of colored grade schools is now eight. There
are no high schools for colored children. There were 85 teachers
employed in the white schools. At the beginning of the school year
39 teachers were employed in the colored schools, and this number
was increased to 47 with the opening of the new school at Gamboa
and new rooms at other schools. The organization also includes a
superintendent and two assistant superintendents. As compared
with 1924 the authorized personnel of the division shows an increase
of eight.
The net enrollment in. the white schools increased from 2,094 in
1924 to 2,274 in 1925, and in the colored schools there was an increase
from 1,911 in 1924 to 2,314 in 1925. The average daily attendance
in the white schools was 1,898.3, and in the colored schools 1,788.2.
The two high schools graduated 46 pupils, as compared with 27 in
1924.
The courses of study for both elementary and iigh schools were
revised during the summer of 1924, with notably beneficial effects
upon the quality of instruction. The school year just closed is the
second in which frequent written lessons and tests checked by the
supervisors were substituted for formal written examinations at the
end of the term, and it has been discovered that the results obtained
are better than under the old practice. The regular examinations,
as in previous years, were given in both high schools, with about the
normal number of failures. For the first time in the history of the
Canal Zone high schools, psychological examinations for admittance
to college were given to students desiring to take them for entrance
to those colleges which admit by this method. The examinations of
the college entrance examination board were also administered.
Of the 75 rooms available in the white schools only 2 will be vacant
when the schools reopen in the fall of 1925, which allows little if any
room for expansion to meet increased enrollment.
In the colored schools, in addition to the provision made as indi-
cated above for a greater number of pupils, an effort has been made to
bring the equipment and curriculum up to the level of the white






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


schools, and, while much remains to be accomplished, a material
improvement has been made at relatively little expense.
The estimated value of school property in the Canal Zone is
$550,000 and the expenditures in 1925 totaled $256,647.55.
The division of schools continued to supervise two schools in the
Alhajuela Basin, which was incorporated with the Canal Zone in 1924,
but as this area is to be depopulated, the schools, which were formerly
maintained by the Republic of Panama, have been continued with
Panaman teachers and in accordance with methods prevailing in the
Republic, and no attempt has been made to include themjin the
Canal Zone school system. They had a gross enrollment of 202
pupils and are not included in any of the statistics of personnel,
equipment, enrollment, and expense quoted in the preceding
paragraphs.
POSTAL SYSTEM
Thirteen post offices were in operation at the end of the fiscal year,
the same number as at the close of the fiscal year 1924, and mail was
handled by representatives of the Canal Zone postal service for three
villages in the Alhajuela Basin, although no post offices were estab-
lished there.
The total receipts of the postal service were $171,125.75, while
expenditures aggregated $161,853.56, leaving a surplus of $9,272.19.
This showing was made without any charge against other depart-
ments for the handling of official mail under frank, which still com-
prises about 60 per cent of the total. It was made possible by the
abrogation, effective June 30, 1924, ofjthe Taft agreement, under
which the stamps used in the Canal Zone had previously been pur-
chased from the Republic of Panama at 40 per -cent of their face
value.
There were 140,662 money orders issued during the year of a total
value of $2,743,018.38, on which fees amounting to $11,087.09 were
collected. The total amount on deposit at all post offices on June
30, 1925, including deposit money orders, old postal-savings accounts,
and unpaid fee money orders in favor of the remitter, was $536,-
939.68, as compared with $487,940.80 on June 30, 1924. Interest
at the rate of 3 per cent is paid on deposit money orders, which are
issued without fee, but the interest payments to depositors are less
than the interest collected from the banks in which surplus money-
order funds are deposited, so that this business shows a profit of
$137,573.02 since August 21, 1916, when the system was inaugurated.
The balance on deposit remains fairly constant at approximately
half a million dollars.
In the registry division of the post offices 265,437 letters and par-
cels were handled, of which 40,990 were official and accepted for
registration without fee.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


During the fiscal year a total of 2,353 dispatches were made to
different foreign exchange offices by the post office at Cristobal and
2,275 dispatches were received. The Balboa post office, which dis-
patches mail to the west coast of Central and South America and the
United States, made 1,631 dispatches to foreign post offices, and
received 606. United States and foreign transit mail destined to
the west coast of Central and South America, as well as mail ex-
changed between Cuba, Jamaica, and other insular governments
and Colombia, Costa Rica, Venezuela, etc., is handled under the
supervision of the director of posts. Mail from European countries
routed via the Isthmus for transshipment is handled by the director
of posts on behalf of the United States Post Office Department,
whereas direct agreements are in effect between the director of posts
and the postal administrations of Costa Rica, Australia, and New
Zealand for the handling of their mails routed via the Isthmus. The
Pan American postal convention has now been ratified by practi-
cally all of the Central and South American countries, and it may
eventually result in the discontinuance of the separate postal agencies
of those countries in Panama and Colon and the assumption of the
work by the director of posts as a central postal agency. Proposals
from the postal administrations of Salvador and Peru are now under
consideration.
The establishment of new shipping routes to the west coast of
Central and South America during the past year has resulted in im-
proved mail service to certain points in that area, and hence cable
reports to the postmaster at New York informing him of connections
at Panama for west coast ports were discontinued, as it was not found
practicable to anticipate such connections two weeks in advance.
During the year mail from the United States and foreign countries
was received on about 400 steamers and dispatched to destination
on about 450 steamers.
CUSTOMS

The total number of vessels entered at the terminal ports of the
canal, including vessels in transit, was 10,447, and the number
cleared was 10,429, a decrease of approximately 10 per cent from
the figures of the preceding year.
All merchandise discharged at. Cristobal and Balboa, destined to
persons or firms in the Republic of Panama not connected with
The Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad Co., or the United States
Army or Navy, is in the custody of the Canal Zone customs until
the submission of the necessary papers from Panaman officials show-
ing that duty has been paid or waived. Permits for 8,707 releases
were granted at the customhouse at Cristobal, and 409 releases
were authorized at the customhouse at Balboa. Cargo landed at






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


the latter port is usually forwarded by railroad to Panama, where it
passes into the custody of the Panaman authorities.
A total of 2,458 free-entry requests were approved for employees
of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad Co. and members of
the United States Army or Navy, who have the privilege of im-
porting articles for their personal use without payment of duty.
Customs duty was paid to the Republic of Panama to the amount
of $81,295.49 on 30,578 mail parcels for nonemployees and on duti-
able articles imported through the Canal Zone post offices.
No arrests were made for violations of the customs regulations.
At each port, however, numerous attempts to smuggle merchandise
of various classes and in small quantities were frustrated, and such
merchandise was confiscated and delivered to the proper authorities
of the Republic of Panama. Customs officers cooperated with the
police to prevent the smuggling of narcotic drugs.
The number of cases of household goods inspected and sealed for
employees returning to the United States was 526, and the fees col-
lected for this service totaled $379.50. There were 597 invoices
certified during the year, on which the fees amounted to $911.50.
The number of vessels requesting the detail of customs inspectors
for the examination of passenger's baggage, etc., after the usual work-
ing hours was 641, and the sum of $5,145 was collected for this
special service.
Customs inspectors checked 500 Chinese crews upon arrival and
before departure to prevent the illegal landing of Chinese in the Canal
Zone or the Republic of Panama. They also assumed responsibility
for 1,133 Chinese passengers, besides 66 on hand at the beginning of
the year, of whom 922 were admitted to the Republic of Panama on
the authority of that Government, and the others, with the exception
of 25 awaiting transportation at the end of the year, either proceeded
on their journey or were returned to port of embarkation. Bonds
were accepted for the temporary release in the Canal Zone of 119
Chinese in transit. The number of Chinese arriving for admission
into the Republic of Panama has increased materially over previous
years, owing to a change in the Panaman immigration laws.

SHIPPING COMMISSION ER-SEAMEN

The shipping commissioner and his deputies have the same powers
with respect to American seamen as shipping commissioners in the
United States and American consuls in foreign ports. During the
fiscal year there were 3,330 seamen shipped on American vessels and
3,266 discharged. There were 461 American seamen lodged and
subsisted in the Canal Zone at the expense of the United States
Government. Of this number 272 were returned to the United States
at the expense of the appropriation for the relief of destitute American






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


seamen, and the remaining 189 were signed on vessels as seamen or
workaways and returned to the United States without expense to
the Government. The wages earned by seamen discharged in the
Canal Zone aggregated $123,216.63; the total approved for deduction
on account of advances, allotments, fines, slop chest account, etc.,
was $38,610.73; and the balance of $84,605.90 was either paid to
them under the supervision of deputy shipping commissioners or
received on deposit for their account. The wages and effects of
eight American seamen who died in Canal Zone hospitals were
handled by the shipping commissioner and forwarded to the proper
courts in the United States for disposition.

ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES
During the year the estates of 76 deceased and insane employees
of The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Co. were ad-
ministered, and there were 34 estates in course of administration on
June 30, 1925.
IMMIGRATION VISAS
By Executive order of the President, dated January 12, 1925, the
executive secretary was designated to issue immigration visas to
alien residents of the Canal Zone going to the United States. This
designation was made in accordance with the provisions of section
28 (e) of the immigration act of 1924.
The work was begun in March, and at the end of the fiscal year
a total of 44 visas ihad been issued, of which 16 were quota, 19 non-
quota, and 9 were nonimmigrant visas. The fees collected for the
visas amounted to $421.

RELATIONS WITH PANAMA
There was direct correspondence between the government of the
Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama on various routine questions.
The negotiations for a general revision of the existing agreements
between the United States and the Republic of Panama, to which
reference was made in my last report, were continued during the
year at Washington without final agreement. The relations be-
tween the two governments are still governed by the IIay-Bunau-
Varilla treaty of 1903.













SECTION IV


ADMINISTRATION
CHANGES IN ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL

There were no changes in the organization of The Panama Canal
during the fiscal year.1925.
Col. Meriwether L. Walker, Engineer Corps, United States Army,
was appointed by the President to serve as Governor of The
Panama Canal, effective October 16, 1924, succeeding Brig. Gen.
Jay J. Morrow, Engineer Officers' Reserve Corps, United States
Army, who had resigned five months in advance of the expiration of
his term of office to engage in private engineering work.
Col. Harry Burgess, Engineer Corps, United States Army, was
appointed engineer of maintenance, effective October 16, 1924, to
succeed Col. Meriwether L. Walker.
Maj. Francis C. Harrington, Engineer Corps, United States Army,
was appointed assistant engineer of maintenance, effective July 19,
1924, relieving Maj. Clarence S. Ridley.
Capt. James H. Tomb, United States Navy, was appointed marine
superintendent, effective February 23, 1925, relieving Capt. Alfred
W. Hinds.
Commander Walter F. Jacobs, United States Navy, was appointed
captain of the port, Cristobal, effective October 13, 1924, relieving
Commander Ross S. Culp.
Mr. Guy H. Martin was appointed by the President as United
States district judge for the Canal Zone, effective October 17, 1924,
to succeed Judge John D. Wallingford, who died in office September
20, 1924.
Mr. Francis Edward Mitchell was appointed by the President as
United States district attorney for the Canal Zone, effective Feb-
ruary 16, 1925, to succeed Mr. Guy H. Martin.

INCREASE OF FORCE

The force employed by The Panama Canal and the Panama Rail-
road Co. on the Isthmus increased from 11,511 in June, 1924, to
12,270 in June, 1925, or 6.59 per cent. The distribution of the per-
sonnel in both years is shown in the following table:







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


June, 1924 June, 1925
Department or division
Gold Silver Total Gold Silver Total
roll roll roll roll

Operation and maintenance:
Office........----------------...------------........-- 38 38 76 27 35 62
Electrical division....-----------.... --.. --------.......... 160 172 332 174 '186 360
Municipal engineering.--.--------------... 72 495 567 73 509 582
Lock operation................----------------...... ------- 203 589 792 204 612 816
Dredging.----...----..-..--..--------------................ 159 872 1,031 173 827 1,000
Mechanical.--..---------------......... --------. 427 822 1,249 470 864 1,334
Marine..-------------------.... --....-----.--- 175 520 695 177 497 674
Fortifications.-------------------------...... 11 18 29 33 283 316
Supply:
Quartermaster-----------------------.......... 168 1,169 1, 337 166 1, 133 1,299
Subsistence...............----------------...------... --- 7 82 89 7 95 102
Commissary-----------.... --------------................... 188 832 1,020 189 912 1,101
Cattle industry and plantations...--. 5 156 161 6 277 283
Hotel Washington---...----------------......- 7 87 94 8 93 101
Transportation---......---........-------------... -- 36 161 197 37 166 203
Accounting----------------------------- 197 7 204 196 8 204
Health-----..----------.........--------.. -- ---. 231 702 933 219 706 925
Executive......---------------......--------------- 477 249 726 495 269 764
Panama R. R.:
Superintendent......................-----------------------. 48 230 278 48 236 284
Transportation.---..---------..-----...------- 64 101 165 62 107 169
Receiving and forwarding agent....... 75 891 966 80 1,300 1,380
Coaling stations----------------------- 62 508 570 41 270 311
Total.---------------------------- 2,810 8,701 11,511 2,885 9,385 12,270

The higher figures in June, 1925, are due either to temporary
causes or to increased business in the units concerned. This may be
explained more in detail as follows:
Electrical division.-Work of installing new automatic telephone
equipment and transfer of stores and equipment to new building at
Cristobal.
Municipal engineering.-Construction work in progress at the close
of the year, including the Gatun-Mountain Hope Road and the Cali-
donia Road.
Dredging.-Increased activity of drill barges engaged in deepen-
ing the channel from the Pacific entrance to the Miraflores Locks.
Mlechanical.-The overhaul of the Peruvian cruiser Coronel Bolog-
nesi and large amount of manufacturing work.
Fortifications.-The resumption of construction work.
Subsisten ce.-Increase of business at the Hotel Tivoli.
Commissary.-Increase of business at the Ancon laundry and at
the Cristobal commissary.
Cattle industry.-Temporary gangs employed to clear pastures.
Hotel Washington.-Increased business.
Transportation.-Increased business.
Executive.-Employment of additional teachers in the schools to
meet increased enrollment, greater volume of postal business, repair
of clubhouses, and employment of additional personnel for silver
clubhouses.
Panama Railroad, superintendent.-Employment of temporary
force to man steam shovel getting out material for a fill at Gatun.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Panama Railroad, transportation.-Employment of additional
crossing watchmen, etc.
Panama Railroad, receiving and forwarding agency.-The number
of cargo vessels handled at the piers in June, 1925, was 25 greater
than in June, 1924.

WAGE ADJUSTMENTS

Gold employees.-The policy of compensating American employees
at the full 25 per cent above rates paid by the Government for similar
employment in the United States was continued in so far as appro-
priations would permit. As in past years, owing to insufficient
appropriations, a number of employees in various divisions of the
civil government had to be denied the full 25 per cent over corre-
sponding rates paid employees engaged in similar work in the United
States.
The more important wage adjustments during the year were:
(a) Effective July 1, 1924, the greater part of the employees, excepting the
mechanical and allied crafts, were placed upon the schedule of rates adopted for
use by the personnel classification board in Washington. Primarily this
amounted to a mere mechanical allocation to rates adopted by the personnel
classification board, since the positions to which the classification rates were
applied have been graded carefully over a considerable period of years.
(b) Effective January 1, 1925, an adjustment of rates of employees in the
mechanical and allied trades was made in conformity with the adjustment in
rates in the navy yards in the United States. For these crafts wages were
determined on the basis of average rates paid in the Boston, New York, Phila-
delphia, Washington, Mare Island, and Puget Sound navy yards, to which is
added the 25 per cent increment applicable to Panama Canal rates to compensate
for tropical service.
(c) Bimonthly adjustments of building-trades rates were continued for the
crafts engaged in building construction. By far the greater number of building-
trades artisans, however, were compensated at the so-called maintenance rate
derived from rates paid corresponding trades in the navy yards in the United
States.
The board on rates of pay, gold roll, composed of the assistant
engineer of maintenance and a representative selected by the organ-
ized employees, held 33 meetings during the year. The more im-
portant wage matters considered, other than the general navy yard
adjustment and the rates for building-trades employees referred to
above, were a readjustment of rates for the towboat employees and
rail transportation employees. With but few exceptions adjust-
ments of rates during the year were upward.
A second board, composed of the heads of the eight major depart-
ments and divisions of The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad,
was appointed for the purpose of maintaining a proper coordination
in salaries among employees included under the classification. This
board meets in June and December of each year to consider and sub-
mit recommendations upon all requests for regrading of classified
positions.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 47

Silver employees.-There were no changes made in the basic
schedules of rates for silver employees. The index on living costs
rose from 137.41 as of July 1, 1924, to' 142.44 as of July 1, 1925.
The increase in cost of living did not call for a revision of silver-rate
schedules, however, since for the past several years the basic hourly
rate has been carried at from 1 to 3 cents an hour higher than the
indicated rate computed on the basis of the index kept of living costs.
The following statement, shows the fluctuations in living costs and
the basic hourly rate for unskilled labor from February 1, 1920:

Living Indi- Living Indi- Rate
Date cost cated Rae Date cated Rate
over rate adopted over cate adopted
1914 1814

Feb. 1, 1920...---------......--.. 71.58 21.25 21 Oct. 1,1922-----..........--------.... 47.81 18.20 20
Apr. 1,1920-------.........-----... 73.09 21.47 21 Jan. 1, 1923---..----------............ 46.82 18.04 20
July 1, 1920-----........------...... 87.88 23.18 23 Apr. 1, 1923...---.......-------.. 44.07 17.83 20
Oct. 1, 1920-------------....... 89.12 23.40 23 July 1, 1923..............------------ 46.91 18.18 20
Jan. 1, 1921.------------- 79.28 22. 19 23 Oct. 1, 1923-------------.... 46. 69 18.15 20
Apr. 1, 1921-------------............ 72.40 21.33 23 Jan. 1, 1924...------------- 42.34 17.61 20
July 1,1921---..---------- 68.98 20.91 22 Apr. 1, 1924--.....----------- 41.52 17.51 20
Oct. 1,1921--...------....-----.. 62.59 20.12 21 July 1,1924............... -------------37.41 17.04 20
Jan. 1, 192............... 9.98 19.82 21 Oct. 1, 1924-- ......----------- 38.61 17.15 20
Apr. 1, 1922.............. 55.46 19.24 21 Jan. 1, 1925..-----.------- 40.08 17.33 20
July 1, 1922....-----------...........-- 50.04 18.&7 20 July 1,1925-..----------- 42.44 17.62 20

While on the basis of indicated living costs, the basic hourly rate
for unskilled labor was maintained from 22 to 3 cents higher than
the corresponding rate in 1914, yet toward the close of the year
some divisions were experiencing difficulty in securing competent
men at the rates authorized. The settlement of many West Indians
on the land, together with the rapid development of the banana
industry, has apparently absorbed the former surplus of West Indian
labor left over from construction days.

