• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Section I: Canal operation and...
 Section II: Business operation...
 Section III: Government
 Section IV: Administration
 Section V: Financial and statistical...
 Back Cover














Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097365/00009
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
Alternate Title: Report of Governor of the Panama Canal
Physical Description: 36 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Canal Zone -- Office of the Governor
Publisher: U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Washington
Washington
Publication Date: 1924
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: June 30, 1915-June 30, 1951.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Some vols. issued in the congressional series as House document.
General Note: Reports for 1914/15-1915/16 each accompanied by portfolio of maps and diagrams.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00097365
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02454300
lccn - 15026761
oclc - 2454300
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report of the Isthmian Canal Commission for the year ending ...
Succeeded by: Annual reports of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government for the fiscal year ended ...

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Section I: Canal operation and trade via Panama
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Section II: Business operations
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Section III: Government
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Section IV: Administration
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Section V: Financial and statistical statements
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
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        Page 59
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    Back Cover
        Page 115
        Page 116
Full Text











UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY









ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE


GOVERNOR OF


THE PANAMA CANAL


FOR THE


FISCAL YEAR
ENDED JUNE 30


1924


WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1924













TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
Introduction-------------------------------------- ------------- 1
Net revenue of the canal and its auxiliaries --------.---------... 1
Service rendered by the canal to shipping _--------_----.._ j _----- 2

SECTION I.-CANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAMA
Traffic in 1924 ----------__-----------------------------------______--- 3
Nationality of vessels ----------------------.------------------ 5
Free transit of public vessels and vessels for repair- --------------- 6
Trade routes and cargo----------------------- ----------------- 6
Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year
1924, classified by leading trade routes------------------------ 7
Principal commodities -------------------------------------- 8
Motor ships------------------------------------------------ 9
Details of the trade ------------------------------------------ 9
The dual system of measurement ---------- __----------------- 9
Lockages and lock maintenance_------------------------------- ----10
Power for canal operation ---------- ------- --------------------- 11
Water supply.----------------------------------------------- 12
Flood of October, 1923 ------------------------------------------ 13
Maintenance of channel- ----------------------------------------- 15
Slides------------------------------------------------------ 16
Aids to navigation------------------------ ---------------------- 17
Accidents------------__-------------------------------------- 17
Salvage operations --------_-------------------------------------- 19

SECTION II.-BUSINEsS OPERATIONS
Repairs to vessels--Mechanical work----------------------------- 20
Work for individuals and companies----------------------- -----21
Work for the Navy and Army --------------------------------- 22
Work for The Panama Canal ------------------------------- 22
Work for the Panama Railroad ------------------------------- 23
Dry docks -------------------------- ---------------------- 23
Plant--------------------------------------------------- 23
Financial ----------------------------------------------- 23
Coal--------- ----------------------------------------------- 23
Fuel oil, Diesel oil, gasoline---------------------------------------- 24
Ship chandlery and other supplies-storehouse operations-------------- 25
Harbor terminals--------------- ------------------------------- 25
Commissary system-------------.--------------------------------- 26
Purchases-------_____------------------------------------------ 27
Sales----------------------------------------------- ---- 27
Cattle industry -------------------------------------------- 27
Dairy farm----------------------------------------------- 27
Plantations----------------------------------------------- 27
Hotels and restaurants----------------------------- ------------- 28


67/6 7






IV TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
Building construction and repairs... ------------------------------------_ 28
Printing.---------------------------------------------------------- 28
Panama Rnailroad --------------...---------------- --------------------_ 28
Telephones--------------------------------------------------_ 29
Lands and buildings.--. ------------------------------------- __-- 30
Clubhouses--------------------------------------------------_ 30
Panama Railroad Steamship Line ------.---------------------------_____ 31

SECTION III.-GOVEKNMENT
Population-------------------- ----------------------------------- ____ 32
Public health---------------------------. ___--------------------------- 33
Malaria------------------------------- -- --------------------- ___ 33
Canal Zone..--------------------------------------_____--- 33
Panama------------------------------------------------ 33
Colon.------ ------------------------------------------- 34
Canal hospitals --------------------_------------------------- 34
Quarantine------------------------------------------------ 34
Municipal engineering----------------------------------------- 35
Water supply. ------- ------- --- -- --------------------------- __ 35
Sewers.--------- ----------------------------------- 35
Roads, streets, and sidewalks- --------------------------------- 35
Garbage disposal---.----- -----------------------------------__ 36
Cities of Panama and Colon ---------------------------------- 36
Miscellaneous work --------------------------------------------_ 36
Public urder-_---__------------- ---------------------------------- 36
Office of district attorney----------------------------------------- 38
District court ----------------------------------------------------_ 38
Marshal.. --------------------------------------------------- 38
Magistrates' courts--------- ------------------------------ 38
Balboa-------. .. ------------------------------------------.. 38
Cristobal ..-- -------------- ---------------------------------___ 38
Fire protection-------------------------------------------------____ 39
Public-school system.----..----------------------------------------_ 39
Postal system --------------------------------------------------40
Customs.. -----------------------------------------------------42
Shipping commissioner-seamen -- --------------------------------- __ 43
Administration of estates-. ---------------------------------------- 43
Relations with Panama------------------------------------------ 43

SECTION IV.-ADMINISTRATION

Changes in organization and personnel----------. ---.----------------- 44
Increase of force ---- ------------------------..-- -----------------___ ---____ 44
Wage adjustments:
Gold employees------------------ --- ------------------------. 45
Silver employees-.-- -----------------_ __-------------------------_ 47
Grievance board-------------------------------------------------- 48
Public amusements and recreation..----------------------------------- 48
Recruiting, purchases, and sales in the United States------------------_ 49

SECTION V.-FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS

For list of tables see-------------------------------- -------------_ ---_ 50


















APPENDIXES NOT PRINTED


REPORTS OF HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS
Reports for the fiscal year 1924 have been made as follows and may be con-
sulted at the Washington office of The Panama Canal or at the office of the
Governor, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone:
Engineer of maintenance:
Assistant engineer of maintenance, report of.
Pacific locks, report of superintendent.
Atlantic locks, report of superintendent.
Electrical division, report of electrical engineer.
Municipal engineering division, report of municipal engineer.
Dredging division, report of superintendent.
Office engineer.
Meteorology and hydrography, report of chief hydrographer.
Surveys, report of assistant engineer.
Gatun dam and backfills, report of general foreman.
Marine division, report of superintendent.
Mechanical division, report of superintendent.
Supply department, report of chief quartermaster.
Executive department, report of executive secretary:
Division of civil affairs, report of chief of division.
Police and fire division, report of chief of division.
Division of schools, report of superintendent of schools.
Bureau of clubs and playgrounds, report of general secretary.
District attorney, report of.
Accounting department, report of the auditor.
Land agent, The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad Co., report of.
Purchasing department, report of the general purchasing officer and chief of
Washingt.on office.














































Digitized by [he Iniernel Archive
in 2010 With funding Irom
Univeisily ol Florida, George A. Smalhers Libraries WiLh support from Lyrasis and Ihe Sloan Foundation


hlip: www.arciiive.org details annualreporlolgol924cana












ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


THE PANAMA CANAL,
September 16, 1924.
The honorable the SECRETARY OF WAR,
Washington, D. 0.
SIR: I submit herewith a report covering the operation of The
Panama Canal during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1924.
Respectfully,
JAY J. MORROW,
Governor, The Panama Canal.


INTRODUCTION
NET REVENUE OF THE CANAL AND ITS AUXILIARIES
For the fiscal year 1924 the net income from tolls and other mis-
cellaneous receipts grouped under the head of "transit revenue"
was $16,307,948.50, as compared with $10,001,066.50 in 1923 and
$3,466,574.69 in 1922. The net profits on auxiliary business opera-
tions conducted directly by The Panama Canal, of which the most
important are the mechanical shops, material storehouses and fuel
oil plants, totaled $901,624.12, as compared with $1,140,642.50 in
1923, while those conducted by the Panama Railroad Co., exclusive
of the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, but including commis-
saries, docks, coaling plants, and cattle industry, showed a profit of
31,044,887.04, as compared with $922,171.74 in 1923. The total net
revenue of the year from all sources, exclusive of the Panama Rail-
road Steamship Line, was $18,254,459.66.
In tabulated form the financial results of the operation of the canal
and its auxiliaries on the Isthmus were:

1924 1923

Net transit revenue..................................................... 16,307,948. 50 $10, 001066. 50
Net revenue on Panama Canal business operations ...................... 001, 624. 12 1, 140, 642. 50
Total net revenue, Panama Canal................................. 17,20,.572.62 11, 141.709.00
Net revenue on Panama Railroad business operations................. 1,044, 887. U4 922. 171.74
Combined net revenue ............................... 18, 254 .45. G 12,063, 880.74







2 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

SERVICE RENDERED BY THE CANAL TO SHIPPING

In terms of service to shipping the main items in the record for
the fiscal year 1924, compared with 1923, were as follows:


1924 1923

Transits of the canal by ships paying tolls-...----.--.--..-------------------- 5,230 3,967
Free transits.................------------------------------------- --------------------- 420 388
Calls at canal ports by ships not transiting the canal------------------------ 739 838
Cargo handled at ports (tons).---..--..--......------.----...--------------------..--..- 933,092 837,271
Coal sales and issues (tons)...-----...------.......-------.....-------..----------------- 222, 734 224,464
Coal, number of ships served other than Panama Canal...-..--...--.---.------------ 722 773
Fuel oil pumped (barrels)...........--------------------......----....----..------------..-- 13,790,823 10,429,517
Fuel oil, number of ships served other than Panama Canal-------.--------. 2, 177 1,487
Ships repaired, other than Panama Canal equipment--------------...................... 510 092
Ships drydocked other than Panama Canal equipment--------...........------------- 85 74
Provisions sold to ships (commissary sales)..---....-----..------------------- $801,886.30 $681,635.47
Chandlery sold to ships (storehouse sales)----------...--------------. 85,340.42 99,582.27















SECTION I



CANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAMA

TRAFFIC IN 1924

The fiscal year 1924 has been by far the most prosperous in the
history of The Panama Canal. The number of ships in transit,
exclusive of public vessels of the United States and others exempt
from the payment of tolls, was 5,230, their aggregate net tonnage
was 26,148,878, and the tolls collected totaled $24,290,963.54.
The latter figure exceeds by 38.7 per cent the tolls for the fiscal year
1923. The gradual increase of traffic since the canal was opened to
navigation in August, 1914, is shown in the table below.


FilNeil year ending June 30


1915 '..--....--.-.-.-.-..-.-.......-......-....--
19186............................................
19 18 ..............................................
19210........................................ ...
1922 ........................... ... ...... ... .
1923. .................. ...........................
1924 ............ ........... ...............
Total .............. ............ ......


Number r
of
transits


Panama
Canal net
tonnage


Tolls Tons of
cargo


1,075 3, 792, 572 .14. 3.7, .50. 10 4, 4.S, 5-1
758 2, 396, 162 2. 40S. 0-i. Hi2 3 04, I 14
1,803 ., 7; 957 5, 627, 4';:3 7 n 53
2,069 6,.574,073 6, -13. 3.15 7,:iU, 0 o1
2,024 6,121,990 6, 17. ?,2. 59 H, UI 1,-.21
2,478 8,546,044 8, 5. 13.933. 15 9.374,499
2.892 11,415.876 11, 276, M9 91 I11. 9. 214
2,713 11. 117.459 11. 197. ,';2 41 10. 4,910
3,967 1A 05 7S(6 17, .-09. 414 85 1i.. 7,7.,
5,230 26. 14 Ni3 24,2 1), 9:3. 54 2.,7'. -1710
25, 032 100, 20,397 7, h02, 1%S. 46 107, 10,991


I Canal ope'e l tololtranll Aug. 15f, 1014.
Cinmal closied to tralfic .ipproiinatlrly 7 mionthi of fiscal year by slides.

The high figures for the fiscal year 1924 were due in part to heavy
oil shipments from California. These began in September, 1922,
and reached their peak one year later, in September, 1923, when
909,879 tons of California crude oil passed through the. canal.
Declining gradually from that date, these cargoes in June, 1924,
totaled only 453.945 tons, and a further shrinkage is expected.
Owing to the loss of this oil business it is possible that the record of
1924 will not be equalled in 1925, but there is a constant.growth in
other directions which tends to make good the loss in oil. Excluding
California oil altogether, the cargo in transit through The Panama
Canal in 1923 was 15,878,826 tons, and in 1924 it was 18,493,700 tons,
an increase of 16.4 per cent.
The heaviest traffic of the year and in the history of the canal was
in December, 1923, when the vessels in transit averaged 16.3 a day,
3


---- --- -------- ~-----







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


and the lightest was in June, 1924, with an average of 12.6 transits a
day. The traffic statistics for each of the 12 months of the fiscal year
are shown in the table below.


United States Panama
Month bhirps equivalent Canal net Tolls Cargo
net tonnage tonnage

1923
July................................. 474 1.856,501 2,310,027 $2,124,830.02 2,337,784
August.............................. 454 1,799,173 2,232,590 2,050,656.97 2,168,750
September.......------------------.........--------...... 413 1,645,379 2,044,552 1,902,453.61 2,168,703
October-----..---...------.........---..-----------.......... 427 1, 724,995 2,139,475 1,988,607.69 2,127,567
November------------.....----.............-------------.... 436 1, 774. 350 2,193, 865 2,058, 188. 61 2, 218, 295
December..-------------.....................------- 506 2,027,753 2,516, 491 2,335,729.81 2,494, 634
L
M 1924
January....................... .....----------------------------. 47 1,021,539 2,400,040 2,216,855.01 2,427, 332
February............................ 418 1,680,768 2,108,879 1,964,155.59 2,243,616
March............................ -----------------------------429 1,712,044 2,136,079 1,997,138.83 2,272,472
April---------.....----..---....--------------.................. 403 1,634,644 2,053,171 1,903,761.27 2,158,721
May....--------------------.......................... ----------417 1,660,246 2,085,670 1,955,764.91 2,353,986
June..-----...--...----------------------............... 377 1, 519,841 1,928,039 1,792,821.22 2,022, 850
Fiscal year 1924..---------------- 5, 230 20,957,233 26,148,878 24, 290,963. 54 26,994,710


The tanker traffic, including tankers engaged in carrying oil from
Peru to the Atlantic and from Mexico to the Pacific, as well as those
in the California trade, is shown in the first of the two tables below
in comparison with the general traffic. The second of the two tables
shows the tonnage of oil shipped through the canal in tankers from
California, Mexico, and Peru.


July....--............
August.................
September-........-..
October................
November ----.........
December.-...----.....-
January................
February----..........
March...---.......-..
April--...............
May.................
June--....- -........--.


Fiscal year 1924...
Fiscal year 1923...


Fiscal year 1924-.......
Fiscal year 1923 --......


Proportion of tankers to total traffic


Total commercial transits


Average daily transits


Tankers General Total Tankers General Total

171 303 474 5.5 9.8 15.3
173 281 451 5.6 9.0 14.6
159 254 413 5.3 8.4 13.7
154 273 427 5.0 8.8 13.8
145 291 436 4.8 9.7 14.5
164 342 506 5.3 11.0 1&3
142 334 476 4.6 10.8 15.4
120 298 418 4.3 102 14.5
132 297 429 4.2 9.6 i&B
118 285 403 3.9 9.5 13.4
121 296 417 3.9 9.5 13.4
105 272 377 3.5 9.1 12 6


3,526
3,054


5,230
3,967


Panama Canal net tonnage


Tolls








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


July ........- ............. .. ...---- .....-
August..--......---..-.......- ...........
September-----..................---...-.-
October..---.-.. .... ---..... --....- ...---.
November...........--.......--......----
December ---.... ---....-.-.....- ..-.-..-- -
January. -.. ....... ........ ...--.-....----
February...............................
March--..------------.................-..------------
April.... --...... -----....... ....--. -
May--......---------------------------...............................
June......------... -----------------... .......
Fiscal year 1924......................
Fiscal year 1923......................


Tanker cargoes.

Californian Peruvian, Mexican, Total
Crude Refined crude crude

791,236 80,874 41,281 9, 607 922,998
849, 308 13,820 23, 392 27,529 914,049
909,879 38,208 34,269 19,546 1,001,902
780, 882 23,112 ............ 28, 130 832,124
833, 555 53,156 22, 695 24, 247 933, 653
804, 347 85,315 25, 367 46, 257 961,286
732,021 78,120 9,446 9,800 829,387
643,318 58,53 ............------------ 19,133 720,987
707,636 62,881 29,550 19,319 809, 386
412,592 103.347 42,400 19.169 577,508
582,291 114, 1,1 85,479 10,939 799,400
453,945 80,528 57,633 18,100 610,206
8, 501,010 782,588 .171, 512 257,776 9,912,886
3,689,049 249, 840 239, 751 261,877 4,440,517


I This table shows the important oil shipments in tank steamers through the canal, but it is complete
only for the headings show. Occasional shipments of refined oil from I'eru and other tanker cargoes of
miscellaneous origin are not included.

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS

There were 21 flags represented in the traffic through the canal. In
terms of cargo carried the United States came first, with 61.7 per
cent of the total; the British Empire second, with 22.4 per cent; and
Japan third, with 3.5 per cent.. Germany moved up into fourth place,
with 2.7 per cent; and Norway was fifth with 2 per cent. The corre-
sponding figures for the fiscal year 1923 were: United States, 56.5 per
cent; British Empire, 25.2 per cent; Japan, 4.8 per cent; Germany, 1.6
per cent, and Norway, 3.6 per cent. The British Empire, Chile,
Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, and Sweden show abso-
lute gains in cargo tonnage, while the figures for Japan, Norway, and
Peru are below those for 1923. The Argentine, Belgian, and Costa
Rican flags, which appear on the 1923 list, were not seen at the canal
in 1924. On the other hand, the flags of the Free City of Danzig,
Ecuador, Finland, and Yugoslavia appear in 1924 but not in 1923.
The complete figures for 1924 appear in the table below:


Nationality


British .................................
Chilean....................... ........
Colombian............................
D anish..................................
Danzig..................................
D utch........................- ..........
Ecuadorian................................
Finnish..............-...................
French................................
German..............................
Oreek...................................
Italian.............. ..............
Japanese................................
M eUican.................................
Norwegian-..............................
Panaman.................................
Peruvian.......................... .... ...
Spanish.................... ...........
Swedish...............................
United States...................... .....
Yugo-Slav-.............................


United States Panama
Number equivalent Canal net Tolls Cargo
f sips not tonnage tonnage


1, 265
47
22
65
11
102
1
3
83
1650
I
43
171
I
136
21
70
45
39
2,947
7


4,891,576
125,790
5,701
193,437
65, 303
412,431
36
4,782
337. 543
483.992
3, 167
140, 334
702,812
j1i3
446,682
33. 571
102, 6h4
1.17.240
107,677
12,743,711
18.621


Total.............................. 5,230 20,957,233


6,097, 611 $5,814,983.83
176,472 157,035.25
6,767 6,612.11
245,929 229,205.17
8, 276 72, 498. 00
551,761 4S9,807.74
36 27.00
4,798 5,757.60
386,640 428,571.BO0
6b0, 156 604, 085. 5
4,038 3,U95.75
1W4,448 170, 55. 0
815,468 844,97(1. :3
102 13:. 24
546, 633 496, 876i. 96
43, 05 40, 804. IV
]uY. 046 127. 18:1.38
172,.572 160, 3.36.100
161.993 IJ30.35.00
15. 80(, 899 14 ,483 ,327.71
27,087 23, 276. 25
26. 148, 878 24,290, 963. '4


6,051,842
107,147
5,897
317,274
54,764
573,929
7. 500
407, 249
737, 103
6,562
125, 156
935,245
539, 101
35,719
102, 136
67. 903
220. 517
16, 654, 435
45,231
26,94, 710






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


FREE TRANSIT OF PUBLIC VESSELS AND VESSELS FOR REPAIRS

The transit statistics in the preceding sections do not include naval
vessels and other public vessels of the United States (or of Panama
and Colombia), which pay no tolls. These numbered 418, as against
388 in 1923. One vessel was sent through The Panama Canal to
the Balboa shops for repairs and subsequently returned to the
Atlantic, exempt from tolls in each case, making two 'additional
transits which are also omitted from the statistics of commercial
traffic. Including this noncommercial traffic, the total number of
transits was 5,650.
TRADE ROUTES AND CARGO

An examination of the tables below, in which the traffic is segregated
by trade routes, will show that the United States intercoastal trade
furnished an even 50 per cent of all cargo passing through the canal
during the fiscal year 1924, and that four other major trades accounted
for 35.5 per cent additional. These were the trades between Europe
and the Pacific coast of North America (United States and Canada),
11.5 per cent; between the east coast of the United States and the
west coast of South America, 10 per cent; between Europe and South
America, 7.4 per cent; and between the United States and the Far
East, 6.6 per cent. Various minor trades contributed the balance
of the cargo, amounting to 14.5 per cent of the whole.
All of the major trades show an increase over 1923, with the single
exception of the trade between the United States and the Far East,
in which there was a slight decline.
The cargo moving in the United States intercoastal trade increased
from 8,068,553 tons to 13,527,378 tons, or 60.7 per cent.. In the trade
between Europe and the Pacific coast of North America there was an
increase from 2,511,791 tons to 3,113,036 tons, or 23.9 per cent. In
the trade between the east coast of the United States and the west
coast of South America the increase was from 2,054,523 tons to
2,702,629 tons, or 31.5 per cent. In the trade between Europe and
South America the 1923 cargo tonnage was 1,749,986, and in 1924
it was 2,005,857, an increase of 14.6 per cent. In the combined
minor trade routes there was an increase from 3,273,737 tons to
3,847,532 tons, or 17.5 per cent. The only decline, as previously
noted, was in the trade between the United States and the Far East,
where 1,798,278 tons were handled in 1924, as compared with
1,909,285 tons in 1923, a loss of 5.8 per cent.
Of the total westbound cargo 69.6 per cent was shipped from United
States ports and 42.6 per cent was consigned to United States ports.
Of the total eastbound cargo 67.9 per cent was shipped from United
States ports and 72.2 per cent consigned to United States ports.







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 7


Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 19.3 classified
by leading trade routes


Number PPanna "ons if 'Prceentige
tonnage cigo cirg


United Stales iniercnastal,
AlililiI t* n Parini e......... ................ ..... .. .. 1. 160 Il.13 1 2.71 240 10.0
Pacific to Atlantic................... .... ..... ...... 1,ITS i 4 111, hi 138 40.0

T otal .................. ............................ -2.33 1 0,W 1.7 27, 3. 50.0

Between cast coast of Unilcel Satels and west coast of
Cnnaida:
Atlantic to Pacifrt .............. .... ............... 41 *20,.37 110,:rW .4
Paciinc lo Atlontic..................................... 277, I I ,22. 1.:1

Tol:il ............................................. 99 4S'. I 1 4%6i, '.7 I.7

Between east coat of t.United States and Far East:
Atlantic to Pacific ...................... ............ 221 1,201,568 1,504,275 5. 5
Pacific to Atlantle.................................... 50 294,551 294,003 1.1

Tol ................ ....... ... ............ 271 14 119 1,798, 278 6.

Between east coast of United States and west coast of
South Airnirc-a:
A llantic to Pa'; irie ................. .. ............. 43 1.011.f 6 t:7.3. 4 1.4
Pacitic to Atlantic.................... .............. .I 290 1,2'-i,4 749 2. 32-J. 2.l kI. G

T otal.............................................. 1 533 2, 27l,39i i 2, 702. 29 10. 0

Between Europe and west coast of South America:
A tllntic to P rithr.................................... 21.1 9 .1,1' 1 i; '7, 3 G6 2.3
Pacific to Atlantic. ................... ....... ...... 227 1.022, 248 1, 37S, 501 1

Total .......... ... ............. ...... ... .. 440 1,97., 332 2. 00., 8.7 1 7.-4

Between west coast of United States and Europe:
Allinlic to Paulkfi .............. ............ .. 195 41, 214 427,092 1.6
Palific to Atlanticr........ ................. ..... 157 78. 030 1,231,230 4.5

Total-......................... ............. .. 352 1, 72ti, 131 1, .65 222 fl. I
I ------ _______________________ -
Between west coast of (Cand-i aind Euiope.
At l.init tlo I'ierill...... ... .. ........ .. ..4 '. 0 1 "42 2 12,2710 .9
'ait ic to t AL ITIi i ... ...... .. .......... ..... 1 7. , '2SU' ,21l, .3. 4.5

Tu' l .11........ ..... ............... 240 1 ,200 3l 1. .51, 814 5. 4

Between erast coIsl of Unit'Il ,I iStes nmI .\iistrat:il.iia: | |
.A l.inltic IW nParvI c............ ... .. ................ 113 5.74. C' A A I" 1 2. 1
Paciic o .it nll .... .. ......... .... ........I I 1 170 47,777 .2

.Tol.l. . ....... ... ... i ..l J ..U.. 2.9 2 3

Between Euriipu .ii-l .\uitr:al.i]. I
A tll.inlln I I'.i.*' .. ....... ...,47 1.8
I'Lin f- to A.1l.0 i in ..... . . ..... ....... .... 73. U 13 3.: ,370 1.1

Tol. ................... ............ ....... ... 11ii i ,,J2G I '.,947 '

Between i:east 'O isIt Wf N11.-I ,andI west. v.ast of South
Aiierin.
A tllantic Ot I'lulii. L.... ..... ............... . ........... 2. 128, IU 0- .49
Pacific tu .A rintl1. ................................. .. | I'J J.i0 .7.1.5 .0

T otal.......... ........ .. ......... ......... . .. i; .

Betweprn Cristobal, ICiin:al Zone, and west coast of jUnited
States:
Atlantic to.l I'acili... ... ............... .......... 1.1 .1
Pacific to Allinn ic... .. .. ................. .. ..... 251 2.**, 536 3 U- .2
I _
Total.............................................. .-1 -1 I,- .7 8 '1 .$ .3

Betwren Cristohal, ('anal Zone, niiil wIst c of Southl
Anmerim. i I
Atlantic to Pacific.................................. 72.331 111, 6r. .0
Pacific to Atlantic.................... ........... 12, N14 9U, .277 .4

Total........................ .....-- - -...-... ..- 1'.- | 1-s9,S I.. 14 .i
I" ----:







8 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 1924, classifie',
by leading trade routes-Continued


Number Panama Tons of Percentage
of ships Canal net cargo of total
tonnage cargo

Between Cristobal, Canal Zone, and west coast of Cen-
tral America:
Atlantic to Pacific.....-----------..---------..------------- 30 19,034 22,854 0.1
Pacific to Atlantic------------.........---..----------...........--------....... 32 28,925 25,618 .1
Total---..---.----------------....------------------... ... 62 47,959 48,472 .2
Miscellaneous routes and sailings:
Atlantic to Pacific....--------...-------...------------------...... 246 1,031,250 419,256 1.6
Pacific to Atlantic-----....--.------.....---....-------....----------..... 146 666,353 986,975 3.7
Total ----------..-..------------------------------..---...-...... 392 1,697, 603 1,406,231 & 2
Total Atlantic to Pacific....------------------------.....------2,740 13,668,049 7,860,100 29.0
Total Pacific to Atlantic...------------------.....----.....-..-------. 2,490 12,480,829 19,134,610 71. 0
Total commercial traffic----------------------............--... 5,230 26,148,878 26,994,710 100.0


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES


The commodity statistics of The Panama Canal are not compiled
from complete manifests but from summary cargo declarations sub-
mitted by the masters of vessels in transit. They are not precise
except for items like crude oil, wheat, nitrate, and lumber, which are
commonly carried in bulk. There is a natural tendency to lump
any small miscellaneous shipments under the head of General
cargo." Subject to errors arising from this source, the following
table shows the principal commodities shipped through the canal
during the fiscal year 1924:

FROM ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC


Tons
Manufactures of iron and steel_----_---- 11,691,712
Refined petroleum ---.........---------------- 648,750
Crude petroleum--.------------------ 319,552
Cement...-------..--.--------...-.--------. 303,724
Railroad materials.------------------- 1192, 537
Tin---..--------------..-----...------. 191,733
Coal---------------- --..----------- 111,488
Machinery..-------------------------- 1 181, 112
Sulphur.------..---.----------...-------..- 1146,712


Lubricating oil..-.....................-
Automobiles -..-..-.--..---.-..- ....
Cotton..-.......-- .-- ....------.--
Iron.--.. ---....---...------------------
Paper.------------....-- ----.- ---. ..- --
Coke---...-..........-.......-.......
Textiles..--..-....-----................----
Ammonia............-..------...........
Tobacco-.--.---------------------------


FROM PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC


Tons
Crude petroleum....-----------...---...----....... 18,872,540
Lumber.----..----........------------------...... 11,824,438
Nitrates.--...--..----------.--.. --------.. 11,744,580
Wheat-----------... -----.. ---------- 1,352,388
Iron ore..-------------- -----...-------- 1888,198
Refined petroleum---.........---------------- 1799,234
Copper.--...........---------------------------.. 286,782
Sugar----...-..----.--------.........------------.. 270,688
Barley--_._------------.-------------.. 266, 859
Canned fruit.....--------------................ ----------229,691
Canned fish----.........--------.....------------........... 151,201
I Indicates increase over 1923.


Food products in cold storage '.-..-..-....
Dried fruit ---------. ..--.-..---..
Coffee -------------- -- -- -- -- -
Copper ore------......................--------
Wool.-------------..--------------- ---..
Rices.-------... -------. ----------------
Beans-...---------.... ---....-.........
Cotton -.-----------.--------.-
Skins and hides -------------...................
Copra........--........----..-----------.......


' Does not include fruit.


