• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Section I: Canal operation and...
 Section II: Business operation...
 Section III: Government
 Section IV: Administration
 Section V: Financial and statistical...
 Back Cover














Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097365/00008
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
Alternate Title: Report of Governor of the Panama Canal
Physical Description: 36 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Canal Zone -- Office of the Governor
Publisher: U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Washington
Washington
Publication Date: 1923
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: June 30, 1915-June 30, 1951.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Some vols. issued in the congressional series as House document.
General Note: Reports for 1914/15-1915/16 each accompanied by portfolio of maps and diagrams.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00097365
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02454300
lccn - 15026761
oclc - 2454300
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report of the Isthmian Canal Commission for the year ending ...
Succeeded by: Annual reports of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government for the fiscal year ended ...

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Section I: Canal operation and trade via Panama
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Section II: Business operations
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Section III: Government
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Section IV: Administration
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Section V: Financial and statistical statements
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
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        Page 101
        Page 102
    Back Cover
        Page 103
        Page 104
Full Text











UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY








ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

GOVERNOR OF


THE PANAMA CANAL

FOR THE

FISCAL YEAR
ENDED JUNE 30

1923


WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1923













TABLE OF CONTENTS.


Page.
Introduction............................................................... 1
Net revenue of the canal and its auxiliaries............................. 1
Service rendered by the canal to shipping................................. 2
SECTION I.--CANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAMA.
Traffic in 1923 ............................................... ............. 3
Nationality of vessels.................................................. 4
Free transit of public vessels and vessels for repair..................... 5
Cargo passing through The Panama Canal in 1923........................ 5
Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 1923,
classified by leading trade routes..................................... 7
Principal commodities.............. ............................. 8
Motor ships......................................................... 9
Details of the trade ........................................................... 10
Inconvenience of the dual system of measurement........................ 10
Lockages and lock maintenance..................................... .. 10
Power for canal operation......................................................... 11
Water supply......... .................................................. 12
Maintenance of channel............................................................. 13
Slides................................................................... 13
Aids to navigation................................................................. 14
Accidents............................................................ 14
Salvage operations................ .................................. 15
SECTION II.-BUSINESS OPERATIONS.
Repairs to vessels-Mechanical work.................................. 16
Work for individuals and companies................................... 16
Work for the Navy and Army......................................... 18
Work for The Panama Canal........................................... 18
Work for the Panama Railroad....................................... 18
Drydocks .......................................... ....... 19
Costs................... .......... ...... ....... ........ ................... 19
Financial................. ........... ...... .................. 19
Coal............ ............ ..... .... ............................... .19
Fuel oil, Diesel oil, gasoline......................................... 20
Ship chandlery and other supplies-storehouse operations................... 21
Harbor terruinals.... ................. ................................. 21
Oommissary system........................................................ 22
Purchases................................... ..................... 22
SSales... ,,,,,,................................... 23
Cattle industry............................................. 23
Dairy farm........................................................ 23
Plantations.................... ............................ .............. 24
Hotels and restaurants....... .. ......... ... ....... ................2..... 24


($7/(16






IV TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Page.
Building construction and repairs........................................... 24
Printing.................................................................... 24
Panama Railroad............................................. .............. 24
Telephones........................................................................... 25
Lands and buildings..................... ... .. ........................... 26
Clubhouses................... ................................. 27
Panama Railroad Steamship Line..... .......................... ............ 27

SECTION III.--GOVEI-NMENT.
Population .... .................................................... 28
Public health............. ............. 28
Malaria... .....................2................ 2
Canal Zone ............... ......................................... ..... 29
Panama........................................................... 30
Colon.................................... ................. 30
Canal hospitals. ............ ........ ............. ................. 30
Quarantine......................................................... 31
Municipal engineering.................................. .................... 31
W after supply........................................................ 31
Sewage systems................................ 32
Roads, streets, and sidewalks (Canal Zone)............................ 32
Garbage disposal ................ ................. ......... 33
Cities of Panama and Colon.... ..................................... 33
Miscellaneous work ...................................................... 33
Public order............................................................... 33
Office of district attorney.......... ........... .................. 34
District court.................. ............................ ............ 35
Marshal................ ........................-............. 35
Magistrates' courts........................ .... ............... .... ...... 35
Balboa.................... ............... ................... 35
Cristobal......................................... ......... ... ....... 35
Fire protection ......... ......................................................................... 36
Public-school system.......................................................... 36
Postal system...... ................... .......-.............. ........ 37
Customs......................... .-........ .................... 38
Shipping commissioner-seamen............................................ 39
Administration of estates............. .... ......... ....... ................. 39
Relations with Panama....................-.................... ......... 39
Laws and executive orders................................................. 40
SECTION IV.-ADMINISTRATION.

Changes in organization and personnel.................................... 41
Increase of force. ....................... .................... ............ 41
Wage adjustments:
Gold employees......................................................... 42
Silver employees.......................... ......................... 43
Grievance board.................... ................................... 44
Public amusements and recreation............................................ 44
Recruiting, purchases, and sales in the United States...................... 45

SECTION V.-FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.

For list of tables see............................................. .................. 46














APPENDIXES NOT PRINTED.


REPORTS OF HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS.
Reports for the fiscal year 1923 have been made as follows and may be consulted at
the Washington office of The Panama Canal or at the office of the Governor, Balboa
Heights, Canal Zone:
Engineer of maintenance:
Assistant engineer of maintenance, report of.
Pacific locks, report of superintendent.
Atlantic locks, report of superintendent.
Electrical division, report of electrical engineer.
Municipal engineering division, report of municipal engineer.
Dredging division, report of superintendent.
Office engineer.
Meteorology and hydrography, report of chief hydrographer.
Surveys, report of assistant engineer.
Gatum dam and back fills, report of general foreman.
Marine division, report of superintendent.
Mechanical division, report of superintendent.
Supply department, report of chief quartermaster.
Executive department, report of executive secretary:
Division of civil affairs, report of chief of division.
Police and fire division, report of chief of division.
Division of schools, report of superintendent of schools.
Bureau of clubs and playgrounds, report of general secretary.
District attorney, report of.
Accounting department, report of the auditor.
Health department, report of chief health officer.
Counsel, Panama Railroad Co., and land agent, The Panama Canal and Panama
Railroad Co., report of.
Purchasing department, report of the general purchasing officer and chief of Wash-
i ngton office.










ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


THE PANAMA CANAL,
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR,
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, August 20, 1923.
The Honorable the SECRETARY OF WAR,
Washington.
SIR: I submit herewith a report covering the operation of The
Panama Canal during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1923.
Respectfully,
JAY J. MORROW,
Governor, The Panama Canal.


INTRODUCTION.

NET REVENUE OF THE CANAL AND ITS AUXILIARIES.

During the fiscal year 1923 The Panama Canal began to yield a
net revenue commensurate with its capital cost. The net income
from tolls and other miscellaneous receipts grouped under the head
of "transit revenue" was $10,001,066.50, as compared with $3,466,-
574.69 in 1922. The net profits on auxiliary business operations
conducted directly by The Panama Canal, of which the most impor-
tant are the mechanical shops, material storehouses and fuel oil
plants, totaled $1,140,642.50, as against $323,259.16 in 1922, while
those conducted by the Panama Railroad Co., exclusive of the
Panama Railroad Steamship Line but including commissaries, docks,
coaling plants, and cattle industry, showed a profit of $922,171.74,
as compared with a loss in 1922 of $710,301.94. The total net
revenue of the year from all sources, exclusive of the Panama Rail-
road Steamship Line, was $12,063,880.74.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


In tabulated form the financial results of the operation of the
canal and its auxiliaries on the Isthmus were:


1923 1922

Net transit revenue................................................. $10,001,066.50 53,466,574. 69
Net revenue on Panama Canal business operations...... ............ 1, 140,642.50 323,259.16
Total net revenue, Panama Canal.......................... 11, 141,709.00 3,789,833. 85.
Net revenue on Panama R. R. business operations 1 .................... 922,171.74 710,301.94
Combined net revenue........................................... 12,063,880.74 3,079,531. 91

1 Exclusive of steamship line.
2 Loss.

SERVICE RENDERED BY THE CANAL TO SHIPPING.

In terms of service to shipping the main items in the record for the
fiscal year 1923, as compared with 1922,, were as follows:


192M 1922

Transits of the canal by ships paying tolls................................. 3,967 2,736
Transit by public vessels of the United States, free......................... 388 276
Calls at canal ports by ships not transiting the canal.................. ..... 838 747
Cargo handled at ports (tons)............................................. 837,271 830,134
Coal sales and issues (tons)................................................ 224,464 251,616
Coal, number of ships served other than Panama Canal...................... 773 843
Fuel oil pumped (barrels)............................................... 10, 429, 517 6,069,993
Fuel oil, number of ships served other than Panama Canal................. 1,487 1,422
Ships repaired other than Panama Canal equipment........................ 692 738
Ships dry docked other than Panama Canal equipment...................... 74 108
Provisions sold to ships (commissary sales)............................ ..... $681,635.47 $640,692.66
Chandlery sold to ships (storehouse sales)............................... $99,582.27 $116,740.85











SECTION I.


CANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAMA.

TRAFFIC IN 1923.

In my annual report for the fiscal year 1922 1 stated that although
there had been no increase of traffic through The Panama Canal
during the period under review, as compared with the preceding year,
a steady growth to double, triple, and quadruple the current tonnage
might be confidently predicted. The statistics for the fiscal year
1923 justify this prediction.
The number of commercial transits increased from 2,736 to 3,967;
net tonnage from 11,417,459 to 18,605,786; tolls from $11,197,832.41
to $17,508,199.57; and cargo tonnage from 10,884,910 to 19,567,875.
The figures for June, 1923, are approximately double those for June,
1922. The growth month by month is shown in the following table:

United States Panama
Month. Number equivalent Canal net Tolls. Cargo.
of ships. net tonnage. tonnage.

1922. Tons.
July................................ 251 897,770 1,127,871 $1,094,127.42 1,214,100
August.....:....................... 257 857,925 1,084,133 1,055,336.75 1,165,950
September......................... 240 843,113 1,070,410 1,020,064.55 1,138,188
October......................... 294 1,049,258 1,310,392 1,255,508.00 1,445,863
November.......................... I 294 1,062,725 1,337,280 1,264,436.54 1,426,860
December.......................... 304 1,104,225 1,375,268 1,312,570.12 1,835,102

January............................ 352 1,281,406 1,610,692 1,505,285.55 1,591,932
February........................... 326 1,237,806 1,529,547 1,423,954.21 1,563,278
March............................. 409 1,608,358 1,988,192 1,827,718.44 1,940,928
April .............................. 404 1,634,457 2,007,690 1,878,938.15 2,187,145
May................................ 419 1,725,399 2,128,414 1,972,216.04 2,265,083
Jun.................................. 417 1,664,051 2,035,902 1,898,043.80 2,096,446
Fiscal year 1923............... 3,967 14,966,403 18,605 786 17,508,199.57 19,567,875
Fiscal year 1922.................... 2,736 9,201,613 11,417,459 11,197, 832.41 10,884,910


The Panama Canal is rapidly overhauling the Suez Canal, which
during the calendar year 1922 had 4,345 transits, aggregating 20,743,-
245 net tons, with 21,360,000 tons of cargo.
The phenomenal growth of the past year was not anticipated and
is in a sense abnormal. It is due primarily to the development of
oil fields in southern California, which has supplanted Mexico as the
principal source of supply for the eastern seaboard of the United
States. The movement of California oil through The Panama Canal
began in October, 1922, and has increased with each subsequent
month, until at the close of the year oil is furnishing 60 per cent of
3





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


the eastbound cargo, and tanker tonnage in either direction is approxi-
mately as great as all other commercial tonnage combined. This is
indicated more clearly in the following table:

Proportion of tankers to total traffic.

Total commercial transits. Average daily transit.

Tankers. General. Total. Tankers. General. Total.

July................................... 20 231 251 0.6 7.4 8.1
August.................................. 19 238 257 0.6 7.7 8.3
September............................... 28 212 240 1.0 7.0 8.0
October................................... 31 263 294 1.0 8.5 9.5
November........................... .. 39 255 294 1.3 8.5 9.8
December................................ 39 265 304 1.3 8.5 9.8
January................................... 51 301 352 1.7 9.7 11.4
February................................. 73 253 326 2.6 9.0 11.6
March..................................... 119 ; 290 409 3.8 9.4 13.2
April.-................................. 148 256 404 5.0 8.5 13.5
May....................................... 173 246 419 5.6 7.9 13.5
June...................................... 173 244 417 5.7 8. 1 13.9
Fiscal year.......................... 913 3, 054 3, 967 2.5 8.3 10.8

Panama canal net tonnage. Tolls.

Tankers. General. Total. Tankers. (General. Total.

July.................. 113,036 1,014,835 1,127,871 $103,286.24 $990,841. 18 $1, 094,127.42
August................. 109,697 974,436 1,0'<4,133 95,995.94 959,340.81 1,055,336.75
September.............. 146,684 923,726 1,070,410 135,861.20 884, 203. 35 1,020,064.55
October............... 182,765 1,127,627 1,310,392 167,074.99 1,088, 433. 01 1,255,508.00
November............. 227,118 1,110,162 1,337, 280 194, 159.04 1,070,277.50 1,264,436.54
December............. 222,604 1, 152,659 1,375,263 203, 017.79 1, 109, 552. 33 1,312,570. 12
January............... 297,485 1,313,207 1,610,692 254,735.56 1,250, 549.99 1,505,285.55
February.............. 454,492 1,075,055 1,529,547 397,267.71 1,026,686.50 1,423,954. 21
March.................. 713,259 1,274,933 1,988,192 627,017.58 1,200,700.86 1,827,718.44
April................... 884,890 1,122,800 2,007,690 782,934.76 1,09, 003.39 1878,938.15
May.................... 1,017,185 1, 111,229 2,128,414 906,731.91 1,065,484.13 1,972,216.04
June............... 1, 005,169 1,030,733 2,035,902 901,241.91 996,801.89 1,898,043.80
Fiscal year....... 5,374,384 13,231,402 18,605,786 4,769,324.63 12,738,874.94 1 17,508, 199.57


It is problematical how long these heavy shipments of California
oil will continue. With the discovery and development of new
fields the trade may decline as rapidly as it grew, but important
contracts have been made, extending over considerable periods, and
there are no present indications of a slump.
A healthy growth of traffic, irrespective of crude oil, is shown by
the totals for other cargo, which aggregated 10,303,538 tons in 1922
and 15,354,174 tons in 1923, an increase of nearly 50 per cent.

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS.

All of the principal maritime nations of the world, with the excep-
tion of Japan, shared in the increased traffic and sent a greater net
tonnage of shipping through the canal than in 1922. The number of
Japanese vessels fell from 189 to 163, and their net tonnage from
872,466 to 753,219. The United States made the greatest gains,





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


increasing from 1,095 vessels of 4,971,509 net tons to 1,994 vessels
of 10,208,536 net tons.
American vessels carried 56.5 per cent of the cargo moving through
the canal. British vessels 25.2 per cent, Japanese vessels 4.8 per cent
and Norwegian vessels 3.6 per cent. The corresponding figures for
1922 -were: United States 45.5 per cent, Great Britain 30.5, Japan
'9.5, and Norway 3. 7.
The complete figures for 1923 appear in the table below:


Nationality.



Areentinp ..... ................ ..
Belgian.. ................... ......
British ......... .. ...........I
Chilean. ............ . ..... .
-Colom bian ............... . .......
Costa Rican .................... .
Danish..................... ........
Dutch.............. .... ........
French................ .... .......
Germ an .... ........... . .. ...... .
Creek .................
Italian.......... .................
.Japanese.. .....................
Norwegian....................
Panaman....................
Peruvian ........ .............
Spanish.............................
Swedish ................... ..........
.1niled Siatc ................ ...


Nnirher
of ships.


1
3
1,065
62
18
1
65
109
56
90
6
29
163
2
147
31
80
14
31
1,994


Total ......................... 3,967


United Statesi Panama
equivalent Canal net Tr-lls. Cargo.
iIIt tonnage. tonnage.

Tons.
0 0 1S.240.00 0
11,167 13,524 13,9.5>.75 23,952
3,968,828 4.R92,338 4,736,221.04 4,929,317
12A,516 201,411 158) 12. 50 76,670
6,012 6,030 7,109.60 7,054
43 45 53.75 5
135,602 240,053 221,569.36 307, F76
374,799 510,970 450,356.36 47,957
213,091 252,3333 258,360.69 230 175
2il', 292 336,149 312,395.335 330,134
17,.79 23,526 20,328.93 30:533
97,219 117,782 119,329. 5 75,25'4
b.30. 215 753,219 S15, 638. 4' 943, 400
1,67 5 2,292 2,661.75 0
4*1,090 597,359 2, ,>39.74 704 292
50,657 61,828 59,259.,6 40,589
122 449 216, 829 152,620.10 111,519
33 551 41,201 3S,102.75 32,178
85,299 130,361 1 IS, 151.33 181,810
8,277,079 10,208,536 9,473,819.65 11,055, 156
14,966,493 18,603,7%6 17, 5-, L9. 571 19,567,47


FREE TRANSIT OF PUBLIC VESSELS AND VESSELS FOR REPAIR.

The transit statistics in the preceding sections do not include
naval vessels and other public vessels of the United States (or of
Panama and Colombia) which pay no tolls. These numbered 388,
.as against 276 in 1922. The increase was due to the passage of the
Atlantic Fleet in February and its return in March. While the
transit of public vessels adds nothing to canal revenues, it emphasizes
the value of the canal as an element in national defense.
One vessel was sent through the canal free of tolls for repair at the
Balboa shops. It is also omitted from the statistics of commercial
traffic.

CARGO PASSING THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL IN 1923.

An analysis of the traffic through The Panama Canal by principal
trade routes shows that the most notable increase during the year
was in the United States intercoastal trade. The cargo handled
between the two coasts increased from 2,562,527 tons to 8,068,553
tons. Excluding California crude oil, which contributed 3,689,049
to the total, this is an increase of more than 70 per cent. In 1922





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


cargo handled in the intercoastal trade represented 23.5 per cent of
all cargo passing through the canal; in 1923 intercoastal cargo
represented 41.3 per cent of the total.
There was also a great increase in trade between the east coast of
the United States and the west coast of South America, cargo moving
over'this route in both directions increasing from 793,123 tons in
1922 to 2,054,523 tons in 1923. Chilean nitrate and iron ore and
Peruvian oil were the most important single items in the total.
The trade between the east coast of the United States and the Far
East, fell off from 2,031,487 cargo tons in 1922 to 1,909,285 cargo
tons in 1923.
The trade between the west coast of the United States and Europe
showed a slight decline in cargo handled, which was balanced by an
increase in the trade between Europe and western Canada. If the
two sets of statistics are combined, as is logical, since vessels trading
to the west coast of North America commonly call at both Canadian
and United States ports and it is difficult to make an accurate segrega-
tion of cargo on the basis of the declarations filed at The Panama
Canal, then the cargo handled between the west coast of North
America and Europe, both directions included, shows an increase
from 2,058,704 tons in 1922 to 2,511,791 tons in 1923, or approxi-
mately 22 per cent.
The trade between Europe and the west coast of South America,
increased from 946,931 cargo tons in 1922 to 1,749,986 cargo tons
in 1923.
These are the important trades through the canal and account for
83.4 per cent of all cargo handled. Of the minor trades, that between
Europe and Australasia continued to decline, but there was an
increase in the trade between the east coast of the United States
and Australasia.
Due to the development of through lines, and a corresponding
decline in transshipment business at the canal, there was less cargo
handled between Cristobal and the west coast of South America.
Shipments of Mexican crude oil to the west coast of South America
were approximately the same as in 1922. Trade between the east
coast of the United States and the west coast of Canada showed
an increase.
Atlantic and Gulf ports of the United States shipped 70 per cent
of all cargo passing through the canal from Atlantic to Pacific, and
received 65 per cent of all cargo moving from Pacific to Atlantic.
Pacific ports of the United States shipped 55 per cent of all east-
bound cargo, and received 42 per cent of all westbound cargo.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 7


Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 1923, classified by
leading trade routes.


Num-
ber
of
ships.


Between east coast of United States and west coast of South
America:
Atlantic to Pacific........................................ 234
Pacific to Atlantic......... ........................ 259
Totals ................................................... .... 493
Between east coast of unitedd States and Far East:
Atlantic to Pacific.............................. 217
Pacific to Atlantic............. ................... ...... 69
Totals................................................-----...... 2S86
I'nited States coastwise:
Atlantic to Pacific..... ............................ 775
Pacific to Atlantic......................... .......---..--- 622
Totals........................................13.......--.-. I 97
Between west coast of United States and Europe:
Atlantic to Pacific........................................ 142
Pacificto Atlantic.................................... .... 134
Totals...................... ............................. 276
Between west coast of South America and Europe:
Atlantic to Pacific........................................ 183
Pacific to Atlantic........................................ 205
Totals.......................................... ....- 3.SS
Between Australasia and Europe:
Atlantic to Pacific....................................... 75
Pacific to Atlantic....................................... 55
Totals...................................... ........ --- 130
Between east coast of United States and Australasia:
Atlantic to Pacific......................................... 79
Pacific to Atlantic........................................ 23
Totals................ ... ........................ 102
Between east coast of Mexico and west coast of South America:
Atlantic to Pacific........................................ 27
Pacific to Atlantic ....................................... 20
Totals.................... ........................... 47
Between east coast of Mexico and east coast of United States:
Atlantic to Pacific........................................ 0
Pacific to Atlantic........................................ 31
Totals................................................... 39
Between Cristobal, C. Z., and west coast of South America:
Atlantic to Pacific....................................... 91
Pacific to Atlantic ........................................ 98
Totals................................... 189
Between east coast of L'nited States and west coast of Canada:
Atlantic to Pacific...................................... 28
Pacific to Atlantic....................................... 55
Totals................................................ 83
Between Europe and west coast of Canada:
Atlantic to Pacific....................................... 56
Pacific to Atlantic......................................... ll
Totals............................................... 167
Between Cristobal, C. Z., and west coast of Central America:
Atlantic to Pacific....................................... 33
Pacific to Atlantic...................................... 32
Totals............................................... 65


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.


917,282
,050 941


Tons of
cargo.


275,313
1,779,210


Percentage
of total
cargo.


1,968,223 2,054,523 10.6

1,146,761 1,466,013 7.5
386,525 443,272 2.3
1,533,286 1,909,285 9.8

4,129,656 2,608,307 13.4
3,403,811 5,460,246 27.9
7,533,467 8,068,553 41.3

690,715 375,700 1.9
646,320 1,020,090 5.2
1,337,035 1,395,790 7.1

802,011 4S6,952 2.5
884,826 1,263,034 6.4
1,6S6, 837 1,749,986 8.9

518, 317 415,861 2.1
312,912 306,404 1.6
831,229 722,265 3. 7

418,059 462,057 2.4
101,744 72,534 0.4
519,803 534,591 2.8

138,994 257,280 1.3
94,678 ............ 0.0
233,672 237, 280O 1.3

37,436 ............ 0.0
180,267 300, 28 1.5
217,703 300,528 1.5

165,276 36,290 0.2
167,761 70,613 0.4
333,037 106,903 0.6

134,375 168,140 0.8
253,504 347,407 1.8
392,879 515,547 2.6

299 098 230,331 1.2
687,491 885,670 4.5


886,589 1,116,001

27,533 23,607
26,774 24,825
54,307 1 48,432


0.1
0.1
0.2


~I I~






6 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

Comniercial Iraffir through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 1923, classified by
fading trade routes-Continued.


K7...... I


Between Cristobal, C. Z., and west coast of United States:
Atlantic to Pacific.......................................
Pacific to Atlantic........................................
Totals................................................
Between Balboa, C. Z., and east coast of South America:
Atlantic to Pacific........................................
Pacific to Atlantic ......................................
Totals................................................
Between West Indies and west coast of South America:
Atlantic to Pacific.. .......................................
Pacific to Atlantic..........................................
Totals................................................
Between West Indies and west coast of United States:
Atlantic to Pacific......................................
Pacific to Atlantic...... ..........................


Ll um-


21
24
45


Panama
Canal net
tonnage.



49, 81
57, Isl
107,062


Tons of
cargo.


21, 685
49, 563
70,248


6 .2,577 29,561
2 1),987 ...........
x 43,564 29,561

13 48,017 ...........
15 61,325 108,755
28 109,342 i 108,755


Percentage-
of total
cargo.



0. 1
0.2-
0.3.

0.1

0.1


0.5-
0.5.


45,324 ........ .. .........
22,786 39,603 i 0.2


Totals................................................ 18 68,110 39,603 0.2-


Miscellaneous trade routes and sailings:
Atlantic to Pacific ........................................ 127
Pacific to Atlantic.................................... 79
Totals................................................ 206
Totals, Atlantic to Pacific..................................... 2,125
Totals, Pacific to Atlantic...................................., 1,842
Total commercial traffic through canal during fiscal year
ending June 30, 1923.................................... 3,967


471,501 229,162
278,140 310, 862
749,641 540,024
10,072,813 7,086,259
8,532,973 I 12,481,616

18,605,786 19,567, A75


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES.


The commodity statistics of The Panama Canal are not compiled
from complete manifests but from summary cargo declarations sub-
mitted by the masters of vessels in transit. They are not precise
except for items like crude oil, wheat, nitrate, and lumber, which are
commonly carried in bulk. There is a natural tendency to lump any
small miscellaneous shipments under the head of "general cargo."
Subject to errors arising from this source, the following table shows
the principal commodities shipped through the canal during the fiscal
year 1923:

FROM ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


Tons.
Manufactures of iron and steel........... 1, 499,842
Refined petroleum................... 1657,901
Crude petroleum....................... .. 284,901
Coal.................................... 182,829
Railroad materials..................... 173,259
Tin.................................... 1144,219
Cntlion................................. 122,728
*ulphur............................... 1117,084
Machinery............................. 115,970
1 Indicates increase over 1922.


Cement................................
Iron............................
Lubricating oil........................
Coke....................... ..............
Paper...............................
Am m onia.............................
Textiles ..............................
Automobiles. ........................


1.2
1.6
2. 8
36.2
63. 8

100.0


Tons.
1 113,726
1113,527
'98,222
97,514
I 89,615
175,949-
I73,943-
161,494





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


FROM PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC.
Tons. Tons.
Crude petroleum....................... 13,928,800 Food products in cold storage I......... 106,058
Nitrate.................................... 11,664,751 Copper ore............................. 196,436
Lumber.................................11,539,340 Dried fruit........................... I190,187
Wheat................................. 1816,392 Beans............................ 184,809
Iron ore............. ............. .. 538,!04 Rice.................................... 183,536
Barley.......................... 379,542 Coffee-............................... 81,654
Copper................................. 297,775 Phosphates........................... 176,750
Sugar.................................. 1296,471 Flour................................... 68,833
Refined petroleum................... 1291,544 Wool................................. 68,141
Canned fruit............................ 272,509 Borax.................................. 152,183
Canned fish........................... 1168,902 Cotton................................. 51,592
Lubricating oil......................... 114,320
1 Indicates increase over 1922. 2 Does not include fresh fruit.

It will be noted that there was an increase in all important items
of westbound cargo excepting crude petroleum, coal, coke, and cotton.
Manufactures of iron and steel show an increase of 40 per cent,
refined petroleum 46 per cent, railroad materials 24 per cent, tin 89
per cent, sulphur 17 per cent, machinery 30 per cent, cement 136 per
cent, iron 64 per cent, lubricating oil 260 per cent, paper 141 per cent,
ammonia 5 per cent, textiles 117 per cent, and automobiles 415 per
cent.
In the eastbound list there was an increase in all items excepting
barley, food products in cold storage, coffee, flour, wool, and cotton.
Eastbound crude oil shipments in 1922 totaled 94,974 tons, and
originated almost exclusively in Peru. In 1923 Peruvian shipments
increased to 239,751 tons, and shipments from California brought the
grand total to 3,928,800 tons. There was a revival of the Chilean
nitrate trade. Iron-ore shipments from Chile began in 1914, but
were unimportant, prior to 1923. Sugar shipments showed a slight
increase in spite of the fact that Hawaii for the first time contributed
nothing to the total, the entire island crop having been shipped to
California refineries. Such typical Pacific coast products as lumber,
canned and dried fruit, and canned fish showed notable increases.
Expressed in terms of percentages, the increases were: Crude petro-
leum 4,035 per cent, nitrate 254 per cent, lumber 113 per cent, wheat,
1.4 per cent, iron ore 1,585 per cent, copper 106 per cent, sugar 15 per
cent, refined petroleum 214 per cent, canned fruit 47 per cent, canned
fish 25 per cent, copper ore 12 per cent, dried fruit 76 per cent, beans
4 per cent, rice 89 per cent, phosphates 15 per cent, and borax 40 per
cent.
MOTOR SHIPS.

There were 121 transits by motor ships in 1923, as compared with
77 in 1922. Although the number of these vessels is gradually
increasing, they are still comparatively rare in Panama Canal traffic.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


DETAILS OF THE TRADE.
Further details of the trade through the canal will be found in the
following tables in Section V of this report:
Table 59: Summary of commercial traffic, 1915-1923.
Table 60: Commercial traffic by nationality, 1915-1923.
Tables 61-A and 61-B: Origin and destination of cargo, 1923.
Tables 62-A and 62-B: Commercial traffic by nationality, ships,
tonnage and cargo, 1915-1923.
Table 63: Commercial traffic by nationality, ships, tonnage, tolls,
and cargo, 19135-1923.

