• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Section I: Canal operation and...
 Section II: Business operation...
 Section III: Government
 Section IV: Administration
 Section V: Financial and statistical...
 Back Cover














Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00097365/00007
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Panama Canal for the fiscal year ended ..
Alternate Title: Report of Governor of the Panama Canal
Physical Description: 36 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Canal Zone -- Office of the Governor
Publisher: U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Washington
Washington
Publication Date: 1922
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Canal Zone   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: June 30, 1915-June 30, 1951.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Some vols. issued in the congressional series as House document.
General Note: Reports for 1914/15-1915/16 each accompanied by portfolio of maps and diagrams.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00097365
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02454300
lccn - 15026761
oclc - 2454300
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report of the Isthmian Canal Commission for the year ending ...
Succeeded by: Annual reports of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government for the fiscal year ended ...

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Section I: Canal operation and trade via Panama
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Section II: Business operations
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Section III: Government
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Section IV: Administration
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 52a
        Page 52b
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Section V: Financial and statistical statements
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Back Cover
        Page 95
        Page 96
Full Text











UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY









ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE


GOVERNOR OF


THE PANAMA CANAL


FOR THE


FISCAL YEAR
ENDED JUNE 30

1922


WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1922


,











































Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from Lyrasis and the Sloan Foundation


http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofgol922cana














TABLE OF CONTENTS.



Introduction ....................................................... ..... 1
Net revenue of the canal and its auxiliaries.............................
Service renidereil by the canal to shipping................................ 2

S lF1(\ I.-C(ANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAIMA.

Traffic in 1922 .. .................... ......... .. ................. 3
Nationality of vessels.................................................... 4
Free transit. of public vessels of the United States...................... 4
Cargo passing through The Panama Canal in 1922. ...................... 5
Principal commodities................................................ 6
Commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during the fiscal year 1922,
classified by lead nz trade routes...................................... 7
Motor ships...... ........... ................... ..-................. 8
Details of the trade................................................. 8
Inconvenience of the dual system of measurement................-.......... 8
LIockages and lock maintenance........................................... 9
Power for canal operation..................-- ............................... 10
Water supply.............................................................. 10
Maintenance of channel ............................................... 11
Aids to navigation........................................ .................. 12
Accidents.. ....................................................... 12
Salvage operations. .............. ................................... 13
Quarantine .......................... .... ................................ 14

SEITIiON II.-BUSINESs OPERATIONS

Repairs to vessels-Mechanical work...................................... 15
Work for individuals and companies.................................- .... 15
Work for the Navy................................................... 16
Work for The Panama Canal........................................... 16
Work for the Panama Railroad............................................ 16
Drydocks......................................................... 16
Volume of work and reduction of force .............................. 16
Costs............................................................... 17
Coal.: ... ......... .......................................... ...........18
Fuel oil, Diesel oil, gasoline............................................... 18
Ship chandlery and other supplies-storehouse operations .................. 19
Harbor terminals....................................................... 20
Commissary system .................. ...................................... 20
Purchases. ........................................................................... 21
Sales............................................................... 21
Meat industry.......................................... ............. 22
Plantations............................................. ........ .... .. 22
Hotels and restaurants................................................... 23


(p7/6'Y









Pago.
Building construction and repairs ........................................... 23
I'nited States Army....................... .......................... 23
United States Navy............. ....................... .......... 223
Repairs ........................................ . ................... 23
1'rinti i l r ........................ ....... ... ....................... 2'1
P oaneaa Railroad................................. ............................ 24
Telephones ... .......... ................ ................................. 25
Land and buildings..................................................... 25
Clubhouses....... ........ .............................. ...... .............. 26
Panamn Railroad Steamship Line.............. ......... ................ 26

SECTION III.-O(;OvFRNIr.NT.
Poipilation ................. .......................................... 28
Public health........................... ........................... ....... 28
Malaria............................................................. ... 29
('anal Zone................................................... ....... 29
Panama,........................................................ 30
Colon.............................................................. .30
Canal hospitals.................................... ................ 31
Medical storehouse.............................................. ........... 31
Quarantine...................................---..................... 31
Municipal engineering........................................................ 33
Water supply .......... .......................................................... 33
Sewers................. ............................................... 33
Roads, streets, and sidewalks.......................................... 34
Garbage disposal........... ........................................... 34
Cities of Panama and Colon..........................................- 34
Public order................ ........................................ 34
Office of district attorney................................................... 36
District court....................-..... .......... ...................... 36
arshal ............................................ ................. ....... 36
lMaistrates' courts. .................. ..................................... 37
Balboa................-......-..................................... 37
Cristobal.................. ................... .................. .... 37
Iire protection... ..................................... ................. 37
Public-school systemn................................................. .... 37
Postal system................ ........................................... 3s
Customs.............................................. ........................
Slipping commissioner-seamen......................................... 40
.Administration of estates ................................................. 40
Relations with Panama................................................... . I
Laws and executive orders.................................................. 41

SlTCTIiN IV.-AnMINTSTUATION.

'lanages in organiiiation and personnel................................... -12
Reduction of force and reduced pay rolls................................. 42
F1re quarters privi w-r withdrawn ...................... .................. 4:
\'age adjustments
Gold employe........................................................ 44
Silver employees................... .......................... ... 45
(rievance board........................ .... ............................ 45
Recruiting in the I'n i Iei States............................................ 46
New lanll policy........................................................ 46






('t INT-: NTS. V


Public amusements and recreation ........................................ 47
Special Panama Canal Commission........................................ 47
New accounting system. .................................... ........... Ps
Instructions of the Secretary of War as to accou nti ng..................... H1!
Commercial value of canal--division of canal capital .................... 49
Chart of new system -classificatioin of accounts ........................ 50
Appropriations, funds, fiscal officers, etc................................' *(
Canal transit property..................................... ........... )0
Canal transit operation............................................ 51
Canal business property............................................... )51
Canal business operations.............................................. 52
Interest...................... ........ ................. ......... 52
Continuing appropriations........................................ .il
New accounting system chart....................................... 53
Notes to new accounting system chart................................... 54

SECTION V.-FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.

FI r list of tables see........................................... ...... ..... 55



















APPENDIXES NOT PRINTED.



REPORTS OF HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS.
Reports for the fiscal year V122 have been made as follows and may be consulted at
the W1'asiingtin office of The Panama Canal or at the office of the Governor, Balboa
TTei lits, Canal Zone:
EnLrineer of maintenance:
Assistant en(gitner of maintenance, report of.
Pacific locks, report of superintendent.
A tlanit ic locks, report of superintendent.
Electrical division, report of electrical engineer.
Municipal engineering division, report of municipal engineer.
Dred tingi division, report of superintendent.
Oflice enginei.r.
Meteorology and hydrography, report of chief hydrographer.
Survey., n.iport of assistant engi netr.
Gatun dam and back fills, report of general foreman.
Marine division, report of superintendent.
Mechanical division, report of superintendent.
Supply department, report of chief quartermaster.
Executive department, report of executive secretary:
Division of civil affairs, report of chief of division.
Police and fire division, report of chief of division.
Division of schools, report of superintendent of schools.
Bureau of clubs and playirouiiils, report of general secretary.
District attorney, report of.
Accounting department, report of the auditor.
Health department, report of chief health officer.
Counsel, Panama Railroad Co., and land agent, The Panama Canal and Panama
Railroad C(o., report of.
P'lrchasiiig department, report of the general purchasing officer and chief of Wash-
ilngtoln ollice.












ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL


THE PANAMA CANAL,
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR,
Balboa Heights., Canal Zone, September 17, 1922.
The Honorable the. SECRETARY OF WAR,
WasJhington.
SIR: I submit herewith a report, covering the operation of The
Panama Canal during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1922.
Respectfully,
JAY J. MORROW,
Governor, The Panama Canal.

INTRODUCTION.

NET REVENUE OF THE CANAL AND ITS AUXILIARIES.

In spite of the fact that. gross receipts from tolls and other miscel-
laneous receipts grouped under the head of "transit revenue" were
slightly less than in 1921, the net transit revenue of The Panama
Canal in 1922 was $3,466,574.69, as compared with $2,711,816.56 in
the previous year. This result was obtained by a material reduction
in operating expenses.
Auxiliary business operations were not so successful. These fall
into two divisions, those conducted directly by The Panama Canal,
of which the most important are the mechanical shops, material
storehouses, and fuel-oil plants; and those conducted by the Panama
Railroad Co., including the coaling plant,, commissaries, and cattle
industry. Panama Canal business operations showed a profit of
$323,259.16, as compared with a profit of $564,211.20 in 1921; and
Panama Railroad operations, exclusive of the steamship line, showed
a loss of $710,301.94, as compared with a profit of $83,282.11 in 1921.
The loss on Panama Railroad operations was due primarily to writ-
ing down the value of stocks of coal, cattle, and commissary supplies
to keep pace with a falling market.








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


In tabulated form the financial results of the operation of the
canal and its auxiliaries on the Isthmus were:


Net transit revenue..........................................
Net revenue on Panama C'anal hI-inics operar ion.i......................

Net total revCnue. Panama Canal.......... .. ..........
Net revenue on Panama Railrn:id lu.arni.e uopirations I..................
Combined net revenue ...........................................

1 Exclusive of steamship line.


323,462574.69
323,259.16


$2,711,816.56
564,211.20


3,789, 33.85 3,276,027.76
2 710,301.94 83,282. 11

3,079,531.91 3,359,309. 87


SERVICE RENDERED BY THE CANAL TO SHIPPING.


In terms of service to shipping the main items in the record for
the fiscal year 1922, as compared with 1921, are as follows:


Tranzlsb of the edial by ships paving Lolls.................................
Transits by public vessels of the 'United State-, frer.........................
Calls at canal ports by ships not transiting the canal.......................
Cargo handled at ports (ton ) ................................... ...........
Coal sales and issues (tons)................................ ............
Coal, number of ships errved other than Panama Canal.......................
Fuel oil pum ped (barrels)........................................ ............
Fuel oil, number of ship. erv\-ed other than Pianama Canal.................
Ships repaired other than Panama Canal equipment................ ....
Ships dry docked other than Panama Canal equipment .....................
Provisions sold to ships.....................................................
Chandlery sold to ships....................................................


1922


2,736
276
747
,i30,134
251,616
843
6,I0.i9,993
1,422
738
108
S640,692.66
$116,740.85


1921


2, 892
426
%42
1,109,726
468,815
1,345
4,565,784
1,175
671
104
3949, 30. 29
$290,466.32


-"


--- ---- i ---















SECTION I.

CANAL OPERATION AND TRADE VIA PANAMA



TRAFFIC IN 1922.

A steady growth of the traffic through The Panama Canal to double,
triple, and quadruple its present volume can be confidently predicted,
but there may well be years when for -temporary causes growth is
arrested and there is even a slight decline. The fiscal year just ended
was such a year. It was a period of wide-spread commercial stagna-
tion, and cargoes became so scarce that a large proportion of the ton-
nage of all the maritime nations was withdrawn from service. It is
not. surprising that. this was reflected to some extent in the traffic
statistics of The Panama Canal.
The number of vessels making the transit (2,736) was less than in
the preceding year (2,892), and they carried less cargo (10,844,910
tons, as compared with 11,399,214 tons). Their aggregate net ton-
nage, however, was slightly greater, being 11,417,459, as compared
with 11,415,876 in 1921. This denotes, of course, an increase in the
average size of vessels using the canal.
The traffic showed no important fluctuations from month to month.
It was lightest in July, 1921, when 206 vessels of 810,613 net tons
passed through, and heaviest, in October, 1921, when the number of
vessels was 255 and their aggregate net tonnage 1,069,554. The
figures month by month are shown in the following table:

-,,iber United Sat PanamaCar
Monih. shi' equivalent Canal net Tolls. '
I net tonnage. tonnage.

1921.
luly ................... ......... 202,439 10,613 1404,503. 11 70 ,9 2
August...... ...... ............... 236 792,442 45, 276 955, 30. 71 39,273
September ...... .. .... ......... 221 74-4,744 921,1:37 -92. 001. .4 754,894
October.............. .......... 25i.i 66. 196 1,069,5534 1,047,933.62 ux?, 775
November .............. .......... 222 7\1,697 942,411 923,04%. 70 W5, 440
December............... .......... 239 27.340 1.)17,244 1 1413,,:.9k. 27 953,053
1922.
January................ . 210 64, 035 "46, .16 47,767. 5 807,298
February... .................. .. 212 710,354A 8%6,.i35 66.216.18 j 38,074
March................ ..234 76, 719 97,5 11 956, 726.76 960, 089
A ril........ .................... ..i 230. 771,932 974,833 1 953,256.11 1 1,046,047
ay............ ....243 82 63 1,032,16' 1,015,057.37 1,15,4,507
June............ .............. 228 773, 79 970,713 932.290.42 I 977, 47,
Total .................... ..... .736 9.201,613 11.417, 49 11. 197. 12.4-1 10,hN.4,911
___ ____ __ __ __ i .._ . ______________ ____ ..__






Ii!::PORT OF C(VERNOR OF THE PANAMA (ANAL.


NATIONALITY OF VESSELS.

There was a decrease in the number of American vessels using the
canal but. an increase in their aggregate net tonnage. British vessels
show a falling off both in number and tonnage, and the same is true
of Norwegian, Danish. Italian. and Chilean vessels. The number of
Japanese vessels increased from 136 to 189, and their aggregate
net tonnage from 613,245 to 872,466. French, German, Dutch, and
Swedish vessels register an increase. American vessels carried 45.5
per cent, of the cargo moving through the canal, British vessels 30.5
per cent, Japanese vessels 9.5 per cent, and Norwegian vessels 3.7
per cent. This represents a relative increase for the Japanese and a
loss for the Norwegians, while Americans and British hold approxi-
mately the same share in the traffic as in 1921. The complete figures
for 1922 appear in the table below.

Number United srate-, Panama ar
Nationuliiy. of equivalent Canal net Tollk. argo
ships. net tonnage. tonnage.

British.............................. 935 3,O0 i, 1T7, 3,795,526 $3,72. O007. 80 3,.129,861
Chilean .............................. 53 92, 623 150,398 1 1,757.90 46,182
CostaRican ........................ 1 25 18 18.75 0
Danish........................ ..... 53 182,969 227,473 222, 146. 65 272,779
Dutch......................... 66 212,3001 293,428 260.1 S.3S 290,573
French........................... 51 174,4 9 190,171 216,475.40 139,463
German......................... .. 37 96,705 122,9.4 120, 087.25 121, 888
Greek............................... 5 17,0-2 18,618 19,293.40 11,956
Italian.............................. 20 58,995 73,393 75,5 11.30 38,851
Japanese.............. ............. 189 777,172 872,466 95'i3,49.00 1,044,515
Mexican............................ 6 2,071 2,219 1.7A0.77 10
Norwegian.......................... 113 320,,7t6 385,007 374,870.62 408,268
Panaman............................ 8 66N 700 611.30 526
Peruvian........................... 60 82,517 161,930 103,035.30 64,370
Spanish............................ .... 9 23,319 27,264 32,712.88 23,701
Swedish.................. .......... 35 A5,961 124,446 105, 939.90 141,448
United States......................... 1,095 3,993,663 4,971,509 4,S67,495.81 4,950,519
Total.......................... 2,736 9.201.6313 11.417,459 i 11.197.832.41 10,8.-4,91,


FREE TRANSIT OF PUBLIC VESSELS OF THE UNITED STATES.

No tolls are charged for the transit of naval vessels and other pub-
lic vessels of the United States, and they are not included in the fore-
going statistics of commercial traffic, but the passage of such ves-
sels represents a service the value of which should not be overlooked.
The number of public vessels of the United States making the transit
in 1922 was only 276, as compared with 426 in the previous year.
The difference is accounted for by the circumstance that in 1921 the
Atlantic. Fleet passed through the canal and back for a manoeuver
and battle practice combined with the Pacific Fleet. Similar mna-
nocuvers were planned for 1922, but they were not held. If tolls
had been assessed on public vessels using the canal, the additional
revenue wvoi1ld have totaled $62S,423.24.


.* 4






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


CARGO PASSING THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL IN 1922.
The cargo passing through The Panama Canal during the fiscal
year 1922 (10,884,910 tons) was equivalent to 93.8 per cent of the
cargo handled in the previous year (11.599,214).
The greatest shrinkage was in the trade with the west coast of
South America. Exports from the Atlantic and Gulf ports of the
United States to that region fell from 933.261 to 244,514 tons.
European exports to South America declined only from 297,166 to
283,S04 tons. Exports from South Amnerica through the canal to the
United States were 548,609 tons, as compared with 975.3Y7 in 1921, and
to Europe 663,127, as compared with 922,499. Crude oil shipments
from Mexico to South Amnerica fell off from 654,659 to 256,5632 tons.
The total loss of cargo in this South American trade was 1,7S6,366 tons.
As serious as this slump in South American business lias been, its
economic causes are temporary, and nothing in the future is more
certain than that the development, of the known resources of ('olom-
bia, Ecuador, Peru, and Chile will support a rapidly increasing
volume of traffic through the canal. Indications of a partial recovery
in the South American trade were perceptible at the close of the
year.
The trade with Australasia has also fallen off. Exports from the
United States to Australasia declined from 620,428 to 288,090 tons,
and exports from Europe from 391,848 to 359,895 tons. Imports
from Australasia to the United States fell from 147,877 to 45,957
tons, and to Europe from 579,745 to 381,538 tons. The total loss
of cargo in the Australasian trade amounted to 664.,418 tons. In
this case also economic conditions are in the main responsible for the
decline, hut there has also been some diversion of traffic from Panama
to competing routes.
Exports from the United States to the Far East increased from
1,213,906 to 1,728,172 tons. Imports from the Far East fell from
428,044 to 303,315 tons.
The most remarkable gains of the year were in the trade of the
Pacific coast of North America.
Exports from the west coast of the United States to Europe were
1,302,183 tons, as compared with 1,154,840 in 1921, and from west-
ern Canada to Europe 420,272, as compared with 154,513. Western
Canadian imports from Europe increased from 20,416 to 149,553 tons,
and American imports from 144,591 to 186,696 tons. The com-
bined increase of cargo in these two closely allied trades aggregated
584,344 tons.
Cargo moving from east to west in the United States coastwise
trade increased from 698.429 to 1,288,075 tons, and cargo moving
from west to east from 673,959 to 1,274,452 tons. The total gain in






SRHEPORT OF. COVERNO(Il OKF THE PANAMA CANAL.

this trade for both directions was 1,190.139 tons, equivalent to 86.7
per cent. This rapid development of the coastwise trade is the most
conspicuous feature of the year's business. It *has compensated for
losses elsewhere, and maintained the volume of traffic at nearly the
same level as in 1921.
The paramount interest of the United States in Panama Canal
business is indicated by the fact that 68.6 per cent of all westbound
cargo moving through the canal in 1922 was shipped from our
Atlantic. ports, and 53.2 per cent of all eastbound cargo was shipped
from our Pacific ports. Cargo moving in the United States coast-
wise trade represented 23.5 per cent. of all cargo handled.

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES.

The principal commodities shipped through the canal during the
fiscal year 1922 were:


FROM ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC.


MIILnuiIt ures of iron and steel.
Crude oil...................
Relinud oil..................
Coal and coke...............
Cotton.......................
ISugar....................
Railroad materials.........
Sulphur......................
Machinery..................
Tin........................
A\n urn nii.....................
Iron......... ...........


Tons.
1 CilI. 361

IS,312
404,379

155,409
139,428
100.449
88,731
76,175
72,213
69,421


FItOM PACIFIC TO ATI..\\TIC
Ton-
\'hr t- . ................. ..... 804, 731;
Lumber....................... 7-20, 022
Nitrate............ ....... 470.796
Barley....................... 418, 234
Sugar........................ 257, 967
Food products in cold storage... 193, 396
Canned fruit................... 181, 320
W onl................. ...... 148,10:,
Copper................. ....... 144,07P
Canned fish............. ..... 135,335
Flour....................... .... 130,217
Coffee....................... 94,978
Crude oil......................... 94, 974
Refined oil................... !12,517
Copper ore................... Ri. 025
Phosphate..................... 337
Cotton....................... il. 011
Copra......................... .52, 46
Dried fruit................... .)1. 225


Of the more important commodities moving from Atlantic to Pacific
manufactures of iron and steel show an increase of 106 per cent, as
compared with the previous year, crude oil a decrease of 59 per cent,
and coal alu] coke a decrease of 47 per cent. Shipments of refined oil
were approximately the same.
Of the commodities moving from Pacific tu Atlantic wheat showed
an increase of 15 per cent over the figures for 1921. lumber an increase
of 102 per cent., nitrate a decrease of 69 per cent, sugar an increase of
15 per cent, food products in cold storage, exclusive of fresh fruit, a
decrease of 52 per cent, and flour a decrease of 40 per cent.

I D1n-, not include fresh fruit.







REPORT OF GOVERNORR OF TH E PANA.1MA CANAL. 7


Nitrate shipments from Chile were less by 1,059,796 tons than in

1921, and this, together with the curtailed purchasing power resulting
from the collapse of the nitrate industry, is sufficient to account in

large part for the whole shrinkage in South American business to
which reference was made under the preceding heading.

Commercial trajfir through The Panamnia Clnial during the jfi.'cl Year 19;:., clnasified by
leading trade routc.q.


between east coast of United Stntes and vwe.l coast of Snuti
America:
Atlantic to Pacifc. ............ ... .
Pacific to Atlantic ............. ...........

Total .............. .................................
Hter ween east coast of United States and Far East:
Atlantic to Pacifi ...................... ................
Pacific to Atlantic.. ........... ........

Total..................................... .. .......

United States coast wise:
Atlantic to Pacific. .................................
Pacific to Atlantic. ... .............................

Total ............................................

Between west coast of United States and Europe:
Atlantic to Paciric...................................
Pacific to Atlanti .....................................

Total....................................... .........

Bet ween wost coast of South America and Europe:
Atlantic to Pacific .........................
Pacific to.Atlanlic...............................

Total.............................. .........

lie ween Australasia and Europe.
Altlantic to Pacific....................................
Pacific to Atlantic ....................................

Total. ............. ..........................

lBetween east coast of United States and Australasi.a
Atlantic to Pacific ....................................
Pacific to .itlan ic....................................

Total .......... ...............................
Itotween easI coaist of Mexico and west coast of South
.merica*
Atlantic to Pacilic .... .............................
Pacific o. Atllantic ...................................

Total ... ............... ............
Itetween east coat of Mexico .in.1 we.i coast of I'nited
'tatps:
Atlantic to Pacific ..................................
Pacific to Atlantic....................................


Num-; Panama
ber of Canal net
ships, tonnage.



13:l 462,123
144 480,486


283 9-12, 09

237 1,200,570
47 | 238,136


Tons of
cargo,


Percentage
of total
cargo.


244,514 2.2
548,609 .0

793,123 7.2

1,728,172 15.8
303,315 2.7


284 1,438,706 2,031,487 18.6

306 1,524,190 1,288,075 11.8
249 1,258,464 1,274,452 11.7

35 2,7S2,6.54 2,562,527 2.3.5

132 606,213 186,696 1.7
173 823,204 1,302,183 11.9

3115 1.429,417 1.488,i, 79 13.11

124 503,733 283,804 2.6
131 552,972 663,127 6.1

255 1,056,705 :-41.,931 8.7

84 565,780 359,895 3.3
70 425,477 381,538 3.5

154 1.,25i7 741,433 6.8

53 270,137 288,090 2.6
13 55,343 45,957 .4

66 .2.3,4SO 334,047 3.0


3tt
25
I


6
12


Total .. ............ I'<
l1etween Cristohal. Canal Zone, and west (OaLrt of Soulh
merica:
Atlantic to Paciir ....... ....................... .. .... 122
Pacific to Atlinti ic.. .................................. 121

Total ................................................ 24


141'..21i ?.i .'iif.,
I '. 71)6 ............
26'l.*)4 2.,tA), i62


26,048 39,300
64,337 3,233

1JI),3 42.53M


180,876 i2,37
1 5.413 85,531


2.3
.0

2.3


.3
.0

.4


.3
.8


.16A,2A9 H7.901 .0n


I






S REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

(' mui-rciWl fri/hr through ThE Paunamn ('aniil during the fiscal 'ir ,1'92. classuhd by
leading frade roues-C'ontinued.

Nurn- Panama Tou, ,f Percentage
ber of Canal net TIg; of total
ships ronnage Cargu. cargo.