Tons
'110,835
1110,351
100,925
94,746
I 90,885
90,447
1 90,207
179,813
171, 550


Tons
2142,830
1 103,469b
1102,451
85,947
1 84,696
74,470
60,030
154,253.
i51, 59&
51,116






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA OANAL


Each of the first 10 items on the list of westbound cargo, with the
exception of refined petroleum, shows an increase over 1923. Rela-
tively this increase was greatest in the case of cement, where it
amounted to 167 per cent, and automobiles, 114.3 per cent. Manu-
factures of iron and steel increased 12.7 per cent, crude petroleum
12.1 per cent, railroad materials 11 per cent, tin 32.9 per cent, coal
4.7 per cent, machinery 56.1 per cent, sulphur 25.3 per cent, lubri-
cating oil 12.8 per cent, paper 1.4 per cent, textiles 22 per cent,
ammonia 5 per cent, tobacco 81 per cent.
Refined petroleum westbound shows a decrease of 1.4 per cent,
cotton 17.7 per cent, iron 16.5 per cent, and coke 7.2 per cent.
Among the items of eastbound cargo the greatest relative increase
over the previous year is shown by refined petroleum with 174.1 per
cent, crude petroleum 125.5 per cent, wheat 65.6 per cent, and iron
ore 65.4 per cent. The other items which show an increase are
lumber 18.5 per cent, nitrate 4.8 per cent, food products in cold
storage 34.6 per cent, dried fruit 14.7 per cent, coffee 25.4 per cent,
wool 24.3 per cent, cotton 5.1 per cent, and skins and hides 11.3
per cent.
The following eastbound items show a decrease: Copper 3.3 per
cent, sugar 9.3 per cent, barley 29.6 per cent, canned fruit 18.6 per
cent, canned fish 10.4 per cent, copper ore 10.8 per cent, rice 10.8
per cent, beans 29.2 per cent, and copra 28.5 per cent.
MOTOR SHIPS
The number of motor ships trading through The Panama Canal
shows a further increase, but these vessels still contribute less than 4
per cent of the total traffic. Transits by motor ships in 1924 num-
bered 203, as compared with 121 in 1923 and 77 in 1922.
DETAILS OF THE TRADE
Further details of the trade through the canal will be found in the
following tables in Section V of this report:
Table 59: Summary of commercial traffic, 1915-1924.
Table 60: Commercial traffic by nationality, 1915-1924.
Tables 61-A and 61-B: Origin and destination of cargo, 1924.
Tables 62-A and 62-B: Commnercial traffic by nationality, ships,
tonnage, and cargo, 1915-1924.
Table 63: Commercial traffic by nationality, ships, tonnage, tolls,
and cargo, 1915-1924.
THE DUAL MEASUREMENT SYSTEM
Efforts were renewed to secure legislation to abolish tlie dual sys-
tem of measuring vessels for the assessment of tolls. which has been
the source of endless annoyance and confusion for the pnst 10 years.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Bills were introduced in both the Senate and the House of Representa-
tives (S. 2400 and H. R. 7762, 68th Cong., 1st sess.) which would.
make the Panama Canal rules the sole basis of measurement. Thir
House bill was reported from the Committee on Interstate and.
Foreign Commerce on April 25, 1924, with an explanatory statement.
by Mr. Hoch (H. Rept. No. 573, 68th Cong., 1st sess.), in which the
argument for the desired change is very forcibly and lucidly sum-
marized. No further action on the bill was taken before the adjourn-!
ment of Congress, but it is hoped that it may be enacted into law at
the next. session.
LOCKAGES AND LOCK MAINTENANCE
There were only minor alterations in the schedule for the dispatch
of vessels through the canal. At the Gatun Locks three operating
shifts were retained, covering the hours from 7 a. m. to 11 p. m., the
second shift overlapping with the first and third during the hours of
heaviest traffic. At the Pacific Locks there was an extension of work-
ing hours; the Pedro Miguel Lock is now operated with two overlap-
ping shifts from 7.30 a. m. to 8 p. m., and the Miraflores Locks with
three overlapping shifts from 6.50 a. m. to 10.20 p. m.
The average number of lockages per diem was 14.3 at Gatun, 15.2
at Pedro Miguel, and 15.1 at Miraflores. The total number of lock-
ages at all locks was 16.352, as compared with 12,551 in 1923, an
increase of 30 per cent.
To handle the increased business the organization was increased by 2
senior general operators, 1 control-house operator, and 5 locomotive
operators at Gatun, and by 2 senior general operators, 4 general
operators, 2 control-house operators, and 5 locomotive operators at
the Pacific Locks.
There were no serious delays to shipping due to the faulty opera-
tion or failure of equipment and no accidents of any moment to
vessels in the locks.
On December 6, 1923, the steamship August ran into a fender chain
when tying up at the Miraflores Locks. There is record of two
similar accidents. In all three cases the chain functioned properly
and prevented a collision with the miter gate without injury to the
vessel.
Both chambers at Pedro Miguel and Miraflores were available for
use during the entire year. At Gatun, owing to the triennial overhaul
of the valves, gates, bulkheads, and other under-water parts, one
chamber or the other was unwatered and out of commission for 41
days. The overhaul was started on February 4, and completed on
March 25, 1924. Work was carried on with three 8-hour shifts,
seven days a week, using the maximum number of men that, could be
employed to advantage. The necessary extra force, tools, material,







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


and spare parts having been previously arranged for, and with no
serious delays, the overhaul, including the change-over from west
chamber to east, was completed in 4.5 days, 9%2 hours. There were
48 men brought down from the United States for this temporary job,
in addition to those that could be recruited locally or transferred from
other divisions. The majority of them arrived on February 2 and
returned on the boat sailing March 19.
The Pacific Fleet, consisting of 65 vessels, including 9 battleships,
was locked through the canal northbound on January 16, 17, and 18,
and 36 commercial vessels were handled on the same dates, making
a total of 118 vessels in three days. Returning from maneuvers in
the Atlantic, the fleet again passed through the canal, southbound,
in April. From April 4 to April 8, inclusive, 66 naval vessels com-
pleted the transit, together with one other Government, vessel and 78
commercial vessels, or a total of 145 vessels in five days.
To pass the fleet and a normal volume of commercial traffic at the
same time necessitated some overtime at the locks and in the marine
division; with the present organization it was equivalent to a peak
load, but well within the canal's maximum capacity both as to
personnel and equipment.
Lockages during the year are summarized in the following table:


Gatun
Month


Pcdro Nliguel


Lock- s I Lock-
ages ages

1923
July............ ..... 452 524 4 7-1
August .............. 441 527 47.3
September ........... 414 45 440
October.............. 4-2.3 516i 4 '2
November........... 447 511 461
December--............ 497 52 543
1024
January.............. 511 617 &53r.
February-----------........... 4 494 44
March............... 430 500 444
April. ............. 425 .S:3 442
May.............. 41 FI 503 414
Jn------------------7 1 :1)
June.................I 376 412i 3UG
Fiscal year 1924. 5, 260 6, 205 5, 572
Fiscal year 1923-...... 4,011 | 4638 ; 4,267


.1Mirallorcs Total


ls Lock- vessels Lck-
ages ages


5.50 489 19 1.43h1
533 408 533 1. 362
487 43 4.37 402 1,291
.5001 440 44 1,321
502 4.6 493 1 ,36-1
5, 7 536 | 5.J I 1.7t


631 I
5u
505
544
510
.127 I
FR. 297
5,017


529
442
442
441
441
393
5, 520
4, 273


63h | 1. 576
507 1,316.
506 1.316
550 1,30S
0."1 1,._01
427 1, 165
6, 277 16,352
4,960 12,551


1.623
1,593
1.464
1,.511
1.1106
1,762


1,508
1.511
1, 62A
1. 51S5
1, 266
18,779
14,615


POWER FOR CANAL OPERATION

The power system, based on a hydroelectric plant at Gatun and a
reserve steam generating plant at Miraflores, was operated throughout
the year with an average combined generator output of 4,688,472
kilowatt hours per month, as compared with 4,422,920 kilowatt hours
per month in 1923. Distribution from substations averaged 3,982,224
kilowatt hours per month in 1924, and 3,796,750 kilowatt hours per
12618-24t-2


I






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


month in 1923. These figures show a transmission and distribution
loss of 14.5 per cent in 1924, as against a loss of 14.15 per cent in 1923.
The Miraflores station was maintained on the basis of stand-by
service and was required to carry load on 44 occasions. From Jan-
uary 1 to March 10 it carried the major portion of the load on the
power system, thus relieving the hydroelectric station at Gatun and
conserving the water in Gatun Lake against a possible dry season
shortage. The plant was improved by the installation of an electric-
steam boiler, which is used during periods of ample water at the Gatun
hydroelectric station. It produced sufficient steam to keep one 1,500-
kilawatt steam turbine operating as a synchronous condenser for power
factor correction, and at the same time was available to take the Pacific
locks load immediately in case of interruption to service on the trans-
mission line. This installation has also resulted in the saving of
approximately 500 barrels of fuel oil a month. Study was completed
and requisition prepared for the new generating equipment that is to
be installed at Miraflores. It is expected that at least part of the new
plant will be available during the 1926 dry season.
There were no interruptions to service at the Miraflores station and
only two at Gatun, both of short duration. There were seven inter-
ruptions to service on the 44,000-volt transmission line of an aggregate
duration of 11Y minutes.
The cost of power generated by the Gatun and Miraflores plants,
including the cost of distribution, was $0.0107 per kilowatt hour, as
compared with $0.0087 in 1923.
WATER SUPPLY

The following table shows the inflow of water into Gatun Lake from
all sources, utilization and losses during the fiscal year:

Billion
Pe- cent cubic
feet

Run-off above Albajuela..... ------------.---- --. -------.-----.-----------------37. 2 83.94
Yield from land area below Alhajuela....--..-----------.. .---. -------------------- 42.4 95. 65
Direct rainfall on lake surface..--------------------------------------------- 20.4 46.05
Total-...........--.- ------------------------.---.-- ----------------------- 100.0 225. 64
Evaporation from lake surface.----. ------------_.--....------------------- -- 8.1 18 24
Gatun Lake lockages----..---.... -- --... ------------------ --------------- 16.7 37.77
Hydroelectric power-----------.----------------------------------------- i M68 37.82
Spillway waste--.....-...... ---------------------- -.--------....--------------------- 56.1 126.58
Diluting salinity of Iliraflores Lake---------... -------... -----.. ----. ------------- .4 .82
Leakage and municipal water--..---..---------------------------------------.7 1.59
Increase in storage-.----.---- ---------------- -------------.--------- 1.2 282
100.0 225.64

The dry season was of average duration, extending approximately
from December 19, 1923, to April 19, 1924. As regards water
supply, it was the fifth driest in the last 13 years. The discharge of
the Chagres River at Alhajuela was 21 per cent below the dry season






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


average for 23 years, or 999 cubic feet per second against a mean of
1,262 cubic feet per second. Gatun Lake fell to elevation 83.6
feet above sea level on April 20, 1924, from which date the recovery
of storage began.
Experiments were undertaken in the economical use of water,
which indicated that approximately 2,250,000,000 cubic feet can be
conserved monthly by substituting the Miraflores steam generating
plant for the hydroelectric plant at Gatun, and that with the same
volume of traffic as in December, 1923, approximately 1,000,000,000
cubic feet can be saved monthly at the locks by crossfilling, short
chamber lockages and other like expedients. During a five months'
dry season this total conservation of 3,250,000,000 cubic feet a
month would amount to 16,250,000,000 cubic feet, or the equivalent
of 3.5 feet of storage in Gatun Lake.
The survey of the Chagres Valley above Alhajuela, where it is
proposed at some future date to build a dam for additional water
storage, was completed in July, 1923. The area of the basin within
the 260-foot contour line is 21.2 square miles, and the storage capacity
of the proposed lake at elevation 240 will be 22,310,000,000 cubic feet.
To forestall any further development of this land, which will ulti-
mately be flooded, the entire basin below the 260-foot contour, to-
gether with a small tract below the dam-site, was transferred from
Panama to the United States as provided in Article II of the Hay-
Bunau-Varilla treaty and incorporated with the Canal Zone, effective
February 1, 1924. There are two small villages, El Vigia and San
Juan. and various scattered huts and clearings within the area of
the proposed lake. The number of inhabitants is estimated at 1,500.
These people will remove to other sites, but they will not be evicted
for the time being, and while they remain the necessary public
services, including police and schools, will be maintained by the
Government of the Canal Zone. Negotiations are now pending to
extinguish all private claims to land and improvements within the
area.
FLOOD OF OCTOBER, 1923
Heavy rains over the watershed of Gatun Lake October 21 and 22
caused a rate of run-off into the lake not previously attained since
the opening of the canal, and brought about an interruption of traffic
on October 23, when no ships were allowed to begin the transit of the
canal between 6.30 a. m. and 3.30 p. m. The interruption was due
in part to a strong current at Gnmboa, where the waters of the
Chagres River rench the canal channel, and in part to the use of the
lock culverts to discharge excess water from the lake. Eleven gates
of the spillway were opened, and when the flood was at its height
the side wall culverts at Gatun and Pedro Miguel Locks were also
opened.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA OANAL


In the afternoon of October 23 the 19'ships which had been delayed
at the ends of the canal were taken through the first locks, and on
October 24 they completed transit. Thirty-one ships made the
transit on October 24.
The surface of Gatun Lake rose from an elevation of 86.10 feet
above sea level on October 21 to a maximum of 87.48 in the early
morning of October 23. This represents an increase in storage of
6,000,000,000 cubic feet. The discharge through spillway gates and
lock culverts aggregated about 175,000 cubic feet per second. It is
estimated that at the height of the flood the water was entering the
lake at approximately 300,000 cubic feet per second, but as the heavy
discharge had been begun well before this there was a margin of space
sufficient to keep the final elevation within bounds.
The Chngres River reached an elevation of 117.4 feet at Alhajuela,
exceeding its elevation at any time since 1909, when a flood record
of 121 feet was set.
The situation was aggravated locally by small slides and washouts
on the Panama Railroad, a break in the water main from the Chagres
River supplying Panama City and the towns at the Pacific end of
the Canal Zone, and a break in the transist.hmian duct line which
interrupted telephone, telegraph, and cable communication. It also
became necessary to strengthen the Mindi Dike, built to prevent
the flow of water from the spillway into the canal channel below
Gatun.
During Wednesday, October 24, rains started again, and conditions
in the afternoon became nearly as bad as on the previous day. Canal
traffic was suspended at. 5 p. m., and the side wall culverts at the
Gatun and Pedro Miguel Locks were used again to spill water from
the lake. In all, eight spillway gates and four culverts discharged
all night. A ninth gate began discharging the next morning, con-
tinuing until 6.50 p. m. on the 25t.h.
While the Chagres River registered two of the greatest rises expe-
rienced since the flood of 1909, this flood was due primarily to heavy
rainfall over the surface of the lake itself rather than to the run-off
from the watershed. During the 48 hours ending at midnight on
October 24, 27.9 inches had fallen at, Gatun, 27.6 at Colon, and 26.1
at Monte Lirio. All rainfall records on the Atlantic side for the
complete month of October were broken in only four days from
October 22 to 25.
No damage was done at the locks, spillways, or hydroelectric plant.
Temporary blocking of the strut openings at the Pedro Miguel Lock
was necessary to prevent the flooding of the tunnels. In spite of the
difficulties created, the passage of ships was delayed only nine hours
at the height of the flood on October 23 and for a brief period late
in the afternoon of October 24.


14






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAT


MAINTENANCE OF CHANNEL
To remove silt from the canal prism and the terminal harbors, deal
with slides, and prosecute certain improvement projects, including
the removal of La Pita Point in the Gaillalrd Cut, of the Gibraltar
Shonl at the foot of Gold Hill, IInd of a point on the west bank south
of the Miraflores Locks, the following dredging equipment, was
employed:
Of the three 15-yard dipper dredges, one was in commission for
101, months, a second for 7 months, and the third for GW.1 months.
One 20-inch pipe-line suction dredge was in service during the entire
year. After March 31,' 1924, it worked in conjunction with a new
relay pump barge, and these two pieces of equipment combined are
expected to handle material through short lines, not, exceeding
1,500 feet, to a height of 230 feet, or to a maximum distance of three
miles, provided the lift does not exceed 20 feet. A second 20-inch
pipe-line suction dredge was converted for use as a hydraulic grader
and so used for 6% months. At the end of the year it was being
reconverted for service as a dredge. The sea-going suction dredge
Cidebra was continued in service for 3j' months from the beginning
of the. fiscal year and then transferred to the United States Engineer
office at San Francisco. One ladder dredge was held in reserve. A
hydraulic grader was employed for 9 months on the La Pita Point
improvement project. A drill boat was in service throughout the
year. An air compressor installed on a barge was used for 12 months
to supply compressed air for drilling at La Pita Point. A crane boat
was in commission during the entire year and used for towing, rigging,
and wrecking jobs and the excavation of sand. Each of the two
250-ton floating cranes was commissioned in alternate months, except
when calls for extra service required that crews be placed on both of
them. Five tug boats were employed, including 1 in reserve, and 13
launches, including 3 in reserve.
New equipment ordered but not delivered during the year included
one Diesel driven three-fourths-yard drag-line excavator, three
1,000-yard dump scows, and one drill barge.
The following is a statement of all dredging during the fiscal year:
From the canal prism: Cubic yards
Atlantic cntrancec-c -----------_--_--- .. _- _---.-_----- 192, 400
Gaillard Cut-
Maintenancel ----....--------------------------------- :3, 194, 800
La Pita Point improvement project--.-------------------- 499, 600
Pacific entrance -------------------- ----..------------------- 736, 100
Total............................. ------------------------------------------------ 4, 622,900
Auxiliary:


Bi
Pi


alboa inner harbor. -i--------.--------------------------_ 479, 200
pe line crossing, Paraiso--..... ... ........_ .. .....__ ___ 1, 700
Total -------------------------------------------------_ 4SO, 900
Grand total-------------------------------------------. 5, 103, 800






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Of the grand total, 2,980,300 cubic yards were classified as earth
and 2,123,500 cubic yards as rock.
Of the improvement projects upon which dredging equipment was
engaged, those at Miraflores and Gibraltar Shoal were completed, and
at La Pita Point, where 1,041,200 cubic yards of material had been
removed at the end of the year, there remained 165,000 cubic yards
still to be excavated. Twelve new improvement projects were
studied, and the dredging division was authorized to undertake
them in the order of their importance as equipment and personnel
became available and without increase of the present organization.
SLIDES
On the night of October 28 a slide occurred at Lirio Curve, between
stations 1729 and 1740 on the west side of the canal. About 300,000
cubic yards of rock came into the prism, leaving a channel about 120
feet wide and 35 feet deep. A portion of the 95-foot berm moved
out toward the canal center intact. The primary movement was
checked to some extent by this rock berm, and later, as this material
was removed by the dredges, the softer material again pushed out into
the canal during November 21 and 22. This movement involved
250,000 cubic yards more, extending over a frontage of 800 feet.
After this second slide the channel was more severely affected, being
100 feet wide with a depth of 34 feet. On December 15 another
movement took place over the same area. At this time 100,000
cubic yards of material pushed into the canal. From the date of
the first slide until December 5 traffic was handled daily without
interruption, starting northbound ships at 2.10 p. m., with 10-
minute intervals between them, and the southbound immediately
after in the same manner, with the exception of two ships held over
temporarily because of the narrow margin of safety between the
draft and available channel in one case and bad handling qualities in
the other. These ships were the Bethore, draft 33.6 feet, and the
San Nazario, drawing 30.5 feet. By the 27th of November the
channel had been so improved that the Steamship Marore, drawing
35.5 feet, which had just arrived, was passed by the slide. At that
time it was as deeply laden a vessel as had ever passed through The
Panama Canal. This slide became active again on January 4, 1924,
at which time 125,000 cubic yards of material were carried into the
canal. This movement, like the previous ones, affected the west
side of the channel. From January to June the north shoulder of
this slide, which had partially broken up during the period of greatest
activity in October, 1923, slowly settled down. The movement was
so gradual during that time that the dredges had no difficulty in
removing the material periodically as it pushed out into the canal.
This rock shoulder was all that separated the old Lirio slide on the





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


north and the new Lirio slide on the south. The entire section
between stations 1717 and 1748 will henceforth be known as West
Lirio slide. This also includes the old West Barge Repair slide. The
amount of material removed from this slide area during the year
amounted to 1,253,100 cubic yards.
Minor slide movements occurred at Cartagena, South Cucaracha,
Cucaracha signal station, East Culebra, West Culebra, and East
Lirio.
To prevent the further disintegration of the high banks through
seepage various lagoons and swamps on either side of the Gaillard
Cut were filled in, slopes were graded, and new drainage ditches cut.
The year's work under this head included 5,230 linear feet of ditches,
involving the removal of 11,897 cubic yards of material; 445,275
cubic yards of material placed in fills or moved in slope work; and
9,000 cubic yards of material handled in culvert construction. A
pipe-line dredge, a hydraulic grader, and hand labor were used in
this work.
AIDS TO NAVIGATION
The maintenance of lights previously installed in the canal and
adjacent waters has been continued; two new buoys have been
established, one in Balboa Harbor, the other at Trollope Rock,
San Jose Bank; lighted spar beacons have been established, two
each at Balboa, in the canal at Gamboa, and at the Atlantic en-
trance; one spar buoy has been placed at the Balboa Fleet Anchorage.
two at the entrance to Coco Solo, and one at the anchorage in Cris-
tobal Bay. Also, 27 new bank lights have been installed in the
Gaillard Cut. The additional aids established in the canal afford
an increased safety factor for the passage of ships. At Cape Manl,
and Bona Island in Panama Bay, the pipe line from the gas tank
houses to the base of the lights has been protected by the construc-
tion of reinforced concrete troughs, 800 feet being required at Cape
Mala and 2,100 feet at Bona Island.
ACCIDENTS
Investigations were conducted and reports submitted by the
board of local inspectors on 22 accidents to vessels in transit through
the canal or using its terminal harbors. They are classified as
follows: Collisions between ships, 6; grounded in the canal, 2; struck
bank, 5; struck lock wall, 4; docking accidents, 3; miscellaneous, 2.
The following is a brief description of the more serious of these
accidents:
On August 8, 1923, at 7.40 p. ni., the American steamer Dorothy
Luckenbach, southbound through the canal, was obliged to go astern
and drop anchor to avoid collision with the American steamer Dean
Emery, also southbound, which had not previously been seen owing






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


to the fact that she was not showing a stern light as required by law.
In maneuvering to break headway the Dorothy Luckenbach struck a
Panama Canal oil barge moored at Paraiso and subsequently swung
her stern into the bank, damaging the port propeller. Finally the
master, having taken over the ship from the pilot, by heaving on his
anchors, broke and dragged out of position a water main laid across
the bottom of the canal at this point. The estimated damages were:
Dorothy Luckenbach, $1,100; oil barge, $1,500; pipe line, $10,000.
Responsibility was shared by the Dean Emery, the Dorothy Lucken-
bach, and The Panama Canal. The Luckenbach Steamship Co.
offered $5,000 in settlement of The Panama Canal's claim for dam-
ages to its property, and this offer has been accepted.
On October 24, 1923, the American tanker Agwistone, northbound
through the canal, grounded on the west bank of the Gamboa Reach.
The Chagres River was then in high flood, discharging into the
canal at Gamboa with a velocity of approximately 8 knots. This
current carried the ship into the bank, but it was shown that the
Agwistone does not properly answer her helm when loaded and was
then overloaded, exceeding her designed fresh-water draft by 4,
inches. The ship grounded on October 24 at 12.25 p. m., and was
not refloated until 6.10 p. m. on October 25, after the transfer of
13,000 barrels of oil from her cargo to another tanker. After a
survey at Cristobal the Agwistone proceeded on her voyage. The
board of local inspectors ruled that The Panama Canal was not re-
sponsible for the grounding or liable for any damages or expenses
in connection therewith.
On October 28, 1923, the American steamer Abangarez, while
approaching the dock at Cristobal, collided with the United States
submarine 0-5, which sank. Three men of the submarine's crew
were drowned, and two others went down in it, but were rescued 31
hours later when it, was raised by the Panama Canal's floating crane
Ajax and wrecking barge No. 91. The 0-5 was adjudged responsible
for the collision.
On January 4, 1924, the American steamer Colin H. Livingstone,
southbound through the canal, grounded near Mamei Point, and was
pulled off the following morning after 120 tons had been taken out
of her. The vessel then proceeded to Balboa, where a survey was
held and temporary repairs made. The cost of permanent repairs
was estimated at $6,000. On January 7, after a total delay of 74
hours, the ship proceeded to sea. The accident was due to the jam-
ming of the steering gear, and no responsibility attached to The
Panama Canal.
On March 9, 1924, the Yugoslav steamerlzgled, southbound through
the canal, had a link in the steering gear carried away while rounding
Gold Hill to enter Cucaracha Reach. She then struck the west bank





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


of the canal twice and was badly damaged forward, the forepeak tank
and No. 1 cargo hold being flooded, so that the bow sank to the bottom
and rested in 34 feet of water. With the assistance of Panama Canal
tugs the hzfled was beached in the cove at the foot of East Culebra
slide. On the following day she was raised by the salvage tug
Favorite and towed to Balboa for partial discharge of cargo, dry dock-
ing, and repairs. The expense to the ship was estimated at $40,000,
in addition to which she was delayed 16 days. No responsibility
attached to The Panama Canal.
Of the other accidents, none involved extensive damages or caused
serious delay to the vessels concerned. The total number is small in
proportion to the number of vessels using the canal or calling at its
terminal ports.
SALVAGE OPERATIONS

At the beginning of the fiscal year the Panama Canal's salvage tug
Faz'orite was assisting the American tanker John D. Arcitbold, owned
by the Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey, which went ashore on Bona
Island in Panama Bay on June 30, 1923. The Joihn D. ArchJbold was
pulled off the following day, and after transferring its cargo of crude
oil to other tankers, proceeded to San Francisco for repairs. This
case was mentioned in the annual report. for 1923.
The Favorite engaged in two other major salvage operations during
the year. On October 22, 1923, it was dispatched to the assistance
of the United Fruit Co.'s steamer San Gil, aground on a reef north of
Old Providence Island in the Caribbean. The flotation was a most
difficult piece of work, but was accomplished on November 15, and
after being made secure for the voyage the San Gil was towed by the
Favorite to Mobile, arriving there on November 26, 1923.
Late in May, 1924, the Farorite went to the assistance of the Ger-
man steamer Sisak, belonging to the Kosmos Line, which had gone
ashore on the coast of Ecuador. On this job the Farorite cooperated
with t he British wrecking tug Killerig from Jamaica. Thl Sisak was
not floated until July, and was then towed to Balboa for repairs,
arriving there on July 14, 1924.
The assistance rendered by the Farorite in refloating the steamship
Izyled, beached in the canal on March 9, 1924, has been mentioned
in the preceding section under the head of "Accidents."
Panama Canal tugs assisted in the salvage of the Cuyaniel Fruit,
Co's. steamer S'aUua, ashore on Little Corn Island off the northern
coast of Nicaragua in November, 1923, and of the Pacific Mail
Steamship Co's. steamer Colombia, ashore on Cano Island in the
Pacific off the coast of Costa Rica in June, 1924. At the time of
these two wrecks the Pfroritc was assisting the San Gil ;ind the Simak
and could not therefore be used.










SECTION II


BUSINESS OPERATIONS
A detailed statement of the expenses (including depreciation),
revenues, and profit or loss on the various subsidiary business opera-
tions of The Panama Canal will be found in Table No. 26 in Section V
of this report. The total net profit on these operations was 3901,-
624.12. The Panama Railroad Co.'s business operations on the
Isthmus yielded an additional net revenue of $1,044,887.04. The
results of the major business operations of both The Panama Canal
and the Panama Railroad Co. are summarized in the following
paragraphs.
REPAIRS TO VESSELS-MECHANICAL WORK
In general there has been a substantial and steady flow of work
through the shops, well distributed except in the case of outside
marine repairs. The total volume of work increased constantly,
and the force employed grew from 298 gold and 675 silver men in
July, 1923, to 380 gold and 789 silver men in June, 1924. The
increased work came largely from The Panama Canal and other
branches of the Government, and a considerable part represented
additions and betterments which may not be repeated. The volume
of repairs to commercial shipping continued meager. However, at
the close of the fiscal year the outlook was good, and a sufficient
volume and variety of work was on order to keep the force employed
for a number of months. The total value of work done was
$2,951,791.25, as compared with $2,290,226.05 in 1923. It was
distributed in 1924 as follows:

Percent-
Class Amount age of
total

Marine .------------.... ..---- ....-------------... .-..--.---------------------$1,787,869.78 60.57
Railroad ..-------.. .----- ---------. .----------------------------------- 488,324.86 16.54
X1 iscellaneous-----------.....-. ------.....------------------------ --.------------- 374,498.57 12.69
Manufacture for stock...----.......-..--------------------------------------......... 301,098.04 10.20
Total-------------..-..----------------------------------- 2951, 791. 25 100.00

Of the total work done during the year, $1,097,250.48 was done for
individuals and companies, including the Panama Railroad Steamship
Line, $1,106,576.84 for The Panama Canal, $513,165.34 for the
Panama Railroad Co. and $234,798.59 for other departments of the
United States Government.
20






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Work for individuals and companies.-At the beginning of the
fiscal year the work of reboilering and reconditioning the Steamship
Colon for the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, as detailed in the
last annual report, was about 50 per cent advanced. The com-
pletion of this work constituted the largest single job undertaken.
With the ship lacking only the finishing touches she was sold to the
Alaska Steamship Corporation. Satisfactory sea trials were run
for the purchasers on January 16, 1924, and she left for San Fran-
cisco in the hands of her new owners on January 19. Gratifying
reports of her steaming abilities were afterwards received.
Bottom repairs were made to the Steamship Amsterdam, extending
generally over her entire length, necessary on account of grounding
on Santo Domingo. About 120 plates were involved, some 20 being
renewed, half the remainder removed, faired, and replaced, and the
balance faired in place. Considerable damage to floors, inter-
costals and frames was involved, and the vertical keel was faired at
two locations. The stern frame was removed and straightened,
propeller shaft realigned, and considerable work was done in the
engine room.
The steamship zhgled, which had run against the bank of the canal
because of broken steering gear and had filled forward, was placed in
the dry dock and repairs made to her bottom. Fifteen plates were
renewed, 35 frames spliced, and considerable fairing of adjacent
structure done.
For the steamship Lancaster the crank shafts were rebuilt, a new
propeller shaft and propeller, sent from the United States, were ma-
chined and installed, and the main engine realigned and reconditioned.
This vessel lost. her propeller at sea and twisted all three cranks about
their shafts. One section was replaced with a spare shaft, and for the
other two new pieces of shaft were forged from 24-inch nickel steel and
fitted to replace the damaged pieces in each section.
The steamship Westu'-eo was docked, and damages from collision
with the approach wall of locks were repaired. The stem was
removed, straightened, and replaced, and damaged bow plates and
frames renewed or faired as required.
Almost the entire bottom of the schooner Irene S. Wilkinson and of
the motor ship Atrato were replanked and the decks of the former
renewed. A new rudder post was fitted to the schooner La Isla.
New tail shafts were forged and installed on the steamship Balboa
and the tugs Gatun and Cocoli. Shell repairs in wake of collision
damages were effected on the steamships The Lambs, Bedwell, Tulsa-
gas, Hercules, and C. H. Livingston. Considerable bulkhead repairs
were made to the steamship Gen. It. C. Goregas.
Turbine rotors of the steamship Bethelridge were removed from the
ship and repaired. All boiler furnaces of the steamship Colonne were






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA QANALr


jacked up and supporting rings fitted. An important electric welding
job was satisfactorily performed on the wrecked 78-inch low pressure.
cylinder of the steamship Gulf State. Due to a bent rod the cylinder
was split from top to bottom, in addition to having a transverse crack,,
one-third down from the top, extending over about one-third of the.
cylinder. The steamship Manuel Calvo was docked because of sus-
pected trouble with the outboard coupling and the starboard shaft
forward broken inside the coupling. The spare stern tube and pro-
peller shafting was installed with a new propeller, and both couplings
were repaired.
Work for the Navy and Army.-For the Navy there were dry docked
the auxiliary vessels Fulton, Camden, Cuyama, Sciota, and Quail, the
submarines 0-1, 0-2, 0-3, 0-4, 0-6, 0-7, 0-8, 0-9, 0-10, R-23, R-26,
and R-27, coal barges 291 and 4 72, oil barge 11 and a battle target.
The various local craft of the Army were periodically docked. The
submarines listed were given their annual overhaul, involving in each
case extensive repairs and renewals of hull and machinery and minor:
alterations. In addition to the vessels listed, work was performed for
29 other naval vessels and for several Army transports. Side plating
of the U. S. S. New Mexico was renewed where damaged from collision
with lock approach wall. The mechanical division assisted in the
raising of the 0-5, sunk in collision in Colon harbor, and in the rescue
of the imprisoned members of her crew, building a cofferdam and
closing a gap in her side, and diving for the rescue work. The drill
boat L-55, thrown on the rocks in a storm, was rebuilt, and the harbor
boat Lieut. Ward Cheney was remodeled for the Army.
Work for The Panama Canal.-The usual maintenance work on the
floating equipment and rolling stock of The PanamaCanal was kept
up, and a varied miscellany of shop work was performed for all depart-
ments and divisions. The program of rehabilitating the battered and
broken decks and stiffening the deck supports of dump scows was
continued. Stern pontoons were fitted to the dredges Gamboa and
Paraiso, in addition to the water-tight subdivisions fitted at the sides
last year, and water-tight athwartship bulkheads were worked across
the forward ends a few feet back from the shells. Permanent steel
foundations were substituted for the wooden supports for the ma-
chinery of hydraulic grader No. 3. The floating caisson for exposing
the lock and dry dock gates was overhauled. The tug Engineer was
converted to oil burning and rehabilitated, and about one-third of the
shell plating and frames of the tug Bolivar were renewed. A 35-foot
pilot boat was build for the port captain at Cristobal, and a 45-foot
pilot boat for the port captain at Balboa. Partial installation was
made of boiler plants for the oil-handling plants at Mount Hope and
Balboa. Four new towing locomotives were begun for the locks. A
large quantity of spare parts was made for the overhaul of the locks






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


at Gatun, including the fabrication of 17 rising stem gate valves,
measuring approximately 12 by 20 feet each.
Work for thc Pananma Ranirood.-The cost of maintaining and repair-
ing Panama Railroad equipment was S4S0,237.76, as compared with
$425,721 in 1923, more work having been necessary. There were 17
heavy repair jobs on locomotives; and 2,2SO light repair jobs. .On
cars in active service heavy repairs totaled 181- and light repairs
1,005. Cars in reserve were alsio inspected and repaired.
Dry docZ-s.-There was a total of 137 dry docking during the year,
69 at B3alboa and OS at Cristob:l. Of those at Balboa. 27 were of
canal equipment and .42 of other vessels, and at Cristobal 25 of canal
equipment and 43 of other vessels.
Plant.-New roofs were applied at a cost of ?(i3,000 to the foundry,
forge shop, and sand house at Balboa to replace reinforced-cement,
tile roofing laid in 1913-14 that had deteriorated. It is expected
that tilhe boiler shop will have to be reroofed this coming dry season
and the wood ihop shortly thereafter. The Balboa machine shop
facilities were improved by the purchase and installation of a 90-inch
gear shaper. For several years past. the pier shop at Cristobal lias
been inactive, an(d in order that the new machine tools installed there
might be used. they were removed and reinstalled where needed at
Balboa and Mount Hope, replacing in many cases tools purchased
in early construction days and nearing the end of their usefulness.
A sum of $86,000 has been set aside for new routfing, and a sum of
840,000 for plant betterment, during the coming year, both from
current earnings.
Fieinclil.-The 11mchaniieidl division earned net profits of $171,-
737.06, as compared with $100,184.33 in 1923. Reserves were
increased S81,431, and, as mentioned above, $105,000 was set, aside
for the replacement of shop roofs and plant betterment. The
reserve for normal repairs to buildings and machinery, however,
shows a net deficit of $3,640.89.