GRIEVANCE BOARD

The board organized in July, 1920, to hear grievances and com-
plaints of American employees, had but two cases brought before
it during the year, which corresponds with the number of cases
considered last year. The small total of four cases submitted to the
grievance board during the last two years bears witness to the general
satisfactory conditions of employment existing on the Isthmus at
the present time.

PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATIONS

There has been no material change in the activities conducted
under the auspices of the bureau of clubs and playgrounds. This
bureau operates five clubhouses, a boathouse, a swimming pool, and
athletic fields for American employees, and five clubhouses for West
Indian employees, besides playgrounds and kindergartens for children.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


At the clubhouses there are refreshment and cigar stands, moving
picture theaters, bowling alleys, pool and billiard tables, and facilities
for various games, exhibitions, and entertainments, which yield a
net revenue that is applied to cover overhead expenses and the cost
of other activities conducted gratis or at a loss. The bureau is
assisted by a subsidy from The Panama Canal. Clubhouse finances
are dealt with in a paragraph in the section on business operations.
The clubhouses are community centers which assist materially in
maintaining the morale of the organization. They are patronized
not only by employees, their wives and children, but by travelers
and the personnel of the Army and Navy.
The employees maintain at their own expense and under their own
control various clubs and fraternal organizations. Some of these
own their buildings either in the Canal Zone or the cities of Panama
and Colon, and for others The Panama Canal provides lodge halls,
collecting a rental sufficient to cover the cost of maintenance.
RECRUITING, PURCHASES, AND SALES IN THE UNITED STATES
The number of persons tendered employment through the Wash-
ington office was 512, of which number 234 accepted. The corre-
sponding figures for 1924 were 973 and 436. While the number of
employees required from the United States was lower than during the
preceding year, many of the calls were for persons with specialized
experience or for short periods of service, and often as much or more
time and effort were needed to fill one vacancy as is normally ex-
pended in filling a requisition for a considerable number of men in
some standard trade.
The correspondence required in securing wage data for use on the
Isthmus was heavy in connection with some positions.
The total number of orders placed for the purchase of supplies
was 6,731, as compared with 7,182 in the preceding year, and the
value of supplies ordered was $4,695,632.29, as against $4,796,022.22.
In spite of the slight decrease in the number of orders placed, the
office force has been taxed to its capacity to take care of the work
incident to the purchase, inspection, and shipment of the supplies
covered by Washington orders, overtime work was necessary at vari-
ous times, and it was found advisable to increase the force by one
clerk and one messenger.
The offices of the assistant purchasing agents have been continued
at New York, New Orleans, and San Francisco. These offices,
however, purchased very little material during the fiscal year, but
acted principally as receiving and forwarding agencies for materials
purchased by the Washington office for forwarding to the Isthmus
through their respective ports in those cases where satisfactory
purchase for Isthmus delivery could not be made. The Panama






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Canal, medical section, New York general intermediate depot,
United States of America, Brooklyn, N. Y., has continued as in the
past to purchase the bulk of the medical supplies for the use of the
canal.
The sale in the United States of surplus canal material handled by
the purchasing department during the fiscal year yielded $45,914.98,
based on 12 sale orders.
The representation of the Washington office on the various boards
and coordinating committees appointed by the chief coordinator
was continued, and involved much attention and time, particularly
of the higher officials.
In July, 1924, the Washington office of The Panama Canal was
removed by direction of the public buildings commission from the
Old Land Office Building, Seventh and E Streets NW., to the Muni-
tions Building, Nineteenth and B Streets NW.













SECTION V


FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS

This section contains financial statements of The Panama Canal
(Tables 1 to 58) and statistical statements of canal traffic (Tables 59
to 63). For convenience of cross reference the original numbering
of the financial statements quoted from the annual report of the
auditor of The Panama Canal has been preserved, although Tables
Nos. 23, 35, 40, 41, and 45 to 58 have not been printed. A com-
plete list of the tables, including those omitted, follows:
Table No.-
1. General balance sheets.
2. Balances in appropriation and fund accounting.
3. Appropriations by Congress.
4. Status of authorized bond issue.
5. Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States.
6. Payments made by fiscal officers.
7. Receipts and disbursements by collector.
8. Collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals and companies.
9. Collector's special deposit account.
10. Audited pay rolls.
11. Accounts receivable registered and outstanding.
12. Comparative statement of accounts receivable.
13. Comparative statement of accounts payable.
14. Statement of defense capital expenditures to June 30, 1925.
15. Details of canal fixed property.
16. Detail of canal transit equipment.
17. Business property, equipment, etc., by divisions.
18. Business fixed property.
19. Canal business equipment.
20. Status of public works in Panama and Colon.
21. Canal transit material and supplies.
22. Receipts, issues, and transfers of stores.
23. Comparative statement of store balances.
24. Statement of canal earnings, expenses, and net expenses.
25. Canal revenues.
26. Business expenses, revenues, and net revenues.
27. Comparison of expenses and revenues and surplus by years to date.
28. Pay-roll deductions from employees, for rent, etc.
29. Reserves for depreciation.
30. Reserves for repairs.
31. Reserves for gratuity.
32. Cost of production and distribution of electric current.
33. Cost of production and distribution of water.







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No.-
34. Dredging operations (channel maintenance).
35. Money orders issued and paid by Canal Zone and Canal Zone orders
paid by other administrations, fiscal years 1907 to 1925, inclusive.
36. Monthly money-order business of Canal Zone postal service.
37. Postal service-audited revenues, fiscal years 1907 to 1925, inclusive.
38. Postal revenues, fiscal year 1925.
39. Postal savings and deposit money-order transactions, fiscal year 1925.
40. Income, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1925.
41. Expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1925.
42. Income and expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1925.
43. Balance sheet, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, June 30, 1925.
44. Coupon books issued, sold, etc., fiscal year 1925.
45. Amounts of injury payments made during the period August 1, 1908, to
June 30, 1925.
46. Injury and death payments, September 7, 1916, to June 30, 1925.
47. Number of injuries, by extent of disability, for each division or de-
partment.
48. Nature of nonfatal cases, by department or division.
49. Number of cases and compensation paid, classed by injury.
50. Class of work being performed by employees at time of injury, by de-
partments and divisions.
51. Cause of injuries, by departments and divisions.
52. Cost of commissary supplies purchased and sold during fiscal year 1925.
53. Collections made from other than employees.
54. Collections of Panama Railroad land rents.
55. Panama Railroad accounts payable vouchers registered during fiscal
year 1925.
55-a. Panama Canal accounts payable vouchers registered during fiscal year
1925.
56. Statement of work of the time inspection division.
57. Statistics of silver quarters, exclusive of Barracks and Las Cascadas.
58. Report of work performed by pay-roll section.
59. Summary of commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the
fiscal year 1925 and since its opening to commercial traffic.
60. Number of commercial vessels of variouFs nationalities passing through
The Panama Canal 1915-1925.
61-a. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing through The
Panama Canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific during the fiscal year
1925.
61-b. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing through The
Panama Canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic during the fiscal year
1925.
62-a. Tons of cargo carried by commercial vessels passing through The
Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 1925, by fiscal years.
62-b. The Panama Canal net tonnage of vessels by nationalities passing
through The Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 1925, by
fiscal years.
63. Statement showing the number of vessels, the Panama Canal net ton-
nage, tolls assessed, and tons of cargo carried by vessels of the prin-
cipal nations passing through The Panama Canal during the first 11
years of its operation.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


EXPLANATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The financial transactions of The Panama Canal as a whole are
covered in Tables Nos. 1 to 58, of which there is an index attached.
Table No. 1-General balance sheet.-No important change was
made in the general balance sheet during the past fiscal year. The
trial balance is published in this table to show the gross expenses,
earnings, and revenues during the fiscal year 1925. The canal
surplus and business surplus figures shown in this table represent
the accumulated net revenues of the canal to June 30, 1924.
In the final balance sheet, the gross expenses have been deducted
from the gross earnings and revenues and the surplus added to the
surplus figures in the trial balance sheet, so that the figures shown in
the final balance sheet represent the accumulated net earnings of the
canal from all sources to June 30, 1925.
The various items of assets and liabilities in the trial balance sheet
are analyzed and explained in subsequent tables.
Table No. 2-Appropriation and fund accounting.-This table shows
the balance of appropriated and available funds in the United
States Treasury and in the hands of The Panama Canal fiscal officers
as of June 30, 1925. The fiscal officers-i. e., the disbursing clerk in
Washington, and the paymaster and collector on the Isthmus-had
cash on hand amounting to $2,953,546.26, as compared with $1,900,-
537.96 June 30, 1924. Of the cash in the hands of fiscal officers June
30, 1925, $924,726.24 covered miscellaneous receipts and trust funds,
leaving the actual working cash available for expenditure at $2,028,-
820.02.
Accounts receivable covered by registered bills, amounted to
$1,181,913.83 as compared with $952,207.71 the previous fiscal year.
The amount shown under the heading of unincumbered and
unalloted appropriations, covers appropriated funds available for
expenditure over and above the reserves and liabilities immediately
payable. The bulk of this amount will be used during the fiscal year
1926 for construction work under way but not completed June 30,
1925.
The amount shown under the heading of unliquidated incum-
brances covers the reserves for replacements, repairs, and gratuity,
and the amount of requisitions for material and supplies on order.
The amount shown under the heading of undistributed incum-
brances represents the value of the general store stock, less unfilled
orders and requisitions.
Outstanding liabilities on incumbrances cover the estimated cost of
material and supplies contracted for under Washington orders.
The liabilities consist of the outstanding accounts payable vouchers
as shown in the general balance sheet, plus the miscellaneous receipts






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


which will be deposited in the United States Treasury and trust funds
referred to above.
Transfers payable offset transfers available on the assets side of
this table and represent only transfers between the various Panama
Canal appropriations. The $708,675.33 shown as transfers payable
from the maintenance and operation appropriation, covers the profits
from business operations for the fiscal year 1925 as shown in detail in
Table No. 26. This amount will be covered in as miscellaneous
receipts immediately.
Table No. 3-Appropriations by Congress.-The individual acts
covering the appropriations for the construction of The Panama
Canal, are shown in Table No. 3 of the annual report for the fiscal
year 1924, and only the total amounts of such appropriations are
shown this year. The total amount appropriated for construction
purposes was $387,069,143.31, but of this amount $158,842.31 was
returned to the United States Treasury surplus fund, leaving the net
amount of $386,910,301 available for expenditure, all of which has
been expended except a small balance in the appropriation entitled
construction and equipment, which is being used in connection with
the Alhajuela Dam project.
The total amount appropriated to cover the annual payments to
the Republic of Panama, including the act of February 27, 1925, for
the payment due February 26, 1926, is $3,500,000.
TUnder the heading of maintenance and operation appropriations
are grouped the three current yearly appropriations maintenance
and operation, sanitation, and civil government. The total amount
appropriated under this heading to June 30, 1925, is $80,516,047.58.
This table also shows the amounts appropriated for the fiscal year
1926 under the three appropriation titles, a total of $8,735,366.
Table No. 4-Status of authorized bond issue.-There has been no
change in this table since last year. After deducting certain items
from the gross amount appropriated for canal construction, the
amount applicable to the authorized bond issue is $373,007,373.38,
leaving a balance available for appropriation within the limits of the
cost of the canal and the authorized bond issue amounting to $2,215,-
782.62.
Table No. 6-Cash. receipts and disbursements.-This table shows
that the Treasury of the United States advanced to the fiscal officers of
The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 1925, the sum of $8,770,-
000 and disbursed directly from the Treasury $450,406.30, a total
disbursement of $9,220,406.30. Against this amount the fiscal
officers of The Panama Canal remitted to the Treasury the sum of
$553,010.98 and direct collections by the Treasury amounted to
$443,983.31, a total of $996,994.29, resulting in a net withdrawal
from the United States Treasury of appropriated funds amounting
to $8,223,412.01 for the fiscal year 1925.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No. 6-Disbursements by the paymaster.-Disbursements to
the amount of $18,912,178.51 were made during the year by the pay-
master. Of this amount, the sum of $7,007,643.76 was on account
of the Panama Railroad Co. Employees on the gold rolls were paid
$6,582,963.82, and those on the silver rolls $3,918,006.61, while the
sum of $1,403,564.35 was paid on miscellaneous vouchers.
Collections on the pay rolls amounted to $3,540,959.40, of which
amount the sum of $2,793,468.71 was for coupon books and the re-
mainder for miscellaneous items. Of the total collections on pay
rolls, the sum of $2,846,219.02 was disbursed by the paymaster, and
the balance, $694,740.38, transferred to the collector's accounts.
The American Foreign Banking Corporation, the Government
depository, was taken over by the Chase National Bank of New York
City, which bank was designated as a Government depository and
the business continued without interruption. During the year the
sum of $7,608,220 Panama Railroad funds, was transferred to the
Panama Railroad treasurer in New York City. This amount
includes $1,308,220 cash transfer, of which $939,050 was mutilated
currency, due to rapid deterioration of paper money through climatic
conditions. This amount is approximately $370,000 in excess of the
previous year, due to the very small amount of new currency being put
into circulation. The latter part of the fiscal year the Chase National
Bank brought down $1,000,000 made up of $600,000 in $5 bills,
$300,000 in one's, and $100,000 in two's. The cash brought down
from the States by the paymaster during the year amounted to
$500,000. Very little gold coin is in circulation. The gold reserve
remains the same, approximately $325,000, of which $300,000 is
held by the various banks. The cash situation on the Isthmus is
good, with the exception of an oversupply of $5 bills, which will be
adjusted by a shipment to be made by the Chase National Bank.
Tables Nos. 7, 8 and 9-Receipts and disbursements by the collector.-
Collections repaid to appropriations amounted to $9,060,662.28.
Miscellaneous receipts collections amounted to $21,707,610.72, of
which amount $21,400,992.24 was for tolls. The amount of money
handled by the collector through his security deposit accounts totaled
$28,205,465 as shown in Table No. 5. In addition to these amounts,
the collector handled independent funds consisting of clubhouse
funds, trust funds, postal-savings funds, money-order funds, interest,
Treasury-savings certificates, as shown in Table No. 7, amounting to
over $2,000,000.
Collections for account, of the Panama Railroad Co. amounted to
$13,729,309.26, making a total cash turn over of approximately
$46,500,000.
Table No. JO-Salaries and wages.-The amount of money earned
by Panama Canal employees during the fiscal year 1925 was $10,615,-
412.92. Of this amount, 6,677,028.24 was earned by gold employees






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


and $3,938,384.68 by employees on the silver rolls. The total pay
roll for the fiscal year 1924 was $9,711,933.36, and for 1923, $8,627,-
698.19. Of the amount paid for salaries and wages during the fiscal
year 1925, $8,943,805.51 was from the appropriation for maintenance
and operation, $807,347.31 from the sanitation appropriation, and
$864,260.10 from the appropriation for civil government.
Table No. 11-Accounts receivable.-There were 33,637 bills regis-
tered during the fiscal year 1925 covering $29,561,896.31, compared
with 34,824 bills and $31,679,167.34 the previous fiscal year, a reduc-
tion of $2,117,271.03, which is more than offset by the reduction
in tolls. Toll bills registered during 1924 amounted to $24,291,708.07,
while the amount for 1925 was $21,400,992.24, a reduction of $2,890,-
715.83. This table shows in detail the bills registered for tolls by
months during the fiscal year, the largest amount being in the month
of July, 1924, $1,935,296.43. The smallest daily average was for
the month of June, 1925. the total amount for that month being
$1,659,517.66.
Table No. 12-Comparative statement of accounts receivable.-The
uncollected bills at the end of the fiscal year 1925 amounted to
$1,181,913.83, which is $229,706.12 more than the amount outstand-
ing at the end of the fiscal year 1924 and 8395,066.74 greater than
the amount outstanding at the end of the fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 13-Comparative statement of accounts payable.-Bills pay-
able at the end of the fiscal year amounted to $1,410,914.82 compared
with $1,330,640.04 the previous year, an increase of 880,274.78. The
amount of bills payable exceeds the bills collectible by approximately
$230,000.
Table No. 14--National defense expenditures.-This table shows the
individual items which were charged off as an arbitrary proportion
of the cost of constructing The Panama Canal, representing its value
from a national defense standpoint. The difference between the
amount so charged off and the total cost of constructing the canal
is carried in the accounts as the commercial value of the canal, on
which a return on the investment is expected. This account was
increased during the fiscal year 1925 by 835,912.97, made up of a
settlement in connection with the depopulation of the Cannl Zone for
military purposes amounting to $3,034.20, which was paid to a family
evicted from the town of Matachin a number of years ago. The
balance of the increase, amounting to $32,878.77, covers expenses in
connection with the securing and handling of armor plates for the
spillways. This latter amount was paid from the. appropriation for
the maintenance and operation of thlie canal, but is added to the
defense capital expenditure since it would not be a proper charge
against the commercial value of the canal.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No. 15-Canalfixed property.-The book value of fixed prop-
erty used in connection with the transiting of vessels amounted to
$235,975,333.74. There were no reductions in this account during
the year, but new items were set up to the amount of $290,671.24.
Of this amount $53,359.02 was for additional rising stem valves at
the locks; $87,271.76 for additional towing locomotives; $35,600 for
the canal's proportion of a new building at Cristobal to house the
offices of the municipal and electrical engineers. The sum of $91,-
115.66 was set up in connection with the depopulation and other
preliminary expenses in the Alhajuela Dam basin. All other items
amounted to $23,325.30
Table No. 16-Canal transit equipment.-The amount invested in
equipment used for the transiting of vessels, and channel maintenance
was $4,139,807.32. During the fiscal year this account was reduced
by withdrawals of equipment and by the use of depreciation funds
for new equipment (which automatically reduced the book value of
old equipment) by $122,800.60. At the same time, the account was
increased by $244,965.46 covering new launches, $35,244.35; new
barges constructed here, $198,000; barge No. 29 purchased from the
Panama Railroad, $8,632.83; and other smaller equipment, machinery
and tools amtounting to $3,088.28.
Table No. 17-Business property.-This table shows the entire
investment in the business activities of the canal, consisting of fixed
property, equipment, material and supplies, cash, work in process,
and undistributed business capital, separated according to the divi-
sions using same. The undistributed business capital charge against
the divisions is made up of a portion of the general store stock (rep-
resenting the value of standard material and supplies held in reserve
for the business divisions); cash; and accounts receivable registered
in the transit accounts for account of the business units. The capi-
talization of these business units amounted to $29,300,163.14 on
June 30, 1925, which represents practically the same investment as
the previous fiscal year, the only difference being in the amount of
work in process and suspended items.
Table No. 18-Business fixed property.-The total amount of fixed
property in use by the business divisions as shown in Table No. 17
was reduced by withdrawals during the fiscal year 1925 to the extent
of $155,573.72 and increased by new itdms amounting to $272,807.65.
The largest item added was the cost of improving the Gamboa to
Panama water main, $47,000. New garages for housing employees'
automobiles were constructed at a cost of $39,808.65. At Gatun an
exchange of gold and silver quarters was made between The Panama
Canal and the United States Army for equivalent values amounting
to $25,100.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No. 19-Business equipment.-The book value of this class of
equipment amounted to $822,762.33, compared with $851,296.08
the previous year. This reduction is due mainly to the system of
depreciating the machinery and tools and writing down their book
value monthly to the debit of the operating expenses. The increase or
decrease in this account is affected by the difference between the
replace cost of machinery and tools and the monthly depreciation.
The account was further reduced by the writing out of the value of the
equipment in the Hotel Aspinwall on Taboga Island, $9,555.06, and
motor vehicles amounting to $6,212.03. The account was increased
by the addition of machinery and tools amounting to $63,863.51.
Table No. 20-Waterworks, sewers, and pavements in the cities of
Panama and Colon.-The amount invested in waterworks, sewers,
and pavements in the cities of Colon and Panama, reimbursable to
the United States on June 30, 1925, was $1,825,720.12, of which
$994,132.34 is in the city of Panama and $831,587.78 in Colon.
The Panama Canal supplies water to these two cities from the
Canal Zone system and maintains the sewers and pavements under a
contract entered into in 1907 between The Panama Canal and the
Republic of Panama. The Panama Canal collects the water rentals
from the residents of these two cities and uses the funds to cover the
cost of the water and maintenance of sewers and streets, interest on
the investment at, 2 per cent per annum, and amortization based on
50 years from 1907 on. During the time the contract has been in
effect The Panama Canal has used approximately $2,850,000 for
maintenance, operation, and repairs of the water system, sewers, and
streets; $956,000 interest on the investment; and $820,000 return on
the capital cost.
Table No. 2-Material and supplies.-This table shows the value
of material and supplies in the general-store stock on June 30, 1925,
compared with June 30, 1924. The amount on hand at the end of the
fiscal year 1925 was $4,256,982.08, which is approximately $175,000
more than the amount on hand the previous fiscal year. The turn-
over of material was considerably greater than during the previous
fiscal year, as shown in the following tables. There is held in reserve
for inventory adjustment from a fund created during the war for
war-price reductions subsequent thereto the amount of $431,581.28.
The $537,897.71 in the table under the heading of reserve for inventory
adjustments includes the value of dynamite secured for the dredging
division through the chief coordinator without cost.
Table No. 22-Mfaterial and supplies received and disposed of.-
Material purchased and handled through the storehouses amounted to
$4,103,322.96, compared with $3,682,379.38 the previous year, an
increase of approximately $421,00). Material purchased and de-
livered directly to divisions without passing through the storehouses
amounted to $1,180,915.71, compared with $844,739.64 the previous