INCONVENIENCE OF THE DUAL SYSTEM OF MEASUREMENT.
Attention is once more called to the fact that under the present
system of measurement to determine tonnage for the collection of
tolls it is necessary to use both the United States rules and the
Panama Canal rules of measurement. The use of the United States
rules, with the various interpretations thereof made by the United
States Commissioner of Navigation, results in irregular reductions
of the toll rate, due to exempted spaces, under which some vessels
benefit more than others. As a conspicuous example, two ships of
exactly the same dimensions and the same cargo carrying capacity,
the Gold Shell and the Silver Shell, pay tolls, of $4,386.25 and
$5,076.25, respectively, for no other reason than that there is a dif-
ference in location of a small fuel transfer pump.
The adoption of the Panama Canal rules as the sole basis of measure-
ment would result in fair play and simplicity of administration,
with a return to the original intent of a toll based on earning capacity.
LOCKAGES AND LOCK MAINTENANCE.
The schedule established last year for dispatching vessels through
the canal was continued with minor alterations. This called for
operating shifts at Gatun from 7 a, m. to 11 p. mi.; at Pedro Miguel
from 7.30 a. m. to 7.30 p. im.; and at Miraflores from 7.30 .a. m. to
9 p. m. Two shifts were employed at Pedro Miguel, and three each
at Gatun and Miraflores, and their hours were arranged to .overlap
at the times of heaviest traffic.
At Miraflores both flights of locks were available for use during
the entire year. At Pedro Miguel one or the other chamber was
unwatered for the painting of the gates and the overhaul of the
operating machinery for a total of 94 days between" December 14,
1922, and April 15, 1923. At Gatun one flight was out of commission
for like reasons for 15J days in April and May.
The average number of lockages a day was 10.9 at Gatun, 11.7 at
Pedro Miguel, and 11.7 at Miraflores. A record was established at





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Gatun on May 25, 1923, when 24 commercial seagoing vessels were
put through in 23 lockages. On February 15, 1923, 38 vessels passed
through the locks at Gatun, but this total included a number of
destroyers and submarines locked through in groups. The aggregate
number of lockages at all locks during the year was 12,551, as com-
pared with 8,834 in 1922, an increase of 42 per cent.
To handle the increased business, the employment of 6 additional
locomotive operators and 1 general operator was authorized at Gatun,
and 5 additional locomotive operators were authorized at the Pacific
locks.
At Gatun there were nine delays in lockages of more than 10
minutes duration due to faulty operation or failure of equipment, the
time thus lost, aggregating 5 hours and 4 minutes. At, Pedro Mliguel
and Miraflores there were only minor delays due to the breaking of
towing cables, bitts, or chocks.
On May 25, 1923, at Gatun, the S. S. Hoven, northbound, and
moving at a speed of about, four miles an hour, struck a fender
chain, as the result of the misunderstanding in the engine room of a
signal from the bridge. The chain functioned properly and stopped
the ship within 50 feet, preventingia collision with the upper guard
gates. No damage was done to either ship or chain mechanism.
There is record of one similar incident at the canal in which a fender
chain was tested and justified its design.
Maintenance work, as was required to keep all machinery and
plant in first-class condition, was carried on at all locks.
Lockages during the year are summarized in the following table:

Gatun. Pedro Miguel. Miraflores. Total.
Month.
Lock- Vessels. Lock- Vessels Lok- Vessels Lock- essels.
ages. ages. ages. ages.

1922.
July................. 247 268 274 297 269 294 790 839
August................. 260 314 280 318 279 322 819 954
September........... 251 295 270 332 269 834 790 961
October. 297 344 319 357 317 357 933 1,058
November.......... 300 327 319 352 316 361 935 1,040
December............. 303 340 316 374 324 369 943 1,083
1923.
January............ 352 883 353 405 369 414 1,074 1,202
February............. 341 436 378 606 373 469 1,092 1,411
March. .............. 434 542 454 500 465 586 1,353 1,727
A l................ 397 456 435 503 427 483 1,258 1,442
ay.................. 416 458 444 490 438 485 1,298 1,433
June................. 413 475 425 484 427 486 1,265 1,445
Fiscal year 19,23. 4,011 4,639 4,267 5,017 4,273 4,960 12,551 14,615
Fiscal year 1922...... 2,801 3,338 3,062 3,599 2,971 3,590 8,834 10,527

POWER FOR CANAL OPERATION.

Electric power for the operation of the canal was derived from the
hydroelectric plant at Gatun, with the steam generating station at
65887-23--2





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Miraflores in reserve. Nothing occurred to affect the operation of
the major equipment, and continuous service was maintained at
both plants, a record always hoped for but seldom attained. No
important additions or extensions were made to the power system,
but study was given to the replacement of the obsolete Miraflores
plant, which has been authorized by Congress.
The average combined generator output in 1923 was 4,422,920
kilowatt-hours per month, as compared with 4,856,905 kilowatt-
hours in 1922. There was an average of 3,796,750 kilowatt-hours
distributed from substations in 1923, the comparable figure in 1922
being 4,104,479. These figures show a transmission and distribution
loss of 14.15 per cent this year, as compared with a corresponding
loss last year of 15.65 per cent.
The steam generating station at Miraflores, maintained on the basis
of stand-by service, was required to carry load on 36 occasions. The
average rate of fuel-oil consumption was 1,362 barrels per month, as
compared with 1,762 barrels per month in 1922.
The cost of power generated by the Gatun and Miraflores plants,
including the cost of distribution, was $0.007 per kilowatt-hour, as
compared with $0.0105 in 1922,

WATER SUPPLY.

The level of Gatun Lake fell from 87.07 feet at the beginning of
the dry season to 82.58 feet on May 9, 1923, from which date the
recovery of storage began. On June 30, 1923, the lake was at ele-
vation 84.97.
The following table shows the inflow of water into the lake from
all sources, utilization and losses, during the fiscal year:

Billion
Per cent. cubic
feet.

Run-off above Alhajuela........................................................ 43.5 78.35
Yield from land area below Alhajuela................................... ....... 37. 3 67.25
Direct rainfall on lake surface................... ............................ 19.2 34.57
Total...................................................... ..................... 100.0 180. 17
Evaporation from lake surface..................................................... 10.8 19.54
Gatun Lake lockages............................................................ 16.6 29.93
Hydroelectric power. .......................................................... 23. 1 41.56
Spillway waste................................... ............................. 49.8 89.68
Leakage and municipal water..................................................... 1.1 1.99
Decreased storage..................................................... ........... 1.4 2.53
Total................ .................................... .......... 100.0 180.17

Work was continued on the survey of the Chagres Valley above
Alhajuela, where a dam must eventually be built to provide for addi-
tional storage. Field work on this survey was nearing completion
at the close of the fiscal year, and the results coincide closely with the





*REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 13

original estimate of the storage capacity of the upper Chagres, based
on an early reconnaissance made bylthe French. While the construc-
tion of the Alhajuela Dam is not yet a matter of immediate urgency,
the rapid increase of traffic through the canal during the past year
has emphasized the ultimate necessity of this or an alternative
project, and the completion of the preliminary studies has been
accelerated.
MAINTENANCE OF CHANNEL.

To maintain the channel against normal shoaling and slides in
the Gaillard Cut and for harbor maintenance work, three 15-yard
dipper dredges were operated for 7, 8, and 9 months, respectively;
one 20-inch pipe-line dredge was employed throughout the year,
with a second in reserve; one sea-going suction dredge was employed
from May 11, 1923, to the end of the year; and one ladder
dredge was held out of commission and in reserve. Of the supple-
mentary floating equipment of the dredging division one hydraulic
grader was employed for 12 months, and one for 2. months, a drill
boat was used throughout the year, an air compressor for 11 months,
a crane boat all year; 5-tugs were employed, including 1 in reserve;
and 14 launches, including 4 in reserve. Two 250-ton floating cranes
were commissioned in alternate months.
The following is a statement of all dredging during the fiscal year:
Cubic yards
From the canal prism: removed.
Atlantic entrance.... ............................ ............ 0
Gatun Lake............ ................................ 34, 400
Gaillard Cut-
Maintenance..... ...... ......... ........................... 1, 955, 300
La Pita Point improvement project-............................. 541, 600
Miraflores Lake........ .......................................... 17, 600
Pacific entrance...... .............................. 1, 450, 050
Total................ ........................................ 3,998, 959
Auxiliary:
Cristobal Harbor and Coco Solo........ ............................. 250,000
Balhoa inner harbor. ...........................*............. 767,450
Pipe-line crossing, Paraiso................................................. 6, 850
Total......................... ............................... 1,024, 600
Grand total.................................................... 5,023,550
Of the grand total, 3,468,850 cubic yards were classified as earth
and 1,554,700 as rock.
SLIDES.

A small slide occurred at the north end of East Culebra on August
28, 1922, between stations 1770 and 1774, followed by a slight general
movement over the whole area of East and West Culebra, which





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA OANAL.


continued intermittently during the months of September, October,
and November.
On December 20, 1922, a slide occurred at East Culebra affecting
the whole water front of the old slide area between stations 1775
and 1790.50. This movement continued until the 23d of that month,
when approximately 595,000 cubic yards of material had moved into
the basin created at the base of the slide and the canal prism, the
amount in the prism being about 150,000 cubic yards.
Simultaneous with this general movement at East. Culebra, the
West Culebra slide showed a slight movement, and at one point
projected into the canal prism for a distance of 32 feet, the area
of the slide extending from station 1772 to 1795.
A total of 1,290,250 cubic yards of material was removed during
the year from the East and West CIlebra, slides.
The Lirio slide became active again during the month of June, 1923.
At the end of the year 57,950 cubic yards had been removed, and it
was estimated that a like amount remained to be handled.
All other slides remained quiescent during the year; but several
small berm breaks occurred at various points in the cut, which were
removed immediately. Small slides of this character, due to the
disintegration of the rock during the dry season and the subsequent
effect of heavy rains, are not infrequent at. the beginning of the wet
season.
The slides caused no interference with canal traffic during the year,
except that the S. S. Amsterdam, drawing 34 feet, was detained from
11 a. m. on December 23 to the morning of December 24. Al-
though a 35-foot channel was available at that time, it was not deemed
advisable to pass a ship with this draft.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION.
No new lights have been established during the year, but the
maintenance and repair of lights already located on the canal and
in the adjacent waters have been carried out as usual, and arrange-
ments were renewed with the Department of Commerce, Bureau of
Lighthouses, under which Panama Canal forces attend to the upkeep
of the three unwatched lights in operation at Serrana, Roncador,
and Quita Suefio. 0
ACCIDENTS.

Investigations were conducted and reports submitted by the board
of local inspectors on all accidents to shipping in the canal and locks.
Classification of the 10 principal accidents requiring formal investiga-
tion by the entire board, is as follows: Collision between ships, 1;
touched bottom, 1; damaged in locks, 1; damaged by tugs going
alongside, 2; struck approach wall at locks, 2; struck bank, 3. Only




REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


three of these accidents resulted in serious damage to vessels usin,
the canal.
On December 28, 1922, the United Fruit Co.'s steamer Heredia,
in leaving Cristobal Harbor, was in collision with the Japanese
steamer France Maru, inward bound. Damages to the Heredia were
estimated at $8,000 to $10,000, and to the France Maru at $13,000.
The Heredia was held responsible for the collision.
On April 14, 1923, the S. S. American Star, belonging to the Ameri-
can Star Steamship Co. and under time charter to the United Ameri-
can Lines, while southbound through the canal, struck the bank in
the Gaillard Cut, and was damaged to the extent of $12,242. The
accident was held to be due to faulty steering caused by an inex-
perienced helmsman and a possible derangement of the steering gear
and not to negligence or lack of care on the part of any employee
of The Panama Canal. The ship was adjudged liable for the cost
of repairs.
On April 15, 1923, the S. S. G. Harrison Smith, owned and operated
by the International Petroleum Co. and under charter to the Ore
Steamship Co., while northbound through the canal with a mean
draft of 33' 10", struck bottom in the Gaillard Cut near station 1793
to the eastward of the center line and about 70 feet from the shore
line. It was held that the accident was due in part to the poor
maneuvering qualities of the ship and in part to the failure of the
pilot to allow for the danger to deep-draft vessels in passing too
close to the so-called Gibraltar Shoals. The Panama Canal offered
to assume one-half the cost of repairs, estimated at $18,000, and set-
tlement is being made on this basis.
SALVAGE OPERATIONS.

The salvage equipment described in my last annual report was
maintained for the benefit of shipping in the canal and adjacent
waters, but there were few occasions for its use. The principal salvage
operations of the year were in connection with the S. S. Pennsylvania,
a Texas Oil Co. tanker, which ran aground at Quita Suefio Bank
on March 23, 1923, and was floated and afterwards towed to Mobile,
Ala., by The Panama Canal's salvage tug Favorite; and with the
tanker John D. Archbold, owned by the Standard Oil Co. of New
Jersey, aground at Bona Island in Panama Bay, June 30, 1923, which
was also pulled off by the Favorite, and, after transferring a cargo
of crude oil, proceeded to San Francisco under its own steam for
repairs. Other Panama Canal tugs assisted in both operations.










SECTION II.


BUSINESS OPERATIONS.

A detailed statement of the expenses (including depreciation),
revenues, and profit or loss on the various subsidiary business opera-
tions of The Panama Canal will be found in Table No. 26 in Section V
of this report. The total net profit on these operations was $1,-
140,642.50. The Panama Railroad Co.'s business operations on
the Isthmus yielded an additional net revenue of $922,171.74. The
results of the major business operations of both The Panama Canal
and the Panama Railroad Co. are summarized in the following
paragraphs.
REPAIRS TO VESSELS-MECHANICAL WORK.

The volume of work handled by the mechanical shops at Balboa
and Cristobal, which was fairly constant during the latter half of
the fiscal year 1922, suffered a further reduction at the beginning of
the fiscal year 1923, and then remained constant until the final
quarter, when the increase of traffic through the canal and an increase
in the number of submarines based on Coco Solo brought some
additional work to the shops. The total value of work done, $2,-
290,226.05, was slightly less than the corresponding figure for 1922,
$2,648,075.43, and was distributed as follows:

Class. Amount. e total.

Marine................................................................................ 1,105,498.32 4. 27
Rairod.......................... ........................ .... ... ........ 441,882.69 1 19.29
Miscellaneous.................. ............. .......... ......... ........ 534,246. 93 23.33
Manufacture for stock.................... ..... ....... ..................... 208,59& 11 9. 11
Total................................................................. 2.290,226.05 100.00

Of the total work done during the year, $522,960.82 worth was
done for individuals and companies, including the Panama Railroad
Steamship Line, $102,158.91 for The Panama Canal, $458,952.04 for
the Panama Railroad Co., and $286,724.28 for other departments of
the United States Government.
Worc for individuals and companies.-The largest single job under-
taken during the year was the reconditioning of the S. S. Colon for
the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, including the installation of
16




REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


new boilers, thorough overhaul of the main and auxiliary engines,
renewal of all worn-out or doubtful steel in the ship's structure, and
the renovation of cold storage and passenger spaces. On June 30,
1923, the work was about 50 per cent completed.
The Mexican gunboat Bravo was docked at Cristobal and repairs
made to propellers and shafts, including new section of starboard
tail shaft and manufacture of new propeller, together with incidental
bottom painting and various machinery repairs.
On the S. S. Mina Brea extensive repairs were executed following
an oil fire in the boiler room, which swept up the boiler room trunk
and destroyed the steering gear and upper bridge, besides damaging
the boilers and their surroundings.
Broken or damaged propeller shafts or propellers were made good
on the steamships Antonio Lopez, Cerro Ebano, Dryden, Pennsylvanian,
and Salvador, and on the tug Gatun. Thrust shafts and blocks were
removed, machined, and replaced on the steamships Hampton Roads
and Empress of Australia. Damaged bow on the tug Gorgona was
repaired. Bottom damage on the combined tanker and ore carrier
G. Harrison Sm ith was temporarily repaired by shoring and cementing
to allow her to proceed north. The S. S. Unita, salvaged from Ser-
rano Bank, was docked for examination, and temporary bottom
repairs were made.
A new pair of gasoline engines was installed in the motorship
Chiralite, along with new shafting and propellers.
On the S. S. Bethore an important welding job was performed.
This vessel developed cracks on each side of her starboard high-
pressure cylinder, extending through the cylinder walls and running
back into the valve chest, the longest extending about 2 feet.
The cylinder was effectively welded by the electric process while in
place, and held the full boiler pressure tightly.
On the S. S. Clan Mac Williams a remarkable welding job was
performed. As the result of a broken piston rod the 73-inch diameter
low-pressure cylinder of the main engine was wrecked, a section being
broken out of the cylinder wall about 10 feet long and 2 feet deep,
this section being fractured into four pieces. In addition the cylinder
head was broken into bits, the stuffing box broken, and another
considerable crack developed in the cylinder walls. Instead of
following the customary procedure of casting a steel piece and weld-
ing it into the walls to replace the break, an attempt was made, in
order to save time, to replace the pieces broken out and weld them in
position. A steel form was accurately machined to fit the inside of
the cylinder, and the pieces after suitable preparation were held
in place against it by jacks. They were secured in proper vertical
relation by being clamped to a steel flange ring secured to the un-
harmed portion of the cylinder flange. The weld was entirely





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


successful and was completed with such truth that the cylinder was
more out of round from previous wear than deformed at the section
welded. So far as can be ascertained this is one of the largest cylinder
welds in marine history. Over 500 pounds of welding wire were used.
Nearly a cubic foot of metal was actually deposited in the weld drop
by drop. Before the advent of welding the length of time required
to cast or obtain a new cylinder and fit it into place would have been
as many months as the job actually took weeks.
Work for the Navy and Army.-For the Navy there were dry-
docked the cruisers Birmingham and Galveston, the destroyer
Farquhar, submarines 0-2, 0-3, 0-7, 0-11, 0-12, 0-13, 0-14, 0-15,
0-16, R-21, R-23, R-24, R-25, R-26, and R-27, Eagle 81, mine
sweepers Cardinal and Quail, oil barge 82, tugs Patuxent and Sciota,
and four subchasers. On the Birmingham new propellers were
installed and the work incidental to installation of new port propeller
shaft was completed. A new propeller shaft and new starboard and
port propellers supplied by the Navy Department were machined
and installed on the Galveston. New crankshafts were installed
on the 0-7 and new tail shaft manufactured and installed. On the
Farquhar three hull plates were renewed and other damage incident
to collision made good. Extensive annual overhaul was made on
the submarines named; on several boats of the "0" class new types
of bow planes were fitted and new bridges built.
Various repairs were made to Navy and Army transports and
auxiliaries and the local craft of the Army were periodically docked.
Two 50,000-barrel fuel-oil tanks were fabricated in the shops and
erected at the Balboa tank farm for the Navy. Forty-five closed
cylindrical tanks for gasoline storage, 8 feet in diameter by 16 feet
in length and 10 feet by 20 feet, were built for the Army.
Work for The Panama Canal.-The usual maintenance work on
the floating equipment and rolling stock of the canal was handled.
The execution of long-contemplated alterations and items of deferred
maintenance served to retain in employment at the beginning of the
fiscal year a number of skilled employees and prevent the disintegra-
tion of the working force. The more important of these jobs involved
changing the spud wells of dredge 86 from round to square to admit
of a more economical and serviceable spud; adding 5 feet on each
side to the beam of the dredges Gamboa and Paraiso; the overhaul
of the craneboat La Valley, and repairs to the 2,000-yard scows.
One standard towing locomotive was built for the locks and two
more started.
Work for the Panama Railroad.-One 61-foot baggage car and one
61-foot hospital car were built and placed in service and one 61-foot
second-class coach was rebuilt. The car department also built two
gasoline motor cars and one trailer for service between Panama
and Paraiso.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


The cost of maintaining and repairing Panama Railroad equip-
ment was reduced from $533,806.33 in 1922 to $425,721 in 1923,
in spite of the fact that under the revised accounting system there
is added to all bills against the Panama Railroad Co. a surcharge of
10 per cent, which was not applied the previous year except during
the last quarter.
There were 39 heavy repair jobs on locomotives and 2,230 light
repair jobs. On cars in active service heavy repairs totaled 98 and
light repairs 528. Cars in reserve were also inspected and repaired.
The condition of the equipment was fully as good at the end as at
the beginning of the year.
Dry docks.-For The Panama Canal 23 vessels were dry-docked
at Balboa and 16 at Cristobal. The number of other vessels dry-
docked was 37 at Balboa and 37 at.Cristobal.
Costs.-Constant attention has been given to keeping down costs,
and although the scarcity of work during the greater part of the year
was a serious handicap, gratifying results have been obtained. The
overhead expenses of the marine group of shops were less by about
$63,000 than during the preceding year, notwithstanding the fact
that increases in the cost of electricity and water placed an additional
burden of $30,000 on the overhead. The average percentage of over-
head was 56.50, as compared with 54.43 in 1922.
Financial.-The operation of the shops, after an extraordinary
transfer to reserve of $50,000 for the reroofing of two buildings, re-
sulted in a net profit of $100,473.26. After deducting from this fixed
capital charges of $41,032.44 there remained a surplus of $59,440.82.

COAL.

Coal sales, which totaled 558,149 tons in 1920, 468,815 tons in 1921,
and 251,616 tons in 1922, showed a further decline and totaled only
224,464 tons in 1923. This is due in part to the increasing use of oil
as a fuel for steamships, but more especially to the fact that the price
of coal on the Isthmus, including transportation and handling charges,
is necessarily higher than at ports nearer the mines where the majority
of vessels trading through the canal can fill their bunkers. Sales in
1923 and 1922 were as follows:

1923 I 1922

Commercial vessels................ ................................................ 198.906 228.231
Panama R. R............................................................... ..... 9,630 4.519
Panama Canal...................................................................... 5.498 8, 584
United States Army................................................................ 7,120 6,343
United States Navy I............................................................... O 0
Miscellaneous .................... ............................. ............ 3,310 3,939
Total......................................................................... 224,464 251, 616
i The Navy maintains its own supply, from which 34,154 tons were delivered in 1923.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


In 1922 heavy losses were incurred through price fluctuations which
forced the sale of large stocks of coal at less than cost in order to move
it at all. In 1923 market conditions were more favorable, and the
expenses of operations were greatly reduced, but the Panama Canal
plants can not be successfully operated on the present volume of
business, and the year's operations showed a loss of $81,891.78.
As a measure of economy the coaling plant. at Balboa was shut down
on March 31, 1923. A small stock is still maintained there, and de-
liveries can be made when required by detailing operators from the
plant at Cristobal.
The quantity of coal on hand at the beginning of the year was
156,903 tons, 139,300 tons were received, 6,455 tons were recovered,
and 224,464 tons were sold, leaving 78,194 tons on hand June 30, 1923,
of which 74,664 tons were at Oristobal and 3,530 tons at Balboa.
Effective August 16, 1922, the special prices for coal taken in large
quantities were canceled, and since then flat rates have been main-
tained of $12 a ton at Cristobal and $15 a ton at Balboa.
FUEL OIL, DIESEL OIL, GASOLINE.
Facilities for the storage of fuel oil were increased by the erection of
four new tanks at Cristobal and three at Balboa. The Panama Canal
now has 12 tanks with an aggregate capacity of 448,040 barrels, the
United States Navy has 6 tanks with a capacity of 300,000 barrels, and
8 companies have 18 tanks with a capacity of 1,082,000 barrels. Some
of these tanks are used for the storage of Diesel oil.
The oil storage tanks are grouped in two farms, one at either end
of the canal, and each served by a central pumping plant owned and
operated by The Panama Canal. The oil pumped for all interests
during the year, including both receipts and issues, totaled 10,429,517
barrels. The revenue from the oil business, which amounted in 1923
to $267,143.16 net, is derived principally from pumping charges, the
sales to vessels from Panama Canal stock being insignificant.
For the storage of gasoline in bulk The Panama Canal has 1 tank
at Balboa and 2 at Cristobal with a combined capacity of 620,000
gallons, and an oil company has 1 tank at Balboa with a capacity of
1,470,000 gallons.
The oil and gasoline business of the year is summarized in the follow-
ing table:
Balboa. Cristobal. Total.
Fuel oil sold to steamships by Panjma Canal ( birrels).............. 0 0 0
Fuel oil sold to steamships by companies (barrels I........... ....... 2,160i,8S7 2,384,348 4,545,235
Number of ships by Panama Canal.................................. O 0 0
Number of ships by companies.................. .............. 741 740 1,521
Bulk gasoline sold to steamships by P:anama Canal (gallonsj........ 16,018 4,317 20,335
Bulk gasoline sold to steamships by companies (gallons)............ 0 0 0
Number of ships by PLanama Canal ....................... 3 5 8
Number of ships by companies ... ............ .................. 0 0 0
Diesel oil sold to steamships by Pnama Canal (barrels) ............ 0 2,421 2,421
Diesel oil sold to- teamships by companies ihbarrel i................. 52,073 2,789 54,862
Number of ships by Panama Canul ................................. 19 19
Number of ships by com panies.............. ...................... 34 2 36





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 21

As compared with the fiscal year 1922, sales of fuel oil to steam-
-ships show an increase of 80 per cent, while Diesel oil sales, which
are relatively unimportant, declined 18 per cent.

SHIP CHANDLERY AND OTHER SUPPLIES --STOREHOUSE OPERATIONS.

The storehouses were operated under the same policy as during
the preceding fiscal year; the forces were held at a minimum, and
every effort. was made to dispose of remaining surplus and 'obsolete
material and to keep the inventory as low as is consistent with safety
and the efficient operation of the canal. The movement of stock is
summarized in the following statement:
Total on hand June 30, 1922, general stores....................... $5, 246, 361.90
Total on hand June 30, 1922, medical stores........................ 97,407.78
Total........................................... ........... 5, 343, 769. 68
Received during the year......................................... 3, 943,216. 53
Total...................................................... 9,286,986. 21
Issued during the year.................................... 6,034,647. 81
On hand June 30, 1923..................................... 3, 252, 338. 40
Sales to steamships totaled $99,582.27, local sales $320,904.77, and
so-called credit sales, which include material issued on foreman's
orders for the Army and Navy and for jobs ordered by individuals
and companies, $565,924.90, or a total of sales from the storehouses
to other than The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad of 3986,411.94.
The corresponding figures for 1922 was $1,532,477.18.
Scrap and surplus material offered for sale in the United States
realized gross proceeds of $448,888.14.

HARBOR TERMINALS.

Although the revenue from wharfage, rent, and storage, stevedor-
ing and the handling and transfer of cargo at the Cristobal and Balboa
terminals fell from $1,156,566.43 in 1922 to $1,101,908.01 in 1923,
operating expenses were cut from $883,384.65 to $823,329.87, and the
net revenue of $278,578.14 was greater by $5,396.36.
Effective August 1, 1922, the stevedoring rates on general cargo
were reduced 25 per cent, and the rates on certain classes of special
cargo from 10 per cent to 15 per cent.
The following table compares the work of the last two years:

1923 1922
Tons of cargo stevedored. ............................................. 307,575 313, 702
Revenue per ton stevedored........................................... S0.5024 $0. 4925
Cost per ton stevedored .................................................. 0.3767 S0.3114
Tons of cargo handled and transferred.................................. 837,271 830,134
Revenue per ton handled............................................. .0.9668 50.9893
Cost per ton handled............................................... 50.6880 50.7328
Gross operating revenue........................... ........ .......... l, 101,908. 01 o 1 15.,566. 43
Gross operating expense............................................... 123, 329. R7 iS*3,381 f5
Net revenue............................... ......................... 27, 578. 14 I 273,181.78
Per cent of expense to revenue....................................... 74.7 1 76.37





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


The bulk of the transhipment and local freight business is handled
at Cristobal, which is a port of call for a number of Atlantic lines
which do not transit the canal and a terminal port of several Pacific
lines. Relatively little cargo is handled at Balboa. The table below
indicates the distribution of business between the two ports:

Balboa. CrstobWl.

Number of ships discharging or taking cargo... ............... .... ............ 608 1 304
Tons of cargo received (ex cargo).............................................. 40,507 427. 843
Tons of cargo delivered (per cargo)............................................. 38,273 316,088
Tons of cargo stevedored by Panama Railroad ................................. 31,143 276,432
Tons rehandled by Panama Railroad........................................... 4,393 10,165

COMMISSARY SYSTEM.

The commissary system (Panama Railroad), consisting of pur-
chasing agencies, 5 wholesale units, 9 retail stores, and 7 manu-
facturing plants, in addition to 2 electric refrigerating plants and an
industrial laboratory, was continued for account of the Panama
Railroad Co. but under the supervision of the chief quartermaster
of The Panama Canal. The difficulties experienced during the fiscal
year 1922, when losses aggregating $241,992.35 were incurred by
reason of the rnpid fall in commodity prices, have been overcome,
and the operations for 1923 show a profit of $392,806.98. Sales
totaled $6,540,452.61, as compared with $6,966,376.63, but the
decrease was not due to a smaller volume of business but to lower
prices.
The total capital investment amounts to $3,517,134.57, made up
as follows: Plants and stores $2,073,104.36, equipment $92,440.76,
supplies on hand $851,589.45, and floating capital $500,000.00. The
amount of accrued depreciation set up is $495,113.65.
The following statement shows by classes the value of supplies on
hand at the beginning of the year, the amount purchased during the
year, and the value remaining on hand at the close of the year:

On hand On hand
June 30, 1922. June 30, 1923.

Groceries. .. ...................................... 158, 339.40 S1,067,994.94 $13A,038.84
Hardware. ......................................... 91,453.32 232,035.31 82,840.39
Dry good ................................... 328, 868. 99 625,076. 90 285,676. 04
Boots andshoes...................:................. 126,146.34 99, 93.83 s, 520.51
Cold storage.......................................... 61,277.05 1,010,806.09 79,817.39
Tobacco.................. .......................... 17,857.89 337,946.59 22 088.59
Raw material........ .............................. 327,199.75 1,053,926.43 184,608.69
Total................ ...................... 1,111, 142.94 4,427,380.09 851,589.45

1 Includes cattle, milk, buittcr, and eigs in amount of S857,117.62.

Purchases were made as follows: In the United States, $3,548,-
344.81; Europe, $142,827.17; Central and South America, 3115,-






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


040.72; from the cattle industry on the Isthmus, $393,576.11; from
The Panama Canal, $127,927.39; other local purchases, $99,663.89
Sales were made as follows:


To United States Government .........................
Panama Canal ..........................................
Steamships.................................... .........
Panama R. R. Co.....................................
Individuals and companies .............................
Employees ............................................
Gross revenue from sales..........................
Less discounts and credits. ......................
Total................ ....... ......................
Supplies for expense- and equipment:
Retail commissaries and warehouses...............
General.......... .......... . .............
PlantR ............... ................... ..
Total............................ .......


1922 I 1923 Decrease.

$1,219,544.76 $1, 083,S20.98 $135,723.73
983,585.SS 696,361.12 287,224.76
359,799.69 343,59. 17 i 16,191.52
215, 697.09 170,399.89 45,297.20
323,417.21 1601,649.42 2278,232.21
4,000,950. 83 r 3,797,313.97 203,606.86
7,102,985. 44 6,693, 173.55 409.811.91
136,608. 3 152,720.941 216,112.11
6, 966,376.63 6,540, 4-2.61 425,924.02

102,2S8.16 71.013.09 31.275.07
737.19 1,101.89 2367.70
77,553. 10 02,9.0.14 14,602.96


180,578.4.5


135,06S. 12


45,510.33


Loss by condemnation. ThrinikaLC. et(. .................. 66,017.98 70,213.01 I 4,195.03
Loss by clerical errors. pilfering, etc...................... 41,194.45 41 4.591..S4 2 3,397.39
Total........................ .................... 107,212.43 j 114,S104.5 27,592.42
Grand total.................................. 7,254,167.51 6,790,325.58 463, 641.93

The iincreaoe in this item is due to the leasing of The Panama Canal restaurants, thus changing the classi-
fication from Panama Canal to individuals and companies.
2 Denotes incrcace.