COAL

The sales of coal from the plants operated by the Panama Railroad
C'o. at Cristobll and Balboa were approximately the same as in
1923, totaling 222.734 long tons for the year, which is below the
minimum required for economical operation. The plants, never-
theless, showed a profit, of $1615.00, as against a loss of $12,000 in
1923. Apart from questions of price, tlie use of oil for fuel on a
scale that. was not ant ieipated 12 years IgLI, when tlie coaling plants
were designed, is responsiPble. for (lie small volume of businc. -. Of
the steam vCssels which pa sed thrii'ugh (the canal duringg the fiscal
year 1924 approximately 70 per cent burned oil. The proportion of





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


motor vessels is not yet large, but to the extent of their use they also
reduce the demand for coal.
Declining sales without a corresponding reduction of overhead
charges have made it difficult to quote prices for bunker coal at the
canal which would secure a reasonable share of the business that
remains, but economies effected after a careful study of all possi-
bilities, in conjunction with a lower range of prices at Norfolk, made
it possible to reduce the price of bunker coal at Cristobal from $12
to $10 a ton, effective February 1, 1924, and again to $9 a ton,
effective March 15, 1924. The corresponding reductions at Balboa
were from $15 to $13 and subsequently to $12. There are few sales
at Balboa under present conditions, and no separate force has been
maintained for the operation of the plant there since April 1, 1923.
When deliveries are to be made operators are transferred tempo-
rarily from Cristobal.
The policy has been to fix the price of coal at the minimum figure
that will cover all charges, determined in accordance with correct
accounting principles, to include amortization, interest, and mainte-
nance, and yield a profit of from 4 to 8 per cent.
The price reductions in February and March stimulated sales, but
scarcely to the extent that had been hoped. The monthly sales
from July, 1923, to January, 1924, averaged 16,566 tons, and from
February to June, 1924, 21,716 tons.

FUEL OIL, DIESEL OIL, GASOLINE

On June 30, 1924, there was tankage at The PanamaCanal for the
storage of 1,906,040 barrels of fuel oil. At Balboa there were 18
tanks with a capacity of 791,540 barrels, and at Cristobal 22 tanks
with a capacity of 1,114,500 barrels. The Panama Canal owned 11
tanks rated at 444,040 barrels, the United States Navy 6 tanks rated
at 300,000 barrels, and eight oil companies 23 tanks with a capacity
of 1,162,000 barrels. Some of these tanks are used for the storage
of Diesel oil.
The Panama Canal continued to maintain central pumping plants
at either terminal and handled all oil in and out of storage. Each
of these plants was improved by the installation of two new boilers
and an additional pump with a capacity of 2,500 barrels an hour.
Additional pipe lines and dock connections have also been provided.
The oil pumped for all interests during the year, including receipts,
issues, and miscellaneous transfers, totaled 13,790,823 barrels, as
compared with 10,429,517 barrels in 1923. The net revenue from
the oil business, which is derived mainly from pumping charges,
amounted in 1924 to $263,194.25.
One small tank owned by The PanamaCanal was converted during
the year for the storage of bulk gasoline. The canal now has two






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


gasoline tanks at each terminal with a combined capacity of 790,771
gallons, and an oil company has one tank at Balboa rated at 1,470,000
gallons.
The oil and gasoline business of the year is summarized in the
following table:

Balboa Cristobal Total

Fuel oil sold to steamships by Panama Canal (barrels)------------- 4,043 0 4, 043
Fuel oil sold to steamships by companies (barrels)...... .-- ........ 3, 17,38 2,952,234 6,128,619
Number of ships by Panama Canal.......-----..-----...- .....---- .---- .... 2 0 2
Number of ships by companies..................................... 1,044 849 1,893
Bulk gasoline sold to steamships by Panama Canal (gallonsi....... 0 0 0
Bulk gasoline sold to steamships by companies gallonsi ........... 0 0 0
Number of ships by Panama Canal---.-------..... .......-----------..... -- --...--.--.---. 0 0
Number of ships by companies...-------------............-------------- 0 0 0
Diesel oil sold to steamships by Panama Canal (barrels)............ 0 3,550 3,550
Diesel oil sold to steamships by companies I.barrels)................. 128,432 1,185 129,617
Number of ships by Panama Canal.----..---..---...------....-------..... ----------.... 86 86
Number of ships hy companies..........---............--.... ....... 78 3 81

As compared with the fiscal year 1923, sales of fuel oil to steam-
ships show an increase of 35 per cent, while Diesel oil sales show an
increase of 132 per cent.

SHIP CHANDLERY AND OTHER SUPPLIES-STOREHOUSE OPERATIONS

The general storehouse at Balboa and the dependent storehouses
at Cristobal and Paraiso carried stocks of material for issue as required
to the various departments and divisions of The Panama Canal and
for sale to vessels. The movement of stock is summarized in the
following table:
On hand, June 30, 1923------------------------------------. $3, 252, 338. 40
Received during the year -------------------------------- 5, 636, 307. 91
Total----__---____---------------------------------- 8,888,646.31
Issued during the year ---------------------------------- ---5, 468, 971. 97
On hand, June 30, 1924------------------------- ---3, 419, 674. 34
Sales to steamships totaled $85,340.42, local sales $159,558.54, and
so-called credit. sales, which included material issued on foreman's
orders for the Army and Navy and for jobs ordered by individuals
and companies, SS06,945.11, or a total of sales from the storehouses
to other than The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad of $1,051,-
844.07. The corresponding figures for 1923 was $980,411.94.
Sales of obsolete, surplus, and scrap material realized 8267,668.14.

HARBOR TERMINALS

There was a material increase of business at the Cristobal and
Balboa terminals. Cargo handled and transferred over the docks
totaled 933,092 tons, as against 837,271 tons in 1923. Of the total
tonnage in 1924, 334,242 tons were stevedored by the Panama Rail-
road. The gross revenue from t-rm:nrdl operations was $1,161,83-S.34,







26 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

and expenses aggregated $867,749.46, leaving a net revenue of
$294,089.88. The work of the past two years is compared in the
following table:


Tons of cargo stre.dorcd ..............................................
Revenue per ton stevedored............... ...-. ........................
Cost per too sevtrldored................................................
Tons of cargo handled and transferred....................................
Revenue per ton handrled........... ... ..........................
Cost per ton handled....................................................
Gross operating revenue-.................................................
Gross operating expense~.--...-......................................
Net revenue............................................... ...............
Per cent of expense to revenue...............................--...........


1924

314, 242
So. 3543
$0. 3056
933,092
SO. 9904
$0.6817
$1,161,839.34
$867,749.46
5294,089.88
74.69


1923

307, 575
0. 3911
SO.3767
837,271
$0.9668
$0.6880
$1,101,908.01
$823,329.87
$278, 578.14
74.72


The number of ships handled in 1924 was 2,205, as against 1,912
in 1923. Of the total for 1924, 1,553 were handled atCristobal,
and 652 at Balboa. Agency service was also performed by the
Panama Railroad Co. for 290 ships in transit through the canal.
The distribution of business between Cristobal and Balboa is further
indicated in the table below:


Balboa Cristobal

Number of ships discharging or taking cargo-.............-----------..----..........----------.......... 652 1,553
Tons of cargo received (ex cargo).--.------------.-----------------------.................I 54, 233 495,023
Tons of cargo delivered (per cargo)--------------------------------------............................................ --18,807 343,613
Tons of cargo stevedored by Panama Railroad-------------------------------.......................... 29,604 304, 638
Tons rehandled by Panama Railroad-----------------------------.....................................-----..-- 10,585 10,831


COMMISSARY SYSTEM

The Panama Railroad commissary system, including five wholesale
units, nine retail stores, seven manufacturing plants, two electric
refrigerating plants, and an industrial laboratory, was operated as
in previous years. Gross receipts from sales amounted to $7,324,-
203.76, and the net profits were $409,248.86. The total capital
investment, is $3,628,964.94 made up as follows: Plant, $2,073,104.36;
equipment, $91,295.87; supplies on hand, 8964,564.71; and floating
capital, $500,000.
The following statement shows by classes the value of supplies
on hand at the beginning of the year, the amount purchased during
the year, and the value remaining on hand at the end of the year:


Groceries...................................................
Hardware..................-............... .... .............
Dry goods......- .........................................-
Sboes.......................................................
Cold storage...........................-....................
Tobacco.....................................................
Raw material..............................................-
Total............................ .....................
-I


On band
June 30, 1923


$138,038.84
82,840.39
285,675.04
58, 520 51
79, 817.39
22, 088. 59
184,608.69
851,589.45


Purchased
during year

$1, 165, 601. 38
349,166. 82
843, 994. 34
169,517.15
1,121, 741. 11
366,643. 95
1, 1,42, 864.92
5, 159,529.67


On band
June 30, 1924

$152,331.34
96,924.67
299,173.53
62,426.85
171,514.82
26,896. 92
156,298.68
964,564.71


I Includes cattle, milk, 'utter, and ,ggs in amount of W",f46.20.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 27

Purchases were made as follows: In the United States,
$3,817,075.44; in Europe, $389,593.87; in Central and South
America, $129,324.89; from the cattle industry on the isthmus,
$484,434.53; from The Panama Canal, $128,467.04; other local
purchases, $210,633.90.
Sales were made as follows:

1923 1924 Increase

United States Government............................. $1. 03,620.9 $1l,001. 572. 10 $2, 2.8s.58
Panama Canal.......... .................. ........ 696.361. 12 767,026.83 70, 665. ;
Steamships-............................................. 313,59 17 4618,291.68 124, 69 51
Panama Railroad & Steamship Co. .................... 170,399. ws 230, 25.10 59, %.5.21
Individuals and companies............................. 601,649. 42 5, 5 49. 54.69 U9. 73
Employees ........................ 3,797, 343.97 4,419,007.40 21,663.43
Total sales................................. 6,693,173.55 7,484,732. 80 791,559.25
Less discounts and credits................ ......... 15-2,7720.94 10W. 529. 04 7.bs.10
Revenue from sales................. ...... ..... 6510. 452 6 7,324. 203. 76 7a3,751 1
Sup lIes for expense and equipmrnet.
eurtail commissanes anid warehouses................ 71,013.09 100,459.98 29,446.89
General ....... ........... .. .................... 1,104.89 1, 429.34 324.45
P n t-s...................... ....... ......... .. 62,950.14 19,UU5. 58 143, 144. .6
Total......... .............. ........... 135. 1tS. 12 120, !94 90 '14, 173 22
Loss by condemnation. shirink-age. etc.................. 70,213.01 63,252.00 '6,961.01
Loss by clerical errors, pilferige, ertc ................. -14. 5911 84 40,0UU 97 I 4,., '7. ,s7
Total............ ........ ........ .......... 114. M04. 5.5 116i 2'.5 97 II, 1...
Grand total ------------------------------------ 90, 32;. 54h,.34., I 7.029 0

1 Uetrc.ise

('attle indiifslr.-There were 8,557 lihead of cattle in the patI1ulres
at the beginning of the fiscal year. Subsequently 2,062 henad were
purchased, and 254 calves were born. There were 6,150 head ,ldl
to the commissary for slaughter, 357 lead were trinsferi ed to the
dairy farm, 3 were sold to individuals and cnim;panics, an11 103 head
died, leaving 4,260 head on hand on June 30, 102-. The gre-s
revenue from sales was $416,345.05, and expenlSe-, >t;ialed $390(,907.66,
resulting in a net profit of $25,437.39. No new p istiies were cleared,
but 4,15:3 acres were recleared at an average u: tI of $3.55 an acre.
All pastures recleared showed a inarked imprn 'v'!cnln in the sta1r.l
of grass.
Dairy fq rm.-Thie herd at the dairy farm az,;i inireaen d from 617
to 663 head. Income from sales of milk, li\c. t< 1 iidr. etc., was
863,254.99, and the expenses of operation w\ire S.S.,02- .., leaving
a net profit of $8,230.46.
Plantation.q.-The Frijoles nnd Junn Minn pinitations wrie (cr-
tinued under the superintendence of the cnttle industry, while the
other and smaller plantations and gardens were ltaisedl to contractors
in the same manner as Inst year. The operation of the plantations
resulted in a loss of $2,50.S.80, the receipts being S 12,783.59 and the
expenses 815,292.39.
126i.1-24t1--3






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF' TRH PANAMA I C3A'SSL


HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS '
The Hotel Tivoli at Ancon incurred a loss of 7,405.61, ,an
Hotel Washington at Colon a losp of $18,081.74. While. these ,hpop
are not profitable, their continued operation is considered necessary qX
for the accommodation of visiting officials of the United States pva
ernment, tourists, travelers awaiting steamship connections, and
strangers having business with The Panama Canal. When in 1922
the hotels were advertised for lease no satisfactory bids were received.
The restaurants for American and West Indian employees werp
operated under contract during the fiscal year, and satisfactory
service was rendered to all patrons at fair prices by the contractor.
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS
Besides the usual maintenance and repair work on all Panama
Canal and Panama Railroad buildings the constructing quartermaster
division of the supply department began the erection of several new
buildings, including the following: A concrete retail commissary
store at Cristobal, estimated to cost $241,821.60; new concrete tele-
phone exchanges at Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel, estimated
to cost 859,000, and 15 cottages at New Cristobal, at $7,000 each,
or a total of $105,000. Alterations to the Balboa telephone exchange
were completed at a cost of $7,500.
PRINTING
The Panama Canal Press carries in stock and manufactures such
necessary stationery as is required on the Isthmus in connection
with canal operations, besides printing the weekly Panama Canal
Record, pamphlets and folders, and miscellaneous job items. The
manufacturing output of the plant was valued at $147,494.26, and the
issues and sales from the stationery section amounted to $117,691.56.
The inventory value of all stock on hand was reduced from $101,792.63
to 893,787.72. Consistent efforts have been made for some years
past to reduce the inventory values to a minimum, and it is con-
sidered that this has now been fully accomplished. The plant.
operates on a self-sustaining basis, and made a profit in 1924 of
$4,373.05.
PANAMA RAILROAD
The net revenue from operations of the Panama Railroad shows
a decrease of approximately $84,000, as compared with 1923, due
in part to the heavy increase in track maintenance expense on account
of slides and washouts in October, 1923, and in part, to an increase
of approximately $64,000 in the cost of repairs to railroad equipment
The gross revenue from operations was $1,418,652.48, and the gross
operating expenses totaled $1,341,954.31, resulting in a net, revenue








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


of $76,698.17, as compared with $160,883.41 for the previous year.
The total revenue from freight traffic was $741,126.(01, and from
passenger traffic S378,908.47.
The trackage maintained aggregated 160.32 miles, divided as
follows: Main line, yards, and sidings, 108.41; Panama Canal tracks,
42.02; United States Army tracks, .89.
The following table shows the number of passengers carried and
the passenger revenue for the fiscal years 1923 and 1924:


First-class passengers ......... ....... . . .
Second-cliss passengers. ..........................
Totdal....................... ............


Number of p"Ms-
sengers c:irrieil


PI'as.nger revenue


1924 1923 '1924 1923

170,058 176,316 $206,743.25 $217,547.08
248.315 243, 136 172, It.5. 22 163, 256. 52
418,373 419,45.' 378. 90 47 380,803.(0


The average revenue per passenger per mile for 1924 was $0.0253,
and for 1923 it was 30.02SS. The gross revenue from the trans-
portation of passengers shows a decrease of $ 1,S95.13, and the num-
ber of passengers carried shows a decrease of 1,079.
The following table contains the general operating statistics of the
Panama Railroad for the fiscal years 1923 and 1924:


A average m iles operated..................................... ...........
Gross operating revenut...................
Operating expenseNs........................... ... ... .... .... .........
Net operating revenue ........ ............... ....
P'r cent of expenses to revenue ................... ..... ..... ...
Gross revenue per miile of road ............ .. ...............
Operating expenses per mile of ro l.......................... ......
Net revenue per mile of road.. ............ ........ ............
Revenue per passenger tri n mile ................. ..................
Revenue per freight train nule- ................................
Total re venue tri n mileage............. ....... .......
Rnilroad revenue per train mile..................----................
Railroad operating expense per revenue train mile............. ......
Net railrond revenue per revenLue train mile .. ... .........
Freight. ip:issrnger. and switch locomotive mileage .................
Work-tr.ain niileg.er .............. . ..... ...........................
P a ss e n g e r -tra in m ilp ng eg -.-.. . ...-- - - ---.. - - . .- . .. .. -
Freight-t ruin niileaget ................- .. ----- . .... .. ...


47.61
$1.418, 6f2.48
$1,.341, 954. 31
$76,t 9s. 17
94.59
$29, 797. 3r
$28,186.39
$1,610.97
$4.32
$10.43
$174, 691
$8. 12
$7.68
$0.44
2n7, 3a84
3, 754
103,624
71.07U


1923

47.61
$1,375,777.72
$1, 214. 84.31
$16.0, b3 41
68.31
$28. 9b. b2
$25.517.63
$.,37'. 19
$4. 26
$10. 25
$175,517
$7. 4
$51. y2
$U. 92
287, 441
2,971
105.127
7U, 3190


TELEP10HNES

The number of telephones installed in the Canal Zone on June 30,
1924, was 2,717. The average' number of calls during thle S-hiour
business day, a; deterinined by peg count, was 23,379, or at the rate
of 2,922 an hour. Th'lie revenue fi-om telephones and electric clocks
was 8200,375..14. and the operating expenses S1911,406.39, resultinUg
in a net revenue of 93,96.i.75. The system includes 36 miles or pole
line, 249 miles of undergroutind conduit, 136( miles of cable, 13,774
miles of wire, 9(0 miles or phantom, and 342 miles of simplex circuits.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


There are 25 exchanges, of which 22 are manual and 3- automatic.
Automatic equipment has been ordered for the four main exchange
at Balboa Heights, Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel, and willbe
installed when delivered. Nine sets of printing telegraph equipment
purchased for use in the dispatching of ships were being adjusted at
the close of the year preparatory to installation in the port captains'
offices and at the locks.
The telephone system is owned by the Panama Railroad Co., but
is operated by the electrical division of The Panama Canal.
LANDS AND BUILDINGS
Panama Railroad lands in the cities of Pahama and Colon and
public lands in the Canal Zone are administered by a joint. land office.
Rentals for quarters occupied by employees are collected by pay-roll
deductions.
The Panama Railroad Co.'s gross revenue from real estate opera-
tions during the year was $157,095.27, against which expenses were
charged totaling $67,738.43, leaving a net revenue of $89,356.84.
The number of Panama Railroad leases in effect at the close of the
year was 1,265, and of revocable licenses 7.
On June 30, 1924, there were 2,154 licenses in effect covering 6,837
hectares of agricultural land in the Canal Zone, to which the United
States holds title. Under the terms of the circular opening the
Canal Zone to agriculture in December, 1921, licensees were allowed
to occupy up to 5 hectares of land free of rent until June 30, 1924; np
licensee was allowed to hold more than 50 hectares, and an annual
rental of $5 per hectare was charged for the excess over 5 hectares.
Collections on this account during the year totaled $5,420. Most of
this land has been planted in bananas, for which there has been a
ready market at. prices profitable to the growers. Banana exports
from Cristohal increased from 264,505 stems during the fiscal year
1923 to 576,297 stems in 1924. This is not all Canal Zone production,
but includes some bananas grown in the Republic of Panama. Many
new plantations in the Gatun Lake region have not yet come into
bearing, and production will increase for some time to come.
The Panama Canal also collected from employees and others the
sum of $616,050.86 in rental charges for quarters, which were main-
tained at an expense of $603,003.45.'
CLUBHOUSES
To the operation of clubs and playgrounds for American and West
Indian employees and their families The Panama Canal contributed
$102,650. The additional expenses defrayed from surplus or current
I See, however, explanation of Tables 24 and 26 in Section V for statement concerning deficit on operation
of quarters for silver employees.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


revenue were 5442,390.25 and the income from moving pictures, soda
fountains, cigar counters, etc., was $455,118.77. The accumu-
lated surplus of clubhouse funds held by the collector on June 30,
1924, was $166,670.33. The clubhouse at Ancon was destroyed by
fire in January, 1924, and The Panama Canal assigned to replace it a
building which had been used originally as a restaurant and after-
wards for nonhousekeeping family quarters.
PANAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LINE

The gross income of the steamship line for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1924, was $2,443,576.29, and the total expenses were
$2,749,433.78, resulting in a net income deficit of $305.857.49. This
deficit as compared with that. for the fiscal year ended IJune 30, 1923,
of $164,461.45 shows an increase of S141,396.04.
The steamship line operating as an adjunct of The Panama Canal
carried all freight and passengers for account. of the United States
Government during the year at material reductions from regular
tariff rates. Had the line received tariff rates its deficit of $305,857.49
would have been reversed and a gain of $134,523.64 shown.
The principal causes to which the deficit of $'305.857.49 are
attributable are briefly-
1. The keen competition of the direct lines operating from the
South Pacific caused a marked lowering of through rates which ma-
terially reduced the freight revenue, despite the fact that the tonnage
carried for the year ended June 30,.1924, amounted to 256,395 tons
as against 230,916 tons for the prior year, an increase of 25,479 tons.
2. The continued depression in business conditions existingC
throughout the countries served by the steamship line.
3. The cost of foodstuffs, stores, and supplies during the year,
which have remained at the high market established duriiii the last
three fiscal years; advances in wages of officers as well as the increased
cost of steveoring due to advances in %wages granted to the men.
In addition to current operating expenses the deficit, includes
depreciation and deferred charges for general niid exirnordinary
repairs incurred in prior years. By eliminating depreciationii and
deferred charges for extraordinary repairs, the deficit. wuuld have
been reduced to $94.S42.59.





I '. I


I i : ,.


ilt j'



SECTION III r



GOVERNMENT

In organizing a civil government for the Canal Zone, wherever it
was found practicable to assign governmental functions to depart
ment heads in the organization for the operation and maintenance
of the canal proper and to the personnel under them, this has been
done. The courts are of course independent, the division of schools is
concerned with education and nothing else, and there are other like
exceptions, but in general governmental functions are discharged by
officials and employees who also have duties connected with the
transit of vessels and services subordinate thereto. This results not
only in greater economy and efficiency, but insures complete coop-
eration.
From the financial statements in Section V of this report data on
the cost and revenue of various branches of the government may be
obtained.
POPULATION

A census of the civil population of the Canal Zone was taken by
the police force during the month of June, 1924, a summary of which
is given below:

Americans All others
Total
Total Em- Total Em- Chil- Total Em- Total Em- Chil-
men ployees women ployees dren men ployees women ployees dren

Balboa district... 1,763 1,497 1,972 302 2.035 3,270 2,012 2,489 41 4,451 15,980
Cristobal district. 580 540 664 25 766 3,254 2, 148 1,956 74 3,816 11,036
Prisoners........ 25 ........ ........ ........ ........................ 4 ......... ........ 127
Total...... 2,368 2,037 2,636 327 2,801 6,622 4,160 4,449 115 8,267 '27,143

1 Includes 142 civilian employees of Army and Navy.

In addition to the civilian population the military population in
the Canal Zone in June, 1924, numbered 10,054, making a grand
total of 37,197. In June, 1923, the civil population was 24,968, and
the military population 9,797.
832






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 33

PUBLIC HEALTHII

Malaria.-The total number of malaria cases reported from the
Canal Zone and terminal cities during the year, compared with the
two previous years, is as follows:

1921 1922 1923 1924

Employees .......................... . ... 325 176 216 208
Military ani navtil personnel................. ........ .. 810 828 870 894
Nonemplo3ces. ........ .............. .. . 459 243 657 521
Total ................... ....... ...... ............. 1 4 1,247 | 1.743 1.623

Can.ul Zone.-The average population (civil and military) for the
fiscal year 19:24 was 31,063, and this figure has been used as a base
for vital statistics. From this population 270 deaths occurred during
the year, 239 of which were from disease, giving a rate of 7.48 for
disease alone, as compared with 7.42 for 1923, and 7.04 for 1922.
SThe birth rate for the year was 21.12 per thousand population.
The infant mortality rate, based on the number of live births re-
ported for the year, was 30.57 for white children and 105.02 for
black children, with a general average of 79.46. Of the total births
reported 4 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths reported,
37 per cent occurred among children under 5 years of age. The
maternal mortality rate (from conditions due to the puerperal state)
was 5.67 per thousand births, stillbirths included.
Panama.-The population of the city of Panama for the year was
59,635. From this population 1,212 deaths occurred during the
year, of which 1,178 were from disease, giving a rate of 19.75 for dis-
easle alone, as compared with 18.24 for the preceding year.
The principal causes of death, compared with last. year, were as
follows:

Number of deaths

1923 1924
-------- -------- i~ ~ ~
Puneumrnni (hronrhonn lo nr) ............... .. ......... .. .... ...... . . 27
Tuherrulousu Ivarious iorgans) .................................... ............. .... 19.1
)iarrha and nr linTritis.......................... ..... .......-.....--- 114 121

There were 2,140 live births reported for the year, giving a rate of
35.89 per thousand population. The infant mortality rate, based on
the number of live births reported, was 153.27. Of the total number
of births reported 5 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths
reported 44 per ceiit occurred among children under 5 years of age.
The maternal mortality rate (from conditions due tothe puerperal
state) was 6.20 per thousand births, stillbirths included.






34 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA ANIAL

Colon.-The population of the city for the year was 31,285. From.
this population 421 deaths occurred during the year, of which 404
were from disease, giving a rate of 12.92 for disease, as compared wit.
13.20 for 1923.
The principal causes of death, as compared with last year, were:

Number of deaths

1923 1924 :

Tuberculosis (various organs)------------------.................---------------..................-----------........... 79 5T
Pneumonia (broncho and lobar)----------------...-------------.........-------....................................... -----------40 42
Diarrhea and enteritis......... .........................................q......... 26 33

There were 745 live births reported for the year, giving a rate of
23.81 per thousand population. The infant mortality rate, based on
the number of live births, was 106.04. Of the total births reported
5 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths 28 per cent occurred
among children under 5 years of age. The maternal mortality rate
(from conditions due to the puerperal state) was 10.24 per thousan4g
births, stillbirths included.
Canal hospitals.-Patients treated in Panama Canal hospitals,
fiscal year 1924:

Number in Remaining
hospital Admitted Died Discharged Transferred June 30,
July 1, 1923 1924

White Black White Black White Black White Black White Black White Black

Ancon-..------------ 170 105 3,490 3, .84 57 147 3,396 3,279 24 68 183 195
Colon.............. 20 24 907 1,269 14 54 734 889 159 330 20 20
Corozal:
Insane......... 87 309 53 75 5 24 53 60 1 6 81 294
Cripples.---...... 4 26 1 3 0 0 3 5 0 0 2 24
Chronics....... 2 23 3 24 0 1 3 22 0 0 2 24
Palo Seco leper
colony----...... 77 0 18 1 4 07 5 0 0 0 86
Total--.-----... 290 564 4,454 4,973 77 230 4,189 4,260 184 404 294 643

Quarantine.-An efficient quarantine was maintained with the
minimum delay to shipping and was successful in preventing the
admission of communicable diseases into the Canal Zone. On the
invitation of the President of the Republic of Panama a conference
of quarantine authorities of the west coast of South America con-
vened at Panama on February 25, 1924, and continued in session
until February 29. It was attended by official delegates from Chile,
Peru, Ecuador, Panama, and the United States, and accomplished
useful results in the simplification and standardization of quarantine
methods and the closer cooperation of quarantine authorities. Dr.
W. C. Rucker, chief quarantine officer of The Panama Canal, did'
much of the preparatory work for.this conference and acted as it-
secretary general.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING
Water Supply.-There was the usual maintenance work on pipe
lines, reservoirs, filtration plants, and pumping stations. Slides along
the Panama Railroad right of way north of Pedro Miguel following
the heavy rains of October and November, 1923, carried away a por-
tion of the 30-inch water main between Gamboa and the Miraflores
filtration plant., and pending repairs it became necessary to draw
water from Miraflores Lake, using first a suction dredge and then a
temporarily installed pumping plant, to supply the southern district,
including Panama, Balboa, and Ancon. During the same period of
bad weather a portion of the Toro Point main was carried away by
the surf and had to be relocated. The 12-inch line from the Agua
Clara pumping station to the Gatun storage tank was also relocated
and shortened. A new wash water tank was installed at the Agua
Clara purification plant, and the steel wash water tank at Mount
Hope was cleaned, repaired, and repainted. A 6-inch water line was
extended along the Panama Railroad tracks in Gatun to provide
fire protection for buildings in this vicinity. The construction of a
new concrete water tank at Paraiso was started and 60 per cent conm-
pleted at the end of the year.
The amount of water consumed was:
Gallons
Canal Zone------ -------------- ------------------ -- 2,633, 131, 000
Panama --..----. -----------------_--------------------- 1, OSS, 266, (00
Colon.... ---------------------------------------------------609, 90, 750
Sold to ships --------------------------------------------- 126,238, 500
Total ---.----------------------------------------- 4,457,542,250
S ur'ers.-The usual maintenance work on the sewer systems of
the Canal Zone was attended to. The sewer line along the Panama
R ai Iroadl tracks at. Gatun, washed away by the October-Novenmber
rains, was relocated and replaced. A short sewer line was laid to
serve employees' quarters on the west side of the Panama Railroad
tracks at Pedro Miguel.
Roads, srctfs, and sideu:alks.-The Bolivar highway from Cristobal
to Gatun was repaired where damaged by the heavy ruins of October
and November, and a new culvert was added to those already built.
The macadam streets in the Gatun district were resurfaced, oiled,
and rolled. The Gaillard Highway was repaired and resurfaced
between Paraiso and Gamboa. The various streets in the Ancon-
Balboa district were repaired. A concrete roadway 450 feet long
was built to connect Roosevelt Avenue with the'head of Dock 7,
Balboa, and the street lay-outs in the vicinity of Dock 6 and the
Balboa clubhouse and dispensary were improved.
Sidewalks were constructed in the shop district at. Balboa, ren-
dered necessary by the increased automobile traffic from lthe docks
and the consequent danger to pedestrians.





REPORT OF. GOVERNOR. OF,.T PANAMA CQAb44J


New or additional parking .space fr, automobiles was provided at
the entrance to the Cristobal Docks,, the Gatun Locks and railroad
station,. the Balboa terminal building, adil the Pedrb Miguel restau-
rant.' :, I ti .1
A complete preliminary survey was made of a road from Simmrn
to Alhajuela in connection with the AJhajuela dam project. At tbl
request of the Army the canal forces supplied the necessary super-
vision, skilled labor, and material for the relocation of.a part of the
road from Pedro Miguel to Camp Gaillard.
Garbage disposal.-The incinerator at Mount Hope was operated
throughout the year and burned 21,280 tons of garbage. In the
southern district garbage was dumped on waste land and buried.
Cities of Panama and Colon.-The water and sewer systems and
the streets of Panama and Colon were maintained, and some minor
items of construction work were undertaken. In Colon the collec-
tions for water were sufficient to wipe out a deficit as of June 30,
1923, and accumulate a surplus which was applied to reduce the
capital cost. In Panama collections were insufficient to meet cur-
rent charges, and a deficit was incurred, for which the Republic is
responsible.
Miscellaneous work.-The municipal division also handled various
construction jobs for the Army, the Navy, the Panama Railroad, the
Republic of Panama, and various departments of The Panama Canal.