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


fiscal year. Material manufactured locally was taken into account
at a value of $495,154.83, compared with $355,426.19 the previous
year. The total value of material issued by the storehouses was
$3,793,186.13 and the sales amounted to $1,092,843.33, compared
with $3,654,960.52 and $1,017,538.79, respectively, during the fiscal
year 1924.
Table No. 23-Comparative statement of material and supplies, by
commodities.-This table shows the classification of store stock by
commodities in comparative columns for the last two fiscal years.
The value of fuel oil on hand at the end of the fiscal year 1925 was
$98, 735.78; medical stores, $65,625.85; Panama Canal press stock,
$89,560.54; lock parts at Corozal store, $434,898.36; sand and gravel
in the Gamboa gravel pile, $203,723.98.
Table No. 24-Canal transit expenses and earnings.-Under the
present system of accounting the gross operating expenses of the
divisions engaged in the transiting of vessels, together with the cost of
sanitation and civil government, are first reduced by the earnings
in those units and the net expense is then compared with the revenues
from tolls and other miscellaneous receipts.
The gross cost of operating and maintaining The Panama Canal
during the fiscal year 1925, including the overhead expenses, sanita-
tion, and civil government, was $11,283,360.92, as compared with
$11,170,800.51 the previous year, an increase of $112,560.41. The
gross expenses include an item of theoretical amortization and depre-
ciation of $655,377.50, leaving the actual expenses at $10,627,983.42.
The transit earnings from all sources amounted to $3,166,667.48,
leaving the net expense 87,461,315.94. Of this amount $5,883,938.45
was payable from the appropriation for maintenance and operation;
$611,940.53 from the appropriation for sanitation; and $965,436.96
from the appropriation for civil government. During the fiscal
year 1924, the earnings amounted to $2,796,895.12 and the net
expense $7,718,527.89. From an appropriation standpoint these
figures are exclusive of amounts expended for capital additions of
fixed property and equipment shown in Tables Nos. 14 to 19, inclusive.
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT
The gross expenses of this department were approximately $15,000
more than the previous year, approximately $13,000 of which were
in the executive-office salaries, representing increase in pay due to the
standardization under the new classification. The earnings were
increased somewhat through the adjustment of salaries chargeable to
business divisions, but there was also an increase of $7,000 in the
bureau of clubs and playgrounds, which represents the difference be-
tween the gross expense and the appropriation limitation of $100,000
a year. The net expense of the entire department ($368,299.30)
was, however, $2,000 less than the previous year.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT
The gross expense in this department was approximately $20,000
more than the fiscal year 1924, due to the reclassification of salaries.
The amount charged off to business units, including the Panama
Railroad, was increased approximately $50,000, representing the
approximate amount of work done in this department for those
divisions. The net. expense for the year ($170,562.37) was $28,000
less than the previous year.
WASHINGTON OFFICE
The increase of approximately $16,000 was due to an increase in the
force in the purchasing bureau on account of an increase in the pur-
chase and inspection of supplies for the Isthmus.
CIVIL GOVERNMENT
The net expense for all branches of civil government was $965,-
436.96 as compared with $921,319.19 the previous year, an increase
of $44,000. Four thousand dollars of this increase was due to a
reduction in the earnings. The proportion of police salaries charged
to the Panama Railroad was reduced on account of a reduction in
the service rendered the railroad. The large increases are in schools
and police departments, $40,000 and $17,000, respectively, mainly
due to salary adjustments, and there is a reduction of approximately
$30,000 in the net postal expense due to the discontinuance of postage-
stamp payments to the Republic of Panama.
HEALTH DEPARTMENT
The total gross cost of operating the hospitals and asylums, quaran-
tine service, sanitation, and street cleaning, was $1,320,340.07,
compared with $1,368,598.38 the previous year. On September 1,
1924, the Panaman Government took over the complete operation of
Santo Tomas Hospital, which resulted in a saving of more than
$10,000 during the fiscal year. On account of limited appropriations,
pay-roll reductions were made to the extent of about $13,000 and
the amount expended for material and supplies was about $25,000
less than the previous year, which practically accounts for the dif-
ference between the operating expenses for the two years.
The earnings amounted to 8708,399.54, which was 820,000 more
than the previous year. The net expense for operating this depart-
ment was $611,940.53, which was approximately $68,000 less than
the previous year. This saving was obligated for some necessary
hospital construction work which will be completed during the
fiscal year 1926.
61 96-25t -5






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


OFFICE ENGINEER, METEOROLOGY AND HYDROGRAPHY, AND SURVEYS

The net expense of :the office engineer was $7,000 more than the
fiscal year 1924, partly due to an increase in salaries and force, and
partly due to a reduction in the amount charged to transit divisions.
The division of meteorology and hydrography operated for ap-
proximately $3,000 less than the previous year.
The expense in the section of surveys was approximately $8,200
less than the previous year, partly due to a reduction in the pay-
roll but mainly to an increase of approximately $7,000 in the earnings
covering work performed in connection with the Alhajuela Dam
project, which expense is charged to another account.
GENERAL STOREHOUSES
The gross expense of operating the general storehouse was ap-
proximately $58,000 greater than the previous year, $25,000 of which
was due to logging operations which were carried on in the fiscal
year 1925, $10,000 in connection with handling armor plate, and
approximately $25,000 in the general labor and material expense due
to increased amount of material and supplies handled. This in-
crease is largely offset by an increase in the earnings, the cost of the
logging operations being charged into the value of the logs and the
increase in general operating expenses being offset by corresponding
increase in the charge against business storehouses corresponding to
the increase in the amount of business material handled and sold, as
compared with that used in transit operations. The net storehouse
operating expense ($326,027.12) was only $2,700 larger than the
expense for the previous fiscal year.
PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS
The net expense for the maintenance of public buildings and
grounds, including the Administration Building, was $151,854.85,
a which is $9,000 less than the previous year. This difference is due
to considerable expenditure in painting the Administration Building
during the fiscal year 1924 and work on one of the concrete houses on
Balboa Prado necessary on account of the sinking foundation.
MISCELLANEOUS
Street lighting increased a small amount, due to an increased
number of lights.
Water for municipal purposes is a fixed figure for which the
municipal engineering division receives credit for water furnished
Balboa swimming pool and for watering public grounds and flush-
ing the sewers.
The amount expended on roads, streets, and sidewalks, $88,674.40,
was limited to the amount appropriated for that purpose rather than







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


to the actual repairs that are necessary for roads in the Canal Zone.
For the fiscal year 1926 the sumn of $120,000 is appropriated for this
purpose.
The expenditure on storm sewers was practically the same as the
previous year.
The amount expended on Panama Canal tracks and reserve
equipment was $20,000 more than was spent the previous year.
This increase is mainly due to the increased expenditures on the
reserve rolling stock which is maintained for emergency purposes,
such as the closing of the canal. Recently this rolling stock was
transferred to the Panama Railroad for maintenance and operation
and the expense of maintenance will be paid by the railroad.
The amount paid the Panama Railroad for transportation of em-
ployees on the Islmunus has not been changed during the last two
years although at times the actual transportation has exceeded
the $10,000 per month.
The amount. spent on laborers' quarters, $87,786.57 was approxi-
mately $8,000 more than was expended for the same purpose during
the fiscal year 1924. This figure represents the difference between
the actual cost of maintaining these quarters and the amount of rental
collected from silver employees and is assumed by 'I'The Panama
Canal in this way rather than through an increase in silver wages
and an increase in the rental, which would be necessary in order to
balance the account.
MARINE DIVISION
The gross expense of the marine division, including the port
captains' offices, the board of admeasurement. the board of local
inspectors, pilots, tugs and launches, handling lines, and the light-
house sub-division, all of which are necessary in the transiting of
vessels, amounted to $1,485,266.28 as compared with $1,428,916."90
the previous fiscal year. The revenues from pilotage charges, use of
tugs and launches for which a charge was made, handling of lines
and salvaging vessels, amounted to $937,145.91 against a revenue
of $999,788.32 the previous fiscal year. Thle bulk of this difference
is due to the reduction in the earnings from salvage work, no large
salvage jobs having been handled during the fiscal year 1925.
The net expense of the marine division for passing vessels through
the canal was $548,120.37, compared with $429,128.5S expended
during the fiscal year 1924. The increase in the net expense of the
lighthouse sub-division due to an increased expense in aids to naviga-
tion and reduction in salvage revenue was approximately $80,000,
and the rest of the difference in' the net expense between the two
years is mainly due to an increase in the net operating cost of tugs
and launches at Balboa, which jumped from 819,793.42 in 1924 to
861,532.04 in 1925.







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


LOCK OPERATION
The cost of operating and maintaining the Gatun Locks in 1925
was $443,154.49 as against $743,120.22 the previous year. The
difference is due to the expense of overhauling the Gatun Locks in
the fiscal year 1924.
The cost of operating the Pedro Miguel Lock was $333,335.57,
practically the same as the previous fiscal year.
The cost of operating and maintaining the Miraflores Locks was
$692,602.05 compared with $412,995.07 in 1924, the difference being
the cost of overhauling the Miraflores Locks carried on during the
fiscal year 1925.
DAMAGE TO VESSELS
The amount paid for damages to vessels in the locks was $8,520,
the largest amount of which, $8,000, was paid for damages to the
steamship Steelore. One hundred dollars was paid for damages to
the steamship Agwimex; $260 to the steamship Andrea E. Lucken-
bach; and 8160 to the steamship Frances E. Powell.
Damages to vessels in the canal outside of the locks amounted to
$966.77. Of this amount $49.72 covers the mechanical division
charge for repairs to the steamship Urabamba and $215.05 for repairs
made to the U. S. S. Rochester for which the canal was found
liable. Sixty dollars were paid for damages to the steamship Andrea
E. Lvckenbach, $250 to the steamship Heredia, $192 to the steam-
ship Nwubanik, and $200 to the steamship Bayway.
CHANNEL MAINTENANCE
The gross amount expended by the dredging division was $2,428,-
471.71. Against this, there is a credit of $370,987.67, covering
dredging jobs performed for the United States Army and Navy on
the Atlantic side, leaving the net expenditure for channel mainte-
nance $2,057,484.04, which was approximately $283,000 less than
the amount expended the previous fiscal year.
Table No. 25-Canal revenues.-This table shows a comparison of
the amounts deposited in the United States Treasury as miscel-
laneous receipts during the fiscal years 1924 and 1925, the revenue
for the fiscal year 1925 being $3,099,235.73 less than that for the
fiscal year 1924. The reduction in tolls alone was $2,914,939.04.
The revenue from taxes, fines, and fees is made up of $21,000 col-
lected through the magistrates' courts, $3,500 by the district court,
$2,300 by the police department, and $30,000 for motor vehicle and
other licenses. The miscellaneous item contains 73 cents pay-car
overages, and the balance is covered in as miscellaneous receipts
from the sale of cotton waste sold for account of Patrick Corr &
Sons under contract 1033-WSO-1284. Settlement was made with
the contractor by direct appropriation, House Document No. 7771,






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Sixty-sixth Congress, under Court of Claims No. 33298. The
proceeds from the sale of the rejected waste were held by the dis-
bursing clerk in Washington to apply to the settlement of this claim,
but since they were not needed the amount was covered in as mis-
cellaneous receipts.
Table No. 26-Business expenses and revenues.-This table shows
the business operations of The Panama Canal as separate and distinct
from the operation and maintenance activities directly connected
with the transiting of vessels. Under the annual appropriation
act The Panama Canal is authorized to use funds appropriated for
the operation and maintenance of The Panama Canal in conducting
auxiliary business enterprises with the provision that funds so used
will be. recovered and repaid to the appropriation to be used for the
purposes for which they were originally appropriated and with the
further provision that any profits derived from such business activi-
ties be covered into the United States Treasury as miscellaneous
receipts annually.
ELECTRICAL DIVISION
The electric light and power system includes the operation of the
Gatun hydroelectric plant, the Miraflores steam electric plant,
operation of substations, transmission lines, and distribution system,
detailed cost of which is shown in Table No. 32. The basic rate for
electric current to departments and divisions of The Panama Canal,
Panama Railroad, and other departments of the Government, was
$0.014 up to January 1, 1925, at which time it was reduced to $0.0125
per kilowatt-hour. The basic rate to outsiders remains 4 cents per
kilowatt-hour. The total expense of operating the system was
approximately $50,000 less than the previous year, which is more
than offset by the saving in fuel oil at the Miraflores plant, which
was not operated during the past dry season. The excess of revenues
over expenses was $305,495.79. The previous year the profits were
$214,550.79, and the year before that, $355,221.31.
The expense in connection with electrical work was $724,021.04
compared with $254,277.57 the previous year. This large amount
is due to labor, equipment, and material in connection with the
installation of the automatic telephone system for the Panama
Railroad, which passes through this account.
The cost of operating the telephone, telegraph, and signal systems
for the Panama Railroad was $231,108.81, an increase of approxi-
mately $24,000 over the previous year.
MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING DIVISION
The water system involves the operation of pump stations, filtra-
tion plants, reservoirs, and pipe lines for the production, filtration,
and distribution of water throughout the Canal Zone and in the






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


cities of Colon and Panama, including water delivered to vessels
using the terminals and transiting the canal. The details of these
operations are shown in Table No. 33. The rate for water to depart-
ments and divisions of The Panama Canal, Panama Railroad, and
other departments of the Government was 13 cents a thousand
gallons during the fiscal year 1925. From July 1, 1925, the rate was
reduced to 12 cents per thousand gallons. The rate to outsiders in
the Canal Zone is 20 cents per thousand gallons, and the rate for
water delivered to vessels 50 cents per thousand gallons.
The net revenue amounting to $26,638.26 contains an item of
$23,400 to cover the value of water used for municipal purposes, and
the balance represents an excess over the actual cost of production..
This net revenue lacks $50,000 of covering 3 per cent on the invest-
ment, which is approximately the figure representing water and
water facilities provided by the municipal engineering division for
fire protection but for which they receive no book revenue.
Municipal engineering work, exclusive of the water system and
public works in Panama and Colon, amounted to $644,708.24, which
includes the operation of the incinerator at Cristobal and other
excavation, filling, concrete work, and street work performed for
various departments and divisions of the canal, railroad, other
departments of the Government, and the Panaman Government.
The expenditures, revenues and returns on the investment in
public works in the cities of Panama and Colon are explained under
Table No. 20.
MECHANICAL DIVISION
The total outlay in shop and dry-dock operations during the year
amounted to $3,533,164.26 as compared with $2,780,125.31 the
previous year. The net revenues amounted to $87,010.29. The
expenses include fixed charges of approximately $150,000 set aside
for extraordinary repairs and improvements over and above the
regular monthly depreciation and reserve for repair charges. On
April 1, 1925, the surcharges to cover mechanical division expenses,
which had been 35 per cent on work performed for departments and
divisions of the canal, railroad, etc., and 40 per cent on work done
for outsiders, were reduced to a flat 30 per cent charge on direct
labor on all shopwork. At the same time there was a change made
in The Panama Canal overhead charge which was 10 per cent over
all for many years up to that time. The Panama Canal overhead
charge against departments and divisions was reduced to 5 per cent,
the 10 per cent surcharge on work to outsiders remaining in effect.
WHARFAGE
The revenue from wharfage charges amounted to $65,813.86 com-
pared with $76,047.36 the previous year. Most of this wharfage
revenue comes from charges against vessels using Pier 6, Cristobal,