COatle indiustry.-There has been no importation of beef cattle
since January, 1922, and only enough cattle were sold to the com-
missary during the year to supply the current demand. After
reducing the book value of cattle on hand June 30, 1922, by approx-
imately $500,000, which was charged to profit and loss in the
account for 1922, there remained on hand 13,237 head, with a valua-
tion of $547,891.88. During the year there were 361 births; 4,507
heads were delivered to the commissary or sold to outsiders; 378 were
transferred to other units, and 156 died, leaving 8,557 on hand June
30, 1923.
The revenue from sale of cattle, hides, and other products was
8318,990.23, and expenses totaled $317,478.03, resulting in a profit
from operations of $512.20.
Improvement work was limited to the reclearing of 11,574 acres of
pasture land at a cost of $2.34 an acre.
Dairy farm.-After reducing the book value of the dairy stock by
$16,000 on June 30, 1922, there remained on hand 605 head, valued
at $28,072.10. During the year there were 112 births, and 332
head were received from other units. Sales accounted for 413 head,
and there were 19 deaths, leaving 617 head on hand June 30, 1923.
The revenue from the sale of cattle, milk, and cream was $73,512.60,
expenses were $61,664.21, and the profit from operations $11,848.39.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Pla.ntations.-The Frijoles and Juan Mina plantations were oper-
ated under the superintendence of the cattle industry, while the
operation of the seven other small plantations and gardens was.
continued under contract. The loss from operations was $2,901.01..

HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.

The Hotel Tivoli at Ancon and the Hotel Washington at Colon
were operated at a loss of $17,938.72.- Their continued inainte-
nance is considered essential to afford accommodations to persons-
having business to transact with The Panama Canal, travelers,
tourists, and visiting government officials. In 1922 the hotels were
advertised for lease, but no satisfactory bids were received.
The restaurants and silver messes have been operated under a
contract since May 1, 1922, and satisfactory service was rendered to.
employees by the contractor at fair prices.

Bl'ILDING CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS.

All buildings of The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad
including employees' quarters, were maintained in good repair, and
some construction and repair work was done for the Army and the
Navy. The largest single job undertaken was the construction of
two concrete four-family houses at the Coco Solo Submarine Base
at an approximate cost of $103,000. The total expenditures for build--
ing construction and repairs were $481,750.87, while the revenue
credited to this account was $492,318.06.

PRINTING.

The total value of printing and binding at The Panama Canal
Press and of stationery sales was $204,015.90, as compared with
$258,619.47 in 1922. The plant showed a loss of $973.87 over and
above the interest on the investment in spite of economies effected
during the year. The auditor reports that this is due to insufficient,
charges for work performed and that if the manufactured product
were charged out at rates comparable to those of other printing
plants, this unit would show a large profit. Accounting studies were
being made at the close of the year to determine rates which will
cover the operating expenses. Report is made each quarter to the
Joint Committee on Printing, and all of the plans of that committee-
to promote economy in public printing have been followed.

PANAMA RAILROAD.

Although the freight and passenger business of the Panama Rail-
road continu-d to decline, the loss of revenue was offset in part by
operating economies, and the net revenue was $160,883.41, as coin-






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


pared with $165,632.25 in 1922. The trackage maintained was
reduced from 183.64 miles to 161.78 miles. Of this reduced total
109.54 miles were in main line and sidings, 42.35 Panama Canal
track, and 9.89 United States Army track.
The total freight handled was 213,574 tons, as compared with
208,015 tons in the previous year, but the revenue from freight
service was less by $96,927.62. Through commercial freight de-
creased 3,437 tons, Army freight increased 7,916 tons, Panama Canal
freight increased 7,537 tons, local commercial freight decreased 1,324
tons, and commissary freight decreased 2,903 tons. Company
freight totaled 1,995 tons.
The following table shows the number of passengers carried and
the passenger revenue for the fiscal years 1922 and 1923:


Number of passen-
gers earned.


Passenger revenue.


1923 1922 1923 1922

First-class passengers........ ...................... 176,316 287,463 $217,547.08 $229,842.40
Second-class passengers............................... 243,136 449,502 163,256.52 196,522.74
Total............................................. 419,452 736,965 380,803.60 426,365.14


The average revenue per passenger per mile for 1923 was $0.0288,
and for 1922, $0.0256. The gross revenue from transportation of
passengers shows a decrease of $45,561.54, and the number of pas-
sengers carried shows a decrease of 317,513.
The following table contains the general operating statistics of
the railroad for the fiscal years 1922 and 1923:


A verge nmles operated ..................................................
Gross operating! revenue..............................................I
O operating expense .......... .......................................
Net operating revenue...... .................................
Per cent of expenses to reene........... ......................
Gross re.enu' per mile of road...........................................
Operating expense; per mile of road....................................
Net revenue per mile of road...........................................
Revenue per passenger train-m ile........................ ...............
Revenue per frei-ht triin-mile................... ......................
Total revenue train miller e...........................................
Railroad revenue per train-mile...................... ... ................I
Railroad operating expenses per revenue train -mile......................
Net railroad revenue per revenue train-mile. ........................
Freight, passenger, and switch locomotive mileage ....................
Work-train mileage................. . ..................
Passene er-train mileage. ................................. ............
Freight-train mileage....................................................


47.61
$1,375,777.72
1, 214,894.31
$160,883.41
88.31
$28,896.82
$25,517.63
$3,379.19
$4.26
$10.25
$175,517
57.84
$6.92
$0.92
287,441
36,562
103,127
70,390


47.61
$1,552,400.54
$1,386,768.29
$165,h32.2.5
89.33
$32,0 (6.60
$29,106.64
$3,499.96
$5.07
S192,112
S8.08
$7.22
$0.86
274,894
38,858
99,430
92,682


TELEPHONES.

During the year 614 telephones were installed and 508 removed,
leaving a total of 2,554 in service. Calls during the eight-hour
business day averaged 23,007, as compared with 22,174 in 1922.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


The system now includes 36 miles of pole line, 249 miles of under-
ground circuit, 135 miles of cable, 13,728 miles of wire, 960 miles of
phantom circuits, 276 miles of simplex circuits, 25 manual and 3
automatic exchanges. It is connected with the exchanges of the
Panama Telephone Co. in the cities of Panama and Colon.
The manual telephone exchanges at Cristobal, Gatun, and Pedro
Miguel have deteriorated to such an extent that new equipment has
become absolutely necessary in order to maintain adequate telephone
communication. During the year study was completed, specifica-
tions prepared, and requisition placed for new automatic exchanges
at these points. Requisition was also placed for alternate proposals
on equipping the Balboa exchange with part automatic or full
automatic apparatus.
New buildings are to be erected for the Cristobal, Gatun, and
Pedro Miguel exchanges, while at Balboa available space on the third
floor of the administration building will be used.
The telephone system is owned by the Panama Railroad Co., but
is operated by the electrical division of The Panama Canal.

LANDS AND BUILDINGS.
The revenue derived by the Panama Railroad Co. from real estate
operations was $152,604.46, as compared with $143,449. 40 in 1922;
operating expenses totaled $60,415.45, as against. $34,499.39; and
the net revenue -02,189.01, as compared with $109,950. 01. The
increase in operating expenses is due to changes in the distribution
of the depreciation on buildings and other arbitrary charges.
There are in effect approximately 1,265 leases granted by the
Panama Railroad Co. in the cities of Panama and Colon and 6 licenses
covering the use of its property in those cities. Economic condi-
tions in Colon have resulted in the surrender by the lessees of a
number of leases, particularly in the warehouse district and the district
set aside for residences for Caucasians. Leases which expired in the
two cities were renewed at increased rates.
The Panama. Canal has also issued leases or revocable licenses
for land and buildings in the Canal Zone to steamship companies,
oil companies, and other business interests, and covering small tracts
of agricultural land. The revenue from such land and buildings
aggregated $34,890.61, with expenses of $23,017.83, leaving a net
profit of $11,872.78. The number of agricultural leases in effect on
June 30, 1923, was 1,805, covering 6,6671 hectares. Under the terms
of their leases agricultural tenants with less than 5 hectares of land
will pay no rent until July 1, 1924. The results of reopening un-
occupied sections of the Canal Zone to agriculture are discussed in
Section III of this report under ,the head of public health.
** ' -*'. *' * l .





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


The Panama Canal also collected from employees the sum of
$554,657.14 in rental charges for quarters, which were maintained at
an expense of $512,451.46.
CLUBHOUSES.
The sum of $150,000 was appropriated by Congress toward the
operation of clubhouses and playgrounds for gold and silver employees
and their families, of which a total of $141,424.95 was used. After
deducting the amount of this subsidy from the gross expenses, the
clubhouse accounts showed a profit on the year's business of $47,-
050.87. The accumulated surplus on June 30, 1923, was $161,572.43.
The subsidy for the fiscal year 1924 has been reduced to $100,000.

PANAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LINE.
The gross income of the steamship line for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1923, was $2,378,026.96 and the operating expenses were
$2,542,488.41, leaving a net income deficit of $164,461.45. This
deficit, as compared with that for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1922,
of $587,332.45, shows a decrease of $422,871.
The steamship line operating as an adjunct of The Panama Canal
carried all freight and passengers for account of the United States
Government during the year at material reductions from regular
tariff rates. Had the line received tariff rates its deficit of $164,461.45
would have been reversed and a gain of $290,049.69 shown.
Briefly the principal causes contributing to the deficit of $164,461.45
were-
1. The tonnage carried amounted to 230,916 tons, as compared
with 252,866 tons for the previous year, a decrease of 21,950 tons,
or 9 per cent.
2. The marked lowering of rates caused by the keen competition
of direct lines operating to the South Pacific, the Isthmus of Panama,
and Haiti.
3. The depression in business conditions throughout the countries
served by thed steamship line.
4. The cost of foodstuffs, stores, and supplies during the year,
which has remained at the high mark established during the last
two fiscal years; advances in wages of officers and crews, as well as
the increased cost of stevedoring, due to advances in wages granted
to the men.
The deficit includes in addition to current operating expenses
depreciation and deferred charges for general and extraordinary
repairs incurred in prior years. By eliminating depreciation and
deferred charges for extraordinary repairs, the deficit would have
been reduced to $39,822.98.
65887-23----3











SECTION III.



GOVERNMENT.

The usual functions of government are carried out in t.he Canal
Zone through the executive, health, and municipal departments;
but in addition all of the accounting work is done in the accounting
department, while aids to navigation, steamboat inspection, and
hydrographic and meteorological work, commonly considered govern-
ment duties, are here associated with canal operation. From the
financial statements in Section V of this report data on the cost and
revenue of various branches may be obtained.

POPULATION.

A census of the civil population of the Canal Zone was taken by
the police force during the month of June, 1923, a summary of
which is given below:


E-4

Balboa district. ............. 1,5sl
Cristobal district-...-.............. 5-
Prisoners.....................- 3
Total........... ......- 2,155.


1,4053
46 S

1,S73


nericans.


I d


E- E-i

1,797 294 1,.S3 3, 379
6.57 21 6.,S 2, 69Cj
...... .... .. 136
2,4541 3151 2,51 6,205


All others.


2,327 2, 463 169

218
2,237 1,6b 49


1 includes 432 civilian employees of the Army and Navy.

In addition to the civilian population the military population in
the Canal Zone in June, 1923, numbered 9,797, making a grand total
of 34,765.
PUBLIC HEALTH.

Malaria.-The total number of malaria cases reported from the
Canal Zone and terminal cities during the year compared with the
two previous years is as follows:

1921 1922 1923

Employees .. ............................................ ... 325 176 216
Military and naval personnel......................................... .... 10 828 870
Nonem'ployees................... .... .............----................ 459 243 657
Total................ ........... .. .. ................... ----- - .... 1,594 1,247 1,743


4,150
3, 336
I
7,487


15,203
9,590
175
S24,968


1 AI





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


The increase in the number of cases of malaria among nonem-
ployees experienced this year was expected and predicted as a result
of the new policy of allowing unemployed laborers to return to the
zone to take up land for agricultural purposes. It is impracticable
to sanitate completely the country in which these settlers live. They
are widely scattered over the available parts of the zone, living in
rude shacks near water courses and the lake, and are at all times
exposed to malarial infection. About 1,805 licenses have been
granted these settlers and it is estimated that 650 families are now
living on the land. Each home has a pit privy, not covered nor
water tight, but at least limiting the chances of intestinal infection.
Many have learned to boil their drinking water, and some are under-
taking drainage. Aside from malarial infection, the venture seems
surprisingly successful in most instances. Ground has been cleared
rapidly and already many of the settlers have achieved what appears
to be economic independence, at least according to their standards;
are rearing their families in contentment; and are perhaps in better
circumstances than similar agriculturists in Panaman territory. They
have a certain amount of supervision by the American authorities,
including the sanitation and police forces, and have, at least until
they are able to pay for it, free medical service at The Panama Canal
dispensaries and hospitals. In spite of the physical risk of living in
practically unsanitated areas, and the present resulting increase of
malaria in some of our sanitated areas, the net result of opening up
the zone to land settlers is a great gain to the community in increased
and cheaper food supply, and in converting a large number of idle
pauper blacks, former canal employees, into self-supporting and
self-respecting individuals. The large reservoir of available labor
supply so established may also prove of supreme importance to the
canal in time of sudden emergency. No licenses are granted within
a mile of Army posts and important residential sections of the zone,
but unfortunately laborers residing in zone towns exchange visits
with these settlers, and it is believed that many cases of malaria
among the colored employees and their families have resulted from
this practice.
Canal Zone.-The average population (civil and military) for the
fiscal year 1923 was 31,920, and this figure has been used as a base
for vital statistics. From this population 265 deaths occurred dur-
ing the year, 237 of which were from disease, giving a rate of 7.42
for disease alone, as compared with 7.04 for 1922 and 7.03 for 1921.
The birth rate for the year was 20.02 per thousand population.
The infant mortality rate, based on the number of live births reported
for the year, was 42.25 for white children and 105.63 for black chil-
dren, with a general average of 84.51. Of the total births reported,
5 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths reported, 35 per





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


cent occurred among children under 5 years of age. The maternal
mortality rate (from conditions due to the puerperal state) was 4.47
per thousand births, stillbirths included.
Panama.-The average population of the city of Panama for the
year was 59,635. From this population 1,123 deaths occurred dur-
ing the year, of which 1,088 were from disease, giving a rate of 18.24
for disease alone, as compared with 22.15 for the preceding year.
The principal causes of death, compared with last year, were as
follows:

Number of deaths.

1922 1923

Tuberculosis (various organs).................................................* .. 232 218
Diarrhea and enteritis..................................................... 176 144
Pneumonia ibroncho and lobar)................................................. 225 128

There were 1,986 live births reported for the year, giving a rate of
33.3 per thousand population. The infant mortality rate, based on
the number of live births reported, was 135.45. Of the total number
of births reported, 5 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths
reported, 34 per cent occurred among children under 5 years of age.
The maternal mortality rate (from conditions due to the puerperal
state) was 6.21 per thousand births, stillbirths included.
Co(on.-The population of the city for the year averaged 31,285,
as compared with 31,500 for 1922. From this population 436 deaths
occurred during the year, of which 413 were from disease, giving a
rate of 13.2 for disease, as compared with 13.78 for 1922.
The principal causes of death, as compared with last year, were:

Number of deaths.

1922 1923

Tuberculosis (various organs) ..................................................... 70 79
Pneurnonia 'broncho and lobar)........................................ ............. 32 40
Diarrhea and enteritis.............................................................. 46 26

There were 694 live births reported for the year, giving a rate of
22.18 per thousand population. The infant mortality rate, based on
the number of live births, was 146.97. Of the total births reported,
5 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths, 32 per cent occurred
among children under 5 years of age. The maternal mortality rate
(from conditions due to the puerperal state) was 5.47 per thousand
births, stillbirths included.
Cna nal iospitals.-Patients treated in Panama Canal hospitals,
fiscal year 1923:





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA (ANAL. 31

Number in Tran.i Remaining
hospital Admitted. Died. Dischaiged ferried, June 30,
July 1,1922. 1923.



Ancon .............. .... .. 12 12s 3,320 2,76S 46 171) 3,2r0 2, 41 24 SO 170 105
Colon ...................... 24 0 94 1,370 15 49 6I S 9U 236 4(-9 20 2-4
Corozal:
Insane................. SS 291 72 120 4 19 67 81 2 2 87 3i 09
Cripples................ 5 2S 1 7 0 n 2 9 0 0 4i 26
Chronices............... 2 24 6 1 5 0 2 6 4 0 2 23
Palo Seco leper colony ...... 67 1 16 0 1 2 n 4 n 0 7 77
Total............ 23 558 4,341 4,2S6 63 242 !,9 1 3,547 2.2 491 2910 ) -4

Quarantine.-Throughout the year the policy of extending cooper-
ation with other nations in the matter of quarantine has been con-
tinued. The chief quarantine officer visited the principal ports of
Central America on both the Pacific and the Caribbean coasts and
the west coast of South America as far south as Valparaiso. As a
result, a better mutual understanding was created and the inter-
change of sanitary reports increased.
The chief danger which threatens The Panama Canal in the matter
of maritime quarantine is the presence of bubonic plague in west
coast South American ports. If this disease should gain entry into
the Canal Zone, it is not probable that there would be any great
epidemic, but there probably would be a certain amount of falling
off in the number of ships transiting the canal, since undoubtedly
the presence of plague at this point would result in the imposition
of quarantine by other governments. The work of making the
Canal Zone proof against the introduction of plague, by the elimina-
tion of rat harboring places and catching of rats, was energetically
continued during the year.
Yellow fever has ceased to be a menace. During the year an
epidemic outbreak occurred in the interior of Colombia, but aside
from the small restrictions which this necessitated, quarantine was
not imposed against any country on account of yellow fever.
The policy of moving the ships through quarantine with the utmost
expedition has been continued. During the year no ship has been
detained in quarantine. This has reduced very materially the losses
which ships formerly suffered in this way. For example, in 1920 the
estimated loss on account of quarantine delays was $10.75 per thou-
sand tons of shipping. In this fiscal year the estimated loss was
$0.027 per thousand tons of shipping.

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING.

Water supply.-The usual maintenance work was performed on the
pipe lines, reservoirs, filtration plants, and pumping stations. A





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


concrete surge tank with a capacity of 750,000 gallons was constructed
at Summit, the high point on the main between the Gamboa pump-
inm station and the Miraflores filtration plant, at a cost of $25,151.20.
It has liceen in operation since November 23, 1922. During April,
1923, the main under the Pedro Miguel locks which supplies the west
bank of the canal developed a serious leak that could not be repaired
without putting the locks out of commission for a longer period than
was practicable. A new line was accordingly laid in a trench dredged
in the bottom of the canal at Paraiso. The cost of this job was
$47,730.19. A windmill was erected to supply water to the village
of Monte Lirio, and electric recording gauges were installed at the
high and low service reservoirs in Ancon.
The amount of water consumed was:
Canal ZniE'--.......................................... ....--------- a o s. 2, 07. 771000
Paiinama-................... ................................. do.... 1, 063, 954, 000
Colon......................................................... do.... 716, 883, 250
Sold to ships................................................--------------do.... 111,583, 750
Sewage system.s.-No extensions were made during the year, and no
unusual conditions were encountered. Three new pumps were
installed, two in Colon and one in the New Cristobal sewage pumping
station.
Roads, streets, and sidewalks (Canal Zone).-In addition to the
usual maintenance work, the following jobs were authorized and
completed:
A concrete road 1,760 feet in length and 18 feet wide was con-
structed from Silver Town, Mount Hope, to connect with the road
leading from the cold-storage plant to the Margarita Road. This
will serve to shorten the distance from Cristobal, Colon, and Mount
Hope to France Field, the Naval Air Station, the submarine base,
and Fort Randolph by 6,600 feet, besides eliminating dangerous
curves and grades and interference with the operation of the cold-
storage plant.
Tivoli Avenue was resurfaced from the corner of Ancon Boule-
vard to the Tivoli Hotel, and a dangerous curve at the intersection of
these two roads was widened.
The Paraiso-Gamboa macadam road was repaired, oiled, and
sanded.
The ramp projecting into the street in front of the Cristobal com-
missary, which interfered greatly with the heavy traffic in that
vicinity, was removed and replaced with a concrete pavement.
The asphalt surface of a number of roads in the southern district
has worn very smooth, becoming dangerous to vehicular traffic in
wet, weather and on heavy grades. The surface of such roads was
roughened.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Pedestrian and 'vehicular traffic has increased to such an extent
in Ancon and Balboa that concrete sidewalks were constructed at
four different points to eliminate the danger of accidents to pedes-
trians.
Garbage disposal.-The incinerator at Mount Hope was operated
through the year, and burned 22,490 tons of garbage. As it was
continually overloaded, one of the 60-ton units was transferred from
the Balboa incinerator, which has not been in use, since in the south-
ern district. it has been found feasible and more economical to dump
garbage on waste land and bury it.
Cities of Pananma and Colon.-The revenue received from the sale
of water in Panama and Colon was insufficient to meet the combined
maintenance, interest, and repayment costs of municipal improve-
ments, and a deficit; was incurred, amounting on March 31, 1923, to
$121,410.46. This was paid by the Republic of Panama in June. The
streets in Panama, on account of lack of sufficient maintenance, had
deteriorated to such an extent that repair work at a cost of
816,942.36 became a necessity. Similar repairs on the streets and
sewers of Colon cost $9,158.21. Both items were charged against the
Republic of Panama.
Miscellaneouis work.-The municipal division also handled a large
amount of construction work for other divisions of The Panama Canal,
the United States Navy, the United States Army, the Panama Rail-
road Co., and various individuals and companies.
PUBLIC ORDER.
The resident population of the Canal Zone, consisting almost
entirely of civilian employees of The Panama Canal and military and
naval personnel, with their families and dependents, is law abiding
and requires relatively little police control. The majority of the
crimes and misdemeanors leading to arrest. are committed either by
transients or by persons resident in Panama and Colon but having
access t.o the Canal Zone. The percentage of criminality is not high,
and the formation of a criminal class is prevented by the enforcement
of stringent immigration regulations and the deportation of persons
convicted of felony, excepting the native born, upon the expiration
of their sentences.
The number of arrests made during the year was 3,552, slightly
more than the number in 1922 (3,372), but less than in any other year
since 1905. The average number of prisoners in the common jails at
the close of each month was 73, 1 less than in 1922. The more
common causes of arrest were violations of the motor-vehicle regu-
lations, with 893 cases; disorderly conduct, 395; violation of immi-
gration regulations, 316; loitering, 276; disorderly conduct with pos-
session of liquor, 139; violation of the national prohibition act, 95;





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


intoxication, 44; violation of license regulations, 139; violation of
traffic regulations, 134; trespass, 133; petit larceny, 131; battery, 68;
assault and battery, 57; vagrancy, 47. The persons arrested included
representatives of 38 distinct nationalities and 144 different trades or
professions.
There was only one homicide during the year. This was the case
of a woman killed in an automobile accident. The driver of one of the
two cars involved was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to
serve one year in the penitentiary.
Thirty arrests were made under the narcotic drugs import and
export act, resulting in 17 convictions, 5 cases nol pressed, and 8 dis-
missed.
Sixty-two convicts were committed to the Canal Zone Penitentiary,
with sentences aggregating 109 years, 5 months, and 5 days; and 51
were discharged, of whom 3 were pardoned. The number in confine-
ment on June 30, 1923, was 91, with 1 additional released on bond
pending an appeal of his case to the United States circuit court at
New Orleans.
The number of men employed on the police force on June 30, 1923,
was 173, as compared with 170 twelve months earlier. No change was
made in the organization of the force or in the location of existing
police stations. At the penitentiary, a guardhouse building, removed
from the abandoned Army camp at Las Cascadas, was reerected to
replace the old building used as a cell house, mess hall, kitchen, and
workshop, the stockade was rebuilt, and a combined office and store-
room erected.
In addition to routine police work, a continuous patrol of the har-
bors of Balboa and Cristobal was maintained, and police launches were
maintained at Gamboa and Gatun for the patrol of the Chagres River
and Gatun Lake. Details of police were continued at all canal locks
and at the Gatun spillway. Motorcycle patrols for the enforcement
of vehicle regulations were continued at Balboa, Pedro Miguel, Cris-
tobal, and Gatun. There was a monthly patrol of the interior coun-
try to prevent squatting on public lands. Fifty-four persons, includ-
ing 48 discharged convicts, were deported from the Canal Zone.
Common-jail prisoners were employed in clearing trails, on road
repairs, and for janitor service about police stations. The labor per-
formed by them was valued at $23,530.71. Convicts were employed
on road and municipal improvements, construction and maintenance
work at the penitentiary, the manufacture and repair of prison cloth-
ing, and on the prison farm. Their labor was valued at $28,645.54.
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY.
The district attorney prosecuted 217 criminal cases before the
district court, 28 less than in the preceding year, with 141 convictions,





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


23 acquittals, 28 cases nol pressed, 24 dismissed, and 1 otherwise
disposed of. There was a decrease in the number of burglary, rob-
bery, and larceny cases, but a noticeable increase in violations of the
narcotic drugs act. In addition to the cases disposed of, 12 cases were
pending at the end of the year.
The district attorney represented The Panama Canal, the Panama
Railroad Co., or the United States in 9 civil actions, of which 6 were
still pending at. the end of the year, either in the district court or on
appeal. Three of these civil actions were admiralty cases.

DISTRICT COURT.

The district, court held sessions at Ancon and Cristobal, and trans-
acted the following business:
Cases pending at the beginning of the fiscal year: Civil, 79; probate,
137; criminal, 29. Cases filed during the year: Civil, 75; probate,
155; criminal, 140. Cases settled during the year: Civil, 101; pro-
bate, 232; criminal, 157. Cases pending at the end of the year: Civil,
53; probate, 60; criminal, 12.
Of the civil cases settled, 47 were decided, 52 dismissed, and 2
transferred. Of the criminal cases settled, 19 were acquitted, 104
convicted, 21 nol pressed, 8 dismissed, and 5 forfeited.
Number of marriage licenses issued, 520; number of deeds recorded,
9; total collections, $3,436.05.

MARSHAL.

Writs of process received, 412; served, 333; parties not found,
79; fees collected, $275.50; fees paid to witnesses, $77; trust funds
disbursed by order of the court, $15,537; total trust funds handled
during the year, $138,102.20.

MAGISTRATES' COURTS.

Balboa.--Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Civil, 1;
criminal, 1. Cases docketed during the year: Civil, 42; criminal,
1,831. Of the criminal cases disposed of, 44 resulted in acquittal,
1,475 in conviction, 23 were dismissed, and 80 held to the district
court. Cases pending at the end of the year: 3 civil and 2 criminal.
Total collections, $10,279.85.
As provided for in the Executive order of May 10, 1911, petitions
were made to the district judge for the commitment of 52 persons to
the insane asylum for observation.
Oristobal.--Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Civil, 7;
criminal, 5. Cases docketed during the year: Civil, 35; criminal,
1,298. Of the criminal cases disposed of, 116 resulted in acquittal,
1,041 in conviction, 47 were dismissed, and 100 committed to the





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


district court. Cases pending at the end of the year: Civil, 7; crim-
inal, 6. Total collections, $8,503.10.

FIRE PROTECTION.
The number of paid firemen employed on June 30, 1923, was 44,
an increase, of 2 over the preceding year, and in addition to these 17
volunteer companies were maintained. There were no changes in
the organization of the. department, nor in the number and location
of stations. The equipment was increased by the purchase of a 1-ton
Ford chassis (which was built into a hose wagon) and 2,000 feet of
21-inch fire hose.
Periodical inspections of all Government buildings, docks, store-
houses, yards, etc., were conducted by the department., fire hose and
extinguishers were maintained in good condition, and the volunteers
were drilled and instructed.
There were 58 fires in property of The Panama Canal, 15 in Panama
Railroad property, 6 in United States Army property, 4 in Unit.ed
States Navy property, and 20 in private property. The total loss
from fires during the year amounted to $124,329.75, of which $90,000
was caused by a fire on the S. S. Roman Prince, and $12,132.35 by
the destruction of an Army warehouse at Gatun. The estimated
value of the Government property threatened by fire was $764,913.47,
and of the private property, $8,940,307. The latter figure includes
the estimated value of the S. S. Roman Prince, with its cargo, and
other vessels on which fires occurred in Canal Zone waters.

PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM.

The public schools of the Canal Zone. were administered on estab-
lished lines, with the introduction of minor improvements. There
were 2 high schools and 5 elementary schools for white children,
with 75 teachers at the close of the school year, and 7 elementary
schools for colored children, with 39 teachers. The net. enrollment
in the white schools was 840 boys and 926 girls, and in the colored
schools 1,053 boys and 957 girls. The two high schools graduated
25 pupils.
It has been the aim to provide in the white schools educational
opportunities for American children comparable 'with those offered
by any community in the United States. Adequate buildings have
been provided, and competent teachers are employed under expert
supervision.
The colored schools, owing to lack of funds, leave much to be de-
sired. The buildings are overcrowded, and there is a waiting list of
children who can not be admitted; the equipment is inadequate;
and teachers are required to take care of more children than they





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


can properly instruct. Some improvement was effected during the
year by the assignment of two new buildings, one at Cristobal and
one at Gatun, and by the employment of 7 additional teachers.
Although the instruction is not comparable to that in the white
schools, it has been maintained at as high a level as in previous years.
With the opening of the next school year in October, it is planned
to have one additional colored school at Gamboa, with approxi-
mately 40 pupils, and a new white school at Camp Gaillard, with 3
teachers and an estimated enrollment of 86 pupils.
The cost. of maintaining the public schools of the Canal Zone is
approximately $200,000 per annum.