PUBLIC ORDER

As pointed out in the annual report for 1923, the maintenance of
public order among the residents of the Canal Zone, who are, with
relatively few exceptions, either civilian employees of the United
States Government or military and naval personnel, with their families
and dependents, is a comparatively simple problem, and the difficul-
ties confronting the police are created by transients and the cosmo-
politan population of the adjacent cities of Panama and Colon.
Conditions during the past year have been normal. The number
of arrests, 3,274, was lower than in any year since 1905, and the
average number of prisoners in the common jails at the close of each
month was 63, as compared with 73 in 1923.
The more common charges preferred against persons under arrest
were: Violation of the motor-vehicle regulations, with 858 cases; vio-
lation of traffic regulations, 190; violation of immigration regulations,
309; violation of license regulations, 106; disorderly conduct, 373;
loitering, 275; trespassing, 47; vagrancy, 31; drunk and disorderly,
56; disorderly conduct with possession of liquor, 167; intoxication,
79; violation of national prohibition act, 84; assault and battery, 74;
battery, 25; fighting, 43; desertion from the United States Army o0
I






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Navy, 58; held for military or naval authorities, 54; held for Panarnan
authorities, 51; gambling, 25. The persons arrested included repre-
sentatives of 42 nationalities and 143 trades or professions.
Under the narcotic drugs import and export act 10 arrests were
made, with 8 convictions, 1 dismissal, and 1 case awaiting trial on
June 30, 1924. There was 1 conviction for violation of the white
slave act.
There were two homicides during the year, both resulting from
automobile traffic accidents. In each case the chauffeur responsible
was tried on a charge of manslaughter and convicted. There were
3 suicides in the Canal Zone and 1 on a steamer in transit between
Cartagena, Colombia, and Cristobal, Canal Zone.
At the Canal Zone penitentiary 41 convicts were received, with
sentences aggregating 80 years and 3 months, and 58 convicts were
discharged. Of the latter, 7 were pardoned and 4 were paroled. At
the close of the year 75 convicts remained in custody, as compared
with 92 twelve months earlier. Forty-five convicts were deported
from the Canal Zone at the expiration of their sentences, and there
were 8 other deportations, making a total of 53.
There were 177 men employed on the police force on June 30, 1924,
an increase of 4 over the number employed at the beginning of the
fiscal year. They were divided between headquarters, the Balboa
central station, the Cristobal central station, annd the penitentiary,
with outposts at Ancon, Pedro Miguel, San Juan, Gatun, Monte
Lirio, and Gamboa. the distribution being the same as last year,
except that the incorporation of the Alhajuela Basin within the Canal
Zone rendered necessary the detail of four men to San Juan on the
upper Clingres.
In addition to routine police work, a continuous patrol of the har-
bors of Balboa and Cristobal was maintained, and police launches
were maintained at Gamboa and Gutun for the patrol of the Chagres
River and Gatun Lake. Details of police were continued at all canal
locks and at the Gatun spillway. Motor-cycle patrols for the enforce-
ment of-vehicle regulations were continued at Balboa, Pedro Miguel,
Cristobal, and Gatun. There was a monthly patrol of the interior
country to prevent unauthorized settlement on public lands.
The convicts in the penitentiary were employed during the year
on road and municipal improvements, the improvement of the peni-
tentiary grounds, the maintenance of prison buildings, the manufac-
ture and repair of prison clothing, and the upkeep of the prison farm.
Their labor, at standard rates, was valued at 830,146.98. Common
jail prisoners were employed on road -work, the clearing of trails. jani-
tor service about police stations, and miscellaneous jobs. Their labor
was valued at $20,728.26.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF! THE PANAMA i QNAJ1L


OFlICE Or THE DISTuICT ATTORNEr 7 ., '
The district attorney prosecuted 143 criminal cases before'tthf
district court, 74 less than in the preceding year, with 103 conviti
22 acquittals, 5 cases nol prossed, and 13 dismissed. In additfin to,
the cases disposed of, 7 cases were pending at the end of the Ve! J
The decrease in criminal cases was principally in violations of tIe-
national prohibition act, violations of the narcotic drugs act. ahf
larceny cases.
The district attorney. represented The Panama Canal, the Panathi.
Railroad Co., or the United States Government in nine civil actionA,
of which four were still pending at the end of the year.

DISTRICT COURT
The district court held sessions at Ancon and at Cristobal an4I
transacted the following business:
Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Civil, 53; probate, 60;
criminal, 12. Cases settled during the year: Civil, 104; probate, 166;
criminal, 128. Cases pending at the end of the year: Civil, 30; pro-
bate, 38; criminal, 6.
Of the civil cases settled, 65 were decided, 38 dismissed, and 1
granted change of venue. Of the criminal cases settled, 13 resulted
in acquittal, 93 in conviction, 5 were nol pressed and 16 dismissed.
In addition, there was one extradition case.
Number of marriage licenses issued, 508; number of deeds recorded,
16; total collections, $8,409.88.
MARSHAL
Writs of process received, 673; served, 556; parties not found,
117; fees collected, $168.80; fees paid to witnesses, jurors, interpre-
ters, etc., $170.77; total trust funds handled during the year,
$72,370.80.
MAGISTRATES' COURTS
Balboa.-Cases pertding at the beginning of, the year: Civil, 3;
criminal, 2. Cases docketed during the year: Civil, 35; criminal
1,592. Of the criminal cases disposed of, 54 resulted in acquittal,
1,251 in conviction, 236 were dismissed, and 52 held to the district
court. Cases pending at the end of the year: Civil, 4; criminal, 1.
Total collections: 39,695.04.
As provided in the Executive order of May 10, 1911, petitions were
made to the district judge for the commitment of 52 persons to the
insane asylum for observation.. I -
Cristobal.-Cases pending at thebeginning of tfIbeyear: Civil, 7;
criminal, 6. Cases docketed during the year: Civil, 22;; criminal
1,330. Of the criminal cases disposed of, 119 resulted in acquittal,






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


1,108 in conviction, 44 were dismissed, and 62 held to the district
court. Cases pending at the end of the year: Civil, 2; criminal, 3.
Total collections: $10,310.60.

FIRE PROTECTION

No changes have been made in the number or location of fire
stations, or the number and distribution of fire-department personnel.
At the request of the men the two-platoon system was introduced,
effective February 15. 1924. Under this system each company is
divided into two equal platoons, one for day duty from 8 a. m. to
6 p. m., and one for night duty from 6 p. m. to 8 a. m. The officer
in charge has authority to call the members of the off-duty platoon,
whenever, in his opinion, their services are required. The platoons
change over every third day.
One American La France combination chemical and hose motor
car was purchased during the year and placed in service at the Cris-
tobal fire station, one Ford roadster was purchased for use in the
Balboa district, and 500 feet of extinguisher tubing was purchased
and added to the equipment. One Webb combination pump and
hose wagon was sold during the year to the Panaman fire department.
Periodical inspection of all Government buildings, docks, store-
houses, yards, etc., were conducted by the department, fire hose and
extinguishers were maintained in good condition, and the volunteers
were drilled and instructed.
There were 103 fires, 3 emergency calls, and 3 false alarms during
the year. In Panama Canal property there were 81 fires. 9 in Panama
Railroad property, I in property of the United States Navy, and 12
in private property. The total fire loss was 851,179.43. of which
$36,087.73 represents the destruction of the Ancon clubhouse, and
35,250 private property stored in the clubhouse. The value of
property threatened by fire is estimated at 84,744,408.63, distrib-
uted as follows: Panama Canal, 8503.416.09; Panamna Railroad,
S143,223.06; United States Army, $4,000; United States Navy,
$1,172.79: private property, 84,090,505.79. The Panama Railroad
total included the estimated value of the Cristobal commissary,
where a fire occurred in April, 1924, and the private property involved
includes three steamers which caught fire in Canal Zone waters.

PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM

In October, 1923, a new grade school for white children with a
personnel of three tencliers was opened at Camp Gaillard. With
this addition, there are now in the Canal Zone 2 high schools and 6
grade schools for white children, with 80 teachers, and 7 grade schools
for colored children, with 39 teachers. The organization also includes






REPORT 'O'A GOVERNOR IOF :THEB PANAMA CANALL


a superintdnderit' and two assistant siperinteridents. As compared
with 1'923, the personnel of the division shows.-an increase of 5a.1w rIg
The net enrollment in the white schools -was 2,094, as compared
with 1,766 in 1923. In the colored schools the net enrollment was
1,911 in 1924 and 2,010 in 923.' The average daily attendance in
the white schools was. 1,763.9, agd in the cqlore4. schools. 1 52.5.
The two high schools graduated 27 -pupils.
There have been minor improvements in, the curriculum and ip
teaching methods, and an. attempt has been made to reduce. toiN
minimum the number of pupil failures, and to provide instruetaio
which, in the case of the white schools at least, will compare.favorably,
with that offered in the best public schools in the United States..
Other than the transfer and conversion of the building for the new
school at Camp Gaillard there have been no additions to plant; but,
in the existing schoolhouses for white children 72 rooms out of a
total of 75 are now in use, and it will be impossible to provide for
any material increase of the school population without additional
buildings. There has always been congestion in the schools for
colored children.
The estimated value of school property in the Canal Zone is
$550,000 and the estimated expenditures in 1924 were $217,050.62.
On May 1, 1924, three schools formerly maintained at San Juan
de Pequeni and El Vigia on the upper Chagres River, within the area
transferred from Panama to the Canal Zone, were reopened under
the supervision of the division of schools. As the area is to be
depopulated preparatory to the building of a dam at Alhajuela,
these schools are temporary, and no attempt has been made to co-
ordinate them with the Canal Zone school system, but Panaman
teachers have been employed and the same methods followed as
were previously established. The total enrollment in these schools
was 175. They are not included in any of the statistics of personnel,
enrollment, equipment, or expense quoted in the preceding para-
graphs.
POSTAL SYSTEM
Thirteen post offices were in operation at the end of the fiscal year,
compared with 12 at the close of the previous year, a new office
having been established at France Field on July 1, 1923. Since the
incorporation of the Alhajuela Basin within the Canal Zone, effective
February 1, 1924, mail for the villages of San Juan de Pequeni,
El Vigia, and Tranquilla is now handled by representatives of the
Canal Zone postal service, but. no post offices have been opened in
this area.
The total receipts of the postal service were $152,336.30, as com-
pared with $151,95S.16 in the preceding year. Current expenses.
exceeded receipts by approximately $25,000. As in previous years






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 41

this deficit was due primarily to the fact that under the terms of the
Taft agreement all stamps and stamped paper were purchased from
the Republic of Panama at 40 per cent. of their face value, involving an
expenditure for the fiscal year 1924 of $33,494.63. iIt was contem-
plated that this agreement would be abrogated on May 1, 1924, but
this date was extended by the State Department, to June 1, 1924. with
the understanding that no change would be made in existing condit ions
until the end of the fiscal year. In anticipation of the abrogation
of the agreement, arrangements were made for the purchase at a cost
of approximately $1,500 of one year's supply of United States stamps
surcharged Canal Zone," which were received and plncedl on sale
July 1, 1, 1924. Relieved of the subsidy to the Republic of Panama.. the
Canal Zone postal service should in future be self-sustaining, notwith-
standing the large volume of official mail carried under frank.
Money orders were issued to the value of S$2,538,06S.39, including
deposit orders, issued without fee, to the value of S73S,940. M1\oney
order fees totaled $9,788.92. The total amount on deposit at all
post offices on June 30, 1924, including deposit money orders, old
postal savings accounts, and fee-paid money orders in favor of the
remitter, was $487,940.80, as compared with $470,731 on June 30,
1923.
The sales of Treasury savings certificates during the year aggregated
856,961.50. The sale of these certificates was temporarily discon-
tinued in September, 1923, and resumed on February 1, 1924.
In the registry division of the post offices 243,114 letters and
parcels were handled, of which 41,671 were official and accepted for
registration without fee.
A total of 2,209 dispatches of foreign mail was made from the post
office at Cri.-stohal and 2,158 dispatches were received. At the Balboa
post office. which dispatches mail to west coast Central and South
American ports only, the number of dispatches outward was 1,574
and inward 519.
United States and foreign transit mail destined to the west coast
of central l and South America, as well as mail exchanged between
Cuba, Jamniir.n, and other insular governments and Colombia, Costa
Rica, Venezuela, etc., is handled under the supervision of the director
of posts. Mail from European countries routed via the Isthmus for
transshipment is handled by the director of posts on behalf of the
United States Iost Office Department, whereas direct agreements are
in effect between the director of posts and the postal administrations
of Costa Rica, Australia, and New Zealand for the handling of their
mails routed via the bthmlus of Panama.
Cable reports were forwarded regularly to the postmaster at New
York informing him of connections on the Istlunus for west coast. ports,
which not only affords better mail service but should re-ult in savings






42 REPORT OF *GOVERNOR OF THE IPANAAL 'VNAIAL

over the former system of dispatching all mail to the IsthmUe for
connection rather than holding it at times for dispatch by direct
steamers in the New York-west coast service.
During the year mail from the United States and foreign countries
was received on about 300 steamers and dispatched to destination on
about 400 steamers.
CUSTOMS

The total number of vessels entered at the terminal ports of the
canal, including vessels in transit, was 11,643, and the number cleared
11,653, an increase of approximately 30 per cent over the previous
year.
All merchandise discharged at Cristobal or Balboa and destined to
persons or firms in the Republic of Panama, not consigned to The
Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad Co., or the United States Army
or Navy, is in the custody of the Canal Zone customs until papers
have been submitted from Panaman officials to prove that duty has
been paid or waived. Permits for 8,165 releases were granted at
Cristobal and for 193 at Balboa. Cargo landed at the latter port is
usually forwarded by railroad to Panama, where it passes into the
custody of the Panaman authorities. .
A total of 2,337 free entry requests was approved for employees of
The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad Co. and members of the
United States Army or Navy, who have the privilege of importing
articles for their personal use without payment of duty.
Customs duty was paid to the Republic of Panama to the amount
of 851,627.50 on 21,659 mail parcels for nonemployees and on dutiable
articles imported through the Canal Zone post offices.
No arrests were made for violations of the customs regulations.
At each port, however, numerous attempts to smuggle merchandise
of various classes in small quantities were frustrated, and such
merchandise1 confiscated and delivered over to the proper authorities
of the Republic of Panama. Eleven arrests were made by police
and customs officers for alleged violations of the opium act.
The number of cases of household goods inspected and sealed for
employees returning to the United States was 578, and the fees
collected for this service totaled $462. There were 756 invoices
certified, on which the fees amounted to $929.50.
The number of vessels requesting the detail of customs inspectors
for the examination of passengers' baggage, etc., after the usual
working hours was 574, and the sum of $4,520 was collected for
this special service.
Customs inspectors checked 408 Chinese crews upon arrival and
before' departure to prevent the illegal landing of Chinese in the
Canal Zone or the Republic of Panama. They also assumed respon-






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


sibility for 454 Chinese passengers, besides 72 on hand at the begin-
ning of the year, of whom 334 were admitted to the Republic of
Panama on the authority of that Government, and the others, with
the exception of 66 awaiting transportation at the end of the year,
either proceeded on their journey or were returned to the port of
embarkation. Bonds were accepted for the temporary release in
the Canal Zone of 46 Chinese in transit.
SHIPPING COMMISSIONER-SEAMEN
The shipping commissioner and his deputies have the same powers
with respect to American seamen as shipping commissioners in the
United States and American consuls in foreign ports. During the
fiscal year there were 4,201 seamen shipped on American vessels and
4,119 discharged. Tilhe total amount of wages earned by seamen-who
were discharged in the Canatl Zone was $116,841.25; the amount
approved for deduction on account of advances, allotments, fines,
slop-chest account, etc., was .33,580.96; and the balance of $S3,260.29
was either paid to them under the supervision of the deputy shipping
commissioners or received on deposit, for their ;account. There were
461 American seamen lodged and subsisted at the expense of the
United States Government. Of this number 343 were returned to
the United States at the expense of the appropriation for the relief of
destitute American seamen, and the remaining 118 were signed on
vessels and returned to the United States without expense to the
Government. The wages and effects of eight American seamen who
died in the Canal Zone were handled by the shipping commissioner
as provided by law.
ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES
During the year the estates of 57 deceased and insane employees of
The Painama Cainal and the Panama Railroad Co. were administered,
and there were 32 estates in course of settlement, on June 30, 1924.
RELATIONS WITH PANAMA
There was direct correspondence between the government. of the
Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama on various routine questions.
The negotiations for a general revision of the existing agreements
between the United States and the Republic of Panama embodied
in the Hay-Bunau-Varilla treaty and the so-called Taft agreement,
which were pending at the beginning of the year, were not. con-
cluded; but under date of May 2S, 1924, the President of the United
States, acting under authority of a joint resolution of Congress
approved February 12, 1923, issued a proclamation abrogating the
Taft agreement as of June 1, 1924.
12618-24t-----4












SECTION IV


ADMINISTRATION
CHANGES IN ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL
There were no changes in the organization of The Panama Canal
during the fiscal year 1924.
Col. Weston P. Chamberlain, Medical Corps, United States Army,
was appointed chief health officer June 23, 1924, relieving Col. Henry
C. Fisher, Medical Corps, United States Army, who completed a
tour of duty with The Panama Canal which began March 31, 1919.
Commander Ross P. Schlabach, United States Navy, was appointed
superintendent of the mechanical division, June 13, 1924, relieving
Commander Roy W. Ryden, United States Navy, who had occupied
the position since September 12, 1921.
Maj. Clarence S. Ridley, Engineer Corps, United States Army,
resigned from the position of assistant engineer of maintenance, April
19, 1924. His appointment dated from May 10, 1921. Maj. Francis
C. Harrington, detailed to relieve Major Ridley, had not arrived on
the Isthmus at the close of the fiscal year.
Surg. Carlisle P. Knight, United States Public Health Service,
was appointed chief quarantine officer of The Panama Canal, March
1, 1924, relieving Surg. William C. Rucker, United States Public
Health Service, who had served in the same position since October
28, 1920.
Judge B. F. Harrah, assistant auditor of The Panama Canal at
Washington, D. C., died on August 18, 1923. His appointment
dated from June 17, 1911. The vacancy thus created was filled by
the transfer of Mr. Noble Moore from the office of the Comptroller
General, October 1, 1923.

INCREASE OF FORCE

For the efficient handling of a greater volume of business it be-
came necessary to make slight increases in the force of certain depart-
ments. At the end of June, 1924, the total number of employees was
11,511, as compared with 11,001 in June, 1923. The increase of 510
men is equivalent to 4.6 per cent. The distribution of the personnel
is shown in the following table:
44







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


June, 1923 June, 1924
Department or division I _
Gold roll Silver roll Total Gold roll Silver roll Total

Operation and maintenance:
Oflice................................ 28 47 75 38 38 76
Electrical division-.................... 150 146 206 160 172 332
Municipal engineering-......... ..... 71 487 558 72 495 567
Lock operation....................... 179 570 749 203 589 792
Dredging.............................. 152 886 1,038 159 872 1,031
Mechanical ...................... ....; 340 661 1,001 427 822 1,249
Mlarine-.................. .............. 156 472 628 175 520 695
Fortifications......................... 14 169 183 11 18 29
Supply:
Quartermaster........................ 142 962 1,104 168 1,169 1,337
Subsistence .................... ....... 6 80 86 7 82 89
Cominiss&ry.......................... 164 766 930 188 832 1,020
Cattle industry anil plantations....... 1 6 205 211 5 156 161
Hotel Washington .................... 8 83 91 7 87 94
Tran-portal ion........................ 36 157 193 36 161 197
Accounting............................... 182 8 190 197 7 204
Health.................................... 222 692 914 231 702 933
Executive................................. 476 264 740 477 249 726
Panama Railroad.
Superintendent....................... 47 254 301 48 230 278
Transportation........................ 64 108 172 64 101 165
Receiving and forwarding agent ...... 78 924 1,002 75 891 966
Coaling stations....................... 62 477 539 62 508 570
Total............................... 2,583 8,418 11,001 2,810 8,701 11,511


The pay roll for July, 1923, aggregated $940,575.46, and for June,
1924, $1,054,383.45, an increase of 12.1 per cent.

WAGE ADJUSTMENTS

Gold employees.-Under the provisions of the Panama Canal act of
August 24, 1912, it is provided that the salaries or compensation of
persons in the Panama Canal service "shall in no instance exceed by
more than 25 per cent.um the salary or compensation paid for the same
or similar service to persons employed by the Government in con-
tinental United States."
While the payment of the full 25 per cent increment above rates in
the United States is permissive and not mandatory, it has at all times
been the policy of the administration to allow the full 25 per cent
additional compensation over basic rates in the United States for sim-
lar employment., in so far as funds were available and so long as a proper
coordination in the rates for the various classes and crafts was
maintained locally. The policy of paying the full 25 per cent incre-
ment above United States rates has been more specifically indorsed
since January 1, 1922, at which time employees were required to pay
rent for their quarters, charges for fuel, water, electricity, and other
services furnished, which prior to that date had been furnished to the
employees without cost. to thnim.
In line with the policy of granting the full 25 per cent above
United States rates for similar work, in so far as funds and legis-
lative restrictions permitted, adjustments were made in the






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


rates of numerous crafts during the year, following changes of rates
in the United States. The more important adjustment were:
(a) Adjustment of rates of employees in the mechanical trades following the
July 1, 1923, and January 1, 1924, wage adjustments in the navy yards in the
United States.
(b) Bimonthly adjustments of rates for building trade employees, based on
building trades rates in the United States.
(c) Inclusion of the second half of the bonus increment in the salaries of classi-
fied employees whose rates of compensation were based on Government salaries
in the United States where the congressional increase of $240 per annum was paid
in addition to the basic salary. Owing to lack of funds, however, school teachers,
policemen, and firemen received no part of this $240 increment.
The three foregoing adjustments, together with many minor
adjustments involving smaller groups, resulted in a revision of the
rates of a majority of the American employees during the course of
the year. At the close of the fiscal year adjustment of rates of rail-
road transportation employees was under way, and likewise prepara-
tory steps were being taken toward allocating the salaries of all
employees coming under the provisions of the classification act of
1923 to the new schedule of rates provided for use under classification.
Owing to our isolated location and the necessity of maintaining a
proper coordination between closely related positions, the duties of
which may vary widely, and whose relationship can not well be under-
stood by a board unfamiliar with local conditions, efforts were made
to secure the exemption of employees, in the canal service from the
provisions of the classification act of 1923. The necessity of con-
siderable flexibility in the canal organization, allowing immediate ad-
justments according to the exigencies of the service, makes it of great
importance that the canal organization be hampered as little as
possible by the obligation of conforming to governmental classifica-
tions in the United States where conditions of employment are in many
respects entirely different.
The provisions of the Panama Canal act limiting salaries on The
Panama Canal to 25 per cent above rates for similar employment in
the United States prescribe a definite safeguard in respect to Panama
Canal rates of pay and it would be unwise to fetter the canal adminis-
tration with the provisions of the classification act and the rules and
regulations appertaining thereto, administered by a personnel
classification board in Washington entirely unfamiliar with
local conditions. Such a board would of necessity have to rely on
data furnished by the canal administration relative to the duties and
responsibilities of each position classified; consequently, the real
burden of classification rests with the canal administration in any
event, and the proposed method of applying the classification act to
the Panama Canal service with the personnel classification board in
Washington reviewing and revising the classification made by a local





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


classification board could only prove a constant source of annoyance
and friction.
A careful survey of Panama Canal rates of pay as of May, 1924,
for all classes of employees on the Isthmus, showed that as a whole
Panama Canal employees were receiving 22.9 per cent above rates for
similar service in the United States. This margin above United
States' rates is their compensation for tropical service and is within
the 25 per cent limitation allowed by law.
Adjustments in the compensation of Panama Canal employees
are authroized by the Governor, usually in conformity with recom-
mendation made by a wage board, consisting of an official representa-
tive of the administration and a representative selected by the organ-
ized employees. When a claim for increase is made, data showing
rates for similar employment are obtained from the. United States;
the comparability of the service, the duties and responsibilities of the
employment, the matter of local coordination and other factors are
carefully considered, and recommendations submitted accordingly.
This wage board held 42 meetings during the year, and submitted
recommendations for the revision of a great many rates.
Following the decision that Panama Canal employees outside of
the mechanical and allied crafts were to be included under the. pro-
visions of the classification act, questionnaires covering some 1,200
positions were prepared for the consideration of the personnel classi-
fication board in Washington. The personnel classification board,
recognizing the impracticability of classifying positions in the canal
service in conformity with classification procedure for the depart-
mental service in Washington, directed that for the present, at least,
positions in the canal service be allocated to grades and classes in
the classification schedule simply on the basis of their present sal-
aries. At the close of the fiscal year schedules and regulations were
being promulgated, preparatory to shifting to the classification rates,
effective July 1, 1924. This is a mere mechanical allocation and is
not objectionable in itself.
Silver employees.-Although the number used as an index of the
cost of living for silver employees, which is derived quarterly from
current prices in the Panama Railroad commissaries where these
people buy the bulk of their supplies, declined during the year from
46.909 to 37.411 (percentage of increase over 1914), no further re-
duction was made in the basic rate of pay for silver laborers, which
remained at 20 cents an hour.
The wage rate originally fixed for laborers in 1914, which was sub-
sequently increased to correspond as nearly as possible with the as-
certained increases in the cost of living but no farther, was made
purposely low, with the intention of discouraging the surplus West
Indian labor left over Irom construction days from remaining on the
Isthmus, and at the same time free transportation was offered to





48 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

all those who applied for repatriation. The situation is now entirely
changed. Since the settlement of many West Indians on the land
and the development of the banana industry and other sources of
employment all surplus competent labor has been absorbed, and the
maintenance of a satisfactory canal force warrants the payment of a
20-cent rate for unskilled labor, and of the higher rates for skilled
labor derived from it, in competition with other employers. There
is the further consideration that the wages of American employees,
which fluctuate with wages in the United States, have been gener-
ally increased during the year, and it would be difficult to convince
the West Indians that. while gold employees were demanding and
obtaining better pay, silver employees must suffer a further reduc-
tion. The existing schedules for silver employees have accordingly
been retained without change.
The following statement shows the fluctuations in living costs
and the basic hourly rate for unskilled labor from February 1, 1920:

Living Indi- Living Indi-
Date cos at Rate Date cost cated Rate
over rate adopted over rate adopted
1914 1914

Feb. 1, 1920.............. 71.58 21.25 21 r July 1, 1922............... 50.039 18. 57 20
Apr. 1 1920 ............. 73 09 21.47 21 i Oct. 1 1922-............... 47.81 18.29 20
3uly 1, 1920..--------......--...---- 87.77 23. 18 23 1 Jan. 1, 1923............... 45. 816 18.04 20
Oct. 1, 1920..--------------.......... 89 12 23.40 23 Apr. 1, 1923.............. 44.073 17.83 20
Jan. 1,1921..--------............. 79.28 22.19 23 July I 1923......------------.... -- 46.909 18 18 20
Apr. 1, 1921.............. 72.399 21.33 23 Oct. 1, 1923............... 46 69 18. 15 20
July 1, 1921.....- ........1 68 977 20.91 22 Jan. 1, 1921............... 42.336 17.61 20
Oct. 1921............... 6259 20.12 21 Apr. 1, 1924............-_ 41. 516 17.51 20
Jan. 1, 1922............... 59.98 19.82 21 July 1,192 ............... 37.411 17.04 20
Apr. 1, 1922.............. 55.46 19.24 21

GRIEVANCE BOARD
The board organized in July, 1920, to hear grievances and com-
plaints of American employees and submit its findings and recommen-
dations to the Governor had only two cases brought before it in 1924.
One of these arose out of the excessive overtime required of canal
pilots following the rapid and unexpected increase of traffic during
the early part of 1923 and pending the employment and training of
additional men, and the other concerned the relative seniority rights
of locomotive engineers and conductors and railroad motor car oper-
ators. For the consideration of these two cases the board held six
meetings.
PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATION
As in previous years, five clubhouses were maintained for Americans
and five for West Indians under the supervision of a bureau of clubs
and playgrounds. They are centers for varied community activities,
and while designed primarily for employees and their families, they
are open to all, and are commonly patronized by transient visitors
and by the enlisted men of the Army and Navy. In connection with
the clubhouses there are athletic fields, tennis courts, swimming pools,





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


and children's playgrounds, providing outdoor recreation for both
sexes and all ages. Many clubhouse activities are not only self-
supporting but yield a considerable net revenue, which can be applied
to support. such other features as are necessarily conducted at a loss.
The operations as a whole show a deficit, which is covered by a subsidy
from appropriations. Clubhouse finances for the fiscal year 1924 are
dealt with in a paragraph in the section on business operations.
Reference is made there also to the destruction of the Ancon club-
house by fire on January 9, 192 1, and to the assignment of an avail-
able building to replace it.
The employees support a 'zreat nilmbi'r of clubs and fr;atern:il alnd
other org;nnizations,. which are either entirely independent, of The Pan-
nmna Cianal or merely make use of halls provided by the canal for which
a rental charge is collected.
RECRL1TING, PURCHASES, AND SALES IN TIIE UNITED STATES
The number of persons tendlered employment through the Washing-
ton office was 973, of which number 430 accepted. The correspond-
ing figures for 1923 were 542 and 282. During January it became
necessary on very short notice, due to the failure to secure the detail
of men through the Navy Departmient as had been expected, to recruit
50 mechanics for the overhaul of the Gatun Locks, a temporary job
lasting only six weeks. In view of the short period of employment
and the limited time available, all of these men being required to sail
by January 15 and 25, it was necessary in order to secure the 50 men
required to tender employment to 271.
The total number of orders placed for thie purchase of supplies was
7,1S2, as compared with 5,381 in the previous y-ear, and tlie value of
supplies ordered was $4,796,022.22, as against 82,351,018.33. Owing
to this large increase in the work of the purchasing department it was
necessary to increase the force by three clerks aind t\\-w inspectors at
the beginning of the fiscal year, and again by two) inspectors effect e
November 1, 1923.
The sale in the United States of surplus canal material handled by
the purchasing department during the fiscal year yielded 8327,490.76,
based on 50 sale orders, including one order for the s:ile of the dredge
Culebra for $250,000 to the Engineer Department, of the Army, as
compared with $44S,888.14, based on 184 sale onrlers, priced during
1923. The regular officee force, which was drawn on during the ta:, Il
years 1922 and 1923 to take care of the extra w irk in corniection
with the sale of surplus 1muterial accumuiilated on tile Isthmus, was
released from this work, anid this special sales orIganization was dis-
continued about September 1, 1923.
The representation of tlie Washington ollice on the various Govern-
ment boards and coordinating committees appointed by the chief
coordinator was continued, and involved considerable attention and
time, particularly of the higher officials.













SECTION V


FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS

This section contains financial statements of The Panama Canal
(Tables 1 to 58) and statistical statements of canal traffic (Tables
59 to 63). For convenience of cross reference the original numbering
of the financial statements quoted from the annual report of the
auditor of The Panama Canal has been preserved, although Tables
Nos. 23, 35, 40, 41, and 45 to 58 have not been printed. A complete
list of the tables, including those omitted, follows:


c No.
General balance sheets.
Balances in appropriation and fund accounting.
Appropriations by Congress.
Status of authorized bond issue.
Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States.
Payments made by fiscal officers.
Receipts and disbursements by collector.
Collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals and companies.
Collector's special deposit account.
Audited pay rolls.
Accounts receivable registered and outstanding.
Comparative statement of accounts receivable.
Comparative statement of accounts payable.
Statement of defense capital expenditures to June 30, 1924.
Details of canal fixed property.
Detail of canal transit equipment.
Business property, equipment, etc., by divisions.
Business fixed property.
Canal business equipment.
Status of public works in Panama and Colon.
Canal transit material and supplies.
Receipts, issues, and transfers of stores.
Comparative statement of store balances.
Statement of canal earnings, expenses, and net expenses.


Canal revenues.
Business expenses, revenues, and net revenues.
Comparison of expenses and revenues and surplus by y
Pay-roll deductions from employees, for rent, etc.
Reserves for depreciation.
Reserves for repairs.
Reserves for gratuity.
Cost of production and distribution of electric current.
Cost of production and distribution of water.
Dredging operations (channel maintenance).
50


,ears to date.


Tabi
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
1S.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.