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


and Pier 18, Balboa, both of which are owned by The Panama Canal
but operated by the Panama Railroad. Neither of these piers is
used very much and of course the net revenue is only a fractional
part of the 3 per cent return on their cost.
FUEL-OIL PLANTS
The cost of operating the pumping plants at Balboa and Mount
Hope was 8360,573.63 and the revenues from pumping fuel oil at
4 cents per barrel amounted to $448,776.28, making a profit of
$88,202.65 as compared with $250,000 net revenues the previous
year. The value of fuel oil handled by the canal for its own use was
approximately $470,000 compared with $507,000 the previous year.
During the year approximately 11 million barrels of fuel oil were
pumped in and out by the pumping plants at Balboa and Mount
Hope.
BUSINESS STOREHOUSES
The value of general store material and supplies issued to the
business divisions of The Panama Canal, together with the value of
material sold directly to outsiders, and the storehouse expense
chargeable against such material, was a little in excess of $3,344,000
compared with $3,000,000 the previous year. The net profits from
this business amounted to $57,950.33, which contains a profit of
approximately $25,000 on scrap sales during the year. The balance
of the net revenue results from a surcharge of 10 per cent on material
issued to divisions and 25 per cent on material sold to outsiders,
which is somewhat in excess of the actual overhead cost. The
expenses include the cost of the new Cardex file system installed
during the year at a cost of approximately $15,000 and a reserve for
necessary roof repairs amounting to $35,000.
MISCELLANEOUS OPERATIONS
The cost of animal and motor transportation during the year was
$334,000 compared with $324,000 the previous year, and the net
profits $20,374.28 compared with $41,784.76 in 1924.1
The operating costs of the motor ear repair shop amounted to
$142,000 compared with $133,000 the previous year, the net revenue
for 1925 being 54,967.18.
The operating costs of the building division amounted to over
$1,000,000 compared with $846,000 the previous year, resulting in a
net profit of $40,546.01. 1
The cost of operating The Panama Canal Press was $238,000 com-
pared with $256,000 the previous year. The expenses include a
fixed charge of $10,000 reserved for the replacement of printing
presses.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


The revenue from the rental of gold quarters amounted to $394,-
152.57 compared with 8374,304.65 the year before. The net rev-
enues, consisting of that part of the rental rate intended to cover
amortization and interest on the investment at 5 per cent, have been
used for the erection of some new quarters and extraordinary repairs
on old quarters by authority of the Secretary of War.
The amount of rent collected from silver employees was $190,000;
the cost of operating and maintaining these quarters was approxi-
mately $278,000, the deficit being transferred to general expense of
the canal in Table No. 24 under which an explanation is made for
this method of accounting. The previous fiscal year the revenues
were shown as $241,746.21, which represents the total cost of operat-
ing the quarters rather than the amount of rent collected from the
employees. Through a bookkeeping error, the deficit was credited
to revenues to the debit of the canal expense account.
Under the heading of building rentals have been combined the
rental from garages, boathouses, restaurants, and markets, which
were shown separately the previous fiscal year.
District quartermasters' supplies and services showed a loss of
$18,073.42 as compared with a loss of 828,936.73 the previous year.
As explained in the last annual report, this account and the operations
of the animal and motor transportation division, motor car repair
shop, and partly that of building repairs and construction work hand
in hand and the loss shown in district quartermasters' services is
more than offset by profits in the other units named.
The operations of the Hotel Tivoli produced a gross revenue of
$242,033.67 compared' with $198,535.57 in 1924, resulting in a profit
of $13,685.59 as against a loss of $7,036.63 the year before.
Land rentals increased approximately $17,000 over the previous
fiscal year, which is due to increased revenue from agricultural
licenses a statement of which is shown in Table No. 54. The expenses
charged against land rentals, amounting to over $45,000, represent
the cost of operating the farm bureau, which was established by
direction of the Secretary of War on recommendation of the Special
Panama Canal Commission, to educate native farmers in the pro-
duction of fruit and vegetables for local consumption.
The loss in the sand and gravel deliveries was due to the small
quantity handled, which greatly increased the loading costs. The
stock pile at Gamboa now contains only run-of-bank gravel, which
has considerable sand in it. Arrangements are now being made to
separate the gravel from the sand and to wash the sand and crusher
has been secured to crush the large gravel which could otherwise not
be used in ordinary concreting.
Under the heading of sale of Government property there is shown
a loss of $8,594.42 representing the difference between the proceeds






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


from the sale and the book value of the property sold, the largest
loss being on the Aspinwall Hotel property. The boat house at
Gatun, which was carried on the books at a net value of $2,900, was
sold for $500.
The profits shown under the heading of nautical charts and pub-
lications were due to the fact that so far nothing has been added to
the cost of these charts for the cost of handling same. They are
handled by employees whose salaries are charged to other duties they
perform.
The gross revenues from all business operations amounted to
$14,564,114.93, compared with $12,968,777.29 the previous fiscal
year. The net profits which were covered into the Treasury as mis-
cellaneous receipts amounted to $765,916.85, compared with $901,-
624.12 the previous year.
Table No. 27-Surplus.-The gross canal transit revenues since
the opening of the canal amounted to $121,327,975.46, and the
corresponding expenses, $78,086,461.05, producing a surplus of
$43,241,514.41. During the same period the revenues from business
operations totaled $117,661,396.95, and the corresponding expenses,
$113,429,644.78, which makes a total profit to June 30, 1925, $4,231,-
752.17.
Table No. 28-Collections from gold emrployees.-The total amount
collected from employees for house rent and other supplies and
services was $678,912.12, of which $359,158.26 was for rent and
$77,776.99 for electric current, water, etc.
Table No. 29-Depreciation.-The total amount of depreciation
written into the operating costs was $5,183,145.05. This figure
includes theoretical depreciation amounting to $1,216,050.90 and
theoretical interest on the depreciation fund amounting to $349,-
491.01, a total of $1,565,541.91. Deducting this theoretical amount
from the gross depreciation leaves the net amount of cash in reserve
for the replacement of property and equipment at $3,617,603.14,
which is $127,099.04 more than the amount on hand at the end of
1924. During the fiscal year 1925 approximately $365,000 of the
depreciation funds were used to make necessary replacements of
property and equipment. In the table showing the comparative
figures for 1924 and 1925 the reserve for garage and boathouse
replacements, which was shown separately in 1924, has been com-
bined with that for rented buildings in the fiscal year 1925.
Table No. SO-Reserve for extraordinary repairs.-The total amount
of cash in reserve and available for extraordinary repairs to property
and equipment in daily use, as of June 30, 1925, was $1,617,374.62.
The table includes a new item of $31,594.72 reserved for repairs to
general store buildings. The reserve for maintenance of stadiums
shown in 1924 was transferred to the bureau of clubs and play-
grounds.
61696--25t--






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No. 31-Reserve for gratuity.-The amount of cash held in
reserve for vacation pay due the employees of the four principal
business divisions was $549,581.73. This fund is created by adding
a percentage to the gold labor charges for work performed by the
business divisions and represents a live liability, being immediately
payable when the employees take their vacations or leave the
service.
Table No 82-Electric current.-The cost of operating the hydro-
electric station at Gatun was $79,012.36; Miraflores power plant,
$58,291.81; substations, 3133,931.07; transmission lines, $65,317.18;
distribution system, $114,274.43; a total operating cost of $450,-
826.85. The total kilowatt-hour production was 50,820,685, com-
pared with 47,786,682 the year before. The unit cost per kilowatt-
hour for the fiscal year 1925 was 80.0089, compared with $0.0107
during the fiscal year 1924. This cost is exclusive of the fixed
capital charge.
Table No. 33- Water.-The total cost of operating the pump
stations, filtration plant, reservoirs, and pipe lines in the Pacific
system during the fiscal year, including the overhead expenses, was
$289,024.07 on a production of 2,779,750,000 gallons, resulting in a
unit cost of 10.4 cents per thousand gallons. The total operating
cost in the Atlantic system was $165,791.38 on 1,805,601,000 gallons,
resulting in a unit cost of 9.11 cents per thousand gallons. The
average cost for the year for pumping, filtering, and distributing
water in the Canal Zone and the cities of Panama and Colon was
9.9 cents per thousand gallons. This table shows a comparison of
costs and quantities of water between the fiscal years 1924 and 1925;
also the proportion chargeable for water delivered in the cities of
Panama and Colon and the proportion chargeable for water used in
the Canal Zone, the average cost of water delivered in Panama and
Colon being 7.34 cents per thousand gallons and the average cost of
water used in the Canal Zone 11.16 cents per thousand gallons.
On July 1, 1925, the rate for water furnished departments and divi-
sions, including the Army and Navy, was reduced from 13 cents to
12 cents per thousand gallons.
Table No. 34-Dredging.-The dredging division operated dipper
dredges excavating rock and earth from the canal channel, the
Atlantic and Pacific entrances, and Balboa Harbor to the extent of
1,693,250 cubic yards at a unit cost of 80.39 cents per cubic yard..
Suction dredges removed 1,472,800 cubic yards of earth and rock at
an average cost of 24.18 cents per cubic yard. The total cost of
dredging was $1,717,457.74 on a total yardage of 3,166,050, or an
average of 54.25 cents per cubic yard, as compared with 40.34 cents
per cubic yard the previous year on 5,102,100 cubic yards at a cost
of $2,058,349.69.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Tables Nos. 35 and 36- Money orders.-During the fiscal year
there were issued 140,129 money orders amounting to $2,745,718.24.
Money orders cashed by the Canal Zone post offices amounted to
$1,208,256.79. Canal Zone money orders paid in the United States
amounted to 81,667,907.32. Interest paid on deposit money orders
amounted to $11,320.12.
Tables Nos. J7 and 3S-PoIstal service ru'enues.-The. revenue
from money-order fees, stamp sales, post-office box rents, and news-
paper postage was $136,431.60. The stamp sales alone amounted
to $110,014.08. Interest earned on money-order funds on deposit
amounted to $23,294.79.
Table No. 39-Postal savings.-Postal savings money orders were
issued to the amount of $812,150. The amount paid was $763,860,
and the amount remaining on deposit June 30, 1925, was $535,270.
Tables Nos. 40 to 43S, inclusive-Panama Canal clubliouses.-Table
No. 40 shows in detail the income from clubhouse operations,
amounting to $481,358.38.
Table No. 41 shows the expenses of operating the clubhouses,
$498,333.84.
Table No. 43 shows the current assets and liabilities, the stock of
material on hand amounting to $22,568.33, and bills collectible
amounting to $10,729.71. Against this there were bills payable at
the end of the year amounting to $47,707.09. The accumulated sur-
plus on June 30, 1925, was $148,628.05.
Table No. 44-Coupon books.-The total amount of commissary
coupon books issued to employees was $3,414,560 and the value of
books sold for cash $1,546,735. In addition to these, books were
issued on charge accounts amounting to $113,925, making a grand
total of $5,075,220. The value of coupons lifted in the commissaries
in exchange for goods was $4,675,702.70; at Panama Canal clubhouses,
$138,039.81; at restaurants, $244,100.61; and at the Hotels Tivoli
and Washington, Young Men's Christian Associations, etc., $11,042.50;
a grand total of $5,068,885.62. The amount of coupons handled is
approximately $400,000 greater than the previous year.
Tables Nos. 45 to 51, inclusive-Pirsonal injuiries.-The contents of
these tables are explained in connection with the claims bureau at
the beginning of this report.
Table No. 52-Commissary purchases and sales.-The cost of goods
purchased during the year amounted to 86,334.714.38 and the pro-
ceeds from the sale of supplies at wholesale and retail prices com-
bined amounted to $7,944,101.65, as compared with $7,324,203.76
during the fiscal year 1924. The profits from all commissary opera-
tions, including these sales and the net results from the various
manufacturing plants, were $392,070.48, compared with $409,248.86
the previous fiscal year.








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No. 53.-This table shows collections from other than em-
ployees for rent and the corresponding charges for electric current,
water and janitor service in the houses rented, amounting to approx-
imately $49,000.
Table No. 54.-This table shows the monthly collections for Pan-
ama Railroad real estate rentals and Panama Canal market stalls;
the Panama Railroad land rentals amounting to $158,032.96 and the
rentals for the use of market stalls, $2,669.86.
Tables Nos. 55 and 55-A.-These tables show by months the ac-
counts payable vouchers registered. The total Panama Railroad
vouchers amounted to $4,641,163.08 and the Panama Canal vouchers,
$4,253,479.38. Of the latter amount, $2,864,384.91 was payable
from trust funds, and $1,389,094.47 from appropriations.
Table No. 56.-This table shows a tabulation of inspections made
by the time inspection bureau.
Table No. 5?.-This table shows the number of available silver
quarters by apartments and the rental value of same.
Table No. 58.-This is a tabulation of the work performed by the
pay-roll section of the claims bureau.

TABLE No. 1.-Balance sheets, June 30, 1925
TRIAL BALANCE SHEET


DEBITS-ASSETS
Canal fixed property (Table 15). -. $235,975,333.74


Canal equipment (Table 16).......
Cash clue treasury (Table 2)-..----
Cash working..-..--..........-....
Accounts receivable (Table 12)....
Business property (Table 17)......
Stores (Table 21)-------.........--..---....--
United Slates Treasury.........------
Theoretical interest accruals..--...
National defense expenditures
(Table 14-------).......------.............---
Undistributed business capital
(Table 17)--..--.------........---..----
Canal expenses (Table 24).........
Business expenses (Table 26)..-...-
Canal earnings (Table 24).-.....--
Total............---.... ---..


4, 139.807.32
185,463. 53
2.015, 172.94
1,181,913.83
29,300, 163. 14
3,719,084.37
56, 328, 525. 01
414, F21. 78

112, 653,995.09

1 1, 813, 000. 00
11, 283, 360. 92
13, 798, 198. 08
1 3, 166,667. 48
466,016,17227


CREDITS-LIABILITIES
Canal transit and business capital-
National defense capital (Table 14)
Accounts payable (Table 13)--....--
Unclassified canal credits.---..-.--
A mortization.....--.----.--... -------
Depreciation (Table 29).-......---
Repair reserves (Table 30)......-----
Gratuity reserves (Table 31).......
Canal revenues (Table 25)......----
Business revenues (Table 26)....--
Canal surplus (Table 27)..........
Business surplus (Table 27)._...-.


$273, 673, 818. 51
112,653,995.00
1,410,914.82
73, 853.58
1,465,330.77
5,183.145.05
1,617,374. 62
549, 581.73
21,582,618.1i
14,564, 114.93
29,775,589.69
3, 465, 835. 32


Total------.....--......---..---------- 466, 016,172. 27


GENERAL BALANCE SHEET


DEBITS-ASSETS
Canal fixed property (Table 15)... $235.975,333.74
Canal equipment (Table 16)....... 4,139,807.32
Cash due treasury..---.------.....-------.. 185,403.53
Cash working-------.........-..---------......-. 2, 015,172. 94
Accounts receivable (Table 12).... 1,. 141. 913.83
Business property (Table 17--..... 29, 300. 163. 14
Stores (Table 21). .......-........ 3.719. 084.37
United States Treasury..----..------.. 56.328, 525. 01
Theoretical interest accruals....... 414,821.78
National defense expenditures
(Table 14).----------.........---.--------... 112.653,995.09
Undistributed business capital
(Table 17)----....-----..---------..- 1 1.13,000. 00
Total....................... 444. 101,280.75
I Denotes credit.


CREDITS-LIA BILITIES
Canal transit and business capital. $273. 673, 818. 51
National defense capital (Table 14) 112,653,995.09
Accounts payable (Table 13)-----. 1,410,914.82
Unclassified canal credits..........------- 73,853.58
Amortizntion.......---........---.... 1,465,330. 77
Depreciation (Table 29)........... 5,183,145.05
Repair reserves (Table 30)......... 1, 617,374. 62
Gratuity reserves (Table 31)....... 549,581.78
Canal surplus (Table 27)...--------....... 43, 241,514.41
Business surplus (Table 27)....... -------4, 231,752.17



Total.......--------------------............ 444,101,280.75












REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 3.-Statement of appropriations by the Congress

Net canal construction appropriations to June 30, 1925----.......-------- --------------- $386,910, 301.00
Total appropriations----------...............---------..--------------------............................. $387,089, 143.31
Less amounts returned to surplus fund U. S. Treasury to June 30, 1925.. 158,842.31

Panama Canal fund........-----------..----------------.................... $130,852.05
Canal connecting Atlantic and Pacific Oceans........ --------27,989.66

(For detail see annual report for 1924.)
Fourteen (14) annual payments of $250.000 each to the Republic of Panama, including act
of Feb. 27, 1925, for payments due Feb. 26, 1926......----..-...............--------------------------- 3,00,000.00
Maintenance and operation (detailed below)------ -------------------------......-------. 80,516,047.68
Total appropriation......--------..-...-----..-- --.--..-----------.---------------. 470, 926,348. 58


Civil Increase
Maintenance Sanita government, of com-
and ion Panama pensation, Total
operation Canal Zone Canal and Panama
Canal Zone Canal


Act of-
Mar. 3,1915-----.......----------... $5,200.000.00 $700,000.00 $540,00000 ..--.. $6,440,000.00
July 1, 1916.................. 5, 750.000.00 700,000.00 600,000.00 .....---...-- 7,050,000.00
June 13. 1917................ ---------------9,000,000.00 700,000.00 700,000.00 ........--.. 10,400,000.00
July 12, 1917--------------................. --------.....--------------- --.......................-----------... $10,006. 22 10,006.22
June 4, 1918................... ..... ....... 150, 000.00 .........-- ...... 150,000.00
July 1, 1918.................. 9, 000,000.00 900,000.00 I 750,000.00 ............ 10,650,000.00
July 3, 1918.-- ..............-------------------------..-------------- 16,000.00 16,000.00
Mar. 1, 1919...----------------.. .............................. .............. 32.592. 66 32,592.66
July 19, 1919................. -------------7,547,939.00 850,000 00 702000.00 .........----------... 9099,939.00
Nov. 4, 1919..................--------------. ----....-........ ----------150,000.00 --.......... 150,000.00
May 29, 1920................ ...-----------------------.........-......-...... .--........---------... 34, 500.00 34,500.00
June 5, 1920)....................... 7,531,851.00 850,000.00 900,00 -----0.00 -------........ 9,281,851.00
Mar. 1, 1921...--....--------.................------------..............----...... 24.670.00 ...........24,670.00
Mar. 4. 1921.........--- ........---------- 7,250,000. 85000.00 900,000.00 21,500.00 9,021,500.00
June30, 1922.-....-.......-- 2659,434.00 525,00000 930.000.00 16.800.00 4.131,234.00
Mar. 2, 1923................. 5,079, 683.00 575,000 00 930. 000.00 17,520.00 6,602,203.00
June 7, 1924..-----------........----.... 5,748,160.00 580.000.00 912,000.00 ------------........ 7,240,160.00
Dec. 6, 1924..-----....--............ 103,050.00 6,266.00 79,670.00 ........... 188,986.00