Between east coAst of Unito- .i l 0in wn r-! i (iir1 o;
Canada.
Atlantic to P rci'ic .................................... 1I 'i ,6 7 %., 0US 0.
Pacific to Atlantic ..................................... 0 146, 111 159,921 1.4
Total .................... ............................ 49 2.7,-77 248,329 2.3
ELuroipe to west coast of Canada:
Atlantic to Paciic..................................... 41 *2.210 14-19.53 1.4
P.icilc to Atlantic ...................................... 56 29'J,:327 420,272 3.8
Total .............. ............... .......... .. 7 .21. j37 3569,25 5. 2
Miscellaneous trade routes and bJililn2
Atlantic to P: i fii. .................. .. ........ ....... 12i .1-1, 4. 1
Pacific to Atlantic.....................153............ 1. 3 .360,311 '28,. i.
Totiljl .......................... ..... .......... .........i 64.736 ,l 333: i :


MOTOR SHIPS.

Although the number of motor ships in operation in the world's
trade was undoubtedly greater than in previous years, this was not
reflected in the Panama Canal statistics. There were only 77 transit
by motor ships in 1922 as compared with 99 in 1921. The aggregate
net tonnage of motor ships in 1922 was 369,762. Reduced to a per-
centage basis, the motor ship represented 2.8 per cent of all vessels
using the canal and 3.2 per cent of the total annual tonnage.

DETAILS OF THE TRADE.

Further details of the trade. through the canal will be found in the
following tables in Section V of this report:
Table 54. Summary of commercial traffic, 1915-1922.
Table 55. Commercial traffic by nationality, 1915-1922.
Tables 56 A and B. Origin and destination of cargo, 1922.
Tables 57 A, B, and C. Commercial traffic by nationality, ships,
tonnage, and cargo, 1915-1922.
Table 58. Commercial traffic by nationality, ships, tonnage, tolls,
and cargo, 1915-1922.

INCONVENIENCE OF THE DUAL SYSTEM OF MEASUREMENT.

Attention is again invited to the dual system of measurement. on
which tolls are assessed. If during the fiscal year 1922 the Panama
Canal measurement rules alone had been followed, the revenue would
have heen greater by $2,174,044.35. The introduction of the United
St ltes, measurement rules as a factor in the computation is equivalent
to an irregular reduction of the toll rate under which some vessels





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA ( A-\AL.


benefit. more than others. The dual system of measurement, necessary
until remedial legislation can be obtained, is cumbersome and onerous.
The practical result. is that tolls are collected on a basis which is not
fixed and permanent, but may change between the transits of a
vessel or with minor alterations occurring in the course of prepara-
tions for loading or discharging or made on account of the weather.
In the interest of fair play and simplicity of administration the
Panama Canal measurement rules should be made the sole basis for
the assessment of tolls.

LOCKAGES AND LOCK MAINTENANCE.

The capacity of the locks was not seriously tested at any time dur-
ing the year. The average number of lockages a day at Gatun was
7.67, at Pedro Miguel 8.389, and at Miraflores 8.1397. At Gatun
both chambers were available for lockages during the entire year,
with the exception of a few days when minor repairs were being
made on the gates and machinery at the convenience of traffic. At
Miraflores one flight of locks was out of commission for overhauling
from December 12, 1921, to April 21, 1922. Delays and accidents
due to faulty operation, failure of equipment, and other causes were
few in number and of negligible magnitude.
Beginning August 15, 1921, a new system of dispatching vessels
through the canal on a prearranged time schedule was introduced.
This system, besides permitting of a more economical distribution of
the work at the locks, is safer than the method formerly used in that
it. insures the arrival of vessels at the locks when there are no adverse
currents set up by lock operations. The original ..chedule has been
modified from time to time as experience suggested, and it is now
working smoothly with a minimum of delay to shipping. Vessels ar-
riving at. Cristobal inner harbor prior to 1.30 p. m. and at Balboa
inner harbor prior to 1.45 p. im. are put through the canal on the same
day. A materially better service is impracticable while the operation
of the canal is confined to the hours of daylight, and it will be some
years before the volume of traffic will require or justify night opera-
tion.
Five new electric towing locomotives, built at the Balboa shops
and wired by the lock forces, were put. in operation during the year.
They were distributed: Two to Gatun, one to Pedro Miguel, and two
to Miraflores.
Such maintenance work at all locks was attended to as was required
to keep all machinery and plant in first-class condition.






IHEPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Lockages duri ng tiie' year are summarized in tle following table:

I.Illin I I'eoiru M iiu*l. 1iIr.lmn i'a TIotal
Mon th
LuocK- Ves- I rk- 1p%- Luck- Ves- Lock- Ves-
ages. ses. *ue-. slk. age-,. se1g. tges. sels.

1921.
. l\ .. ....... ......... 210 261 239 291 23i* 290 135 M42
\iILIist.. 245 294 27,; 337 274 .342 793 973
Seriptemlr'r ................ .... .. 225 276 247 288 2-4I.3 S5 715. 849
'Ictoher. ........................... 263 307 285 342 288 1 344 h9t. 993
November........................... 221i 235 256 300 255 298 737 S51.
December......................... 248 30P6 269 335 25G 33' 773 97'4
1922.
Juinluar\ .. I J. JM I I. 3 44
It- hru rv.... . .. 2 .. 224 I 23 I 19? 232 i.2S i 71,3
MIrch........... . . . ...2. 279 247 2..1 231 28P 713 I 350
\p'ril............ . 23J. 26i .11 2I 241 3U13 744 .S46
: ........... ......... . .. .. 241. 2S 29t l s 773 k 170
J.Inr.............. ... . .. 2413 2 5.'52 25 7 2. 54 I *7S 750 839
'o :il . . . 2 01 33 3, 06.2 .s.. 2. Q7 I 31..90 8. 834 10,527


POWER FOR CANAL OPERATION.

Electric power for the operation of the canal was derived from the
hydroelectric plant at Gatun, with the steam-generating station at
Miraflores in reserve.
The average combined generator output per month was 4,856,905
kilowatt hours, as compared with 5,'058,660 kilowatt. hours per
month during the previous year. There was an average of 4,104,497
kilowatt hours distributed front substations, as compared with a
corresponding average of 4,991,677 kilowatt hours in 1921. This
gives a transmission and distribution loss of 15.65 per cent in 1922'
ais compared with a loss of 16.23 per cent in 1921.
The steam-generat~ing station at Miraflores was maintained on the
basis of stand-by service, and was required to carry load on 15 occa-
sions. The average rate of fuel-oil consumption for this plant was
1,762 barrels per month, as compared with a corresponding rate of
2.313 barrels for the previous year.
The cost of power generated by the Gatun and 'Miraflores plants .
including the cost of distribution, was $0.0105 per kilowatt hour, as
compared with .0.0089 in 1921.

WATER SUPPLY.

The water supply available for lockages, hydroelectric power, ana
other uses was ample at all times during the year. The level of
Gatun Lake fell from 87 feet at the beginning of the dry season to
84.27 feet on May 7, 1922, from which date recovery of storage was
begun. A lake level of SO feet is ample for navigation. The steam-
generating station at MIiraflores was maintained on the basis of
stand-by service, nnd was required to carry load on 15 occasions


O10






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 11

during the year, but these were emergencies only and not due to
any lack of water for the operation of the hydroelectric station at
Gatun. The following table shows the source and disposition of
water in Gatun Lake:

Billion
Per enti. cubie

Rnn-ofT ahove Alhajuela .... ... ... 36.7 9. .7
Yield from land area belo\ .\lh tl.. .... .. .. ...... .. ..... 41.3 7 s-.35
Direct rainfall on lake ir ..... ..... .... .. ..... ... .. . 22.0 41.65
Total................ ...... 100.0 19. 57
Evaporation from lake surfacu..... 10.4 19.60
atun Lake lockage..... ......... . . .. ... .. ... 11.3 21. 0
Hydroelectric power. .. . .. . .. 26.0 49.34
SplUlway waste... ..... . . . .. .. . 1. 2 97.01
Leakage and m municipal watr..... .... ... .. ... ....... ...... .... .9 I 1.67
Increased storage.. .. .. ... .. . . . ...... . .... .2 I. 4
-- I
Total .. .......................... .. ............... .. I o I. 189.57

While there is ample water to take care of the present volume of
traffic and the estimated increase of the next several years even
under extreme dry-season conditions, the eventual need of additional
storage has been borne in mind, and work was continued on a survey
of the valley of the Chagres and its tributaries above Alhajuela to
determine accurately what volume of water can be impounded by a
dam constructed across the gorge at that point. The Alhajuela dam
has always been considered an essential feature of the lock canal, but
its construction can be safely deferred for a number of years. The
possibility of diverting the Rio Indio into Gatun Lake was also
investigated during the year, and this project was abandoned as
infeasible.
MAINTENANCE OF CHANNEL.

The maintenance of the channel involves the removal of silt and of
material carried into the canal prism by slides in the Gaillard Cut.
As the latter can not be predicted or estimated, it is necessary to
hold in reserve for emergencies equipment in excess of what would
be required for ordinary maintenance work.
The Cucuracha slide and the Culebra slides showed intermittent
movements during the year, but were controlled without difficulty
by dredging out the material before it reached the prism. A general
movement occurred on the afternoon of July 14, 1921, on the east
side of the cut one-half mile north of the Culebra slides and opposite
the barge-repair station, carrying a mass of earth and rock into the
channel amounting to 185,000 cubic yards. This slide caused such
shoaling in the canal that a channel only 120 feet wide and 30 feet
deep along the west bank was available for the passage of ships.
12951-22-2






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


No serious inconvenience to traffic was occasioned, and two dredges
working until the end of August removed the obstruction.
A statement of all dredging during the fiscal year follows:
Location: bi ar
('_.ubic vard.-
Canal prism- removed.
Atlantic entrance.................................... 0
Gatun Lake...................................... 0
Gaillard Out . ....... ........................ 1,-136, 300
Mfiraflores Lake.................................... 0
Pacific entrance. ................................. 2, 597, 300
Total.................... .................... 4,033, 600
Auxiliary, Balboa inner harbor. ...................... 122, 100
Grand total.................. ......... ...... . 155. 700
This dredging was all maintenance work, with the exception of
105,700 cubic yards removed by cutting off a point of land just south
of -the Miraflores locks to improve the alignment of the original
channel.
The amount of dredging that will be required during the fiscal
year 1923 is estimated at 3,175,000 cubic yards.
As a minor item in channel maintenance it was necessary to con-
tinue the campaign against the water hyacinth, and 7,871,330 of
these plants were destroyed either by pulling or spraying.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION.

In addition to continued maintenance of lights already established
in the canal and adjacent waters, an 18,500-candlepower light was
established on the southwest side of Flamenco Island, in Panama Bay,
latitude 80 54' 35" north, longitude 790 31' 23" west, focal plane
160 feet, visible for 20 miles, exhibited from a square concrete pedestal
surmounted by lantern, painted white. The characteristics of this
light from sea are: Showing white from 2900 to 50 through north;
red sector from 50 to 1030; obscured from 1030 to 2900 through south.
New four-room keepers' quarters were constructed at Toro Point
and the lighthouse tower reinforced with concrete for a distance of
30 feet. New concrete tank houses were constructed at the Cape
Mala and Taboguilla Lights. At Margarita Point (Fort Randolph)
new front and rear ranges were constructed for the United States
Army.
ACCIDENTS.

There were very few marine accidents in canal waters. Investiga-
tions were conducted by the board of local inspectors in only 10 cases,
of which 4 were trivial.
On July 16, 1921, the U. S. S. Nevada, southbound through the
canal, struck the bank at the northern end of the Gaillard Cut, and






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA (ANAL.


was damaged to the extent. of approximately $5.000. The cana'
assumed liability for the repairs.
On August. 4, 1921, the steamship HJnimptn, Rinds, owned by the
United States Shipping Board, southbound through the canal, struck
the center approach wall at the Gatun Locks, and the resulting
damages to the ship were estimated at $1,000, for which the canil
accepted liability.
On January 13, 1922. the British steamship H7itfipara, owned by
the British India Steam Navigation Co., southbound through the
canal, ran down ii. small schooner-rigged sailing cayuca in Cristobal
Harbor. The property loss was slight, but of the three men in the
cayuca two were drowned. The Halipara and the canal pilot on board
were exonerated.
On March 18, 1q22, the Norwegian steamship Havo, southbound
through the canal, struck the center wall of the Pedro Miguel Lock,
and was damaged to the extent of $2,000. The ship was held
responsible for the accident.
On April 2, 1922, the Dutch steamship Wols-riin. outward bound,
and the American steamship West Hil.rod, inward bound, were in
collision at the entrance to Cristobal Harbor. The Wolisurn's dainages
were estimated at $5,000 and the West Hinrtulr's at $i.oo00. This
case is now pending in the courts.
On June 16, 1922. the Danish steamship NSrvdfrer, sout bound
through the canal, struck barge No. 137 in the cut near Paraiso.
Damages to the barge were estimated at $12,4-30. The ship was also
damaged. It was held that the accident was due to the poor steering
qualities of the ship when heavily laden and steaming at slow -;peed.
This case is also pending in the courts.

SALVAGE OPERATIONS.

The Panama Canal maintains two ocean-going tugs, one at Cris-
tobal and one at Balboa, available for towing operations, and the
wrecking tug Favorith. The latter is a 12-knot steamer of 1,200
horsepower, equipped with a 25-ton derrick and a powerful modern
towing engine. She has'cargo space for about -So4 tons and carries
500 tons of water. Due to the great amount. of water ballast, she
can be lightened to operate in shoaler water than would ordinarily
be the case with a vessel of her size and power. During the last
months of the fiscal year the Favorite was converted from coal to oil
burning, and can now remain on a job for 30 days without refueling.
The salvage equipment. includes four portable 12-inch centrifugal
gasoline-driven wrecking pumps and four 4-inch submersible electric
salvage pumps, with a combined capacity of 2,240 tons discharge
per hour, as well as a number of steam-driven portable pumps which






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


considerably augment. this capacity. There is ground tackle of all
descriptions and reserve supplies of wire and chain cable to any
extent required.
The most important and difficult salvage operation of the year
was in connection with the steamship Garfifld, of the Grace Line,
which went ashore in Galern Bar on the northern coast of Colombia
on January 21, 1922. and was driven 11 miles through a series of
hars., coming to rest in 5 feet of water. To get the Garfildi out of
the shallows it was first necessairy to run out 8.3300 feet of wire cable
to ground anchors, and this was successfully accomplished in spite
of the heavy seas which greatly impeded the work. The Garfitid
was finally Iiauiled out to deep water on March 18 and towed into
Cristohatl with her cargo intact and her hull very little damaged.
The Favorite had been standing by since January 24.
Other important salvage operations during the year were:
The steamship Lake Elmoni. belonging to the United States
Shipping Board, went ashore near Cartagen.mi. Colombia, early in
Janiiua-ry, 1922. The Faroriter left the canal to go to her assistance on
JTanuary 4. and towed her to Cristobal for repairs. arriving January 11.
The steamship Will polo, of the William Steamship Co.. lost, her
propeller w'i April 5 when 900 miles north-northwest of Panama.
The tug Tiarriul7ii was sent to her assistance on April 10, arrived
alongside April 14, and towed her to San Pedro, a distance of 1,940
miles, arriving there on April 28. The tug subsequently returned
to Balboa, arriving on May 15.
The steamship W. J. HanMna belonging to the Standard Oil Co.
of New Jersey, broke a propeller shaftV off the coast of Peru. The
tug Gorgona left Balboa on April 6 to take her in tow and brought
her into port on April 20.
The Favorite also rendered assistance in July, 1921, to the stea.m-
ship Koyo 1aria, stranded on Serrana Bank, about 300 miles north
of the Atlantic entrance to the canal. This was mentioned in my
last annual report.
The Panama Canal will undertake salvage operations either on a per
diem basis for the use of the equipment., a fixed price for the job
with graduated reimbursement in case of failure or partial success,
or on the basis of "no cure, no pay." The salvage section is main-
tained for service rather than for revenue, and whatever form of
contract owners or underwriters may prefer the efforts of the wreck-
ing crew will be to do quick and efficient work consistent with the
canal's reputation.
QUARANTINE.
The simplified quarantine procedure adopted at the canal to
expedite the transit of vessels is explained in Section III of this
report.











SECTION 11.


BUSINESS OPERATIONS.


The business operations of the canil and Panai.a I;; luilroad ;iare
indicated in detail un the chart accompanying the explana:ti'nl of
the new joint accounting system (Section IV); and further details
of the business activities of the canal are given in the a;c( hunting
statements which form part of Section V. Reference is especially
made to Tables 14, 17, 19, 21, 27, 33, 34, 43, 44, 53. In the following
pages only the more important buIsiness enterprises of the canal
and railroad are referred to. In case the enterprise is conducted
by the P;iainam Railroad statement to tlihat effect is made.
REPAIRS TO VESSELS-MECHANICAL WORK.
The illchanical shops at Balboa and Cristobal were operated on a.
reduced scale. Repair work and manufacturing jobs for the canal
;ind the Panama Railroad were of less magnitude than in previous
years, and fewer jobs were obtained from the United States Navy
and from vessels operating through the canal. The value of work
done in 1921'was $6,S23,24S.42. In the fiscal year 1922 it was- only
82,648,075.43, distribiited as follows:

Class. Amount. total.

Marine.......... .... .................. ................... SI, M, 2.3.' .1. 53
Railroad...... ... . ..... ......... ........ ..... .. ., 172. 70 2. 13
Miscellaneous .......................... . ........ ... ... .. .3i 1. .41
Manufacture for stock............. ... ................. ...... .. . 1-2,399. 1i 12.93

Of this total, $920,866.52 worth was done for individuals and com-
panies, including the Panama Railroad Steamship Line, $953,653.70
for The Panama Canal, $636,571.09 for the Panama Railroad, and
$136,984.12 for other departments of the United States Government.
Work for individuals and companies.-The largest single job handled
during the year was the reconditioning of the steamship Panama, of
the Panama Railroad Steamship Line. The work included the in-
stallation of new boilers and a general overhaul of hull, machinery,
and superstructure.
The Chilean battleship Almirante Latorre, one of the largest vessels
of its class afloat, was dry-docked for the second time for cleaning
and painting.
15





IHFPl.T OF GOVERNOR o1' THE PANAMA (CANAL.


The tanker K. R. Kini ury, with a full cargo of lubricating oil
on board, was dry-docked for the purpose of renewing a propeller
blade. Thlis was a very large vessel, and the weight and fluid nature
of the cargo imade the docking an unusual performance.
A most unusual and exacting job was completed by the Balboa
shops in straightening a twisted crank shaft from the port auxiliary
compressor engine of the Pedrip (i.tpritplier.'in, distorted to a total of
about, 630 from a vertical line from No. 1 throw to the end of the
shaft. When the rigidity of the shaft, the general twist over its
entire length, and the small amount, of material lost in remachining
are considered, it is believed that an unusually difficult job was
successfully handled.
Work for the V-Vwy.-The cruisers Dolphini and Br rmi1ham were
dry-docked,. and for the latter a broken propeller shaft. was changed.
including the manufacture of couplings and the machining of the
new shaft. Six submarines and various small craft at the Coco Solo
naval base were dry-docked and minor repairs effected. Annual
repairs were made to submarine 0-12.
librk for The PanamaCaCinal.-The usual maintenance work on the
floating equipment and rolling stock of the canal was handled. Five
electric towing locomotives for the locks were completed and de-
livered and repair and manufacturing jobs were handled for various
departments and divisions as required.
Work for the Panama, Railroad.-A reduction of 8B510,110.10 was
made in the cost of Nwork done by the mechanical division for the
Panama Railroad and charged against maintenance of way, mainte-
nance of equipment, and transportation. This saving is principally
accounted for by the policy of retiring unnecessary rolling stock, but
considerable savings were made through the utilization of salvaged
material and through careful attention to all phases of the work.
The number of heavy car repair jobs was 223 and of light repairs 594.
One first-class ecoich and three second-class coaches were rebuilt..,
and two first-class and two second-class coaches were refinished in
canobh blanca. a native hardwood. Heavy repairs to locomotives
were made in 37 cases and light repairs in 2.977 eases. The work of
'e1gregating equipment according to its usefulness and physical con-
dition was completed, and 104 freight cars were scrapped out. of 209
condemned. Fifteen of the retired 201-class locomotives were dis-
mantled and prepu;red for shipment to the purchaser in the United
Sta.tes.
Dry dock.s.--At B1alboa 50 vessels were dry-docked for The Panaima
Canal and 23 at Cristobal. The number of other vessels dry-docked
was 43 at Balboa and 65 at Cristobal.
Volume of i'ork and reduction offorce.-The falling off in volume of
work, which began to be noticeable during the latter half of the





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


previous fiscal year, continued until December, 1921, since when the
volume of work has been fairly constant-but very much below what
it was during the two years following the war. This has necessitated
a very radical reduction of force. For the month of June, 1922, the
average total force working, not including employees on leave or
furloughed, was 861, as compared with an average of 2,621 for the
fiscal year 1920-21 and of 2,869 for 1919-20. The force now em-
ployed is much below what it should be for the economical operation
of so extensive a plant., and if any large job were to be handled it
would be necessary to send to the United States for additional men.
It is believed that the lowest point in volume of work handled has
now been reached. Work for The Panama, Canal will probably not
increase in amount., and may even be less in future than in the past.,
but work for commercial shipping should gradually increase. How-
ever, the most that can be hoped for from commercial shipping is
emergency work on vessels using the canal and possibly an occasional
overhauling job on vessels that have either Balboa or Cristobal as a
terminal port.. In the latter case the mechanical division must be
able to compete successfully with repair plants at the other end of
the run. The majority of ships passing through the canal are laden
and on a definite voyage and could not afford to stop here for extensive
repairs even if the work cost materially less than elsewhere, as the
running expenses of the ship would more than offset any possible
saving on the repair bill.
For the fiscal year 1923 there is reason to expect a slight increase
in orders from the War Department and from the Navy.
CosIts.-A great. deal of attention has been paid to the cost of work.
During construction days and the period of great, activity during
and after the war economy was more or less subordinated to rapidity.
But, lately the cost, of work has become the most important considera-
tion in the minds of prospective customers. A realization of this on
the part. of all employees has led to a greater average output, and
there has been an appreciable reduction in the final cost of work.
With such a great reduction as took place during the fiscal year 1922
in t he volume of work,-it has been a serious problem to cut down the
(overhead. The ave"racgr overhead percentage for the marine group
of shops was 54.43. which is considered a very creditable showing in
comparison with 45.26 for the preceding year, when the amount of
work done wis so very much greater. It is believed that this rate
will compare very favNorhbly with the rates at navy yards and in-
dustrial plants.
The cost of work has also been favorably affected by a close atten-
tion to estimates. Another factor, and one that, has many times con-
tributed to the satisfaction of customers, was the inauguration o0
flat rates. whereby the amount to be charged is determined and paid





1:EPORT OF GOVERNOR 01F THE1I PANAMA CANAL.


before the work is started. This system was authorized November
26, 1921. Prior to that date work was accepted only on a cost. plus
basis.
COAL.

Coal was supplied to commercial vessels at the coaling plants of
the Panama Railroad at Cristohal and Balhna to the amount of
22S,231 tons. The total coaling business was as follows:

1.122 1Q21 1922 1921

Com mercial v -e pl;...... ....I .12. .4.641 6 nis Slu.i -, N.i v. .. ... .. .
Pan.ii a Railroad ....... .... ,1 t '. l2 .ll. .n .. . .... 3.939 ., 27N
Panama Canal................ 1 .,1 2' 7 -
l'iiIred S tate- Army... ....... Tiil . . N.2 6 N4 \ s5 .
i The N.Avy maintinns i own 'ipply,. from whit h .i%,i4 i inns 'rc ideli'. cried iI 1922.

The total coal on hand June 30, 1921, was 144,3083 tons; received dur-
ing the fiscal year1922, 275,874 tons; sold, 251,616 tons. Receipts from
sales. including charges for handling Navy coal, were $3,329,955.92:
cost of repairs, depreciation of plant, and handling coal was $1,103,-
919.22; and the loss on the year's business was $424,112.56, due mainly
to price fluctuations, which forced the sale of coal at a loss in order t.o
move it at all, and to the large decrease in the tonnage handled
through the plant which automatically increases the cost per ton.
The sales fell from a monthly average of 34,000 tons per month
during the latter half of the fiscal year 1921 to an average of 20,968
tons per month during the fiscal year 1922.
The selling price of coal trimmed in bunkers at Cristobal on July
1, 1921, was $14 per ton of 2,240 pounds; on July 10, $15; October
15, $12; December 15, $10 in quantities exceeding 1,000 tons for
vessels transiting the canal, and $12 in smaller quantities or to vessels
not transiting the canal; February 1, 1922, $10 to vessels taking 1,200
tons or full bunker capacity of not less than 825 tons, and $12 for
smaller quantities. At Balboa the price of coal hlas ruled approxi-
mately .$3 per ton higher than at Cristohbil.

FUEL OIL, DIESEL OIL, GAqOLINE.