25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No.
35. MAloney orders issued and paid by Canal Zone and Canal Zone orders paid
by other administrations, fiscal years 1907 to 1924, inclusive.
36. Monthly money-order business of Canal Zone postal service.
37. Postal service-audited revenues, fiscal years 1907 to 1924, inclusive.
38. Postal revenues, fiscal year 1924.
39. Postal savings and deposit money-order transactions, fiscal year 1924.
40. Income, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1924.
41. Expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1924.
42. Income and expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1924.
43. Balance sheet, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, June 30, 1924.
44. Coupon books issued, sold, etc., fiscal year 1924.
45. Amounts of injury payments made during the period August 1, 1I)l18, to
June 30, 1924.
461. Injury and death payments, September 7, 1916, to June 30, 1924.
47. Number of injuries, by extent of disability, for each division or department.
4S. Nature of nonfatal cases, by department or division.
49. Number of cases and compensation paid, classed by injury.
.150. Class of work being performed by employees at time of injury, ly depart-
ments and divisions.
51. Cause of injuries, by departments and divisions.
52. ('Cost of commissary supplies purchased and sold during fisncal year 1924.
53. Collections made from other than employees.
54. Collections of Panama Railroad land rents.
55. Panama Railroad accounts payable vouchers registered during fiscal year
1924.
55-a. Panama Canal accounts pay able vouchers registered during fiscal year 1924.
56. Statement of work of the time inspection division.
57. Statistics of silver quarters, exclusive of Barracks and Las Cascadas.
58. Report of work performed by pa.y-rull section.
59. Summary of commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal
year 1924 and since its opening to commercial trtffic.
60. Number of commercial vessels of various nationalities passing through The
Panama Canal 1915-1924.
61-a. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing through The Panama
Canal from the Atlantic to the Pacifici during the fiscal year 1924.
61-b. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing through The Panama
Canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic during the fiscal year 1924.
62-a. Tons of cargo carried by commercial vessels passing through The Panama
Canal from its opening to June 30, 1924, by fiscal years.
62-b. The Panama Canal net tonnage of vessels by nationalities passing through
The Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 192-1, by fiscal years.
63. Statement showing the number of vessels, the Panama Canal net 1inuzage,
tolls assessed, anil tons of Iargri carried by vessels if the principal nations
passing through The Parinuin C(anal during the first ten years if its opern-
tion.
EXPLANATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The linaniciiI traInszctions of The Panama Canal us ai whole are
covered in Tables Nos. 1 to 58S, of which there is an index attached.
Table ANo. 1----7ntral balance she'f.-One important change has
been nimade in the general balance sheet. When tie commereil value
of The Paiii rn:i Cainil Iand nuxilimry works was d(It rinini d as of Apr il





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


1, 1922, the amount fixed as having been expended from a national
defense standpoint, amounting at that time to $110,997,602.38, was
dropped from the books. During the fiscal year 1924, land settle-
ments were made covering old claims which are properly chargeable
to this account, and during the fiscal year 1925 it is estimated that
approximately $40,000 will be spent from the maintenance and
operation appropriation for shipping, handling, and storing armor
plate for the spillway gates, which should also be charged to the
national defense account, and for these reasons, the total national
defense expenditures have been taken up on the asset side of the
balance sheet and a corresponding capital account set up on the liabil-
ity side which now amounts to $112,618,082.12.
The canal transit capital and business capital, which were shown
separately last year, have been consolidated. The two capital
accounts now represent approximately the total amount appropriated
by Congress for canal construction, as shown in detail in Table No. 3.
The item of undistributed business capital was increased by $150,-
000, representing the value of store stock carried for account of the
constructing quartermaster.
The other asset and liability items in the general balance sheet are
taken up in detail in succeeding tables.
Table No. 2-Appropriation and fund accounting.-Cash in the
hands of the three fiscal officers was reduced from $3,166,724.68 on
July 1, 1923, to $1,900,537.96 on June 30, 1924. Of this amount, the
disbursing clerk in Washington had $211,168.22; the paymaster,
$958,036.61; and the collector, $731,333.13. The amount collectible
on registered bills increased $165,360.62, the total amount outstanding
at the end of the year being 5952,207.71.
Table No. 8-Appropriations by Congress.-Individual acts have
been omitted in the annual report for several years, and it was thought
advisable to print them in detail this year on account of taking up
the national defense expenditures in the general ledger. This table
shows the total amount of money appropriated for canal construction,
less amounts returned to the surplus fund, leaving a net for canal
construction amounting to $386,910,301.
The amount paid to the Republic of Panama to June 30, 1924, was
$3,250,000, and the total amount appropriated for the maintenance
and operation, sanitation, and civil government of The Panama Canal
and Canal Zone, since 1914, is $73,094,495.88. The amount appro-
priated for the fiscal year 1925 is $7,240,160.
Table No. 4-Status of authorized bond issue.-The status of the
authorized bond issue has been changed by the amount returned to
the surplus fund. There now remains available out of the total
authorized bond issue the sum of $2,215,782.62.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No. 5-Cash receipts and disbu.rsements.-This table shows
that the Treasurer of the United States advanced to the fiscal officers
of The Panama Canal the sum of $6,869,500, and disbursed directly
$463,454.16, making a total of 57,332,954.16. Against this amount
the fiscal officers of The Panama Canal remitted to the Treasurer the
sum of $951,418.40 and the direct collections amounted to $416,-
192.79, a total of $1,367,611.19, indicating that The Panama C;anal
withdrew from the Treasury appropriated funds during thse year
amounting to approximately -0,000,000.
Table No. 6- Di.burstmen 1. by the )payU/mastcr.-Disbursemenwts to
the amount of $17,482,161.50 were made during the year by the
paymaster. Of this amount the sum of 86,284,809.52 was on account
of the Panama Railroad Co. Employees on the gold rolls of
The Panama Canal were paid $5,918,833.06 and those on the silver
rolls $3,703,083.58, while the sum of $1,575,435.34 was paid on mis-
cellaneous vouchers.
Collections on the pay rolls amounted to $3,237,408.96. Of this
amount the sum of $2,553,615.80 was collected for coupon books,
the remainder being for miscellaneous items. Of the total collections
on pay rolls, the sum of $2,593,774.40 was disbursed by the paymaster,
Panama Canal, the balance, 8643,634.56, being transferred to the
collector's accounts.
The American Foreign Banking Corporation was continued as a
Government, depository. During the year the sum of $7,229,090
Panama Railroad funds, was transferred to the Treasurer, New
York. This amount included $569,150 mutilated currency, due to
rapid deterioration of paper money through climatic conditions.
This amount is approximately $200,000 less than the amount shipped
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1923, which is accounted for
by this office putting into circulation nearly $250,000 in new money.
The circulation of gold coin has been practically eliminated. The
total amount of gold reserve on the Isthmus is around $325,000. Of
this amount $300,000 is being held in reserve by the various banks.
No cash was brought down from the United States by the pay-
master during the year, which is the first year in the history of The
Panama Canal that it has not been necessary to requisition a con-
siderable quantity of cash for use on the Isthmus.
Tables Nos. 7, 8, and 9-Rocipts and disbursements by the collector.-
Collections repaid to the appropriations totaled $8,157,836.33.
Miscellaneous receipts collections amounted to $24,798,311.60.
The amount of money handled by the collector through his security
deposit accounts totaled $30,063,355.28. (See Table No. 5.) This
makes a total of over $33,000,000 handled by the collector, and, in
addition to this, independent funds consisting of clubhouse funds,





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


trust funds, postal savings funds, money order funds, interest and
Treasury savings certificates, as shown in Table No. 7, amounting, lAq
approximately $2,000,000.
The collections for account of the Panama Railroad Co. amount@
to $12,405,727.56. This makes the total cash turned over in t4
collector's office more than $47,000,000.
Table No. 10-Salaries and wages.-The amount of money paid toT
Panama Canal employees in the fiscal year 1924 was $9,711,933.36.
The amount for the fiscal year 1923 was $8,627,698.19 and for 1922,
$9,731,338.82. Of the total amount paid in the fiscal year 1924,
$8,145,768.68 was paid directly from the appropriation for mainte-
nance and operation, $773,301.20 from civil government, and $792,-
863.48 from the sanitation appropriation. The total amount paid on
the gold rolls was $6,000,506.87, and on the silver rolls $3,711,426.49.
Table No. 11-Accounts receivable.-The number of bills registered
in 1924 exceeded the bills in 1923 by 3,200. This table shows the ups
and downs of the bills covering tolls in the various months, the month
of December being the highest, $2,335,791.31. The lowest amount
was in June, $1,792,834.42.
Table No. 12-Comparative statement of accounts receivable.-The
amount collectible at the end of the fiscal year 1924 was $165,360.62
greater than at the end of the fiscal year 1923. This was principally
due to increased business,
Table No. 1.3-Accounts payable.-The amount of bills payable by
The Panama Canal at the end of the fiscal year was $1,330,640.04.
This is $176,000 less than the amount owed at the end of the fiscal
year 1923.
Table No. 14-Defense expenditures.-This table shows the indi-
vidual items which were charged off as the proportion of the cost
of The Panama Canal, valuable from a national defense standpoint.
The amount was increased $515,000 during the fiscal year 1924,
$400,000 of which represents the book value of the steamship Colon,
which was sold and written out of the accounts and $115,000 for old
land settlements.
Table No. 15-Canal fixed property.-The total value of fixed
property used in connection with transiting vessels is carried at
$235,684,662. No retirements were written off during the fiscal year
1924, but a few additions were made, consisting of rising stem valves,
new towing locomotives, signal station, additional parking spaces, and
improvements to the lighting system on the Gaillard Highway.
Preliminary expenses in connection with the Alhajuela basin, amount-
ing to $61,950.49, were also added to this account. A large part of
this represents land and other property settlements necessary to
obtain possession of this area. The total amount added to the value
of fixed property during the year was $210,205.71.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


Table No. 16-Canal transit equipment.-The amount invested in
equipment used in transiting vessels and channel maintenance was
$4,017,642.46. During the year the dredge Culebra was sold to the
United States Army engineering department for $250,000. This
dredge was built by the Maryland Steel Co. and delivered at the
Isthmus in September, 1907, 8362,425. It is a seagoing suction
dredge, twin screw. It was used in the construction of the canal and
channel maintenance until the World War, when it was converted
into a cattle-carrying vessel to bring cattle here from Colombia-
A few years a go it was converted back into a dredge and finally sold
for dredging work on the coast of California.
A number of barges carried in the accounts at approximately
$50,000 were withdrawn from service and put on sale. Grader No. 1,
carried in the accounts at $55,000, sank and was removed from the
accounts. The total withdrawals amounted to $380,256.33. Addi-
tions were made to the extent of $102,918.49. Barge No. 8 was
rebuilt into a relay pump barge and set up at a value of $50,000.
An excavator was purchased for the dredging division at a cost of
$17,370. Grader machinery was installed on dredge No. S3 at a
cost of $11,S50. Two new launches, named Helen Louise and Butler,
were constructed at a cost of $12,800 for the two.
Table No. 17-Business property.-This table. shows the entire
investment in business activities by divisions, showing separately
the amount of fixed property, equipment, material and supplies,
cash, work in process (which is equivalent, to accounts receivable),
and undistributed business capital, which is that portion of material
and supplies, cash, and accounts receivable carried in the transit
accounts for account of the business units. This undistributed
business capital was increased by $150,000, representing material
and supplies carried for the constructing quartermaster, consisting of
lumber and other building materials. Of these business units, the
electric light and power system has the largest investment, totaling
$6,500,000. The investment in the water system is a little more
than $3,000,000: quarters for white employees, $3,500,000. The
investment chargeable to other business units is shown in the first
column of this table. It is on these figures that the business divisions
are expected to make 3 per cent on the investment, that interest
being shown in the last column of Table No. 26.
Table No. IS-Business fixed property.-A new concrete electrical
storehouse was built near the Gatun Locks at an expense of approxi-
mately $10,000 out of the depreciation reserve of the electrical divi-
sion. An additional pump station was established in Miraflores Lake
during the flood period last October at apcost of $19,500. Landslides
along the water main between Gamboa and Miraflores cut off the
supply of water from the Chagres River, and water was temporarily






56 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

pumped from Miraflores Lake until this pump station was installed,
which will remain there permanently.
The steamship Colon was removed from the business property
account., where it had been carried at an appraised value of $400,000.
This vessel was constructed at Cramp's shipyard in Philadelphia in
1899. In 1905 it was purchased by the Isthmian Canal Commission
from Ward & Co., agents for the New York & Cuba Mail Steamship
Co., for $650,000, for the purpose of carrying material and supplies
and employees to the Isthmus. Its name then was Mexico, which in
1906 was changed to Colon. At the completion of the canal $250,000
of its value was written into canal construction and from that time
on it was carried in the capital account at a value of $400,000. It
was continuously operated by the Panama Railroad Co., and in
February, 1924, was sold to the Alaskan Steamship Co. for the sum
of $600,000. Of this amount $394,891.91 had been spent for rcboiler-
ing and overhaul during the latter .part of 1923. The balance,
$205,108.09, was covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts
toward the amortization of its original value. This amount is shown
in Table No. 25 under the heading of "Proceeds from Government
property."
The other additions and withdrawals, with the exception of one
or two, do not involve any cash transactions. The total amount
added to business fixed property was $56,220.48 and the withdrawals,
including the $400,000 for the Colon, were 8506,148.51.
Table No. 19-Business equipment.-Outside of an item of $26,000 for
replaced automobiles, the additions to business equipment consisted
of replaced tools, and under the heading of Withdrawals" the prin-
cipal items were the monthly depreciation which was written into
operations. This is really a method of amortization in order to write
the value of machinery and tools into operations approximately as
fast, as they wear out.
Table No. 20- lVaterworks, sewers, and pavrements in Panama and
Colon.-The amount invested in waterworks, sewers, and pavements
in the cities of Colon and Panama, which was reimbursable to the
United States as of June 30, 1924, was $1,893,234.52. The United
States Government produces and distributes water in these two cities
and collects for same, and these water rentals are used to maintain,
operate, and repair the water systems in the two cities, aswell as that
portion of the Zone system chargeable to Panama and Colon. Out of
the water rentals the United States Government also retains interest
on the investment at the rate of 2 per cent per annum and amortiza-
tion on the basis of 50 years from 1907. The sewers and streets are
maintained out of the same water fund. If there is a deficit, bills are
made against the Republic of Panama, and when there is a surplus it
is arbitrarily applied in the amortization of the capital cost. The






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


unpaid investment in the city of Panama amounted to $1,024,836.87
and in the city of Colon $868,397.65. Since the contract started in
1907, approximately $2,600,000 of the water rentals have been used
for the maintenance, operation, and repairs, approximately $900,000
to pay interest on the investment and $785,000 have been repaid on
the capital cost.
Table No. 21-1Material and suipplies.-This table shows the value of
material and supplies on hand June 30, 1924, as compared with June 30,
1923. Considerable material was purchased during the fiscal year 1924,
but it was immediately used, so that the amount onhand isonly $200,000
in excess of that last year. The reserve for inventory adjustments
has been reduced approximately $280,000.
Table No. 22-Material and .upplie.s received and disposed of.-
Material purchased and handled through the storehouses amounted to
$3,682,379.38. Last year the purchases were somewhat less than
$2,000,000. Material purchased and delivered directly to divisions
without passing through the storehouses amounted' to $844,739.64,
compared with $625,5SS.09 last year. Material manufactured
locally was taken into account at a value of $355,426.19. The value
of material issued was $3,654,960.52, compared with $2,978,281.21
last year. Sales amounted to $1,017,538.79, which is approximately
$300,000 less than was sold last year.
Table No. 2S-Coin paratirc stahlent of material and supplies by
comnmodities.-This table shows the classification of material and sup-
plies carried in the storehouses under 153 classifications, and compares
the stock on hand July 1, 1924, with the stock on hand July 1, 1923.
The value of fuel oil on hand .at the end of the fiscal year 1924 was
$86,073.27; medical stores and supplies, $54,204.08; papers, etc.,
Panama Canal Press, $90,191.88; lock spares and material, Corozal
store, $453,563.87; sand and gravel, Gamboa gravel plant, $225,-
614.68.
Table No. 24-Canal trnin.ii expense and earnin.-The gross cost
of operating and maintaining The Panama Canal, including overhead.
sanitation, and civil government expenses, was $11,170.S00.51, com-
pared with $10,308,723.06 List year. This figure includes $655,377.50
theoretical amortization ind depreciation of the canal investment.
-The collections for supplies and services performed by the divisions
operating the canal amounted to $2,796,895.12. compared with
$2,617,945.50 last year: and the net expense $S,373,905.39, as com-
pared with $7,690,777.56 Inst year. Taking out the amortization
and depreciation charge leaves the amount payable from the appro-
priation $7,718,527.89. This does not include the funds used for
capital additions and equipment mentioned in Tables Nos. 15 to 19,
inclusive.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


The gross expense of the office engineer was $38,641.18 as com-
pared with $34,184.02 last year, but the net expense shows a large
difference because of the different method followed in billing out
what had previously been considered as overhead work. The office
engineer billed out most of his expenses last year even to other
divisions who also operate from appropriations. This has been
changed so that the net expense of the office engineer, meteorology
and hydrography, and surveys will remain steady; i. e., nothing will
be billed out that will become an overhead expense in some other
division.
The net storehouse operating expense was $323,353.01, approxi-
mately $10,000 less than last year, which i's principally due to the
larger turnover of business material, in which case the operating
expense is advanced to the business divisions.
The street lighting expenses have increased from $10,000 to $13,600
on account of the additional lighting which has been provided on
Gaillard Highway through Corozal and Fort Clayton, etc.
The charge for water for municipal purposes is shown as $23,400,
which represents the water used for flushing sewers, watering public
grounds, filling the Balboa swimming pool, etc. Last year the charge
was fixed at $69,205.86, but this included a fixed charge for fire pro-
tection which was eliminated by approval of the Secretary of War.
This expense, when there is any, now loses itself in the profit and
loss statement of the waterworks system in Table 26.
The $79,668.86 covering maintenance of laborers' quarters repre-
sents the difference between the cost of operating and maintaining
houses for silver employees, and the amount of rent collected from
this class of employees. As explained before, for economic reasons
efforts are directed toward housing as many colored employees in
the Zone as possible, and the rent charges and salaries paid are fixed
accordingly. This maintenance item is, therefore, equivalent to
additional salary for those employees who live in the Zone.
The net, expenses of the marine division were considerably less
than last year. This is due to an increase of approximately $140,000
in revenues, the revenues being almost $1,000,000. The lighthouse
subdivision, which operates the salvage boat, had a number of jobs
which brought in $112,000, and the net expense of that division was
approximately $60,000 less than last year.
The net cost of operating and maintaining the locks at Gatun,
Pedro Miguel, and Miraflores was $1,500,000, as compared with
$1,136,000 last year. Most of this increase is due to the cost of
overhaul at Gatun, which was considerably more than in former
years, the total overhaul cost being over $300,000. Besides this, of
course, there have been increases due to the increased traffic through





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANA*A CANTAX


the canal. A change is contemplated in the method of effecting
periodic overhauls of the locks. It is now intended to overhaul
Miraflores Locks in the fiscal year 1925, and in the fiscal year 1926
to make only sufficient repairs in the Pedro Miguel Locks to bring
them in step with Miraflores, then overhaul the Gatun Locks in
1927, and Pedro Miguel and Miraflorec together in 1929.
The expenses of maintaining Gatun Dam and Gatun Spillway
showed an increase from less than 340,000 in 1923 to nearly $66,000 in
the fiscal year 1924. This is due to the flood last October. Large
quantities of rock had to be taken from Sosa Hill to strengthen the
Mindi Dike and considerable local filling was done.
The amount expended in connection with damages to vessels in
the locks was $6,177.42 and for damage to vessels in the canal,
$27,981.52, a total of $34,158.94. Of this amount only $23,101.51
was actually paid out. in cash. The balance, $11,057.43, represents
the value of repairs made by the mechanical division in cases where
ships preferred to have the repairs made here at the expense of the
canal rather than cash settlement and have the repairs made else-
where. Of the cash settlements, $14,904.05 was paid in connection
with the steamship G. Harrison Smith damaged April 15, 1923,
which was reported in last year's annual report. Besides this cash
settlement, the sum of S2,714.33 was expended on the vessel here,
making a total for this one vessel of $17,618.38. From the time
the canal was opened to June 30, 1924, the canal had assumed lia-
bility and settled for damages to vessels (either by cash settle-
ments or by repairs made at Panama Canal shops and dry docks)
to the amount of $137,046.38, of which $40,130.12 are for accidents
in the locks and $96,916.26 for injuries in the canal outside of the
locks. There are several claims pending, but the amounts are not
large. It is to be expected, however, that as traffic increases the
accidents will increase in proportion.
The expenses of the dredging division, under the heading of Chan-
nel Maintenance, amounted to $2,340,973.06. Of this amount the sum
of S576,866.31 is chargeable to the removal of La Pita Point. in order
to facilitate the movement of vessels through Gaillard Cut.
The earnings credited to Executive offices represent a proportion
of the salaries and other expenses of the various bureaus which are
charged to the Panama Railroad Co. and the various business divis-
ions of The Panama Canal for services performed for them. The
earnings deducted from the gross expenses of clubs and playgrounds
represent the salaries and wages of certain employees of the club-
houses carried on Panama Canal rolls hut which are payable from
the business funds of the bureau of clubs and playgrounds which
are carried separately in the collector's office.
12618-24t-5-





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


The earnings, credited to the accounting department represent A
proportion of the salaries and office expenses of this department
chargeable to the Panama Railroad and business divisions for services
performed. This includes the salaries of whole sections of this de-
partment, like the railroad accounting bureau and the coupon atL
counting section which are bodily chargeable to the Panama Rail-
road.
The earnings credited to the purchasing bureau of the Washington
office represent a charge against the business storehouses for a proL
portion of the cost of purchasing and inspecting material and supplies
used by the business divisions. This amount was arrived at by strik'-
ing a ratio between the amount of material and supplies used by
canal operating divisions as compared with that used by business
divisions.
The 39,627.58 credit to posts under the heading of civil government
includes a monthly collection from the United States Post Office De-
partment for handling mails at the Isthmus, and a charge of $200
per month against the Republic of Panama.
The $7,000 credit to schools is for tuition charged non-residents
and for receipts from the sale of school books, penalties for mutila-
tion, etc.
The earnings under police and prisons, amounting to $52,600,
represent the salaries of policemen carried on Panama Canal rolls
but charged to the Panama Railroad, etc.
Under the health department, the earnings at the Ancon and Colon
Hospitals amount to $370,000, which are for hospital fees at fixed
rates, including operations and private rooms, for subsistence of
patients, burial expenses, etc.
The $15,000 credit to dispensaries represents the proceeds from
the sale of prescribed drugs and medicines.
The $125,000 revenue credited to Corozal farm and asylum is
made up of a charge of $90,000 against the Panaman Government
for its patients there and $35,000 from the sale of produce from the
farm operated by employees injured in the service of the canal.
The $29,000 credit to quarantine service is made up of $14,000
charged for the subsistence of those quarantined, and $15,000 for
other miscellaneous services, such as transportation to and from
quarantine stations, medical attention, etc.
The gross cost of sanitation, street cleaning, and garbage disposal
in the cities of Panama and Colon *as reduced by an earning of $85,000
collected from the Republic of Panama. The 847,000 credit to
Zone sanitation represents charges against the Panama Railroad
and other interests of the Zone for garbage disposal and other sanitary
measures.






REPORT UF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


The $180,000 credited to storehouse operating costs represents the
proportion chargeable to material and supplies sold and used by the
business divisions of The Panama Canal.
Under the heading of public buildings and grounds, superintendence
includes the salaries and office expenses of the chief quartermaster
and the $40,001) credit shown against this expense represents the
proportion chargeable to the Panama Railroad for supervision over
commissaries and other railroad units and a charge to the various
business divisions. The other four items under this heading repre-
sent the operations of the district quartermasters, and the earnings
applied against the gross expense are collections from employees and
others for quartermasters' service performed.
The earnings in the marine division are self-explanatory. The
credits allowed the port captains were for miscellaneous services of
the marine division. IHandling lines includes the handling of lines
at the terminals aw well as through the locks. The revenue derived
from handling lines on northbound ships through the canal is credited
to Balboa, and t-he collections for handling lines on southbound
vessels are credited to (ristobal.
Table No. 25-(amnal re'enu.n -.-This table shows a comparison of
the amount deposited in the treasury as miscellaneous receipts for
the two fiscal years 1923 and 1924. It sets forth the remarkable
increase in tolls, approximately $6,800,000, over the previous year.
The item of proceeds from the sale of Government property repre-
sents the net amount received from the sale of the S. S. Colon, which
is explained in detail under Table No. 18. The miscellaneous item
in the fiscal year 1924. amounting to $1,822.05, is made up of two
items-pay car averages, $1.32, and the escheatment of the estate
of Chas. Sackett, amounting to 81,820.73, for which no heirs could
be located. Taxes, fees and fines include 520,000 collected by the
magistrates' courts, $8,400 by the district courts, approximately
$2,400 for fees and fines imposed by the police department impound-
ing animals, etc.. and 235,000 for motor vehicle and other licenses.
Table No. 26-BRluinsSR expen-se.s a ld rev'en ues.q-This table embodies
the business operations (of The Panama Canal as separate and distinct
from the operation and maintenance activities directly connected
with the transiting of vessels. These auxiliary enterprises are
financed by authority of the Panama Cunal act, which provided for
the repayment to the appropriation of all revenues derived from
business activities, with the provision that any profit made on such
business be covered into the Treasury annually as Miscellaneous
Receipts.
In actual practice, this authority in the act means that The Panama
Canal is authorized to use the funds appropriated for transiting
",i i; X" i j : " ;r.":I






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


vessels, as a working fund to carry on these business activities,,lWith
the provision that it be collected back and made available as, fIas
as it is needed for the purpose for which it was appropriated. iu. u'i
The electric light and power system involves the operation of the
Gatun hydroelectric plant, Miraflores steam electric power plants
operation of five substations, maintenance of transmission lines, land
the distribution of current and power, the details of which are foun4
in Table No. 32. The revenues are derived from the sale of current'
and power. The basic rate for electric current to departments and
divisions of The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad, and -other
departments of Government, and employees, is 1l cents per kilor
watt-hour. The basic rate to outsiders is 4 cents per kilowatt-hour.
The expenses increased considerably over last year, while the reve-
nues are less. Last year the revenues exceeded the expenses. by
$355,221.31. This year the profit was $214,550.79. which is. still
$20,000 in excess of a 3 per cent return on the investment.
Under the heading of electrical work, this division completed,
during the past year, the wiring of the Gamboa penitentiary, in-
stalled the necessary ducts and cables for a new pumping station
at the Darien radio station, installed the cables and equipment for
the emergency water pumping station in Miraflores Lake, installed
electric equipment aboard the new floating relay pump station of
the dredging division, performed considerable electrical work on
ocean going vessels. The working force, as well as material and
supplies, are interchangeable between the electric .light and power
system and electrical work, and the loss shown under this head is
due more to clerical methods than to actual difference between
costs and bills rendered for same.
The water system involves the operation of five principal pump
stations, filtration plants, maintenance of reservoirs and pipe line
for the distribution of the water throughout the Canal Zone and
into the cities of Colon and Panama and the various Army posts.
The details of these operations are shown in Table No. 33. The
revenues represent proceeds from the sale of water. The basic rate
for departments and divisions of The Panama Canal, Panama Rail-
road, and United States Government and employees was 15 cents
per thousand gallons. The basic rate for outsiders, including water
delivered to vessels using the canal, is 50 cents per thousand gallons.
Over 40,000,000 gallons were delivered to vessels at Balboa. and
85,000,000 to vessels at Cristobal. The net revenues of a little
over $43,000 do not cover 3 per cent on the investment, because
under authority of the Secretary of War this system is not givefi
credit for the value of water and water equipment supplied for -fire
protection. Last year that item, approximating $50,000, was ored&
ited to the water system to the debit of water used for municipal





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


purposes in Table No. 24. Nothing is gained, however, by using
appropriated funds under maintenance and operation to produce
a profit to be covered in as miscellaneous receipts.
Municipal engineering work, which involved the expenditure of
$624,000, includes the operation of the Cristobal incinerator and
considerable work for the Army, Navy, Panama Railroad, and
Panaman Government. in addition to excavation, filling, and con-
crete work for the various departments and divisions of The Panama
Canal which is billed out on the basis of cost plus surcharge to cover
overhead and return on the investment.
The shops and dry docks did a business of almost $3,000,000
during the year, with a net profit of $171,737.06 compared with
$100,184.33 last year. The operating expenses included an arbi-
trary reserve charge of $60,000 to replace roofs on the shop build-
ings, and a reserve of 8$40,000 for the replacement of machinery and
tools. This is money set aside out of net revenues and has the
effect of reducing the profits by $100,000. The direct profit on dry
dock operations was approximately $70,000. Included in this
account, of course: ure the operations of the Panama Railroad round-
house and car shops which involve the maintenance of all Panama
Railroad rolling stock. The remainder of the profit was made in
the foundries, gas production plant, rolling mill, boiler shop, fitting
and forge shops, etc.
Under the heading of docks, piers, and wharves the revenues
are from wharfage charged vessels at Pier 6, Cristobal, and Pier
18, Balboa, both of which are owned by The Panama Canal but
operated by the Panama Railroad.
The revenues from pumping fuel oil exceed the expenses by S250,-
000. The basic rate for pumping fuel oil into tanks and from tanks
to vessels is 4 cents per pumping, which means that The Panama
Canal receives S rents per barrel for all the fuel oil handled at the
Isthmus. Several years ago The Panama Canal was in competition
with the other oil companies for supplying oil and large profits were
made from the sale of oil. At present, however, The Panama ('anal
has no oil for sale to outsiders and fixes its prices so that it. ceases
to compete with the other oil companies who have tanks here and
carry supplies of oil for sale to transiting vessels. The storage ca-
pacity at Balboa, including The Panama Canal tanks, is approxi-
mately 800,000 barrels, and at Mount Hope somewhat over 1,000,000
barrels. During the year approximately 14,000,000 barrels were
pumped in and out. hy tlhe oil-pumping plants at Balboa and Mount
Hope.
The figures under the heading of business storehouses represent
the value of material and supplies issued to business divisions of
The Pananma Canal. icgether with the material sold and the store-





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


house expenses chargeable to that material. On material iss9eed
to departments and divisions and all those entitled to Panama Canal
rates, a surcharge of 10 per cent is added to cover purchase, handling,.
and storing expenses, and on sales to outsiders 25 per cent is added.
The storehouses are primarily operated to carry stocks of material
and supplies for the divisions necessary to the transiting of vessels,.
and therefore all the operating expenses are included in Table
No. 24 and in that account credit is given for the proportion charge,
able to material and supplies used in business activities.
The animal and motor transportation, motor car repair shop,
building repairs and construction, and district quartermasters' sup-
plies and services in this table, to some extent, work hand in hand,
so that profits and losses from these operations to some extent are
theoretical. The animal and motor transportation assumes the
cost of repairs, operation, and maintenance of motor cars and de-
rives its revenue by charging for the use of these cars on an hourly
basis. The district quartermasters in turn are debitedl for the use
of motor cars and, after adding utility services, derive their revenue
from employees and others for delivering coal and kindling, handling
household goods and baggage, etc. The building repair and con-
struction division does considerable work on furniture for the dis-
trict quartermasters and the district quartermasters in turn receive
revenue for those services from employees and others who receive
the furniture. The charges in these cases are more or less arbitrary,
so that the loss of approximately $29,000 under district quartermas-
ters' supplies and services is more than offset by the revenues shown
under the other three units mentioned.
The Panama Canal Press did a business amounting to $260,000,
approximately $150,000 of which was derived from the manufactur-
ing output and the balance from issues and sales of stationery and
office supplies. In addition to showing a profit, of $4,373.05 this
year, this unit also set. aside the sum of $5,000 out of the revenues
for the replacement of printing presses.
The rent collections for gold quarters were approximately $375,000
and exceeded the operation and maintenance expenses by $13,000.
By authority of the Secretary of War, that part of the house rent
charge which was intended as amortization and interest on the invest-
ment has been used to erect some new quarters and for painting and
general overhaul of the old quarters occupied. Fifteen type 17
cottages are under construction in New Cristobal.
The amount collected from occupants of silver quarters was $241,-,
746.21, compared with $192,355.40 last year. The cost of operating
and maintaining these silver quarters was $79,668.86 in excess of the
collections. This deficit is charged off as a canal expense murder the






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


heading of maintenance of laborers' quarters in Table No. 24, the
reasons for which are explained under that heading.
The $500 loss shown under the heading of garage rentals is due to
the fact that during the past year the garages required extensive
painting and door renewals. These garages are maintained for the
benefit of employees' private cars and the monthly rental rates are
fixed to cover cost only.
Under the heading of land rentals, the rents collected, amounting to
$32,954.84, are $1,S60.83 short of the expenses charged to this account.
This is due to the fact that the entire expense of the agronomist has
been charged against these rentals. In this amount are included the
rentals from agricultural licenses issued in connection with the re-
population of the Zone for farming purposes, which during the fiscal
year 1924 amounted to $5,000, representing rent on ground in excess
of that allowed free prior to July 1, 1924. The .rent which will be
collected from these farmers during the fiscal year 1925 will be
approximately $30,000; in other words, an increase of about $25,000
in the revenues. There are 2,562 such licenses in effect. A state-
ment by districts is shown in Table No. 54.
Under the heading of sale of government property is included the
sale of the dredge Culebra for $250,000.
The total revenues from these business operations were approxi-
mately $13,000,000 and tho profits $901,624.12 as compared with
$1,140,642.50 last fiscal year.
Table No. 27-Surplus.-Attention is directed to the remarkable
increase of surplus from $13.467,641.19 in the fiscal year 1923 to
$29,775,589.69 in the fiscal year 1924. The total profits from busi-
ness operations from 1914 to (late are 83,465,835.32.
Table No. 28-Collectionms from gold employees.-This table shows
collections by months from employees for rent and other supplies and
services, a large part of which were formerly furnished free. The
total amount collected from employees was $623,162.26.
Table No. 29-Depreciation.-The total amount charged into the
accounts as depreciation is now $4,612,299.52. Of this amount,
$910,673.40 is theoretical depreciation of canal property and( $211,-
122.02 is theoretical interest on the depreciation fund. Removing
these two items from the total above leaves $3,490,504.10 as tlhe
amount of money which is actually in reserve for the replacement
of equipment and property, th(lie details of which are shown in this
table.
Table No. 30-ReveNrir nr c .draordiniary repairs.-This reserve was
increased by approximately $175,000. The total amount of cush
now actually available for general overhauling of and extraordinary
repairs to property and equipment is $1,414,523.71.