64,870, 117.00 7,386,268.00 8, 118,340.00 I 148,918.88 80,523,641.88
Less amount transferred to sur-
plus fund U. S. Treasury----......-- .------......--------....--....--..---....-------. -------....--...-- 7,594.30 7,594.30
Total..------....-----------................I 64,870.117.00 7.386, 266.00 8,118.340.00 141,324.58 80,516,047.58

Appropriation for fiscal year 1926I i
(act of Feb. 12,1925)---------.......... 7140,000.00 653,216.00 42 150.00............ 8,735,366.00


TABLE No. 4.-Status of authorized bond issue

Authorized bond issue..--..--.--------...-----------------------------------..........--................--- $375, 200, 900.00
A ppropriated for canal construction.... -----------------......---------....----. $386,910,301.00
Less amount exempted by law:
Colliers TUlhse( and Achilles.................... ....... $1,985.552 29
Coal barges Mamei and Darien---------.......---------.............---. 2, 295,746. 57
Dock No. 6, Cristohal-----......---........................... 2,093,190.00
Eouipping colliers Lpsses and Achilles........---------.....-----.... 250,000.00
Painting tanks, colliers Ulpasrs and Achilles............ 44,279.70
Repairs to steamships A ncon and Cristobal............. 720,000.00
Expended for operation and maintenance of canal...... 4, 289, 159.00
Stock of material and supplies for operation and main-
tenance of canal.-------..-....---..------------.........--------. 2,225,000.00 13,902,927.62
373, 007, 373. 38
Balance... ---------------------.... ........ ... ----- --------------................-- 2, 193,526. 62
Appraised value American Legation building In the city of Panama, exempt from charge
to bond issue. act July 1, 1916..---------------------------------------------------............ 22,256.00
Balance available for appropriation within limit of cost of canal and authorized bond
issue...----------.......... -------------- -------------------- ......------------ 2,215,782 62








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 73


TABLE No. 5.-Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States,
fiscal year ended June SO, 1995

CASH RECEIPTS


United Disbursing
States clerk, Paymaster, Collector, Total
Treasurer Washing- Canal Zone Canal Zone
ton, D. C.

On hand July 1, 1924, by appropriations
and funds-
Maintenance and operations, Pan-
ama Canal....................... $8,262, 133.63 $86, 094.92 $724,952.30 $41, 2(7. 88$9, 114,448.73
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal.................---------------------......----.. 216,976.66 13,446.24 128,594 11 36,610.63 395,627.64
Civil government, Panama Canal
and CanalZone.-----................ 84,724.62 3,245.77 101,244.72 5,378.45 194,593.56
Construction and equipment, Pan-
ana Canal........................ 172, 509.97 21,249.86............. ............. 193,759. 83
Increase of comn pensation, 1923...... 33. 32-.... -I--. .............- I '33.32
Increase of compensation, 1924..... 20.00 107.36--...--------.. ------------...... 127.3
Miscellaneous receipts, United
States revenues...............---------------............ ............ ............. 209, 675. 87 209,675. 87
Security deposits................... ............. ---------87,024.07 3,245. 48 438, 400.30 528,669.85
Total...------------.....---------.............. 8,736,398.20 211,168.22 958,036.61 731, 333 13110,636,936. 16

Appropriations for fiscal year 1925:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal-........... 5,851,210 00-------....... ------- ----- ---------- -- 5,851,210.00
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal..........--------------.......----.....--... 586,266.00 -.....-...-. --.....-----... ---.....-... 586,266.00
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone..------.....------......--- 991,670.00--------------------------------............ 991,670.00
Total........------------......---............. 7,429,146.00 ............ ............. ............. 7,429,146.00
Transfers between fiscal officers:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal....................... 492,386.705,025,000.00 10,744,417.60-----------... 16,261, 804.30
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal........................... 33,249.81 120,000.00 1,036,709.89-----------.. 1,189,959.70
Civil Government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone--------..---....-------......... 6,017.25 25,000.00 907,166.04--.....----------........ 938,183.29
Construction and equipment, Pan-
ama Canal...........-------............ -------------21,249.86.. .. ---- .. .. 21,249.86
Increase of compensation, 1924...-. 107. 36(i..-------.......- -------......--..-------.. --...---.... -------107. 3
Total.................----------...........------------- 553, 010.985, 170,000.00 12, 688, 293. 531 ............ 18,411,304.51
Collections:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal......-----------................ 414,816.65 442,312.08 833.65 8,404,69407 9,282,686.45
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal............................ 29,166.66 32,221.80 33.31 603,564.80 664,986.57
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone...----------------. ------------ 5, 512. 75 ............ 52,403.41 57, 916. 16
Miscellaneous receipts, United'
States revenues-..--------------.........-- ...-....-------- 4,653. 99 .73 21, 681, 282. 6021,685, 937.32
Security deposits.---.........-----.....------------..----- 417,739. 42j 2, 846, 221. 02 2, 205, 465. 00,31,469, 425. 44
I -I
Total..........---- ....--------------- 443, 93. 31 902, 440. 04 2. 847, 088. 71 58, 947, 409. 8863, 140, 921. 94
Total cash debits....-------------............. 17.162, 538.49 6, 2&J, 608. 26 16,493,418. 85 59,678,743. 01 99,618,308.61
I, I









74 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 5.-Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States,
fiscal year ended June 30, 1920-Continued

CASH DISBURSEMENTS


Covered Into United States Treasury:
Maintenance and operation (busi-
ness profits, 1924)........--...-...
Miscellaneous receipts, United
States revenues..................
Total............................

Transfers between fiscal officers:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal..................
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal..........................
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone.--.....------.--......
Construction and equipment, Pan-
ama Canal----..----..-----..-----....
Increase of compensation, 1924......

Total............................

Disbursements:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal....-----.....-........
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal.........-- --............
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone.................
Construction and equipment, Pan-
ama Canal....-.......- --------..
Security deposits.--------------.......

Total........................ -

On hand June 30,1925:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal....---.....--.........
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal.. ...-...----.-.-.-----...
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone.................
Construction and equipment, Pan-
ama Canal................----
Increase of compensation, 1923......
Increase of compensation, 1924......
Miscellaneous receipts, United
States revenues..---..------.........
Security deposits--...----.......-------

Total....--.....................

Total cash credits------------................


United
States
Treasurer




$843,583.09


843, 583. 09


7, 375, 000. 00

520,000.00

875,000. 00



8, 770,000. 00


26,976. 75

205,322.98

105, 272. 50

112,834.07
-------..--..-


450, 406.30


6, 774,987. 14

140.336. 15

102,139.37

80, 925. 76
33.32
127.36



7,098,549.10


Disbursing
clerk, Paymaster, Collector,
Washing- Canal Zone Canal Zone
ton, D. C.



---...------ ------------- -------------

$4. 653. 99 $0. 73j$21,705,494.94

4,6.53. 99' .73!21, 705,494.94


Total


$843,583.09

21,710, 149.06

22, 553, 732.75


455,747. 47............. 8, 431. 056.83 16,261,804.30

32,958.05------------- 637,00.L 65 1,189,959.70

6, 012. 75 ....-....------..-- 57,170.54 038,183.29

21,249.86 ----------- ------------- 21,249.86
107. 36 .----------..-...------------.... 107.36

516,075. 49....---------.........-- 9, 125,229.02118,411,304. 51


4, 841, 126. 55 10, 025, 212. 73-------...---. 14,896,316.03

121,520.001 979, 574. 67---....-.... 1,306,417.65

21,755. 78 899,747. 38 -----------1,026,775.66

------.....----.--........ --..-........ 112, 834. 07
504, 734.31 2, 845, 433. 25 27,908, 665.02 31, 258,832.58


5, 492, 136. 64 14, 749, 968. 03


253,5325398 1, 444, 990.82

11,189.99 185, 762. 64

5,989.99 108,663.38





29. 18 4,0 33.25

270, 742. 14 1, 743, 450. 09


27, 908, 665. 02


14,905.12

3, 173.78

611.32




185,463. 53
735, 200( 28


48,601,175.99


8, 488,416. 06

340,462.56

217, 404.06

80,925.76
33.32
127.36

185,463.53
739, 62. 71


939,354. 0310,052,095.36


17, 162, 538 49 6, 283, 608. 26 16,493,418.85 59,678,743. 01


~


III


99, 618, 308. 61










REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 8.-Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals
and companies, and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts, during fiscal


year ended June 30S, 1935

Maintenance and operation, Pana-
ma Canal:
Collections credited to earnings-
Executive office services... --
Cables and radiograms.----.-
Sales of Canal Record.......
Clubs and playgrounds ser-
vices--..................
Accounting office services. -..
Lost metal checks... ----......
Paymaster's office services-...
Collector's office services.---.
Safety deposit box rentals-..
Office engineer services.. -..
Sales of prints---------------
Meteorology and hydro-
graphy division services-...
Survey section services.----
Balboa storehouse services...
Cristobal storehouse services.
Supply department office ser-
vices---------------------.
District quartermaster, Bal-
boa, services ------..........
District quartermaster, Pedro
Miguel, services------..
Distrlot quartermaster,
Gatun. services.......-...
District quartermaster, Cris-
tobal. services-------.........---
Marine superintendent, ser-
vices----------.................
Port captain, Balboa. services-
Port captain, Cristobal, ser-
vices--.-------------------
Admeasurement of vessels....
Inspection of vessels......--
Pilotage, Balboa....--.....-
Pilotage, Cristobal...--.....
Tug and launch service, Bal-
bo......--...--....--......
Tug and launch service, Cris-
tobal...--...-...-- .......-
Handling lines, Balboa------
[landling lines, Cristobal ..
Aids to navigation....-.... .
Gatun Looks, services.......
Pedro Miguel Locks.servlies.
Gatun Dam, services..-----
Dredging division, services..
Electric current--..........----
Electric work...............
Telephone and telegraph
work......................
Sales of water.....--........
Municipal engineering work.
Water rentals, Panama......
Water rentals, Colon.._---
Shop work.......--.......--
Dry dockage, Balboa.......--
Dry dockage, Cristobal.....
Dockage and wharfage......
Handling fuel oil............
Fuel oil sales.--..............
Fuel oil tank rentals........


$56, 675.55
1,658. 99
29.25

70,492. 76
150,626.58
408.00
15, 977.00
20,901.00
388.50
1, 141.14
2,767. 80

69.14
1,825.12
1, 474.P5
382.05

10,051.35

9,601.75

11,924.84

6,844.26

3,430.78

30.00
2,381.01

247.89
3,070.00
4,707.47
72,970.00
188,071.34

147,026.70

205,355.61
109,021.68
114,240.00
43,923.34
147.05
38. 90
2,115.00
312, 910.51
303,469.56
105,959.85

226,221.22
278,052. 56
147. 517. 82
151,530.41
73,188.08
2,000,153.86
116,665.87
21.326.04
88,067.80
424,988.37
44,990.41
9.200.00


Maintenance and operation, Pana-
ma Canal-Continued.
Collections credited to earnings-
Continued.
Business store sales......... 1,019, 795. 32
Animal and motor transpor-
tation .................... 119,069.88
Motor car repair shop work. 30, 150.20
Building repairs and con-
struction------------------ 276, 113.49
Panama Canal Press. services 112, 548.81
Gold quarters rentals-------- 379,260.33
Silver quarters rentals------- 189, 05. 67
Garage rentals--------------- 22,652.41
Boathouse rentals----------- 736.38
Restaurant rentals.----.------. 7.320.00
Building rentals------------- 9,940.10
Market rentals-----.--------- 2,661.77
Sale of fuel------------------ 8,252.47
Sale of gasoline-------------- 72,700. 12
Sale of general supplies--.... 6,288.26
Exchange of furniture ------ 10,489.43
Mattress factory sales-------- 23,913.66
Janitor service.--------------- 25, 554. 44
Hotel Tivoli....-............ 212,736.88
Land rentals---------------- 50,8 4.09
Sales of sand and gravel..... 8,6386.50
Sales of Government prop-
erty-.--------------------- 1,205.00
Sales of nautical charts and
publications............... 2,2865.20
Fortifications Division..... 208,806.66
Collections credited to expenses-
Injury compensation.-----. 134. 68
Commissary coupons honor-
ed by Panama Canal...... 2,092.28
Electrical division----------- 42.33
Municipal engineering divi-
sion--------.......................- 38.67
Shops and dry docks........ 159.48
Animal and motor transpor-
tation................ 492.06
Motor car repair shop. ------ .87
Building repairs and con-
struction------------------ 21.84
Cold quarters.--------------- 6.33
Silver quarters---........... 37.48
Hotel Tvoli................------. 241.76
Fortifica tions division....--- 497. 60
Clains vs. carriers and con-
tractors_---__ -....-.--- 8302.09
Sale of obsolete property... 2,685.00
Section of surveys........... 1.568
BDlboa store-................. 3,482. 91
Supply department ......... 5.8
District quartermaster, Bal-
boa...........-----............. 25.80
Marine division............. 5,784.19
Pacific Locks---................ 4.34
Dredging division............ 17,434.38
OGencral accounts---......---------, 75. 28
RecruiLing and repatriating
employees--.-------886.48
Clubs and playgrounds...... 477.13
Total, maintenance and
operation..-----..---------R. 404. fi94.07









78 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

TABLE No. 8.-Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals
and companies, and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts, during fiscal
year ended June 30, 1925-Continued


Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal:
Deduction certificates for medical
services...............-------..
Chief health offce.....---..-...
Ancon Hospital fees........-..
Ancon Hospital mess............
Ancon Hospital burials..........
Ancon Hospital miscellaneous...
Colon Hospital fees..............
Colon Hospital mess............
Colon Hospital burials..........
Colon Hospital miscellaneous....
Line dispensaries................
Corozal farm produce............
Corozal farm pasturage.......---
Corozal Asylum fees..........--
Corozal Asylum miscellaneous.
Palo Seco Leper Asylum-.....---
Santo Tomas Hospital.......----
Quarantine subsistence.-----...
Quarantine miscellaneous.--...-
Sanitation, Panama-------------
Street cleaning and garbage col-
lection, Panama... ------..-
Sanitation, Colon-...--------...
Street cleaning and garbage col-
lection, Colon..-..----...---
Sanitation, Canal Zone..--------
Refunds... ------..-.....------..


$21,040.96
3,947.60
218.166.85
17,592.41
8, 530. 30
5,065. 94
29,933. 32
3, 696. 14
762.26
.71
17, 134.98
17,212.05
159.65
93,669.81
3,757.81
17,958.25
110.82
23,125.01
13,764.45
11,333.95

41, 537. 25
3,536.00

35,072.56
15,509.03
946.69


Total, sanitation.............. 60, 564.80


Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone:
Civil affairs-- ---.......------
Customs---------------------
Postal Service...----...--.......
School tuition....----.....-....
Sale of school books....-..---..
Sale of school materials----------
Fire protection..---....------......
Police and prisons.-------. --..--
District court.-- ---------.......
Magistrate court, constables.----
Refunds...----....---.----------

Total, civil government....

Miscellaneous receipts:
Public works, Panama, amorti-
zation and interest --------.. -
Public works, Colon, amortiza-
zation and interest.-.....-..-.
Tolls....-------. -------------....
Taxes, fees, fines, Canal Zone ---.
Postal receipts. --------------
Interest on bank balances---.--


Total, miscellaneous receipts. 21,707,610.72


Individuals and companies: Panama
Railroad Co..... ----...........-------


RECAPITULATION
Maintenance and operation, Panama Canal................----------------------------..............------............... $8, 404, 694. 07
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama Canal----......---------------...................-------.........-------------.. 603,564.80
Civil government, Panama Canal and Canal Zone..--------......--------....-------........------.......--.. 52,403.41

Total repaid to appropriations--.............----------------..........-------....------------...................---..... 9,060,662.28
Miscellaneous receipts..................-----------------................----------.......--------------------......................... 21,707,610.72
Individuals and companies---..-..----..--...............-----------------.................................--------...... 227. 55

Grand total....--..-------------------..---.....------..--......-------........---................---------------.................. 30, 768,500. 55


$23.00
380.50
2,621.83
6,082.66
473.88
422.31
143.46
42,063.85
45.25
2.40
144.27

52,403.41



39,523.44

63,803.22
21,400,992.24
56,744.42
136,547.40
10,000.00


227. 55









REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


79,


TABLE No. 9.-Statemnent of transactions in the collector's special deposit account
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 19.5

IN THE UNITED STATES


Month



1924
July ..... .... ............................
Agust .........................................
Septim ber...............................
October....................................
Novemhlbr.................................
December...................... ........


JJnua:
Fehiru
n arcl
April
May.
June.


Dssits Panama Canal
eposits bills applied


$149,061. 35
145, 971. 47
120,i 6U2. 10
IV., 137.01
11). 372. i;2
105, n07.31


$125,412 28
135, 823. 57
13.; W61. 50
122. 122.63
88, t628. 08
116,242.01


Paymenls to
individuals
and companies


$6,381. 49
6, 879. 69
5,9351.59
8.296 65
2, 471) 59
1,618.81


1925
ry.................................... 158,930.06 150,179.33 3,699.81 7,598.65
ary................ ................... IY, 492.90 138,239.03 8,337. 28 10,038 33
h -.........--... ---.-.......- ... -..- 172. 608.61 163, 0tl. O t 8, 124.38 3,251.29
-.........--.....- .....----- 127,256.55 122,031.04 6,530 67 7,931.25
.................................... 100.140 10 90,601.89 7,425. 15 16,197.00
......-........---.--...- .....--- 109, 615. 09 101,370.72 1, 568. 22 4,780.46

Tulal............-................... 1,619,935.17 1,489,303.77 66,984.33 101.522.20


ON THE ISTHMUS


1924
July. .. ...................................
Auu .. ... .....----------------....-..--..---------...-----..
Septr .............----------.--------.-----------..
October.........--....-------------------..------
Nueber..................................
D'rembujer.................................