POSTAL SYSTEM.
Twelve postoffices were in operation at the end of the fiscal year,
one new office having been opened at Fort Clayton on July 1, 1922.
To expedite the handling of mail at France Field, arrangements
were made to open a postoffice there. on July 1, 1923.
The total receipts of the postal service were $151,958. 16, as com-
pared with $157,407.85 in the preceding year. Under the terms of
the Taft agreement the Canal Zone post offices continued to purchase
stamps from the Republic of Panama for 40 per cent of their face
value at a total cost of $41,484.91. While the service is burdened
with this subsidy it will necessarily be operated at a loss.
Money orders were issued to the value of $2,695,172.02, on which
fees amounting to S9,883.74 were collected. This total included
deposit money orders, which have been issued since August, 1916,
in lieu of postal savings certificates, to the value of $803,200. The
rate of interest on these deposit money orders was increased by au-
thority of an Executive order dated December 6, 1922, from 2 per
cent to 3 per cent. The total amount on deposit at all post offices
on June 30, 1923, was $470,731, as compared with $43S,180.05 on
June 30, 1922.
The sale of Treasury savings certificates during the fiscal year
totaled $196,674.50. The sales fell off after October 1, 1922, due
to the lower rate of interest paid on the new series, and again after
January 1, 1923, probably due to the increased rate of interest paid
on deposit money orders.
In the registry division of the post offices 229,177 letters and parcels
were handled, of which 41,893 were official and accepted for regis-
tration without fee.
The Cristobal post office made 2,127 dispatches of mail to dif-
ferent foreign exchange offices and received 1,747 dispatches. The
Balboa post office, which dispatches foreign mail to west coast
Central and South American ports only, made 256 dispatches and
received approximately the same number.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


United States and foreign transit mail destined to the west coast
of Central and South America, as well as mail exchanged between
Cuba, Jamaica, and other insular governments with Colombia, Costa
Rica, Venezuela, etc., is handled under the supervision of the director
of posts. Mail from European countries routed via the Isthmus for
transshipment is handled by the director of posts on behalf of the
United States Post Office Department, whereas direct, agreements
are in effect between the director of posts and the postal adminis-
trations of Costa Rica, Australia, and New Zealand for the handling
of their mails routed via the Isthmus.
The establishment of new direct shipping routes to the west coast
of Central and South America has resulted in a decrease in the
number of bags of transit mail received and dispatched under the
supervision of the director of posts, but has increased the number of
dispatches.
During the year mail was received on about 300 steamers from
United States and foreign ports, and mail was dispatched to destina-
tion by approximately 400 steamers.
CUSTOMS.
The total number of vessels entered at the terminal ports of the
canal, including vessels in transit, was 9,116, and the number cleared
9,113. These figures show an increase of approximately 50 per cent
over the previous year.
All merchandise discharged at Cristobal or Balboa and destined to
persons or firms in the Republic of Panama, not consigned to The
Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad Co., or the United States Army
or Navy, is in the custody of the Canal Zone customs until papers have
been submitted from Panaman officials to prove that duty has been
paid or waived. Permits for 7,366 releases were granted at Cristobal
and for 139 at Balboa. Cargo landed at the latter port is usually
forwarded by railroad to Panama, where it passes into the custody
of the Panaman authorities.
A total of 1,693 free-entry requests was approved for employees
of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad Co. and members of
the United States Army or Navy, who have the privilege of import-
ing articles for their personal use without payment of duty.
There were 16 arrests for violations of the customs regulations and
30 arrests for alleged violations of the opium act.
The number of cases of household goods inspected and sealed for
employees returning to the United States was 1,025, and the fees
collected for this service totaled $713.50. There were 581 invoices
certified during the year, on which the fees amounted to $675.
The number of vessels requesting the detail of customs inspectors
for the examination of passengers' baggage, etc., after the usual





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CAN. L.


working hours was 501, and the sum of $4,165 was collected for
this special service.
Customs inspectors checked 376 Chinese crews upon arrival and
before departure to prevent the illegal landing of Chinese in the
Canal Zone or the Republic of Panama. They also assumed re-
sponsibility for 513 Chinese passengers, besides 25 on hand at the
beginning of the year, of whom 235 were admitted to the Republic
of Panama on the authority of that Government, and the others,
with the exception of 72 awaiting transportation at the end of the
year, either proceeded on their journey or were returned to the port
of embarkation. Bonds were accepted for the temporary release in
the Canal-Zone of 159 Chinese in transit.

SHIPPING COMMISSIONER-SEAMEN.

The shipping commissioner and his deputies have the same powers
with respect to American seamen as shipping commissioners in the
United States and American consuls in foreign ports. During the
fiscal year there were 3,342 seamen shipped on American vessels and
4,119 discharged. The total amount of wages earned by seamen
who were discharged at Canal Zone ports was $141,665.35; the
amount approved for deduction on account of advances, allotments,
fines, slop chest, account, etc., was $41,632.51; and the balance of
$100,032.84 was either paid to them under the supervision of the
deputy shipping commissioners or received on deposit for their
account. There were 277 American seamen lodged and subsisted at
the expense of the United States Government. Of this number 238
were returned to the United States at the expense of the appropria-
tion for the relief of destitute American seamen, and the remaining
39 were signed on vessels and returned to the United States without
expense to the Government. The wages and effects of four Ameri-
can seamen who died in the Canal Zone were handled bythe shipping
commissioner as provided by law.

ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES.

During the year the estates of 65 deceased and insane employees
of The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Co. were adminis-
tered, and there were 28 estates in course of settlement on June 30,
1923.
RELATIONS WITH PANAMA.

Attached to the report of the executive secretary is a list of the
subjects which gave rise to correspondence between the government
of the Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama. They were exclus-
ively of a routine nature.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


A general revision of the existing agreements between the United
States and the Republic of Panama embodied in the Hay-Bunau
Varilla treaty, the so-called Taft agreement, and the interpretations
that have been placed upon both, affecting the operation of the
canal and the reciprocal rights and duties of the two Governments,
has been desired for some time by both, and negotiations with that
end in view are pending between the State Department of the United
States and the Department of Foreign Relations of the Republic of
Panama.
LAWS AND EXECUTIVE ORDERS.

Laws enacted and Executive orders issued during the year, appli-
cable to The Panama Canal, are collected in an appendix to'the report
of the executive secretary.










SECTION IV.


ADMINISTRATION.

CHANGES IN ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL.

Following the reopening of the Canal Zone to agriculture and after
consultation with the Department of Agriculture at Washington, the
position of agronomist was created in the supply department, and
Mr. Holger Johansen, formerly director of agriculture in Santo Do-
mingo, was appointed to fill it. He is to develop plant introduction
and propagation in the Canal Zone in cooperation with the Depart-
ment. of Agriculture, and to advise and assist local farmers. The
appointment. of an assistant agronomist was also authorized, but. the
position had not been filled at the end of the fiscal year. The aban-
doned poultry farm at Summit was assigned to the agronomist for
experimental and plant development work and a small force of
laborers was employed under his direction. The expense of this work
will be charged against the revenues from public lands.
Capt. Alfred W. Hinds, United States Navy, was appointed marine
superintendent of The Panama Canal, effective April 16, 1923, reliev-
ing Capt.. Earl P. Jessop, United States Navy, who had rendered
efficient service in the same position since April 15, 1920.
Effective October 17, 1922, Commander R. S. Culp, United States
Navy, was appointed captain of the port, Cristobal, relieving Com-
mander F. V. McNair, United States Navy.
Effective January 18, 1923, Commander M. E. Manly, United
States Navy, was appointed captain of the port, Balboa, relieving
Lieutenant Commander S. L. Henderson, United States Navy.
Effective September 1, 1922, Mr. John G. Claybourn was promoted
from assistant, engineer to superintendent of dredging, to succeed Mr.
Joel M. Pratt., deceased June 11, 1922.
Effective May 28, 1923, Lieut. Col. Will L. Pyles, Medical Corps,
United States Army, was appointed superintendent of Ancon Hos-
pital, relieving Col. Louis T. Hess, Medical Corps, United States
Army.
INCREASE OF FORCE.

There was a slight increase of force during the year, amounting to
a little more than 1 per cent for gold employees and to a little more
than 10 per cent for silver employees. This is amply accounted for
41






42 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

by the greater volume of business handled. The details of the in-
crease are shown in the following table:

June, 1922 June, 1923
Department or division.
Gold Silver Total. Gold Silver Total.
roll. roll. roll. roll.

Operation and maintenance:
Office ..... ........................ ......-- .. 28 37 65 28 47 75
Electrical division............................... 141 152 293 150 146 296
Municipal engineering............................ 71 664 735 71 487 558
Lock operation............................... 163 530 693 179 570 749
Dredging.............. ..................130 597 727 152 886 1,038
Mechaical.............................. 319 553 872 340 661 1,001
Marine............................... 154 360 514 156 472 628
Fortifications................................. 39 234 273 14 169 183
Supply:
Quartermaster.................................. 139 897 1,036 142 962 1,104
Subsistence...................................- 6 79 85 6 80 86
Commisary.................................. 164 742 906 164 766 930
Cattle industry nd plantations..................... 6 133 139 6 205 211
Hotel Washington.............................. 9 83 92 8 93 91
Transportation................................. 32 147 179 36 157 193
Accounting..................................... 180 7 187 182 8 190
Health ... .. ...................................... 211 705 916 222 692 914
Executive........................................... 499 243 742 476 264 740
Panama R. R.:
Superintendent................................. 46 221 267 47 251 301
Transportation.................................. 67 99 166 64 108 172
Receiving and forwarding agent................... 64 625 689 78 924 1,002
Coaling stations................................ 85 515 600 62 477 539
Total...............................: ........... 2,553 7,623 10,176 2,583 8,41I 11,001


The pay roll for July, 1922, aggregated $915,366.93, and for June,
1923, $970,184.43, an increase of approximately 6 per cent.

WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.

Gold e mployees.-Such wage adjustments as were made during the
year were subject to the clause in the current appropriation act
reading:
No part of the foregoing appropriation shall be used to pay the salary for any posi-
tion at a rate in excess of the rate in effect for such position on June 30, 1921.
Subject to this limitation, the established rule was followed that
local wages should be higher by not more than 25 per cent than wages
for the same or similar work in the public service in the United States
or in private employ when no comparable job could be found under
the Government. The granting of this increment has always been
limited by requirements of suitable coordination within the service,
the full 25 per cent not being allowed for isolated groups or indi-
viduals if its application would result in rates not properly commen-
surate with the service performed in comparison with pay allowed
other employees.
There were few changes during the period covered by this report.
The majority of the local rates for skilled trades are based on the navy-
yard rates. These were not revised until May 1, 1923, and since it
appeared from information received on the Isthmus that the revi-





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


sion of that date would not apply to the entire schedule in the navy
yards and would be modified on or about July 1, 1923, it was con-
sidered advisable to make no changes here until a final decision had
been arrived at by the Navy Department, provided, however, that
the eventual changes should be made retroactive to coincide with
the corresponding changes in the navy yards.
The so-called construction rates in the building trades were
revised effective July 1, September 1, and November 1, 1922, and
March 1 and May 1, 1923, resulting in increases, subject to the limit-
ing provision in the appropriation act, but this affected only a small
number of men, as there was little new construction during the year.
The maintenance rates for the building trades are based on the navy-
yard scale and remained unchanged.
The rates for carman, carman leading man, oxyacetylene operator,
car inspector, and signal maintainer were revised effective July 1,
1922, in accordance with decisions of the United States Railroad
Labor Board, resulting in slight reductions.
The rates for pattern makers were revised upward on May 1 and
again on June 1, 1923.
With these exceptions there were no changes during the year in
basic rates. Numerous individual cases, not based directly on rates
paid for similar employment in the United States, were handled
administratively.
Following the readjustments made during the preceding fiscal
year, during which the establishment of charges for rent, fuel, etc.,
red uced the net income of the employees, the fiscal year ended June
30, 1923, was a period of relative peace in the matter of compensation.
Upon the levying of the rent and associated charges, the adminis-
tration stated that it would stand squarely behind the 25 per cent
increment, subject to the limitations of coordination, including the
legislative increase or bonus allowed in the United States. Although
the payment of the second half of the bonus has not been made, on
account of objections of the House Committee on Appropriations,
the efforts to secure its payment have been appreciated. The policy
and methods of wage adjustments are well understood by the em-
ployees, and, coupled with complete publicity, have developed an
attitude of mutual confidence. The system is excellently adapted
to maintaining a coordinated wage scale for employment in the opera-
tion of the canal and its varied allied activities.
Silver employees.-There has been no change in the system of de-
termining the basic rate for laborers and the related rates for other
alien employees in subordinate positions and carried on the silver
pay roll, which are adjusted quarterly to meet fluctuations in the
cost of living.
65887-23---





44 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

Effective July 1, 1922, the rate for common labor was reduced
from 21 cents to 20 cents an hour, the higher hourly rates were re-
duced by 1 cent to correspond, monthly rates were cut $2.50, and
per diem rates reduced 10 cents. Since then, although the quarterly
analysis of commissary prices for October 1, 1922, and for January 1
and April 1, 1923, indicated that the cost of living was still declining,
no further reductions have been made. Prices began to rise again
in the last quarter of the fiscal year, and this was reflected in the
analysis for July 1, 1923.
The following statement shows the relative increase of living costs
over 1914, the mean hourly rate indicated by such increase, and the
hourly rate adopted, for each quarter since February 1, 1920, when
the present method of adjusting silver wages was first adopted:


Date. Living cost Indicated Rate
Date over 1914. rate. adopted.

Per cent. Cents. Cents.
Feb. 1, 1920....................................................... 71.58 21.25 21
Apr. 1, 1920........................................................ 73.09 21. 47 21
July 1, 1920.................................... 87.77 23. 18 23
Oct. 1, 1920 ...................................................... 89.12 23.40 23
Jan. 1, 1921........................................................ 79.28 22.19 23
Apr. 1,1921............................................... ..... 72.399 21.33 23
July 1,1921........................................................ 68.977 20.91 22
Oct. 1, 1921................................................ 62.59 20.12 21
Jan. 1, 1922............................................... 59.98 19.82 21
Apr. 1, 1922......................................................... 55.46 19. 24 21
July 1, 1922....................................................... 50.039 18.57 20
Oct.1, 1922....................................................... 47.81 18.29 20
Jan 1 1923............................................. ... 45.816 18.04 20
Apr. 1, 1923.............................. ........................ 44. 073 17. 83 20
July 1, 1923................................................. ..... 46.909 18.18 20

GRIEVANCE BOARD.

The board organized in July, 1920, to hear grievances and com-
plaints of American employees had only 3 cases brought before it
during the year, as compared with 5 in 1922, and 32 in 1921. The
assistant engineer of maintenance and the head of the division in
which the complaint originates represent the administration on this
board, and the organized employees are represented by two delegates.
The functions of the board are advisory. It conducts hearings in
cases which are referred to it, and submits its recommendations to
the governor.

PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATIONS.

The bureau of clubs and playgrounds, subsidized by The Panama
Canal as explained in the section on business operations, conducted
5 clubhouses and 1 boathouse for American employees and their
families, and 5 clubhouses for alien colored employees. The club-
houses operate soda fountains and lunch counters, deal in magazines,
candy, tobacco, photographic and athletic supplies, postal cards and





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA ( A.AL.


souvenirs, exhibit moving pictures, stage varied entertainments,
maintain bowling alleys, and pool and billiard tables. These activi-
ties are not only self-sustaining but yield a considerable net revenue.
The bureau also maintains free reading rooms, kindergartens and
children' playgrounds, and supervises and promotes such athletic
sports as swimming, baseball, boxing, wrestling, handball, and tennis.
The clubhouses are community centers, patronized by all ages and
both sexes, and used for the most diverse social activities. On
account of the development. of independent and voluntary organiza-
tions, they are less essential now to adult employees than in the
construction days, but they contribute materially to the health and
happiness of the children and young people, who are now as numerous
as in older communities, and for whose energies some safe outlet
must be provided.

RECRLTTING, PI'RCIIASES, AND SALES IN THE UNITED) STATES.

The number of persons tendered employment through the Wash-
ington office was 542, of which number 282 accepted. The corres-
ponding figures for 1922 were 448 and 173. Purchases were heavier
than in the. previous year, the number of orders placed by the Wash-
ington office being 5,381 for a total value of $2,351,048.33, as com-
pared with 2,629 orders involving an expenditure of $1,169;248.68
,in 1922. The sale of scrap and surplus material to the value of
$448,888.14 was also handled by this organization.
In addition to these and other routine duties, the Washington
office was required to represent The Panama Canal on the various
boards and coordinating committees appointed by the chief coordi-
nator and the director of the bureau of the budget. The work of
these boards and committees has absorbed a large share of time of
executives and clerical force.












SECTION V.


FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.

This section contains financial statements of The Panama Canal
(Tables 1 to 58) and statistical statements of canal traffic (Tables 59
to 63). For convenience of cross reference the original numbering
of the financial statements quoted from the annual report of the
auditor of The Panama Canal has been preserved, although Tables
Nos. 23, 35, 40, 41, and 45 to 58 have not been printed. A complete
list. of the tables, including those omitted, follows:


Table No.
Table No.
Table No.
Table No.
Table No.
Table No.
Table No.
Table 'No.
panies.
Table No.


Table No. 10.
Table No. 11.
Table No. 12.
Table No. 13.
Table No. 14.
Table No. 15.
Table No. 16.
Table No. 17.
Table No. 18.
Table No. 19.
Table No. 20.
Table No. 21.
Tablle No. 22.
Table No. 21.
Table No. 24.
Table No. 25>.
Table No. 26.
Table No. 27.
Table No. 28.
Table No. 29.
Table No. 30.
Table No. 31.
Table No. 32.
Table No. 33.
46


General balance sheets.
Balances in appropriation and fund accounting.
Appropriations by Congress.
Status of authorized bond issue.
Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States.
Payments made by fiscal officers.
Receipts and disbursements by collector.
Collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals and comr-


9. Collector's special deposit account.


Audited pay rolls.
Accounts receivable, registered, and outstanding.
Comparative statement of accounts receivable.
Comparative statement of accounts payable.
Statement of defense capital expenditures to June 30, 1923.
Canal fixed property.
Canal transit equipment.
Business property, equipment, etc., by divisions.
Business fixed property.
Canal business equipment.
Status of public works in Panama and Colon.
Material and supplies.
Receipts, issues, and transfers of stores.
Comparative statement of store balance.
Gross canal expenses, earnings, and net expenses.
Canal revenues.
Business expenses, revenues, and net revenues.
Comparison of expenses and revenues and surplus by years to date.
Pay-roll deductions from employees for rent, etc.
Reserves for depreciation.
Reserves for repairs.
Reserves for gratuity.
Cost of production and distribution of electric current.
Cost of production and distribution of water.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Table No. 34. Dredging operations.
Table No. 35. Money orders issued and paid by Canal Zone and Canal Zone orders
paid by other administrations, fiscal years 1907 to 1923, inclusive.
Table No. 36. Monthly money-order business of Canal Zone postal sen-ice.
Table No. 37. Audited revenues, fiscal years 1907 to 1923, inclusive-Postal Service.
Table No. 38. Postal revenues, fiscal year 1!923.
Table No. 39. Postal savings and deposit money-order transactions, fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 40. Income, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 41. Expenses, bureau of clubs and playLrounds, fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 42. Income and expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year
1923.
Table No. 43. Balance sheet, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, June 30, 1923.
Table No. 44. Coupons books issued, sold, etc., fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 45. Amounts of injury payments made during the period August 1, 1908,
to June 30, 1923.
Table No. 46. Injury and death payments September 7, 1916, to date.
Table No. 47. Number of injuries, by extent of disability, for each division or de-
partment.
Table No. 48. Nature of non fatal cases, by department or division.
Table No. 49. N umber of cases and compensation paid, classed by injury.
Table No. 50. Class of work being performed by employees at time of injury, by
departments and divisions.
Table No. 51. Cause of injuries, by departments and divisions.
Table No. 52. Cost of commissary supplies purchased and sold during fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 53. Collections made from other than employees.
Table No. 54. Collections of Panama Railroad land rents.
Table No. 55. Panama Railroad accounts payable vouchers registered during fiscal
year 1923.
Table No. 56. Statement of work of time inspection division.
Table No. 57. Statistics of silver quarters, exclusive of Barracks and Las Cascadas.
Table No. 58. Report of work performed by pay roll section.
Table No. 59. Summary of commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during
the fiscal year 1923 and since its opening to commercial traffic.
Table No. 60. N umber of commercial vessels of various nationalities passing through
The Panama Canal 1915-1923.
Table No. 61-A. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing through
The Panama Canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific during the fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 61-B. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing through
The Panama Canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic during the fiscal year 1923.
Table No. 62-A. Tons of cargo carried by commercial vessels passing through
The Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 1923, by fiscal years.
Table No. 62-B. The Panama Canal net tonnage of vessels by nationalities passing
through The Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 1923, by fiscal years.
Table No. 63. Statement showing the number of vessels, the Panama Canal net
tonnage, tolls assessed, and tons of cargo carried by vessels of the principal nations
passing through The Panama Canal during the first nine years of its operation.

NOTES IN EXPLANATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.

Table No. 1.-There are two items on the general balance sheet,
on the asset side, in addition to the ones shown in the annual report
last year; (a) Theoretical interest accruals; (b) Undistributed business
capital. The theoretical interest, which amounts to $104,885.79,




REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


represents 3 per cent on the amortization and depreciation reserves
as of June 30, 1922. The undistributed business capital, amounting
to $1,663,000, consists of a part of the general stores, working cash
and accounts receivable which is chargenble to the various business
divisions. This item is shown more in detail in the table covering
business property.
The canal capital account has been increased by $75,000, covering
appraised value of Cristobal incinerator which was transferred from
business property to the health department. Business capital has
been reduced by $1,180,479.74, which includes the incinerator just
referred to and several other items which were charged off as canal
defense expenditures. Reference will be made to the items in
detail under canal defense expenditure table.
Comparisons of the figures in the other accounts with last fiscal
year will be made under the various tables covering same.
Table No. 2.-This table is the same form it was in last year,
showing the available cash in the Treasury and in the hands of the
fiscal officers, together with the accounts receivable and Treasury
transfers which are repayable to the appropriations. This statement
also shows the liabilities and encumbrances. Last year the accounts
receivable amounted to $1,266,323.28, against $786,847.09 this year,
a reduction of almost $500,000. The stock of store material on hand
has -also been considerably reduced but this is only a temporary
reduction, as the requisitions and orders in the process of being
filled are already beginning to increase the store stock. The greater
part of the balance in the old appropriations, "Construction and
equipment," "Panama Canal fund," and "Canal connecting Atlantic
and Pacific Oceans," is being released for transfer to the surplus fund.
Tablh No. 3.-This table shows the total amount appropriated
for constructing The Panama Canal; the total amount appropriated
to date, covering the annual payment of $250,000 to the Panaman
Government; and the amounts appropriated year by year for the
Imaintenance and operation, sanitation, and civil government of
The Panama Canal. This includes the appropriation for the fiscal
year 1924.
Table No. 4.-This table is an exact copy of the one in last year's
annual report showing the balance available for appropriation within
the limit of the cost of the canal and the authorized bond issue,
amounting to $2,056,975.31.
Table No. 5.-This table shows the amount of available appro-
priated ca-h in the Treasury, together with the cash in the hands of
the three principal liical officers, June 30, 1922, and cash receipts and
di1mhur.-.nemnts during the fiscal year, and the cash on hand June 30,
1923. It shows the amount, appropriated for expenditure during
the fiscal year 1923 and the transfers of cash between these four





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


agencies, also the amounts collected, showing separately the collec-
tion of business funds, which were repaid to the appropriations, the
canal revenues which were deposited as miscellaneous receipts, and
the amounts deposited to cover the payment of bills. On the dis-
bursement side this statement shows the amounts covered into the
Treasury as miscellaneous receipts and the amount transferred to the
surplus fund. It also shows the disbursements from the various
appropriations by the Treasury, disbursing clerk, and the paymaster,
and the use of security deposits in the payment of bills. The Treas-
ury furnished the other fiscal officers with cash amounting to
$5,396,500, and made settlements by transfer, amounting to
$444,539.45, a total disbursement of $5,841,039.45. Against this
amount the other fiscal officers supplied the Treasury with cash
amounting to $737,677.74, and the Treasury collections repayable
to appropriation amounted to $1,658,595.41, a total of $2,396,273.15,
indicating that The Panama Canal called on the Treasury for appro-
priated funds, during the year, to the extent of approximately three
and one-half million dollars.
Table No. 8-Payma.qter.-Disbursements to the amount of $15,-
425,240.57 were made during the year by the paymaster. Of this
-amount the sum of $5,605,129.36 was on account of the Panama
Railroad Co. Employees on the gold roll of The Panama Canal were
paid $5,211,430.77 and those on the silver roll $3,349,096.46, while
the sum of $1,259,583.98 was paid on miscellaneous vouchers.
Collections on the pay rolls amounted to $2,857,917.17. Of this
amount the sum of $2,232,124.65 was collected for coupon books,
the remainder being for miscellaneous items. Of the total collec-
tions on pay rolls the sum of $2,263,150.98 was disbursed by the
paymaster, Panama Canal, the balance, $594,766.19, being trans-
ferred to the collector's accounts.
The American Foreign Banking Corporation was continued as a
Government depository. During the year the sum of $6,587,335
Panama Railroad funds, was transferred to the treasurer, New York.
This amount included $757,335 mutilated currency, due to rapid
deterioration of paper money through climatic conditions. The
cash situation on the Isthmus was satisfactory during the year.
The sum of $500.000 was brought, down by the paymaster from
the United States during the year.
Tables Nos. 7, 8, and 9-Collector.-The collections repaid to
appropriations amounted to $6,329,372.72; miscellaneous receipts,
$17,885,044.49; security deposits, $22,487,430.73 (see Table No. 5);
making total cash received, $46,701,847.94. Besides this the collector
handled the cash in connection with the clubhouse fund, trust funds,
postal savings fund, money order funds, interest and Treasury savings
certificates, a cash turnover of approximately $2,400,000. The





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


collections for the account of the Panama Railroad Co., amounted
t.o $11,S02,865.46.
Last year the erpayment to appropriations amounted to $7,730,-
187.92, and the deposits as miscellaneous receipts, $11,477,312.91.
The collections for the Panama Railroad Co. last year amounted to
$13,219,897.45.
The large increase in the total amount of cash passing through
the collector's office was due to the increase in tolls collected.
Table No. 10.-The total amount of salaries and wages paid during
the year was $8,627,698.19, as compared with $9,731,338.82 during
the fiscal year 1922. Of the amount paid during the fiscal year 1923,
$4,224,305.91 was for salaries and $4,403,392.28 for wages.
The amount paid from the appropriation for maintenance and
operation was $7,081,157.10. Of this amount $4,072,300.24 was in
connection with transit divisions, and $2,974,976.15 for business
divisions. The sum of $750,254.46 was paid to employees of civil
government, and $796,286.63 to the employees of the health depart-
ment.
Table No. 11.-This table shows that there was an increase of
almost five thousand bills registered and also shows the gradual
increase in the bills for tolls during the twelve months, ranging from
$1,094,132.67 to $1,972,262.99.
Table No. 12.-This is a comparative statement of accounts
receivable outstanding June 30. The amount outstanding on
June 30, 1923, is over $400,000 less than last year. There is also a
reduction of approximately $78,000 in the bills against the Panaman
Government in connection with the maintenance and operation of
the water system.
Table No. 13.-This is a comparison of the accounts payable out-
standing. The amount outstanding June 30, 1923, is $228,892.80
more than last year, most of which is in United States invoices for
material purchased.
The number of Isthmus vouchers registered is 2,203, covering
payments amounting to $3,622,852.04.
Table No. 14.-The amount chargeable to national defense was
increased during the past year by $1,105,479.74. The old Wash-
ington Hotel restaurant, which was set up in the accounts at $2,000,
and the Balboa Heights Ladies' Restaurant, which was set up at
$1,500, were closed and the amount which was set up under the
heading of business property, as their possible value as restaurants,
was written off to canal defense expenditures.
The Balboa incinerator, which was set up under the heading of
business property at the value of $100,000 and which is not being
operated, was also written to the debit of the canal defense account.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Pier No. 6, Cristobal, the only Panama. Canal pier at the Atlantic
terminals, was set up under business property at its cost of con-
struction, $2,201,979.74. It was decided last year that this amount
is greatly in excess of its commercial value to-day, and therefore the
sum of $1,001,979.74 was written off to the canal defense account
and the dock left in the business account at a fair value of $1,200,000.
Table No. 15.-Additions to canat fixed property amounted to
$17,537.99. Besides this the Cristobal incinerator, valued at $75,000,
was removed from business property to canal fixed property.
Table No. 16.-The additions to canal transit equipment., which
resulted in the expenditure of funds, amounted to approximately
$20,000. The crane boat. La Valley was rebuilt and the sum of
$10,000 was set up as increased valuation. The other increases are
minor ones in connection with floating equipment, machinery,
and tools.
The withdrawals amount to $213,259.99, the principal items being
the tug Empire, which was sold for $9,300; supply boat. No. 1,
810,000; dredge No. 84, $50,000. A number of launches and
barges have been retired for sale and the book value removed from
the canal equipment account.
Table No. 17.-This table shows the entire working capital of the
business divisions, made up of fixed property, equipment, stores,
cash, etc. The changes in fixed property are shown more in detail
in Table No. 18, and the additions and withdrawals of business
equipment are shown in detail in Table No. 19.
Under the heading of stores are included the material and supplies
drawn by the divisions to be used in their work, as well as the stock
of supplies for sale, such as fuel oil, stationery, and office supplies
carried by The Panama Canal Press, sand and gravel stock at Gamboa,
and the value of general store stock shipped to the United States
for sale which has not yet been disposed of or for which the proceeds
have not yet come into the accounts.
Under the heading of work in progress are carried the expended
labor, material, and supplies, etc., on uncompleted work for which
bills will not be rendered until the work is completed.
The undistributed business capital, which has been charged to the
business divisions during the past year, amounting to $1,663,000,
consists of store material, accounts receivable, and cash; that is, the
value of store material carried in the general storehouse for the
future use of business divisions and the ready cash carried by the
fiscal officers to meet. the claims of the business divisions.
The accounts receivable included in this item represent the unpaid
business division bills. These amounts are charged to the individual
divisions in order to arrive at the interest on the investment that