rikP'6BT'6V 66EiRk6R cFIi" it Pil4A iA 'dtAl L


r' ae N6' lieserve for gratuifty .- he amount 6f cwsh in i'rPt4d
for vacation pay iue the 'employees of thed four principal btMigbif
divisions' apd'the frtifiedt.ioris division is $492,644.57, an iLicfe'ed of
ap''jlinatbly70,006 'o+er the amount in reserve last year. 1TMh
is money 'Actallry collected by the business divisions through BiI
rendeibd' for services performed and thereby 'made available fou' t't
payment of gratuity when the employees go on leave and to futriiiH
replace labor.
Table No. 32-Electric current.-This table has been change.
Last year the unit cost per kilowatt hour was shown as $0.00,
which has now been increased to $0.0087 by including in the cost thb
division and general expenses. This figure does still not include a
charge for the return on the investment. The unit eost for the fiscal
year 1924 was $0.0107 on a production of 47,786,682 kilowatt houts.
Table No. S3- Water.-This table has been entirely changed front
the form in which it was shown last year, so as to show the average
cost of producing and distributing water on the basis of 1,000 gallons;
and also showing a separation of the cost of furnishing water to the
Republic of Panama and that distributed in the Canal Zone. The
unit cost in the Canal Zone is 12.09 cents. The basic price for water
in the Canal Zone was reduced from 15 cents per thousand gallons to
13 cents, effective July 1, 1924.
Table No. 34-Dredging.-This table has been entirely changed so
as to obtain a better unit yardage cost for dredging, listing the
various expenses in dipper dredge operations separate from the
suction dredges, and then a combined cost and yardage unit which is
approximately 40 cents per cubic yard.
Tables Nos. 35 and 36- Money orders.-The amount of money-
order business done by the post offices during the fiscal year 1924 was
approximately $2,500,000.
Tables Nos. 87 and 38-Postal service revenues.-The revenue from
money-order fees, stamp sales, post-office box rents, and newspaper '
postage was $120,411.47. The interest on money-order funds on
deposit amounted to $22,397.25.
Table No. 39-Postal savings.-Postal savings money orders were
issued to the amount of $738,940. The amount paid was $722,510.
The amount on deposit at the end of the year was $486,980.
Tables Nos. 40 to j43, inclusive-Panama Canal clubhouses.-Table
No. 40 shows in detail the income from clubhouse operations, amound-
ing to $455,118.77. Table No. 41 shows the expenses of operating
the clubhouses, 5442,390.25. Table No. 43 shows the current assets
and liabilities, the stock of material on hand amounting to $23,598.03;
and the accounts receivable, $10,965.25. Against this there were
bills payable at the end of the year amounting to 831,026.80. The






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


surplus to date, which is kept in the collector's office, amounted to
$166,670.33.
Table No. 44'--Coupon books.-The total value of coupon books
issued to employees and deducted from their salaries amounted to
$3,209,205, and the value of books sold for cash, $1,333,530. In
addition to these, books were issued on charge accounts to the extent
of $81,545, making a grand total of $4,624,280. The value of coupons
used by employees was $4,638,009.25, of which amount $4,244,624.35
was used at commissaries in exchange for goods, $134,947.65 at club-
houses, $246,696.17 at restaurants, and the balance at the Hotels
Tivoli and Washington, at the Army and Navy Y. M. C. A.'s, etc.
Tables Nos. 4.5 to 51, inclusive-Personal injuries.-The contents of
these tables are explained in connection with the claims burean
report.
Table No. 52-Conmmissary purchases and sales.-This table shows
a comparison of the various kinds of commissary supplies on hand at
the end of the fiscal years 1923 and 1924; also the purchases and
place purchased and the details of the sales. The value of goods
purchased was slightly in excess of $5,000,000 and the proceeds from
the sale of supplies at wholesale and retail prices combined amounted
to $7,324,203.76. The profits from all commissary operations,
including these sales and the net results from the various manufac-
turing plants, were $409,248.86.
Table No. 53.-This table shows the collections from other than
employees for rent for Panama Canal quarters occupied and the
corresponding charges for electric current, water, and janitor service
in those quarters, amounting to $60,000.
Table No. 54.-This table shows the monthly collections of Panama
Railroad real estate rentals and Panama Canal market stall rentals,
Panama Railroad land rentals amounting to $153,455.02.
Tables Nos. 55 and 55a.-These tables show by months the accounts
payable vouchers registered. The total Panama Railroad vouchers for
the year was $3,758,472.75, and The Panama Canal vouchers amounted
to $4,157,276.63. Of this amount, 32,615,824.52 was payable from
trust funds and $1,541,452.11 from appropriations.
Table No. 56.-This table shows a tabulation of inspections made
by the time inspection bureau.
Table No. .7.-This table shows the number of available silver
quarters by apartments and the rental value of same.
Table No. 5S.-This is a tabulation of the work performed by the
pay-roll section of the claims bureau.







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 1.-Balance sheets, June 80, 1924

TRIAL BALANCE SHEET


DLBITS
A sets:
Canal fixed property.......... $235 684,662.00
Canal equipment----------...........---. 4.017,64244
Cash due treasury ............. 209, 675.87
Cash working-................. 1,131, 188. 67
Accounts receivable-......... 952, 207.71
Business property............ 29, 136, 620.07
Stores ................ ..... . 3. 470, 877. Iir
United States Treasury....... 42.823,230.88
Theoretical interest accruals... 213,967. 43
National defense expenditures. 112,618, 082. 12
Undistributed business capital
(credit account) ............. 1. 813,000.00
Canal expenses................ 11, 170,800. 51
Business expenses............. 12.067, 153. 17
Canal earnings (credit ac-
count) I. .................... 2, 796, 895. 12

Total.--...................... 448,916,212.93


CREDITS
Liabilities:
Canal transit and business
capital.................-... $273, 673, 818.6
National defense capital... -... 112,618.082.12
Accounts payable.......--------..----. 1, 330, 640.04
Unclassified canal credits......- 873.48:
Amortization................. 1, 082, 845.41
Depreciation...---............... 4, 612. 299. 52
Repair reserves--...-------...--.......--- 1.414. 525. 71
Gratuity reserves.............. 492, 644. 57
Canal revenues.............. 24. 681, 853.89
Business revenues............ 12. 12 968, 777.29
Canal surplus................ 13,467,641.19
Business surplus-.............. 2,564, 211.20

Total........................ 448.916,212.93


Assets.
Canal fixed property........
Canal equipment..........
Cash due treasury...........
Cash working...............
A accounts receivable.........
Business property.........
Stores........................
L'nited States Treasury......
Theoretical interest accruals..
National defense expenditures
U distributed business capital
(credit account) '...........


GENERAL BALANCE SHEET

Liabilities.
.$235,684,66200 Canal transit and business
4,017,642.46 capital.................
209,675. 87 National defense capital.......
1, 131, 188.67 Accounts payable. --.........-
952. 207. 71 Unclassified canal credits......
- 29, 136, 620.07 i Amortization..................
3,470.877. 16 Depreciation.--................
42.823, 230. 88 Repair reserves..............
243.967.43 Gratuity reserves..............
. 112,618,082. 12 Canal surplus......- ...........
il Business surplus...........


1.813,000.00


Total........................ 428. 175,154.37
IA credit


T otal.......................


$273.673,818.51
112, 618, 082. 12
1,330, 640. 04
8,873.48
1.082.845.41
4, 612, 299.52
1,414,525.71
492 644.57
29, 775, 589. 69
3,465,835.32

428,475,154. 37


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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


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REPORT OP GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 3.-Statement of appropriations by the Congress


Canal construction appropriation to June 30, 1923........................................
An act to provide for the construction of a canal connect ing the waters
of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. approved June 24, 1902-......... $50000. 000.00
An act to provide for the temporary government of the Canal Zone at
Panama, the protection of the canal works, and for other purposes,
approved Apr. 2S, 1904........................................ .... 10. (00.00.00
Deficiency act, Apr. 27. 1904........................................... 35.00
Public act. Dec. 21, 1905.............................................. 11.o000,o000.0
Deiciency act, Feb. 27. 1906................. ....................... 5. 990. 786. 00
Sundry civil act, June 30, 1906......... .............................. 25. 456, 415. 0'
Sundry civil act, M ar. 4, 1907......................................... 27, 101.367.50S
Deficiency act, Feb. 15, 1908......................... ........... ....... 12, 178.100.00
Sundry civil act, May 27, 1908....... ................................. 29. 187. 00. 00
Deficiency act, Mar. 4, 1909................................. ....... 5.458.000 00
Sundry civil act. M ir. 4, 1909.................................. .............3...... 3. M38, 000. 00
Sundry civil act. June 25, 1910.......... ....... ..... ................... 37. 855, 000. 00
Deficiency act, Feb. 25. 1910......................................... 76. 000. 00
Private act. June 17. 1910-Elizabeth 0. Martin..................... 1.2.00.0
Sundry civil act, Mar. 4, 1911-.................... ...........-..... 4-;. 560.000. 00
Private Act 174, Jan. 13, 1911-Marcellus Troxcll .................. . 1.500 01
Private Act 1911, Feb. 13, 1911-W. L. Miles................. 1,704. IR
Private Act 248, Mar. 2, 1911-Charles A. Caswell.................... 1,056. 00
Sundry civil act, Aug. 24, 1912................................... .. 28,980,000.00
Private Act 32, July 3, 1912-Heirs of Robert S. Gill ............ ..... 2, 520. 00
Private Act 34. July 3, 1912-Douglas B. Thompson......................... 1.500.00
Private Act 56, July 10. 1912-Alessandro Comba...................... 500.00
Act Aug. 26, 1912. Judgment, Court of Claims........................... 196.45-
Sundry civil act. June 23, 1913.............. ............................. 16. 2 SI, 393. 00
Private Act 125, Feb. 7, 1913:
Peter Wiggington.......................................... .. 0 .iOO. 00
Raymond R. Ridenour.......................................... .500.00
Heirs of Charles E. Stump.................. ................. 1. l00.o00
Private acts of Feb. 18, 1913:
Parents of Edward Maher...................................... 1.980. 00
Oscar F. Lackey................................................ 1.500.01)
Pedro Sanchez...................................................................... 2.000. 00
John H. Cole.. .................... ...... ..... ......... ........ 1,951.33
Robert Coggon.................. ............................ .. ....... 1.500.00
Act Mar. 4, 1913, judgment, Court of Claims........................... 900.00
Act Apr. 6, 1914, judgment. United States court ...................... 9.489.76
Sundry civil act, Aug. 1, 1914........................................ 20.718,000 00
Deficiency act. Apr. 6, 1914............ ........ ......................... ,. 450.000 00
Public Act 18S, Aug. 25, 1914, presenting ste.im launch Louier to French
Government .......................... .... .................. .... 1. 000. 00
Private Act 6t., July 17, 1914-Mary E. Goodley.............. .. ..... 1.000. 00
Act July 29. 1914, judgment. Court of Claims.......................... 905. 3:i
Sundry civil act Mar. 3, 1915................. ....... ............... .100. 000. 00
Private Act 195. Feb. 27, 1915-John Burrows................ ... ... I 4. 3.1
Private Act 220, Mar. 3, 1915-F. \N'. Theodore Schrcwter........ ..... 1.397. r.
Private Act 222, Mar. 3, 1915-L. V'. Thomas............. ......... 1. 80. 00
Sundry civil act July 1, 1916..................... ....... ......... ... 750.000 0i
Private Act 66, Aug. 4, 1916-Joseph A. Buckholilt.................... 1. 001 00
Private Act 85, Aug 8. 1910-Olaf Nelson............................. 1.i2)l.1t1
Act Feb. 28, 19116, judgment, Court of Claim'......................... 1.09). 00
Act Sept. 8, 1916. ................. ....... ....................... 537. 21)
Sundry civil act, June 12, 1917................... ................. 2.755.,000.11)
Deficiency a *t for war expenses. Mar. 28, 1918............... ..... 5 a93. 190. IYI
Sundry civil act, July 19. 1919----------............-------------------------...... 72 H,89KS.00
Deficiency act, Mar.1, 1921............................................ 714,007.39
Less amounts returned to surplus fund fiscal year 1921-
Panama Canal fund.....-----------------------------------................. 130. 2.
Canal connecting Atlantic and Pacific Oceans..................... 27. 989.6 e


$387, O59.143.31


Total to surplus fund...................... ..------------------------------.. ........... 1, 2.31
Canal construction appropriation to June 30. 1924-...-.............. ....... ... 341. 910. 301. 00
*








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 'lI


Annual payments to Republic of Panama-------------....................---........-----.---.----.----------- $3,250,000. 00
Act of-
Mar. 4, 1913.................................................... ....--- $250,000.00
Apr. 6, 1914 ........................................................... 250,000.00
Jan. 25, 1915........................................................... 2,50,000.00
Feb. 28, 1916 .......................................................... 250,000.00
July 1, 1916................ ............... ......................-- 250,000.00
%M ar. 3, 1917...... ................. .. ................. 250,000.00
Apr. 15, 19ib .......................................................... 250,000.00
Apr. 15, 1919..................... ................................... 250,000.00
June 4, 192U..................................................... .. 250,000.00
M ar. 2, 1921... ..... ...... ........................................... 250,000.00
June 1, 1922.... .. ...... ............ ........................ ...---- 250,000.00
Jan. S, 1923....... .. .... ... ... .............................. 25 0,00.00
M ay 2 Iv24............ ......................................... 250,000.00

Operation .ind mainienance detailedd helowi.............................---..--....-- 73,086,901. 58
Total .appropr t ions................... ................... ... .... ... .............. 4 3,247,202 58

Civil Increase of
M ntenance .3nitation, i Government, compen-
und operation Canal Zone Panalmand ain. Tt
Canal Zone Canal


Act of-
Mar. 3, 1915 .................. -5,. 200,000. 00 $700, 000. 00 $540. 000 00 ----------- $6,440,000.00
July 1, 1916 ..... .. .. .. ... 750. 000. 00 700. 000. 00 600, 0000 ............ 7--------- 0., 000. 00
June 13, 1917 .... ........ .. 000, 00 7 00,00 7 000. 0000 ............ 10,400,000.00
July 12, 191 ................ . .... . .. ... 10 006.22 10,000.22
June 4, lhlb ......... 1.50.000.00.... .O .............. ..... 150,000.00
July 1. 19l.................... UOO, 000, 0 000. 00 .00 00 000.0 ............ 10.650,000.00
July 3, 191n.................... 16,000.00 16,000.00
M ar. 1,1919 .......... ... ... ............. ............ 32, 592.66 32.592.66
July 19, 1919............. 47,939.00 50. .00 702,000.00 ........... 9,09, 939. 00
Nov. 4, 1919 ............... .......... .... ....... 150,000.00 .......... .. 150,000.00
M ay 29, 1920............ ............ ....... .... .... .... -... 4, ,AO. O i 34,500.00
June 5, 1920 ................ 7,5.11, .. u I ). 000.00 900,000.00 ---- P, 51. 00
M ar. 1, 1921 ........ . .. ... . I ...... ... 24.670.00 .. .....- . 24. 670.
M ar. 4 lu21 ..........., 2.., 000. 5, U 900,000.00 1 50.00 01, 500. U
June 30, 1922 .......... ...... 2. rSY. 434. 00 525, 000. 00 1130, 000. OU 16, 00. 00 I 4,131,234.00
Mar. 2, 1923 .... ........ . .. 079.63 00 575,000. 00 930,000.00 17 5'0. 00 I 6602,203. 00
59. 01. 10)7. 00 8, ,800, 0 0 00 7, 126,670.00 148, 9ib. 8 I 73. 04, 495. bW
Lrrs amount tran-ferred to surplus
fund....... ... .. .. ... ....... .. ... .... .... .. 7.594 30 7. .-4. 30
Total............. .........59. 018, W07. 00 06,800.000.00 7,126,670.00 141.324. 75, f86, 901.
. pprolination for fiscal yet'a 1925
(RCt of Junr. 7. 19241.............. 74R. 160. 00 380,000.00 912.,000.00 ......... .. .240, 160. 00


TABLE No. 4.-- tuttis of authorized bond issue

Authorized bond issue................. .. ... ------- -- ------- M$37:., 200.-000
Appropriated for Canal construction ........ .. ............-- .... $36,910, .1301 00
Less amount enempled by Inw:
Colliers Upsav and .4chille. .. ................ 1,595, 552 29
Coal barges Mamei and Darrn .............. ........ 2,295,746. 57
Dock No. 6, Cristobal.......... ................... 2,093,190.00
Equipping colliers Ulysars and Achilles ............... 250,000.00
Painting tanks, colliers i'ly.p s and .4chillf.i ......... 44,279.76
Repairs to Fteamships, Ancon and Crislobal............ 720, 000 00
Expended for operation and naintenance of Canal..... 4, 29,159.00
Stock of material and supplies for operation and mainle-
nAnce of Canal........... ........... .........-- ...... 2,225,000.00
13, 902, 927. 62
373, 007,373.38

Balance............ .................... ...-----------------.----------...... 2, 193, 526. 2
Appraised value American Legation building in the city of Panama, exempt from charge
to bond issue, act of July 1, 1916............ ........................................... -----22,56.00
Balance available for appropriation within limit of cost of canal and authorized
bond issue----................................. ............----------......... 2.215.782.








72 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

TABLE No. 5.-Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United Stales,
fiscal year ended June 30, 1924.

CASH RECEIPTS


unitedd I)ishursing Paymaster, Collector,
States Washin Canal Canal Total
Treasurer oashiDg- Zone Zone
ton. D. C.

On hand July 1, 1923, by approprin-
lions and funds:
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal.............. $8. 498. 805.79 $$20.748 10$1.433.176.17 $90. 703. 0 $10,243, 403. 06
Sanitation. Canal Zone, Panamn
Canal.......................... 268,091.15 21.941.25 173,831.43 9,532.29 473,396. 12
Civil government. Panama Canal I
and Canal Zone ............... 64.969 81 3.110 95 103,312 19 1,691.44' 173,114.39
Canal connecting Atlantic and
Pacific Oceans.................. 27.989.66 ............ ............ ............. 27,989.66
Construction and equipment, i
Panama Canal................. 272.509 97 21,249 8 ............. ............ 293.759. 83
Panama Canal fund.............. 127.940 99 2, 911 66 ............ ............ 130,852.65
Increase of compensation, 1922.... 615 65 ........... ....... .. ............. 615.65
Increase of compensation, 1923..... ............ 33.32. .. ............ 33.32
Aviation. Navy. 1922 .......... .80,003 0)............ ...................... 80,000.00
Miscellaneous receipts. United
States revenues............... .......... ........... ........ -105.994 10 405.994. 10
Security deposits................. ..... .... 90.50ti.78 2.273 05 585.679 09, 678,458.92
Total........................1 9.340 983.02 360.501 92 1.712 622 84, 1.093.599 92, 12,507,707.70
Appropriations for fiscal year 1924:
Maintenance and operate ion. Pan-
ama Canal..................... 5,079.683 00 .......... ..... ..... ............ 5,079, 683. 00
Sanitation. Canal Zone. Panama i
Canal ....................... 57.5,000 00 ............ ......... .... ............. 575,000.00
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone. ............. 930,000 00 ....................... ............. 930,000. 00
Increase of compensation, 1924
(Washington ollicel............. 17,520 00 .......... ..... ............. 17,520 00
Total........... ............ G.602.203 00 .......... ....... ... ......... 6,602,203.00
Transfers between fiscal officers:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal ..................... 88, 730 194,006. 000 00 8, 646, 107. 38 ............. 13, 540,843. 57
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal .................. ..... 53, 566 01 116.000.00, 937,024.66............. 1.106,500.69
Civil government. Panama Canal I
and Canal Zone .............. 6. 171 20 30,000.00 858,568 02 ............. 894,739.82
Panama Canal fund ..... ......... 2.911. 66 ...... .... ......... . ....... .. 2.911.66
Increase in compensation, 1923.... 31.32 ....... .. ............. 33.32
Increase in compensation. 1924................ 17. 500 00 ............ ........... 17, 500.00
Total........................ 951. 418. 404. 169.500 00 10,441. 700 66... ........ 15.562,619.06
Collections:
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal..................... 416. 192 79 329,.031.72 71 93J 7,530,573 22 8,275,869.66
Sanitation. Canal Zone, Panama |
('anal ........................ ............ 40229. 39 20.73 564,837 48 605,087.60
Civil government, Panama Canal I
and Canal Zone................ ....... ..... 6,000.00 ............. 62425 63 68425.63
Miscellaneous receipts, United I
States revenues................. ................. ... 1. 32 24, 796,206 69' 24, 706 208. 01
Security deposits........................... 412. 110 13 2.591. 774 4030,063,355. 281 33,069,239.81
Total........................... 416,192.79 7a7,371.24 2,593.868.3863.017.398.30i 66,814,830.71
Total cash debits............... 17. 310. 797. 21 5.I
Total casb debits17.310.797.21 5.317,373.16 1614 74., 191. 8864,110, 999 22 101,487, 360. 47







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 73


TABLE No. 5.-Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States,
fiscal year ended June 30, 19S4-Continued

CASH DISBURSEMENTS


l'nlcl1 Dishbusing Pavmi.scer, Collector.
slates wlrk, 'anal Canal Total
Treurerr n Zone Zone
Trenisurer ton.* D..


Covered into Unilted Stales Treas.ur\
Maintenance and operation (busi-
ness profits, 1923)........... $1, OIs1, S9 .... . . ..... $1,081, 96.
Canal connecting Atlantic andl i I
Pacific Ocenns ............ 27.. .. . .. 27, 9014 66
Panama Canil fund........ ..... 130, . . . . 130. 52.65
Increase in compensation, 1922. .. fS 5 .......... . ... . .. 5.5
Miscellaneous receipts, United
States revenues.-------------.............. .... . . . . . 32 2,'2.2412 24. 92, 2.526 24
Total---......----------------.... ....--..... 1,241. 44 .. ....... 1.32 24,992.24.92 26, 233.971 09
Transfers bet ween fiscal officers: I I
Maintenance and operation, Pan-
ama Canal ................ ..5. 50,. J iiuu 00' $S154. 35 231. 7, .M, 00o. 34 13, 40, 843 57
Sanitation. Canal Zone, Panainma I
Canal ..........................I s 51,000.0I) 5.2,31 5. 5 .... ..... 37,759 14 1,106,590.6
Civil government. Pana.na Canal
and Canal Zone................ 830,000.00| 6,001.20' . ., 73.. ,2 894,739.82
Panamna Canal fund ... . ............ ...... .. .. 2, 9 1. 9i
Incrreaseof compensation, 1923.... ........ .... 3. 32...... ... ... ... 3332
Increase of compensation. 1924 .... 17, 00 ( ............. ......... ............ 17.500. 00
Total-. .......................... R:I, '.r)o. 00 516.612 -6;............ .17;. 508. 10 11. 562,619.06
Disbursements.
Maintenance and operation. Pun-
ama Canal ...................... 33. 57. 25 4.011. 849 7 9. :354, 403. 1S'....... . 402, 610. 10
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama I
Canal.......................I 163, :C.0 .'2 111.892 MS 9482, 282.71 ...... 1, 257, 08
Civil government, Panama Canal I |
and Canal Zone ................ 86,416.3'J 29,863.A9 860,66 6.09 ------------- 976,946.46
Construction anil equipment, i 1
Panama Canal.. .... .. 110, 000 00 .. .. .. . 100.000.00
Increase of compensation, 1924.. .. .... 17,3 .64 ........................ 17,392. C4
Aviation Navy, 1922.............. (110 K) ............ ......... .............. 80,000.00
Security deposits. ............... ....... .... 41 55 4 2, J2,801.97130,210.63-4.07 33,219.028.88
Total................... ........ 43.454. 16i4. 5.1,'.591.98 13 790,153 9.5'30, 210, 634. 07 49, 53. 34. 16
On hand June 30, 1924:
Nlainlenanc and operation, Pan-
ama Canal ................... 8,262,133. '3 86, 094.92 724, 952.30 41,267.88, 9,114,448. 73
Sanitation, Canal Zone. Panama
Canal.................. 216,976. r'i 13,446.24 128,694. 11 36,610.63 395,627.64
Civil government, Panama C'anal i
and Canal Zone ................ 84,724. 2 3,245 77 101,244.72 5,378.4.5 194,593.50
Construction and equipment, i
Panama Canal......... ......1 172, U7 21,249 86 .. .. ..... .......... 193. 7. 83
Increase of compenr salion. 19 .... 3 ........ ..... ....... .... ... .. 33 32
Increase of compensation, 1924....' 2U0 WO 107. 311.. . .. .. . . . . .. . . 12. 3
Miscellaneous receipts, wilted
States revenues........................ .................. .201,675. h 209, 67 87
Security deposits................. ....... .... .. b7.024.07 3,245. 4n 43$, 4PI( .1i0 521, 66,9.85
Total......................... 8, 736. 39m. 20' 211. 116N 22 M9.8, I ll 731, 133. 131 10, I.3f., 9,. 16
Total cash credits............... 17,310. 797 21 5, 317, 373 11. I. 74k, 191. K 64i, 110. WSef. 22 101. 487. 360 47








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA qANAL


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76 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 8.-Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to indi-
viduals and companies, and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts during
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1924


Maintenance and operation:
Commissary coupons honored by
The Panama Canal............
Electric light and power system
(unclassified)..................
Electric work (unclassified)......
Telephone and telegraph work
(unclassified).................
Water system (unclassified).....
Municipal engineering work (un-
classified)......................
Public works, Panama, unclassi-
fled credits....................
Public works, Colon, unclassified
credits......................
Shops and dry docks (unclassi-
fied)..--........-----.........-------
Hotel Tivoli (unclassified)...-.-.
Lands rented (unclassified)......
Fortification division (unclassi-
fied)..........................
Price differences -.........--.-..-
Claims versus carriers and con-
tractors........................
Surplus and obsolete property for
sale...-.....------. .......--------..-----
Accounting office (unclassified)..
Office engineer (unclassified).....
Surveys (unclassified) ...........
General storehouse fixed prop-
erty......-.....-- ..-........-
Supply department (unclassified)
Marine division, subsistence, etc.
Atlantic locks (unclassified).....
Dredging division, subsistence,
etc.................-------......---
General accounts, sale of Govern-
ment property, etc............
Recruiting and repatriating em-
ployees..--------------.......--..-..---....
Executive office..............
Cables and radiograms.........
Canal record...................
Railroad motor cars.............
Clubs and playgrounds..........
Accounting office--................
Lost metal checks...............
Paymaster's office..............
Collector's office--................----
Safety deposit box rentals.......
Office egnineer services........
Sales of prints-...................
.Meteorology and hydrography
division services...............
Survey section servire.s.........
Balboa storehouse services....---
Cristohal storehouse services.....
Supply department office services
District quartermaster, Balboa. -
District quartermaster, Pedro
Miguel...............-----...
District quartermaster, Gatun...
District quartermaster, Cristobal


$3,151.39

33.61
93.81

34.64
25.69

7.16

163,465.24

48,279.14

39. 23
51.23
2. 12

8.90
500.00

420.05

4,865.00
1.19
12.79
1.20

112.55
&60
6,825.90
7.77

18,377.71

402,010.94

2, 583. 73
61,661. 19
2,48.44
24.06
207.97
63, 727. 39
135,326.64
408.00
17, 276.00
20,079. 00
562.50
4,364.22
2,483.12

67.30
1.332.98
1,439. 55
323.02
8,594.37
9, 232.37

11, 755. 65
6, 269. 07
2,795.71


Maintenance and operation-Continued.
Port captain, Balboa............ $1,157.09
Port captain, Cristobal..---------........ 736. 18
Admeasurement of vessels......--- 3,'225.00
Inspection of vessels-............. 2,987.80
Pilotage, Balboa-------------..............-- 89,417.53
Pilotage, Cristobal--.......--....... 171, 277.00
Tugs and launches, Balboa...... 165, 696.42
Tugs and launches, Cristobal... 202,0 942.16
Handling lines, Balboa........-------.. 95,468.91
Handling lines, Cristobal...-..-- 99,222.00
Aids to navigation............... 92,567.23
Gatun Locks...----------......--..------. 187.06
Pedro Miguel Locks............. 65. 00
Miraflores Locks...........--.. .51
Gatun Dam....--------...--....------...--. 478.65
Dredging division.--............. 11,697.58
Reserve for repairs, clubs and
playgrounds....----------.............. ---------285. 16
Reserve for repairs, hotel Aspin-
wall fixed property......-...... 1,850. 00
Electric current--..------------.............--. 302, 438 84
Electric work.............----------....... --------52,960.09
Telephone and telegraph work..- 214,523.72
Sales of water.......------....--..--------278,671.29
Municipal engineering work..... 169, 813.93
Shop work.......---------....--.......... ----------1,423,055. 35
Dry dockage, Balboa............ 92,900.35
Dry dockage, Cristobal.......... 14,673.10
Dockage and wharfage..-----......----- 94,893.79
Handling fuel oil-.......------------........ 488,959.50
Fuel oil sales.....-------.....-----------...- 40.485.57
Fuel oil tank rentals.....-....... 8,063. 06
Business store sales.............. 897, 352.76
Animal and motor transportation 123, 034. 19
Motor car repair shop-------......---- 20,806.81
Building repairs and construction 258, 290 66
Panama Canal Press------------......... 87,775.10
Gold quarters, rentals---------.......... 359,674.84
Silver quarters, rentals.......... 191, 346. 00
Oarage rentals............------------------....... 17, 451.58
Boathouse rentals---------.............. 39. 15
Sale of fuel----....--------...---------............. 25, 628.69
Sale of gasoline........-......... 57,097.75
Sale of general supplies.......... 3,456.03
Exchange of furniture----.....------..... 11,644.79
Mattress factory.............-... 17,165.94
Janitor service................... 22, 824. 25
Hotel TIVoli..................... 163, 816. 77
Restaurants ..................... 7,570.00
Hotel Aspinwall-................. 550.00
Building rentals................. 11,520.24
Landl rcntnls- .................... 32, 111. 17
Fquipment rentals-.............. 26. 30
NM arker rentals-................. 2,346.91
Sand and gravel-................. 7,884. 50
Sales of Government property... 7,439S 61
Sutils of nautical charts and pulp-
lications ...................... 2, 385. 75
Fort ification division............ 78.710. 13
Total, maintenance and oper-
ation..-..................... 7,530,573. 22








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 8.-Stante n.n' of cUle-liont repaid to appropriations a I to indi-
viduals and cormpani.e., ail i collections depsitel to mi sccllaneowis receipts during
the fiscal year nrer,' Jiinn *109. .19S4-Continued


Sanitation:
Health certicfiati. ... .....
Health department rerund 4of
vacation pay) ................
General accounts................
Chief health office............. .
Ancon Hospital fes .. ... .
Ancon Hospital mess...........
Ancon Hospitil burials..........
Ancon Hospital miscellaneous...
Colon Hospital fees..............
Colon Hospital mess...---......
Colon Hospital burials.........
Line dispensaries,..... .. ..
Corozal farm produeet....... ....
Corozal farm pasturage...... .
Corozal Asylum feesp............
Corozal Asylum miscellaneous...
Palo Seco Leper Asylum.... .
Santo Tomas Hospital..... ... .
Quarantine services............ .
Quarantine subsistence..........
Quarantine miscellaneous........
Sanitation, Panama............-
Street cleaning and garbage (uolle -
tion, Panama...................
Sanitation, Colon.............
Street cleaning and garbage collec-
tion, Colon...................
Sanitation. Canal Zone.........


* .22. 974.68

914.00
C, 408. 50
230.97
'(1. 406. 19
Iii, 622. 69
4,486. 35
5, 629. 78
33, 682.91
3,504. 97
706. 44
15, 055. 75
18, 802. 20
15. 10
68,453.31
2, 883.24
14, 085. 00
429.33
6.25
13,940.25
15,326.65
9, 226.26

35,133.67
2,029.41

27,463.13
15,422.45


Total, sanitation ............ 54. 837. 48


Civil government:
Civil government.--...--.......-
Civil affairs--.....-............
Customs........................
Postal service, --.-.------......
School tuition..-.....-.---------
Sales of school books.-..-----.-..-
Sales of school materials...---.
Fire protection..................
Police and prisons...............
District court-...--....-...- -
District attorney................-

Total, cih il government--.....