January..... ... ..-----------...----------------.----

rur. . --------------......-..----...--..--..------
JunMarc..-------------.....-----......----------------

il.t .. ...................................
Tot lal . . .... ... .. ... ... ... .... .


RECA PITULATION


In thle Lnited Statl a


On hand July 1,1924-----------------.................---.......--- $52,459.56
DeuusPtls lurin year-----.......-----..----..----------- 1,619,935.17


Uu Ihu Istlimus


$385. 940.74
28, 585, 529.88


ma Cankil hills applied..................... $1,489,363. 77 $22,3 16, 904. 40
ents tu individuals auil compainies....... 66, W94. 33 3, 79u. 714.82
nd .......................... ............ 101, 522 20 1.1. 175 50
and Juno 30, l'J5--------------35........ ----------.............. 14,524.43 720. (.675. 85

Total......---------..---------......................---------------.... 1672..3 73 1,672, 34.73 2971, 470. 57 2671,470.57 1, 170. 57


Refunds




$10. 11.77
12, 236.12
J. 519.81
I r, 123.97
7,821.79
2,861.78


$2,213,339. 19
2. 210,490. 61
2,300. 773. 46
2. 12i, 949 17
2,180,800 27
2,479,731.39

2,198, 313. 99
2. JU1, .508.82
2'. -12.060 44
2, 136i,421. 17
1,965,264.33
2,209, 783.99

26, 585,529.83


$1,948,378 19
1,885,847. 78
1,934, 196 74
1,900, 998. 99
1, 788,878. 98
1,909,437.42

1,872,621 26
1, (Ji., 824. 10
2, 212, 336. 59
1,778,198.67
1, 7S, 0J... 7
1, 697, 3.50

22,316,904.40


$248, 033. 5.1
297, 264. 1,5
298. 2.8 07
271, 14.1 36i
319. 645.90
405,385 99V


345,416.26
2.56, 600 63
356, 82. 53
359, 672. 36
3Uo, i)2i.. 93
328, 778 61

3, 79,714. 82


$802. 50
1U2, 11. 22
6.28 30
1, 6b6. 81
4.131.59
2,154.26


10,398 88
5'2) 02
1. 2i9. bO
11,386.93
1,yl16. 37
831.82

134,175. 50


Palu
Payn
Refu
Onb


"


--- ~









8U REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 10.-Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 19S5


Total


Maintenance and nopert lon:
r'anul trnil rlielnn.-


Gold rolls Silver rolls


'"'


Cana business a divisions-
Electrical....................................... 575,874.98 458,101.21
Municipal engineering-----........................ 521,792.12 210,050.50

Mechanical division-
Balboa shops............................... 1- 1,651, 523. 61 1, 196, 164. 27
Cristobal shops.....--........................ 336,970.36 217,598.96
1--~-----------
Total, mechanical division................ 1, 988, 493. 97 1.413,763. 23

Supply department:
Quartermaster-
Fuel oil plants.............................. 123, 235.33 82, 576.05
Animal and motor transportation-........... 129, 558. 08 46,835. 13
Nlotnr rar repair shop ...................... 66,620.05 41,874.09
Building repairs and construction--------.. 430,022.33 172,438. 11
Panama Canal Press....................... 74.060.94 24, 532.29
Hotel Tivoli................................ 58, 109. 25 16,352.81
Farm bureau............................... 17,099.69 7,833.34


117,773.77
311,741.62

455,359.34
119,371.40

574,730. 74


40,659.28
82, 722 95
24,745.96
257, 584. 22
49,528. 65
41,756.44
9,266.35


Total, quartermaster..................... 898,705.67 392,441.82
Fortifications. ...... ................................. 136,084.06 1 44,962. 24

Total, business divisions.......................... 4,120,90. 80 2, 519, 319. 00

Injury and death (act Sept. 7, 1916)................. 33,557.95 33,557.95

Total, maintenance and operation................| 8,943,805. 51 5, 429,493. 62


506,263.85
91,121.82
1, 601, 631. 80


I


3, 514, 311. 89


I 1='-


Executive department-
Ex cutive............................ ...... $20,78 11 $20,786. 11 ......
Record..... ................................ 83. 06. 6-1 62, 480. 2 $20,588.39
Personnel.... ........... ..... ............ 40, 19f.. 73 40, 196.73 .............
Correspondence ........................... 4, 197.05 43, 569. 20 1,628.75
Property... .. ........................... 30,431.43 30,430. 43 .---..............
Statistics................................... 20,6 7.73 20,627 73 ........ ........
General................................. 40, 254.62 39,33-3. 41 921.21
Shipping commissioner...................... 35, 122.94 34,026. 60 1,096 34

Total. execuli ro department.............1 315,68'.. 1 291. 450. 46 24,234.69

Clubs and playgrounds-......................... 13F, 948.61 67,90.5.85 69.042 76

Accounting department-
Accounting................................. 377,. 520.04 374,123.29 3,396.75
Paymaster.----------------------......--------- 3, 35. 97 35,263.97 3,090.00
Collector................................... 44, 127.91 44, 127.91 ................

Total, accounting department ............ 460, 0(0!. 92 453, 515. 17 6,486.75

Office engineer.................................. 39, 0. 92 37, 735. 25 1 1,625.67
Meteorology and hydrography...............- 30,445.27 1 22,731.67 1 7, 713. 60
Surveys........................ ............. .. 34, 60. 12 19,996.4 14, 263. 66

Supply department-
Quartermaster-
Ofice............. ........---------... 45,358.32 i 44,435.82 922. 50
District quartermasters................. 21G. 089. 94 45, 098. 8 170, 991.41
Storehouses....................-........ 243,961.23 i 101,347.68 I 142,613.55

Total quartermaster.................I 505, 409. 54 190,882. 08 314, 527.46
Marine division-
Superintendent's office ..................... 12,515. 22 12,515.22 ................
Port captain-
Balboa................................1 490. 662. 55 259,877. 26 230, 786. 29
Cristobal............................... I 428,709.21 249,415.72 179, 293.49
Lighthouse subdivision..................... 143,327. 14 75,875. 83 67, 451. 31

Total, marine division....................---------------- 1075, 214. 12 597,684.03 477,530.09

Lock operation-
Atlantic................................... 358,815 47 230,202. 34 128,613. 13
Pacific...................................... 710,997. 63 436,323.34 274, 674. 29

Total, lock operation..................... 1,069,813. 10 666,525.68 I 403,287.42

Gatun Dam and backflll.......................... 42,112.69 8,783.72 33,328.97
Dredging division.............................. 1, 080, 045.32 519,406.30 560,639.02
Total, transit divisions........................ 4,789,296.76 2, 876, 616. 67 1,912, 680. 09








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLEB No. 10.-Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year
1925-Continued


Civil government:
Civil affairs and customs.........................
P osts...............................................
Schools .................. ..........................
Fire protection................... .........
Police and prisons.......................... ....
District courts........ ....... .... .........
District attorney............................
M arshal................... ........................
Magistrates' courts................ ..............

Tot al, civil government. -........-.-.-..........
Sanitation:
Office...................... ............
Ancon Hospital........................... ..
Colon Hospital..................................
Linte dispensaries............ ......................
Corozal farm.......................................
Corozal Asylum...-----------------...............--
Palo Seco Leper Asylum.. .. ..............
Santn Tomns Hospital..............................
Quarantine-
Offlee................ .......................
B alboa................................ ........ .
Cristohal.......................... ......
Total, quarantine .........................
Health office-
Panama...........................................
Colon. .......................
Sanitation, Zone.--.....................................

Total, sanitation-----------------..................

Orand total......................................-----------------------------


Total


$41,452.65
108,934.62
212,491. 25
108,509.95
339,523. 65
21, 177. 93
9, 696. 78
7, 563. 67
14,909.60


Gold rolls


Silver rolls


$40, 642. 65 $810 00
97.424.51 11,510. 11
182, 101.05 30,390. 20
10s,509. 95 ................
39, 213. 46 36,310. 19
19, 6f7. 89 1,550.04
9,696.78
7,563.67
12,989.60 1,920.00


864,260. 10 781, 769. 56 82,490. 54

14,195.11 14, 195. 11 ................
339,327.47 245,958.91 03,368.56
J50,582.15 35,481.59 15,100.56
36,987.85 31,211.81 5,786.04
13, 250.59 2,400.00 10,850. 59
56,791.74 33.088.68 23,703.06
18,696.14 3,741.97 14,954. 17
3,458.98 3,458.98 -....-..- ...-
328.60 328.60 ................
25,252.44 17,481.38 7,771. 05
22,384.10 17,030.97 5,353. 13

47,965.14 34,840.95 13, 124. 19

97,726.61 26,107.77 71,618.84
54,906.96 21,111.28 33,795.68
73,448.57 14,168. 01 59, 280. 56
807,347.31 465,765. 06 341,582. 25


10,615,412.92


6,677,028. 24


3,938, 384.68


TABLE No. 11.-Statement of accounts receivable registered during fiscal year ended
June 0SO, 1925


Num- Against
I her Against other N Miscel1
Month b Totals t d Co Ilaneous Tolls
bills Panama ments of I cia r
regis- Railroad the United receipts
tered States


1924 I
July.........----- 2, 638 $2, 487, 695. 02 $164. 004.39 $8, 902.32 $289,301. 88 100.00 $1, 95, 296. 43
August.-.-...- 2,644 2,444.281. 63 182,329.81 122,222.80 369,614.83 100.00 1,770,014.19
September...I 2,741 2,568,4.19. 19' 182,812.13 189, 0i0.79 33, 513.99 100.00 1,832,952.28
October.-..-- 2,728' 2,365,733.58 15-..057. 54 120,041.56 293,270.31 100 00 1,7096. 2G4.17
November --. 2.677 2,388,332.70 190.385.73 201,319.21 245,582.51 10. 00 1, ,750, 945. 25
December.... 2,887 2,493,380.38 182,740.29 196, 986.21 220,019.391 100.00 1. 893, 534. 49
1925
January...... 2,896 2,469,621.861 177,326.90 175.,917.27' 284,208.67. 100.00 1,832,069.01
February.... 2,870 2,297,030.23 203,934.64 182. 80.22 261,380.57, 100.00 1. 049, 034. 80
March--...... 2,847 2,827,978,811 186,525.70 161, 691.04 639,514.23 100.00 1, b40,147. 4N
April.........1 2,776 2.341,847.911 201, 191.96 154,M723.67 250,297.01 100.00 1. 735, 55..'7
May.......... 2,880: 2,244,133. 18' 181,746.79 128,511. 12 228, 03iG.42 108.00 1,705,68.h 5
June ........ 3,053 2, 633,421.83. 582,346.67 144,426.33 247, 023. 77 107.50 .659.517. 66
Totals. 33,637 29,561,896.31 2,691,492. 45'1, 876,432. 54 3, 691, 763. 581, 215. 50 21,400, 992 24
Totals for
yearend-
ed June
30, 1924. 34,82431,679,167.34 2,140,120. 3 1,543,171. 3,704,166.4,, 171. 943, 704, 16.40 .... 24,1708.07
I 1I


Repay to
appropria-
tions


$552,398. 59
674, 267.44
735, 48F. 91
569, 469.41
637, 387. 45
599.845. 89

6(37. 552. 84
8t47, W5. 43
967, W30. 97
606. 312.64
5:18, 452.33
973,904.17

8,160,904.07


7, 387,459. 27


I








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 12.-Co mparaive statement of accounts receivable

Fiscal year Fiscal year
1924 1925


Audited bills................................ .................................. $885,015.57
Hospital certlicates-------.........---------------------..............-----------.....................-..------22,804.57
Injury compensation...---------------.....-------.........-------------.................------...-------............ 1,798.95
Cement bags returned to contractor......................................... 2, 232.46
W ater rental deficit bills.................................................... 40,356. 16
Commissary coupon books honored by The Panama Canal................ ................

Total........------------------------------------------......-----------...........-- 952,207.71


$1,078,196.03
24,854.50
2,465.99
3,445.00
72,785.51
165.90

1, 181,913.83


TABLE No. 13.-Comparative statement of accounts payable


Fiscal year
1924


Fiscal year
1925


United States invoices and ocean freight-------------.....------------........................----- $326, 143.51 $317,978.75
Isthmus vouchers.....------------.....------..........-----------...................---------------................---. 148,374. 16 133,905.08
Current pay rolls-............................................................i 824, 658.25 886,905.31
Unpaid salaries and wages...--------..-----------..-------...--------------...........--............--- 57,774.82 68,907.27
Drums, carboys and reels-.........- -........................................ I 26,760.76 3, 247.00
Treasury settlements in suspense...............---........................-... 450.06 -----......--
Local purchases--------------...--------..............-----------..................................---------..........--------....----------- 128.5

Total--------........-------------......--------..........--------------..........----.......................---.....--1,330. 640.04 1,410, 914. 82

I Debit.

TABLE No. 14.-Defense capital expenditures to June 30, 1925


Prism excavation:
Ontun to sea------..-.. ---....
Gatun to Pedro Miguel...---...
Pedro Miguel to sea...---..-..
Oatun Locks.....................
Pedro Miguel Locks.........--- ....-
Miraflores Locks.........-...--.---
Armor plate for spillway protection.
Oatun spillway--..........----.--.-
Miraflores spillway and east dam. -
Oatun-Mindi levee...-----........-
Oatun Dam........-...- ..........
Trinidnd River Dam...............
Pedro Miguel Dam...-.......... ---
Miraflores west dam................
La Boca Locks and Dams (aban-
doned i..--........--.. .....--....
Colon east breakwater..............
Colon west breakwater.............
Naos Island breakwater............
Aids to navigation. ---...--............
Purchase, Toro Point Light........
Floating caisson......--............
Power-transmission system.......---
Coaling stations:
Balboa..........-.......-..-...-
Cristobnl.-.-......-....-.....
Dry docks:
Balboa........-.........--.....
Cristobal. ..........----........
Docks, piers, and wharves:
Balboa.........--.....--.....-
Cristohal............-.---......
Entrance basin, Balboa.............
Inner Harbor:
Balboa.........-...............-
Cristobal............-.--........
Preparatory work, Balboa terminals
Panama water-supply system.--....
Other Zone water-supply systems..
Zone sewage system.....----.......-
Zone roadways....-...-..-..- -.....
Flurlographs.-..............-...-
Permanent townsite:
Ancon-Balboa...................
La Boca...............---......
Red Tank..............-.......
Pedro Miguel..................
Oatun........................-
Cristobal......................-
Sanitary fills............-.....-...


$237, 482. 88
2,141,358.67
388,049.34
1,203,953.05
638, 599. 30
867,655. 23
32,878.77
99.317. 86
89,133. 95
2, 813.01
196,462. 60
1,328. 47
8, 633. 66
23,195.78

748,054.48
3,771,111.74
85,506.42
20,312. 78
93,388.54
15.000.00
20,872.15
10.055. 46

2, 284, 568. 35
3, 179,797.59

3, 376. 647. 49
23,475.51

1,590, 160 35
1, 033, 984. 61
489,480.39

3, 265, 207. 04
237, 101. 43
1, 808.921. 65
40.697. 58
155. 190 03
298,284. 69
610,956. 00
3,427.02

596, 596. 73
123,206. 13
2,614.43
96, 797.08
1. 776.56
355.847. 29
636,732.11


Sanitary ditches...-----... ..----.--
Playgrounds.......................
Administration building, Balboa
H eights.... ............ ..........
District court and law department
office, A neon..-.. ................
Shops and store oiTmr...............
Terminal offimc building, Balboa....
Shops:
Balboa..............-.- .........
Cristobal.......................
Storehouses............----......
Rotels and mess halls...---.......-
Quarters:
Gold...... .....................
Silver..........................-
Miscellaneous buildings............
Ancon Hlospital.................--
Colon Hospital......------....-----.....
Dispensaries........................
Asylumrns........ .. ---...-....
Quarantine stations-.. ..............
Storehouse, health..................
Btalbo: incinerator..................
Miscellaneous buildings, health-....
Schoolhouses........................
Post offices .....-.....--.-....-...
Court houses, police nnd fire stations,
etc. ...................... ........
Canal construction and flooded areas.
Auxiliary works and building.......
Depopulation of Canal Zone ...-..
Joint'land commission expenses....
Purchase from New Panama Canal
Co..............................
Invest ment Panama R. R. stock....
Concession from Republic of
Panama..........................
Relocation of Panama R. R.........
PrPsentatlion of launch Louise to
French Government ----..........
Canal protection 1917-18............
Equipment and property transferred
to and from other departments of
the government..................
Construction equipment............
Construction material and supplies-
Loans to Panama R. R. Co....----.