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


each one should earn. The amount is made up of stores, $830,000;
accounts receivable, $601,000; and cash, $232,000.
Table No. 18.-This table shows the detail of business fixed
property by divisions operating it. It. also shows the capital
additions and the reductions during the year.
The capital additions for which appropriated funds were used
cost. approximately $120,000, of which the surge tank at Summit,
$27,666.32; new oil pipe line to Dock No. 6, Cristobal, $58,510.41:
and the new sprinkler system in the Hotel Tivoli, $23,997.35, are
the principal items. The sprinkler system was started in last fiscal
year but the item has been set up in the capital account in the fiscal
year 1923.
With reference to the reductions, the capital value of the Balboa
incinerator, $100,000, was charged off to national defense and the
value of the Cristobal incinerator, $75,000, was transferred to transit
fixed property. The valuation of Pier No. 6 was reduced by $1,001,-
979.74, which was charged to canal defense expenditure. The other
reductions are due to minor sales and transfers of property as ex-
plained in the table.
Table No. 19.-This table shows the detail of canal business
equipment in use by business divisions at the beginning and end of
the fiscal year and the additions and with(draw-als during the year.
New machinery and tools were acquired at a cost of approximately
$55,000. Under the heading of withdrawals are listed the monthly
depreciation reductions. This equipment is being depreciated on
the monthly balance which is equivalent to writing its value into
the operating expenses in a given time. The depreciation is de-
ducted from the account and new purchases are charged to the
account every month. This method is entirely different from the
regular depreciation method where the original cost of the property
remains intact and the monthly and annual depreciation is set aside
in another account.
Table No. .0.-This statement shows the investment in public
works in the cities of Colon and Panama. It also shows the amount
expended by the United States Government in maintHaining and
operating the water works, sewers, and streets in the two cities;
the amount of interest which has been deposited in the Treasury,
and the repayments which have been made out of the water rent
collections. The water rentals have never been quite sufficient to
cover the cost. of operation and maintenance and to pay interest
and amortization, which resulted in the rendition of bills against
the Panaman Government for the deficit, in accordance with the
contract. During the past year the Pananman Government has
paid those deficit bills so that the amount now outstanding is very
small.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Table No. .?.-This table shows the value of material and supplies
on hand June 30, 1923, as compared with last year. The reduction
in the stock carried in the general storehouse at Balboa approxi-
mates $2,000,000. A large amount of this reduction consists of
surplus stock which we sent to Hoboken for sale, and the difference
between its value and the sale price set for it was charged to the
reserve for price reduction, of which there was a balance of $1,524,-
018.78 last year and which now has a balance of $8S8,723.15. As ex-
plained last. year, thigh account is used to control the price fluctuation.
The present store stock is below normal but the requisitions and
orders which are in transit will considerably increase the stock
during the next year.
Table No. .2.-This statement shows the value of stores received
and disposed of by months during the past fiscal year and the balances
on hand at the beginning and close of the period. The purchases,
which were handled through the storehouse accounts, amounted to
$1,935,571.79, and the purchases delivered direct to divisions,
$625,588.09; material manufactured and taken into stock amounted
to $315,457.35. The value of material issued was $2,978,281.21 and
the sales amounted to $1,399,839.74. The regular store stock on
hand July 1, 1922, was changed from the amount shown last year
($5,510,260.15) by making a correction of $73.06 and adding the
value of material in the Corozal storehouse, $404,098.85, and sand
and gravel, $260,955.03: making the new balance, $6,175,387.09.
The value of material on hand July 1, 1923, is shown in this statement
as $4,323,477.81, to which should be added the value of scrap and
obsolete material ($312,821.72), shown in Table No. 23 which is not
printed, making a total of $4,636,299.53. This figure includes the
value of fuel oil, $140,204.13; stationery and office supplies at The
Panama Canal Press, $101,792.63; sand and gravel, $239,776.07; and
material sent to Hoboken for sale, $347,942.47; a total of $829,715.30,
which is carried under the heading of business property. By re-
moving this figure from the balance it leaves the amount of transit
material on hand as $3,806,584.23.
Table No. 23.-This table shows the value of material and supplies
on hand, by commodities, compared with last fiscal year.
Table No. 94.-Canal expenses and earningis.-The gross cost of
operation and maintenance was $10,308,723.06, as compared with
$10,407,784.23 last year. The earnings credited against the gross
expense amounted to $2,617,945.50, as compared with $2,488,766.60
for the prior year. The net expense was $7,690,777.56; which is
$228,240.07 less than last year.
Attention is called to the reduction in the expenditures by the
executive and accounting departments and the Washington office.
The net civil government expense shows an increase of approximately





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


$10,000 over last. year, while the net health department expense
shows a decrease of approximately $75,000.
The net marine division expenses were S523,S04.77 against $617,-
958.11 last year, a reduction of over $90,000. The pilotage revenues
at Cristobal exceeded the expenses by $22,424.54, and the cost of
handlinglines was $13,781.88 less than the fixed charges for that
work. Roughly speaking, the difference between the expenses last
year and th is are as follows:
The cost of operating the port, captains' offices shows an increase
of approximately S60,000 (the Balboa port captain's expenses
included approximately $40,000 for maintenance of signal stations
and moorings in the cut). The net pilot age expense shows a decrease
of approximately $100,000, and the net cost of operating tugs and
launches shows a decrease of approximately $100,000.
Lock operations cost $1,128,817.27 in 1923 against $1,120,419.10
the prior year. The expenditure at Gatun locks was $349,525.66,
compared with 8346,151.06 for the fiscal year 1922. The expense
at the Pedro Miguel locks was $406,501.86, compared with $261,-
750.73 last year. This difference is due to biennial overhauling.
The expenditure at the Miraflores locks was $372,789.75, compared
with $512,517.31 last year. This difference is also due to repairs.
Channel maintenance shows an increase of approximately $150,000.
The net amount expended in 1923 was $2,111,947.25, compared with
$1,960,793.15 in 1922.
The charge made directly against the appropriated funds for water
for municipal purposes was $69,205.86, compared with $64,009.27
last year. This represents the cost of water system expense for fire
protection, water for street cleaning, sprinkling lawns, etc.
Under the heading of maintenance of laborers' quarters there is a
charge of $50,705.29 which represents the excess of the expenses of
housing silver employees over the rentals collected from them. The
sum of $116,000 was appropriated for maintaining these quarters.
Damaqces to vess.els.-The total amount of settlements made on
the Istlhmus during the fiscal year on account of damages to com-
mercial vessels for which The Panama Canal assumed liability, was
$2,342.85, $1,996.59 of which was for damages in the locks and
$346.26 in the canal. In addition to this, Treasury transfer was made
to cover the damage to one Government-owned vessel, the U. S. S.
Thoridnton, amounting to $1,260.62, making the total cash settlements
$3,603.47. Besides this, damages were repaired by The Panama
Canal to avoid claims. The cost of making these repairs was $299.78
for vessels damaged in the locks and $2,88S8.04 for vessels damaged
in the canal, a total of $3,187.82, making a grand total for all damages
to vessels of $6,791.29.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


In addition to the above, an expense of $17,618.37 was incurred
in connection with the damage in the canal to the S. S. G. Harrison.
Smith on April 15, 1923. All data in connection with this claim had
not been fully accounted for at the close of this fiscal year and this
item will show in the accounts for the fiscal year 1924.
Table No. 25-Canal rcvrniues.-Tolls and other revenues deposited
in the Treasury during the fiscal year 1923 amounted to $17,691,844.06,
as compared with $11,385,592.32 last year. The increase in tolls
alone was $6,314,247.05. These revenues exceeded the net canal
expenses by $10,001,066.50, which amount has been carried to the
surplus fund.
Table No. .26-Business expenses and revenues.-This table shows
the amounts used by the various business divisions in carrying on
their operations, the revenues derived from such business, and the
profit or loss compared with what 3 per cent on the investment would
amount to; that is, 3 per cent on the value of property, equipment,
stores, etc., used by the divisions in carrying on their work.
The large profit of the electric light and power system is due partly
to rates charged for current and power in excess of the actual cost
at the time the rates were made, and partly to reductions in the
operating expenses since the present rates were established. Changes
were made in the method of charging for electric current, effective
April 1, 1923, which will reduce the revenues somewhat.
Electrical work shows a loss of $15,703.44. This is due to the
very small amount of work that this division has at the present time
against. the expense of a steady force which it is necessary to maintain
in-order to meet emergency demands in this line of work.
The profit, in the telephone system operations represents the
difference between the actual overhead charged to this account and
the offsetting revenue from fixed surcharges.
The expenses of operating the water system were reduced by an
amount. which would bring a net revenue sufficient to cover the 3
per cent on the investment. This amount ($69,205.86) was charged
to transit operations under the heading of water for municipal pur-
poses. On the basis of the regular charge for metered water and the
maintenance of fire plugs, etc., this amount would undoubtedly be
considerably greater, but. it was thought best not to show a profit
in the water-works system in excess of the 3 per cent, at the expense
of the appropriation.
The total revenue from operation of shops and dry docks was
$2,289,953.18, compared with $2,073,222.16 last year. The revenue
from the dry dock at Balboa amounted to $68,145.42 and at Cristobal,
$12,129.04. The profit was $100,184.33, compared with $97,988.67
last year.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Under docks, wharves, and piers, the expense consists of repairs
to Dock 18 at Balboa and Dock 6 at Cristobal, and the revenue is the
wharfage paid at those docks by commercial ships. Dock 6 at
Cristobal is used principally for oiling vessels, in which case only
50 per cent of the regular wharfage charge is made. Dock 18 at
Balboa does not bring in much revenue on account of so few ships
using the Pacific terminals. The 3 per cent interest on the invest-
ment, which is shown as $91,135.60, is based on the original cost.
Since 50 per cent. of the cost of Dock 6 has been written off, the
interest will amount to considerably less.
Under the heading of fuel oil plants, the expenses in connection
with handling fuel oil cover the operations of the oil pumping plant,
together with maintenance of pipe lines and Panama Canal tanks,
and the revenue is derived from a charge of 4 cents per barrel for
pumping in and out. Under fuel oil sales, the debits represent the
value of the oil sold and the revenues the amount received at a fixed
price per barrel. Very little oil is sold to outsiders. The tank
rentals last year amounted to more than $24,000, against $S12,268.44
this year. This difference is accounted for by one tank being released
by the United States Shipping Board, which reduced the revenue
$9,000, and another one by the Navy, and also a reduction in the
rate charged the Navy per month for two other tanks they have.
Business storehouse expenses include the value of material sold
and material issued to business divisions, together with a proportion
of the cost of operating storehouses, purchasing and accounting for
materials and supplies, and proportionate overhead expenses. The
revenues consist of the sale price of that material, plus the fixed
surcharge.
The Panama Canal Press shows a loss of $973.87 over and above
the interest on the investment. An explinat.ion is necessary here be-
cause these figures should not be a reflection on the efficient operation
of the printing plant.. The Panama Canal Press is operated entirely
different from any other printing plant. It is required to absorb all
expenses, including depreciation and repairs of buildings, equipment
and other property, and its proportion of the overhead expense of
The Panama Canal. The necessary repairs to an old frame building
alone become a burden to an operation of this size. The account, as
it stands, includes the operation of the stationery and office supplies
store of The Panama Canal. The other stores on the Isthmus receive
allotments from the appropriation to operate with, but. the printing
plant., including the stationery store, has not been allotted any funds
on account of being carried as a business unit. The stationery and
office supplies are issued to the other divisions at c. i. f., plus the
usual surcharge to cover handling expenses, and the manufactured
output of the printing plant is also issued and sold at actual cost of





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


labor and material, plus a surcharge to cover undistributable ex-
penses. During the past year The Panama Canal Press made an
actual saving on indirect. labor of approximately $2,000, but this
and other economies are more than offset by the close margin on
which the bills are rendered above actual direct cost. Accounting
studies are being made to fix the price of stationery and office sup-
plies and to charge for the manufactured output, at rates which will
cover all the operating expenses and leave a profit, besides sufficient
t.o cover interest on the investment. If an allotment were made to
the printing plant for the operation of the stationery store, and if the
manufacturing output were charged out at rates comparable to the
ones used by other printing plants, this unit would show a large
profit.
In connection with gold quarters, the expenses include the cost
of operating and maintaining these quarters, together with the 2 per
cent depreciation charge on their value. The net revenues do not
equal the 3 per cent amortization because a part of this fund was
used for extraordinary repairs in accordance with authority granted
the chief quartermaster.
The expenses in connection with the operation and maintenance
of silver quarters were reduced to equal the revenues without showing
any profit or interest on the investment. The amount so reduced
($50,705.29) was charged to canal operations, as stated before.
The operations of the district quartermasters show a loss of $30,-
168.79. It has not been determined where the leakage is, but. studies
have been made for several months to avoid this difference between
the expenses and the revenues.
Land rentals show an excess of revenues over expenses of $8,057.13.
The new agricultural section of the supply department, under the
agronomist, is being operated through this account.
The profit. on sand and gravel does not equal the 3 per cent interest
on the investment, but the interest is calculated principally on the
value of the sand and gravel itself, and as this material only moves
in large quantities periodically when there is considerable construc-
tion going on it is difficult to make it produce interest on itself with-
out making the rates too high.
The sale of Government property includes the sale of such items of
equipment and property as are not handled through the general stores,
such as the sale of buildings. In some cases the property has no
value on the books, having been written off to canal defense or depre-
ciated out., and when there is no expense of making the sale the total
proceeds pass to miscellaneous receipts through this account.. Some
of the larger items included in this account during the past year are
the sale of dredge No. 84 for $50,000; tug Empire for $9,300; S. S.
Caribbean for $60,000; supply boat. No. 1 for $10,000; railroad cars





REPORT OF. GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


and trucks, $46,000; the balance of it. consists of a number of smaller
items.
'The total profits on these business operations for the fiscal year
amounted to $1,140,642.50. The 3 per cent interest on the investment
involved amounts to only $675,185.80; 858,655.61 of the profit, rep-
resent.ing interest on Panaman Government public works, ha.s already
been covered in as miscellaneous receipts and the balance will be
covered in by Treasury transfer.
Table No. 27.-This table is interesting this year in that. the excess
of revenues over expenses in t.he operation of the canal proper to
June 30, 1922, amounts to $3,466,574.69, and that the excess in the
fiscal year 1923 alone amounts to $10,001,066.50, making the total
to date $13,467,641.19. The profits from business operations to
June 30, 1922, had amounted to $1,423,568.70, whereas the profits
for the year 1923 alone amount to $1,140, 642.50, making the total to
date $2,564,211.20, a grand total of surplus from all operations of
$16,031,852.39.
Table No. 28.-The collections on the pay rolls from the employees
of The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad for rent, electric current,
and water amounted to approximately $380,000. Besides this, a
considerable amount was collected for hospital service, fuel, care of
grounds, etc., which were formerly furnished free, indicating that the
total amount of collections for supplies and services which were
formerly free of charge amount, to considerably over $400,000. This
table includes the collections for other items like telephone service
and garage rental, for which employees always did pay. The total
collections thus made amount to $567,583.57.
Under the heading of miscellaneous in this table are included fuel,
commissary bills, subsistence, cable charges, property rentals, corral
and motor car bills, and other similar items.
Table No. 29.-The total amount of depreciation set aside for the
replacement of equipment and property is $3,891,207.53. Of this
amount, $610,755 is on canal transit property, for which the funds
are not actually available but appropriated cash and proceeds from
business activities are held in reserve for all the other items.
Table No. 30.-The total amount held in reserve for the overhauling
of equipment and repairs to property is $1,238,793.66. This is
approximately $300,000 greater than last year. This money has been
reserved from appropriated funds and proceeds from business activi-
ties and is actually available for expenditure.
Table No. 81.-The vacation pay earned by gold employees in the
larger business divisions is written into the costs each month on a
percentage basis and set aside in this reserve account from which the
employees are paid when they actually take their leave. The amount
in reserve on June 30 was $424,068.68.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Table No. S32.-This is a comparative statement of the cost of pro-
ducing and distributing electric current and power. The charges for
depreciation have been considerably reduced and other economies
resulted in a reduction in the total cost of approximately $200,000
from last year. The net unit cost per kilowatt-hour is $0.007, com-
pared with $0.0105 last year. These figures, of course, do not include
any interest on the investment.
Table No. 33.-The Ancon-Balboa-Panama water system produced
3,468,510,000 gallons of water during the past fiscal year at a unit
cost of $0.0853 per thousand gallons. Of this quantity, 1,063,952,000
gallons were consumed in Panama. The Gatun system produced
391,322,000 gallons at a unit cost of $0.1424 per thousand gallons.
The Cristobal-Colon system produced 1,484,799,000 gallons at a unit
cost of $0.0619 per thousand gallons. Of this quantity, 719,638,000
gallons were consumed in the city of Colon.
Table No. 34.-The amount expended in connection with the
dredging operations in Gaillard Cut during the fiscal year 1923 is
$1,699,675.33, as compared with $1,079,026.65 last year. The in-
crease is due principally to the work of removing La Pita Point.
Tables Nos. 35 and 36.-The amount of money-order business done
during the past year approximates $2,700,000.
Table No. 37.-This table shows the total postal service revenues,
by years, from 1907 to date, consisting of money-order fees, stamp
sales, post office box rents, newspaper postage, etc., the total revenue
for the year 1923 being $118,201.25.
Table No. 40.-This statement shows the income from the operation
of clubs and playgrounds, both by source and location, the total
amount of receipts being $469,062.54.
Table No. 41.-This table shows the expenses in connection with
the operation of the bureau of clubs and playgrounds, by source and
location, the total expenditure for the year amounting to $418,143.75.
Table No. 43.-This table shows the amount of profit made by the
bureau of clubs and playgrounds during the fiscal year as $47,050.87,
and the accumulated profit to June 30, 1922, as $114,521.56, making
the total accumulated surplus $161,572.43.
Table No. 44.-The total value of coupon books issued to employees
for deduction on the pay rolls during the fiscal year amounted to
$2,867,780. The value of books sold for cash amounted to 31,214,-
862.50, and books issued on charge accounts $52,705, making a grand
total of $4,135,347.50. Last year the pay roll issues amounted to
$2,965,635, and the cash sales to $1,300,917.50. Coupons lifted at
commissaries in exchange for goods amounted to $3,765,589.80; at
restaurants, $229,025.03; at Panama Canal clubhouses, $118,085.50;
smaller amounts were accepted at the Hotel Tivoli, on marine equip-
85887-23--5







60 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


ment, Balboa community house, Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., and the
yacht club. The total amount of coupons lifted and accounted for
was $4,119,565.65.

TABLE No. 1.-Balance sheets, June S0, 1923.

TRIAL BALANCE SHEET.


DEBITS.
A ssets:
Canal fixed property......... $235,474,456. 29
Canal equipment.............. 4,294,980.30
Cash due treasury.............. 405,994.10
Cash working................. 1,911,521.13
Accounts receivable........... 76, 847. 09
Business properry............. 29, 25,932. 23
Stores........................ 2, 9S, 206.48
United States Treasury........ 23,740,801.93
Theoretical interest accruals... 104, SS5. 79
Undlistributed business capital
credit account)............. 1,66000.00
Unclassified canal expenditures 42,883.16
Canal expenses............... 10,3089723. 05
Business expenses............ 9,732,200.86
Canal earnings (credit account) 2,617,945.50
Total....................... 315,336,436. 92


CREDITS.
Liabilities:
Canal capital .................
Business capital..............
Accounts payable............
Unclassified canal credits......
Amortizat ion................
Depria I ion .................
Rr-pair Reserves...............
Gratuity reserves.............
Canal revennues...............
Business revenues.............
Canal surplus.................
Business surplus. .............


$246,493,9S9.1S
27,579,828.70
1,506.706.48
2,214.37
744, 846.S88
3,891,207.53
1, 38,793.66
424,068.63
17,691,844.06
10,872, S43.36
3,466, 574.69
1,423, 5138. 70


Total........................ 315,336,486.92


GENERAL BALANCE SHEET.


DEBITS.
Assets:
Canal fixed property........... $235,474,456.29
Canal equipment .............. 4, 294, 980. 30
Cash due treasury............. 405,994.10
Cash working................. 1,911,521.13
Accounts receivable........... 786, S47.09
Business property............ 29,825,932.23
Stores ......................... 2,98 206.48
United States Treasury........ 23,740,801.93
Theoretical Interest accruals... 104,SS5.79
Undistributed business capital
(credit account) .............. 1,663,000.00
Unclassified canal expenditures 42,883.16
Total.................... .... 297,913, 508.50
t credit.


CREDITS.
Liabilities:
Canal capital.................. 246,493,989.81
Business capital.............. 27, 579, S2. 70
Accounts payable............. 1,506, 706.48
Unclassified canal credits...... 2,214.37
Amortization.................. 744,846. 88
Depreciation................. 3,891,207.53
Repair reserves............... 1,238,793.66
Gratuity reserves............... 424,06S.68
Canal surplus.................. 13,467,641. 19
Business surplus. ............. 2,564,211.20


Total.................... 297,913,508. 50







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 63


TABLE No. 3.-Statement of appropriations by the Congress.

Canal construction appropriations....................................................... 387,069,108.31
(For details see annual report for 1920 and prior.)
Annual payments to Republic of Panama................................................ 3,000,000.00
Act of-
Mar. 4, 1913......................................................... 325n, o.00
Apr. 6, 1914......................................................... 250,000.00
Jan. 25, 1915...............................................---.--..-- 250,000.00
Feb. 28, 1916........................................................ 250,000.00
July 1, 1916.......................................................... 250,000.00
Mar. 3, 1917......................................................... 250,000.00
Apr. 15, 1918........................................................ 250,000.00
Apr. 15, 1919........................................ 250.000.00
June 4, 1920......................................................... 250,1100.00
Mar. 2, 1921....................................................... 250, 000.00
June 1 1922......................................................... 250,0010.00
Jan. 8 1923.... .................................................... 250,000.00
Operation anA maintenance............................................................ 73, 087, 517.23


Maintenance
and
operation.


Act of-
Mar. 3, 1915................. 55,200,000.00
July 1, 1916................ 5,750,000.00
June 12, 1917............... 9,000,000.00
July 12, 1917............. .............
June 4, 1918................ ...............
July 1, 1918................ 9,000,000.00
July 3 1918................. ...............
Mar. 1, 1919................ ..........
July 19, 1919................ 7,547,939.00
Nov. 4, 1919................ ...............
May 29, 1920................ ..........
June 5,1920.............. 7,531,851.00
Mar. 1, 1921................. ...............
Mar. 4, 1921............... 7,250,000.00
June 30, 1922............... 2,659, 434.00
Mar. 2, 1923................ 5,079,683.00


Less amount transferred to sur-
plus fund....................


Sanitation,
Canal Zone.


$700,000.00
700,000.00
700,000.00
1i5&, 66 oo
900,000.00

850,000.00

850,66 00.00

525,000.00
575,000.00
575,000.00


Civil
government,
Panama
Canal anid
Canal Zone.


$540,000.00
600,000.00
700,000.00

750,000.00

702,000.00
150,000.00
.900,000.00
24,670.00
900,000.00
930, 000.00
930,000.00


Increase
of com-
pensation,
Panama
Canal.





$10,006.22

16,000.00
35,018.33

34,500.00

21,500.00
16, 800.00
17,520.00


Total.


86,440,000.00
7,050, 000.00
10,400,000.00
10,006.22
10,650,000.00
16,000.00
35,018.33
9,099,939.00
150,000.00
34,500.00
9,281,851.00
24,670.00
9,021,500.00
4,131,234.00
6,602,203.00


59,018,907.00 6,800,000.00 7,126,670.00 151,344.55 73,096,921.55
............... .............. .............. 9,404.32 9,404.32


Total..................... 59,018,907.00 6,800,000.00 j 7,126,670.00


141,940.23


73,087,517.23


TABLE No. 4.-Status of authorized bond issue.

Authorized bond issue.................................................................. 375,200,900.00
Appropriated for canal construction...................................... 387,069,108.31
Less amount exempted by law:
Colliers Ulysses and Achilles ............................ 51,985, 552. 29
Coal barges iamei and Darien ......................... 2,295,746.57
Dock No. 6, Cristobal.................................. 2,093,190.00
Equipping colliers Ulysses and A chilles................ 250,000.00
Painting tanks, colliers Ulysses and Achilles............ 44, 279.76
Repairs to steamships, A ncon and Cristobal........... 720,000.00
Expended for operation and maintenance of canal...... 4,289,159.00
Stock of material and supplies for operation and main-
tenance of canal................................... 2,225,000.00
13,902,927.62
373,166,180.69

Balance.......................................................................... 2,034,719.31
Appraised value American legation building in the city of Panama, exempt from charge
to bond issue, act July 1, 1916....................................................... 22,256.00
Balance available for appropriation within limit of cost of canal and authorized bond
issue ............................................................... 2,056,975.31







64 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 5.-Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States,
by appropriations and funds, fiscal year ended June 30SO, 193S.

CASH RECEIPTS.


United
States
Treasury.


Disbursine.
clerk, Paymaster,
Washing- Canal Zone.
ton, D. C.


On hand July 1, 1922:
Maintenance and operation,.
Panami Can.il................... 7,905, 22.6S 8277,118.91 61,677,416.94
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal........................... 370,33S.31 3,251.63 188,491.38
Civil government, Panami Canal
and Canal Zone.................. 9,17.22 3,127.09 46,794.28
Canal connecting Atlantic and
Pacific Oceans................. 27,989.66......... .............
Construction and equipment, Pan- 8 .........
ama Canal....................... 3:03, 257.21 21,249.861.............
Panama Canal fund............... 12S,992.08 2,911.66 ............
Increase of compensation, 1921..... 3,208.81 ........................
Increase of compensation, 1922..... .............. 615.65.............
Engineerinn.BureiL of Engineering 14,000.00 ........... .............
A aviation, Navy, 1922.............. 80,000.00................. .............
Miscellaneous receipts, United
States revenues.................. ............. ............ .............
Security deposits.................. I............... 5,210.05 2,63 .11

Tftal........................... I, 922,525.97: 35.3, 4.4. ?5 1,915,336.71

Appropriations for fiscal year 1923: I
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal.................. 2,659,434.00 ............ ............
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal............ ............ 525,000.0.........................
Civil government, Panima Canal
and Canal Zone................ 930,000. ............ ......
Increase in compensation, 1923
(Washington office).............. 16,800.0(1 ............ ..........

Total...................................


Transfer of funds between fiscal officers:
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal..................
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal.........................
Civil government, Panama Canal
and CinlI Zone..................
Increase in compensation, 1922....
Increase in compensation, 1923.....

Total....................


Collector,
Canal Zone.


$4,746.20

9,502.75

4,758.17


125,26S. 96
433,027.86

577,303.94
577, 303. 941


------ i i i: I


726,782.571,917,700.00 7,770,278.26

5,890.06 63,000.00 946,525.91

4,389.46 9,000.00 900,655.73
615,65 ............ .............
............. 16,800.00.............
7.37,077.74i2.,00f, .'IX.)0 9,617,462.90


:tions:
maintenancee and operation,
Panama Canal................ 1,556,891.41 720,448.11 2S9. 50
sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal........................ 101,539.38 24,133.97 6.00
civil government, Panajm Canal
and Canal Zone.................. 164.62 5,231. il;'.............
[iscellaneou- receipts, United
States revenues.................. .......... 1,710. 72 1.72
security deposits.................. .......... 838,874. 0i; 2,263,173.31

Total............................ 1, ii', y.. 11 ;'90, 391. 4i' 2.26, 2 470. 53

Total cash debits............... 15,450, j.3. 12 3,950, 3b.. J4 1i, 796,270.14


Total.


19,865,104.73

571,584.07

143,596.76

27,989.66
324,507.07
131,903.74
3,208.81
615.65
14,000.00
80,000.00
125,268.96
480,872.02

11,768,651. 47


2,659, 431.00

525,0000.00

930,000.00

16,800.00

4,131,234.00


............. 10,414,760.83
............... 1,015,418.97


914,045.19
615.65
16,800.00

12,361,640.64


5, 774,597. 77 8,032, 226.79

497,026.95 622,706.30

57,748.00 63,144.28
17, &M5,044.4917, 86,%756. 93
'2, 7, 430. 7325,589,478.07
46, 701, 847. 94.52, 214, 312.37

17,279, 151.88!80,475,838.48


CoUec
M
Si

C

M
Si


.............
.............
.............






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 5.-Cash receipts and disbursements for account of the United States,
fiscal year ended June S0, 192.3-Continued.

CASH DISBURSEMENTS.


United
States
Treasury.


Disbursing
clerk,
Washinr-
ton, D.C.


____I I _ - I I -


Covered into United States Treasury:
Maintenance and operation (busi-
ness profits, 1922)................
Miscellaneous receipts (United
States revenues).................
Increase in compensation, 1921 (to
surplus fund)...................

Total..........................

Transfers between fiscal officers:
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal...................
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal............................
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone.................
Increase in compensation, 1922.....
Increase in compensation, 1923.....

Total............................

Disbursements:
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal...................
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal.........................
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone..................
Construction and equipment......
Panama Canal fund...............
Increase of compensation, 1923.....
Engineering,Bureau of Engineering
Security deposits.................

Total. ...........................

On hand June 30, 1923:
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal..................
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal...........................
Civil Government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone..................
Canal connecting Atlantic and
Pacific Oceans...................
Construction and equipment, Pan-
ama Canal......................
Panama Canal fund..............
Increase of compensation, 1922.....
Increase of compensation, 1923.....
Aviation, Navy, 1922..............
Miscellaneous receipts, United
States revenues.................
Security deposits.................

Total............................


Paymaster,
Canal Zone.


$264. 801. S1 ............ .............


............. $1,710.72

3,208.81 ............

268,010.651 1,710.72


4,017,i700.00 708,419.86

513,000.00: 5,421.56

849,000.00 4,230.46
............. 615.65
16, 800.00 ............
5,396,500.00X 71S,687.53
I-


67, 5;:3.0.31, 916,099.06

221,676.60: 63,022.79

109,501.49 10,017.34
30,747. 241. ..........
1,051.09i............
............. 16,766.65
14,000.00............3
............. 793,577.30


.............








8,014,808.53

961,194.86

84-1,107.82



2,263,534.37


Collector,
Canal Zone.


Total.


$264,801.84


t1. 725$17,601,319.35117,606,031.79


1.72 17,604,319.35


5,688,640.97


3,208.81

17,874,042.44


10,414,760.83


496,997.41 1,015,418.97

60,814.73 914,045.19
............. 615.65
............. 16, 800.00

6,246,453. 11 12,361,6 40.64


.............10,068,470.62

............. 1,245,894.25

............. 963,626.65
............. 30,747.24
............. 1,051.09
............. 16,766.68
............. 14,000.00
22,334,779.5025, 391,891.17


44-4,539.452,869,483.17 12,083,645.58 22,334,779. 50 37,732, -17.70


8,498,S65.791 220,748.10

268,091.151 21,941.25

64,969.81 3,110.95

27,989.66 ............

272,509.97 21,249.86
127,940.99 2,911.66
615.65 ............
33.32
80,000.00...........

.....'........ 90,506.78

9,340,983.02! 360,501.92


1,433,176.17

173,831.43

103,342.19









2,273.05

1,712,622.84
1, 712, 622. 84


I I


Total cash credits............... 15,450,033.12 3,950,383.34


90, 703. 00 10, 243,493.06

9,532.29 473,396.12

1,691.44 173,114.39

............. 27,989.66

............. 293,759.83
............. 130,852.65
............. 615.65
............. 33.32
............. 80,000.00

405,994.10 405,994.10
585,679. 091 678,458.92

1,093, 599. 92112, 507, 707.70

47,279,151.88 80, 475,838.48


i i I I


13,796,270.14







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


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68 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 8.-Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals and
companies, and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 19S3.