At. the close of the fiscal year 1922 The Panama Canal had 10 oil stor-
age tanks on the Isthmus with an aggregate capnaity tlf 451,393 barrels,
and 8 private companies owned 21 tanks with an aggrega te capacity of
1,034,640 barrels. Oil for all interests was handled through the
Panama Canal pipe lines and by tile canal's pumping plants. New
tanks are now being erected by the West India Oil Co. aud by the
United States Navy, which will increase total storage capacity to
1,726,041 barrels for fuel oil. 59,992 barrels for Diesel oil. and 60.786
barrels for gasoline.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 19

The oil and gasoline business of the year is summarized in the
following table:


Balboa lount Total.

Fuel oil sold to steaiushipc by Panama Canil, in barrls............. 4, 1l4 211. 13,309
H'ii1l oil sold to s'ainslip by v oinpani in b.irrrls ............. ". 711 I i.G, ii2 2,4 1, 2lti
Nu mber of ship : i
By Panama Canal........ ....... ..... ... .2 12 114
Bv com panieP ............. .... .. ..... .................i I t1>. 1,371
Bulk gasoline sold to -reainm hiij by P ainaii Ca'il. Ii gallon s...... 1 143 21,079 '...772
Number of ships by PanallinaCanal....... ..................... 1.1 2 35
Diesel oil sold to .teuam.hips Y\ Panama Canal, in ba.rrels... 8 tl 18l
Diesel nil old to isteaishi p by1 comnparn I', in bIarrel............. .. 1 *., 4 0 49
Number of 4-hupa by Panama Ciiil ...... ........... .. ..... . 20
Number of ships by coimipnnies.......... ... ......... ..... 7. 74

The Panarma Canal lost on oil sales $36.992.43, due to the fact that.
price for fuel oil during tie year has been maintained at a little
less than cost in order to dispose of high-priced oil on hand. The
oil companies are selling their oil at prices materially lower than the
present stock value of Panama 'anal fuel oil: but tihe loss on sales
was offset by the profit made (on pumping and handling til fur the
companies. The net profit on all oil business was $3-I4,8'2.1S.

SHIP CHANDLERY AND\ OTHER SLPPLIES- STOREHOUSE OPERATIONS.

As in the preceding year the maiin stock of iiaterial and supplies
was carried in the general storehouse at Balboa, but fur convenience
and economy of operation a smaller storehouse was maintained at
Cristobal, and a storehouse was continued at Paraiso primarily for
the dredging division. .Material was issued as needed to the various
departments of The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad, and
sales were made to the Army and Navy, to vessels using the canal,
and to individuals and companies on the Isthmus.
At the beginning of the year, owing to the cessation of construction
work and to the curtailment of sales resulting from the general busi-
ness depression, the storehouses were overstocked with materials
purchased at boom prices, and efforts were directed mainly toward
cutting down the inventory. This was reduced 35 per cent, as
follows:
On hand June 30. 1921, exclusive of obsolete material and
scrap. .................. ..................... $8, 106, 269. 70
Received during the year.............................. 4,562, 899. 69
Total...... ................................. 12, 669,169. 39
Issued during the year............................... 7, 422, 807. 49
On hand June 30, 1922 .............................. ,2-16, 301. 90
Sales to steamships aggregated $1 16,740.85, local sales $202,s59.50,
and so-called credit sales, which include material issued on foreman's
orders for the Army and Navy and for jobs ordered by individuals





20 RE-POnT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMIA CANAL.

anid companies, 81,212,876.-S3, or a total uf sales froin the storehouses
to other than The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad of $1,532,-
477.18. As the corresponding figure for 1921 was $2,040,477.12, this
outside business has fallen off approximately 23 per cent.
Obsolete and surplus material offered fior sale in the United States
by competitive lid realized gross proceeds of $177,027.98. American
scrap was issued or oqld to the value of $11,95S.34.

HARBOR TERMINALS.

There was less cargo handled over the (locks at Cristobal and
Balboa by the receiving and forwarding agency of the Panama Rail-
road Co., and the revenue from this source shows a corresponding
reduction, as compared with the fiscal year 1921: but. heavy reduc-
tions of force and economy in operation resulted in a favorable show-
ing. The following table summarizes the work of the two last. years:


1922 1921

Tons of cargo stevedored....................................... ..... 313, 702 442,750
Revenue per ton stevedored (average).................. ... .... .. S. -925 SO. 4832
Cuo i per ton stevedored................................................ 80.311-1 t0. 5327
Tons of cargo haiidlr l and transferred................................... q30, 1314 1, 109,726
Reventie per ton handled (average) .............................. .... 0. 9893 I1.0095
Cost per ton handled.............................. .................... SO. 732 SO0. 8589
Gross opera ing revenue........................................... ... 16,66.43 I1, 505,810.95
( rno opera ing expense................................................ S.il, 3.4. t65 I, 528, 689. 51
Net revenue............................................................ $273, 181.78 1 522, 878.56
Per cent of > r\pen-r to revenue.......................................... 76.37 101.52

1 Loss.

The revenue in 1922 was $1,156,566.43, or $349,244.52 less than ini
1921. The cost of operation was $.SS83.381.65, or S6645,304.86 less
than in the preceding year. The net result in 1922 was a gain of
$273,181.7S, as compared with a loss of $22,878 in 1921.
The following table shows the distribution of business between the
two ports:

I.idlboi. i Cristob;il.

Number ofst::i. 11.1 Lin I .ir:i ................................. .. 403 1. 21.
Tons of fcaro 'I .*' I :11..- ........... ......... ............. .. ... .. H. 48 430. 441
.NI iiIi of ships ft..il '. cargo. ... ........ ......... .... 253. 1.21.J
Tons of cargo delivered (per cargo)............................ ..! i. :i0 .11.) ,40
I'[*n- of cargo stevedored by I '.mn.llaj '. .I. ................. ... .. 22, r92 I 291. 0 u
Tons I'..I.ilid by I'anama I. R. Co...... .............. ..... ,041 17. 19t,


CO.1MMI.SAl.Y SYSTEM.

Tli c(llfinl-t.ry .i slciln (Paiiin1;1 Railr amid), consisting of pur-
clauming genrli-ic-.. W hlc.il c units, seveli manufacturing plants, nine
retail store.,. lwo electrical re'lriger i g plants and an industrial
Laboratory, was vcol'tilled fer ie icclmt Of tllie Panama H il road Co.
but under the iupervisimon of the chief quartermaster of The Panama






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Canal. The receipts from the sale of commissary supplies- amounted
to $6.966.371i.63, a decrease of $4.145,957.66 as compared with the
previous Vyear. The business loss, after writing down the value of
beef in cold-storage and other supplies on hand at the close of the
year was $2-i1,992.35. The loss on sales was approximately 3.5
per cent.
Purcisas'- :.--The greater part of the stock wa;i purchased in the
tUnited States, with the exception of meats, and the goods were
sold at, a price that represents the co-(st laid (down on the Isthmus
plus a surcharge based on the cost of handling and retailing. The
following statement shows by classes the value of. supplies on hand
at the beginning of the year, the amount purclLhase(d (Iidring the year,
and the value remaining on-hand at the close of the year:


Groterier ....... ............. .. ....................
Hardware. ........... ........................
Dry goods....... ......... ............................
Boots and Mhoes................. ......................-
('old storage. .................... ...............
Tobacco... ...... ........................
H aw m ait'rial... ..... -.- _....... .. .


On hand
June 30, 1921.


$190,251.19
IIt 415. 47
7i., .''3. 47

27,134.74
503,299.42


Purchases.


1S, 43R.3 S. 48
2114. .' l. 94
430,002.50
116,959.23
920,989.32
27qs910 18
11, 494.1072.0fi1


1,981, .593.87 4,483,899. 66

I Includes .attli-, hoig,. poultry. Ianl inlk in :iuuoijui of $970,472.15.


On hand
June 30, 1922.


11 , : 40
1. N1 N. (119
121., 141...4
71,277.0'
17, '.7. .:'1
327,199.75
1, 1 1 42. 44


Purchases were made as follows: United States. $3,165,759.09;
Europe, $101,217.49; Central and South America, $52,978.91; cattle
industry, $892.195.84; local purchases. $135.339.83: Pan;iama Canal,
$136,408.50; total, $4,483,899.66.
Sales were made is follows:


1921


To United States Cc Prnment.......................... 1, 736, 682. 50
Panama Canal.. .... ... .......................... 1.'. 117. 58
Steamshis........ ............................... '.49 3O. 29
Panama R. R. I'o.................................. 1'. 1.485.58
Individuals and companies......................... 13, 845.66
Employees..... .......................... 6,-l 1. .91
Gross revenue from ales.... ........................ 11..131.37.. 52
Less discounts iand crecdiis. ............................ -'19,1. 2.1


1922

11 .19, 544.7ti 6
4 3. 1s6. %N
:i.64.7N9.i I
*Jl.,6'i7.it ;
323,417.21
-1, 000.950. Q3
7, 1 2, -'. ".. 4t;
13ri,01:.!!' '


Decrease.

")17, 1.37.74
.".N 3i1.70

532,7N. I7
I ,171. :..,
2,413. N6i. .L.I
4,22S,.190. n0'.
,2.1.12. 41,


Total ................... ...................... 11, 112.3.34.29 6,966,376.63 1 4, 145,9.7.S66


-upphes for expenerls and Pequipmen.i.
Retail conuimissaries and warehouLs.*- ..............
General................................ ...........
Plants....
T total. .. .. . .


140.698. 23
705.60
110.336. 57
2601.711 111


111. 288.16
737. 19
77,553. 10
Nil, -7 4-1


47.410.07
1 31. 5
32,783.47
O.f161. .43


Loss by courdemnatioLni, slinrkage, eitc....... ..... ... l.1,21.71 l',7.9 79.iiO. 7
Loss by clerical error-. pilfermu *. err ..................... .:1. '1. 41, 14. -. 19, 62. 77
Total.......................................l. 6 | i l. .' 11.7. 212. 43 19,7-.3.9',
G rand lotal ................... ............... .. 1 11 ,041. 7. 254. 167. 51 <.. ,7:3. 7

I Denotes iiicrea.ie.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR. OF THE PANAMA C'ANAL..


The commissary investment. proper (exclusive of plantations, cattle
industry, dairy and hog industries) amounts to 53,848,892.30, as
follows: Commissary plants and stores. 82,074,234.19; equipment,
$113,515.17; supplies on hand, $1,111,142.94; floating capital, ap-
proximately $550,000. 'he amount of accrued depreciation set. up
is 8407,089.35), aInd the total profits from Augitst. 1905. to June 30,
1922, amount. to $1 ,2535,i45.51.
]hi t1 ii&Ilst.r' .-The irmportationof Colombian beef cattle, which was
discontinued in thelast liisca; year, was resumed in September, 1921, and
5,000 head of cattle at a cost of $330,611.26 were brought in to com-
plete an open contract. These cattle were purchased at, a cost of
6.6 cents per pound. transportation charges being paid by the con-
tractor. The total number of cattle handled during the year was
21,000, with only 193 deaths, the average death rate being 0.9 per
cent.. Only 3 deaths occurred from anthrax, and these were among
cattle imported from Colombia in September, 1921.
The area of the pastures remained practically the same as in the
previous year. No new clearing was undertaken, but 12,81364 acres
were recleared.
The steamship Cairibbialn, the service of which had been extended
to include commercial cargo in May, 1921, was continued in the east
Colombia service as a feeder for the steamship line until the open
cattle contract was completed in June, 1922, when she was withdrawn
from the service and replaced by the steamship Adratnci.
During the year 7,567 head of cattle were sold to the conummissary
or to individuals and companies. The revenues received from the
sale of cattle and hides amounted to $751,967.83. Operating ex-
penses amounted to'$170,831.29. The net revenue of the year from
operation was $143,103.55; but the value of fat and lean cattle on
hand at the close of the year, which had been carried at $85.28 and
$54.43 per head, respectively, was written down to the estimated
cost of replacement, $45 and $23 per head, a reduction of $502.528.64,
making a net loss of $359,425.09.
The following is the present investment in the beef cattle industry:
Pastures and buildings, $716,761.39; equipment, $7,749.25; other
material, $640.79; horses and mules, $18,607.46; cattle on hand June
30, 1922, $547,S91.88.
Pl nlitation s.-The contract system of running the plantations was
extended during the year to include Limon and the remainder of the
small farms, so that on June 30, 1922, the only plantations under
direct operation were at Frijoles and Juan Mina. At Frijoles 17,000
alligator pears were gathered, with many new trees coming into
bearing. At Juan Mina 32,500 grapefruit, 155,800 oranges, 2,500
lemons, and 2,800 limes were gathered. The launch service on the
Chagres River has been discontinued, and only ordinary maintenance






HI-'.IPOtT OF (OVEPNOR OF TFll'. PANA.MA. CANAL.


work done. The operation of the Chinese gardens at Summit was
discontinued and the gardens let. out under contract on a rental
basis. The operation of the hog farm and the poultry farm was dis-
continued toward the close of 1921, and both units were let out under
contract on a rental basis. The hog farm continues to operate, but
the poultry farm contract has been abandoned.

HOTcELS AND RESTAURANTS.

The new accounting system introduced January 1, 1922, involved
placing the employees' restaurants on an entirely self-supporting
basis. which increased the operating cost to such an extent that it
brought, about their lease to a contractor, effective May 1, 1922.
Under the lease a rental is paid which covers the exterior maintenance
of the buildings and partly pays the interest, and depreciation charges.
whereas under gov-ernment operation running expenses were greater
than the receipts.
The Hotel Tivoli and the Hotel Washington were also advertised
for lease, but the bids received were unsatisfactory and were rejected.
For the time being these two hotels are retained under the manage-
ment of the supply department.

BUILDING CONSTHUlCT(ON AND REPAIRS.

The construction work for the fiscal year was considerably less
than in past years, although general repairs to buildings about
equaled those of other years.
United States Army.-The building construction for the Army
amounted to $2S,023.83, for which two one-family commanding offi-
cers' quarters were built at Fort Clayton and Fort Davis.
United Sfates. Navy.-One two-family quarters under construction
at Balboa Radio Station, which expenditure to date amounts to
$5,122.45.
Repairs.-Repairs and alterations to chill rooms at cold-storage,
plant., Mount Hope, amounted to $17,931.87. This was the most
important job of the year. The jobs done for the canal and railroad
did not in any individual case exceed $4,000. These jobs consisted
principally of the upkeep of employees' quarters and other buildings
and miscellaneous jobs done for departments and divisions.

PRINTING.
The total value of printing and binding at The Panama Canal Press
and of stationery sales was $258,619.47, as compared with $400,377.51
for the previous fiscal year, a decrease of 35 per cent. There has been
a corresponding reduction of the force employed. At its peak during
the fiscal year 1921 it numbered 17 gold and 132 silver employees.





I:EPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA ('ANAL.


At the close of the fiscal year 1922 it was 9 gold and 78 silver
employees. Report is made each quarter to the Joint Committee on
Printing, and all of the plans of that committee to promote economy
in public printing have been followed here.

PANAMA HAILROAI).

The actual business transacted by the railroad proper shows a
marked decrease both in tonnage and passengers transported, with a
corresponding decrease in revenues, as compared with the preceding
fiscal year; but heavy reductions in force, the retirement of a large
number of locomotives and other equipment from active service, and
the closing of several stations, combined with a reduced train service,
resulted in a very favorable showing. The net revenue for the year
amounted to $165,632.25, as compared with a loss of $156,713.23 for
the fiscal year 1921.
The railroad maintained 183.64 miles of track, of which 115.25 were
in main lihe and sidings, 58.19 miles in Panama Canal track, and 10.20
miles in track of the United States Army.
The stations at Mount Hope, Fort Davis, Frijoles, and Summit were
closed on account, of decreased business or reduction of force.
The total freight carried both ways was 208,015 tons of 2,000 pounds
or 40 cubic feet., as compared with 321,031 tons in the previous year,
and the average revenue per ton was $3.99, as compared with $3.24 in
the previous year. Revenue freight amounted to 205,785 tons, a de-
crease of 110,451 tons, as compared with 1921; local commercial
freight, decreased 8,404 tons; Panama Canal freight decreased 81,694
tons; transit, freight increased 504 t.on,; and Army and Navy freight
decreased 15,078 tons.
The following statement shows the number of passengers carried
and the passenger revenue for the fiscal year 1922 as compared with
the fiscal year 1921:


( lassilieat ion.
1922.! 1'J 21 22 1921

I irslt-L.i, I.4MN.rr' ................. . 7,41.l 41.4. I031 S229, .2.40 SI' 2,012.33
.1 1111nti la.s pi..i 'Iu l . ... ...... ...... 1.2-4,3: 421,3'3. 14 3,463.0

The average revenue per passenger per mile for 1922 was $0.0251
and for 1921, $0.0329. The gross revenue from transportation of pas-
sengers shows a decrease of $257,098.52, and the number of passengers
carried shows a decrease of 507,870.







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


The following table contains a summary of the operating statistics
of the railroad for the fiscal years 1922 and 1921:


averagee miles operated...........................................
Gross operating reveniue.....................................
Operating expense...........................................
Net operating revenue ............... ................. ..........
Per cent of expense-s to revenue......................................
Gross revenue per mile of road.........................................
Operating expenses per mile of road.....................................
Net revenue per mile of road ............................................
Revenue per passenger train-mile.......................................
Revenue per freight train-nule .........................................
Total revenue train mileage ................ .................. ........
Railroad revenue per train-mile.........................................
Railroad oper acting expenses per revenue train-mil...................
Net railroad revenue per reveiinue train-mile............................
Tons per loaded car.... ....................................
Tons per train...... ....................................
Freight, passenger, and swiii-h locomotive mileage..... ............
Work-train mileage.. .. . .................................
Passenger-train mileage ... .............................. ............
Freight-irain mileapge... ................................

Loss.


1922

47.C61
S1,. 552., 40.54
tl..i-i,76N. 29
816i.632. 25
9. 33
S32, i60. 60
V29, 106. 64
P, 499. gA
$4.29
$8.82
192,112
ii. 27
$5.41
90.86
11.09
121.94
274,894
38 8538
99,430
92,682


1921

51.45
$2,242,021.69
62,398,734.92
1 156,713.23
106.99
$43, 576. 71
$46,622.64
1 $3,045.93
$4.84
$10.03
260,428
* $8.61
69.21
180.60
10.02
129. 39
369,006
110,050
158 108
102,240


TELEPHONE ES.

During the year 490 telephones were installed and 1,065 removed,
leaving a total of 2,417 in service at the end of June, 1922. Calls
during the eight-hour business day averaged 22,174, as compared
with 28,809 in 1921. The system now includes 36 miles of pole line,
249 miles of underground circuit, 135 miles of cable, 13,728 miles
of wire, 960 miles of phantom circuits, 276 miles of simplex circuits,
26 manual and 3 automatic exchanges. The telephone system is
owned by the Panama Railroad Co., but operated by the electrical
division of The Panama Canal.

LAND AND BLULlDINGS.

'IThe revenue credited to rentals from lands of the Pnnama Railroad
Co. amounted to $120,104.73. The expenses in connection with
land leases were $18,900.62, leaving a net revenue of $110,204.11,
which is an increase of $2,381.07 over the previous year. Rentals
from buildings not used in the operation of the railroad amounted to
814,344.67, and the expenses to $15,598.77, leaving a net loss of
$1,254.10, as compared with a profit of 87,227.07 for the fiscabvear
1921.
In March, 1922, the capital investment in railroad real estate,
estimated at. $2,162,354.95, was raised to $6,749,735.75, based on
the numerous improvements in Colon and Panama'lands. The
value of various capital assets constructed during the period of high
prices for material and labor was reduced to the estimated cost. of
replacement under normal conditions, and the value of other units
which had outlived their usefunul-ss was removed from the capital





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


account. The net reduction in railroad capital assets amounted to
$2,113,428.04, and the principal items consisted of assets to the
value of $1,892,316.33 returned to The Panama Canal and $206,943.31
charged to accrued depreciation. The following list covers the prin-
cipal items that were reduced in value or removed, and their value
written off to the increase in real estate:
Railroads and appurtenances......... . .. .. ... $1, 892, 844. 67
Docks, piers, and appurtenances............. ..... 347, 430. 44;
Harbor terminal equipment........................ 142, 737. 2s
Coal plants................. ................... ....... 140, 805. 31
Farm industries........................... ...... . 00, 239. 75
Commissary plants and stores......... ..... .. .... S20. 982. IS)
Buildings and other structures.......... . . 108, 827. 2
Railroad equipment.................... ....... .... 71,397.00
Concrete dock, Balboa............................... :173, 742. 10
Cristobal roundhouse...................... ... .. .... 42. 500 on

CLUBHOUSES.

The Panama Canal assumes overhead expenses of the various club-
houses for gold and silver employees to the amount of $150,000 a
year. The reasons for this are dealt with briefly in Section IV of this
report. Excluding this overhead expense, the income of the club-
houses amounted to $483,848.71 and the expenditures to $442,205.99.
The principal sources of income were cigars and candy, soda foun-
tains and lunchrooms, and moving pictures. At the end of the year
the clubhouses had an accumulated cash surplus of $114.521.56.

PANAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LINE.

The gross revenue of the steamship line for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1922, was $2,862,898.57 and the operating expenses were
$3,450,231.02, leaving a net deficit of $587,332.45. This deficit, as
compared with that for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, of
$700,810.22, shows a decrease in deficit of $113,477.77.
Briefly, the principal causes contributing to the deficit were:
1. The tonnage carried amounted to 252,866 tons, as compared
with 415,159 tons for the previous year, a decrease of 162,293 tons,
or 39 er cent.
2. The marked lowering of rates caused by the keen competition
by direct lines operating between South Pacific and Caribbean-
Colombian ports and New York.
3. The continued depression in business conditions throughout the
world.
4. While there has been a slight reduction in the cost of foodstuffs,
stores, and supplies during the operating year, they were in the main
maintained at the high mark established during the prior fiscal year.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


5. The unsettled exchange conditions and the curtailment of
credit of American merchants to South American merchants have
greatly reduced imports into the United States and influenced the
purchase of their requirements in Europe.
The reduction in deficit as compared with that of the previous fiscal
year, despite the large falling off in tonnage transported, is due not
only to the fewer ships operated but to the economies effected,
particularly in pay rolls, rentals, etc.
The deficit includes, in addition to current operating expenses, de-
preciation and deferred charges for general and extraordinary repairs
incurred in prior years. By eliminating depreciation and deferred
charges for extraordinary repairs the deficit would have been reduced
to $275,427.36.
12951-2--3











SECTION III.

GOVERNMENT.


The usual functions of government are carried out in the Canal
Zone through the health, municipal, and executive departments; but.
in addition all of the accounting work is done in the accounting
department, while aids to navigation, steamboat inspection, and
hydrographic and meteorologic work, commonly considered govern-
ment duties, are here associated with canal operation. The cost of
government is merged with that of administration, and as close a
division as can be made is found in the statement of working forces
by canal operation, business operation, and government in Section IV
of this report. From the general financial statements may be obtained
the data of cost and revenue of various branches.

POPULATION.

A census of the civil population of the Canal Zone was taken by the
police force during the month of June, a summary of which is given
below:

Americans. All others.
Total.
Total Em- Total Em- Chil- Total Em- Total Em- Chil-
TotalPloy- P-ploy-
men. women. ploy dren. men. p women. Ply- dren.

Balboa district...... 1,39 I 37 1,762 241 1,863 3,2443- 2,267 2.232 73 3,874 14,516.
Cristobal district.... 07 474 397 2S 61l 2,5iu 2,328 1,619 5 3,034 8,985
Prisoners............ 17 ....... ........ ........ ... 151 ....... 2 ....... ....... 170
Total.......... 2,063 1,849 2,359 269 2,481 5,977 4,595 3,883 78 6,908 1 23,671

1 Includes 226 civilian employees of thp Army and Navy.
In additionto the civiUnn population the military riopulaiiomi of theCanal Zol c in June, 1922, iir brrerd
4,34S.
PUBLIC HEALTH.