Miscellaneous receipts:
Public works, Panama, unclassi-
fied credits-----........----.--
P'uhlic works, Colon, unclassified
credits....................
Tolls............................
Taxes. fees, fines, Canal Zone-....
Postal receipts.....---....--.-------...
Interest on bank balances ---.---
Proceeds from Government prop-
erty.....-....-----------------
Miscellaneous...-..------. ---


$46.75
24.17
397.50
4,357.06
5,782.56
589.00
258 66
65.13
50,794 55
7.75
102.50

62.425.63




27. 891. 96

86,462.16
24,291,708.07
55,931.76
119, 388. 83
10,000.00

205,108.09
1,820.73


Total, miscellaneous receipts.. 24,798,311.60


Individuals and companies, Panama
Railroad Co.----.................-------


55.08


RECAPITULATION
Maintenance and operation, Panama Canal.---..- .....--......---.....................--- $7.530,573 22
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama (anal...... .... ............. ................... .... 564, 837.48
Civil government, Panama Canal and cnn.dl Zone.....--....... .......----..-.............--- 62,425.63

Total repayment to appropriations-... ......-.-...........................--.... 8,, 157. 836. 33
M iscellancous recepls.. . .. .. ........................................................ 24, 798,311. 60
Individuals an companies......-................---..--- .............-....-----..--- ........- 55.06

Ir and total........... .. .... ..............-....-----..- .. ........--............ 32,956,202. 99








78 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 9.-Statement of transactions in the collector's special deposit account
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1994

IN THE UNITED STATES


Month


1923
July....................................
August........................ ........
September................................. ....
October................. ..............
November................ ....................
December................................

1924
January................. .........................
February..................................
March ........... ....................
April............ ........... .............
May ...........................................
June...........................................


Payments to
Deposits Panama Canal individuals f
Deposis bills applied and Refunds
companies

--- -- --- I

$317,914.80 26,8, 195.631 $28,810.44 $7,281.70
266, 591. 17 266.53. 48 9,810.34 I 3,473.10


177,154.76
167,888. 64
203. 859. 00
208,482. 16

752,115. 58
184, 141. 19
147,421.09
160,354.63
142.479.80
130.283.43


205,284.83
151,475.71 !
177.,563.48
217,242.18 I

166,425.88
155,639.57
759.034 97
141, 121.48
144,476.24
94.816.43


18,361.37 :4,252.28
1,88&5.02 2,558.81
613.52 2,549.35
:3,249.33 4,440.33


33,112.82
4,772.24
6,247.04
4,665.51
7,901.98
4,292.90

85, 548.06


854.26
536 64
651.34
696. 72
7,207.80
3,591.67


Total-,..... ........................... 2,838,666.31 2,747.814. 88 76,270.45


ON THE ISTHMUI.


1923 I
July...... ... ............... .........
August......................... ...............
September ....................................
October.............................. .........
November ..................................
December.......................... .......
1924
January......----......-..-.....-..........-..-
February --..........- ...- ....- ---....--..-...
March.-......-----.-..........................-
April---...--.....--------.........................----------------
May---....--..----............................------------------------
June.......--....................................

Total.--...................................


$2,109,746.44
2, 100. 173. 27
2.113,280.18
2,332,287.57
2, 131,485.68
2, 702, 544. 88

2. 632, 885. 43
2, 038, 425.71
2, 276, 245. 81


$2.046, 454. 53
1.906,886 21
1,840,071.0:1
1,963,461.85
2.006. 2. 36
2.381.380.52

2, 203. 980. 25 '
1,932.050.79 i
2.024, 701. 78


$272, 362. 46
213,306.71
230,737.50
263, 027. 47
234,687.34
279,170.82

273, 194. 83
310. 173. 12
264, 531. 15


$831. 68
286.73
3,464.48
912.54
1,149.34
2,344. 20

809. 19
2, 489.28
499. 12


Z, LoY, 50u. ou 1. 9IO, n9L. O J63, .-'. 99 1, 1V3. 1I
2, 235,415.33 1,976, 696. 84 320, 990. 46 956.42
2, 272, 690. 17 1. 831, 291. 44 298, 172. 92 1,881.50

27,204,688.97 24,069,947.28 3,213,635.77 17,417.63


RECA PITUL.ATION


In the Uniled States On the Isthmus


On hand July 1, 1923............------..----.-----------..... 103, 426.04 $482,2152.45
Deposits during year........................... 2, 858, 666. 31 27, 204, MS8. 97
Panama Canal bills applied.----....---...---.......... ---------, 747, 814. 88 24, 060,947. 28
Payments to individuals and companies........ 76. 270. 45 3,213, 635.77
Refunds.....--.....--...........--.................. 85.548. 06 17,417.63
On hand June 30, 1924............................ 52.459.50 385,940.74

Total-------------.......----------------.... 2, 902. 092.95 2,962,092.95 I 68, 941.42 27,686,941.42








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 79


TABLE No. 10.-Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 92.19


Total Salaries I
______- ____________ --


Wages


Maintenance and operation
Canal transit divisionf-
Executive drljart mrnt -
E xecutiv . ......................... ....
Recor ......................... ...
Personnel . .. . . . . . . . .
C'orrPslinor en t .... ............ .
P property .. . . .... .... ...
I HnisL ticS.. .... ............... . .
G general ... .. ... .
Shipping orn riiii nn r. .. .i. .


Trr,Ll. fe tiiiive departmi

Clubs and I';l4ai priiurnd

Accounting de:irInini r -
Accounting .. ...
Pay masler
Collector.

Total, aCciiirJIinF rlelp:irtli

Office engineer. .. ...
Meteorology and h\.lrogEralphy.
Surveys

Supply depart menl -
Quartermaster-
Office. ..... ..
Ui.tridl qiuarcerLtuIvr-
't urehoues. . .

Total lumrlermra-t-1r

Marine division-
Superintendlentri o'Tiif
Port captain-
Balboa
Cristobal
I.iglithobSt sutiJivision

Total, marine division

Lock operate ion-
Alaul.. . . . .
Pacific ...... .

Total. lock orn-raion .

Gatun Dam and baLkfill .. .
Dredging division............

Total. Iransit divisions......
Canal kbluina c 1 divcis ---


rent.







llrlT


$21.Th7S.F2
7.7.31
:41. 357. 92
42, i532 Wi
:40. 4( KM3
"U, 21hb. Hi.
.384. K 1. 3%
32,. i9. 4O

:ini. 322 '30

1:12. 709 78


7l. 'T47. 31
: i,7. 92 ........

20. 3 21 ............ ...
20. 21...............

:12. 619 M i...

:l30.322 90 I . .

121.1)70 7;: $11,729 03


'.j.207 39 35., 207 39 i...........
3 97 .3 :-1 97 .......... .
. .. 41. 561. 12 4 1. 561. 12 ..............

439. 151. 49, 4:391. I.1. 48 .

iI. kii l 13. 114. 41 1 02 50
29J,1m 41 27.88I 18 I 2,034.23
:4, .'i I 2.1, 1!.,1. 06 11,377. 75



42,889.64 42,889.64 ...............
211. .i87 :42 131. 223. 24 3. 364. 68
.29.61. t 98 168,321 13 6 1. 360 85

1M7. 159. '4 1342.43. 01 144.72.5.53


11,677.69 11,677.69 ........-....

461.433. 76 20.5. 979. 03 255.454. 73
412,252.61 220. 42. 43 191.t610. 18
135.322 37 41,099.79 94,22258

. . . 1.020.6 43 47,.398 94 1 541.287 49


465.869.19 1 "1. 55 3-19. 572. 64
%4. .%17 72 175.i-13 12 40, 174. 60

: .. ,050.W 91 29f.939.67 758. 747.24

... 7.09 ..: 10. (;2:I. 20 26, 470. 13
............... 1.043. 551. 92 249.43;n.60 794.143.32

S ........ 4. f J. Kil. 2 1 2.31'J.5-11 20 I1 2. 291. 317. 22
I-- -- -


ElPetnral......... .... ... 517.91 77 203.651.50 314.240.27
Municipal engincerinp... 49W. 25. 04 191407 22 305.417 82

Mechanical division-
Balboa shops ... .... ... 1, 302.19 2'i lbl, ,ai. 17 1, 121. 253. 09
C'rislobhHl hops ...... ... 314. 13f6. 17 31,47.3 >2. 688. 84

Toral, mecharncal di in-on.. . ... 1.17555. 4 213t, 3. 50 1.403, 9j 1.93

Supply Department, Quartermater -r
Fuel-oil plants................ ...... ..... 113.241.05 29, 123 93 M, 117 12
Animal and motor Iransport.i 1rn ....... ....... 121, 0. 11,.81.74 110.223.34
Motor car repair shop........................... 64. 30'. 13 11,741.70 .52.54.43
Building repairs and construct in............... 376..01Ki .?% 77, 351 .19 2ah. 648.99
Panama Canal Press.. ..................... 69. x7. .1 2.4. 184 1H 45. 691.37
Farm bureau and lands rented ................. 13. '25. 4a4 5. Ml) 5? 7.7065 8
Hotel Tivoli............... ................. 54 ,410.57 27.71. 94 26,G18.63

Total, quartermnster......................... x.1, Iq. 20 I 17,. sW 44 62. 5111.76

Fortiflcations..................................... 61. 113.88 I 29, W51 U 31. 2t 23

Total, business divisions. ......................I 3. 50. 554. 32 I 826. 122. 31 2. 6O. 4:42 01







80 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL

TABLE No. 10.-Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 1924-
Continued


Total Salaries Wages
I- -__________
Maintenance and operation-Continued.
Injury and death (act Sept 7, 1916)................. 128. 362.94 $1. 954.66 $26, 808.28
Total, maintenance and operation............... 8. 145,768. I .1, 147. 211 17 I 4.998,557.51
Civil Oovernment
Civil aTffairs and customs........................... 38. 178. 32 ., 17.32 -----.......---..-..-----..
Posts. ........... .................. .............. 103, 16W. 10 103, 160 10 ..............
Schools............. ..................... 176, 117.51 76, 117.51 ................
Fire protection..................................... 95.42 08 I 95. 426.08 I.... ... .....
Police and prisons........ ....................... 307,079.72 307.n7U "2 1 ........ .......
D district courts....................... .............., 20,909. 11 20,909. 11 ................
D district attorney ..... ... ........................ 11.347. 4 11. 347 49 ... .....
Marshal............................... ........ 7, 455. 6 7,455. 68 ....... .........
M magistrates' courts-................................ 13,.627. 19 13, 627. 19 1................
Total, civil government .......................... 773.301. 20 773:. 01. 20 '................
Sanitation:
O ffice............................................... 12.662.11 12.662.14 ................
Ancon Hospital.................................. 327,735.01 268,987. 59 55.747.42
Colon Hospital........--.....--.......---............... 45.991.9t; :9,228.50 f,763.46
Line dispensaries................................... 36,045.76 34,765. 26 1,280.50
Corozal farm..............-........ ................. 12.855.03 3.701.25 9, 153.78
Corozal Asylum ................................. 52,898.15 40, 764. i 12, 133.97
Palo Seco Leper Asylum..... ...................... 16.937.59 6. 826.88 10, 110.71
Santo Tomas Hospital............................. 13,920.38 13,920.38 ..............
Quarantine-
O thice ......... .. ..... ........................ .. 539 0 539. ....... .. .....
Balboa................................... ...... 22,0 2 19, 760. MS 3. 325. 06
Cristobal-....................................... 23.547. 33 22,018. 3I 1,528.97
Total, quarantine................ ...... ... 46 173.04 41.319.01 1.854.03
Health Office-
Panam a.......--.............. --............... 107,711.19 14,641 55 73,069.64
Colon .......................................... 57.391.02 24.766. 24 32.624. 78
Sanitation. Zone ....................----.............. 62.542 21 20.,278.97 42,263.24
Total, sanitation................................. 792, 863. 48 541,861. 95 251.001.53
Grand total-.- .-.-.----................. 9, 711. 933. 16 4. 462. 374. .32 5, 249, 559. 04


TABLE No. 11.-Statement of accounts receivable registered during fiscal year
ended June 30, 1924


Against
Num- Againt other
ber of A iest depart- ,,,>; Repay to
Month bills Total panae ments eiam Tolls appropria-
regis- Railroad ofthe tions
tered United
States


1923
July................. 2, 9142,638,034. 71 $143.949.39 68. 589.61 $l1.,0di6. 1412. 124. 429.57 $513. 05.14
August .............. 3,055 2,588, 167.95 143,194.80 155,840.63 2W8, 450. 401 2,050. 82.12 537,485.83
September .......... 2.756 258 2.404, 211.12 151,84980 116,003.17 233. 465. 89 1. 902 82.26 501,318.86
October ............ 2.817 2,461,402.28 159.275.10 87.582.12 -25,633. 29, 1.988.911.77 472,490.51
November........... 2,803 2,805,903.44 153,387.53 370,035.63 224. 252. 671 2,058, 227. 61 747, 675. 83
December........... 3,077 3,043,653.63 192,043.01 118.705.26 397. 114.051 2.336.791.31 707,862.32
1924 | i
January............. 3.265 2,860,522.82 178.768.20 205,900.601 258.961.21 2,216,89281 643.630.01
February............ --- 2,780 3, 068.204.94 221.937.55 78, 086.61 3,998. 74 1.964 182.041,04 104, 022. 90
March.............. 2.993' 2571,034.99 223,41264i 79.972.42 270.489.90 1,997. I. 0.031 573,874.96
April.............. 2.750 2.458,68a 34 182,731.23 86,.756.57 2.. 336. 571 1.903,853.971 554,824.37
May................ 2.960 2.459,824.16 189,252.41, 83.323.96' 231,399.631 1.955. 48. 16 503.976.00
June................. 2.654 2.319,526.96 200,319.27 92,375.36, 234J.997.9l 1.792.834.42 526,692.54
Total.......... 34, 824 31. 679, 167. 34 2. 140, 120.93 1. 543, 171. 9413. 704. 116. 4. 291. 70. 07 7, 387, 459. 27
Totals for year
ended June I
30, 1023...... 31,61523,815,292. 551.803,006.311,453,813 81 3049, .7317.s 78. 7 30 813. 85
____ I_____.48.____70_[6____








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 12.-Comparative state7nent of accounts receivable


Fiscal year Fiscal year
1923 1924


Audited bills--....-----...--..------------------------.......--------------...........- $743,323. 29 $885,015.57
Hospital certificates-.........-.........-............-..........-............ 22,033.55 22,804.57
Injury compensation.-------....----------.........--------------...........-----....----.....--------1,716.81 1,798.95
Cement bags returned to contractor.......-------..----..----....--------------------......... 2,283.26 2,232.46
Water rental deficit bills --------.........-......-------------..------..--------------..........--. 17,498.68 40,356.16
Commissary coupon books honored by the Panama Canal.........------------....------..... 8.50 ..............

Total..-----...----.....---...---..--------------------------------------................................................ 786,847.09 952,207.71

1 Credit.
TABLE No. 13.-Comparative statement of accounts payable


Fiscal year Fiscal year
1923 1924


United States invoices and ocean freight.-------------................-------------................--- $313,131.45 $326,143.51
Isthmus vouchers........................................................... 181,860 60 148,374. 16
Current pay rolls...........................---------------------------------............--------..............--------.... 759,745.01 824,658.25
Unpaid salaries and wages----..--.----.-----------------........---------------................ 253,048.87 57,774.82
Drums. carboys, and reels...................-----............................ 12,072.13 1 26,760.76
Treasury settlements in suspense............................................ 992.68 450.06

Total ------------------- ------------.. -----------------............ 1,506,706. 48 I 1, 330, 640. 04

1 Debit.
TABLE No. 14.-Defense capital expenditures to June 30, 1924


Prism excavation:
Gatun to sea.--..--.. ---------..
Oatun to Pedro Miguel.........
Pedro Miguel to sea----...----.
Otiun locks..-..------..------.....-
Pedro Miguel locks..-...--.......-.
M iraflores locks. ...................
Gatun spillway............. ...
Mi iraflores spillway and east dam...-
Oatun-Mindi levve .................
OGtun dam.........................
Trinidad River dam ................
Pedro M iguel ilam .................
Miraflores west, dam................
LaBoca locks and dams (aban-
doned).... .................
Colon east breakwater-..---..-..-..-
Colon west breakwater---..........
Naos Island hreakwater..........
Aids to navigation.................
Purchase, Toru Point light.........
Floating caisson..--....-.........-.-
Power transmission system........ -
Coaling stat ion:
Balboa.......................
Crisiobal .................
Dry docks:
Balboa.................. .....
Crislou hl......................
Docks, piers, and wharves:
Balbo .......................
Cristobal .......................
Entrance basin, Balboa..........
Inner harbor:
Balboa. .....................
Crlstobal.......................


$237,482.88
2,141,358.67
388,049.34
1, 203, 953.05
638,599.30
867,655.23
99,317.86
89,133.95
2,813.01
196,462.60
1, 328. 47
8,633.66
23,195.78

748,054.48
3,771,111.74
85,506.42
20.312.78
93,388.54
15,000.00
20,872.15
10, 055. 46

2, 284, 568.35
3,179,797.59

3,376,647.49
23. 475. 51

1, 500,160.35
1,013.984.61
489,480 39

3, 265.207.04
237. 101.43


Preparatory work, Blnl bo terminals
Panama water supply system......
Ut her Zone water supply systems ..
Zone sewage system-...............-
Zone roadways-.....--.--.-........-
Fluviographs...-..----.-.---.--....-
Permanent townsite:
Ancon-Balboa...----.------....
LaBoca------...................
Red Tank...-...................
Pedro Mliguel... .... ..... ..
O alun ..................... ..
Cristobal.......................
Sanitary fills-------..........---......
Sanitary ditches..................
PInygrounds........................
Administration building, Balboa
Heights.--.......................-
District court and law department
office, A neon................
Shops and store office...............
Terniin.aloffice building. Balboa....
Shops:
Balboa.........................
C ristobnl ................... ..
Storehouse......................
Hotels and mess halls......----.....
Qurlters:
G oldl ..... ......... .......... ..
,Silver........................ .
N iscrllaneouis buildlings ...........
Ancon Hospital.......-........_ ...
Colon Hospital......-..............
Diswp nsarir s .................. ....
Asylums .................. ....
Quarantine stations................-


$1, 808, 921. 65
40. 697. 58
155,190.03
298,284.69
610,956.00
3,427.02

596, 596.73
123. 206 13
2,614.43
96,797.08
1, 776. 56
355,847.29
636,732.11
199, 706.
13,902.41

308,211.51
,
65.446.39
238,553.94
3,225.42

3, 795. 2160. 32
184,147.93
475.934.74
242. 0. 87

1, 351, 269. 07
269.85. 74
43.700. 28
435. 325. 80
IV3. A71". 90
40.303.97
128W,06.16
40, 129. 18








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 14.-Defense capital expenditures to June 0S, 1924-Continued


Storehouse, health......-.....-....
Balboa Incinerator..............
Miscellaneous buildings, beallh.....
Schoolhouses......-................
Post offices-........................
Courthouses, police, and fire sta-
tions, etc.........................
Canal construction and flooded areas
Auxiliary works and buildings......
Depopulation of Canal Zone........
Joint land commission expenses.....
Purchase from New Panama Canal
Co....-........................ .
Investment Panama R. R. stock... --


$2,547. 15
100, 000. 00
129, 824.94
49,227. 23
26, 987. 62

50,963. 50
991,707.06
14G. 258. 94
2,336, 889. 63
356, 006. 61

38, 717, 335. 97
155,818.24


Concession from Republic of Pan-
ama-----...--....--------.......----------- $10,000,000.00
Relocation of Panama R. R......... 9, 800,626.46
Presentation of launch Louise to
French Government.............. 13, 50t 00
Canal Protection, 1917-18........... 25,236.79
Equipment and property trans-
ferred to and from other depart-
ments of the Government ........ 1,970,877.33
Construction equipment............---------- 3,020,090. 65
Construction material and supplies. 2, 225,000.00
Loans to Panama R. R. Co......... 3,247,332.11


Total.--.............-........-


112,618,082.12


TABLE No. 15.-Details of canal fixed property, fiscal year 1924


July 1, 1923 Additions June 30, 1924


Channels:
Gatun to sea... ...-..-.....-.. ...---- ...- ............. $11,636.700. 00 1I ......... .. $11,636,700.00
Oarun to Pedro Miguel--------......------------........----............... 104,926, 54200 ............ 104,926,542.00
Pedro Miguel to sea............-----..................... 18032 612.00 ............ 18,032,612.00
Locks: I
Gatun..---------------............................ ..............------------------34,848, 254. 12 .... . ...... ......
Rising stem Oalves-------------------........................-------------...................... $30. 800. b 1 34,879,054.93
Pedro Miguel--------....---------------....------------- 15,.362.860. 75 ...........................
Rising stem valves...-----------------.....- --------------... .... 13,475.35 1 15,376,336.10
Miraflores----.....--....-----------------------....-------- 22,529940.29
Towing locomotives..........-----........--------..........----------... ............... 220.94 ................
Rising stem valves---------------------..... ........ 19,892. 19 22. 597, 053. 42


Spillways:
G atun...... .... ...... .................... ........ ... .
M iraflores.................-------------...........---....
Floating caisson............................................
Dams:
A lhajuela ...... ...........- ........... ........-..-..
Oatun... ..............- ...-----...... ............
Gatun-Mindi levee............------- --...--...........
Trinidad River............... ..........................
Pedro M iguel ........................................
Miraflores.... ...................................
Breakwaters:
Colon-West........................................
N aos Island ...... ............ ....................... .
Aids to navigation............... ..........................
Signal station............--.......... ... ...... ...- .....-
Roads, streets, and sidewalks..............................
Parking spaces. -....------- .----.-.--..............-----
Storm sewers.......------....-...---.---...------...------...--...
Street-lighting system .--................ .. .....------......
Lighting on Gaillard Highway......................
Office buildings:
Administration-..----.----............-----------.....--....-..--------..
Terminal office, Balboa-------------.........----........-----.....--
Storehouses ................................ ..--.........
Hydrographic structures................................
Health department buildings:
Ancon Hospital.............--...............-..
Colon Hospital............................
Dispensaries...------------.......-......---------......-----..---I
Asylums.........-..-....-- ---------------------.....---
Quarantine stations..--------------...................------------....-..--.
Other health department buildings........--............
Cristobal incinerator--------.........--------------.....----...........
Installation...........-------------------------...----
Civil government:
Schoolhouses.-------------...--- --------........ ------
Post offices.---....----..----..............----------.------------..-
Fire sat at ions..... .......... ..--------.------ ------------
Police stations and prisons...-..-- ---------- ----... -----
Courthouses.....-----...--...--.---....----------------------
Clubs and playgrounds........-------------------------

Total.-- -... ...--------------------------..


3.982, 199.00 ............ 1I 3,982,199.00
1,231,256.00 --............I 1.231,256.00
326, 996.00 ............ 326,996.00

................ 61,950.49 61,950.49
9, 626.678.00 ............ 9,626, 678. 00
137. 822.00 ............ 137,822.00
65,057.00 ............ 65,.057.00
423,070.00 ............ 423,070.00
1, 136. 594.00 ............ 1. 136,594.00


4, 189.810.00
995,337. 00
829, 251. 63

991.600.01

200,0600.00
90.490.00


918,636.00
77.409.00
300,000.00
11,772.00

1,305,975.00
191,630.00
120,910.00
128.471.49
40,129.00
58,507.00
75,000.00


443,044 00
8,995.00
21,644.00
19,870. 00
74,896. 00
114,498.00


............I

. 3. I.
3,569.18 .
. .. . . . .
11,075.76


8. 746. 44






- - -- -------- '




13,474.55




------......


235,474,456.29 210,205.71


4,189,810.00
995,337.00
-..-..---------
832,8 20. 81

1,002, 675. 77
200,000.00
..-..-.--------
99, 236.44

918,636.00
77,409.00
300.000.00
11,772.00

1,305,975.00
191,630. 00
120,910.00
128,471.49
40,129.00
58, 507.00

88 474.55

443,044.00
8,995.00
21,644.00
19, 870.00
74,896.00
114,498. 00

235, 684. 662.00








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 83


TABLE No. 16.-Detail of canal transit equipment


July 1, 1923 AddiLions d i h-s June 30. 1924


Floating equipment:
Tugs........................................... $790,213.73 ............------------ -----............--- $70,213.73
Supply boats.................................. 51,544 4K .... ........... ... 51,544 48
Laun les ................... ......... .. 171,237 64 ....... ... ........ ......... ....
Mary B., new engine................... .............. $3.450.00 -------.-------------
Helen Louise. built..................... ............ 9,365. 11 ......-...-------. --
Butler, rebuilt ............................. .............. 3,500.00 --..--.------------ - ---
Aspinwall. new engine....................------- ...........-- .. 462 76 .............------------
Lirio. sunk .................... .................. .... .2,400.37 ....-.....--- -
No. 8, surveyed foi s.il .................................. .. ..... ... 500.00 --..- .- ------
(loodwill, surveyed for sale ........... .. ....... ... ....I--.------- 6,850.00 178,265.14
Dredges ................ ..................... I 1, 424,. 666. tO ........ -------.---- ----------------
No. 83, macteryv. .. ......... ....... 11,850.00 ..--------
Culebra, sold---..------------- ----- ----- ----.. ---. 250, 000.00 1, 18, 516. 60
Barges ................... ...................... 1, 01)18, 182. 86 ............ ............
N o. 96. run ewils ....... ...... ..... . ........... 2, 00 2. .............
No. 170, renewals.................................. 2,500.00 ............ ..........
No. 103, surveyed for sale -------------- --------------- -------- 7,804.04 ..........
No. 104, surveyed for sale.... .... ..... ..........I 7,804.04
No. 10.5, surveyed for sale.................. .............. .... ....... ..7,804.04
No. 107. surveyed for sale............... ............ .......... 10,000.00 --. -------
No. 109, siu veyed for sale.................. ............--- ---- .......... 7,804.04----- --
No. 1U2, surveyed for sle ................. .....----- ----------- 7. 804. 04 -----. ------
No. 220, alijuistmnot ...................... ................. 3.. 00. .
No. 3. transferred.. ................... .............. ............ 67. 5)W 00 j65, Sli. V16
Floating cranes ..--------- ......................... 656792 15 .. ............ 656,792.45
Crane hoat------.. -.-....-- ----- 30 000. 00 .. ......... 30, 000. 00
Graders .................. ..... ............. 3. W690.30
No. 1.sunk ............... ......... ........... .. . .000 00 1 28,690.30
Drill barge...... ............................ 15,000. 00 .i 15,000.00
Compressor barge........................... 20, 4M. 00 I.............. ... .I 20,848.00
Coal hoist barge .......... .................... 2,112.00 ------------.- ------. 2,112.00
Relay pump burge-
Rebuilt from barge No. 3. 50,000.00 ------------ 50,000.00
Other equipment-
Road. rollers................... ............ 19,256.00 ... ..
No. 7, surveyed for sale ................ .............. ........... 2, i87. 00 .
No. 8. surveyed for sale............ ........... ............ 2,595.00 13,786.00
A utom obdes ............................... 1,951.23.. ............ I ..............
No. 713, transfer..--------------------------------- 700.00 ............ 2,651.23
Excavators-
No. 1, purchased...................... .............. 17,370.00 ....-----..------- 17,370 .00
Salvage section-
Machinery and tools------------------- 9,485.01 1,620.62 .....................
Depreciation applied............ ... I......... ... ........... 3,065.76 8, 039.b7
Total................................. 4, 294, 980.30 102,918.49 380,256.33 4,017,642.46









REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 17.-Business property by divisions-Continued.

U'NDISTRIBUTF.D BUSINESS CAPITAL BY DIVISIONS


Electri light and power syiosrrii...............
Electric work ................ .................
Water sy.tmcni .......... ..... .. ... ...........
NIurm ii ipal engineering work.. ....... .........
Shops andi dry 'Iorks......... ..................
Fuel-oil plants ..... .... . ............
Busiucis storehuuse .............. ........ .. .
Animal and motor Ir.ansport-ition ..................
Motor-car repair shnp.......... ................
Building repairs and conjstrullIou ..........
Paniimn ('anl Pres. .......... ......
Hotel Tivoli....... .. .....................

Total-----......-...--...-..-...-........-


Accounts Working
receivable cash


$50,000. 00
5.00) 00
45.000 00
25,000 UO
100.000 00
75. 000 00
25. 0,000 00
15.000.00

25,000.00 I
10,000.00
1,000.00


$20.000.00
II), 000 00
30.000. 00
20,.000. 00
100,000.00
5,000.00

10.000.00
3,000 00
25,000.00
5,000.00
4,000.00


601,000.00 232,000.00


TABLE No. 18.-Business fixed property, fiscal year ended June 30, 1924


Balance July
1,1923


Ilydroeleclric plant -------------------------........................... 1.669,265.12
Miraflores steam plant.--------------------------- 308,270.31
Sulsiatioos. .................. .. ................ 1, 841.045. 18
Electrical .lorehouse. cfatlun ............. ................
Depreciation applied ............... ...... ................
Transmission system............ ............ 1.355. 73:, 38
Distribution lines........ ............... .. 1, 103, 259 Stj

Total electrical division.. ------------------................ 6,277, 573. 85


Additions





$lu. 319. 39



10,319.39


With- Balance June
drawals 30, 1924


........... i $1,669,265. 12
308,270. 31

$10.319.3y 1.841,045.18
.1.355,733.38
---.--.... 1, 103, 259.86

10,319.39 6,277,573.85


Panama water system ........... ....... 1,760,062.67 ............ ........... ..........
Miraflores Lake pump station .... .......... ................ 19.500.00 ........... 1, 779. 562.67
'olon water system ................... ...... ..... : 5.642 89 ........... ............ 585,642.89
Zone water system ............................... 1 568. 279.37 ............ ......... 568, 279. 37

Total municipal engineering division.. ---.. 2,913, 984. 93 19,500.00 ....---------. 2,933,484.93

Waterworks and sewers, Panama......- ........ 876 353 22....................... 876.351.22
Pav'ements......... ......... . ........... 592. 913.2.3 ........... ............ '2. 913. 2

Total public works., ianaia ............. 1,469.266.45 -....------... ...... 1,469,2i6 45
I.0-ss repay11'ments.............. .............. 413.724.98 ------------ 30,704.60 44. 429. 58

Halance.................... ....... ..... 1,055,541.47 ............ 30,704.60 1,024,836.87

Waterworks and sewers, Colon................... 623.883.68 6.23,883. 68
Pavements............................. ..... ... 625, 619. 03 ........... ........ 625,619.03

Total public works, Colon. ............ 1,249.502.71 ............ .. ......... 1,249,502. 71
Less repayments.... ................. 342,679.48 ............ 3. 425. 58 381, 105. 06

Balance........ ...... ......... ......... .. 90682..2 23 ............ 38,425. 8 868, 307. 65
Dry dock, Cristobal........... ....... ....... 50,000.00 ............ ............ 0,000. 00
Roundhouse. Balboa............... ............. 111. 500 ........................ 111,500.00
Car and paint shops. Balho-.................... 95.000 ............ .. ......... 95,000.00
Totnal hnni inil k rind dry ,nckq ci1 -- 9 M Mma n


Steamships.
Colon........... ........................ .. .. ... 400,000.00 ....... ..... ............ ..............
Sold ........... .................................. 400.000.00 ..............
Panama............................. ...... 400,000 00 ...... ............ 400,000.00
A.ncon.. ...................... 600.00000 ............ ............ 600.000.00
Cristobal................................................ 600,000.00 ............ ... ....... o600,000.00

Total steamships.......... ......... 2.000.000.00 ............ 400,.000.00 1.600,000.00
Pier 18, halbtan....... ... ...... ..... ... 1, 168.200.26 ........................ 1, 168.200 26
Pier 6, Cristobal ....... ....... ... ......... 1, 20 0,001) 00 .............. ......... 1.200. 00.00

Total docks, wharves, and pir ...... ..... 2. 368. 200. 26 ............ ...........-. 2,368.200.26
Coaling plant, Cristobal.--............. ........... 500.000.00 .............. ..... 500.000.00


Stores


$100,000.00 )
50. 000. 00
.50, 000. 00
50, 000. 00
250, 000. 00

250. OW0.00
20.000 1)0
10.000 00
200,000.00
--------------
--------------


980,000.00


Total


$170.000 00
65, 000. 00
125,000 00
9(5, 000. 00
I40.O00 00
80,000. 00
500. 000. 00
45,000.00
13,000.00
250,000.00
13.000.00
.1, 000. 00
1,813,000.00


............ .. ... .. w


. . . .. . . . . .