Maintenance and operation:
Injury compensation........
Commissarv coupon books hon-
ored by Panama Canal........
Municipal engineering work, un-
clas-ified credits............
Water rentals-
Panama....................
Colon.......................
Mechanical division, unclassified
credits........................
Fuel oil plants, unclassified cred-
its ..... ...... ...............
Bu.sincvs ;torihouse;, unclas-ified
credits.... ... ...........
Building repairs and conctruc-
tion, uncla-.if6ed credits.......
Horel Tivoli, unclassified credits.
Pedrn Nfrifel Re'taurant-
Equipment..............
Unclassified credits.........
Fortification division, unclassi-
fied credits....................
Claims against carriers and con-
tractors........................
Sundries suspense..............
General storehouse, Cristobal....
Marine division services.........
Dred gi n g di vision services.......
Civil service retirement fund....
General accounts...............
Rer railing and repatriating em-
ployees........................
Executive office services.......
Cables and radiograms.......
Canal Record...................
Railroad motor cars............
Clul.s and playgrounds.........
Accoi in t i n office services.......
Lost metal checks,. ......
Paymaster's office services......
Collector's office services.........
Safety deposit box rentals.......
Office engineer services..........
Sales of prints .................
Meteorology and hydrography
division services ..............
Survey section services.........
Balboa storehouse services......
Cristobal storehouse services....
Supply department office serv-
ices.........................
[i)Lt rict quartermaster-
Balboa .....................
Pedro Miguel...............
Gatun......................
Cristobal....................
Port captain-
Balboa.....................
Cristobal....................
Admeasurement of vessels......
Inspection of vessels............
Pdotagc, Balboa...............
1'ilotage, Cri-tobal...............
Tug< and launchec--
BallIto .....................
Cristobal.................
Hanrlling lin.,--
Balboa .................
Cristobal...............
Aids to navigation..............
Gatun Looks................
Pedro Miguel Locks..........
Miraflores Locks.................
Gatun Dam....... ..............
Dredging division work........
Recsrvce for repairs, clubs and
playgrounds...................
Electric %ork....................
Electric current................
Telephone and telegraph work...


$150.10

3,151.05
5.60

150,823.04
91,601.55

21.00

21.00

4,856.08

79.20
.29

81.84
60.00

3.82

51.19
468,064.00
12.00
8,371.63
14,469.62
219.57
523.81

708.83
67,856.81
2,100.10
37.25
7,059.10
49,760.42
134,262.86
375.50
16,732.00
l, 974.00
47S.00
1,076.014
2,928.28
75.75
2,538.18
1,831.46
804.14

8,557.16

9,337.92
11,532.11
4,559.53
3,101.03

237.43
551.37
3,360.00
2,953.80
70,905.50
146,449.00

126,244.80
228.561.b7

63,929.00
69,280.00
62,005.76
809.70
25.45
3.50
.202.70
50,952.07

229.26
229, 501. 09
32,357.59
190.439.555


Maintenance and operation-Contd.
Sales of water ................ 141,641.32
Municipal engineering work..... 70,011.23
Shop w ork...................... 957,719.47
Dry Dockage-
Balboa ...................... 40,098.24
Cri3 tobal.................... 6,099.44
Dockage and wharfage........... 82,695.30
Handling fuel oil................ 354,772.90
Fuel-oil sales ................... 29,553.99
Fuel-oil tank rentals.............. 6,626.10
Business store sales.............. 677,563.59
Animal and motor transportation 128,172.21
Motor-car repair shop............ 12,522.76
Building repairs and construction 59,317.53
Panama Canal Press............ 69,257.52
Gold quarters rentals............ 353,203.36
Silver quarters rentals........... 192,359.79
Garage rentals................... 15,309.71
Boathouse rentals................ 500.96
Sale of fuel ...................... 29,361.82
Sale of gasoline .................. 58, 108.03
Sale of gent-ral supplies........... 1,640.34
Exbchane of furniture............ 1.5,351.13
Mattress factory................. 14,586.34
Janitor service.................. 10,773.11
Hotel Tivoli..................... 171, 838.00
Restaurants..................... 7,112.84
Hotel Aspinwall................ .1,005.00
Building rcntals.................. 9,251.47
Land rentals. .................. 23, 375. 14
Equipmi'nt rentals............... 847.31
Mark-t rentals................. 1,023.66
Sand and gravel................. 14,633.90
Sale of Government property.... 122,916.00
Sale of Nautical Charts and Pub-
lications....................... 2,335.90
Fortification Division services... 150,722.24
Total........................ 5,774,597.70
Sanitation:
Claims against carriers and con-
tractors........................ 9.27
Health dc part ment.............. 60.00
Civil service retirement fund.... 66.89
General accounts.................. 30.00
Chief health officer .............. 236. 07
Ancon Hospital-
Fees ...................... 170,260.95
Mess....................... 17,527.54
Burials ..................... 3,475.13
MiscelUaneou ...........4.... 4.854.39
Colon Hospital-
Fees...................... 33,169.48
Mess...................... 3,232.30
Mis'wllaneous. ............... 364.50
Line disppnarics............... 13,596.57
Corozal farm produce............ 24,474.89
Corozal farm pasturage.......... 12.75
Corozal Asylum fees.............. 78,058.52
Corozal Asylum, miscellaneous.. 3,046.42
PaloSeco Leper Asylum......... 12.102.00
Santo Tomas HIospital........... 947.86
Quarantine subsistence.......... 11,999.22
Quarant in miscellaneous. ...... 19,396.72
Siuitatinn, Panama............. 8,138.04
Street leaning and garbage col-
lection, Panama............... 31,717.70
Sanitation, Colun ................ 3,520.87
Street cleaning and garbage col-
lectiotn, Colon................. 36,313.34
Sarutation, Canal Zone........... 20,385.54

Total.......................... 497,026.95
Civil government:
Retirement fund (division of
civil affairs)................... 157.85
Civil affairs...................... 83.00
Customs services ................ 747.50
Postal service ................... 1,776.33
Schools. .......................... .99







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE NO. 8.-Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals
and companies, and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1923-Conliined.


Civil government-Continued.
School tuition...................
Sale of school books..............
Sales of school material..........
Fire protection.................
Police and prisons..............
District court........................


14,306.44
649.95
534.63
124.63
49,341.68
25. 00


Total......................... 57,748.00
Miscellaneous receipts:
Proceeds of waterworks......... 192,353.97
Toils ............................ 17,508,478. 70


Miscellaneous receipts-Continued.
Taxes, fees, fines, Canal Zone.... 145,951.58
Postal receipts .................... 118,260.19
Interest on bank balances....... 20,000.00
Excess cash (overage) .......... .05

Total.......................... 17,885.044.49


Individuals and companies: Panama
R. R. Co..........................


103.24


RECAPITULATION.

Maintenance and operation, Panama Canal............... ............................... $5,774,597.77
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama Canal.................................................. 497,026.95
Civil government, Panama Canal and Canal Zone.......................................... 57,748.00
Total repayment to appropriations.................. ........................... ..... 6,329,372.72
Miscellaneous receipts.......................................................---.......- 17,885,044.49
Individuals and companies.............................................................- ---- 103.24

Grand total.......................................................................... 24,214,520.45

TABLE No. 9.-Statement of transactions in the collector's special deposit account during
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1923.

IN THE UNITED STATES.


Month.


1922.
July....................................
A ugust................................
September............................
October ................................
November............................
December.............................

1923.
January ............... ............
February .............................
March.. .........................
April........... ........ .............
M ay...................................
June.................................


Deposits.



$52,900. 00
77,577.07
81,812.54
71,856. 24
162,003.85
105,806.15

190,761.33
197,424.34
223,132.42
2419,946.42
222,321.41
294,207.87


Total............................ 1,929,749.94


Panama Canal
bills applied.



$30,201.31
56,904.70
60,013.61
77,806.93
102,990.92
91,610.83


142,626.99
166,177.95
193,267.42
221,030.16
238,379.85
269,351.32

1,650,361.99


Payments to
individuals and
companies.


11,11.50 so
160,5S2.91
23,973.69
3,119,45
13,124.05
4-,259.53


Refunds.


$1,813.09
1,894.84
2,837.66
5,142.81
4,842.49
3,231.21


16,682.20 8,502.97
14.657.93 7,230.41
12,678.72 3,141.35
12,722.18 4,8R2.29
13,074.85 3,347.49
14,523.56 1 6,504.81

156,547.57 53,371.42


ON THE ISTHMUS.


1922.
July ..................................
August......... ..............
September.............................
October................................
November. ...........................
December.............................

1923.
January.......... .............
February ......... ...........
M arch.................................
April.................................
May...................................
June...................................

Total............................


11,346,557.96
1,287,412.48
1,383, 694.02
1,389,421.21
1,573,151.11
1,640,030.20

1,822, 689.38
1,586,272.79
2,098,027.69
2,033,289.37
2,146,240.09
2,250,046.31


51,167,556.34
1,082,953.11
1,109,510.88
1,283, 063.67
1, 291,157.44
1,312,707.08

1,465,737.39
1,387,717.83
1,779,691.65
1,847,266.24
1,880,101.24
1,801,438.55


$299,370.79
195,055.02
172,062.29
239,496. 15
207,730.72 ,
264,132.51

332,344.32
185,415.25
270,850.07
271,771.36
272,216.06
219,718.59


$90,536.56
8,078.10
1,944.31
2,147.21
10,652.23
2,285.72

1,498.14
6,403.41
2,003.65
6,119.57
925.43
1,971.46


20,56,82.6 17408,01.2 2930183.3 14,55.7


i


20,556,832.61 17,408,901.42


2,930,183.13


134,565.79







70 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 9.-Statement of transactions in the collector's special deposit account during
the fiscal year ended June 30SO, 1928-Continued.

RECAPITULATION.


In the United States. On the Isthmus.


On hand July 1, 1922.......................... 33,957.68 8399,070.18
Deposits during vear........................... 1,929,749.94 20,556,832.61
Panama Canal bills applied.................... 51,650,361.99 $17,408,901.42
Payments to individuals and companies I...... 156,547.57 2,930, 183.13
Refunds....................................... 53,371.42 134,565.79
On hand, June 30, 1923......................... 103,426.64 482,252.45

Total................................. 1,963,707.62 1,963,707.62 20,955,902.79 20,953,902.79


1 Includes the Panama R. R. Co. and other individuals and companies.

TABLE No, 10.-Statement of audted pay rolls on Isth mus during fiscal year 1923.


Maintenance and operation:
Canal transit divisions-
Executive department-
Executive..................................
Record.................................
Personnel................................
Correspondence..........................
Property.................................
Statistics........... ...............
General..................................
Shipping commissioner...................

Total...................................

Clubs and playgrounds........................

Accounting department-
Accounting........... .............
Paymaster...............................
Collector................................

Total....................................

Office engineer................................
Meteorology and hydrography..................
Surveys.....................................

Supply department, quartermaster-
Office................................
District quartermasters...................
Storehouses.............................


Total.


522,077. 40
77 275.30
33,886.19
38,290.44
28,777.74
16,263.08
3 ,521.37
32,093.16


287, 1S4. 98


149, 81. 76


336,905. 91
36, 281. 28
39,269.01

412,459.20


31,042.60
29,441.00
36,624. 69


44,059.39
211,9.33. .t3
224 267.55S


Total... .............................. 480, 200. 19

Marine division-
Superintendent's office................... 9,758.77
Port captain-
Balboat................................ 395,5q9;.44
Cristobal............................. 355,374.74
Lighthouse subdivision..................... 123,11 It. 90


Total....................................

Lock operation-
Atlantic...............................
Pacific.................................

Total .....................................

Gatun Dam and backfill.....................
Dredging division.............................

Total transit divisions.................


8.3, 848. s5


Salaries.





322,077. 40
77,275.30
33,886.19
38,290.44
28,777.74
16,263.08
38,521.37
32,093.46


287,184.98


139,316.56


336, 905.91
36,284. 28
39, 269.01

412, 459. 20


30,284.80
27,787. 19
22,625. 83


44,059.38
130,133.56
160,950.98

335, 143.92


Wages.


510,565.20


757.80
1,653.51
13,998.86


81,799.67
63,316.60

145,116.27


9,758.77 ...............

189, 395.29 206,203.15
190 267.41 165,107.33
35:963. 10 87,153.80


425,384.57


458,464. 28


279,380.02 89,361.38 190,018.64
524,994.55 146,646.58 378,347.97

804,374.57 236,007.96 568,366.61

36,095.95 9,996.16 26,099.79
921,086.45 227, 21.98 693,804.47
4, 072, 300. 24 2, 153,473.45 1,918, 826.79


'--~-


l-----I I


-----------I----------I----------


................
................
................
................
................
................
................
................


................
................







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAT.. 71


TABLE No. 10.-Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 1923-
Continued.


Maintenance and operation-Continued.
Canal business divisions-
Electrical......................................
Municipal engineering.........................
Mechanical division-
Balboa shops.............................
Cristobal shops............................
Total...................................

Supply department, quartermaster-
Fuel-oil plants...................................
Animal and motor transportation..............
Motor-car repair shop..........................
Building repairs and construction...............
Panama Canal Press...........................
Hotel Tivoli..................................
Total...................................
Fortifications......................................
Total, business divisions.....................
Injury and death (act Sept. 7, 1916)..............
Total, maintenance and operation.........
Civil government:
Civil affairs and customs...........................
Posts............................... ....... .
Schools................. ..........................
Fire protection...................................
Police and prisons................. ...............
District courts.......................................
District attorney ..................................
Marshal................. .. ... ....................
Magistrates' courts............... ..........
Total, civil government..........................
Sanitation:
O ffice.................. ...........................
Ancon Hospital..................................
Colon Hospital....................................
Line dispensaries ...............................
Corozal Farm .....................................
Corozal Asylum................................
Palo Seco Leper Asylum..........................
Santo Tomas Hospital.............................
Quarantine:
Office............ ................................
Balboa.........................................
Cristobal................................... ........
Total..................... .......................
Health Office:
Panam a..................................... .......
Colon..................................... ....
Sanitation, Zone....................................
Total, sanitation...........................
Grand total..................................


Total.


3439, 597. 85
523,861.61


Salaries.


3179,240.27
196, 897.50


Wages.


8260,357.58
326,964.11


942, 516. 2) 167,258.06 775,258.14
258, 794. 0S 28,547.78 230,246.30
1,201,310.28 195,805.84 1,005,504.44

79,91S.71 23,633.41 56,285.30
125, '1.26 11,463.33 114,377.93
49,106.04 11,6M5.67 37,420.37
282,577.91 58,526.53 224,051.38
65,373.47 23.066.52 42,306.95
49,910.04 24,536.98 25,373.06

652,727.43 152,912.44 499.814.99
157,478.98 46,06. 15 111,418.83
2,974,976.15.1 770,916.20 2,204,059.95
33,880.71 786.74 33,093.97

7,081,157.10 2,925,176.39 4,155,980.71

34 253 34,662.53 662. ................
100,773.81 100,773. R1 ...............
167, 867.21 167,67.21 ................
93,807.56 93, S'07. 56 .............
303,445. S2 303,445.82 .............
18,533.19 18,533.19 ................
9,874.88 9,874.88 ................
7,400.03 7,400.0:3 ................
13,889.43 13,889.43 ..............
750,254.46 750,254.46 ..............

11,543.34 11,543.34 ................
329,553.16 272,965.16 56,588.00
50,126.69 43,649.41 6,477.28
36,494.93 35,581.43 913.50
12,656.52 3,828.18 8,S28.34
53,086.79 43,684.81 9,401.98
15,729.09 6,275.50 9,453.59
13,652.49 13,652.49 ...............


843.00
23,101.81
20,086.63


843.00
19,907.69
18,500.67


3,194.12
1,585.96


44,031.44 39,251.36 4,780.08

105,743.45 32,441.16 73,302.29
60,597.91 25,958.16 34,639.75
63,070.82 20,044.06 43,026.76
796,286.63 548,875.06 247,411.57


8,627,698.19


4,224,305.91


4,403,392.28







72 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 11.-Statement of accounts receivable registered during fiscal year ended
June, 30, 192S.


Num-!
ber of Against the
bills Total. Panama.
regis- R. R.
tered.


1922.
July. 2............... 2,62l, 579,74.36 140,855,52
August............. 2,394 1, 50u,U7.74 158,296.26
September......... 2,3163 1,520,156.6.5 169,723.32
October............. 42,4 739, 611.05 151, 24. 59
November......... 2,474, 1,703,132 SS 13S,621.24
December.......... 2,4 7 1, 747, 669. 20 151,388.9S
1923.
January........... 2,787 2,"1lS,095.9i 149,421.02
Febr'inzry........... 2,50u. 1,977, 770.44 151,0:33.03
SMarch.............. 3,149' 2, 496,u 6 51, 159,12. 41]
April............... 2,S67' 2, 419, 976 80 145,567 05
May................ 2, .Nu 2,5 .7, 171 60 131.,5j15.3S
June............... 3,1u I-', i3.3,21S. 0 15,2,13.S.51
Total............. 31,615123., ?1.,292 53 1,803,006 31
Totals for year
ended June 30,
1922............. 26,4-13 20, 31,32 132112,144,015.64
I I112 I 4,15


Against
other
depart-
ments of
the United
States.


3125, 77. 85
SS,919.85
112, 808.04
125, 120.60
SI,700. 31
107,96S 41

135,514.11
153.646 7u
10o; "(16 .31
93,475 23
99, 263 73
133, A02. GU
1,4,33,S13 Sl

1,812,372.71


Commercial. Tolls.





$216, 098.32 1,094, 132.67
197,494.03 1,0315,368.60
217,554.44 1,020,101.05
207,705.71 1255, 520.15
218,359.37 1:264,451.89
175, 736.35 ,312.575.52

227,62.70 1,505, 298.15
249,118.20 1,423,972,51
31R, s3S.47 1,827,733.32
291,947.07, 1,878, 9S7.45
3 1,076.50, 1,972 262 99
349,202.57, 1, S9%, 074. 40
3,019,993 73 17,50s,47S.70

15,376, 735. 25 11, 19S, 008. 51


1 Includes $1,864,427.99 trust funds.

TABLE No. 12.-Comparative statement of accounts receivable.


Fiscal year Fiscal year
1922. 1923.


Audited bills............................................................. 1,1441,630.65 $743,323.29
Hospital certificates....................................................... 21), 4.99 22,033.55
Injury compensation...................................................... 4,234.49 1,716.81
Cement bags returned to contractor...................................... 1,499.66 2,283.26
1a'3ter rental deficit bills ................................................. 95,950.24 17,498.68
Commissary coupon books honored by The Panama Canal................. 3.25 8.50
Total.................. ............................................ 1,266,323.28 786,847.09

Credit.
TABLE No. 13.-Comparative statement of accounts payable.


Fiscal year Fiscal year
1922. 1923.


United States invoices and ocean freight. ................................ 8185,166. 10 5313,131.45
Isthmus vouchers .................................................. 100,015.06 181,860.60
Current pay rolls.................................................. ...... 739,335.77 759,745.01
Unpaid salaries and wages........................ .................. 252,930.16 253,048.87
Drums, carboys, and reels................................................. 111,810.53 12,072.13
Treasury settlements in suspense...................................... 2,177. 12 992.68
Total.............................................................. 1,277,813.68 1,506,706.48

i Credit.


Repay to
appropria-
tions.


8485,741.69
444,710.14
500,085.80
484,090.90
438,680.99
435,093.74

512,797.83
553,797.93
668,773.19
530,989.35
614,908.61
637,143. 68

6,306,813.85

7,445,201. 18







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 14.-Defense of capital expenditures to June 0SO, 1923.


Prism excavation:
Gatun to sea..................
Gatun to Pedro Miguet........
Pedro Miguel to sea............
Gatun Locks......................
Pedro Miguel Locks ...............
Miraflores Locks...................
Gatun spillway...................
Miraflores spillway and east dam..
Gatun-Mindi Levee ...............
Gatun Dama.......................
Trinidad River Dam..............
Pedro Miguel Dam................
Miraflores West Dam..............
La Boca Locks and Dams (aban-
doned) .........................
Colon East Breakwater...........
Colon West Break water..........
Naos Island Breakwater..........
Aids to navigation................
Floating caisson..................
Power transmission system........
Coaling station:
Balboa........................
Cristobal ...................
Dry dock:
Balboa.......................
Cristobal....................
Docks, piers, and wharves:
Balboa........................
Cristobal.....................
Entrance Basin, Balboa...........
Inner Harbor:
Balboa.....................
Cristobal.....................
Preparatory work, Balboa termi-
nals...........................
Panama water-supply system.....
Other zone water-supply systems..
Zone sewage system..............
Zone roadways....................
Fluviographs.....................
Permanent townsite:
Ancon-Balboa..............
La Boca........... .......
Red Tank.....................
Pedro Miguel.................
Gatun......................
Cristobal.....................
Sanitary fills. .................
Sanitary ditches.................


5237,482.88
2,141,358.67
388,049.34
1,203,953.05
638,599. 30
867,655.23
99,317.86
89, 133. 95
2,813.01
196,462.60
1 328.47
8,633.66
23,195.78
748,054.48
3,771,111.74
85,506.42
20,312.78
93,38d.54
20,872.15
10, 055. 46
2,284,568.35
3,179,797.59

3,376,647.49
23,475.51

1. 590,160.35
1,033,984.61
489,480.39

3,265,207.04
237, 101.43

1,808,921.65
40,697.58
155,190.03
298,2&4.69
610, 956.00
3,427.02

596,596. 73
123,206.13
2,614.43
96,797.08
1,776.56
355,847.29
636,732. 11
199,706.53


Playgrounds......................
Administration building, Balboa
Heights ........................
District court and law department
office, Ancon...............
Shop and store office............
Terminal office building, Balboa...
Shops:
hBalboa.......................
Cristobal.....................
Storehouses......................
Hotels and mess halls.............
Quarters:
Gold..........................
Silver.....................
Miscellaneous buildings..........
Ancon Hospital.................
Colon iospital....................
Dispensaries.......................
Asylum s..........................
Quarantine stations...............
Storehouse, health...............
Balboa incinerator................
Miscellaneous buildings, health....
Schoolhouses.....................
Post offices.......................
Courthouses, police and fire s a-
tions, etc ............. ......
Canal construction and flooded
areas.................... ......
Auxilary works and bwuldings....
Depopulation of Canal Zone.......
Joint land commission expenses... -
Purchase from new Panama Canal
Co...............................
Investment Panama R. R.slock..
Concession from Republic of Pan-
ama ............................
Relocation of Panama R. R.......
Presentation of launch Louise to
French Government.........
Canal protection 1917-18..........
Equipment and property trans-
?erred to and from other depart-
ments of the Government.......
Construction equipment...........
Construction material and supplies.
Loans to Panama R. R. Co........


Total...................... 112,103,082.12


TABLE No. 15.-Details of Canal fixed property, fiscal year 1923S.


: June 301922. Additions. June 30,1923.


Channels:
Gatun to sea.................... .......................
Gatun to Pedro Miguel...............................
Pedro Miguel to sea...................................
Locks:
Gatun.....................................
Gate Spares........................................
Pedro Miguel.......................................
House 70..........................................
Miraflores.............................................
Spillways:
Gatun................................ ..........
Miraflores.............................................
Floating caisson.........................................
Dams:
Gatun..................................
Gatun-Mindi Levee.................................
Trinidad River........... ........... .....
Pedro Miguel........................................
Miraflores.............................................
Breakwaters:
Colon west.............................................
Naos Island............................................
Aids to navigation........................................
Quarters, Toro Point Light..........................
Flamenco Light....................................
Roads, streets, and sidewalks...........................
Sidewalks, Tabernilla Street........................
Road, Silver City...................................


11,636,700.00 .......
104,926,542.00 ..........
18,032,612.00 ...........

34,844,900.35 i
................. S3,353.77
15,362,560.75
................. 300.00
22,529,940.29 .............

3,982,199.00 ..........
1,231,256.00............
326,996.00 ...........

9,626,678.00 .............
137,822.00 ............
65,057.00 .............
423,070.00 .............
1,136,594.00 .............
4,189,810.00 ............
995,337.00 ............
827,359.00
................. 1,155.00
................. 737.63
979,766.35


$11,636,700.00
104,926,542.00
18,032,612.00

34,848,254.12

15,362,860.75
22,529,940.29

3,982,199.00
1,231,256.00
326,996.00

9,626, 678.00
137, 822.00
65,057.00
423,070.00
1,136,594.00

4,189,810.00
995,337.00

829,251.63


991,600.01


513,902.41
306,211.51

65, 46. 39
238,553.94
3,225. 42
3,795,260. 32
164,147.93
475,934.74
242,909.87
1,351,269.07
269,685.74
543,700. 28
435,325.80
63, 7T6.90
40,303.97
128,506.16
40,129.48
2,547.15
100,000.00
129,824.94
49, 227. 23
26,987.62

50,963.50

891,707.06
146 25S.94
2,336,889.63
356,006.61
38,717,335.97
155,818.24

10,000,000.00
9,800,626.46
13,500.00
25,236.79

1,970,877.33
2,620,090.65
2,225,000.00
3,247,332.11







74 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 15.-Details of Canal fixed property, fiscal year 1923-Continued.


Storm sewers..................................... ........
Street-lighting system....................................
Office buildings:
L Administration........................................
Terminal office, Balboa...............................
Storehouses...........................................
-Hydrographic structures.............................
Health department buildings:
SAncon Hospital............. ................... .........
Colon Hospital........................................
R Dispensaries..........................................
SAsylum s...............................................
Addition, Ward I, Corozal........... .............
Quarantine station............................ ...
Other health department buildings.....................
Cristobal incinerator..................................
Civil government:
SBhoolhouses..........................................
Post offices...........................................
Fire stations..... .... ...... .................
Police stations and prisons............................
Courthouses..........................................
Clubs and playgrounds..............................


June 30, 1922.


$200,000.00
90,490.00

918,636.00
77,409.00
300,000.00
11,772.00

1,305,973.00
191,630.00
120,910.00
125,313.56

40,129.00
51, 507.00


4-143,044.00
8,995.00
21,644.00
19, 70. 00
74,896.00
114,498.00


Total............................................... 235,391,918.30


Additions.


.............
.............
............
............

............
............
............

S157.93


............
............
............
............
............
............

92,537.99


June 30,1923.


$200,000.00
90,490.00

918,636.00
77,409.00
300,000.00
11,772.00

1,305,975.00
191,630.00
120,910.00

128,471.49
40,129.00
58,507.00
75,000.00

443,044.00
8,995.00
21,644.00
19,870.00
74,896.00
114,498.00

235,474,456.29


TABLE No. 16.-Detail of canal transit equipment.


July 1, 1922.


Floating equipment
Tugs................................... $818,677.23
Tug Empire sold..................... ...............
Supply boats........................... 103,088. 96
No. 1 sold .................. ...............
Launches ................................ 170,773.56
Dorothy, purchased ................. ................
Dan adjustment............ .......... .......
Nard No. 2, rebuilt.................. ................
Goodwill, renewals................... .................
Lirio, new engine................... ................
Flamenco, surveyed for sale.......... ................
Pest sold............................ ................
Nard No. 1, surveyed for sale......... ................
Dredges....................................... 1,474,666.60
No. 84, sold.............................. ........
Barges.................................. 1,048,141.52
No. 169, transfer...............................
No. 226, Machinery............... ................
No. 101, surveyed for sale............. ................
No. 122, surveyed for sale............. ................
No. 123, surveyed for sale............. ................
No. 146, surveyed for sale ............ ................
No. 147, surveyed for sale............. ................
No. 148, surveyed for sale............. ................
Floating cranes.......................... 656,792.45
Craneboat................................. 19,503.00
La V'allev revaluation................
Graders................................I 83,690.30
Drill barge................................ 15,000.00
Compressor barge........................ 20,848.00
Coal hoist barge........................ 2,112.00
Unwatering barge......................... 30,076.S5
Transferred. ........... . ................
Other equipment:
Road rollers......................... 19,256.00
Steam shovels........................ 6,450.30
Sale. ................................... .......
Automobiles......................... 1,430.64
Transfer.................. ........ .......
Salvage section:
Machinery and tools............. ... 13,164.86
Depreciation applied.............. ..............

Total........................ 4,483,672.27


Additions. June 30, 1923.
drawls. June 30, 1923.


$550.00
25.00
2,666.79
350.00
855.37
............




3,532.65
5,000.00







10,497.00

............


828,463.50

51,544.48





1,850.60
250.00
1,882.48


1790,213.73

51,544.48







171,237.64


50,000.00 I 1,424,666.60


7,804.04
7,776.00
8,553.60
4,785.89
4,785.89
4,785.89



..............


1,018,182.86
656,792.45

30,000.00
83,690.30
15,000.00
20,848.00
2,112.00


30,076.85

........... 19,256.00

6,450.30 ................


520.59 1............


570.62


24,568.02


1.951.23


102.60
4,147.87 9,485.01

213,259.99 4,294,980.30







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


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76 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 17.-Business property, by divisions.-Continued.

UNDISTRIBUTED BUSINESS CAPITAL, BY DIVISIONS.


Division.


Accounts
receir- working
able.


Stores.


Electric light and power system................................ $50,000 20,000 5100,000
Electric work............................................... 5,000 10,000 50,000
Water system............................................... 45,000 30,000 50,000
Municipal engineering work.................................... 25,000 20,000 50,000
Shops and dry doLks........................................... 100,000 100,000 250,000
Fue oil plants............... .................................. 75,000 5,000 ..........
Business storehouse.................... ......................... 250,000 .... 250,000
Animal and motor transportation............................. 15,000 I 10,000 20,000
Motor car repair shop...................................... ..... .... 3,000 10,000
Constructing Quartermaster................................... 25, 00rn 25,000 50,000
Panama Canal Press.......................................... 10,000 5,000 ..........
Hotel Tivoli..................................................... 1,000 4,000 1..........

Total.................................................... 601,000) 232,000 830,000


Total.



3170,000
65,000
125,000
95,000
450,000
80,000
500,000
45,000
13,000
100,000
15,000
5,000

1,663,000


TABLE No. 18.-Basiness property, fiscal year ended June 30, 192S.


Balance
July 1, 1922.


Hydroelectric plant............................. 1,667, 953. 44
Extensions...............................
Miraflores steam power plant.................. 307, S62. 44
Test boring for new plant.................. ..........
Substations.................................... 1,841,045. IS
Transmission system.......................... 1,355.733.38
Distribution lines-..............................' 10,10, 419. 90
Extensions................................. ..............