The health department has continued to follow the established
policy of some years past of reducing the cost of sanitation by close
attention to and supervision of details and the substitution of tried
and proved economies developed by experience. Rock and tile
subsurface drains are being installed in areas once controlled by open
ditches that require frequent grading, grass cutting, and oiling. In
addition to the actual elimination of large areas formerly maintained






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 29

by temporary but expensive measures, the health department has
been enabled to drain other large mosquito-producing areas lying
outside these formerly sanitated areas, which recent carefully made
observations proved were sending many anopheles mosquitoes into
the towns, especially on the Atlantic side of the Isthmus. The
areas near by such residential and industrial sections have always
been carefully maintained free from mosquito breeding, and this
control has been and is being extended outward as observation and
study indicate the need therefore. Economies have resulted also
from improved methods in the use of oil and other larvacides; and
changes in various other phases of sanitation on the Canal Zone and
the cities of Panama and Colon (especially in the methods of garbage
collection and disposal, street cleaning, inspections, etc.) have
resulted equally favorably. Whereas on June 30, 1919, there were
employed in the above activities 20 sanitary inspectors, 2 incinerator
operators, and 571 silver employees, on June 30, 1922, there were so
employed but 10 sanitary inspectors and 313 silver employees, with
a still greater than proportionate decrease in cost of these activities,
yet it is believed that the employees and other residents of the
sanitated areas are now better protected from infections than
formerly. These clianges and other matters relating to health and
sanitation have been more fully discussed in the published annual
report of the health department for the calendar year 1921.
Malaria.-Conditions with respect. to malaria are shown in the
following table:

*Rate per thousand per annum
among employees.

White. Black. Total.

Fiscal year 1921:
July to December...................... ....... ..... 18. 72 23.37 22. 19
January to Jume...................................................... 20. 14 10. -4 13.30
For the entire vear.................................................... 19.39 17.65 18.10
Fiscal Jear 1922:
July to December................................... .......... 15.57 17.54 17.01
January to June................ ........... ..................... 16.0 12.&62 11. 54
For the entire year............................. ......... ................ 15.78 15.25 15.39

Canal Zone.-The average population (civil and military) for the
fiscal year 1922 is 30,683, and this has been used as the base for vital
statistics. From this population 249 deaths occurred during the
year, 216 of which were from disease, giving a rate of 7.04 for disease
alone, as compared with 7.03 for 1921, and 7.08 for 1920.
The death rate from tuberculosis was 0.65, as compared with 0.78
for the fiscal year 1921 and 0.81 for the fiscal year 1920. Deaths
from tuberculosis during the fiscal year 1922 were 8 per cent of all
deaths.





30 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

The birth rate for the year was 24.87 per thousand population.
The infant mortality rate, based on the number of births reported for
the year, was 46.26 for white and 124.48 for black children, with a
general average of 96.99. Of the total births reported, 4 per cent were
stillbirths. Of the total deaths reported, 43 per cent occurred among
children under 5 years of age. The maternal mortality rate (from
conditions due to the puerperal state) was 2.52 per 1,000 births.
Pananma.-The estimated average population for the city for the
year was 60,500, a new census not having )been taken during the year.
From this population 1,37.5 deaths occurred during the year, of which
1,340 were from disease, giving a rate of 22.15 for disease alone, as
compared with 19.52 for the preceding year. Tuberculosis gave a
death rate of 3.S3, as compared with 3.26 for 1921 and 3.80 for 1920;
this was 17 per cent of the total deaths, as compared with 16 per cent
for the fiscal year 1921.
The principal causes of death, compared with last year. were as
follows:

Number of deaths.

1920-21 1921-22

Tuberculosis (various organq).................. .......................... 197 232
Pneumonia (broncho and loharj............................................... lb2 225
Diarrhea and enteritis............................ ................. ............. 178 176

There were 2,160 live births reported for the year, giving a rate of
35.70. The infant mortality rate, based on the above number of
births reported, was 165.28. Of the total number of births reported.
6 per cent were stillbirths. Of the total deaths reported, 39 per cent
occurred among children under 5 years of age. The maternal
mortality rate (from conditions due to the puerperal state) was 6.52
per thousand births, stillbirths included.
Colon.-The population of the city for the year averaged 31,500,
as compared with 26,078 for 1921. From this population 457 deaths
occurred during the year, of which 434 were from disease, giving a
rate of 13.78 for disease, as compared with 18.63 for the preceding
year. tuberculosis gave a death rate of 2.22; this was 15 per cent of
the total deaths.
The principal causes of death, as compared with last year, were:

Number of deaths.

1920-21 1921-22

Tuberculosis (various organs)....................................................... 91 70
Diarrhea and enteritis............................................................ 28 46
Pneumonia lobarr and bronchol .................. .................................... 36 32






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 31

There were 830 live births reported for the year, giving a rate of
26.35. The infant mortality rate, based on the number of births,
was 140.96. Of the total births reported, 7 per cent were stillbirths.
Of the total deaths, 39 per cent occurred among children under 5
years of age. The maternal mortality rate (from conditions due to
the puerperal state) was 15.77 per 1,000 births, including stillbirths.
Canal hospitals.-Patients treated at Panama Canal hospitals,
fiscal year 1922:

Number in Remaining
hospital Admitted. Died. Discharged. Transferred. June 30,
July 1, 1921. 1922.
Hospital.
.0 .0 e^ .0 oS .0 0 .1 0 1

Ancon ................. 166 169 3 w7 2 12, 4-. 6I) 3,3r.i 2, 13 35 61 128 128
Colon................. 24 18 1,072 1,377 18 67 823 838 231 470 24 20
Corozal:
Insane............. 96 284 77 110 8 24 74 71 3 8 88 291
Cripples............ 4 26 4 4 ......I...... 2 2 1 ...... 5 28
Chronics........... 1 25 3 3 ...... 1 2 2 ...... 1 2 24
Palo Seco leper colony 15 69 9 ...... 8 ....... 3 ............ 6 67
Total............. 2911i 9 1,764 4,96 71 260 4t, 66 3,72 27n 40 252 5

I Includes 2 Chinese.
In the surgical clinic at Ancon Hospital 1,524 major operations and
3,859 minor operations were performed and 263 obstetrical cases were
delivered. In the eye and ear clinic 1,544 refractions were done and
1,346 operations performed, in addition to which 8,716 cases not in
the hospital were treated. In the X-ray clinic 2,701 cases were
handled, 4,586 plates and 790 films were made, in addition to 1,974
dental films made. In the medical clinic, in addition to the hospital
work, 1,971 cases not in the hospital were treate(l.
Medical Rtorel-ouwc.-On January 1, 1922, the medical storehouse
was transferred to the general store of the supply department,
Balboa, in order to make additional room for the Ancon commissary.
The change has been beneficial to both the health and supply depart-
ments, and the delivery of medical supplies to the hospitals and other
units of the health department has been satisfactory.
Quarantine.-In the operation of quarantine the aim throughout
the year has been to discard those measures which were formerly
necessary for the protection of the health of the Canal Zone, but
which are no longer needed on account of the improved sanitary
conditions in other countries and in the Canal Zone itself. The elini-
nation of yellow fever from the west coast of South America and its
almost complete eradication in the Western Hemisphere has made it
possible to relax very considerably the quarantine restrictions
hitherto imposed. Furthermore, the sanitary conditions within the
Canal Zone itself are such that at the present time were a case of





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


yellow fever in the infectious stage to be introduced it would hardly
be possible for it to spread to other persons.
Since The Panama Canal is operated for the purpose of saving tune
for vessels, it is felt that every safe means which will augment this
saving should be put in force, and quarantine operations are therefore
limited to only the absolutely essential things so that the movement
of ships may be facilitated and the annoyance to passengers and
hindrances to commerce shall be reduced accordingly. To this end
radiopratique for merchant vessels was instituted by the following
Governor's Circular No. 626-10, issued February 17, 1922:
Hereafter ships with clean bills of health, from noninfected ports and without
sickness on boari, intenling to transit the caffal without taking supplies or stores of
any kial or lanirinu passengers or cargo, may be granted pratique by radio under the
following conditions:
(a) By making application therefore by radio between the hours of 8 a. m. and 4 p. m.
Such application to state---
1. That the vessel has a clean bill of health and has no sickness on board.
2. Names of ports and places visited within the past 10 days.
3. That the vessel intends to transit the canal without taking stores of any kind
or landing passengers or cargo.
(b) Radio will be addressed to chief quarantine oBicer through port captain.
(c) Pratique will not be considered as granted until reply has been received from
port captain: "Chief quarantine officer grants pratique."
In consonance with the general policy outlined above, the quaran-
tine station at Bocas del Toro was closed, effective November 1,
1921. The chief quarantine officer made a visit to the Republic of
Venezuela for the purpose of determining whether or not it would
be safe to raise the quarantine which for many years has been in
effect against that Republic. This official reported that on account
of very notable sanitary improvements which had been made in that
country it was safe to do this, and the quarantine was accordingly
raised.
The yellow fever quarantine restrictions hitherto effective against
Nicaragua and San Salvador were also modified, so that passengers
from these countries need not now be placed in quarantine to com-
plete six days from the port of departure; all that is necessary at
the present time is for the landed passenger to report once daily to
the quarantine officer until the completion of the sixth day. This
facilitates very greatly commercial and social intercourse with these
countries.
The menace of plague still continues, the world-wide distribution of
this disease making its further international spread through the agency
of ships even more possible than hitherto. It is realized that human
beings play a relatively small r6le as the distributors of bubonic
plague, and attention has therefore been fixed upon the ship rodent
itself. The number of ship fumigations for the purpose of destruction






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


of rats has therefore been very considerably increased during the
past year, and it is noted that invariably after the second or third
fumigation few rats are found on these vessels, even though large
numbers may have been secured on the first fumigation. This work
therefore exercises a beneficial influence not only upon Panama
Canal ports, but upon the other ports of the world as well.
With the idea that greater efficiency and a marked economy might
be secured, there has been a consolidation of the functions of the two
quarantine stations maintained on the Isthmus, that at Cristobal
being utilized exclusively as a boarding and fumigation station and
that at. Balboa as a boarding and detention station. Under this
plan it has been possible to close all detention quarters at the Cristobal
station, merely holding them in reserve to meet some emergency and
utilizing the detention quarters at Balboa station exclusively for this
purpose.
If persons arriving at the Atlantic port of the Isthmus are to be
quarantined, they are brought to Balboa in the hospital car and trans-
ported by ambulance to the Balboa quarantine station. If vessels
on the Balboa side require fumigation, they are either fumigated by
the trained operatives from the Cristobal side or the vessel is sent
through the canal to be fumigated at Cristobal.
A total of 21 cases of smallpox was reported during the year.
Ten cases of leprosy were admitted to the Palo Seco colony from
Panama, Colon, the Canal Zone, and the interior of Panama. With
the two above exceptions, no cases of maritime quarantinable disease
originated on the Canal Zone during the year.

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING.

Water supply.-The pipe lines, reservoirs, filtration plants, and
pumping stations were operated and maintained during the year
along routine lines, at a direct cost, not including depreciation and
interest, of $468,605.63. (See Table No. 34, Section V.) One new-
pumping station was installed at Pedro Miguel to supply filtered
water to the west side of the canal in place of distilled water formerly
used there for domestic purposes. This change was made principally
on account of the expense and difficulty of getting a supply of coal
to the west side after the removal of the pontoon bridge.
The amount of water consumed was:
Gallons.
Canal Zone.......................... .............. 3, 671,055,000
Panama................. .......... ................ 1,060,754,000
Colon.............................. .... 639,157,500
Sold to ships........................... ......... ....... 121,062,293
Sewers.-No unusual conditions were encountered during the
year in the maintenance of the sewer system. To take care of surface






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


water during periods of heavy rainfall, for which existing lines
proved inadequate, a 24-inch sewer line 228 feet long was installed
near Garage 812 at Balboa, and a 2,037-foot line was installed near
the Balboa freight yards. The sum of $18,130.27 was spent on the
maintenance and repair of sewer systems in the Canal Zone, not
including depreciation and interest. (See also Table No. 21, Sec-
tion V.)
Roads, streets, and side walks.-A number of macadam roads in the
Canal Zone are becoming increasingly expensive to maintain, and the
resurfacing of a few of the worst of them was authorized during the
year. Concrete sidewalks were constructed at four points in Ancon
and Cristobal, where both pedestrian and vehicular traffic is heavy,
and under former conditions there was serious danger of accidents.
The maintenance and repair of roads, streets, and sidewalks, exclusive
of depreciation and interest, cost $80,701.55. (See also Table No.
21, Section V.)
Garbage disposal.-The incinerator at Mount Hope was operated
during the year at a cost of $21,938.53 for the disposal of garbage
from the Atlantic side area, including Colon. The incinerator at
Balboa was not operated, the garbage from Ancon, Balboa, and
Panama being dumped on waste land and buried by the health
depart men (.
Citit of Panama and Colon.-The revenue received from the sale
of water in Colon during the year was in excess of the combined
maintenance, interest., and repayment costs, and the surplus was used
for concreting a few of the worst macadam streets in the city at a cost
of $25,561.59. In Panama the revenue from water rentals was in-
sufficient to cover the combined charges, and a deficit of $22,677.08
was incurred, which added to the deficit of previous years made a
total of $95,950.24. As a result of continued deficits it was neces-
sary to cut maintenance work in the city to an absolute minimum,
.and many repairs were neglected, which, if final economy had been
the only consideration, sholild ha-ven been attended to. (See Table
21, Section V.)
PUBLIC ORDER.

In spite of the mixed population of the Canal Zone and the constant
flow of transients of all nationalities, a high standard of public order
has always been maintained. Thllis was notable during the fiscal year
1922. The number of felony cases was unusually low, and the total
arrests were only 3,372, as compared with 4,941 in 1921.
The police force was reduced from 178 to 171 men. No changes
were made in the organization of the force or in the location of
existing police stations, and no new buildings were constructed
during the year.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


A monthly average of 74 prisoners served sentences in the common
jails, and all those physically able were employed in clearing trails,
road repairs, and other municipal improvements and on janitor work
around the police stations. The total value of the labor performed
by these prisoners amounted to $22,868.43.
There were three homicides during the year, of which one was the
case of an escaped convict, shot while resisting recapture, and another
that of a colored servant at France Field, killed by a stray bullet.
fired by a hunter on the opposite side of the hay. Four suicides were
reported.
There were six arrests under the opium and drug acts, and both the
local traffic in narcotics and the smuggling of opium through the
Canal Zone were effectually discouraged.
A continuous patrol of the harbors of Balboa and Cristobal was
maintained, principally for the enforcement of the navigation laws
and for the prevention of smuggling and irregular traffic. A launch
patrol was also maintained on the Chagres River and Gatun Lake.
Details of police were continued at all the locks. Motor-cycle
patrols for the enforcement of vehicle traffic regulations and emer-
gency police service were continued at Balboa and Cristobal.
The more common causes of arrest were: Violation of motor-vehicle
regulations, with 989 cases; immigration regulations, 347; disorderly
conduct, 342; loitering, 304; disorderly conduct. (liquor), 188; petit
larceny, 180; assault and battery, 96; held for naval authorities, 88;
trespass, 73; violation of national prohibition act, 57; gambling, 55.
The persons arrested included natives of 67 different countries
or colonies: Among others, 851 Americans, 626 Jamaicans, 415 Bar-
badians, 412 Panamans, 142 Colombians, and 79 Spaniards.
Among the 94 occupations represented, the most common were:
Chauffeurs, 929; laborers, 394: soldiers, 333; sailors and seamen, 236;
ships' firemen, 184; and domestics, 83.
At the Canal Zone penitentiary at Gamboa 61 convicts were re-
ceived and 70 were discharged, leaving 81 in confinement at the end
of the year. The convicts were employed on roads and municipal
improvements, the maintenance of the penitentiary buildings and
grounds, the manufacture and repair of prison clothing, and the
cultivation of the penitentiary farm, where convicts raise a large part
of their own food. The total value of the labor performed by con-
victs at standard rates of pay was $30,848.62 and the total cost of
subsisting, guarding, and clothing them was $38,146.83.
New buildings for the housing of convicts and warders have been
needed for some years, but no funds have been available for their
construction.





RIP'ORT OF CiOVEHNOIL OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


OFFICE OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY.

The district attorney prosecuted 245 criminal cases before the
district court, with 176 convictions, 17 acquittals, 29 cases dismissed,
and 23 cases otherwise disposed of. This is a reduction of more than
50 per cent in the number of cases handled, as'compared with the
previous year, which the district attorney attributes to decreased
population, the discouragement of appeals from the magistrates'
courts, and the imposition by the district court of sentence com-
mensurate with the crimes charged.
In addition to the cases mentioned above, 32 other criminal cases
were pending at the close of the fiscal year, there having been no
session of the district court since May 22, 1922.
The district attorney represented The Panama Canal or the Panama
Railroad Co. in 11 civil actions and The Panama Canal or the United
States Shipping Board in 3 admiralty cases. There were 3 additional
admiralty cases pending at the close of the year.

DISTRICT COURT.

The district court held sessions at Ancon and Cristobal and trans-
acted the following business:
Cases pending at the beginning of the fiscal year: Civil, 101;
probate, 150; criminal, 44. Cases filed during the year: Civil, 50;
probate, 155; criminal, 179. Cases settled during the year: Civil, 72;
probate, 168; criminal, 194. Cases pending at the end of the year:
Civil, 79; probate, 137; criminal, 37. Of the civil cases settled, 30
were decided, 41 dismissed, and 1 venued. Of the criminal cases
settled, 14 were acquitted, 134 convicted, 15 were nol-prossed, 27
dismissed, 3 filed away, and 1 forfeited. Number of sessions of
court, 101; number of marriage licenses issued, 616; number of deeds
recorded, 22; total collections, $5,983.05.
Judge Charles Kerr assumed the duties of the office of district
judge on July 16, 1921, and left the Isthmus on May 22, 1922, re-
signing subsequently in the United States. Prior to July 16, 1921,
and subsequent to May 22, 1922, there were no sessions of the district
court during the fiscal year.
MARSHAL.

Writs of process received, 596; served, 453; parties not found,
143; fees collected, $236.70; fees paid witnesses, $86; fees paid jurors,
$5; fees paid interpreters, $15; trust funds handled, $123,476.50;
attendance at court, 72 days in Balboa and 29 days in Cristobal.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 37

MAGISTRATES' COURTS.

Balboa.-Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Civil; 2;
criminal, 1; total, 3. Cases docketed during the year: Civil, 49;
criminal, 1,615; total, 1,664. Of the criminal cases disposed of, 65
resulted in acquittal, 1,323 in conviction, 154 were dismissed, and
73 held to the district court. Appeal was taken in 2 civil and 29
criminal cases. Cases pending at the end of the year, 1 civil and
1 criminal. Total collections, $10,348.96.
As provided for in the Executive order of May 10, 1911, petitions
were made to the district judge for the commitment of 55 persons to
the insane asylum for observation.
Cristobal.-Cases pending at the beginning of the year: Ci il, 0;
criminal, 1. Cases docketed during the year: Civil, 29; criminal,
1,314; total, 1,343. Cases disposed of during the year: Civil, 22;
criminal, 1,310; total, 1,332. Of the criminal cases disposed of during
the year, 187 resulted in acquittal, 967 in conviction, 44 were dis-
missed, and 112 committed to the district' court. Cases pending at
the end of the year: Civil, 7; criminal, 5; total, 12. Total collections,
$7,986.49.
FIRE PROTECTION.

No changes were made in the organization or distribution of the
fire department, and, with the exception of hose, no new equipment
was purchased during the year.
Fire stations were maintained at eight places and four tugs were
equipped with fire-fighting apparatus. The paid force on June 30,
1922, consisted of 42 men, distributed: 1 at headquarters, 16 at
Balboa, 4 at Pedro Miguel, 16 at Cristobal, and 5 at Gatun. In
addition there were 17 volunteer companies, with a total membership
of 170.
There were 94 fires during the year, with a total loss of $75,647,
of which $32,000 represents loss due to a fire in the officers' barracks
at the Coco Solo Naval Base and $22,589.50 the destruction of the
United States Army storehouse at Empire. The next largest loss
was $15,600, due to a fire caused by spontaneous combustion in the
cargo of the steamship loan, of the American-Hawaiian Line.
The value of Government property endangered by fires during the
year is estimated at $653,632.19.
PUBLIC-SCHOOL SYSTEM.

Five grade schools and two high schools were maintained for white
children and seven grade schools for colored children. The net
enrollment in the white schools was 911 boys and 986 girls and in the
colored schools 951 boys and 858 girls. Nineteen buildings were used





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


for school purposes. The number of teachers employed in the white
schools at the beginning of the term in October was 79 and in June 77.
The number of teachers in the colored schools was 32. Twenty-three
pupils graduated from the two high schools, making a total of 200
graduates to date.
It has been the policy to provide for American children educational
facilities of the same character as can be found in the best public
schools in the United States. Only American teachers are employed,
with normal school or college training and previous experience in
their work. For the colored West Indian children the curriculum
does not extend beyond the grammar-school grades, and West Indian
teachers are employed.
During the fiscal year 1922 the status of funds would not permit the
making of needed repairs and alterations to buildings, and only
emergency maintenance work received attention. In order to curtail
expenses pupils were required to provide their own expendable school
supplies and railroad transportation, and the amount of janitor service
was reduced.
While it has been necessary to practice stringent economies, this
this has been done, in general, without impairing the immediate
efficiency of the schools. A high standard of pupil instruction has
been maintained.
Additional funds are needed to repair and preserve the present
buildings and to provide additional classrooms and teachers required
in the colored schools.
POSTAL SYSTEM.

Eleven post offices were in operation in the Canal Zone on June 30,
1922, there having been no change during the year in the number or
location of offices, but arrangements had been completed to open a
new office at Fort Clayton on July 1.
The total receipts of the postal service were $157,407.85, as com-
pared with $161,475.13 in the preceding year, a decrease of 2j per
cent. As in former years the Canal Zone postal system would have
been self-sustaining, in spite of the very large proportion of mail
carried without, revenue under the official frank, if it had not been
necessary under the Taft agreement to purchase all stamps from the
Republic of Panama at 40 per cent of their face value.
Money orders were issued to the value of $2,642,480.25, on which
fees amounting to $9,153.10 were collected. Of these orders $862,880
represent so-called deposit money orders, which are issued here with-
out fee in lieu of postal savings certificates and bear interest at the
rate of 2 per cent. Deposit money orders were repaid to the value of
$1,045,315, interest payments on money orders totaled $9,085.58,
and the balance on deposit on June 30, 1922, was $437,200.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Authority was obtained for the sale through the Canal Zone post
offices of United States Treasury savings certificates, and they were
offered to the public beginning May 1, 1922. Sales during the months
of May and June totaled $89,140, with a maturity value of $111,425.
Because of the higher rate of interest the sale of these certificates has
resulted in a decrease in the amount of deposit money orders issued
and withdrawal of money order deposits for reinvestment in cer-
tificates.
In the registry division of the post offices 234,S79 letters and parcels
were handled. Of the registered mail dispatched, 42 per cent was
official matter registered without fee.
From the exchange office at Cristobal there were 2,243 dispatches
of mail to 57 different foreign exchanges, and 1,639 consignments of
foreign mail were received. From the Balboa exchange office, which
handles mail to west coast Central and South American ports, there
were 218 dispatches to 25 different foreign post offices, and approxi-
mately the same number of consignments was received.
All United States and foreign closed transit mail destined to the
west coast of Central and South America, as well as mail exchanged
between Cuba, Jamaica, and other insular governments, with Colom-
bia, Costa Rica, Venezuela, etc., is consigned to or handled under the
supervision of the director of posts of the Canal Zone. Arrangements
were being made at. the close of the year to handle the transit mail
of the Republic of Salvador.
CUSTOMS.
The total number of vessels entered at Canal Zone ports was 6,306,
and the total number cleared was 6,307, a decline of slightly more
than 9 per cent from the figures for 1921. All merchandise discharged
at Cristobal or Balboa for local consignees'not connected with The
Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad, or the United States Army and
Navy is in the custody of the Canal Zone customs until submission of
the necessary papers from Panaman officials showing that duty has
been paid. Permits for 7,476 releases were granted during the year.
Free-entry requests submitted by employees and members of the
Army and Navy were approved to the number of 1,394. There were
no arrests for attempted smuggling, but 8 arrests were made for
alleged violations of the opium act and 5 convictions were obtained
in the district court. The number of cases of household goods in-
spected and sealed for employees returning to the United States was
2,329, and the fees collected for thbis-service totaled $1,617. There
were 1,229 commercial invoices certified, for which $892.50 were col-
lected. The number of vessels requesting the detail of customs
inspectors for the examination of passengers' baggage, etc., after the
usual working hours at the terminal ports was 399, and a total of





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


$3,500 was charged for this special service. Customs inspectors
checked Chinese crews upon arrival and before departure to prevent
illegal landing of Chinese in the Canal Zone or the Republic of Panama.
They also assumed responsibility for 689 Chinese passengers, of whom
161 were admitted to the Republic of Panama on the authority of
that Government; I died at Ancon hospital, and the remainder, with
the exception of 25 held a.t the close of the year, either proceeded on
their journey or were returned to the port of embarkation. Chinese
in transit can make arrangements to be released temporarily in the
Canal Zone under bond, and 309 such bonds were accepted during
the year.
SHIPPING COMM.N.ISSIONER--SEAMEN.