Total-----------...............--------.. 112,653,995.09


$199,706.53
13,902.41

306,211.51

65, 446. 39
238,553.94
3, 225.42

3,795,260.32
164, 147.93
475, 934.74
242, 909.87

1.351,269.07
269, 685.74
543.700.28
435,325.80
63,876.90
40.303.97
128, 506. 16
40, 129.48
2. 547.15
100,000.00
129, 824.94
49,227. 23
20, 987.62

50.963. 50
991, 707. 06
146,258.94
2, 339, 923. 83
356, 006. 61

38,717,.335.907
155,818.24

10,000,000.00
9, 800, 626.46

13,500. 00
25,236.79

1,970,877.33
3, 020,090. 65
2, 225,000. 00
3,247,332.11








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 83


TABLE No. 15.-Details of canal fixed property, fiscal year 192L5


July 1, 1924 AAdliiuns


June 30, 1925


Channels:
(l1atun to sea .................................... ...... $11, 700 0............ ------------ 700 00
Gatun to Pedro Miguel .................... .............. u.2.542.00' ............ 10i. 2J. 12 00
Pedro Miguel to se.................................... 18, 032. 612. 00 ............ 32, 12.00
Locks:
atun...---............................................... 31.879. 4 3 ............ ......93.. ........
Hising-stomn valves. .......................... ............... 25, 612. 33 34,, W, U67. 26
Pedro liguol...... ....... .............. .......... ... 15,376. 336. 10 ............................
Rising-stei vales---------------................---------........ .......-- .--.--..--------. 11,217.70 .............
Lathe .............................................. ............ 1 50.00 15,3 U 0
M irnflores............................................... 22,5 7.053. 42 ............ ................
Mirfloes-------------------------- 22------ ---.------4---
Towing loconm olives ................ ........ ... ............... 87.271.7 ...............
Hising-stcr lves............------------------------------..................... .....----------... 16, 528. 99 22, 700, 54. 17


Spillways.
G atun........................... ...................... 3,982, 1 9.00
M irallores-.................. .................... .... 1, 231, 256.00
Floating cailson-....-... .............................. 326,996.00
Dams
Alhahu la-.............................................. 61,950.49
Gatun....................................---.............. 9,626,678.00
Gatun-Mindll levee.---.----. ------------------------- 137,822.00
Trinidad River-.----------- ------------------ 65,057.00
Pedro. liguel---------------................----------...................---.....-------- 423,070.00
M ir tlories............................ .................. 1,136,594.00
Breakwaters:
Colon-west .........................-........ .....---- 4,189,810.00
Naos Island.. ..............-------------------------------------- 995,337.00
Aids to navigation--.---------- ---------------- 832,820.81
Radio compass station............................... .............
Roads, streets, and sidewalks........................--------------------------I 1,002,675.77
Street improvement.s..............---............. .......---...---.....
Storm sewers...............------------................---------------------------.............. -------200,000.00
Sump pump, Cristobal .----------...........-..----..--..--.------- ------------...
Street-lighting system.....----------......------------....................----------------... 99,236.44
Office buildings:
Administration.... -.---.-----..-----..---------..------------.. 918,636.00
Terminal office, Balboa----.....-..-.----..-..---.---..------------. 77,409.00
Storehouses............................................. 300,000.00
Hydrographic structures---...-------------..-.....-..........----------.. 11,772.00
Telephone exchange, Cristobal (proportion)......... -------...--..-------------
Health department buildings:
Aucon hospital..-.....-..-------------.....-..-------------------.. 1,305,975.00
Colon hospital ......................................... 191,630.00
Dispensaries.....------------------.........------...........----- 120,910.00
Asylum s................................................ 128,471.49
Quarantine stations--.....-------..------------.......................---..--------- 40, 129.00
Other health department buildings..................... 58,507.00
Cristobal incinerator................................... 88,474.55
Civil government:
Schoolhouses.......--...................................---. 43,044.00
Post offices......--------------------------.......................----..-..------. 8,995.00
Fire stations....-----------. ------ .---------- ------- 21,644.00
Police stations and prisons.............................. 1j,870.00
Courthouses............................................--- 74,896.00
Clubs and playgrounds................................. 114,498.00

Total-------..---........------....-----------------235, 684, 062. 00


............ 3,982,199.00
-............ 1,231,256.00
-............ 326,996.00

91,115.66 153,066.15
-......- .. 9,626.678.00
.-..:s.. I7, 822.00
..----..- 6, 0',057. 00
....-.-.. 42.3.070. 00
-I-- -------.. 1, 13t, 591.00


8,772.69

5,816 30
------------
6,786.'31





35,600.00

------------.


4,189,810 00
995. 337.00
----------------
841,593.50

1,008,492.07

206, 786.31
99, 236 44
918,636.00
77,409. 00
300,000.00
11,772.00
35,600.00

1,305,975.00
191, 630.00
120,910.00
128.471.49
40.129.00
5h', U7. 00
86, 474.55


-.-..-- 443,044.00
.------- 8,995.00
-.-..-----. 21,644.00
------.. 19.870.00
.-.....-- 74, I96. 00
.---.- ... 114,498.00

S290, 671. 74 235, 975. J33. 74









84 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TaBLz No. 16.-Detail of canal transit equipment


Floating equipment:
Tugs...........................................
Supply boats...................................
Launches... -.-.-------........................
Jessup, built...............................
Taboguilla, purchased from Panama R. R..
Urava, purchased from Panama R. R.......
Goodwill, withdraw from sale............
Motor Sailor C-857 purchased from U. S.
Navy...............-....................
La Pita, rebuilt from No. 7..- --...........
Winnie Fred, built..........................
No. 7 surveyed for scrap---.---...-........- -
Sargent, transferred to municipal division...
Pratique, surveyed for sale.................
No. 405, surveyed for sale.--.--..-........-
Dredges........................................
Barges.........................................
No. 29 purchased from Panama R. R........
No. 97, renewals.................. .-- -- -.
No. 128, built...--..--...--...............--
Depreciation applied --------..............-
No. 49, rebuilt as a drill barge.......--- -.. _..
No. 217, transferred to clubs and play-
grounds..................................
Floating cranes--...........- --.................
Crane boat...................................
Graders........................................
Drill barges..... ................ ... ..-.. .._-.- -
Terrier No. 2, built..--....................-
Compressor barge..-------.............-
Coal-hoist barge...............................
Relay-pump barge..-.........................---
Other equipment:
Road rollers.----.-. -..--...-..-.. ..............-
Automobiles...................................
Excavators..............-.................... -
Reserve equipment......................_....
Salvage section-
Machinery and tools-... .................-- -
Depreciation applied...---------..--..-

Total....................................


July 1, 1924




$790,213.73
51,544. 48
178,265. 14













186.......516....... 60
965,812. 66







--656,.792. 45
30,000. 00
28, 690 30
15,000.00

"20, 848. 00
2,112.00
50,000.00

13, 786. 00
2,651. 23
17,370.00


8, 039. 87
..............






..............























--------------


Additions


$14, 702.21
1, 556. 34
3,322.56
4,146. 80

1, 026. 10
1,121.42
9, 368. 92






8, 632.83
2. 254. 24
103,000.00









095, 00. 00







..700. 00

134. 04
2, 254. 24 -
103, 000. 00
............
............






............
............







134. 04 --
............


With-
drawals


June 30, 1985


--.--..-.....- $790, 213.173
....-.---I 51,544.48
------------ I------------
..- ..-- ..- ---
------------ ---------
... .. .. .. .. .. ..
........ --------------..


$500.00
2,117.50
1,300.00
2,819.48

--.-----....



103, 000.00
9, 680. 00

935. 00
















2, 448. 62
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............


4,017.642. 46 244,965 46 122,800.60


206,772.51
1,186,516.80







986,084.73
658, 792 45
30,000.00
28,690.30

11000o0oo.1
20,848.00
-------.----..
..............
-..-.--...--..
..............



















2,112.00
50,000.00

13, 1 86. 600
2,651.23
17,370.13
700.00


5, 725."29

4,139,807.32
------.--.-.--
--------------
--------------

--------------
--------------

















-----.--------


4, 139, 807. 32












REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 17.-Business property, by divisions-Continued

UNDISTRIBUTED BUSINESS CAPITAL, BY DIVISIONS


Divisions


Accounts
receivable


Electric light and power system.-------...-----------.......-- $50,000
Electric work...------......-------..--.......-.---------------......------... 5,000
Water system---------------... ..............---- 45,000
Municipal engineering work............................ ---------------------25,000
Shops and dry docks....---------............----------........--..---.----. 100,000
Fuel oil plants.---------. --------------------------- 75,000
Business storehouse.---------.-----...-----------------1 250,000
Animal and motor transportation..-----.....-..-...------------- 15,000
Motor car repair shop----.......----...----...- ---- ----.....----....
Building repairs and construction------...-.....------------. 25,000
Panama Canal Press..............-----------------------------10,000
Hutel Tivoli-----------........-----....--..----------------------- 1,000

Total.......................-------------------------------------- 601,000


Work ing
cash


$20,000
10,000
30,000
20,000
100,000
5,000


3,000
25,000
5,000
4,000


Stores


$100,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
250,000

250, 000 1
20, 000
10,000
200,000
------------
----------..-


Total


$170,000
65,000
125,000
95, 000
450, 000
80,000
500,000
45,000
13,000
250,000
15, 000
5,000


232,000 980,000 1 ,813,000


TABLE No. 1S.-Business fixed properly, fiscal year ended June 30, 1925


Hydroelectric plant ....-......-..--.--.--..-....
M iraflores steam plant.-.-.....----......-- -------
Substations.--.....----.. ---- -.------------
Transmission system...---------------......--...-----..---
Distribution lines.................---......--....
Feeder line Miraflores to Pedro M iguel .....

Total electrical division. -...-- ......--....

Panama water system.----....--- ----... --------
Calking Gamboa main.----..........----------
Colon water system...........----.----..---.........
Zone water system-----..... ---....-.-...--- .. ---
Fire protection extension, Gatun.-..--..-....
Fire protection extension, Balboa and Ancon.
Extension suction header, Balboa.-........
Wash water tank, Gatun...-..----.----------
Concrete water tank, Paraiso....-....-..-----
Compound meters, northern district.......--

Total, municipal engineering division......


Balac Additions
July 1, 1924-1


$1,669,265. 12 ............
308,270.31 .....----
1,841,045. 18. ..--...---....
1,355,733.38 ..--...-------
1,103,259.86 .......---
......--.--.-. $11,665.90

6,277,573.85 11,665.90


With- Balance
drawals I June 30, 1925


_-.....-...I $1,669,265. 12
.-.-..-.---. 308, 270.31
---.------ -. 1,841,043. 18
.-.....-.--- 1,355,733.38
------------ ------.-------
............ 1,114,925. 76

-.-.----..- 6. 2S9, 239.75


_____________________________I:


1, 779,562.67 ..-..--...-.- -
- -..--.---.--.- 47,000.00
585,642.89 I..-....-.---
568,279.37 |...........
.......-.---....- 1,574.97
....-....-- .-- .. 6,653.24
...- -.. 2, 189.22
-.-.------ 2, 348. 73
-.....- ...-- 4,734.33
...-.--.----. 9,526.20


2, 933, 484. 93


Waterworks and sewers, Panama.--.------.....----- 876,353. 22
Pavements....--.....--------------------------- 592, 913. 23

Total, public works, Panama-------------- 1,469, 266.45
Less repayments---.------------------------- 444,429,58

Balance---------.....-----....-..-.......-.......----------..-.. 1.024, 836. 87

Waterworks and sewers, Colon --------------- 623, 883. 68
Pavements..---------------------------................................------ 625,619.03

Total, public works, Colon..-------------.... I 1, 249, 502. 71
Less repayments...---...------.......---------..-.....------- 1 381,105.06

Balance--------------------------------... 868, 397. 65

Dry dock, Cristobal....---------------------------- 50,000.00
Roundhouse, Balboa........------..-..-------------------. 111,500.00
Car and paint shops, Balboan...----...----...-.---------- 95,000.00

Total, shops and dry docks...-..--------...---..--.-- 256,500. 00


74, 026. 69


------------. 1,826,562.6
--.-...... I 585,642.89
------------ .--------------

------------ - - - -

----.------. 595, 306. 06


- -I: ~ ~ I :1 ____________________________________________


............ 876,353.22
592,913.23

..--- .... 1,469,266.45
$30, 704.53 475,134.11

30, 704. 53 994, 132 34

-I. 623,883.68
....-.-.. ... 625, 619.03

....--........----1,249,502.71
36,809.87 417,914.93

36,809.87 831, 687.78

............ 50,000.00
-.--..--. 111, 500.00
-.--.----... 95,000.00

..--- -... 256,500.00


.-..........-- 3,007.,511.02


............

............

............
............

------------

............
............
............
............
............









REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 18.-Busines8 fixed property, fiscal year ended June 0SO, 1925-Con.


Balance With- Balance
July 1, 1924 Additions drawals June 30, 1925


Stramships-
Panaima:................-...-..............
Ancon..........-..................... --- ...
Cristobal...--....---......---......... .......

Total, steamships............ ........

Pier 18, Balboa.....-......--... .....--.....--
Pier 6, Cristobal--..---------- -------.-------

Total, docks, wharves, and piers..---....--

Coaling plant, Cristobal..........----....------.........

Colliers...------..----......................---------
Coal barges.........................------------..--

Total, colliers and coal barges...-------........

Fuel oil plant, Balboa-----------..----------...
Fuel oil plant, Cristobal...-----------............

Tot al, fuel oil plants...---........--..---.....

Business storehouses.... -.....-- ---...........---
Animal and motor transportation-----...........--
Motor car repair shop........--...-....--.......
Building repairs anl construction... ...-....-- ..
Gold qluarteris.................. .............
15 typj 17 cottages.....-.. -......... ......
Depreciation applied........--............-----
Transferredl from U. S. Army, Gatun..-----
Transferred to U. S. Army, Gatun-----------

Tutal, gold fquarters................... ..

silver 'lunrders. ................ ........ ..............
Tra:nslrredI from U. S. Army, Gatun........
'-ile house 319. Parniso .................---
Iolusi' 5.5, Ancon, demolished--------.........----

Tot .l, ilver quarters...---....--..-........-----


$400,000.00
600,000.00
600,000.00


$400,000.00
600,000.00
600,000.00


1,600,000.00 ----------.------------ 1,600,000.00

1,168,200.26 ------------------------ 1, 168, 2i. 26
1,200,000.00 W ---------------------- 1,200,000.00

2,368,200. 26 -------------------- 2,368,200. 26

500,000.00 -----------------------.. 500, 00.00

2,029,232.00 --, -- -- 2, 029, 232. 00
1,600,000.00 ----- ----. 1,600,000.00

3,629,23200 ----------.------------ 3,629,232.00

458,860. 58 ---------------------- 458,860. 58
618,968.00 ----------- ------------618,968. 00

1,077,828.58 ----------.------------ 1,077,828.58

300, 000.00 00-----------..---------- 300,00 00
14,285. 00 ---------------------.. 14,285. 00
16,633.32 -------------- --------- 16,633.32
11,690.00 ------------------------ 11,690.00
3,428,150.71---- -- -----
--------------- $122,206.41 -- --- -----
-------------- ------- -------- $51, 408. 73 ---- .
------------.--- 7,000.00 -----------
-..--..- ---.---- -------- 25, 100.00--...- ..

3,428,150.71 129,206.41 76,508.73 3,480,848.39

616, 906. 00 --- -- -........... -- --......
-.-------------- 18, 100.00 -.---.-- ..
300.00 ------.
-.--.--.------- G600.00 -----...

616, 906. 00 18, 100.00 900.00 631, 106. 00


Garages .....I---------........----- -..- .. 83,524.76 I...........
Additional garages (212 stalls).-------....--........-------.-----..-----39, 808. 65
" Deprciainn applied........................ .. ...------
Bo.athorusc I -. .......... .......................... 4.000. 00 .- ... ..
8old................-........................................
R tu i 1......-------------------------------------------- 198,350.00..........


6,650.59 116,682.82

4,000.00........
--- -- --- --18, 50. 00


Trit.il, rented buildings-------................... 285,874.76 39,808.65 10,650.69 31 ., 032. 82

Hotel Tivoli............ ......................... \Gl ,258. 13 I......... .............. f1,258.13
lotel Tivojli------------------------------------- 16,258. 13------------------------161,258. 13

Oraind total, business property............. 25, 370, 852. 06 272, S07. 65 | 155, 573. 72 2| 4., 5 .S. 99

I These items consolidated under rented building.E.


I


---- -- -------- -
. -.. -. - - - - - - -


I


- - -. -. - - - - --. - -. .








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 19.-Canal business equipment


Electric light and power system:
Machinery and tools--........-....--...---
Depreciation applied --.-..-...........-
Automobiles...--------. -.. --.............-
Electric work:
Machinery and tools ---------........-....-
Depreciation applied. --------------.....-....
Automobiles -..-----........................
Telephone and telegraph work:
Machinery and tools.......................
Depreciation applied...................
Water system:
Machinery and tools...-...................
Depreciation applied...................
Municipal engineering work:
Machinery and tools..----------....-.....-
Depreciation applied...............--
Automobiles...............................
Shops and dry docks:
Machinery and tools.......................
Depreciation applied...---------.....-----
Fuel-oil plants:
Machinery and tools.......................
Depreciation applied.................. .
Animal and motor transportation:
Machinery and tools.......................
Depreciation applied.................. .
Automobiles...............................
Mules......................................
Motor car repair shop:
M achinery and tools.......................|
Depreciation applied--..------------........ .
Building repair and construction:
Machinery and tools..-....................
Depreciation applied................... .--------------
Panama Canal Press:
Machinery and tools.......................
Depreciation applied................... -
Rented buildings:
Restaurants-
Machinery and tools.--................
Depreciation applied---............
Hotel Aspinwall-
Machinery and tools...................
Sold.....-........................- .
Hotel Tivoli:
Machinery and tools--.........-.-.........
Depreciation applied...-------..-............
Farm Bureau: I
Machinery and tools----....-..............
Depreciation applied ------..........-
Mules......-............................. -

Total.--..-......-......--...-..........


Blanc24 iAdditions
July 1, 1924



$B, 116.90 $3,049.61

880.72 .--- -- --- --


14, 580. 58

5,031.77


3,510. 55

2, 735. 05


Withdrawals


Balance
June 30, 1925


Sii,iiO."00 $10, 056. 51
----....--.... 880.72


1,"788.306


-.--.-.-------
16, 302.83
7,766.82


6,321.79 1,710.10 .............. .............
....---.....- .............. 805.49 7,226.40

25, 219. 44 10,424.24 ........-... ......-------------------
....---.-..-................ -------- 9,465.90 26,177.78


27,120.56 9,707.66

6,254.08 j .-- ..- -

362,061.74 11,064.89

6,771............. 1233.80
6, 771. 46 L-1, 233. 80
.. -- --- .- .-. . .. .... ..


2,958. 67
.............
224,086.05
3,356.63


7, 631.24
.....-----.----
.......----..--
-------------.


13,607.07 1,962.09
............. ...... .. ..


19,611.86


30,420.16


9, 555.06
---------..---


10, 358. 85 26,469.'37
-..---........ 6,254.08

29,545.03 343,581.60


2, 326. 33 5,678.93


2,619.05 7,970.86
6,212.03 217,874.02
555.42 2,801.21

"686.73 --- 3,--882.43
1,686.73 13,882.43


9, 146.a7 1, 820.03 -----. -- -6i --- -----7 .- 9.
-.--.----- ... .............. 3, 164.64 1 7,801.96


596.59 ---------......... ......-------.-....
... .....-.- 2,268.77 17,939.68

179.74 .............. .........
.............. 2,920.03 27,679.87


-1----1-1----- 9,'555.06 -.------------


73,934.11 7,861.34 .............. ..............
---- .......- ......- .. 7,610.45 74,185.00


1,174. 10

1,086.76

851,296.08


376.58


63,863. 51


405. 18


92,397. 26


..............
1,145.50
1,086.76

822, 762. 33


I Title of account changed from lands rented.









REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 20.-Stat us of public works in cities of Panama and Colon June 30, 1925


Construction cost:
Waterworks and sewers ---.----- -----------. -
Pavements.........................................
Total...--.. .............--.-...--.....-......
Maintenance, operation, and repairs, including pro-
portion of zone system-......-----.---.- .........
Interest at 2 per cent per annum:
Waterworks and sewers --..---.......----.......---....
Pavements....-----....~.~.......---. ....-------..
Zone system........ ......................----- .....
Total.......---.........----------.......-------..---.....

Total payable from water rentals.....-........----
Water rentals and deficit payments applied to-
Maintenance, operations and repairs...........-------
Interest.................... ...-. .............
Proportion of capital cost............ ...............
Total...........................- .. ....-
Collections to be applied from unpaid deficit bills to
capital costs---..............--........----------.......
Capital cost reimbursable June 30, 1925 (in addition to
unpaid deficit bills):
Waterworks and sewers...,...-.............-.--..-
Pavements-----.-------------------------------
Total --.................----....---........------.....

Total payable from water rentals-..-------------.-


Total


$1, 500, 236. 90
1,218,532.26


Panama


$876, 353.22
592,913.23


Colon


$623,883.68
625. 619.03


2,718,769. 16 1, 469, 266. 45 1, 249,502.71
2,850,052. 17 1,645,380. 83 1, 204. 671. 34
405,746.63 223, 108. 87 182,637. 76
334, 278. 11 176,817.44 157,460.67
216,098. 28 143, 136. 87 72, 961.41


956, 123. 02

6,524,944.35


2,850,052.17
956, 123.02
820,263.53

4,626,438.72
72,785.51


543, 063. 18

3,657,710.46


1,645.380.83
543,063. 18
402,348.60

2,690,792. 61
72,785. 51


413,059.84
2, 867, 233.89


1,204,671.34
413. 059. 84
417,914.93

2,035,646.11


1,026,520.26 599,493.68 427,026. 58
799,199.86 394, 638. 66, 404,561.20


1,825,720.12


6,524,944.35


994, 132.34


I I


3,657,710.46


831,587.78


2,867,233.89


TABLE No. 21.-Detail of canal transit material and supplies


Fiscal year 1924 Fiscal year 1925


Balboa store--------..........----.------------..--.......----........--....------.------- $2,444,176. 83 $2,624,269.70
Medical store-----..............----..--...---------------------------------...................................... 64,204.08 65,625.85
Stationery store, administration building...------------------ ------------- 16, 329.35 16,355.34
Paraiso store..--.......-------------------.................----------------..--.....---------.. 631,990. 27 695,420.10
Cristobal store.------......----..-------------.......--------------------------................................... 417, 643. 16 382,307.53
Corozal.....----...-----------..----....---------------......----..-----------.........----..-. 453, 563.87 434,898. 36
District quartermasters' stores:
Balboa.--.--..----------...--..........--------------...--.--.-----.-----------...... 423.93 ,040.78
Pedro Miguel---------....--.....-------------...............-----------............. ----------------120 97 124.72
Gatun--......---------..----.....................----------------------------------------- 138. 74 170.33
Cristobal..--.----..----........................--........-----------------.-----..-------------------- 21. 52 189.61

Total--------.. -----------------------------... ........--... ... 6,946. 16 5, 52.44
Local purchases----------...------------------------- ---- --------- 2,128.69 .............
Invoices in suspense...--------...-------.....----------.................-----...........--......--------- 6.438.83 93.39
Material drawn by division not yet charged to the work--.......-------------... 48,466.68 32, 486.37
Total.--------.....--..-----.....- .--....-.-.... ..------..-------------.. 4,080,886.92 4,256,982.08
Less reserve for inventory adjustments----.....-- ..-- ...--------------------.. 610,009.76 537,87.71
Book value of stores on hand...................................... --------------------------------470,877. 16 3,719,084.37


f









90 REPORT .OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE NO. 22.-Receipts, issues, and transfers of stores (and purchases charged to
divisions) during fiscal year 1924-25


Balance
Montr h on hand
Month beginning
of month


July.----------. $4,428,383. 11
August--------..... 4,655, 641.24
September........ -------4, 600, 062.51
October..--------- 4, 705, 773. 68
November...--..... 4,672, 793.47
December......... 4, 554. 625. 06
January---------........ 4, 599, 747.88
February--------. 4,581,068.76
March.------.---- 4,576,832. 39
April -....--------- 4,457,964. 48
May.............. 4,366, 360.30
June.......------------. 4,507,058.22


Receipts by-


Purchase


$521, 303. 19
265, 246. 32
484,862. 34
279, 215. 37
183,262. 65
408,954. 30
308,438. 95
299,871.15
245,014. 16
276, 539. 33
472,058.40
358, 556. 80


Total-.......------ ---------.......... 4,103, 322. 96


Transfer


$168,433.99
160,128.50
174,250.43
151, 349.39
170, 204. 07
157,945. 39
147,824.82
158,837.69
181.819.75
172,394. 06
257,224.01
253,482.48

2,153,894. 68


Manufacture I Adjustments


$51,176.01
51,092 00
22,208.38
26,503.85
31,157.81
21,054.48
24,191.38
25, 544. 92
30, 520. 84
38,758. 90
45,678. 76
127,267. 50

495, 154. 83


$2,963. 68
7,156. 36
9, 379. 64
2,611.24
4,963.51
3,756.44
4, 199.37
3,804.88
5,743.65
3,608. 52
6,157. 70
11,208.72

65, 553.61


Regular stock in storehouses, July 1, 1924.............--------------------------...............------.........-------- $4,213,9069.84
Scrap and obsolete material in storehouses, July 1, 1924-..........-------------------- ...--------....... 214,413.27
Total stock in storehouses, July 1 1924.---.-----------------. .---- .-----------------4,428,383. 11

Material in hands of divisions, July 1, 1924...-...------------. -----.-----------.---------- 199,326.67
Canal transit---------............---------------------......-------...------------- $48,466.68
Canal business---......---.-- --....--.------ -------------.---------- 150,859.99


Issued by-


Month
Issues


July-..---.---- $286, 207.62
August-----..- 315,276.63
September... 372,166.66
October. ... 297,767.48
November_ 276,953.35
December -... 329,373.84
January-.... 285,905.82
February -.. 267, 702.15
March------....... 324,827.57
April......-.I 342,986.82
May-------....... 313,939.49
June.........------ 380,079. 70

Total.... 3, 793, 186. 13


Transfers


$120, 520.41
107, 332. 81
128. 613. 12
112, 094.35
106, 753.89
129.352. 62
116,517.22
113, 516.89
125,070. 15
129,920.87
226, 221. 64
144, 589. 78


Sales Ad]ust-
ments


$88, 557. 50 $21, 333.21
105,207,06 11,395.41
61,715.14 22,494.70
75,711.88 7,086.35
98, 105.35 25,943.88
82,516.91 5,344.42
93,518.79 7,391.81
97,053.58 14, 022.39
99,341.66 32.726.83
100,715. 97 9, 282.33
83,260.19 16.999. 63
107, 139.30 9, 342.32


Total
credits


$516, 618. 74
539, 201.91
584, 989. 62
492, 660. 06
507, 756. 45
546, 587. 79
503, 333. 64
492,295. 01
581, 966.21
582, 904. 99
640,420.95
641, 151. 10


Balance on
hand at close
of each
month


$4,655,641.24
4, 600,062. 51
4, 705,773. 68
4, 672, 793.47
4,554,625. 06
4, 599, 747.88
4, 581,068.76
4, 576, 832. 39
4,457,964. 48
4,366,360.30
4,507,058. 22
4,616,422. 62


I I I I~'- --- I--- - I---- '


1,560, 493. 73 1,092,843.33 183,363.28 6, 629,880. 47


Regular stock in storehouses, July 1, 1925----..----.....--.--.---.......--------------------- $4, 523, 552.96
Scrap and obsolete material in storehouses, July 1, 1925..----------.----.....-------------------.. 92,869.66
Total stock in storehouses, July 1, 1925----------------------.. .........---------------.... 4. 616,422.62
Material in hands of divisions, July 1, 1925------------------------..-------..---------- 191.360.58
Canal transit .---.--------. --..--.----------....... .....---..-..-. ..---- $32,486. 37
Canal business--------------........---..-- ..----..-----------.--.----.. -- 158,874. 16


Total to be
accounted for



$5, 172,259.98
5,139, 264. 42
5,290, 73. 80
5,165,453.63
5, 062,381. 51
5, 146,335. 67
5, 084,402.40
5,069,127.40
5,039,930.80
4,949,265. 29
5,147,479.17
5, 257,573.72


Purchases
direct to
divisions



$41,330. 59
54,235. 83
110, 635. 77
85,556.26
88, 509. 98
52,860.62
92,327.60
46,052. 87
72 721. 19
52,966.42
44,189.62
439,528.96


1,180,915.71








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 24.-Statement of canal earnings, expenses, and net expenses


Fiscal year 1925 Net canal

Canal expenses Earnings expenses


$330,329.56 $121,151.21 $209, 178.35
1,333.03 1,665.94 1332.91
1, 691. 28 .....----------------- 1,691.28
4?,111 34 ................ 42, 111.34
12,800.61 121.59 12,679.02
2, 400.00 ------------ 2,400.00
572.22 -......-..-....- 572.22
177,738. 14 77,738.14 100,000. 00

568,976. 18 200,676. 88 1 368.299.30


Executive department:
Executive offices..................................
Cables and radiograms............................
General executive expenses......-.....-- ..-........
Shipping commissioner ............................
Canal record........................................
Land office---.......................................
Law books........................................
Clubs and playgrounds.............................

Total.................................. ............

Accounting department:
Accounting office....-......-----....--........-....
Paymaster's office..........-----....................
Collector's office...... ....................

Total............. ................. ....

Washington office:
Chief of office........................... ............
Purchasing bureau.................... ..............
Assistant auditor's office... .....................
Disbursing clerk's office.........................

Total......................... .........................

Civil government:
Civil affairs.................... .. ..........
Customs............... ..................
Posts................... .... .......................
Schools.................. .............. ..........
Fire protection...............................
Police and prisons.............................. ..
District court..................... ....... ..........
District attorney......... .. ..............
M arshal...... .................. ............. ......
Magistrates' courts........... ..............

Total............... .............. ............

Health department-
Chief health office........................... ......
Ancon Hospital.....................................
Colon Hospital................... .........
D ispensaries........................................
Corozal Farm and Asylum.........................
Palo Seco Leper Asylum............................
Santo Tomas Hospital.....................--.......
Medical storehouse...............................
Quarantine service....................................
Sanitation, Panama...............................
Street cleaning and garbage collection, Panama....
Sanitation, Colon................ .........
Street cleaning and garbage collection, Colon......
Sanitation, zone...................... ............

Total..................... ...................

Office engineer................... ...........
Meteorology and hydrography...................
Surveys...................--- ..........................

Storehouses, general:
Balboa storehouse..................................
Administration building storehouse..............
Paraiso storehouse.........................................
Cristobal storehouse......................... ...... ...

Total............................ ..........


Public buildings and grounds:
Superintendence......... ..................... 50,507.43
Balboa......................... .................... 193,721. 13
Pedro Miguel.................................... 41, 543 81
Gatun.............................................. 29, 04i. 77
Cristobal............................ .............. 63, 519.38

Total......---------.............------------................... 378,338.52

I Earnings exceeded expenses.

61696-251-7


267, 734. 98
27, 525.00
31.900. 50


135, 155. 29
18, 125.38
17,281.70


402,890.27
45,650.38
49,182. 20


497,722. 85 327,160.48 170, 562.37

49,923.96 35.44 49,888. 52
174,970.22 40,668.11 134, 30211
2A, 4t6.60 ---O ...-.-.-... 28,466. 80
8,002.41 --.............. 8,002.41

261, 363. 39 40, 703. 55 220,659. 84

16,603.76 23.00 16,580.76
30,265.68 380.50 29,885.18
148,365.91 9,231.83 139, 134.08
266,026.71 9,379 16 256,647.55
119,236.37 207.61 119,028.76
387,090.45 46,603.76 340,486.69
26,690.17 45.25 26,644.92
11,537.37 ------......---------- 11,537.37
9,132.22 ---------------- 9,132.22
16, 3; 1. 83 2.40 16,359.43

1,031,310. 47 65,873.51 965,436.96

26,820.34 1,649.95 25,170.39
567,504.85 339,100.33 228,404.52
90,989.37 44,446.34 46,543.03
47,563.41 15,943.91 31,619. 50
136,578.69 117,352.18 19,226.51
40, 877. 53 18,213.25 22, 6&I. 28
3,639.00 110.82 3,528.18
8,502.84 ................ 88,502.84
74,031.01 37,166.82 36,8C64.19
52, 272. 52 11,444.25 40,828.27
61,836.90 38.369. 18 23, 467.72
24, 191.30 3, 593. 85 20, 597. 45
59,595.16 34,710.11 24,885.05
125,937. 15 46,298. 55 79, 638.60

1,320.340.07 708,399.54 611,940.53

43, 618. 69 28,949.83 14, 668. 8
37, 601.87 359.41 37,242. 46
36,955 25 14,104.22 22,851.03

412,994.36 201,077.61 211,916.75
6, 323.74 ................ 6, 323.74
36. 792.71 4,150.00 32,642.71
105, 446. 12 30, 302. 20 75, 143.92

561,556.03 235. 529.81 326,027.12


42.841 50
97. 583. 08
33, 239. 85
19, 73G.08
33.083.10


7,665. 87
9, 138.05
8 303.96
9,310.69
30, 436. 28


22, 483.67 151,854.85
a








92 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 24.-Statement of canal earnings, expenses, and net expenses--Contd.


Fiscal year 1925


Street lighting .....-....-.............-- ...-.......---
Water for municipal purposes............---- ..-------
Roads, streets, and sidewalks...-..............-......-
Storm sewers...........---------------------------------...............
Miscellaneous general expenses:
Tracks and equipment maintenance-------............----
Recruiting and repatriating employees.....--......-
Transportation, employees on Isthmus...........-
Compensation injured employees........-----......----
Maintenance, laborers' quarters.......---------------..........
Total...........----......--....----.------
Marine division:
Marine superintendent..........--...............
Port captain-
Balboa.-.......----.-.......-..........----.......
Cristobal..--....----------------------------
Board of admeasurement...----...............------......
Board of local inspectors--...--......---...........--
Pilots-
Balboa-------...............---.........--.......----
Cristobal--...------..---.------------....----.
Tugs and launches-
Balboa------.........--..---------.----...---------
Cristobal -------..--------..... ---------------
Handling lines-
Balboa...-....................---...----------.........-
Cristobal.. -..---.................--------......----
Aids to navigation..-------.--..---------------
Total----.....--------------.-.---------
Lock operation and maintenance:
Gatun locks-
Superintendence. -------------- -...... -----
Operation----------------. --------------...
Maintenance..---------------.-------------
Total, Oatun locks-. ...............----.....
Pedro Miguel locks-
Superintendence-..--..--------------.. -..
Operation-----.----------- ------------
Maintenance.---------- --... --.... ------------
Total, Pedro Miguel locks.--.......-........
Miraflores locks-
Superintendence...... .....................------
Operation.----------------. ------------
Maintenance---..............--- ...- ..........
Total, Miraflores locks-...--.--...-.....-----
Miraflores spillway.-------.....-----.- --------
Corozal store (locks)-..-.--------------------
Total, locks ---------------------------
Gatun dam, maintenance----.......................---
Oatun spillway----------...................-----...........----
Colon east breakwater-...- ..---- -------...-----
Damage to vessels in locks --------------..- -----
Damage to vessels in canal..............................
Channel maintenance:
Atlantic entrance-...............----------...--.........-
Gatun Lake-...............................----
Gaillard Cut------...-----------........ ------------
Pacific entrance...--...........---.--............------
Cristobal Harbor.....---------------..--.----..-----..-
Balboa Harbor........-------------------......-...----------
Removal, floating obstructions---------------................-----
Floating derricks, maintenance-----..------..-----.
Dredging division work.- ............---.........-
Total...---- --.....------.--------------
Total....................------------- -----
Amortization-------..---..--...-........--------------
Depreciation.......-...................................
Grand total.----------------------------------


Canal expenses


$14,931.43
23,400.00
88,674.40
15.718. 62


Earnings


Net canal
expenses


$14,931.43
23,400.00
88,674.40
15.718. 62


56,234.92------...----------. 56,234.92
22,207.66----------------.. 22,207.66
120,000.00----------------..... 120,000.00
100.50 .---------------- 100.50
87,786.57 ...............- 87.786.57
286329.65 .........---------.....------.. --286,329.65

11,537.90 $30.00 11,507.90
120,888.08 4,569.13 116,318.95
52,340.77 722.91 51,617.86
44,080.58 3,070. 00 41,010. 58
4,710.29 4,692.47 17.82
139,446.61 73,586.84 65,859.77
159,209.68 188.314.20 129,104.52
220,588.44 159,056.40 61,532.04
222,623.54 219,152.18 3,471.36
109,517.29 114,160.68 14,643.39
101,908.04 114,288.00 112,379.96
298,415.06 55,503.10 242,911.96
1,485.266.28 937, 145.91 548, 120.37


39,425.99.--...-.......--- --------.............
261,721.02 ....--- ...... --.----...---
142,518 84 ................ ................
443,665.85 511.36 443,154.49

20,.624.88 ------ -....- -----------
220,899.75-............... ......---- ....
92,131.28 -----...............-.......-........
333, 655.91 320. 34 333,335. 57

27,569.43.--.--..-.--- ------------
228,941.18 -----............... ----..........
436.091.44................--- --.......---.....
692,602.05 ................ 692, 602.05
1,983.10---------------- 1,983.10
8,131.08.....----------..------ 8,131.08
1,480,037.99 831.70 1,479,206.29
54,042.01 9,461.30 44,580. 71
3,605.13----------------.. 3,605.13
235.21--...--------------. 23& 21
8,520.00---------------- 8,520.00
966.77 .---...-------------- 966.77

34,290.22--------....- ............---
3,745.&86.............. --.......--.....
1,208.907.95-....-------- -------- -..
593,135.91 --..........---.......--..........
49.83------................ ..---...-.....
165,978.86......------- ..---------.
29,973.91 ...- ....... --................
57,534.54---............- ..--...........----
334.854.63 :................ --------.--
2,428,471.71 370,987.67 2,057,484.04
10,.627,983.42 3,166,667.48 7,.461.315. 94


350 000.00
305. 377.50
11,283,360.92


3,166,667.48


350, 000.00
305,377. 50
8,116,693.44


I Earnings exceeded expenses.




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