Total electrical division..........*... 6,274,014.34

Panama water system......................... 1,732,396.35
Summit surge tank......................... ..............
Colon water system............................I 585,642.809
Zone watersystem............................. 568,279.37

Total municipal engineering division. 2,886,318.61

Waterworks and sewers, Panama.............. S76,353.22
Pavements.................. ............ ........ 577,718.28
Pavements, new construction:.................. ..............

Total public works, Panama........... 1,454,071.50
Lessrepayments............................ 383.462.32

Balance............................. 1,070,609. 18


Additions.


With-
drawals.


Balance
June30,1923.


81,311.68 1............. 1 51,669,265.12


407. 87 ............

.............. ..............


1,839.96

3,559.51


27,666.32

..............


I I~ -- -


27,666.32 ..............


15,194.95 ..............


I I 1,69,26.4


15,194.95 ..............
.............. 530,262.66


15,194.95


Waterworks and sewers.Colon.................. 623,883.68 .............
Pavements................................. 624,638. 25
Pavements, new construction................. .............. 980.78

Totalpublic works, Qolon............... 1,248,521.93 980.78
Lessrepayments............................ 311,549.57 ..............

Balance............................ 936, 972.36 980.78

Incinerator, Balboa............ ............ 100,000.00
To defense capital ...... ............................... ..............
Incinerator, Cristobal....................... 75,000.00
To transit capital................... ...... ................ .. ... .......
Dry dock, Oristobal............................ 50,000.00 ..............
Roundhouse, Balboa........................... 111,500.00 ..............
Car and paint shop, Balboa.................... 95,000.00.00 .............
Miscellaneous bwldings......................... 104-.03
Absorbed................................. .............. ..............

Total shops and dry docks........... 256,604.03 ..............


Steamships:
Colon...................................... 400,000.00
Panama..................................... 400,000.00
Ancon................................. 600,000.00
Cristobal............................... 600,000.00


30,262.66


I I


31......,129.91.......

31,129.91
31, 129. 91


308,270.31
1,841,045.18
1,355,733.38

1,103,259.86

6,277,573.85


1,760,062.67
585,642.89
668,279.37


2,913,984.93

876,353.22

592,913.23


1,469,266.45
413,724.98

1,055,541.47


623,883.68

625,619.03

1,249,502.71
342,679.48
906,823.23


100,000.00 ............


75,000.00



104.03

101.03


..... 0........00
50,000.00
111,500.00
95,000.00


256,500.00


400,000.00
400,000.00
600,000.00
600,000.00


Totalsteamships.................... 2,000,000.00 j........................... 2,000,000.00


I : I I-----------


,


..............

..............


..............
..............


. .. .. .. .. ... .
. ... ... ... .
. ..... .. .. .
. .. .. ... .. .. .






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 18.-Business property, fiscal year ended June 30, 1923-Continued.


Balance
July 1, 1922. Additions.


Pier 18, Balboa................................. 11,168,
Pier 6, Cristobal............................... 2,201,1

Total, docks, wharves, and piers..... 3,370,

Coaling plant, Cristobal....................... 500,(

Colliers................... ....................... 2,029,
Coal barges..................................... 1,600,(

Total, colliers and coal barges........ 3,629,;

Fuel-oil plant:
Balboa.................................. 45-15,
Cristobal................................... 560,4
New pipe line, Cristobal................ .......

Total, fuel-oil plants................. 1,019,:

Business storehouses-......................... 300,
Animal and motor transportation.............. 23,i
To motor-car repair shop.................. .......
To building division..............................
To garages .................. .............. ........
Motor-car repair shop:
From animal and motor transportation..... .......
From garages............................... .. ......
Building repairs and construction:
From animal and motor transportation .... ......
Alteration of sawmill...................... .......
Gold quarte:s.................................. 3,439,7
Absorbed in operation.............................
House 70 to Pacific locks.................. ........
Sales of houses............................. ........
Silver quarters................................ 619,2
Sales of houses. ..................... ........
Garages........................................ 92,1
From animal and motor transportation..... ........
New 8-stall garage.......................... ........
New 3-stall garage.......................... ........
To motor-car repair shops.................. ........
Boathouses.................................. 4,0
Hotel Tivoli................................... 136,9
Garage for guests........................... ........
Sprinklersystem.......................... ........
Restaurants................. ........... .. 201,8
To defense capital..........................

Grand total, business property...... 26,935,;


200.26 .............
979.74 ..............

180.00 ..............

300.00 ..............

00.0O ..............

232.00 ..............


860.58 ..............
157.59
....... 858,510.41

318.17 58,510.41

00.00 ............
583.00



....... 3,782.00
....... 16,052.00

....... 1,202.00
A 72* q I


With-
drawals.


Balance
June30, 1923.


.............. 11,168,200.26
$1,001,979.74 1,200,000.00

1,001,979.74 2,368,200.26

.............. 500,000.00

2,029,232. 00
....... ...... 1,600,000.00

.............. 3,629,232.00


3,782.00
1,202.00
467.00

..............


29.01043.01


31.00100.00
...... .............. 2,850.00
.63.00
467.00
...... 1,358.15
...... 996.14
...... .............. 16,082.00
00.00 ........ ...........
172. 00
...... 288.78
...... 23,997.35 ............
30.00
...... .............. 3,500.00

76.70 I 158.805.74 1,273,802.35


.............. 458,860.58

.............. 618,968.00

.............. 1,077,828.58

............... 300,000.00


18,132.00

19,864.00

5.922.35


3,432,286.00

616,381.00



78,902.29
4,000.00

161,258.13

198,350.00

25,820,780.09


TABLE No. 19.-Canal business equipment.


Balance With- Balance
July 1,1922. Additions. drawals. June30, 1923.


Electric light and power system:
Machinery and tools........................ S6,717.72
Depreciation applied................... ..............
Automobiles..... ..............................
Electric work:
Machinery and tools........................ 14,584.12
Depreciation applied.................................
Automobiles............................... 3,822. 27
Telephone and telegraph work:
Machinery and tools........................ 6,928.91
Depreciation applied................... ..............
Water system:
Machinery and tools........................ 24,533.31
Depreciation applied................... ..............
Municipal engineering work:
Machinery and tools....................... 30,520.324
Depreciation applied................... ..............
Automobiles............................... 6,254.08
Shops and dry docks:
Machinery and tools..................... 415,596 81
Depreciation applied................. ..............


31,336.00 $201.49
.............. 857.65
880 72


1,421.26
...............
...............

399.20

7,026.86
..............

6,2.35.73


4,105.93
..............


50.26
1,838.38

101.09
803.06
11.12
8,177.00

2,704.84
9, 965. 81


10,977.18
24,217.32


$6,994.58
880.72

14,116.74
3,822.27

6,423.96

23,372.05

24,105.32
6,254.08

384,508.24


" '----~'






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 19.-Canal business equipment-Continued.


Balance With- Balance
July 1, 19,22. Additions. drawals. June 30, 1923.

Fuel oil plants:
Machinery and tools..................................... $4,603.16
Depreciation applied................................. .............. $251.89 S4,351.27
Animal and motor transportation:
Machinery and tools.......................... IS63.96 $1,553.43 245.88
Depreciation applied................ ............................ 281.67 959.92
Automobiles............................ 223,615.56 5,505.18 8,961.05 220,159.69
Mules................................................ 4,443.39 1,086.76 3,356.63
Motor car repair shop:
Machinery and tools....................... 11,471.20 220.96 33.34
Depreciation applied.. .............. .............. .......... 3,535.58 8,121.24
Building repairs and construction:
Machinery and tools........................ .............. 5,996.86 4,891.46
Depreciation applied................. ............................. 223.79 881.61
Panama Canal Press:
Machinery and tools........................ 23,522.50 5.99 210.00
Depreciation applied................... .............. .............. 1,803.85 21,514.61
Hotel Tiv\oli:
Machinery and tools....................... 58,599.48 9,897.74
Depreciation applied................ ............................ 5,961.29 62,535.93
Restaurants:
Machinery and tools....................... 37,562.30 .............. 733.54
Depreciation applied.................. .............. 3,448.63 33,380.13
Hotel Aspinwall:
Machinery and tools....................... 12,129.01
Depreciation applied................ ............................ 1, 158.78 10,970.23
Lands rented:
Machinery and tools...................... .............. 312.04 4.58 307.46
M ules ...................................... .............. 1,086.76 ............... 1,086.76

Total.................................... 875, 791.55 55,051.21 92,739.29 838,103.47

1 Credit.

TABLE NO. 20.-Status of public works in the cities of Panama and Colon June SO, 1928


Total.


Constructing cost:
Waterworks and sewers............................. $SI, 515,431.85
Pavements........................................ 1,203.,337.31

Total............................................ 2,718, 769. 16


Maintenance, operation, and repairs, including propor-
tion of zone system..................................
Interest at 2 per cent per annum:
Waterworks and sewers............................
Pavements.......................................
Zone system.......................................

Total.............................................


Total payable from water rentals................ 5,934, 078. 40


Water rentals and deficit payments applied to-
Maintenance, operation, and repairs...............
Interest..........................................
Proportion of capital cost..........................
Total............................................
Collections to be applied from unpaid deficit bills to
capital cost........................................
Capital cost reimbursable June 30, 1923 (in addition to
unpaid deficit bills):
Waterworks and sewers............................
Pavements.......................................
Total........................ .... ...............

Total payable from water rentals.................


2.374,468.77


Panama.


5891,548.17
577,718.28

1,469,266.45


1,329,728.17


Colon.


$623,883.68
625,619.03
1,249,502.71


1,044,740.60


I________________________________ I:


362,751.67
300,953. 27
177, 135.53


197,655.34
160,606.45
114,688.62


165,096.33
140,346.82
62,446.91


-O, 840. 47 472, 950. 41 367,890.06


3,271,945.03


2,662,133.37


2,374, 46s. 77 1,329,728.17 1,044, 740.60
840,840.47 472,950.41 367,890.06
738, 905.78 403,893.78 335,012.00

3. 9.i4, 215. 02 2,206,572.36 1,747,642.66

17,498.68 9,831.20 7,667.48


1,089,930.05 636,525.36 453,404.69
872,434.65 419,016.11 453,418.54
1,962,364.70 1,055,541.47 906,823.23


ilI


5,934,078.40


3,271,945.03


2,662,133.37






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 21.-Detail of Canal transit material and supplies.

Fiscal year, Fiscal year,
1922. 1923.

Balboa store........................................................... 4, 100,018.94 $2,263,706.40
Medical store... ....................................... 97,407.78 65,441.04
Stationery store, administration building............................... 21,862.06 14,0S0.37
Paraiso store............................................................ 766,438.23 695,357.53
Cristobal store........................................................... 692, 409.06 400,451.02
Corozal store............................................................ 404,098. 85 363,912.91
District quartermaster stores:
Balboa................................... 2,339.24 2,500.63
Pedro Miguel....................................................... 1 107.84 153. 15
Catun ....................................................... .. 1,262.18 555.34
Cristobal............................................................ 606.25 425.84

Total ....................................................... 4,099.53 3,634.96
Local purchases........................................................ 1,218.52 16,479.86
Invoices in suspense ..................................................... 90.13 1 12,962.S6
Material drawn by divisions not yet charged to the work............... 43,723.18 66,82. 40

Total.................................... 6,131, 1%6.32 3, 76, 929.63
Less reserve for war price reductions.................................... 1.524,018.78 88b a,723. 15
Book value of stores on hand...................................... 4,607,167.54 2, 9S8, 206. 48

1 Credit.

TABLE No. 22.-Receipts, issues and transfers of stores (and purchases charged to divisions)
during fiscal year 1923.


Month.



July...............
August...........
September........
October.........
November.......
December........
January..........
February.........
March.............
April..............
-y...............
June.............

Total........


Balance on
hand June
30, 1922.


56,575,593.15
6,304,570.66
6,157,045.67
5,884, 183. 41
5,704,311.53
5,550,665.00
5,346,331.21
5,251,419.91
5,124,553.49
4, 861, 525.37
4,669,675.64
4,712,920.71


Receipts by-


Purchase.

$47,011.69
242,865.37
74, 858.03
108,032.36
88,617.97
160,394.31
220,349.85
161,127.23
144,495.37
118,216.39
227,607.47
341,995.85


Transfer.

1134,351.24
231,950. S9
174,859.59
212,960.86
138,960.22
191,284.57
220,150.60
363,851.94
240,137.58
239, 156. 99
226,193.52
157,865.66


..............1 1,935,571.79 2,531,723.66


Manufacture. Adjustments.


316,987.S5
32,048.06
23,631.33
21,099.64
20,447.53
44,794.71
16,307.23
29,647.00
12,118.92
37,376.98
27,601.08
33,397.02

315,457.35


$4,690.09
9,362.04
3,674.13
23,073.98
13,665.89
'28,321.08
111,379.80
4,477.34
6,914.34
3,691.55
9,960.15
157,981.11

320,549.34


Regular stock in storehouses, July 1, 1922...................................................
Material in hands of divisions, July 1, 1922..................................................
Canal transit.............................................................
Canal business.............................................. ....................


Month.


July........
August.....
September..
October.....
November..
December ..
January....
February ...
March......
April .......
May........
June........

Total..


Issues. I Transfers.


$198,045.01
215, 754. 42
204, 933. 24
205,680.79
201,440.49
235,713.84
329,626.35
256,132.91
311,360.08
307,621.27
246,123.10
265,849.71

2,978,281.21


$116,722.99
174,861.64
132,797.00
178,129.07
105,808. 16
154,839.71
161,849.09
326,436. 52
194, 120.75
155,525.52
132,521.90
96,607.52


Issued by-

Sales.

S140,884.90
122, 662. 85
137,187.40
94,213.18
101,133.64
116, 4R. 23
153,668. 73
94,500.36
127,717.25
97,680.30
54,441.02
158,901.88


Adjust-
ments.

$18,410.46
150, 472. 44
74 967.70
67,015.68
6,955.85
65,084.52
17,954.61
8,900.00
33 496.15
29,464.55
15,031.13
246,501.71


Total
credits.

$474,063.36
663,751.35
549, 885.34
545,038.72
415,338.14
572,486.30
663,098.78
685, 969.93
666,694.23
590,291.64
448,117.15
767, 60. 82


Balance on
hand June
30, 1923.

$6,304,570.66
6,157,045.67
5,884,183. 41
5,704,311.53
5,550,665.00
5,346,331.21
5,251,419.91
5, 124,553. 49
4, 861, 525. 37
4, 669,675.64
4,712,920.71
4, 636,299. 53


1,930,219.87 11,399,R39.74 1 734,254.94 7.042,595.76 ..............


Regular stock in storehouses, July 1, 1923...................................................
Material in hands of division, July 1, 1923..................................................
Canal transit ................................................... ............................
Canal business ................................................ ...... .......... ...........
I Credit.


Purchases
direct to
divisions.

$49,140.36
48,418.82
50,146.89
31,279.36
43,623.41
54,798.79
49,995.10
85, 361.17
76,817.72
46,561.35
40,7S4.23
4', 660. 89

625,588.09


$4,323,477. 81
227,053.35
66,828.40
160,224.95


Total to be
accounted
for.


$6,778,634.02
6,820,797.02
434, 068.75
6,249,350.25
5,966,003.14
5,918,817.51
5,914 518.69
5,810,523.42
5,528,219.60
5, 259, 967.28
5,161,037.86
5,404,160.35

. . - - -


$6,175,387.09
680,659.25
43,723.18
637,136.07






80 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

TABLE No. 24.-Statement of canal expenses, earnings, and net expenses.


Executive department:
Executive offices.................................
Cables and radiograms.............................
Shipping commissioner.............................
Canal record ......................................
Land office.........................................
Legal services........................................
Railroad motor cars...............................
Clubs and playgrounds.....................
Total........................................
Accounting department:
Accounting office.................................
Paymaster's office...............................
Collector's office...............................
Total.................................
Washington office:
Chief of office........... ...............
Purchasing bureau .................................
Assistant auditor's office..........................
Disbursing clerk's office ...........................
Total.........................................

Civil government:
Civil affairs.......................................
Customs.............................................
Posts..............................................
Schools..............................................
Fire protection...................................
Police and prisons...............................
District court.....................................
District attorney ........................
Marshal........................................
Magistrates' courts .................... .............
Total...................................
Health department:
Chief health office................................
Ancon hospital ......................... ..
Colon hospital.. ................ .................
Dispensarnes............................ .......
Corozal farm and asylum..........................
Palo Seco leper asylum..............................
Santo Tomas hospital...............................
Medical storehouse..................................
Quarantine service.... .......................
Sanitation. Panama.............................
Street cleaning and garbage collection, Panama.....
Sanitation, Colon...................................
Street cleaning and garbage collection, Colon.......
Sanitation, Zone...............................
Total........................... ..........
Office engineer........................................
Meteorology and hydrography......................
Surveys..............................................
Storehouses, general:
Balboa storehouse..............................
Administration building storehouse.................
Paraiso storehouse................................
Cristobal storehouse................................
Total.................. ......................
Public buildings and grounds:
Superintendence ...................................
Balboa . . ......................................
Pedro Miguel......................................
Gatun.................................
Cristobal.......... ...............................
Total.....................................


Fiscal year 1923.


Canal expenses.


$298,248.97
3,118.19
39,180.23
12,604.21
2,400.00
489.67
13,211.58
191,189.47
560,442.32


Earnings.


$118,824.42
2,154.58
255.45

12,378.34
49,764.52
183,377.31


Net canal
expenses.


$179,424.55
963.61
39,180.23
12,348.76
2,400.00
489.67
833.24
141,424.95
377,065.01


361,723.45 225,147.79 136,575.66
43,791.27 27,936.10 15,855.17
441,029.92 29,151.00 14,878.92
449,544.64 282,234.89 167,309.75

48,692.44 21.01 48,671.43
131,777.55 I 23,794.29 107,983.26
27,178.68 ................ 27,178.68
7,648.62 ................ 7,648.62
215,297.29 23,815.30 191,481.99

15,039.39 83.00 14,956.39
25, 102.20 647.50 24,454.70
178,464. 90 8, 608.70 169,856.20
201,916.98 5,512.64 196,404.34
104,888.26 145.13 104,743.13
375,053.21 49,649.97 325,403.24
24,250.90 25.00 24,225.90
11,339.22 79.80 11,259.42
9,302.61 ................ 9,302.61
15,566.92 ................ 15,566.92
960,924.59 64,751.74 896,172.85


24,856.22
535,661.28
96,617.94
47,155.52
139,712.35
35,437.37
14,577.71
7,111.12
73,382.11
50,158.09
72,218.27
27,465.59
66,398. 51
117,081.15


4,013.68
298,392. 56
47,699.34
13,361.63
125,312.83
13,644.00
869.44
43,691.62
8,126.31
38,051.04
3,243.67
38,161.01
53,269.64


20,842.54
237, 268.72
48,918. 60
33,793.89
14,399.52
21,793.37
13,708.27
7,111.12
29,690.49
42,031.78
34,167.23
24,221.92
28,237.50
63,811.51


1,307,833. 23 687,836.77 619,996.46
34, 184. 02 15,605.29 18, 578.73
37,426.30 543.92 36, 882. 38
39,129.51 3,447.75 35,681.76

323,551.62 103,235.83 220,315.79
6,047.10 ................ 6,047.10
34,457.94 4,007.46 30,450.48
104,399.11 26,265.25 78,133.88
46, 455.77 133,508.654 334,947.23

48,163.42 41,908.70 6,254.72
202,178.85 111,080.98 91,007.87
44,492.45 84,121.47 10,370.98
29,772.81 21,283.65 8,489.10
64,599.15 38,968.58 25,630.57

389,206.68 247,363.381 141,843.30






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 24.-Statement of canal expenses, earnings, and net expenses-Continued.


Street lighting.........................................
Water for municipal purposes-..........................
Roads, streets, and sidewalks..........................
Storm sewers.........................................
Miscellaneous general expenses:
Transportation tracks and maintenance...........
Recruiting and repatriating employees..............
Transportation, employees on Isthmus............
Compensation, injured employees..................
Maintenance laborers' quarters.....................
Total... ................................
Marine division:
Marine superintendent............................
Port captain-
Balboa .......................................
Cristobal.......................................
Board of admeasurement ..........................
Board of local inspectors............................
Pilots-
Balboa ........................................
Cristobal ......................................
Tugs and launches-
Balboa. ...............................-....-
Cristobal ......................................
Handling lines-
Balboa. ................................ ..
Cristobal ......................................
Lighthouse subdivision.............................
Total........................................
Lock operation and maintenance:
Gatun Locks-
Superintendence................................
Operation .....................................
Maintenance ..................................
Total, Gatun Locks.........................
Pedro Miguel Locks-
Superintendence. ..............................
Operation. .. ...................................
Maintenance....................................
Total, Pedro Miguel Locks..................
Hiraflores Locks-
Superintendence...............................
Operation .. ..................................
Maintenance........................... .......
Total, Miraflores Locks......................
Miraflores spillway................................
Corozal store (locks)...............................
Total, locks..................................
Gatun Dam, maintenance..............................
Gatun spillway........................................
Colon East Breakwater...............................
Damage to vessels:
In locks.................... .........................
In canal................. ..........................
Channel maintenance:
Atlantic entrance.................................
Gatun Lake....................................
Gaillard Cut.......................................
Miraflores Lake...................................
Pacific entrance ...................................
Cristobal Harbor..................................
Balboa Harbor...................................
Removal floating obstructions.....................
Floating derricks, maintenance....................
Dredging division work............................
Total........................................
Total, canal earnings, expenses, and net
expenses...................................
Amortization ..........................................
Depreciation .......................................
Grand total.................................


Fiscal year 1923.


Canal expenses.


Earnings.


I II


210,045.93
69,205.86
68,990.64
14,455.90

49,092.87
31,879.79
120,000.00
650.00
50,705.29
252,327.95

12,149.53

110,019.80
59,071.00
41.811.39
3,947.44

131,359.23
128,872.46

214,185.34
210.241.61

63,531.57
62,783. 55
346,433.36


$23,809.42




23,899.42



3,705.14
2,731.41
3,370.00
2,913.80

75,821.33
151,297.00

147,481.45
206,459.63

70,161.00
69,936.00
124,724.75


Net canal
expenses.

210,045.93
69,205.86
68,990.64
14,455.90

825,193.45
31,879.79
120,000.00
2 650.00
L50,705.29
228.428.53

12,149.53
106,314.66
56.339.59
38,441.39
1,033.64

55,537.90
'22,424.54

66,703.89
3,781.98
16,629.43
'7,152.45
221,708.61


1.384.406.28 858,601.51 525,804.77


39,488.72 ................ ...............
222,520.03 ................ ................
88,568.59 ................ ................
350,577.34 1.051.68 349,525.66

20,402.26 ................ ................
201,705.94 ................ ................
187,007.27 ................ ...............
409.115.47 2.613.61 406,501.86

28,563.99 ................ ................
247,352.18 ................ ................
96,975.66 ................ ................
372.S91.83 102.08 372,789.75
491.62 ................ 491.62
6,440.91 ................ 6,440.901
1.139.517.17 3.767.37 1,135,749.80
33,107.51 407.23 32,700.28
6,170.87 ................ 6,170.87
5,149.48 ................ 5,149.48

2,296.37 ................. 2,296.37
4,494.92 ................ 4,494.92

598.39 ................ 598.39
19,836.51 ................. 19,836.51
1,699.675.33 ................ 1,699,675.33
5.562.22 ................ 5,562.22
251,813.14 ................ 251,813.14
1,915.35 ................ 1,915.36
59,719.45 ................ 59,719.45
28,686.39 ................ 28.686.89
55,341.23 ................ 55,341.23
77,584.32 88,785.08 11.200.76
2.200.732.33 88.785.08 2,111.947.26


9,653,345.56
350,000.00
305,377.50
10,308,723.06


2,617,945.50


2,617,945.50


7,035, 400.06
350,000.00
305,377.50
7,600.777.56


I Indicates credit.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 25.-Detail of Canal transit revenues.


Fiscal year 1922. Fiscal year 1923.


Tolls..................................................................... 511,193,383.47 817,507,630. 52
Taxes, fees, fines, Canal Zone .......................................... 45,201.62 45,951.58
Postal receipts ......................................................... 116,847.24 118,260.19
Interest on bank balances.............................................. 25,000.00 20,000.00
Proceeds of Government property...................................... 4,416.00 ................
Miscellaneous.................. ............. ........ ................ ... 743.99 1.77
Grand total...................................................... 11,385,592.32 17,691,844.06



TABLE No. 2Q.-Statement of business expenses, revenues and profit and loss fiscal year
1923.


Fiscal year 1923.


I Expenses.


Electric lighting and power system.....
Electrical work ........................;
Telephone, telegraph, and signal sys-
tem .................................
Water system ..........................
Municipal engineering work............
Public works:
Panama...........................
Colon..................... ...
Incinerator, Colon.................
Shops and dry docks...................
Docks, wharves, and piers..............

Fuel-oil plants:
Handling fuel oil...................
Fuel-oil sales.......................
Tank rentals......................

Total.. .........................
Business storehouses..................
Animal and motor transportation......
Motor-car repair shop................
Building repairs and construction......
Panama Canal Press.................
Quarters:
Gold................................
Silver............................
Garages................................
Boathouses............................
District quartermaster supplies and
services ..............................
Hotel Tivoli ...........................
Restaurants...........................
Building rentals .......................
Land rentals..........................
Equipment rentals..................... .
Market rentals........................
Sand and gravel .......................
Sale of Government property v........
Nautical charts and publications.......
Fortifications division...............

Grand total............................


5396,730.73
222,039.37

182,701.07
552,932.49
357,658.14

183,235.24
124,506.85
28,091.29
2,189,768.85
29,860.18


Revenues.


8751,952.04
206,335. 93

191,557.98
624,235.99
370,926.88

217,858.55
148,539.15
29,916.95
2,289,953.18
76,495.35


Profit or loss.



$355,221.31
1 15,703.44

8,8&56.91
71,303.50
13,268.74

34,623.31
24,032.30
1,825.66
100, 184.33
46,635.17


256,159.19 468,867.15 212,707.96 ................
431,128.72 473,315.90 42,187.18 ................
20.42 12,268.44 12, 248.02 ................


687,308. 33


2,407,813.00
330,597.83
102,516. 74
481,750.87
158,229.05

320,096.06
192,355.40
13,372.25
557.93

181,654.97
214,517.58
10,823.99
7,560.82
15,457.01

318. 18
32,304.99
75,031.29
1,171.11
231,239.25


9,732,200.86


954,451.49


267,143.16


Fixed capital
charge 3 per
centperannum.


$190,913.30
2,138.41

283.82
71,303.50
5,094.64

'34,623.31
224,032.30
1, 551.73
32,122.93
91,135.60


34,698.36


I._____________________________ _____________________________ ______________________________


2,463,731.63
365,359. 42
104,394.90
492,318.06
157,255. 18

362,301.74
192,355.40
14,883.83
501.41
151,486.18
206,328.34
6,847.99
11,376.47
23,514.14
962.46
1,023.66
36,543.30
185,869.80
2,326.71
231,239.25


10,872,843.36


55,918.63
34,761.59
1,878.16
10,567.19
1973.87

42,205.68

1,511.58
156.52

130,168.79
1 8,189.24
13,976.00
3,815.65
8,057.13
962.46
705.48
4,238.31
110, 83S. 51
1,155.60
................


8 1,140,642.50


24,954.66
7,839. 53
932.47
3,065.10
4,396.36

103,370.77
18,520.63
2,350.49
119.85

6,850.28
7,421.25
15.86
.......:........


7,439.87
10.'78


675,185.80


I Loss.
I Figured at 2 per cent, in accordance with contract.,
3 Profits on public works, Panama and Colon, amounting to (58,655.61, have been included in quarterly
remittances to the United States Treasurer, covering interest and amortization collections from the
Republic of Panama, the balance of the 51,140,642. 50 net profits above,after deducting the 558,655.61 already
remitted, which balance amounts to $1,081,986.89 will be immediately covered into the United States
Treasury as miscellaneous receipts, United States revenues, in accordance with regulations.


i


I






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. Wd


TABLE No. 27.-Comparison of expenses, revenues, and surplus to date.

CANAL TRANSIT OPERATIONS.


1914...................
1915....................
1916..................
1917...................
1918...................
1919.................
1920..................
1921...................
Total...........
To business surplus....

1922...................
1923....................
Grand total......


Tolls.


$14,618.69
4,343,383.69
2,399,830.42
5,631,781.66
6,264,765.71
6,156,118.95
8,493, 02.56
11,261,919.31


Taxes, licenses,
fees, fines, pos-
tal receipts, etc.



15 '711. '96
176,617. 04
147,077.57
197. 89. 03
442,789.01
778,197.39


Total transit
revenues.


$14,6186, 's
4,343,3.S3.69
2,558,542.38
5, 80S, 398. 70
6,411, -.43.28
6,3.54,016.98
R,935, S71.57
12,040,116.70


Net canal tran- Net revenues.
sit expenses. I


3166,030.91
4,123, 12. 09
6,999,750.15
6, 78,047.60
5,920,342.94
6,112,194.77
6,548,272. 43
9,32S,300.14


1$151,412.23
220. 255.60
14 441 207.77
1979 648.90
491,500.34
241,822.21
2,397, 599.14
2,711,816.56


44,565,500.98 1,901,291.00 46,466,791.98 45,986,057.03 480,724.95
................ 480,724.95 480,724.95 ................ 480,724.95
44, 565, 500. 98 1,420,566.05 45, 96, 067. 03 45, 986, 067. 03 ................
11, 193,383.47 192,208.85 11, 3.5,592. 32 7,919,017.63 3,466,574.69
17,507,630.52 184,213.54 17,691,844.06 7,690,777. 56 10,001,066.50


73,266,514.97


1,796,988. 44 75,063,503.41


61,595,862.22


13,467,641. 19


CANAL BUSINESS OPERATIONS.


Business Business
revenues, expenses. Net revenues.
revenu-s. expenses.