The shipping commissioner and his deputies have the same powers
with respect to American seamen as shipping commissioners in United
States ports or American consuls in foreign ports. During the year
there were 3,888 seamen shipped on American vessels and 3,422 dis-
charged. The total amount of wages earned by seamen discharged
in the Canal Zone amounted to .$202,758.84. and this was either paid
to the seamen or deposited for them with the deputy shipping com-
missioners. There were 363 American seamen lodged and subsisted
at the expense of the Government; of this number 214 were returned
to the United State. at the expense of the appropriation for the relief
of destitute seamen, and for the remaining 149 an opportunity was
found to sign on homeward-bound vessels and work their passage.
The wages and effects of 9 American seamen who died in Canal Zone
hospitals were handled by the shipping commissioner as provided
by law.
ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES.

During the year 85 estates of deceased and insane employees of
The Panama Canal anti the Panama Railroad Co. were administered
and there were 16 estates in course of settlement on June 30, 1922.

RELATIONS WITH PANAMA.

Attached to the report of the executive secretary is a list of the
subjects which gave rise to correspondence with the Republic of
Panama. They were almost exclusively of a routine nature.
During the month of June, 1922, negotiations, which had for a
considerable time been pending, concerning the acquisition by the
United States for defense purposes of certain lands and easements or
rights of way over and through other property on the island of
Taboga were concluded. During the late war it had been planned to
take over the whole island, excepting the site of the village, but this





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


project was opposed by the owners of the land and the Republic
of Panama, and it was subsequently abandoned. The area finally
acquired comprises only 5.75 hectares on the summit of the highest
hill and a tract of approximately the same size on the beach at the
spot known as The Cove, together with an easement or right of way
for a telephone cable connecting the two tracts.

LAWS AND EXECUTIVE ORDERS.

Laws enacted and Executive orders issued during the year, appli-
cable to The Panama Canal, form Appendix E of the report of the
executive secretary. Three volumes containing "The Laws of the
Canal Zone," "Treaties and Acts Relating to The Panama Canal,"
and "Executive Orders Relating to The Panama Canal," annotated
and revised to December 31, 1921, were published during the year.










SECTION IV.


ADMINISTRATION.

CHANGES IN ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL.

Col. M. L. Walker, United States Army, was appointed engineer
of maintenance, effective July 2, 1921, with supervision over the
following divisions and sections of the department of operation and
maintenance: Section of surveys, division of lock operation, office
engineer, section of meteorology and hydrography, division of munici-
pal engineering, Gatun Dam and back fill, and dredging division.
In compliance with directions of the Secretary of War and in order
that he might devote more of his time to the duties of a coordinator
and business manager, the engineer of maintenance was relieved of
direct charge of all these units, except the dredging division, on No-
vember 10, 1921, and the other divisions were placed under the super-
vision of the assistant engineer of maintenance. The duties of the
engineer of maintenance were defined in a circular issued November
22, 1921.
Mr. H. A. A. Smith, who as auditor had been in charge of the
accounting department since its establishment on April 1, 1914, and
who prior to that date had served for several years as examiner of
accounts under the Isthmian Canal Commission, tendered his resig-
nation, effective June 18, 1922. To him is due in large measure the
change from the accounting system of construction days to the sys-
tem that was in effect from April, 1914, to December, 1921, and for
the changes effected in January, 1922. He remained with the service
six months after he had intended to leave only because of his desire
to see the new accounting system in use since January, 1922, effec-
tively working before he resigned. I wish to record here my appre-
ciation of his loyal and efficient service. The office of auditor was
filled by the promotion of the assistant auditor on the Isthmus, Mr.
Elwyn Greene, effective June 20, 1922. The position of assistant
auditor on the Isthmus was filled by the promotion of the chief
accountant, Mr. W. H. Kromer.
RftDUOTION OF FORCE AND REDUCED PAY ROLLS.
The force einployed by The Panama Canal and the Panama Rail-
road Co. on tht Isthmus was reduced between June 15, 1921, and
June 21, 1922, fr6r 13,600 to 10,176. This reduction was effected





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


very largely in the first half of the fiscal year and was due in part to
the completion of various items of construction work, in part to a
falling off in vessel repairs, coal sales, commissary sales, and other
business operations and in part to a general overhauling of the
organization and the introduction of more economical methods of
operation. The reduction extended to all departments, but was
heaviest in the mechanical division.
There was a reduction in the monthly pay roll from $1,374,307.36
in June, 1921, to $963,229.64 in June, 1922. This reflects not only
the simultaneous reduction of force, but reductions in the pay of
gold and silver employees, to correspond with wage adjustments in
the United States and a lower cost of living on the Isthmus. While
the force was reduced 25.196 per cent, the reduction in the monthly
pay roll amounted to 29.911 per cent.
The following table shows to what extent the force was reduced
in each department and division:

1921 1922
DIepartmenL or division.
Gold Silver Total. Gold Silver Total
roll. roll. roll. roll.

Operation and maintenance:
Office.... ................................... 31 50 81 238 37 65
Electrical division............................... I17 216 413 141 152 293
Municipal en-ineering............................ 90 7P0 S50 71 664 735
Lock operation.................................... 173 557 732 163 530 693
Dredein'......................................... 167 755 922 130 597 727
Mechanical.... ....... ....................... 645 1,00 1,645 319 553 872
Marine.......................................... 191 518 79 154 360 514
Fortifications ..................................... 61 11 242 39 234 273
Supply:
Quartermaster........................ ........... 279 1,474 1,753 139 897 1,036
Subsistence..................................... 33 299 332 6 79 85
Com missary................... .................. I 239 1, 166 1,401' 164 742 906
Cattleindustry, plantations...................... 19 1.54 173 6 133 139
Hotel Washington...... ..................... .... 10 81 91 9 83 92
Transportation....... ............ ............. ........ ... ..... ........ 32 147 179
Accounting ........................................... 226 9 235 180 7 187
Health....................................... 246 47 1,093 211 705 916
Executive........................................... 564 25s A22 499 243 742
Panama R'ilroad:
Superintendent ................................... 61 332 393 46 221 267
Transportation.................................. 94 125 219 67 99 166
Receiving and forwarding agent................... 66 687 753 64 625 689
Coaling stations................................. 112 56t6 67S 85 515 600
Total.................................... 3,500 10,035 13,541 2,553 7,623 10,176


FREE QUARTERS PRIVILEGE WITHDRAWN.

On December 3, 1921, the President signed an Executive order
directing that on and after January 1, 1922, a charge be made for
rent, fuel, electric current, water, and services in connection with
quarters occupied by employees of The Panama Canal and the
Panama Railroad Co. on the Isthmus. Rental charges were to be
fixed on the present depreciated value of the area occupied by the
tenant in an amount sufficient to amortize the investment in quar-
12951-22-4





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


ters on the basis of an average life of 36 years, to return 5 per cent
for amortization and interest on the investment, and in addition
cover the amount fixed for expenditure for repairs due to ordinary
wear and tear and for the disposal of garbage and other services
necessary from a sanitary point of view.
Under the regulations issued in compliance with this order, ordi-
nary family quarters, with necessary furniture, rent for from $10
to $25 a month, and bachelor quarters, including janitor service, for
approximately $9 a month.
The employees applied to the district court of the Canal Zone for
an order restraining the Governor from collecting rent charges on
the ground that free quarters were a privilege guaranteed them by
act of Congress. The court held that it had no jurisdiction, and
when an appeal was taken to the United States Circuit Court of
Appeals at New Orleans this decision was confirmed. Efforts made
by representatives of the employees to have Congress enact a pro-
vision restoring the free quarters privilege were also unsuccessful.
The total amounts collected for rentals and allied services from
gold employees for the six months of the fiscal year during which
such charges were directed by the Executive order referred to were
$207,944.91.
WAGE ADJUSTMENTS-GOLD EMPLOYEES.

The method referred to in my last annual report of adjusting
rates of pay on the basis of rates in the United States, to which is
added an increment of 25 per cent for service in the Tropics, was
continued; and these adjustments were made after consultation with
and recommendation by a board on rates of pay, composed of one
member representing the administration and one representing the
central body of the employees' organizations. The board held 27
meetings.
In instructions under date of October 18, 1921, the Secretary of
War stated:
It is believed that the basis as fixed in the law, of not to exceed 2.5 per cent above
rates paid for similar service in the Government service in the.United States, may be
recozn ii'ed as fair, and it is directed that it be used for canal and railroad em ployees.
Thi're are certain rates (notably bases fixed for railroad employees, for buildinc-tr.ade
rates. and for rates derived from the latter) which are now too hiEli. and for which a
new rate should be i1x(d. In fixin ticse rates, whether from Government rates or
from commercial rates when no Government employment of similar nature can be
conveniently found, consideration should be given to the fact that in some sections of
the United States where the rate is higher than in other places the hourly rate is fixed
on such a basis as to give a suitable wage per year, taking into consideration the fact
that inclement weather may close down employment during" portions of the year.
Similarly proper consideration should be given to a suitable differentiation between
maintenance emplonyeo and construction employees at the canal, these terms being






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


used to differentiate those holding reasonably permanent positions from those whose
employment may terminate with cessation of a construction job.
It is directed that thi- bases upon which wages are determined be gone over care-
fully and that they he readjusted alonw the lines above indicated.
The foregoing instructions have been complied with.' As the trend
of wages in the United States has been downward, the numerous
revisions which have been made during the year have resulted in
practically all cases in lower rates.

WAGE ADJUSTMENTS-SILVER EMPLOYEES.

The wage scale for silver employees is adjusted quarterly to cor-
respond with fluctuations in the cost of living on the Isthmus. The
method followed is to ascertain by what percentage current living
costs exceed the figures for 1914 and then add the same percentage
to the basic hourly rate for common labor, which in 1914 was 12.37
cents. Special hourly rates and monthly rates are adjusted to con-
form with the basic hourly rate. Fluctuations in the basic hourly
rate since February, 1920, are shown below:

Living Indi- Livin Indi-
Date. costs coated Rate Date costs P3atp
over rate over ate. adlird.
1914. 1914.

Per d1. Cnt,. Cn.il. Per ct. Cents. Cents.
Feb. 1, 1920.............. 71.'. 21.2.3 '1 ily 1, 1921............. 68.977 20.91 22
Apr. 1,1 .............. 7.. I. 21.47 21 Oct. 1, 121.'l............. 02.59 20.12 21
July 1, 1920 .............. 7.77 23.11 2:3 ln. I. 1 22............. 59.98 19. 2 21
Oct. I, 19 .0.............. 2 2. 0 23 Apr. 22............ 55.46 19.24 21
Jan. 1, 192 ............... 2 2;2. 19 23 .Ily 1, 1922.............. 50.039 18.57 20
Apr. 1, 1921.............. 72.3.:9 21.33 23

By strict adherence to the plan adopted in Jinuiuary, 1920, reduc-
tions in the pay of silver employees would have been made more
rapidly than they have been. A reduction from 23 cents to 22
cents was due on January 1, 1921, and a reduction to 21 cents was
due April 1, 1921. No reduction was made, however, until July 1,
1921, when the rate was lowered to 22 cents, and not to 21 cents
as was justified by the cost of living data. Similarly a reduction to
20 cents was due October 1, 1921, but the cut was made to 21 cents
only. The most recent cut to 20 cents made July 1, 1922. still
leaves the rate I cent higher than the figure indicated by the statis-
tics. It will be seen that The Panama Canal has not followed the
downward trend or living costs exactly, but has withheld reductions
six months or more.
GRIEVANCE BOARD.

The board organized in July, 1920, to hear grievances and conm-
plaints of American employees on working conditions continued to
function during the year. The assistant. engineer of maintenance
replaced the engineer of maintenance on the board, the other members





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


being as heretofore the head of the division in which the complaint
originates and two representatives of the organized employees.
This board held 4 meetings and reported to the Governor in 5 cases.
As compared with the previous year, when the board held 35 meetings
and considered 32 cases, its work during the fiscal year 1922 was
very light.
RECRUITING IN THE UNITED STATES.

The recruiting work handled by the Washington office was light
in comparison with former years, as few new employees were needed
on the Isthmus. Appointment was tendered to 448 persons, of
which number 173 accepted and were appointed. There were 36
different positions to which appointment was made. The ratio of
acceptance to tenders of employment was 35 per cent, as compared
with 73 per cent in 1921 and 58 per cent in 1920.

NEW LAND POLICY.

Since the depopulation of the Canal Zone prior to the opening of
the canal it had been the established policy to reserve t.he land
exclusively for Government use, and no cultivation was permitted
except such as was carried on by or under contract. with the supply
department and such gardening as was (lone by employees on small
plots allotted to them in the vicinity of their quarters. With the
reduction of the force employed by The Panama Canal and the
Panama Railroad Co. Inrge numbers of idle and destitute West
Indians congregated in Panama and Colon. With a view to relieving
the distress of these people, increasing the food supply, and creating
a local reservoir of unskilled labor that could be drawn upon when
needed, it was decided to reopen certain specified areas in the Canal
Zone for cultivation under revocable licenses. Applicants for land
were assigned up to 5 hectares, rent free until July 1, 1924, after
which an annual rental of $5 a hectare will be collected, and they
were given enough secondhand lumber and corrugated-iron sheets
to build a small house on each tract. The order relative to these
agricultural lenses took effect. December 2, 1921, and between that
time and the end of the fiscal year 1,026 licenses had been issued
for a total of 3,138 hectares. The lessees are in practically all cases
West Indians who are employed or were formerly employed on the
canal. They grew up under rural conditions in their native islands,
and have some knowledge of primitive agricultural methods. Plans
have been made for the establishment of a model farm in connection
with the Canal Zone penitentiary under the management of an
expert recommended by the United States Department of Agri-
cultrre, who will advise and assist the small cultivators in the develop-
ment of their 5-hectare tracts.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATION.

Five clubhouses for gold and five for silver employees were con-
tinued in operation. These clubhouses have long since demonstrated
their value as necessary community centers. Most of the activities
which they serve are self-supporting, and the contribution made
by the canal to the overhead charges is amply justified by the indirect.
benefits to the Government. The same remark applies with even
greater force to the children's playgrounds, athletic fields, swimming
pools, and tennis courts which have been constructed and are main-
tained at but little expense to the canal and to the marked improve-
ment. of the physical and moral health of the community.
Supplementing the facilities for recreation provided through the
division of clubs and playgrounds, there. are many independent
organizations which have been built up and are supported by the
employees and other residents of the Isthmus, such as the golf clubs
at Panama, Fort Amador, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel; the Gatun
Tarpon Club; the Balboa-Ancon Gun, Rifle, and Pistol Club; the
Tabernilla Hunt Club; and many others. A community house at
Balboa was erected last year by Catholic societies and is maintained
by them. The Young Men's Christian Association supports club-
houses for the enlisted men of the Army and Navy. The Young
Women's Christian Association has two clubhouses for women. The
Salvation Army maintains restaurants and lodging houses for seamen.
The majority of these organizations are accorded certain privileges
in the Canal Zone, although they are not given direct financial
support.
SPECIAL PANAMA CANAL COMMISSION.

The special commission appointed by the Secretary of War to
investigate the canal administration arrived on the Isthmus on June
18, 1921, one of the members, Mr. H. P. Wilson, arriving a week
later. Mr. Molitor left for the United States on July 6, having been
here less than three weeks, and the other members of the commis-
sion left on July 20, having been here approximately one month,
except Mr. Wilson, whose stay was approximately three weeks.
The commission submitted its report on September 15, 1921, and I
submitted my preliminary comments under date of September 17,
1921. After conference held with the chairman of the commission, in
which certain recommendations that were in keeping with my policy
were agreed to by b6th of us, the Secretary of War issued a letter on
October 18, 1921, addressed to the Governor, indicating his approval
of such recommendations. Under date of January 15, 1922, I sub-
mitted detailed recommendations, and, under date of February 6, 1922,
the Secretary of War authorized the withholding of further action
until after the end of the fiscal year.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Inasmuch as all of the correspondence and data evoked by the
investigation of the commission are on file in the Washington office of
The Panama Canal, in the office of the Secretary of War, and in the
records as well on the Isthmus, and are available to persons legiti-
mately interested in them, only brief reference will be made here to
the recommendations and the action taken thereon.
Among the more important matters was the reorganization of
the accounting system, to which extended reference is made else-
where. The charging of rental for quarters occupied by employees
and for certain services in connection therewith was begun on Jan-
uary 1, 1922, and the result of the first six months is shown in the
financial statements in Section V. The opening of the Canal Zone
to settlers who may be available for the labor force was undertaken
as indicated in the section on Government in this report. The re-
duction of stock in warehouses was carried on along the lines that
had already been initiated; and the leasing of certain parts of the
cattle industry and the canal restaurants was carried out, as indi-
cated elsewhere in this report. It was found impracticable to place
sales at the commissaries on a money basis instead of on the coupon
basis, and the latter system has been continued. Upon my advice,
under date of May 12, 1922, the Secretary of War disapproved the
Special Panama Canal Commission's recommendation to the effect
that the posts, customlls, quarantine, shipping commissioner, and
steamship inspection work be divorced from the canal organization
and transferred to departments of the Government in the United
States. In a more extended report which I submit to you this
month the various matters left in abeyance by your letter of October
18, 1921, and your memorandum of February 6, 1922, are referred
to in detail.
NEW ACCOUNTING SYSTEM.
[Table references are to Sec. V, p. 55, et seq.]
The accounting system, which had been in use since the opening
of the canal in 1914, was so changed during the year as to make it
practically a new system.
The old system was a blend of the accounting required by Govern-
ment regulations and that demanded by the commercial character of
the business operations of the canal and railroad. It was devised
by Mr. H. A. A. Smith, for many years auditor of the canal and
railroad, who was assisted in the work by experts from the Treasury
Department. It had been approved by the comptroller. During
the fiscal year 1922 a committee from the office of the Comptroller
General made an investigation of the old system and in a report
dated March 23, 1922, stated-
* * the system approaches perfection, and the administration thereof hae
developed it into a smooth-running machine.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


INSTRUCTIONS OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR AS TO ACCOUNTING.

From a Government accounting standpoint. the old system has
never been unfavorably criticized, but from a business standpoint it
had certain deficiencies which it is believed are remedied in the new
system. The change -was made in accordance with the following
instructions from the Secretary of War October 18, 1921:
A careful study shall be made of the cost of the canal, in order to establish, if pos-
sible, a capitalization to determine a fair commercial value that should be fixed for
the canal and its various allied activities. When this has been arrived at, the actual
cost of the canal and its activities be written down to this figure, which should there-
afterbe used in the operation and official reports as capital account upon which returns
and expenditures should be justified. Having, arrived at this figure, it will be sub-
divided and an allocation be made to each auxiliary activity under the canal adminis-
tration. and thereafter the sum allotted to each of these activities shall be the one
that must be used in justifyinL, the continued existence of the activity concerned;
but. in case the operations show a loss, the Governor may present to the Secretary of
War a statement of reasons why the activity might be longer continued. There are
certain activities, such as sanitation. hospitalization, fire and police protection, and
other similar governmental functions, which obviously are not activities from which
commercial returns can be expected. These should be attached to canal operations
proper and the cost. thereof borne by canal operations. By capitalizing the canal
and its various subdivisions as therein recommended, it is believed that many desirable
results will obtain. for thereafter not only the canal as a whole but each of its auxiliary
activities will be given a measure by which the efficiency of its operations should be
determined.
* In the -iim of accounting there shall be provision made for a complete
and independent showing by each separate business activity throughout the Zone,
and invested capital (subject to the revised set-up value as elsewhere directed) shall
be set up as a direct charge thereto. the accounts showing the actual results of each
unit.
COMMERCIAL VALUE OF CANAL-DIVISION OF CANAL CAPITAL.

The instructions quoted above made it necessary as a first step in
reclassifying the accounts to arrive at a commercial value of the canal
and its various activities and to divide the canal capital into three
classes: First, items considered as national defense expenditures;
second, property and equipment used in the operation of the canal
proper; third, property used in business operations aside from the
transiting of vessels.
The study to determine the commercial value of the canal and its
allied activities resulted in the division of capital (see Table 14,
Section V) into-
(1) Canal transit property.
(2) Canal business property.
(3) Defense capital expenditures.
Conservative amounts only of the capital expenditures were charged
off. The charges to national defense account as of June 30, 1922
(8110,997,602.38), are detailed in Table No. 15. Some of the items,





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


such as the payment to the New Panama Canal Company and the
Republic of Panama and certain expenditures for projects which
were afterwards abandoned, were written to the national defense
account in toto. Others were divided between national defense
expenditures and the canal commercially and were written off on a
percentage basis according to the estimated life of the property-
estimating the life of the channels, excavations, fills, and concrete
work and the locks and spillways, breakwaters, etc., as 100 years,
and other items a lesser life, depending on the nature of the con-
struction.
The commercial value of the canal was thus determined as
$246,418,989.81 for transit capital and $28,760,308.44 for business
capital.
CHART OF NEW SYSTEM-CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS.
A chart showing the broad outlines of the new system is presented
herewith. It will be seen that the accounting of the Panama Rail-
road on the Isthmus is included, as it was in the old system, because
the canal and railroad, while separate legal entities, are so closely
linked for practical purposes as to be one large organization. The
accounts of the railroad are all handled as "business operations,"
however, while those of the canal are divided among business and
canal transit operations.
It has been necessary to adopt what are practically two inde-
pendent series of accounts:
(1) A series of accounts showing appropriations, funds, fiscal
officers, allotments, and obligations.
(2) A series of general and detail accounts covering property,
income, and operations.
This second series of accounts is divided between-
(1) Canal transit operations, which have to do with the transiting
of vessels through the canal.
(2) Canal business operations, which are auxiliary to or even inde-
pendent of canal operations proper and which are to be self-support-
ing.
APPROPRIATIONS. FUNDS, FISCAL OFFICERS, ETC.

The nature of these transactions is shown by Tables 2 to 13.
CANAL TRANSIT PROPERTY.
This is divided into (1) fixed property (see Table 16) and (2) equip-
ment (see Table 18).
Amortization on canal fixed property, the usable life of which will
be considered as 100 years, was written into canal expenses for
the fiscal year in a lump sum, as shown in Table No. 25. This






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CUAAL.


amount is based on a figure of annual amortization which at com-
pound interest at 3 per cent will amortize the investment in 100
years. Items which have an estimated life of less than 100 years
were depreciated in a lump sum at a figure which will provide funds
for maintaining similar property in a usable condition during the
entire life of the canal.
The equipment, with few exceptions, used in connection with the
operation of the canal was continued in the accounts at the values
placed on the same when it was transferred from the construction
accounts to the operation and maintenance accounts or at the values
paid for the same when subsequently purchased. Depreciation on
this equipment has been charged into the accounts regularly and a
reserve established for its replacement. Table No. 18 gives a list of
such equipment and the value at which it is carried on the books.
CANAL TRANSIT OPERATION.

The nature of canal transit operations is shown in the chart and
in Table 26. The essential feature is that all revenues (such as tolls..
taxes, etc.) are turned into the Treasury.
CANAL BUSINESS PROPERTY.

Business property is being depreciated on the basis of its estimated
life. Table No. 17 shows the fixed property which is being used in
connection with the business operations of the canal. In some cases
the book values of business property were not changed, but in the
case of the dry docks, and shops, docks, piers and wharves, coaling
plants, and employees' quarters rather large amounts are written off
to the defense capital account because large expenditures had been
made over and above the amounts which it would have been neces-
sary to invest in a plant sufficient for the commercial needs of the
canal.
In line with the instructions of the Secretary of War to the effect
that each business of the canal should make a showing for itself in
the nature of interest on the investment, all of the property-real,
personal, and mixed-used in connection with business operations is.
carried in one account but under separate headings, as shown in
Table No. 19.
No separate table has been prepared for the business equipment,
as that consists principally of machinery and tools which are not
carried in the accounts by name or number. Depreciation on the
equipment, both in business and canal use, was continued practi-
cally the same as before, and the depreciation reserves were retained
in the accounts.