86 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 18.-Business fixed property, fiscal year ended June 30, 1924-Con.


Balance July
1, 1923


Additions


__ ______ ______ _

Colliers.........................-................. $2 029,232.00 ..
Coal barges...................................... 1,600.000.00 ..

Total colliers and coal barges............... 3.629. 232.00 ..


Fuel-oil plant, Balboa............................
Fuel-oil plant, Cristobal...................--


4-58,860. 58
618, 968.00


Total fuel-oil plants........................ 1,077, 828.58

Business storehouses.-........................... 300,000.00
Animal and motor transportation................ IS, 132.00
From public garages ......................... ................
To motor car repair shop.................... ................
M otor car repair shop............................ 19,864.00
From animal and motor transportation....... ...............
Addition to building 5063, Cristobal.......... ...........
To building repairs and construction...................
Building repairs and construction-................ 5,922.35
Addition to paint and plumbing shop........ ................
From motor car repair shop......... ......................
To building repairs and construction equip-
m ent....................................... ...............
Gold quarters .................................... 3, 432, 286. 00
Addition to house 403, Ancon ............. ............
House 65. Gatun, demolished................................
House 505, Corozal, to United States Army- _................
House 514. Ancon, demolished............... .............
Silver quarters................................... t616,381.00
Adjustment house 914, La Boca.............. ................
Sale house 14, Gamboa........... ................
Garages....................................----------------------.....---------. 78,902. 29
Additional garages..........- ............... ................
To animal and motor transportation........ ..........
Adjustment of construction cost 142....... .............
Boathouses---------.....----------.....-------.......................--------- 4,000.00
Hotel Tivoli-..--------------------.......-------------...-... 11, 258. 13
Restaurants......-------------.......----------........-....--.--------. 198,350.00

Grand total business property...--------....----.... 25, 820, 780. 09


:1--


............

81, 998. 00

5,845.00
412.32


126. 50
9,488. 00


With-
drawals


Balance June
30, 1924


S2,020,232.00
1,600.000.00

3.629.232.00


............ 458, 860 58
............ 618,968.00

.......... 1,077,828.58

............ 300.000.00
........ .... ..- ..-. ..-.. -

"5,"845.00 14,285.00


9,488.00 16. 633."32


............ ..............


....... .... 3,846.85 11,690.00

964.71 .. 0..... ..0 -.. -.... .-
............ 200.00 ........... -
............ 3, 500. 00 ............ .
............ 1,400.001 3,428,150.71

825.00 ......... . ... .. ....
.... 0....... 300.00 616,906.00

6,741.56 ............- - ..... -.....
............ 1,998. 00 ..............
............ 121.09 83.524.76
............ ............ 4,000.00
-.. -.-..... ............ 161, 258. 13
.-.-..-..-. -.-. ------. 198,350.00
56,220.48 506,148.51 1 25,370.852. 06


TABLE No. 19.-Canal business equipment



J lany Additions Withdrawals Jun a o


Electric light and power system:
Machinery and tools....................... $6,994.58 $2, 303. 17 $303.54
Depreciation applied.-..---.---...-.---. ..--........-. ........._ 877. 31 8, 116. 90
Automobiles................................ 880.72 .---..-...-------.......-..----..-....----------- 880.72
Electric work:
Machinery and tools........-------............-------------.. 14. 116.74 2, 184. 13 .............. .............
Depreciation applied......--------------..--.....-----......-- ......................... 1,720.29 14,580.58
Automobiles. .............................. 3, 822. 27 1,209.50 .............. 5,031.77
Telephone and telegraph work: I
Machinery and tools....................... 6,422.96 744.47 86.46 ..............
Depreciation applied-------------------.............. .............. 759. 18 6, 321.79
Water system:
Machinery and tools.......................I --------------------23,372.05 10,182.77 .............. ..............
Depreciation applied......--------------.....----................ .............. 8,335.38 25,219.44
Municipal engineering work:
Machinery and tools.....-----------......--------.........--24.105.32 12,110. 12 244.56 .............
Depreciation applied..------................-------------.............. .............. 8,850.32 27, 120.56
Automobiles ............................... 6.254.08 .............. .............. 6,254.08
Shops and dry docks
Machinery and tools.............----------..........-------- 384, 508.24 .............. .............. ....
Depreciation applied................... .............. .............. 22,446.50 362,061.74
Fuel-oil plants: I
Machinery and tools....................... 4351.27 4,995.08 175.00 ------------........
Depreciation applied....--..--.------...----.....---------......---.....-- -----------.... 2,399.89 6,771.46
Animal and motor transportation:
Machinery and tools.--....-----.-----.--.--------- 959.86 3,230.55 667. 58 ..............
Depreciation applied......-----.--.-----------....... ........ -----------............ 54.16 2,958 67
Automobiles......................---------------------- 220,159.75 26,621.57 22,695.27 224,08&605
Mules......................................- 3,356.63 ............- ............ 3.356.63


- . . . -
-. -. -. -. -. -.
-







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 87


TABLE No. 19.-Canal business equipment-Continued


July 1 1923 Additions Withdrawals!


Motor car repair shop:
Machinery and tools......... ... ....... $8,121. 2 S7.790. 38 $80. 04
Depreciation appliedl.................. ... ...................--------- 2,224.51
Building repair and construction:
Machinery and tools......................I SI..61 10,986.90 67.66
Dcpreciailion applied .. ................ ...... .. .......... ..... ---- ,C 54. 2
Panama Canal Press:
M machinery and tools. .......... .......... 21,514.64 603.98 . .
Deprelialion aipplield............... . ................ ..... 2,06. 76
Hotel Tivoli:
Machinery and tools .......... ............ 62,535.93 18. 444.32 299.46
Depreciat ion applied ................... ...........-------- --------- 6,746.68
Res.taurants: I
Machinery and tools....................... 33,380. 13
Depreciu tion applied ................ .............. .....- --......... 3,191.12
Holt) Aspminwall: I
Machinery and tools........... .......... 10,970.23 400.00
Depreciation applied.. ..... .. .. ........... ..... -- ---- 1,015.17
Lands rented: I
Machinery and tools....................... 307.46 1,542.11 ..............
Depreciation applied ................... ... ............. ........... 675.47
M ules..................... ................ 1.086.76 ................ ..... ....

Total.....................................1 838,102.47 103, 180.20 89,986.59


Halmnrce
June 30, 1924



1J3, 607. 07

%,146.57

19, 11. 86

--------------
73,934.11

.----.--------
30,420.16

9,555.06

1, 174. 10
1,086.76

851, 296.08


TABLE No. 20.-Status of public works in cities of Panama and Colon, June
30, 1924


Total Panama Colon


Construction cost.
WaterworKS and sewers............ ............ I, 515.431. S5 $?9n, 548. 17 I $623, 83. 68
Pavem ents......................... ............... 1, 20 .337.31 i 577,718. 28 625,619.03

Total............................. .............. 2,7 18, 769. 16 1,469, 266. 45 1, 249.5502. 71

Maintenance, operation, and repairs, including propor-
tion of Zone system--- ..---.......----..---.-------------- 2,606,726.99 S7, 662.31 1, 119, 4. 68

Interest at 2 per cent per annum:
Waterworks and sewers ............. ............. 384,152.51 2Ii, 1:.3.56 173,998.95
Pavements ......................................... 318,028.57 1hH. 833. 83 149, 194.74
Zone system...................... ............... 196. 700.42 :12, x55. 14 67, 845. 28

Total.................... ............... 8U9, a1. .o 507. .2. 52 391, 38.97

Total payable from water rentals--..--------------............... 224,377. 3, 44, 771. 29 2, 759, 606. 36

Water re utals aind doefiit payments applied to-
M1aintenance, operation, and repairs ................ 2,606,726.99 1, 417, 662. 31 1, 19, 0C4. 08
Interest................................... ... l. 50 707, 42. 53 391, 03& 97
Proportionofcapitalcost.... ....................... 785. 17. 48 404,073. 42 381.105.06
Tuttal.................................... ......... 4.290. 74. 7 97 2, 399, 578. 28 1. S9 1, 08.71

Collerlions to be applied froim unpaid defcit bills to I
apitl costs------.........................------------------------------- 40 31. 16 40. 356. 16 ---.....---------..

Capital cost reimbursable June 30, 1924 (in addition to
unpaid deficit bills):
Waterworks and sewers....... ........-----------------.........-----, 05, 225. 12 ; 18, 009. 50 440, 215. 62
Pavements.........................................------------------------ 835,009.40 41 06,827.37 428,182.03

Total.-----------------------.......................--------------.................. 1,893, 234. 52 1. 024, 836. 87 808, 397. 65

Total payable from water rentals-................-------- 6 224. 377. 65 3, 464, 771. 29 2, 759, 606. 36


-1 ---







88 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 21.-Detail of canal transit material and supplies

Fiscal year 1923 Fiscal year 1924

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ F- -I


Balboa store.. ................................ ................ ..... ..
Medical store ...........................................................
Stationery store, administration building................................
Paraiso store.................................................
Cristbal store. ................................... ................... ........
CoroIal store..............................................

District quartermaster's stores-
Balboa.......................................................... .
Pedro M iguel...... ........................ ......................
Oatun...........................................................
Cristobal..............................................

Total .......... .............. ...............................
Local purchases.. ........................................................
Invoices in suspense............................................... .....
Material drawn hy divisions no[ yet charged to the work................

Total. .........................................................
Less reserve for war price reductions-. ..................................

Book value of stores on hand.....................................


$2, 263,706.40 2,444. 176.83
65,441.04 51,204.08
14. 080.37 16, 329.35
695,357. 53 3,1.990.27
400, 451. 02 417,643.16
363,912.91 453,563.87

2, 500.63 5, 423.93
153. 15 12097
555.34 138.74
42. 84 261.52

3, 634. 96 7945. 16
16, 479.86 2,128.69
I 12.962. 86 6,438.83
66 828. 40 474, 466.6A

3,876,929. 63 4,080,886. 92
888.723. 15 fi10,009.73

2,988, 206.48 3,470. "77. 16


ICredit

TABLE No. 22.-Receipts, issues, and transfers of stores (and purchases charged
to divisions) during fiscal year 1923-24


Month


July................
August..-....-- .. -
September........
October.........--
November ........
Decembei.........
January.--.......-
February.---......
March...---------
April..............
May..............
June...........---------

Total.......


Balance
on hand
beginning
of month


$4,636,299. 53
4, 559,009.36
4, 708, 853. 57
4,597,472.28
4,221,211.27
4,342,112.82
4,360,260.00
4, 218, 228. 27
4,312,225.61
4, 495, 098. 01
4,456,365. 73
4,378,510.80


Receipt


Purchase Transfer


$156,015. 12 $152,924.04
AA0 ,7B4 A 17 I A 1 5r.


163,527.94
150,004.72
366,031.72
354, 685. 80
241,164.39 1
516,079.95
477,770.23
241, 112.52
181,211.45
384,931.06


I .
179,289.62
178,401.51
181, 461. 98
192,678. 77
201,999. 38
183, 633.82
189,592.66
155,449.97
170,925.52
186,443.04


3,682,379.38 2,140, 232. 26


s by-


Manufacture I Adjustments


$13,276.13
33,094.55
11,780.82
30, 039.47
21,329. 6f
15,564.67 |
34,042. 78
22,904.03
62,063. 70
54,227.97
28, 239. 65
28,862.77


$5,135.71
5,930.96
5,095.49
39,271. 42
252, 285. 23
9,002. 60
5,695.59
7, 291. 46
5,108. 29
7,749.68
6,656.69
16,122.93


355,426. 19 263,346.05


Total to be
accounted
for


$4,963,650.53
5,215,271.30
5,068,547.44
4,995, 249.40
5,042,319. 85
4,914,044.66
4,843, 162. 14
4,948,137.53
5,046,760.49
4,953.638. 15
4, 843,399.04
4,994,870.60


Regular stock in storehouses, July 1, 1923......... .......................................... $1,323,477.81
Material in hands of divisions, July 1, 1923-------------....------................------------.....--.................-------.. 227,053.33
Canal transit .-...---..-----------.------....------------...----------------------------.............--.....---......... 66,828.40
Canal business.--.....-.........-.....--......................................--...-...... 100.224.95

Issued by-
Balance on Purchases
hand end of direct to
Issues Transfers Sales Adjust- I'Tolal month divisions
ments credits


July...........
August........
September.....
October. -..--.
November.....
December.
January ......
February-...... 1
March.........
April..........
May. .........
June...........


$234,811.85 i $96,338.57
240,861.63 119,957.40
252,448.61 121,158.79
260,961.79 157,344.37
495,580.67 t129, 664.77
264,335.43 118,553.70
347, 463. Y6 150,398.27
410,983.8 I 113.095.49
277, 9OW 1 : 125,. i .fi 1
310, 22s. 87 10., 698. 84
2..55.48 47 121,902 U5
303. 827. 03 134,787.34


$61,741. 44
121,950.97
71,155.44
142, 984.03
66,025 99
5, 076. 16
74,268.79
69,415.77
74.793 17
74,772 72
7ti, 102 79
99. 251. 52


$11,749.31
23,647.73
26,312.32
212,747.94
8,935.60
85, 819.37
52, 802.85
42,426.78
73,280.47
8,571.99
9,334.93
28, 621. 60


Total.... 3,654,960. 52 1, 1494,570. 10 1.,017,53b 79 584,250.89


'$404,641. 17
506,417.73
471,075.1f-
771,038. 13
700, 207. 03
553,784. 66
624,933.87
635,911.92
551,662.48
497,272.42
464, 888. 24
566.487.49

6,751,320.30


$4, 559, 009. 36 $32,236.21
4,708,853.57 57,219.0h
4,597,472. 28 78,032.1.'r
4, 221,211.27 55,147.02
4.342,112. 82 62,572.07
4,360,260.00 59, 077. 7
4,218,228.27 46,663.07
4,312,225.61 73,172.24
4,495,098.01 108,572.3.1
4,456,365 73 68,309. 51
4.378,510.80 64,406.89
4. 428, 383. 11 139,331. 22
.............. 44,739.64
I


Regular stock in storehouses, July 1, 1924-.................................................. $4,213,969. 84
M material in hands of din sons, July 1, 1924.................................................. 199,32156.67
Canal transit........... ........ ............ ............................................... 48, 4t6.6
Canal business....--......................................... ................................ 150, 59 9


I







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL 89


TABLE No. 24.-Statement of canal earnings, expenses, and net expenses


Executive department:
Executive offices................................
Cables and radiogramss................ ............
Shipping commissioner...........................
Canal record.................. .. ..................
Land office ...---------- -------------------
Legal services--....------..------ -------------
Railroad motor cars-----------..----------------
C(lubs and playgrounds-..----...----------..-------

T otal .............................. ...............

Accounting department-
Accounting office..................................
Paymaster's office,..-----..---...----------- ------
Collector's office...-...............................

Total............ ............ ..........

Washington office:
Chief of office--...---------..-------------.-------
Purchasing bureau ...............................
Assistant auditor's office............................
Disbursing clerk's office.........................

Total...-- -.....---....-.------. -------
Civil government:
Civil afairs....................................... .
Customs... .. ......................... ..
Posts .......... ..................................
Schools------------------------------------------
Fire protection........................... ..........
Police and prisons-.----.-------. ------------------
District court----------------.............................------------------
District attorney...............................
Marshal................... ...............
Magistrates' courts...-..........-----........-----...-------

Total....................- .....................


Health department:
Chief health office.................................
Ancon Hospital.....................................
Colon Hospital.....................................
Dispensaries..................-................... ..i
Corozal Farm and Asylum........ ...........
Palo Seco Leper Asylum......--....................
Stinto Tomas Hospital...........................
Medical storehouse...---------------.. ------- I
Quarantine service .................................
Sanitation. Panami: .............................I
Street cleaning and garbiigc collection, Pianalii.....
Sanitation, Coon, Colon............... .........


Fiscal year 1924


Canal expenses


$317. 608. 58
2,917.89
41,117.43
14, 564.69
2,405. 70
383.74
1,. 83g. 56
173,318.43


Earnings



$110,614.29
2,498.37
145.21


70, 668. 43


Net canal
expenses



$206,994.29
419.52
41,117.43
14,419.48
2,405.70
383.74
1,868. 56
102,650.00


554,185.02 183,926.30 370,258.72

385, 587.17 2-21, 807. 17 163,780.00
44.950.55 27. 46.00 17,404. 55
46,587.80 29.212.50 17.375 30

477, 125. 52 278,565.67 198, 559. 85

48,833.40 36.26 48,797.14
160,479.62 40,723.18 119,756.44
27.527.76 ---------------- 27, 527.76
7,861.92 ----------------- 7,861.92

244, 702. 70 40,759.44 203,943.26


15,999. 54
27,778.11
177,813.26
224, 114. 38
114, 997.81
365, 622. 12
26.476.70
13, 69. 00
9,410.61
15,222. 27


991,303 80


i :1 1- --


22,946.98
573,179.82
95,951.22
59,387.16
151,638.18
42,393.09
14.735.55
6,910.45
72. 1144. 79
(1.417. 24
'ib.b 44 6.1
26. 3.15 :39


24.17
397.50
9,627.58
7,063.76
169.13
52, 592. 22
7.75
102.50


69,984. 61


967.68
322,328. 23
47,6 S1.88
15. 145.13
124, 80) 45
15., 88. 00
469.33

29. ISS. bri
9,yu7 t1
38:,332 L1
2, 5:36. 2.


15. 975.37
27, 380. 61
168,186.68
217,050.62
114,828.68
31:1,029.90
26,468.95
13,766.50
9,410.61
15, 222.27

921.319.19


21,979.30
250.851.59
48. 269 34
44, 242 03
26,837.73
26,505.09
14,266.22
6,910.45
42,995.93
51,509.43
30,511.82
23.799. 13
CI Arlo 0.


Street cleaning ann garonge collection, i oluii ....... -, 4-. : ,3I. '. I U
Sanitation, Zone.................................. 112, 72i. .*'3 47.031.27 61. 698.62

Total ..............----------------------------.. ---------- 1 8.. 38 I 4 679 92. 91
Office engineer................ ... ..................... :..114 1. 1m 31. 33 0i4 7,303. 14
Meteorology anti hydrography.................... ... 41. 047.23 21 2- 7, 40. 222 44
Surveys............................................... 3 272' 4 7.221' 01 31. 0.1 47
Storehousos, general. i
Hlhon storhnusr ........ ........................ 31'. .\011.43 14'j. ii s1 21f.030 60
.A\ l in inistr tiin huisli ng PartiiS storehoiuisr ..................................I 2.. 'I-i 4.i 1IJ) 24. 4.'4.
Cristolirl -storehrnuse................... ............ 1U-'. 922 I 2#'. 2:.' 52 711. it5. 6
Tuotil ............................................. 50.1. i0.31. 17U. %37. 3.!, .152.:35 111
Public buildings and Krounds.
Superintcnlen........................................ 47. 179. 57 41, 81 41 6 3r,30 1
Balbo ........................... ..................I 21. 17 1 02 110,44 1
Pedro Miguel .................................... -41.214 11 S.. .'* 11 <, 121. 97
O tun....... .................................. .. .. ..... 31 '.72 I ; 2?. l -4 x.*n
Cristohbal... ................. ................... .A.. i..' r.i. I 17. 'is 27. til' 2S
Total............................................ 4.1. .17. 1.7 2.13.03 I'' l1,C1. 07 48
Street lighting.......................................... 1.3, i Ii I................ 1 4... ., 24
Water for municipal purposes.......................... 23. 400. 0)J '................ ( I400 00







90 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 24.-Statement of canal earnings, expenses, and net expenses--Contd.


Fiscal year 1924
Net canal
expenses
Canal expenses Earnings


Roads, streets, and sidewalks.............--------------.............-------- $101,092. 20 -----..........
Storm sewers.......------------...------............-----------------..........--........ 15.591. 8 ................
Miscellaneous general expenses-
Tracks and equipment maintenance................ 36,481.62 ................
Recruiting and repatriating employees.....-......... 29,173. 85 .--....-.......
Transportation, employees on Isthmus....--------........ ----120,000.00 ................
Compensation, injured employees.................. 1,000.00 ................
Maintenance laborers' quarters....-----.-----..--.--... 79,668.86 ................

T otal..... ... ................... ............ 2 6 324. 33 ....- ...........
Marine division:
M marine superintendent ............................. 11,308. 65 ................
Port captain-
Balboa.............. ......................... 113, 693.82 $7, 268. 24
Cristobal....................................... 54,215.56 1,600.53
Board of admeasurement...-------.....---..--..-------........---....--45,953.74 1 3,215.00
Board of local inspectors......................... ... 190.46 i 2,987.80
Pilots-
Balboa ..... ...... ............................. 143,118.20 88,881.73
Cristobal................................ ...... 164,722.93 171,904.30
Tugs and launches-
Balboa-......................................... 211, 148.96 191,355.54
Cristobal-...................................... 216,107.23 218,339.53
Handling lines-
Balboa-......................................... 100,877.62 I 102.998.91
Cristobal..........---------.......--....-----....------------- 88, 559.46 99,044.00
Lighthouse subdivision............................. 275,020.27 112,192.74

Total.......................... ... ............... 1.428.916.90 i 999,788.32
Lock operation and maintenance:
Gatun Locks- I
Superintendence-................................ .. 39, 653.46 ----......-.-
Operation................................... ..... 269,516.97 ..------..-.. .- -.
M aintenance--................................. 436,932. 17 ................

Total, Oatun Locks................. ......... 746,.102.60 2.982. 38
Pedro Miguel Locks-
Superintendence ........ ....... .............. ... 22, 153.38 ................
Operation.......................... ....... ... 218,543.44 -------.........
M aintenance............. .................... .. 92,S95.55 -- ..----..----.-


$101,092.20
15,501.86

3,481. 62
29,178. 85
120,000.00
1,000.00
79, 668. 86

266. 324.33

11,308.65

106.425.58
52,615. 03
42,738.74
1,202.66

54,236.47
17,181.37

19,793.42
1 2,232.30

I 2, 121.29
110,484.54
162, 827. 53

420,128.58






743. 120. 22


Total, Pedro Miguel Locks..................-----i 333.292.37 i 2301.67
Miraflores Locks-
Superintendence........................----------------------- 27, 020. 95
Operation. .. ... ....................... 261, 653. 88 ....... .
M maintenance. .................................. 124,320.24 -..---- ........-

Total, Miraflores Locks -....----.......------...---....----------- 412,995.07 \................

Miraflores spillway....... ................................ 3,298.29
Corozal store (locks).... ........................... 9,844.98 ................

Total, locks....... ........................... 1,505,533.31 i 5,284.05

Gatun Dam, maintenance.............................. 56,593.61 9,049.78
Gatun spillway......................................... 9,559.07 ................
atun spila--------- 9,559.07
Damage to vessels in locks..............................i 6, 177.42 ..............
Damage to vessels in canal..... ........................ 27,981.52 ........ .....
Channel maintenance:
Atlantic entrance... ................ .................. 10,603.36 '
Oaillard Cut ....... ..... .......................... 2,014,950.88 ................
Miraflores Lake.................................. 12.56 1
Pacific entrance. ---------------.........-----.......----------........... 122,254. 31 ....
Cristohal Harbor ................................... 1,090.37 ..............
Balboa Harbor------......---...........................-----------------------... 97,485.22 ................
Removal floating obstructions...................... 29,765. 10 ................
Floating derricks, maintenance ..................... 66,085.89 I................
Dredging division work----.....----------.........------..--...... 57.341.47 ---...............


T otal.........................................

T otal .......................................
Am ortization...........................................
Depreciation.......................................


Grand rotal ............................------------- .... -------------11, 170,800.51

I Earnings exceeded expenses.


330,990. 70


----------------
--...--.--------....--
------------
412,995.07

3, 298. 29
9,844.98

1,500,249.26


47,543.83
9,569. 07
6,177.42
27,981.52


----------------

-----.-...------
--.-.----.------
................
-----.----------


2,399.589.16 58.616.10 2,340,973.06

10,515,423. 01 2,796,895. 12 7,718,527.89
350,000.00 ................ 350,000.00
305,377.50 ................ 305,377 50


2,796,895.12 8,373,905.39


;-~------- 1~1








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 25.-Detail of canal transit revenues


Fiscal year Fiscal year
1923 1924

Tolls .................................. $17, 507,630. 52 $24, 289, 603. 16
Taxe's. fees. fines. Can: l Zone ................... ... ......... . 45,951. 58 .55,931.76
Postal receipts .. 118, 260.19 11, :l SK. 83
Interest on hbank balances .................. ....................... 20,000.00 10, ( t. 00
Proceeds from government property ... ....... .......... -.5.i IOm 09
M iscellaneous........................ 1. 77 1, 22 05

Total.---------.------ ----.... ------------------------------ 17,691,844:06 24, n 1. >.-.3 89



TABLE No. 26.-Statemnent of business expenses, revenues, and profit and loss,
fiscal year 1924


Fiscal year 1924


Expenses


Electric light and power system........ $509, 563. 10
Electrical work . ............... 54, 277. 57
Telephone. telegraph, and signal sys-
Lem ................................ 207,145.98
Water system .......................... 530,045. 32
Municipal engineering work .. ... 623,732 29
Public works. P knama.............. I 188,638.74
Public works. Colon ................... 112,753.66
Shops and dry docks................. 2,780.125.31
Docks, wharves and piers.............. 50,497.64

Fuel oil plants:
Handling fuel oil ................... 305,454.28
Fuel oil sales.-----------..................... 503, 352. 68
Tank rentals.----------------------- -.-----.-----.

Total -------------------------- 808, StI. 96

Business storehouses-.--------------..- 3,006,371.42
Animal and motor transportation...... 324,438.06
Motor car repair shop .................. 133,114.69
Building repairs and construction...... 846.467.42
Panam i Canal Press. ----------------- 256,464.96
Quarters. gold-.......................... 361,257.24
Quarters, silver........................ 241,746.21
'Garages .............................. 17,665.87
Boathouses............................. 643.07
District quartermaster supplies and
services.............. ............. 194,837.58
Hotel Tivoli ......... ..... ......... 205,572.20
Restaurants........................... 10,782.51
Building rentals.... ... .............. .6,870.18
Land rentals ..................... 34,815.67
Equipment rentals---------.......... --..............
Market rentals.------.. ------------------- 350.45
Sand and gravel... ............; 2'1,817. 93
Sale of government property y. .........1 254,407.75
Nautical rharts and publications ....... 1, 422 39
Fortifications division................. 80, .2 1.00

Grand total.----------.---------........ 12,067,153.17


Revenues


$724,113.89
245, 354. 0(1

208,972. 97
573,209. 76
656,627.68
223,530. 86
135,902.57
2,951,862.37
76,047.36


Profit or loss


Fixed capital
charge 3 per cent
per annum


I I


$214,550. 79
18, 923.48

1,826.99
43, 164. 44
32,895.39
'14.892.12
2 23, 148.91
171,737. 06
25,549. 72


$193. 976. 08
., jsl. 28

370.27
74,053.29
7,776.78
34,892.12
23,148.91
46,200. 54
71,046.00


556,376.95 250,922.67 ------..----
507,497.60 4,144.92
8,126.66 8,126.66 ............-.

1,072,001. 21 263, 194. 25 37,682.33


3,036.301. 29
366, 222. 82
136,664. 08
882,924.70
260, 838. 01
374.304.065
241,71fi.21
17, 165.89
631.15

165,900.85
198. 535.57
8,170.00
11,717.95
32,954.84
11.15
2,346.91
26,053.30
255. 722. 41
2,421.75
80,521.00


12, 968,777.29


29,929. 87
41,784. 76
3,549.39
36,457. 28
4,.373.05
13,047.41
----------------
1499.98
111.92

128,936.73
17,036.63
12,612.51
4,847.77
1 1,860.83
11.15
1,996.46
2,235.37
1,314. 66
99. 36l
----------------


3 901,624.12


27, 536. 12
8,777.62
1,329.80
6,667.05
4,146.87
102,948.34
18,518.28
2,457.36
120.00


7,318. 83
7,201. 48
----..--.-------
-----..---------
----------------
----------.-----
7,027.75

11.75
----------------


686, 788.85


2 Figured at 2 per cent in accordance with contract.
I Profits on public works, Panama and Colon, ,mounting to $58.041.03, have been included in quarterly
remittances to the U'nited Rnltes Treasurer covering interest and amortization collections from the Re-
public of Panama. The balance ofthe $U01.24.12 net profits :bove. afler dedlutiing the $.r,041.03 already
remitted, which hailance amounts to $843.5Ki.09, will be inimindiatrlv covered ini the United Stares Treas-
ury as miscellaneous receipts, Inited States revenues, in accordance with regulations.

12618-24t--7


1 I~







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


TABLE No. 27.-Comparison of expenses, revenues, and surplus to date

CANAL TRANSIT OPERATION


1914--------......--.......-------
1915.-.................
1916-.................-
1917 ..................
1918................
1919 ..................
1920 ...................
1921.. ...... ...........

Total............
To business surplus....


1922...................-----------------
1923...................
1924....... ..........


Tolls



814.618.68
4,343,383. 69
2, 399. 830. 42
5.631, 781. 66
6,264.765 71
6, 156, I118 95
N,493. 082. 56
11, 261,919.31

44. 565, 500. U8


44, 56, 5(X0. 9
11, 193, 383. 47
17, 507, 63u. 52
24. 289, '603 16


Grand total-... 97, 556, 118. 13


Taxes, licenses,
fees, lines
postal receipts,
etc.




$158.711.96
176.617. i4
147,077. 17
197, ayS 03
442,.7S9. i
778, 197. 39


Total transit
revenues



$14,618.68
4.343,383.69
2,558,542. 38
5,808, 398. 70
6.411,843.28
6. 35 016. 98
5. 935. 871. 57
12, 040, 116. 70


Net canal
transit Net revenues
expenses


$166.030.91
4.123,128.09
6.999,750.15
6,788,047.60
5.920.342. 94
6. 112, 194.77
6. 548, 272.43
9.,328,300.14


1,901.291 00 I 6,4643,791.98 45,986,067.03
4m10,724.95 i 40.724.95 ................


1,420,566.05U
192,208. 85
184. 213. .A4
392. 2530. 73


45,986,067. 03
11. 385, 592. 32
17,691,844.06
24,681,853.89


45.986.067.03
7.919,017.63
7,690, 777. 56
8,373,905. 39


II i


2, 189,239.17 99, 745,357.30 69,969,767.61


18151,412.23
220,255.60
14.441,207.77
1979, 648. 90
491,500.34
241,822.21
2. 387,599.14
2,711.816.56

480,724.95
480,724.95


3.466, 574. 69
10,001,066.50
16,307,948. 50


29, 775, 589. 69


CANAL BUSINESS OPERATIONS


Business rev- Business Net revenues
enues expenses


1914. ................................................... i90, 298.32 $695,720.71 185,422.39
1915.......................... .......................... 135, 074.92 2,191.475.70 156,400.78
1916 ................. ................. ........ ....... A. ,488,521.61 6,476.623.17 11,898.44
1917.........-......................... ... ............. 7, 579,588.44 7,540, 160.78 39,427.66
1918................................................... 10,324,071.91 10,317,912. 35 6,159.56
1919-.................................. ...... ......... .. 13,684,881. 18 13,623,853.92 61,027.26
1920. ...-................ ....... .. ..-....-. .. 14,705.371.82 14.465.685.69 239,686.13
1921.......................... .... ................ ..... 15,232.317.08 14,668,105.88 564,211.20

Total............................................. 70,840, 125.28 69,979,538.20 860,587.08
Profit carried in canal-transit operations above........... ................ 379, 862. 13 379, 862. 13

Net revenues carried to surplus-................... 70, 840, 125. 28 70. 359,400.33 480,724.95
Interest on public works, P.nama and Colon, etc., not
included in not revenues in prior years................ 619, 54. 59 --...--..-....-.... ----------619,584.69

Adjusted status June 30, 1921------------............---...--.... 71, 459, 709.87 70,359.400.33 1, 100,309. 54
1922............................. ............... 7,747,227.57 7.423,968.41 323,259. 1
1923........................................... .. 10. 872, 843.36 9,732,200.86 1, 140,642.50
1924.............................................. ----------------------12, 968, 777.29 12.067, 153. 17 901,624. 12

Total......................................--------------------------------------. 103.08,558.09 99 582, 722.77 3,465,835.32


1 Deficit.


I I I 1




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