1914.................................................... $690,298.32 $695,720.71 15,422.39
1915........................................... 2,135,074.92 2,191,475.70 1 56,400.78
1916................................................... 6,488,521.61 6,476,623.17 11,898.44
1917................................................... 7, 579, 588. 44 7,540,160.78 39,427.66
1918.......................................................... 10,324,071.91 10,317,912.35 6,159.56
1919................................................... 13,684,881.18 13,623,853.92 61,027.26
1920.................................................... 14,705,371.82 14,465,685.69 239,686.13
1921.......................................................... 15,232,317.08 11,668,105.88 564,211.20
Total............................................. 70,840, 125.28 69,979,538.20 860,587.08
Profit carried in canal transit operations above.......... ................ ................ 379,862. 13
Net revenues carried to surplus................... ................ ................ 480,724.95
Interest on public works, Panama and Colon, etc., not
included in net revenues in prior years................ ................ ................ 619,584.59
Surplus to June 30, 1921........................... ............... ................ 1,100,309.54
1922.................................................... 7,747,227.57 7,423,968.41 323,259.16
1923..................................... 10, 872,843.36 9,732,200.86 1,140,642.50
Total............................................ 89,460,196.21 87,135,707.47 2,564,211.20

SDebit.
2 The loss during the fiscal years 1914 and 1915 was charged to maintenance and operation, The Panama
Canal, and is included in the net canal expenses shown above.

TABLE No. 28.-Statement of collections for rent of gold quarters and allied charges from
employees on The Panama Canal and Panama R. R. rolls, July 1, 1922, to June 30,
1928.
PANAMA CANAL ROLLS.


Rent and Tele- Hos- Miscella-
Month. janitor Current. Water. pone. Garage. pita. neous. Total.


1922.
July............... 20,970.30 53,359.68 51,415.07 5900.46 5961.25 $2,156.11 58,487.47 $38,250.34
August............. 20,560.02 2,931.51 1, 368. 81 905.99 953.89 2,107.19 8,536.39 37,363.80
September......... 20,755.97 3,004.92 1,376.56 954.13 1,055.99 1,873.45 8,208.45 37,229.47
October............ 22465.48 3,096.33 1,453.10 1,032.99 977.67 1,986.97 8,840.87 39,853.41
November......... 21,861.64 3,173.90 1,435.70 1,036.68 1,082.79 2,021.89 8,843.46 39,456.06
December.......... 21,013.08 3,772.54 1,580.09 1,048.64 975.76 2,644.50 8,849.59 39,884.20
1923.
January.......... 21,753. 07 3,850.15 1, 595.59 1,215.41 1, 026. 09 2,992.21 10, 131.12 42,563.64
February.......... 21,646.45 3,953.04 1,626.03 1,136.91 11,140.50 2,776.29 8,619.99 40,899.24
March............. 21,224.71 3,776.87 1,607.69 1,175.21 1,040.43 2,548.28 7,876.88 39,250.07
Aril............... 21 481.87 466.39 1 632.47 1 110.51 1,091.16 1,941.92 9,43874 37,163.06
ay................ 21,698.83 3,171.52 1,650.19 1,191.18 1,046.17 2,045.80 8,278.71 39,082.40
June............... 21,172.06 3,362.28 1,620.74 983.32 1,165.10 1,820.93 10,249.69 40,374.12
Total......... 256,603.48 37,919.13 18,362.04 12,691.46 12,516.80 26,915.54 106,361.36 471,369.81






84 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLa No. 28.-Statement of collections for rent of gold quarters and allied charges
from employees on The Panama Canal and Panama R. R. rolls, July 1, 1922, to
June 30, 1923-Continued.

PANAMA RAILROAD ROLLS.


Month. Rent and
janitor.


Current.


1922.
July..............5 4,770.64 $670.88
August............. 4,729.30 643.62
September ........ 4,635.88 632.92
October........... 4,812.32 635.78
November........ 4,601.21 621.8;9
December ......... 4,425.74 S02.51
1923.
January............ 4,707.30 854.81
February.......... 4, 537.21 820. 08
March. 4,547.63 792.02
pril............... 4, 198. 65 109.04
May................ 4.324.86 639.63
June............... 4,363.73 662.66

Total........ 54,654.47 7,885.84


Water.


5299.59
308. 09
293.99
292. 86
291.43
336.99

344.75
347.56
332. 10
3118. 18
310.72
321.99

3,788. 27


Tele-
phone.


$242.14
254.00
244.13
267.86
228.97
220.37

259.87
251.95
244.36
226. 00
283.10
269.98

2. 992. 73


Garage.


3143.00
161.00
144.35
144.47
166.33
160.30

151.00
158.07
149. 70
138.00
138.00
202.64

1,856.86


Hos-
pital.


5897.66
430.21
566.99
38. 75
343.55
411.65

822. 55
627.60
440. 25
393. 18
428.75
305.45

6,056.59


Miscella- Total.
neous. Total.


11,662.88
1,460.06
1,270.01
1,569.80
1,848.77
1,958.36

1,711.01
1,244.67
1,626.70
1,517.46
1,479.73
1,629.55

18,979.00


_____________I ___________________ ______I _________ _____


Grand total. .,311,257. 95 45, 804.97


22,150.31 15,684.19 14,373.66 32,972.13 125,340.36


TABLE No. 29.-Detail of reserves for depreciation.


Fiscal year 1922. Fiscal year 1923.


Canal transit property:
Equipment-
T ue ;............................................................
Supply boats...................................................
Launches.......................................... .............
D redees.........................................................
Barges. ................ ...........................
Crane boat .................... ...................................
G raders........................................................
Drill barges.................................................
Air-compressor barge...........................................
*Coal-boist barge....................................
R oad rollers................... .................................
Steam shovels.................... ..............................
Aut omobiles...................................................
Total equipment...........................................
Fixed property........... ....................................


$316,086.66
32,320.92
70,896.27
407,127.76
477, 821.58
16,149.21
16,111.90
1,156.25
7,507.40
1,653. 62
11,930.92
667.50
459.13
1, 359, 89. 12
305,377.50


Total canal-transit property................................... 1,665,266.62
Business property:
Equipment-
Electri c light and power system................................. ................
Autom obiles.................................................... 158,102.19
Shop equipment ................................................ 21,336.72

Total equipment.............................................. 179,438.91


Fixed property-
Electric light and power system.................................
W ater system ...................................................
Dry docks............................ ...............................
Fuel oil plants ........................................
Animal and motor transportation...............................
Motor car repair shop ........................................
Building repairs and construction...............................
Gold quarters...................................................
Garages.........................................................
Boat houses.................. ..................................
H otel Tivoli ...................................................
Restaurants....................................................
Silver messes....... ...... .............. ...... .............

Total fixed property........................................

Total business property.......................................

Total....................................
Theoretical interest................................ .....................

Grand total................................................


1,037,42S. 18
25,000.00

229,778.54





6, 848.58
1,932.15
499.98


$338, 25.24
15,531.60
84,954.95
447,260.13
497,616.45
560.00
21,007.90
1,218. 76
7,618.52
1,857.62
12,698.56

502. 53
1,429,152.25
610,755.00
2,039,907.25


483.20
179,079.73
18,328.38

197,891.31

1,131,538.42
66,439.38
5,000. 00
253,862.54
1,813.44
1,986.36
120.24
32, 493.44
7,654.80
399.96
20,652.97
7,161.63
................


1,301,487.43 1,559,023.18

1,480,926.34 1,756,914.49


3,146,192.96

3,146,192.96


3,796 821.74
94,385.79

3,891,207.53


$8,686.79
7,986.28
7,788.27
8,111.84
8,102.17
8,315.92

8,851.29
7,987.14
8,132.76
6, 890.51
7,604.79
7,756.00

96.213.76

567, 583. 57


'I'


---l--~---~-r


|






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THA PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 30.-Detail of reserve for repairs.


Canal-transit property:
Equipment-
T ugs........................ ....................................
Supply boats.................... ........... .........
Launches. ......... ......... .................
Dredges................... .....................................
Barges.................. ........................................
Crane boat.................. .............................
Graders.............. ........ .....................
Drill barges.............. .... ......... ...............
Air-compressor barge...........................................
Coal-hoist barge.................. .............................
Road rollers........................................... .......
Total equipment.................................. ........
Fixed property-Baseball stadium......................................
Total canal-transit property...................................
Business property-Shops and dry docks................................
Fixed property:
Electric light and power system....................................
Shops and dry docks...............................................
Fuel oil plants.....................................................
Hotels.............. ..................................
Total fixed property........................................
Total business property.......................................

Grand total reserve for repairs................................


i Fiscal year 1922.


S262,121.53
8,3S0.66
6,282.37
200,525.39
153, S88. 54
3,522.67
15,592.28
1, x29. 33
675. 93
1,496.64


Fiscal year 1923


$378,391.92
9,119.03
7,711.05
230,919.50
211, b97. 41
1,442.06
16,967. 68
2,550.65
375.00
675.93
250.04


654,915.34 560,301.17
179.43 220.63

655,094. 77 860,521.65
63,093.71 66,994.10


12,761.32
S, 11'). '7
199,927.27
1,932.19
222,740.65

235, 34.36
940,929.13


3,379.65
79,64'.15
230, 69.65
1 2,439.74

311,277.71

378,271.81

1,238,793.66


I Debit.
TABLE No. 31.-Reserve for gratuity due employees.


Fiscal year 1922. Fiscal year 1923.


Electrical division, electric light and power system......................; 56, e43. 00 570,243. 4
Municipal engineering division, water system........................... 49,702.18 52,168.25
Mechanical division, shops and dry docks............................... 251,071.77 25i, S45. 42
Constructing quartermaster, building repairs and construction.......... 23,455.38 17,115.62
Fortifications........................................................ 37,734.57 25,695.91
Total............................................................ 431,806.90 424,068.68


TABLE No. 32.-Detail of cost of production and distribution of electric current.


Gatun hydroelectric power plant:
Operation and maintenance........................................
Reserve for depreciation...........................................
Reserve for repairs................................................
Tot al cost...........................................
Kilowatt-hours..................................... ..... ...........
Unit cost..................................... ......................
Mirafloressteam electric power plant:I
Operation and maintenance.......................................
Reserve for depreciation..........................................
Reserve for repairs................. ...............................
Total cost........................................................
Kilowatt-hours......................................................
U nit cost.................. ........................................
Total cost, both plants..........................................
Total kilowatt-hours............................................
Average cost per kilowatt-hour..................................


Fiscal year
1922.


$45,207.30
52,00.00
2,850.00
100,857.30


Fiscal year
1923.


$32,296.61
25,019.28
2,400.00
59,715.89


49,249.471 45,560 996
50.0020 '50.6013

M4, 656.98 559,313.43
26,400.00 4,617.96
1,590.00 1,320.00
112,646.98 65,251.39
18,394 ...............
$6.1241 ...............
8213,504.28 $124 967.28
49,267,865 45, 0 996
t0.0043 50.0027


1 Mirafiores steam power plant is generally operated as a reserve generative station and for stand-by service.
During fiscal year 1922 it was required to carry load on 15 occasions, while during fiscal year 1923 load was
carried on 36 occasions.






66 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 32.-Detail of cost of production and distribution of electric current-Con.


Fiscal year
1922.


Fiscal year
1923.


Operation of substations: I
Balboa................................................
Cristobal. ..................................................... .......
Gatun............................................ ..................
Miraflores............................ ...... ..............
Gamboa............................................................
Reserve for depreciation............................................
Reserve for repairs..................................................
Total cost......................................................
Transmission lines:
Inspection and maintenance ........................................
Reserve for depreciation...........................................
Reserve for repairs...............................................

Total cost.........................................................
Distribution lines:
Inspection and maintenance........................................
Reserve for depreciation............................................
Total cost........................................................

Grand total cost of distributed power............................
Total kilowatt-hours...........................................
Total unit cost.............................. .............


518,599.03
18,286.78
24,138.34
25,544. 19
2,231.41
55,200.00
1,800.00


$13,759.33
14,459.98
18,772.70
17,802.71
3,865.80
27,615.72
1,500.00


145,799.75 97,776.24

36,551.75 19,699.02
27,600.00 20,336.04
5,910.00 4,980.00
70,061.75 45,015.06

45,641.80 35,678.82
43,800.00 16,521.24
89,441.80 52,200.06

518,807.58 319,958.64

49,267,865 45,560,996
S0.0105 30.0070


TABLE No. 33.-Detailed cost of production of water per 1,000 gallons.

Fiscal year 1922. Fiscal year 1923.

Total cost. Quantity. nit Total cost. Quantity. cUit


Ancon-Balboa-Panama system:
Operation, pump ?ration, Gamboa.
Operation, pump station. Balboa..
Operation, filtration plant, Mira-
flores............................
Maintenance water mains and res-
ervoirs .........................
Total.........................

Distribution of water:
Panama.........................
Canal Zone, other than Army and
Navv..........................
United States Army and Navy,
Fort Clayton, Corozal, and Bal-
boa..... .....................
Commercial shipping..............
United States Army and Navy
vessels.......................
Panama R. R. steamships........
Total........................
Gatun system:
Operation, pump station, Agua,
Clara.. ....
Operation, filtration plant, Agua
C lara............................
Maintenance, reservoir, AguaClara
Maintenance, water mains......
Total... ...................


$61,605.72
41,654.45
81.262. 65

59,425.87


Thousand
gallons.
3,325,480
2,143,772

2,786,935
3,325,480


50.0185
.0194

.0292
.0179


371,279.05
45,347.30
67,110.72

63,757.77


Thousand
gallons.
3,468,510
2,097,481
2,717,255

3,468,510


50. 02 6
.0216
.0247

.0184


243,948.69 3,325,480 .0650 247,494.84 3,468,510 .0853

......... 1, 048,626 ........ ............ 1,063,952 ........

............ 1,966,249 ........ ............ 2,138,566 ........

... ......... 2291,60S ........ ............ 234,485 ........
............ 20,264 ........ ............ 19,877 .......

........... 8,458 ........ ........... 11,274 ........
............ 275 ........ ............356 ....... .

............ 3,32.,480 ........ ............ 3,468,510 ........


21,758.51 1 0572 21,554.23 .0551
14,204.11 380,627 .0373 20,699.83 391,322 .0529
8,032.07 .0211 9,348.24 .0239
6,671.27 .0175 4,117.06 .0105


50,665.96


Distribution of water:
Canal Zone, other than United
States Army.. ............... ...........
United States Army, Fort Davis, -
and Fort Sherman.......................


380,627 1 .1331 55,719.36 391,322 .1424


181,043

199,584


........ ...... .. .. 197,923 ........
........ ............ 193,399 ........


391,322


Total............ ........... .'


I I I I I M I I I I I


380,627 1........ ............


.. ..






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 33.-Detailed cost of production of water per 1,000 gallons-Continued.


Fiscal year 1922. Fiscal year 1923.


Total cost. Quantity. Unit Total cost. Quantity. UnL


Cristobal-Colon System: Thousand Thousand
Operation, pump station, Mount gallons. gallons.
Hope.......................... S32,412.59 1.0209 834,071.79 (0.0229
Operation, filtration plant, Mount
Hope........................... 22,68.22 1,552,49 .0146 20,527.86 1,484,799 .0138
Maintenance, reservoir, Miount
Hope ........................... 9,S35.63 .0063 9,514.15 .0061
Maintenance, water mains........ 21,732.93 .0140 27,&14.47 .01S8

Total........................... S6,629.28 1,5.52,495 .0558 91,95S.27 1,4S4,799 .0619
Distribution of water:
Colon................ ......... ............ 648,722 .......... ........... 719,63h ........
New Cristobal.................................. 46,505 ........ ............ 32,905 ........
Canal Zone, other than United
States Army. ................... ............ 521,607 ........ ............ 387,561 ........
United States Army and Navy
submarine base, Fort Randolph,
France Field, and Cristobal.................. 24,704........ ............ 266,929 ........
Comm ercial shipping.............. ............ 65,376 ........ ............ 61,4 3 ........
United States Army and Navy
vessels........ ......................... 5,963 ........ ............ 5,322 ........
Panama R. R. steamships ........ ............ 11,001 ........

Total................... ........... ........ 1,532,495 ........ ............ 1,414,799 ........

Additional raw water furnished to
cold-storage plant direct from
reservoir and through mains for
short distance only, estimated... ............ 730,000 ........ ............ 720, ........

Grand total........................... 2,282,495 ..................... 2,204,799 ........


TABLE No. 34.-Dredging operations (channel maintenance.).


Dredging:
Dipper dredges.......
Suction dredges.......

Total dredging......
Towing:
Tugs and scows.......
Miscellaneous floating
equipment..........

Total towing......
Other expenses:
Hydraulic graders....
Drill barges...........
Pipelines.............
Sluicing...............
Blasting..............
Drilling..............
Surveys.............
Channel lights........
Dikes.................
Relay pumps.........

Total other expenses

Division overhead........

Total................
Indirect charges..........

Grand total...........


Gaillard Cut.' Pacific entrance.


Cost.



3524,786.95
34,222.27

559,009 22


495,104.23

27,088.93

522,193. 16


Unit
cost.


S0.2101
.0137

.2236


.1982


Cost. coLni
cost.


185,610.42
60,220.07

145,830.49


41,588.36


.0108 10,567.48

.2089 52,155.84


50.0591
.0415

.1006


.0287

.0073
.0360


Balboa inner har-
bor.
Total.
Cost. Unit
cost.


............ ........ $610,397.37
$38,224. 69 10. 051 132,667.03

38,224.69 .0501 743,064.40


275.30

2,495. 23

2,770.53


35,943.25 .0144 ............ ........ ............ ........
69,648.30 .0279 ............ ........ ............ ........
12,178.52 .0049 2,216.49 .0015 7,694.25 .0101
32,674.85 .0131 ............ ........ ............ ........
74,589.16 .0298 ............ ........ ............ ........
115,348.12 .0461 ............ ........ ........... .......
35,844.77 .0143 5,159.64 .0036 2,017.88 .0026
367.45 .0001 ........................................
1,120.31 .0004 4,046.04 .0028 1, 378.45 .0018
2,047.77 .0008 ............ ........ ............ ........

379,762.50 .1519 11,422.17 .0079 I 11,090.58 .0145


146,709.95

1,607,674.83
92,000.50

1,699,675.33


.0587

.6431
.0368

.6799


29,398.94

238, 807. 44
13,005.70

251,813.14


.0203 5, 491.37

.1648 57,577.17
.0089 2,142.28
.1737 59,719.45


1 Includes removal of La Pita Point, $774,187.98.


.0072

.0754
.0028

.0782


.0004 536,967.89

.0032 40,151.64

.0036 1 577,119.53


35,943.25
69,648.30
22,089.26
32,674.85
74,589.16
115,348.12
43,022.29
367.45
6,544.80
2,047.77

402, 275. 25
181,600.26

1,904,059.44
107,148.48

2,011,207.92


i I I i






88 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 34.-Dredging operations (channel maintenance)-Continued.


taillard Cut. Pacific entrance. Balboainner har-
Total.
Cost. Cost. Unit Cost. t
__ _cost. _ cost. ot cost

Quantities excavated:
Dipper dredging-- Cubic yardF. Cubic yards. Cubic yards. Cubic yards.
Earth............ 646,600 44,00 .................... 691,400
Rock............. 1,428,350 87,100 .................... 1,515,450
Suction dredges-
Earth.............. 421,930 1,318,150 767,450 2,507,550

Total............. 2,496,900 I 1,450,050 767,450 4,714,400


TABLE No. 36.-Postal service-Statement shouting the monthly money-order business of
the Canal Zone postal service during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1923.


ione orders ied, Money orders paid by Canal
including deposit Interest Zone post offices.
money orders. paid Z e poson of
deposit ____
monev
Num- Amount order-. I United Costa Canal
ber. mouStates. Rica. Zone.



9,084 $231,351.93 8S32.95 814,712.50 $101.25 9S, 005.73
8,670 204,245.15 7S0.25 17,470.27 40.00 94,526.52
8,646 202,134.47 523.56 16,630.17 4.90 72,359.42
8,604 190,055.88 426.99 14,736.28 2.40 67,960 93
9,986 209,299.82 581.99 14,670.67 8.00 73,333.86
11,111 215, 195.39 574.48 19,771.59 58.00 76,795.08

10,034 226,S79.52 635.23 15,819.90 .60 64,489.14


217, 78.46
337,637.41
221,936.91
212,381.91
208,733.70


446.78
532.19
796.09
1,198.74
1,032,87


16,519. 14
19,421.33
19,421.17
24,053.92
22,785.12


119,575 |2,707,610 55 S,362.1216,012.06
1 1 1


........ 58,494.1
4.50 65,228.29
....... 84,486.07
.......06,459.16
13.36 92,566.67

233.01 4,705.06


Canal Zone money orders
paid by-


Marti-
nique.


Costa
Rica.


$5.00 ........
5.00 ........
S........ 555.10
3.00 .........
9.00 .........
14.00 665.12


50. uu
14.00
10.00
2.00
2 50


472 00

540.29


114.50 12,232.51
1


United
States.



3117,988.47
174,591.94
89,238. 49
137,747.90
89,968.22
92,383.33

190,976.50
132,829.73
135,245.03
241,365.07
187,329.71
142,701.61

1,732,366.00


1 Including deposit money orders.

TABLE No. 37.-Postal Service-Statement of audited revenues, fiscal years 1907 to 1928,
inclusive.


Year.


Receipts.


Mi-cella-
neous.


1907.......... ............
1908.................
1909. ..................
1910..................
1911....................
1912. ........ ............
1913. ..... ............
1914 .....................
1915.................
1916 .......... ............
1917........... 1,207.59
1918.......... 1.344.7.5
1919.......... 2,313.23
1920........... 1,951. 1t
1921.......... 2,522.35
1922 ........ 2,152.09
1923.......... 2,211. 4

Total... 13,703 31


Money-
order fees.


$9,832.65
19,309.14
21,720.93
22,980.96
23, 457.98
22, 889.93
23,366.31
19, 08.44
13,169.55
12,878.29
12,371.28
1I,918.35
10,424.16
10,,2107. 59
11,60i6.28
9,153.56
9,889. 70


Stamp sales. Box rent.


$54, 803.79 ..........
72,708.67..........
74,241.S7 ............
E3,765.60 ............
82,55.5.21 ...........
87,497.21...........
100,599. 15 ............
00,792.63 ............
75,202.29 $2,973.65
76,337.r08 5,029.50
74,474.98 8,100.)00
83,939.74 8,147.30
81,723.76 8,:268.20
87,096.72 8,776.55
102,3514.76 11,605.20
93, 83.24 i 10,637.50
93,532.290 10,733.55


264,585.10 1,415,338.99 74, 271.45


Newspaper
postage.



$0.87
85.53
81.50
28.51
144.24
318.84
463.67
988.50
1,410.39
1,703.89
1,825.38
2,553.8R
1,782.53
1,268.77
1,525.87
1,834.07

16,016.44


Total reve-
nue.


S64,636. 44
92,018.68
96,048.33
106,828.06
106,071.70
110,531.38
124,284.30
110,664.74
92,333.99
95,655.26
97,857.74
107,175.52
105,283.25
109,815.03
129,357.36
117,152.20
118,201.25


Interest
on money-
order
funds.







2,884............5




32,9110.22
25,746.20
22,141.38
25,803.10
32,696.81
25,173.21


1,783,915.29 177,385.49


Month.


1922.
July........
August.....
September .
October....
November..
December..

1923.
January....
February...
March......
April.......
May........
June.......

Total.....


1u, 477
14,003
9,894
10,031
9,035


I







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 38.-Postal Service-Statement of postal revenues, fiscal year ended June
30S, 1923. 1


Month.


1922.
July........................
August....................
September.................
October....................
November.................
December.................

1923.
January-....................
February...................
March.....................
April........................
M ay .'........................
June .. ....................


Total.................


Reci


Miscella- Money- Stamp
neous. order fees. saleF.



5174.68 $719.18 56.154.21
3b8. 12 733.16 7,33. 50
119.26 71)9.64 6, 196. ir1
170.96 698 59 ti,'7.i68
15S.74 797.49 i 7,875.43
183.97 892.86 10,597.05 5


165.01 784.23 7,511.21
171.43 916.20) 8,455.19
18S.03 1,296.13 10,381.07
'174.85 777.73 7,417.73
136.15 78.S.70 7,315.25
170.44 70'.5.77 7, t01.91

2,211.64 9,8S9.70 93,532.20 9


eipts.


Newspa- Total
Box rent. per post- revenue.


age.


5983.55
92.95
1,423.15
1, 101.05
7S.35
1,483. 60


1,128.20
76.25
1,781.65
880.85
S3.85
1,620.10


596.90
98.60
284.27
221.97
133.48
155.98


144.70
125.93
140.62
147.92
142.49
141.21


10,733.5 1 I.S34.07


IntereSt
on
money-
order
funds.


S8,128.52 $2, 903.83
S,629.33 1,326.98
8,752.38 1,119.27
8,890.253 005.86
9,043.49 1.052.78
13,313.46 912.42


9,733.37 2,434.44
9,745.00 938.79
13 787 5 I 4 901 54


S100 00o


9,39Y. 0 I 1,12 1 3.
8,449.44 1,24-1.10
10,329.43 1,134.98

118,201.25 25,173.21


TABLE No. 39.-Postal Service-Statement of postal-savings payments and deposit
money-order transactions (in lieu of Postal Savings System) for fiscal year ended June
30, 192S.


Postal-savings certifi-
cates.
Month.
Balance Paid.
July 1,1922.1 raid.

1922.
July....................................... $208 ............
August....................... ............. ... .......... ........... .
September. .......... ............ .......... ...........
O october ................................... ............ ............
N ovem ber................................. ............-.............
December.............................................
1923. I


January ..................................
February.................................
M arch..................................
April...................................

June..................................
Balance unpaid, June 30, 1923.............

Total..............................


............ 27


............ ............


Deposit money orders.


Balance Issued
July 1,1922. Issued


$437,200
............
............
............
............
............

............
............
............
............
............


............ 181 ............

208 208 437,200


Paid.


891,980 $81,530
60,025 77,195
64,825 59,495
56,305 55,310
62,000 61,915
53,575 63,725

81,460 50,395
64,780 : 45,290
72,565 i 48,710
74,525 70,755
71,090 89,995
60,575 76,100
............ 470,550

813,765 1,250,965


TABLE No. 42.-Summary of income and expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds
fiscal year 1923.

EX PEN DITURES.


Ancon. La Boca. Balboa. Pedro Paraiso. Gatun. tun

Soda fountain inventory, July I
1,1922........................ $345 87 $151.43 5995.71 1222.16 5152.03 $360.35 5206.34
Cigars and candy inventory,
July 1, 1922................... 1,216.43 495.26 3,119.24 240.05 562.01 795.85 284.44
Salable merchandise inventory,
July 1, 1922................... 1,549.03 .......... 5,19. 10 188.04 ........ 807.70........
Bureau of clubs and play-
grounds' stock inventory,
July 1, 1922......... ... .................... .......................... ....................
Total expenditures, fiscal year
1923........................ 54,653.861 25,916.80147,665.00 10,453.81 19,261.02 23,249.60 13,985.37
Earnings, fiscal year 1923....... 3,465.10 6,268.93 10,327.33 197.65 4,982.731 298.94 2,456.66

Total................... 61,230.29 32,832.42167,306.381 11,301.71 24,957.79; 25,512.44 16,932.81


f\ on~n n.3


I






UU REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

TABLE No. 42.-Summary of income and expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds,
fiscal year 192j-.-Continued.

EXPENDITU R ES-Continued.

Bureau
Cristobal Red Balboa of clubs General
Cristobal. Silver. Tank boat- and pla- Total.
house. grounds' secretary.
stock.

Soda fountain inventory, July
1, 1922......... ................ 366.75 $128.58 $125.38 $23.91.......... .......... $3,078.51
Cigars and candy inventory,
July 1, 1922....... ........... 969.06 984.80 378.75 57.85 ......... ......... 9,103.74
Salable merchandise inventory,
July 1, 1922................... 747.00 .......... .......... 297.10 .......... .......... 8,786.97
Bureau of clubs and play-
grounds' stock inventory,
July 1, 1922................... .......... .......... .......... .......... 14,126.35 .......... 14,126.35
Total expenditures, fiscal year
1923.......................... 44,432.16 35,98x.29 12,571.83 6,216.22 23,252.12 $497.67418,143.75
Earnings, fiscal year 1923....... 7,097.97 9,219.26! 1,276 11 '58.65 1974.23 2,493.07 47,050.87
Total..................... 53,612.9 46,320.931 14,352.07 6,536.43 36,404.24 2,990.74500,290.19

INCOME.


Ancon. La Boca. Balboa. er Paraiso. Gatun. Seun

Soda fountain inventory, June
30,1923...................... $541.S0 $388.10 $1,606.72 $166.86 $205.04 $336.26 $249.27
Cigars and candy inventory,
June30, 1923.................. 1,047.99 385.53 2,381.59 171.84 448.51 400.77 433.90
Salable merchandise inventory,
June 30, 1923.................. 1,372.58 .......... 6, 17.56 70.67 .......... 786.04 ..........
Bureau of clubs and play-
grounds' stock inventory,
June 30, 1923.................. .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... ........ .........
Total income, fiscal year 1923... 58,264.92 32,058. 79 157,129.51 10,892.31 24,304.24 23,989.37 16,249.64
Total..................... 61,230 29 32,832.42167,305.38 11,301.71 24,957.79 25,512.44 16,932.81

Bureau
Cristobal ristobal Red Balboa of clubs General
Cristobal. ver. Tank. boat- and pla- retary, Total.
house. grounds' eetary.
stock.

Soda fountain inventory, June
30,1923.................... $373.70 $161.14 3187. Il........... ........ ........... $4,219.07
Cigars and candy inventory,
June 30, 1923................. 676.59 611.75 284.04 $383.01 .......... ........ 7,225.52
Salable merchandise inventory,
June30, 1923.................. 1,016.92 .......... .......... 66.33 .......... .......... 9,500.10
Bureau of clubs and play-
grounds' stock inventory,
June 30, 1923................... ......... .......... .......... 1,282.96......... $10,282.96..96
Total income, fiscal year 1923... 51,545.73 45,548.04 13,880.85 6,087.09 26,121.28 $2,990.741469,062.54
Total.................... 53,612.94 46,320.93 14,352.07 6,536.43 36,404.24 2,990.74 500,290.19

1 Losses.

TABLE No. 43.-Bureau of clubs and playgrounds, balance sheet June SO, 1923.


ASSETS.
Cash on hand:
Secretaries' balances... $6,440.06
Deposited with collec-
tor................. 137,327.38
$143,767.44


Inventories:
Soda fountain......... 4,219.07
Cigars and candy...... 7,225.52
Salable merchandise... 9,500.10
Bureau of clubs and
playgrounds'stock... 10,282.96


31, 227.65


Accounts receivable: Reg-
istered bills......................... 10,951.59
Total............................ 185,946.68


LIABILITIES.
To June 30, 1922....... $114,521.56
Profit, current fiscal
year................ 47,050.87
$161,572.43


Accounts payable: Audited
vouchers ............................


24,374.25


Total............................ 185,946.68








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