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


CANAL BUSINESS OPERATIONS.
It has been a difficult matter to prepare a classification of accounts
to cover business operations in a commercial way which would com-
ply with the rules and regulations which must be followed in Govern-
ment accounting. It was necessary to divide the revenue into three
classes:
First. Those which affect strictly canal activities in the nature of
a reduction in the expenses.
Second. Those which affect the total expenses of canal operations.
Third. Those which are distinctly business revenues.
The first and last are repaid to appropriations and made available
for expenditure, and the second are covered into the Treasury as
miscellaneous receipts. In the new system only the last of these is
considered under the head "Canal business operations." The chart
and Table No. 27 indicate the nature of these operations.
While the changes in the capital account of the canal were made
as of December 31, 1921, and a number of business divisions started
operations under the new scheme as of January 1, 1922, the new
classification of accounts did not go into effect until April 1, 1922.
At that time the old accounts were written off and new accounts set
up. There was no small amount of difficulty in setting up the
accounts at the end of nine months of the fiscal year and making
the change back to July 1, 1921. However, it was undertaken, and
the accounts as they stand on June 30, 1922, are reasonably correct.
This change, however, has made it practically impossible to make
comparisons with the previous fiscal year, and the financial tables
are therefore prepared only for the fiscal year 1922. In such state-
ments as the statement of business expenses, revenues, and profit
and loss (see Table No. 27) it must be remembered that the divi-
sions have been operating under the scheme only a few months and
that while the rates in some cases were adjusted in January, others
were not adjusted until the first of July.
There is shown after each business unit what 3 per cent on the
investment would amount to as a comparison with the actual result,
but in many cases this is not a fair comparison, for the rates, at least
prior to January 1, 1922, were not fixed to produce 3 per cent on the
investment. A better showing will be made after a longer period of
operations under the new scheme.
INTEREST.
The treatment of interest in connection with the amortization and
depreciation reserves caused some complication in canal accounting.
The interest accrual will be entirely theoretical, since the canal does
not liLav( cont rl of the funds which would ordinarily be set aside by




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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 53

business concerns for accomplishing the purpose for which the charges
are made. The United States, through the repayment of amounts
covering such charges, is in a position to save the accrual of interest
on the funds so repaid; therefore, it seems entirely proper for the
canal to take credit for interest on funds theoretically set aside,
which funds it could and would set aside if it had control of the same.
CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS.

I believe that, all those who have examined into the financial
transactions of the canal will now agree that it is necessary to keep
the appropriations of The Panama Canal on a continuing basis and
that the reserves which have been built up should be continued as
a working fund.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


NOTES TO CHART OF ACCOUNTING SYSTEM FACING PRECEDING aAGE.

(1) The Panama Canal is capitalized at $275,179,298.25, on the proposition that
this represents its value as a commercial enterprise. Expenditures in excess of this
amount were written off partly as defense capital expenditures and partly in accord-
ance with established methods of depreciation. The question of whether the canal
pys3'" in the commercial sense will henceforth be answered according as the receipts
from all sources pay for all expenses (including depreciation) and in addition 3 per
cent (aloptel as rate of interest on Panama Canal bonds) on the capital investment.
See, however, (12).
(2) This series of accounts deals with funds that are accounted for in the canal
transit and business operations accounts. It is required by the Government regula-
tions concerning appropriations and returns by fiscal officers.
(3) Appropriations for The Panama Canal are male under the heads of "Main-
tenance ani op3rat.ion." "Sanitation," and "Civil government.'
(4) Includes revenues shown in (9).
(5) Accounts of fiscal officers.
(6) A-n)rirititia on canal fixed property, the usable life of which is considered as
103 years, was written into canal expenses for the fiscal year in a lump sum based
on a figure of annual amortization which at compound interest at 3 per cent will
amortize the investment in 100 years. Items which have an estimated life of less
than 103 years are depreciated in a lump sum at a figure which will provide funds
for maintaining similar property in a usable condition during the entire life of the
canal.
(7) Equipment depreciation is charged into operations at rates that represent
amortization on the basis of the usable life of each unit, with proper allowance for
salvage.
(8) Each of the units in this account derives some revenues from its operation, and
these? are usel to help pay the expenses. The balance of the expenses is paid from
appropriations made by Congress.
(9) Revenues from sources shown are covered direct into the Treasury of the United
States without use of any part of them in defray'ing expenses of the operations from
which they come.
(10) Fixed business property is amortized at rates that will provide for replace-
ment.
(11) Equipment depreciated as in (7).
(12) Ea2h separate business unit charges rates that will insure a 3 per cent return
on the investment. The only exception is public works in Panama and Colon, which
are limited to a 2 per cent return in accordance with a contract made with the Gov-
ernment of Panama.
(13) The telephone system is owned by the Panama Railroad, but operated by
The Panama Canal. The account, therefore, is carried for both organizations.
(14) The railroad proper sells only services, and its accounts may, therefore, be shown
as" Expenies" and Revenues." The business is conducted on the basis of amortiz-
ing the property and paying interest on the investment.
(15) In these business operations the railroad sells both services and commodities
and each unit has, therefore, its own revenue, expense, and profit-and-loss account.
The system is self-sustaining and also pays amortization charges and a small profit.
Separate units return a profit according as business fluctuates.








SECTION V.


FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.



This section contains financial statements of The Panama Canal
(Tables 1 to 53) and statistical statements of canal operations and
traffic (Tables 54 to 58). For convenience of cross reference the
original numbering of the financial statements quoted from the annual
report of the auditor of The Panama Canal has been preserved,
although a few of those statements have not been printed and others
have been summarized. A complete list of those statements, in-
cluding those omitted, follows:
Table No. 1. Trial and general balance sheets, June 30, 1922.
Table No. 2. Balance in appropriation and fund accounting ledger, June 30, 1922.
Table No. 3. Statement of appropriations by Congress.
Table No. 4. Status of authorized bond issue.
Table No. 5. Statement of appropriation receipts and disbursements for fiscal year
ended June 30, 1922.
Table No. 6. Payments by paymaster, fiscal year ending June 30, 1922.
Table No. 7. Detail of collections and disbursements for fiscal year ended June 30,
1922.
Table No. 8. Statement of collections repaid to appropriations and to individuals
and companies, and collections deposited to miscellaneous receipts during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1922.
Table No. 9. Statement of transactions in the collector's special deposit account
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1922.
Table No. 10. Balance of miscellaneous trust funds on deposit with collector, June
30, 1922.
Table No. 11. Statement of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 1922.
Table No. 12. Statement of accounts receivable registered during fiscal year ended
June 30, 1922.
Table No. 13. Comparative statement of accounts payable.
Table No. 14. Statement showing expenditures for canal construction (including
-capital additions) to December 31, 1921; the value of property set up in new accounts
"Canal transit property" and "Canal business property"; and amount charged to
"Defense capital expenditures. "
Table No. 15. Defense capital expenditures to June 30, 1922.
Table No. 16. Detail of canal fixed property to June 30, 1922.
Table No. 17. Fixed business property, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922.
Table No. 18. Detail of canal transit equipment to June 380, 1922.
Table No. 19. Business property by divisions.
Table No. 20. Property and equipment exchanged between The Panama Canal
and Panama Railroad Co.
Table No. 21. Status of public works in Cities of Panama and Colon, June 30, 1922.
Table No. 22. Detail of canal transit material and supplies.
Table No. 23. Receipts, issues, and transfers of stores and purchases charged to
-divisions during fiscal year 1922.
Table No. 24. Comparative statement of store balance, July 1, 1921. and July 1,
1922. This statement has not been printed. It will be found in the auditor's report.
5.5





56 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.

It shows stores valued at $8,515,384.99 on July 1, 1921; and stores valued at $5,510,-
333.21 on July 1, 1922.
Table No. 25. Statement of canal expenses, earnings, and net expenses.
Table No. 26. Detail of canal transit. revenues.
Table No. 27. Statement of business expenses, revenues, and profit and loss, fiscal
year 1922.
Table No. 2s. Comparison of expenses, revenues, and surplus to June 30, 1922.
Table No. 29. Pay-roll deductions from employees for rent, etc.
Table No. 30. Detail of reserves for depreciation.
Table No. :1l. Detail of reserve for repairs.
Tahle No. 32. Reserve for gratuity due employees.
Table No. 33. 'Detail of cost of production and distribution of electrical current.
Table No. 34. Detailed cost of production of water per 1,000 gallons.
Table No. 35. Dredging operations.
Table No. 36. Statement of money orders issued and paid by the Canal Zone and
Canal Zone orders paid by other administrations, fiscal years 1907 to 1922, inclusive.
Table N-.. 37. Postal service. Statement showing the money order business of the
Canal Zone postal service during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1922.
Table No. :>. Postal service. Statement of audited revenues, fiscal years 1907 to
1922, inclusive.
Table No. 39. Postal service. Staterieni of postal revenues, fiscal year ended June
30, 1922.
Table No. 40. Postal service. Statement of postal savings and deposit money order
transactions, tiieil year ended June 33, 1922.
Table No. 41. Statr-ni it. of income, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year
ended June .10, 1922. This table has not been printed. It will be found in the
auditor's report. The total income of the bureau was -,4$3,S48. 71
Table No. 42. St- neiient of expenses, bureau of clubs and playgrounds, fiscal year
ended June 30, 1922. This table has not been printed. It will be found in the
auditor's report. The total expe- ses of the bureau were -4422,.205.99.
Table No. 43. Summary of income and expenses. bureau of clubs and playgrounds.
fiscal year ended June 30, 1'922'.
Table No. 44. Bulreaii of clubs and playgrounds. balance sheet, June 30, 1922.
Table No. -I5. Commissary coupons issued, sold, and honored during the fiscal year,

Table No'. 46. Statement of amounts paid on account of employees' death and
injury claims. This table has not been printed. It will be found in the auditor's
report. Payments to June 30, 1922, aggregate $1,746,717.03.
Table No. 47. Statement of payments on account of employees' death and injury
claims duriine the liseal year 1922. This table has not been printed. It will be found
in the auditor's report. Payments totaled $64,563.23.
Table No. 48. Number of injuries, by extent of disability, for each division or de-
partment. This table has not been printed. It will be found in the auditor's report.
Total number of injuries was 1,740.
Table No. 49. Nature of nonfatal cases by department or division. This table
has not been printed. It will be found in the auditor's report. The number of
nonfatal cases was 1,736.
Table No. 50. Number of cases and compensation paid, classed by injuries, for
the fiscal year. and number of cases and amount of compensation paid during the
fiscal year on account of injuries occurring during the period September 7, 1916,
to June 30, 1921. This table has not been printed. It will be found in the auditor's
report. Payments in 1922 on account of 1,740 cases aggregated *16,525.37. Pay-
ments from Septembc-r 7, 1916. to June 30. 1921, on account of 81 cases aggregated
$46.413.44.






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


Table No. 51. Causes of injuries by departments and divisions. This table has
not been printed. It will be found in the auditor's report.
Table No. 52. Class of work being performed by employees at the time of injury,
by departments and divisions. This table has not been printed. It will be found
in the auditor's report.
Table No. 53.. Supply department, commissary branch, statement of cost of material
and supplies purchased and sold during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1922. This
table has not been printed. It will be found in the auditor's report.
Table No. 5-1. Summary of commercial traffic through The Panama Canal during
the fiscal year 1922 and since its opening to commercial trallic.
Table No. 55. Number of commercial vessels of various nationalities passing through
The Panama Canal 1915-1922.
Table No. 56-A. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing through
The Panama Canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific during the fiscal year 1922.
Table No. 56-B. Origin and destination of all commercial cargo passing tlhrougli
The Panama Canal from Pacific to the Atlantic during the fiscal year 1922.
Table No. 57-A. Number of commercial vessels by nationality passing through
The Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 1922, by fiscal years.
Table No. 57-B. Tons of cargo carried by commercial vessels passing through Tlhe
Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 1922. by fiscal years.
Table No. 57-C0. The Panama Canal net tonnage of vessels by nationalities passing
through The Panama Canal from its opening to June 30, 1922, by fiscal years.
Table No. 58. Statement showing the number of vessels, The Panama Canal net
tonnage, tolls assessed, and tons of cargo carried by vessels of the principal nations
passing through The Panama Canal during the first eight years of its operation.

TABLE No. 1.-Trial balance sheet June 30, 1922.


DEBITS.
Canal fixed property ............ .23),3 1.91<.30
Canal equipnment.................. 4,4S:1,672.27
Cash due '1 reasur........... ..... 125,269. 96
Cash working .................. 2, 106, 225. 12
Accounts rer.eiable............... 1,266, 23.2
Business property ................ 2S, 700, 129. 24
Stores............................ 4,ti 167. 5
Unite I States Treasury .......... 9,529. 137. 57
Unclassi 'ed canal e'penlitures.... 17, 9.56. 41
Canal c penses .................. 10, 407, 74. 2.13
Business expenses ............... 7,423,968.41
Canal earnings I crodi t accou nt).... 12,488,766.60
Totai. ...................... 301,561,384.72


CREDITS.
Canal capital......................
Business capital...................
Acco ints paa 1ie. ..............
Unclassi ie I Lanal '.redits.......
Amorti ation.....................
Dep'e *iiron n .............. .
Repair reserves...................
G;rua ity resr'-es...............
Canal rp er'e.; ....................
Business revenues.................
Business surplus.................


General balance sheet June 30, 192?.


ASSETS.
Canal fixed property.............
Canal equipment.................
Cash due Treasury.................
Cash working ....................
Accounts receivable .............
Bu siness property.............
Stores........................
United States Treasury...........
Unclassified ranal e"ipenditures....


123. 331.918.30
4, 4w3, 672.27
125, 26q.96
2, 106f, 2'. 12
1.266.3123. 2;
2,4,7fo0, 129.24
4,1)17, 167.54
9,529, 137.57
17,9.5i.40


Total.................. ..... 26,2 ., 39R. 68
'Credit.


LIABILITIES.
Canal capital...................... 5246, 41. 99. 1
liLirin.-;, capital................... 2, 7t0, 30S. 41
A.c.v nt l pi able ................. 1,277,.3.6
Un>la-si f I canal credits.......... 2.2 14 37
Amorti ation...................... 3)0. ).O00
1 epre nation .................... 3, 14. ,192. 96
Rprinir reserves .................... 940,929. 13
';rat' rtv reserves........... .. 431, 'i;. 90
Canal rpls ....................3, 461, 574.
Pisiiness surpluis.................. 1,423,568.70
Total..................... 2W1, 21-, 39N.68


The balance sheet, Table No. 1, is entirely different from the one in the last annual report. The items
which were charged off as natiohnl defense e.spen litures an which appear in the halince sheet last year,
are omittel this vear. In the new bl in-e sheet I'e ein l canit-l account and the business cainital account
have ta'cen the place of tie oil account Apnrpriiti >ns by Cxn-rass." The anorapriltian fun Is which
have not yet been requisitions I by fiscal o Ticers, I)ut w tlii are subject to requisition, are no 1Ineer carried
in the general balin"e sheet but now aoonir in the t'Ilpe fIr apprapriatihns an3 funis accounting. The
canal capital account was use I as the hilancing account when the books were opened arter setting up the
account with the United States Treasury, representing the excess deposits over withdrawals as of April 1,
1922.


i-' 16,418,989. 81
2, 760,308.44
1,277,813.68
2,214.37
350,000.00
3,146,192.96
901)929. 13
4A1l, s) 190
II. '.1 r )92. 32
7. 6-41.770. 2.'
1, 15. 766. 14,


Total....................... 301,51, .384.72







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


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REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 3.-Statement of approprialions by Congress.


Canal construction appropriate ions................................ .. ..................... $37, 069.10 .11
(For detail see annual report for 1920 and prior.)
Annual payments to Republic of Panama..................................... .... 2.70. 000. 00
Act of-
Mar. 4, 1913 ....................................................... $250,000.00
A.pr. 6, 1914......... ... .......... ............... ..... ... ...... 250,000. 00
lan. 2., 1911 ........... .... ...................... 2.30, 000.00
Feb. .91 ....................... .............................. 250,000. 00
July 1, 191. ........ ........ ................... ...... ............. 230.000.00
Mar. 3, 1917........................ ......................... ... .. .50, 00.00
.Apr 1U.. 1 14 ... ..... ... ...... .................. .............. 27)0, 000.00
Apr. 1i 190 ..................... ........ ............................ 250,000.00
June 4, P1921 .............. .... ............. ....... ......... .... 2 0, O. 00
ar. 2. 1921 .... ....................... ............................. 250.000.00
June 1. 1922' ................. .......... .... ................... 250, 000.00
Uiperat ion and maintenanc'e........ .. .......................................... b2,3 1 S, :303.94


Maintenance
and
operation.



Act of-
Mar. 3,1915.......... ..... S.. ,?0. 000.00
July 1, 1916................ I 5,750,000.00
June 12, 1917.................. 9,000,000.00
July 12, 1917................... ..............
June 4, 1918.................... .............
July 1, 1918.................... 9,000,000.00
July 3, 1918........... ..... ..............
Mar. 1, 1919............. ..............
July 19, 1919................. 7,547,939.00
Nov. 4, 1919................... ..............
May 29, 1920................ .............
June 5.1920................... 7,531,851.00
Mar. 1, 1921.................. ..............
Mar. 4,1921................. 7,250,000.00


Less amount transferred to surplus
fund... ....... .. ..............

Total........................ 51,269,790.00

Appropriation for fiscal year 1923:
Act of June "0, 1922 ......... 2, 659,4.34. (00


Sanitation,
Canal Zone.




$700,000.00
700,000.00
700,000.00
..............'
150,000.00
900,000.00
..............

850,000.00
..............


850,000.00

850,000.00

5, 700,000. 011

..............


Civil gov-
ernme nnt,
Panarn.i
Canal, Canal
Zone.


I nCreaQV of
compenqa-
tion.
Panama
Canal.


$540, 000.00 r.............
600,0 W. 00 ............
700,000.00 ............
.............. 510. 006. 22
.............. ............
750, 000. 00 ..... ..
.............. 16.000.00
.............. 35.01 .33
702,000.00 ............
150,000.00 . ......
.............. 34,500.00
900,0.000.00 ...........
24,670.00 ............
900,000.00 ............

5,266.670.00 1 95,524. 55

.............. 3, 67 61


5,700,000.00 5,266,670.00


525, 000. 00


91,845.94


F F--


030,1000.00 1. .. .....


Total





S6.440.000.00
7,050,000.00
10, 400. 000. 00
10, 006. 22
1.50,000.00
10,650, 000.00
16,0 O)0.00
315. 01.33
9,099, 939. 00
130, 000. 00
34, 500.00
9,2 1.,' 1.00O
24,670.00
9,.00,I0O. 00

62, 341, 9y4. 55

3,678.61


62,33i,305. 94


4,114,434.00


' TABLE No. 4.-Status of authorized bond issue.


Authorized bond issue................................................................ 375,200,9.0 1
Appropriated for canal construction................................... 3387,069,108.31
Less amount exempted by law:
( oUiers Ulysses and Achilles......................... S, 9s5, V'52. 29
Coal hirgr.s Mamei and Darien........................ 2, 295,746.57
Dock No. 6, Cristobal................................ 2,093,190.00
Equippini *'olliers L'Isfs and A chillei.................. 250,000.00
I'Paointm tanks, c(Uiers Ulysses and Achilles............. 44,279.76
Repairs to steamships A con and Cristobal............. 720,000.00
Expended for operation and maintenance of canal...... 4,2?', 159. 00
Stock of m.iterral and supplies for operation and main-
tenance of canal.. ............................. 2, 22.., 000.00
-13,902,927.f 2
373, 1ic. 1s0. 1 .9

Balance.............................................................. ...... 2,034,719.31
A .ipriised value A riii ilun leLea(iun building in he rit y of Panama. exempt fron0.h:arge to
mnd n i..sue, act Jul.y 1. I9it.... ......................................................... 22,256. 00

1.1I inee available for appropriation withinlimit of cost of canal and authorized bond
issue.................................................................. 2,056,975.31

NOTE.-NO statement has been iprepoirrld showing the e.\xpi-nlitures of these funds, as the tablein list
year's annual report is complete wiih tIli' exception of a snilml amountof e.nIstruction dredginc, wbhrh
was perfr.ormed luring the fiscal year 1922.


)I ( jI







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 5.-Statement of Uppropriation receipts and disbursements for fiscal year
ended June AJ), 1/92.


iCash balance. Appropria- -
July 1, l21. tions.


Construction appropriations:
Canal connecting AtlantiL
and Pacific Oceans........
Panama Canal fund.......
Construction and equipment,
Panama Canal.........
Private act, Feb. 18, 1913,
Oscar F. Lackey.........

Total construction.... ... .

Operation and maintenance ap-
propriations:
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal.............
Sanitation, Canal Zone,
Panama Canal............
Civil government, Panama
Canal and Canal Zone......
Increase of compensation....

Total operation and main-
tenance..................


$29,102.76
131,992.08

(.92,047.23

1,500.00


I.... ....


854,642.07 .............. .............. .............. $54,42.07



5,007,888.68 $7,250,000.00 $9,9. .2, 8.. 50 $748,467.95 22,95 ,945.13
270, .25. 57 850,000.00 835,490.49 .............. 1,95, 11.06

147,122.11 900,000.00 74,477.95 .............. 1,121,600.06
5,725.71 21,500.00 ............................... 27,225.71


5,431,362.07


9,021,500.00 110,862,556.94


748,467.95


Construction appropriations:
Canal connecting Atlantic and
Pacific Oceans.. .............
Panama Canal fund...............
Construction and equipment,
Panama Canal.................
Private act, Feb. 18, 1913, Oscar F.
Lackey.........................

Total construction.............

Operation and maintenance appropria-
tions:
Maintenance and operation,
Panama Canal...................
Sanitation, Canal Zone, Panama
Canal .......................
Civil government, Panama Canal
and Canal Zone.................
Increase of compensation...........

Total operation and maintenance.


Expenditures.


5"%. 34

9,214.24


$1,113. 10

31S, 325. 92


$1,113.10
88. 34

367,540. I,


$27,989.66
131,903.74

324,507.07

1,500.00


9,302.58 359,439.02 368,741.60 485,900.47



13,093,840.40 ............... 13,093,840.40 9,.865,104.73

1,171,740.42 212,791.57 1, 3M, 531.99 571,584.07
876,213.95 101,789.35 978,003.30 143,596.76
23,401.25 ................ 23,401.25 3,824.46


Total.


$29,102.76
131,992.08
692,047.23

1,500.00


26,063,886.96


UIPop'. Il1.Ilts.


1


I


...... ......


15,165,196.02


314,580.92


15,479,770.94


10,584,110.02






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 6.-Pnymnent. made 'ih fiscal oflicefr.. ji.col Iur fnded June *>0( .922.1

I'iuyments by Iuuyinasler:
I'anama CaiiIul-
Gold rolls................................................................. ti, 247,008. 7x
Silver rolls.................................................................. 770, 800. ti
Vouchers................................................. ....... .................... 4,283,649.69
Totul .................................... ....................................... 11.301,459.12
Panama Railroad-
Palv rolls................................................. ................., 094,40. 63
Vouchers........................................................ ........ 4,981, 153.65

Total .................................................................. 8,175,562.28
Grand total ................................................................. 22,377,020.40
Payments by disbursing clerk..................................................... ...... .2,092.806.57
Payments by collector:
Clubhouse funds........... .................................................. 332, 5.8. 1.
Trust funds......................................................................... 9..678. 50
Poltal savings funds ...................................................... ..... 250.00
Money-order funds........................................................... .. 1,679,061.09
Interest...................... ........ ............................................ 34,149.2-1

Total.................................................. ........ ........ ..... 2,055,696.97

1 This table is summarized. Figures are given in greater detail in table of same number in annual re-
port of accounting department.

TABLE No. 7.-Detail of collections and disbursements for fisel year ended June 30, 19&2.


Cash disbursements:
Panama Canal fund.........
Construction and eq uipment,
Panama Canal..............
Maintenance anld op.-ration..
Sanitation, Canal Zo.II,
Panama Canal............
Civil government............
Increase of compensation....
Panama fortifications........


TeDi-burniiwg
Treasurer. clerk.



..............I $88.43

$9,214.24 ..............
562, 087. 74 1, 980, 374. 58


Paymaster.


r
Collector.


S9,987, 1ii6.88 4, 211.20


12,887.46 73,914.38 1,084,938.58 ..............
3,949.21 17, 544.92 854,719.82 ..............
2,516.90 .-'.1, N '4. ..) ..............................
1,262.52 ........... ............. ..............
*01. 01>. '17 2.l''. a llt.M 11 1. 'Y .2 5 ."64.211.20


Disbursements account individ-
uals and companies and other
than from appropriar inn ............................... 2,374,634.59
.591. 91S.07 2.092, 03. 66 1 4. i0 l, .l:-9. h7

Collections:
Maintenance and operation.. 2,331,258.44 681,306.78 912.06
sanitation, Canal Zone,
Panama Canal............. 108,706.84 2,928.76 14.50
Civil government, Panama
Canal and Canal Zone..... l, .N2. i :. 1:.24 I.

2, 441, 817.68 689.623. 78 927.56
JMiscellaneous receipts and indi-
viduals and companies......... .............. 15,975.00 ..............

S2,441, 817.68 705, 593.78 927.56


4,14. 50J. 54
4.712.714.74

6,939,111.22

723, in. i9


Total.



$88.43
9,214.24
1:. 093, 840.40

1,171,740.42
A76,21'. 95
23,401.25
1,262.52
1. 175,.761.21

h, 523, 13s. 13
21.698,899.34

9.952,588. 50

835, 490.49


7,72.26.3.1 74,477.9.5
7,730, 187.92 1I, '62, 556. 94
11, 477,944. 4h 11, 493,919,48

19,208,132.40 22.. :.56.46.. 42








REPORT OF GOVERNOR) (F THE PANA.A <.\N.\1..


TABLE No. 8.- ialtemein ofq collection repaid to appropriations and to iii-divi'dlaIl.% and
rompanie.s. and rollretion. deprnilited to miscellaneous receipts dlir;,n the tiwa'l uenr
199-?.1

To maintenan'.-e and oupertiil ..................................... $. i4.<'. 111.22
By electrical division...... ...-.-.--. .................... . ... .. 7. '20
By municipal engineering divi-min . ......... ...... ..................- ....... 4W .i. 11-,rt
By dredging division... .................................................. 17,573.88
By m technical division. .. .................... ............... ............... 1, 41, .9. .
By m arine division.......... . ......... .................................. ...... 63 .691. 13
By quartermaster. -.......... .............-............. _-... .............- 2.226,211.4s
By subsistence division . .. .. . .... .... ... .. .. .. ... ... ... ............. 264, 164.6
By fortifi sions division. .......................................... .. .. 1, 3.2
By other divisions. ................................. ................. 2,96't. 14
By executive department .. .......................... 136,4.05
By accounting depart meni ... . ....................................... ............ 250, 670.05
By rentals credited to10 maintenance and operation.......................................... 49,986.41
By various collection, credited to maintenance and operation .............-............... 42f6, 51.. 33
To health department isa ri I In) ............................................. 72:I, W40 .3
By miscellaneous collect ion ..... .................................................... 721, 41 .19
Tocivil government..... .. ...:.................. ................. $67,236.31
By miscellaneotiz collection .. ... .. ................................ ... .... ... .-11.7 1. i 31
To miscellaneotis rcreipt. ..................................... $11,477,312.91
By tolls .............. ... .. ... .......... .------..... .. 11, 198,W s. 51
By licenses and ra-s...... ................................................. 20,176.02
By court fees and fines. ................................. ............. 21,732.10
By postal receipts. ......... .. ............ .............................. ....... 117,047.24
By water Ituntals. Panama. ......... ................... ..... .............., 188.30
By water rentals. Colon .. ............................... ......... 49,412.70
By interest on bank balanice.... ................ ................. ................ ...... 2. 000. 00
By credit due canal construction ariiiits................... ................................ 3,716.00
By miscellane-nzs ic.zonlot., pound il-c-, etc.)........................... ............... 1,032.04
To individuals and com panies... ................-------------...............--------- ............. $631.57
By paymaster, various individual- !and companies..................................... 604.22
By paymaster, Panama R. R. i"iinmini"-ary books.......................................... 17.35
By Canal Zone trust fL nd . .... ... .................... ........................ 10.00

RECAPITULATION.

Maintenance and operation, Panama Canal................................................. 6, 939,111. 22
Sanitation, Panama Canal and Canal Zon ...................................................... 723, 40.39
I'ivil government, Panama Canil andl Catal Zone........................................... 7.236. It

Total repayment to 'ai.propriations....... ........ ............................... 7,7.1. 187.92
Miscellaneous reeipt.. .. .................. .....11,477,312.91
Individuals and com ani .. ............................................................... 31.57
Total collect in.... ..... .. i,'2 -.132.40

'This tale is .ummarized. FiPIt a;r. ci:i 1 itn gratr.r Ictaili in it1- -Jf imn n siirir :nnirl riiport
of accounting departi ini.

TABLE NO. 9.-Stt'frialt of Irals arti, in tht rfilltt ir ./ir p,. Ail it, /b pi' i-rei i I/ho i if/
the iscall jilr' I Idevl/ .J -l. I;.'.)


In the United Stati-e.


In i hr Ilihmin-.


On hand July 1. 1921 ... . ... .. ..... .... .1. V. . l. . 44 .
Deposits during the vear ....... ........... ., 62. 6. 25 ........ 790.624 7 . .... ... ..
Panama Canal bills applied............. ... ..... t471. 014. . . 12. 2'6. -6:3. 4,
Pavwnts to individrl and companies .. .. ...149, h.79. ..... 1.401, 42. 7.
Refunds............... ............... ....... 4%,7uJS.7 99,2-17. .:
On hand J.Ine 3n, 1922 . . ..3 3.'9 33 7.6 .... . .199,070. 1
Total ......................-..........- 7 7. 524 27, 707.:242.. 25 16 ., :,0%N ill N., 1G,30s. 01

1 This table is -sInmarized. Figure" are ci6en in greater detail in table of ,.ini nmiiinlir in annual r ionri
of accounting depart ment.
I Includes the Panama R. R. ('A-. .ll America C('ales i .lu. and other individuals :;inl companies.

TABLF No. 10. -Rrllanres of rniscellanrottq trust funds on deposit a* rh ':zlli-elcr J.11111
.30, 1922.
Postal savings funds................ .... ......................................... ... S.MA. li
Money-order funds.... ....... ....................................... ..7.... .. 7s. tl 12
Trust funds........... ............... .... ................................... 6,360. 7t.
Clubhouse funds.......................... ... .................................... ... lo),35.-. 21
Interest.................... .. .. ........................................ 7 669.2
Treasury savings certificates funds.............. ................................. 1. 50. 1.1S.
Tota.e........... ........... .......................................... 1,033, 197 31







4 REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 11.-Statement n)f audited paiq rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 192R.


Operation and maintenance:
Executive office-
Executive................. ..............
Record...................... .............
Personnel........... ........................
Corre -poldence ........ ......... ......... ....
Property.........................................
Statistic ................. ...................
General...................... ..........
Pay rolls. ............................. ........
Shipping cornniioner.......... ................
Motor car' ................................
Clubs and playgrounds....... . . ......

Total, executive office...... .

Engineer of maintenance:
Lock operation-


Total.




323,257.67
75,560.68
33,398.97
39,125.23 ,
31,202.36
20,812.73
22, 893.75
79, 465.47 ,
33,300.34
3, 860.99
165,815.40


Salaries.



323, 257.67
75,324.62
33,398. 97
39,092 73
31,202.36
20,812.73
22,893.75
79,465.47
33,300.34
1,892.95
146,498.09


530, 693 59 507, 139.68


Atlantic.............................................. 290,627.25
Pacific.............................................. 558,607.84
Electrical.............................................. 490,750.62
Dredging................................................. 895,687.06
1Municipal ninecring...................................... 599,657.56
Office rnCgIeecr ............................................ 32,452.91
Met eorology and hydrography......................... 30, 539.65
Surveys........................................... 38,376 SO
a;attun Dam and back fill................................ 4). 2A0. 69

Total, engineer of maintenance........................ 2,976, 90. 38

Marine di. iion:
Office.................................................... 10,258.01
Port captain-
Balboa.......... ............................. 388, 958.96
Cristobal ........ ......................... 341,722.77
Lighthouse division.................................... 137,857.86

Total, marine division.................... .............. S78,797. 59

Mechanical division:
Balboa.... .......... ............................1,238,112.08
Cristobal ................................................ 373,992.95

Total, mechanical division............................... 1,612,105.03

Supply department:
Quartermaster-
Office................................................. 37,643.09
Storehouses..................................... ......... 246, 81. 27
District quartermaster................................. 354,967.98
Printing plant..................................... 68,237. 50
Fuel-oil plants.......................................1 72,473.43
Constructing quartermaster........................... 292, 919. 16
Motor-car repair shop.................................i 20, 907. 25
Motor transportation................................. 83,97. 40

Total, quartermaster..................................1, 1,7s, OOS. Os
Subsistence.......... .............................. 144,056.78

Total, quartermaster and subsistence ................... 1,322,064.86

Accounting-
Auditor ............................................. 355,372.59
Pa\mnastoer........................................... 38,522.31
collector............................................. 41,701.34

Total accounting ................................... 435,596.24

ForvliicaTions ....................................... 95S, 046.25
Injury and death-
Old act.............................................. 631.21
New act.............................................. 63,9.32. 02

Total, operation and maintenance.................. 0,s, S847. 17


civil government
Civil allairs......................... ...................
I'osts................. ........... ...... ..... .. .............
Police and prisons........................................
Fire protection.................................. .........
Schools..... ................................... .....
District court.......... ......... .........................


37, -19.02
101,910.20
310,657.68
92,760.12
165,200. R2
20, 149.f 4


86,441.86
150,S94 39
200, 6N7.07
235,085 35
2-24,725.35
31,6N4- 2-
28, 186.71
24,797.30
9,358 49

992,060.80


Wages.


5236.06

32.50




3,968.04
19,317.31

23,553.91


204, 18. 39
407,713.45
290,063.55
660,601 71
374.932.21
768.63
2,352.94
1:3.570.50
30,722. 20

1,984,919.58


10,25S 01 1...........


191, S97 48
193,319.02
42,145 25

436,619.76

244,072.43
48,497.56


292,569 99


198,061.48
148,403.75
95,712.60

442,177. 83

994,039.65
325, 495.39


1,319,535.04


37,643.09 ..............
173,996.25 72, 885. 02
165,589.78 189,378.20
22, 390. 20 45,847.30
15,440.75 57,032.68
64, b56.05 228,063.11
7,018.42 13,888.83
7,068. 82 76,909. 5

494,003.36 684,004.72
73,216.25 70,840.53

567,219.61 754,845.25

355,362.92 9.67
3A,522.31 ............
41,701.34 ..............

435,586.57 9.67

77,017.14 191,029.11


1,31.399 1


631.21
62,397.03


3,309, 74S. 34 4,779,098.63

37, 89.02 .............
101,910.20 .............
310,657. 8h ..............
92,760.12 ......... ..
165,200.82 .......... .
20,149.64 .







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE NO. 11.-StatenMent of audited pay rolls on Isthmus during fiscal year 1922-
Continued.


Total. Salaries.


Wages.


Civil government-Continued.
IDistrict attorney......... ............................... $10,414.85 $10,414.85 ....
Marshal .......... .......................... 7,400.00 7,400.00 ..............
Magistrate court .................................- .... 14,063.78 14,063.78 ...........
Total, civil government ........................................... 760,176.11 760.176.11 ............


Sanitation:
Office ......... .................. .... ........
Medical store....................... ..............---
Ancon Hospital..........................................
Colon Hospital ........ ...............................
Santo Tomas Hospital..............................
Palo Seco Leper Asylum.............................
Dispensaries........................... ......
Quarantine-
(ffice......... ..........
Balboa.. ........................ .................. ...
Cristobal .................................. -------
Bocas del Toro......................................

Total, quarantine. .......................--....

Corozal Farm.................................... .......
Corozal Asylum ............................. ...........
Health office-
Panama ...................................
Colon. .......................................................
Zone sanitation......................... .... .... ......-------
Total, sanitation ...................................------


Grand total....


....................................... 19,731,338.82


11,425.57 11,425.57
5,969.77 5,690.47
357,011.81 298,729.09
56,017.08 49,126.07
13,474.34 13,474.34
17,062.51 7,839.36
40,151.79 39.356.54

739.17 739.17
19, l19. 34 16,605.69
26, 16R.3Y 22,692.39
1,577.07 1,577.07


$279.30
58,282.72
6,891.01

9,223.15
,02. 2.


3,213.65
3,474.00
..............


48,301.97 41,614.32 6,687.65
13,927.81 3,834.63 10,093.18
54,113.38 44,631.03 9,482.35

115,641.26 35,514.17 90,127.09
67, 29. 72 27, 454. 50 39, .35.22
81.921.53 21, 919.20 60,002.33

882,315.54 600,609.29 281,706.25


4,670,533.94


5,060,804.88


TABLE No. 12.--Statement of accounts receivable registered during the fiscal Yiear ended
June 30, 192!.'
Number of bills registered....... ................ .. .............. .... ............ 26, 4t."
Total ............................................ ................. ..............5 20,531,132.11
Against the Panama Railroad.................................................................... 2, 144,015.6
Against the Republic of Panama......... ........................................ 308,055. 016
Against other departments of the United States.......................................... 1,12,372. 71
Against steamship companies.............................................................. 1,688,195.19
Against other individuals and companies................................. ............ 1,516, 057. 01
Trust funds.......................................................... 1, 864,427.99
Tolls ..................................................... ......... ...................... ,198,008.1
Repay to appropriations ...........................................-.. ...-.......--.- 7,445,201.18

i This table is summarized. Figures are given in greater detail in table of same number in annual report
of accounting department.

TABLE No. 13.-Comin parative statement of accounts payable.


United States invoices and ocean freight....................... ...
Isthmus vouchers .................................. ...........
Current pay rolls.....................................................
Unpaid salaries and wages..............................................
Drums, carboys, and reels................................
Treasury settlements in suspense..................................
Total.......................................


Fiscal year Fiscal year
1921. 1922.


"S39,609.59
547,407.84
1,048,513.33
262,451.75


2,697,882.51


5185,166.10
100,015.06
739,335.77
252 ,930. 16
1 1,810.53
2,177.12


1,277,813.68


I Credit.


I


--- -


I ----


i







tjb REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No 14.-Statement showing expenditiuitsfor canal construction including capital
additions) to December 3.1. 1931; the value of property set up in new accounts "Canal .
transit property'" and Canal business property" in December, 1921. accounts, and
amount charged to Drfcens capital expenditures."


Canal construction:
Prism excavation-
Gatun to sea..................
Gatun to Pedro Miguel.........
Pedro Miguel to sea.............
Gatun Locks..... ..............
Pedro Mi guel Locks...............
Miraflores Locks..................
Gatun Spillway.................
Miraflores Spillway and East Dam.
cGatun-Mindi Levee...............
Gatun Dam.......................
Trinidad River Dam...............
Pedro Mig uel Dams...............
Mirafnores \\'est Dam...............
La Boca Locks and Dams (aban-
doned i...........................
Colon East Breakwater.........
Colon West Breakwater.........
Naos Island Breakwater...........
Aids to navigate ion................
Floatiniii -a son...................
Anxiliary works:
Hydroelectric power plant, Gatun..
Steam electric power plant, Mira-
flores.............................
Power tra i ismision system.......
Coaling station-
Balboa........................
Cristobal......................
Fuel-oil plant-
Balboa......................
Cristobal......................
Dry dock-
Balboa......................
Cristobal.......................
Docks, piers, and wharves-
Balboa........................
Cristobal.....................
Entrance basin, Balboa...........
Inner harbor-
Balboa........................
Cristobal......................
Preparatory work,Balboa terminals.
Panama water-supply system......
Colon water-supply system.........
Other zone water-supply systems...
Zone sewage systems............
Zon i- roadways....................
Fluviographs.................
Permanent town site-
Ancon-Balboa.................
La Boca .......................
Red Tank.....................
Pedro Mipueel .................
Gatun......................
Cristobal....................
Sanitary fills......................
Sanitary ditches...................
Playgrounds.......................
lluildings:
Administration, Balboa Heights...
District court and law department
office, Anon....................
Shop and store office. Balboa.......
Terminal office building, Balboa...
Shops-
Balboa.........................
Cristotal... ................... .
Storehouses ........................
Hotels and mess halls..............
Quarters-
Gold...........................
Silver........................
Misce-llaneous buildings ............
Ancon Hospital............ ...
Colon Hospital....................
Dispensaries...................
Asylums........................


Ledger
balances
Dec. 31, 1921.




$11,874, 182.88
107,067, 900.67
18,400,625.05
35,965,982.05
15,988,049.30
23, 285,399. 23
4, OS 1,516.,41
1, 320,389.95
140,635.01
9,823, 140.60
66,385.47
431,703.66
1,159,789.78

748,054.48
3,771,111.74
4,275,316.42
1,015,649.78
920,747.54
347, 868. 15


Canal transit
properly.




$11, 636,700.00
104,92i, 342.)00
18,032,612.00
34,762,029.00
15,349,450.00
22 418,744.00
I3,98 199. 00
1,231,256.00
137, 22. 00
9,626,678.00
65,057.00
423,070.00
1,136,594.00

...............

4, 189, 810.00
y9.9, 337. 00
-27, 359. 00
(2r, 996. ( (


1, 667, 093.96 ..............

307, 862.44 ... .........
4,394, 051.62 90,490.00
2,284, 568.35 .............
3,679,797.59.

458,860.58 ................
5(60, 457.59 ................

3,376,647.49 ...............
73,475.51 .............

3,132,102.71 .............
2,201.979.74 .............
49, 480.39 ................


3,265,207.04
237,101.43
1, 808,921.65
1,765,222.58
585,642.89
723,428.14
498,284.69
1, 586,622.89
13,709.02

596, 596.73
123, 206. 13
2,614.43
96,797.08
1,776.56
.354,827.53
636,732.11
199,706.53
54,474.41

1,224,847.51

130,892.39
238, 553.94
80,634.42

3,997,760.32
206,647.93
1,075,934.74
574,731.87

4,803,110.90G
890, 266.7-14
815, 233.48
1, 741, :300. 80
2.55,506.90
161, 213. 97
252,786.54


200,000.00
978,070.00
S in0, 22.00


................
................
................
................
................
40.572.00


Canal business I D f
property. capital
expenditure.


................I
.................
................I
................
................
. . . . . .
.................

................

.................
.... . .. .
................
................
................
................
................
................





..........,......


5237, 4!,2. 8S
2.141,358.67
368,013.05
1,203,953.05
638,599.30
Q67,655.23
99,317.86
Q9, 133.9.r
2,813.01
196,462.60
1, 32A.47
s, 633. 66
23,195.7,

748,05 4.41,
3,771,111.74
5. 506. 42
20,312.7.s
93, 3-S. 31
20, 872. 1


l1, b67, 093. 9, ...............

307, 862. 44 .
4, 293, 506. 16 10,05. 41

... ........ 2,2 3
500,0.00 3,179,797.59

458, W0. 58 ...............
560,457. 9 ..............

.... ............ 3, 376,647.49
51 000.00 23,475.51

1, 16s, 200.26 1,963,902.45
2,2n1,979.74 ................
................ 489,480.39

................ 3,263,207.04
........ ... .. 2237,101.43
................ 1, 808,921.65
1,724,525,.00 40,697.58
5S5,642. 89 . ..........
561, .23. 11 i 159,190.03
................! 298,284.69
................ 608,552.89
.............. 3,427.02


918,636.00 1................

65,446.00 ................
77,409............00... ..........
77,409.00 ................


................

300,000.00



76,416.00
1,303,975. 00
191,630.00
120,910.00
126,393. 00


202,500.00

300,000.00
335,322.00

3,435,076.00
619,231.00
219,746.00


.396,596.73
123,206.13
2,614.43
96,797.08
1,776.56
3:54, 827. 53
636,732.11
199,706.53
13,902.41

306,211.51

65,446.39
238,553.94
3,225.42

3, 795,260.32
206,647.93
476, 934.74
239,409.87

1,368,034.96
271,035.74
520, 071.48
435,325.80
63,876.90
40,303.97
126,393.54


................
................
................

................
... .. ... .. ..
. .. . . . .







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 14.-Statement showing ierpcnditirrs for canal constr'ctiin (including -aupital
additions) to December .31, 1921; the i aluie of piroprtyi set up in new accounts Canal
transit property'" and Canal business property" in December, 1921, accounts, and
amount charged to 'DifEnse rcapital expendiitres"'--t'ontinued.


Bluildmtns-Colntinued.
Quarantine stations. ..............
Storehouses, health.................
Miscellaneous buildings. health.....
Schoolhouses......................
Post offices........................
Courthouses, police and tire sta- ,
tions, etc........................
Real estate:
Canal construction and flooded
areas..........................
Auxiliary works and Ibuildings.....
Depopulation of Canal Zone........
Joint land commission expenses....
Miscellaneous
Purchase from New Panama Canal
Co..............................
Investment. Panama R. R. stock..
Concession from Republic of Pan-
ama .......... ........ ..........
Relocation of Panama R. R........
Presentation of launch Louise to
French Government............
Canal protection, 1917-18...........

Grand total...................


Ledger
balances
Dec.31 :i. 1921.


.80, .,. 48
2), 471. 1.)
240,407. 94
492. 271. 23
35, 9'2. 62

101,927.50


891,707.06
146, 2S.94
2,1.36..8i9.631
.156,001i. 61


38,720,190.16
13., slS.24

10,000,000.00
9,800,626.46

13,500.00
25,236.79


Canal transit
proper y.


$40,129.00
22,924.00
3.i, 3. 00
443,044.00
N 995. 00

50,964.00




................


355,734,673.75 235,171,123.00


Canal business
property% .


................
................
75,000oo.00



---------................ --
................

................


......... . .
................
.......... I. .
................


Defense
capital
expenditun-


.40,T124. I
2,547. 1.
129, S24. 94
49,227.2.1
26, 9,7. A2

'A, 91. .150


891,707.06
1460,2.5T. 94
2,336,889.63
356,006.61
*


................ 38,720,190.16
155,818.24
................ 10,000.000.00
........... 9,800,626.46

...... 13,5no. 00
................ 25, 236.79

19.269,241.73 101,294,309.02


TABLE No. 15.-Defense capital expenditures to June 30, 1922.


]'isin Ixf-avation-
(1:ittin to sea...................
';atun to Pe'lro lig.i1 .......
Pedro Miguel to sea............
catun Looks.......................
Pedro Miruel Los................
.Miraflores Lo-ks.......... .......
Gatun Spillvway ................
.tiraflores Spillv.-ay andl Easr Dam..
Giatun-Mindi Levee .......
ratun fam..........
Trinidad River Dam..............
Pedro Miruel imns..............
Miraflores West Dam..............
La Boca Loe;s and Dams (aban-
donrd)............................
Colon East Breakwater............
Colon West Breakwater..........
Naos Island Breakwater... .......
Aids to navigation .................
FIoatins E-aisson .......... ........
Power-transmission system.......
Coaline station-
Balboa..........................
Cristobal......................
Drv dock-
Balboa......................
Cristobal............ ..
Do'-ks, piers, and wharves-
Balboa ................ .......
Cristobal ........................
Entrance basin, Bnlhoa..............
Inner harbor-
Balboa.............. .. .
Cristobal...................
Preparatory work, Balboa rrrminal.
Panama water-supply s system .......
Other 7one water-supply s stems....
Zone sewage system .......... .... .
Zone roadways.........
Fluviographs.............. .
Permanent town sites-
An. on-Balboa.......... ... ..
La Boca...................... .
Red Tank......................
Pedro Miguel........... .....
Gatun.............. ......
Cristobal.......................
Sanitary fills........................


$237, 4N2. xs
2. 141,353. 67
S.,049 34
I, 0i, ,953 05
638,599 30
'h 7,655.23
99,317.86
Q,.133.95
2,813.01
196,462.60
1,328.47
v.633. 66
.i. 195.78

748,054.48
3,771,111.74
85,506.42
20,312.78

-'l, -72 1.1
10,055.46

',24,.:fi6 .:.5
1, 179,79'7.: 5i

3..17ti..17 44
.I.171.. S1

. n. 14I :7
;C*'.,ull. '7
489,480.39

. 2, '6 -'17 oi
237, nil 1s:
1,'ih.H.2 61
41i. r.17 ;'o
2-9'., 2I 69
U11,2 Il [1,956.00
3,427.02

19f. 1i6 73
12.13.206.13
2,611 43
96i, 797.01'
1,776.56
35-51,-47 29
636,732 11


Sunitary vitches...................
Pla'igrr in ) lu S....................
Administration building, Balboa
Hrights........................
District court and law department
office, Ancon...................
Shop and store office-...............
Terminal olfi\' building, Balboa.....
Shops-
Balboa........................
Cristobal.....................
Storeho ...'s......... .........
Flotels -u'dl mess halls...............
Quarl Gold............................
Silver.......... ...........
Miscellaneous bil lin.s... ..........
Ancon Hospital....................
Colon Hospital.....................
Dispensaries........................
Asylums............................
Quarantine stations................
Storehoi'ses, health.................
Mis *ellanoius buildings, li'jtli......
'choolhousps .......................
Post onices. .........................
Courthouses, poli e and fire sr.ilion?.
etc.......... ..................
Canal construction and floo:led areas.
Auxiliary worl,s and buiblinis ......
Depopulation of Canal Zone.........
Joint land commission epni's. s ......
Purchase from -New Panrami Canal
Co......... ................ .....
TnvestmCnt Panama R I1. R. stk....
('on''ession from Republic of 1' in imi.
Relocation of Panama It. .........
Presentation of launhli Louise to
French Government ..............
Canal proper tion, 1917-18............
IEiinipment and property transferred
to andl from other departments of
the Government...................
Construction equipment..........
Construction mat-riil an I s ipplirs..
Loans to Panama R It. Co.. ..... .


Total. . ....... .......... .110,997. 112.39


NOTE.-See reference in descriptive matter under "New acoulntmle system," S'etion IV.


$199,7016.53
13,902. 41

30t,211. 51

65. 446. 39
238,553.94
3,225. 42

3,795.261' .12
l64, 147.91'
475,934.74
239,409.87
1.351.269 07
2w Cf,"i.74
543,700. 2
435. 32'1. SO
63. 'ffi. "i|
40.30. iL9.;
12X,5416. 1C
401,129. 4-
2. 547. 1 1
129,4<21.91
19,227 23
28, O 6
26",97.62

M1.7ll7 in.
146, 23. 991
2,336.,'J 63
30,61)>(1 61

3S,717.:n5 (7
153iIS.24
10,00 OO1. I 111
9, S00, 620. 1r.

13.50Q1.0 R
25, 236.79

1. 970,s77.1
2,620,0911 61
2,225, 0M. 1i1
3,247,3.12 11







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE NO. 16.-Detail of canal fixed property.


Channels:
Gatun to sea...................
Gatun to Pedro Miguel.........
Pedro Miguel to sea............
Locks:
Gatun... ......................
Pedro Miguel....................
Miraflores.. ....................
Spillways:
Gatun.......................
Miraflores......................
Floating caisson...................
Dams:
Gatun.........................
Gatun-Mindi Levee............
Trinidad River................
Pedro Miguel...................
Miratlores ...................
Breakwaters:
Colon, West..................
Naos Island..................
ids to navigation................
Roads, streets, and sidewalks.......
Storm sewers-......................


811,636,700.00
104,926,542.00
18,032,612.00
34,844,900.35
15,362,560.75
22,529,940.29

3,982,199.00
1,231,256.00
326,996.00

9,626,678.00
137,822.00
65,057.00
423,070.00
1,136,594.00

4, 189, 10. 00
995,337.00
827,359.00
979,766.35
200,000.00


Street lighting system.............
Office buildings:
Administration................
Terminal office, Balboa.........
Storehouses..................
Weather and bydrographic
structures ....................
Health department buildings:
Ancon Hospital...............
Colon Hospital................
Dispensaries...................
Asylums ......................
Quarantine stations............
Other health department build-
ings .........................
Civil government:
Schoolhouses....... .......
Post olffices....................
Fire stations....................
Police stations and prisons......
Court houses...................
Clubs and playgrounds............

Total......................


90. 490.00

918,636.00
77,409.00
300,000.00

11,772.00

1,305,975.00
191,630.00
120, 910.00
128,313.56
40,129.00

58,507.00

443,044.00
8,995.00
21,644.00
19, 870.00
74,896.00
114,498.00

235,381,918.30


TABLE No. 17.-Fixed business property, fiscal year ended June .30, 1922.

Hvdroelectri' plant...................................................... 1,667,953.44
Mirafores steam power plant................................................. 307,62.44
Substation. ............................................................. 1,841,045.18
Transmi-;ion system........................................... .............. 1,355,733.38
Distribution linE ............................................................. 1,101,419.90

Total, electrical division.............................................................. 6,274,011.34
Panama water system....................................................... 1,732,396.35
Colon water system......................................................... 3.55,642. 89
Zone water system......................................................... 568,279.37

Total, municipal engineering division............................................... 2, 5h6,318. 61
Waterworks and sewers, Panama............................................ 876,353.22
Pavements................................................................. 577,718.28

Total, public works, Panama......................................... 1, 454,071.50
Less repayments............... ... ................................ 383,462.32

Balance.................................................................. ........ 1,070,609. I
Waterworks and sewers, Colon............................................. 623,883.68
Pavements................................................................ 6241,638.25

Total, public works, Colon..................................... 1,248,521.93
Less repayments......................................................... 311,549.57
Balance .................................. ... ............................936972. 36
Incinerator:
Balboa.................................................................... 100,000.00
Cristobal....................................................................... .. 75,000.00
Dry dock, Cristobal.......................................................... 50,000.00
Roundhouse, Balboa......................................................... 111,500.00
Car and paint shop, Balboa................................................. 95,000.00
Miscellaneous buildings...................................................... 104.03

Total, shops and dry docks........................................................... -6,604.03
Steamships:
Colon............................................................... 400,000.00
Panama.................................................................. 400,000.00
Ancon ...................... .................................... 600,000.00
Cristobal....................... ................................ 600,000.00
Total, steamships ..................................... ................. 2,000,000.00
Pier 18, Balhoa.............................................................. 1,168,200.26
Pier 6, Cristobal........................................................ 2,201,979.74

Total. docks, wharves. and piers........... ... ............................... 3,370,180.0(1
Coating plant, ('ristobal.. ...................................................... 500,000.00
colliers........................................ .................... 2,029,232.00
Coal barges .. .................................................. 1,600,000.00

Total, colliers and coal barges ...................................................... 3,629,232. 00
I-uel-oil plants:
Balboa.................. ............................................. 458,s6 .5.
Cristohal ........... ............................................... 560,457. 59

Total, fuel-oil plants............................................................... 1,019,318.17
Business storehouses........ ................................................ 300,000.00
Animal and motor transportation....................................................... 23,583.00







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 17.-- Fi.rt.d business property,.iscal year cndrd June .10., 1i' Continuced.

Gold qillarter.... .... ............. ........................... ......... 3,439,729.01
Silver quarters. ...................... ................................. 619,231.00
Garages.......... ... ...................................................... 92,163.00
Boathouses.... ................ .... .. .............................. ...... 4,000.00
TivoliHotel........ ... ......................................................... 11, ,72.00
Restaurant:
Balboa....... ... ...................................................... ... 60,000.00
.Incoi... ........... .... ............................................ 40,000.00
Ladies', Balboa Hiightl ............................................................. 1,500.00
Pedro Miguel.. .... .................................................. 13,350.00
Cristobal... .. ....................... ...... .............................. 75,000.00
Old Washington. (Critobal ........................................... ....... 2,000.00
Silver mess:
La Boca. . ............... ............ ................ ........................ ... .5,000.00
Camp Bierd . . ..... ......... ........................................... ,000.00
(G rand total, business property.............................. 26,935,776.70
'o4TE.--Se. do-cwriptive matter under "General acrountning," Sec. IV.

TABLE NO. 18.-Detail of canal transit equipment.


Iloatiig t;1inip1CnIL*
Tugs.................................... ............... 818,677.23
Supply boats . ........................ 103, .'i
Launches... .... ........... ............................... 17t,773. 7e
Dredge. ....................... ..................... 1, 474,666.60
Barges. ............ ..... ..... .. ... .................... .... 1,048,141.52
floating cranes.... ................................................... 654, 7.2. 45
Crane boat ........ .. .................................................. 19,502.00
Graders............. .................................................. 83,690.30
Drill barges ............................ ................................. 15, 000.0
Air compressor barge ..................................................... 20, SA&. 00
Coal hoist barge.... ............................. ............ ...... 2, 112.0
Unwavering barge..... ................................................ 30,076.85
Total, floal ing equipment ........................................................
Other equipment:
Road rollers.. ..................................................... 19,256.00
Steam shovels......... ................................................... 6,450.30
Automobiles. .......................................................... 1,430.64


4,443,370.47


Total, other equipment.. ..................................................... 27,136.94
Machinery and tools, lighthouse division, salvage section ................................ 13,164.86
Total, canal equipment.......................................................... 4,483,672.27









I:l.l'PO)IT OF ( 'FIVRN(OI: OF THE PANAMA (ANAL.


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12 EI-PORT OF (;6iVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 20 -Property and nUlldpneli trchanqed between The PI'arna ('anal and.
Panama Railroad ro.

TrHnsfecrreil frrm Panama Railroad to Panama (anal:
Enu)ploy.'> quarters.......................................................... 5. 321, .:.o0
Mjchinrry, Cristolbal roundhouse.............. ......................... ... 3,255.00
Tools....................... .............. ............ .................... 2,500.00
Gamboa gravel plant...... ....................---- ....................... ...... 79,961.2R
Tug Bolivar......................................................... .. ..... ..... 26,000.00
Launch I'I i* ...................................................... . 2,918.83
Launch Flying Fish................................................. ....... ... 1.000.00
Equipment and tools, launch Naos..................................... .... 31.17
l;arbac'. si oiw No. 86...................................................... 50.00
Four wodern floats.............................................. .... .. ... 300.00
Wreclkinc t rane No. 3.................................. .... .. 259.
Loi nommo-r crane No.2.......................................................... ... 3,570.87
Railroad motor car No. 8...................................................... ........ 2,750.00
Steim Iru imtive No. 4......................................................... .. 1.500.00
Wooden car.................................................................... 250.00
Orange peel bucket....................................................... ... .. .1 00
uilper No. A-74.................................................................. ... 90.0(
Steel tank............................................................ .................. 00.00
2 motors......................................... ................................... .. 10.00
1 anchor....................................... ................................ 114.00
5 hoisting engines........... ................ ................................... 1,400.00
Silver In ho I'ristob.al.................... .......................................... 21,758.94
'I ulul.............................. ......................... ....443,064.44
Transferred from Panama Canal to Panama Railroad:
12 locomotives................................................................., 560. 15
86 Li:erwood cars, at $523 each.................... ............................ 44,978.00
50, 12y.inri li er dump cars, at 8414.60 each................................................ 20,730.00
100, 19-. ard ili'.er dinmr cars, at $604 each............................................... 60, 400.00
220 steel flat cars, at $538.60 each........................................................ 118,492.00
3 locomotive cranes.............................. .............. ..................... 11,018.29
1 floating pile driver........................... ....................... 2,550.00
9 barges.................................... ....................... .. ...... S0,790.64
41aunches............................... ........................ 7,799.81
Mis,'ellaneousi machinery......................................... ... .... .... 7,745.55

Total......................... ............ ................ ... ....... 443,064.44


TABLE No. 21.-Status of public works in cities of Panama and Colon June .3', 192


Total.


Constructing cost.
Waterworks and sewers........ .'31, 500,236. 190
Pavements..................... .. ..... 1,202,334. 3S
'rotal................ ........... ... ..i 2,702,571.28

Maintenance, operation, and repairs, including proportion of
zone system................................................ 2, 128,119.29


Panama.


$87, 353.22
3.77,718.28
1,454,071.50


Colon.


$623,883.68
624,616.10
1,248,499.78


1,176,7i55.59 951,363.70


Interest at 2 per cent per annum:
Waterworks and sewers.................................. 340,711-.72 1S4,78G. 80
Pavements...................... ......................... 283,1.03.52 I 152,442.45
Zone system........................................... 157, 6l4.58 101,097. 5
I ---
Total............................... ............. 72,184.2 438,327.10
I'otal payable from water rentals....................... 5, .12,875.39 3,0O9, .14.19

Water rental and deficit payments ial'plied to-
Maintenance, operation, and repairs.................. 2,124, 20I. 4 1,17," S20.2S
Interest.. .... ..................................... 782,14.S2 43.5,327. 10
Proportion of capital cost.......................... 02,972.48 2IS, 447.39
Total. ........................................... 3.509,36i0.7.; 1,902,594.77


155,929.92
131,161.07
50,766.73
343,857.72
2,543,721.20

94S,388.18
343, 857.72
314,525.09

1, 106,770.99


Sole tiuns to be applied:
1'npiid delkiti lills-
To repayments for maintenance, operation, and re-
pair i:h-ires.......... ........ ......... .....
To Capit'll cst.........................................
Tot:il charges covered by water rentals and de-
ficits to date. -- -.


93.3.JI. 3 1 .
9.-,014.93 9 014.93 .............

3, .05,31t..00 1.q9, 545.01L 1,606,7710.99







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 73

TABLE No. 21.-Status of public works in cities of Parnaria and Colon June 30, 19.h'-
Continued.


Total. Panamra. i


Capital cost reimbursable June 30, 1922:
Waterworks and sewers.................................. 121, 633.03
Pavements......................................... ,924.36t:
Total..................... ............... ......... 2,007. '.9. 39

A mount capital cost reinimbursable.
From unpaid detivit bills................................ 95, 014.93
From future surplus............................... ....- 2,97; 52
Amount operate ion and man.u tenance.
'harves reimb ursablpe-
From future surplus .............................. 2,975.52
From unpitid deficit hills............................ 935.31


Total amount due................................... 2, 1093, i. 63
Total reimbursements from collections.............. 3,509,365.76
Total payable from water rentals.................... 5,612,875.39


$655,041.25
415,567.93

1,070,609.18


95,014.93



-935. 31

1,165, 559.42
1,902,594.77
3,01.9. 154.19


Colon.


$466,593.78
470,356.43
931., 970.21


. 2,975.'52


2,975.52

936,950.21
1,606,770.99
2 .,43,721.20


I Cred it.
NnoE.-I'nder the original contracts made with the Republic of Panama in 1907, these expenses are to
be reimbursed in 50 years from that dale through the collection of water rentals in the two cities. Up to
June 30, 1922, the anori i:nt ion on the Pan.irn iI it y system amounted to $383,462.32. The :.etial amount
repaid, however, "as .nil 24,4-l.7.:39, the balance being in outstanding hills zguaiu-l the PIepublic of
Panama. Under the conditions of the tc intruct, whenever the water ruentAis do n'r r-over the rost of
operating and nriin inning the system, the interest on the investment, and thi repaynients, deficit bills
are rendered and the inp.id .imoiint to date is $95,014.93. Besides this nniount. th(- I'-nin-nirn Govern-
ment alsj owes deficit in the cost, of op:r.atin and maintaining the Pan im-1 i ity s:.ptoi amounting to
S935.31, mnakine the t *tal unpaid bills S4'.,-* i'.24.
The water rent..ls in the rity of Colon have more than covered the charges fo am n'.i'.tion, interest,
and cost of ol-.ration, nidi tie .urrdpli, which would ordin.trily be used to reduce the v iit-il cst, is being
extended for ne essar:. imprr.j'.eieunts to some of thestreets. In Panama' I it, ho ric.r r, r'lri Is invari-
ably a defilt, and ne.oti:iti'ons .are under way to increase the rates for water.

TABI.E No. 22.-Detail of canal transit material and supplies.


Balboa store. . ..... ............ .. ....... ..... .................... **
Cristobal store. .... .. ...................................................... --
Corozal store............. .. ........................................................
Paraiso store............ ... ....................... ..... ................. ...
Medical store.......... ..................................... ..............----
Stationery store, administration building......................................-------- .
District quartermaster stores:
Balboa...... .................................................................. ... $2, ). 24
Pedro Miguel......... ............................................ 11 i. -
Gatun.. ........................................ 1,262.18
Cri tohbal . ........... .................................... 606.25


4,100. 018.94
Vj. 409. 06
404,098.85
766,438.23
97,407.78
21.1')-).06


4?099.83
Local purchases................. ............. .............. -............. 1,218.52
Invoices in suspense........................................................................ 90. 1
Material drawn by division not yet charged to the work................ ................ 43,723.18
Total... ... ................... ................. 6,131,186.32
Less reserve for war-price reductions ......................-............................. 1. 524, 018.78
Book value of stores on hand................................ ........................ 4,607,167.54

SCredit.
The above does not include materials and supplies in the hands of business divisions, which are shown
in Table No. 19.
The item deducted at the root of the statement as a reserve for store stock reduction is the balance oi
the old price difference account which was started during the war in order to create a reserve for the adjust-
ment of store stock values and prices after the war. When the prices on the material and supplies were
gradually rising the stock on hand was increased at an average price on the basis of the cost of the new
material received and this account credited to build up a reserve for future fluctuations in priLes down-
ward. During the fiscal year 19'2 this account hasalso been credited with an inventory adjustment repre-
senting the difference between the book value of stock on hand August 1, 191, and the actual inventory
value as of that date. In the adjustment of the capital accounts the sum of $2.225,000, representing con-
struction material on hand at the completion of the canal, was charged off no the national defense account
to the credit of this account. In an effort to dispose of the surplus stock of thy so-called war material.'
considerable reductions have boon made in the prices and the sum total of iht-e reductions is charged to
the price difference account. It is believed iha r he change in store stock value-, and the disposition of ithc
surplus can be made gradually by using this reserve account without atTeuiing the operating expenses of
either transit or business divisions. The net book value of material and supplies on hand June 30, 1921.
amounted to 59,323,072 94 A. the end of the fi-al year 1922 the book value of material on hand in the
general store houses and 1'ith both transit and bhusii. divisions, taking the price dilTerrcie reserve itIII
consideration, amounted to 5$..244,3l.(.61.


~I I-------~







7'14 lI:PORT O)F O)VEHN H (IF THE PANAMA CANAL.

T.\I[r.F No. 23. -*ecrrit' "ufr, and transfers nf .stoi s fnd imrrhs's chlvirnel to dirnisions
0it,/ inJti.serl year 1,9!!.'
Receipts by-
Purchasie ... ... ................................................................... i, 439, JOIi. )
Transfer .............. ........... .. ..... ... .. .......................... ,54,691.01
Manufacture .. ....................................................................... 54.60
Issues by-
Issue . ... 3, 680, 680. 79
Transr ................... ............ ... .. ...... 1,870, 533. 30
'*ahs ............... ................ . ................ .. .. . . .. 974.500. 19
I'urchases direct to divisions. ................. ............ ......................... ... 1,013, 465.72
Regular stock in storehouses July 1. 1921 ......................... ....... ............ 515. 34.99
M1arerial in hands of divisions July 1, 1921............................ ........ 707, 10. :;5
Regular stock in storehouses July 1, 1122... ..... ................................... .10, 260. 1.
MillcerijI in hands of divisions July 1, 1922... .......................... .. ........ .. .. 859. 25

I This table is summarized. Fienrec. are given in greater detail in table of samne number in annual report
of accounting department.

TABLE No. 25.:-Statement of canal expenses, earnings, and net t.t.pense.s.


Canal
expenses.


Executive department:


Net eanal
rexlpensc.


Executive office..................................... .192. 115.39 1176.519.87 1 215,3595.52
Advertiing....................... ..... ....... 9. 13. 13 90. 60 9,092.53
Cables and radiograms................................... 2.932.44 278. 10 2,654.34
-hipping commissioner................................. 39.21. 2 .70 39,250.42
Canal record....................................... 11.960.79 272.90 11,687.89
Land office............. ..........................0. ............... 2,400.00
Legal services..................................... 94. 42 ............... 394.42
Railroad motor ecars...................................... '% 940.57 16,.59i.58 2.381.99
Clubs and playgrounds................................. 202,346. 65 55,099.03 147,247. 62

Total................................................ 679,664. 50 248,859.78 430,704.73
i-ecouTning department:
accounting office ......................................... 385,933.69 221,47.37 164,086.32
Paymaster's office....................................... 45. 6(60. S, 21,135.84 24,471.04
Collector's office.................................... 46, 44.70 22,539.72 23{,944.9b
Total .............. ......................... 47,.n25. 27 265,522.93 212,502.34

Wa -hingi on office: I--
Chief of office............................................ ..., '72. 2 26. 63 55, 8-. 63
Purchasing hmicnu....................................... li9,492.26 1.(00.74 118,891.52
Assistant auditor', office................................. 32.3.9.91 i..............| 32,389.91
Disbursing clerk's office .................................. 9,2.2. S .............. 9,262.88
Total............................ .... ..... .......... 217,417.31 1,027.37 216,389.94
civill gov ernmenI.
Civil affairs .............................................. 1, 4064.22 152.16 15,312.06
Customs................................................. 27.7.. 1,662.48 26,038.38
Posts...................................................... 1 ,1 31 7.561'.51 172,623.80
Schools.. .......................................... 19-4, )9. 21 4 96q. 60 189,640. 64
Fire protection ..................................... ..... 1ii4.fill.22 105.43 I 104,505.79
Police and priqons................ ............. ...... .5.9, 11.. 12 .12.978. 87 316.205.25
District court........................................... 21.343.70 23.22 25,320.48
District attorney........................................ 11,837.014 1.36 1 11,835.68
Marshal........................................... ...........70. 8,870.34
Magistrates' courts ....................................... 1,54 .2S .............. 15,548.28
Total. ........................ ...................... 93.354.33 67,453.03 885,900.70

lallth department.
Chief health offire........................................ 19,254.73 40.48 19,214.25
\ncon honsrital .......................................... -12673. 17 22, 7..35 259,917.82
Colon hospital............................................. S, 156. 50 1 S,174. 02 49, 982. 48
Dispensaries ............................................. .3.35S.84 1.1,479.36 39,879.49
Corozal farm and asylum................................ 125, 988.12 lli.024.9:1 I 10,963.17
Palo Secolcrarsvylum................................ 38,497. 10 12.4S3.25 26.013.85
"anloToma.s hospital.................................. 14,231.08 249. 14 13,981.94
Medical stnrphose ...................................... 31,786.00 21,228... 10,537.45
Quara nti ne ricsIre ....................................... 71,000.4-5 31,4,2. 90 39,517.55
Sanitation, Panama ..................................... 59,185.43 10,623.00 48,565.43
streett cleaning and garage collection, Panama ......... 71.657.93 38.094.20 ; 33,563.73
anitation, Colon .................................. 3, 98. 4.5 9.50..1 26, 474. 64
4trcni cleaning and garbage collectlioll. Colu ............. 64,8S3.06 37,216.431 I 27,606.63
Sanitalioni. 'inil Znne.............. ................... 120,373. 953 31.902.77 88,471.18

Total............... ............ .. ............ 1.347.029. S1 I 652. 20. 21 i 694.769.60






REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANA.MA CANAL. (0


TABLE No. 25.-8tatement of canal expenses, earnings, and net expenses-C'ontinued.


Canal
expenses. Earn .


Net canal
expenses.


Office engineer........ ................... .............. I t39,K34.89 $16,821.73 23,013.16
Meteorology and hydrography................................ 38, 642.79 1, 29.45 37,34.34
Surveys ........ .................. ....................... 43,282.50 3,796.52 39,485.98
Storehouses, general: i
Balboa storehouse ..................... 354,353.21 121,767. 8& 232,585.33
Administration building storehouse I .................. ......... 1,543.05 ................. 1,543.0
Paraiso storehouse I...... ............................. 6,427.51 1,613.98 8,041.49
Cristobal storehouse I......................... ..... ..... 24, 188.68 3.60 24, 18.08
Total................................ . ........ .. ........ 386,512.45 120,157.50 266,354.95
Public bwldings and grounds:
Siiperintendencp .. ...... 11,944.02 10.362.35 1,581.67
Balboa................. ............ 3,944. ..7 201.3 7,.61 l-1..017. 96
Pedro Miguel ............................. 71,429.84 4, 12 7 2 .17
0(atun ... 71 4.21 33,719.271 2.1, t0. 94
Cristohal ... ... ... ..... .. ... ... 1N. 3 *4.12 9i.29 93,793.64
Total................ . ....... .7 .6 ..7 ...9'4. 19 32 ,727.
Street lighting............. ........ ... . .. 10, 0-I4. 149 .. ........... I 0 4.
Water for municipal purpose.................... .. ,341. 12 21, 1I.. ri4.qHt0.2'
Roads, streets, and sidewalks ............ .. ....... 1. 0(9. 63... %1, 0N.6:j
Storm sewers............................... 46 ...I 26.914. 2,914.
Miscellaneous general expenses:
Transportation track and maintenance. ......... 12 83 2,468.77 23,661.06
Recruiting and repatriating employee ................... 4.439.98 s,404.19 40,035.79
Transportation, employees on Icthmi ................. 144.1100. '*1 "1 Iq). 64 121,619.36
Compensation injured employees. ...........00 .............. 1,200.00
Total....................... .... .... 219,769. 1 3li. 253. 6 1.9,516.21
Marine division:
Marine superintendent .......... .... .... 2,6 21 ........... 2,569.20
Port captain, Balboa............ ................. 5, 442. 0 686.49 54,755.59
Port captain, Cristobal....... ............. 6, 2. 29 640.40 45,'41.90
Board of admeasurers.......................... ...... 40.111.30 900.00 39,205.30
Board of local inspectors........... .................. 9,231..52 2, 426..5.5 6,804.97
Pilots, Balboa..................................... 137,796.6 36,'00.00 101,7S.56.
Pilots, Cristobal ............. .................... 131,21. 79 l 107,390.00 23, 28.79
Tugs and launches, Balboa............................ 263,502.20 125490.25 138,011.95
Tugs and launches, Cristobal ........................... 244,131. 20 1&3, ,729. 2r.- 5,401.93
Handling lines, Balboa...............................39,695.01 40,143. i 0 l 2447.99
Handling lines, Cristobal............................... 45,04. 75 45,948.00 2899.25
Lighthouse subdivision................................ 263,088.96 114,991. b 148,097.15
Total............................................... 1,278,311.86fi 660,353.75 5 617,958.11


Lock operation and maintenance:
Gatun Locks-
Superintendence.................. ... . ....
Operation .................. ... ............. ....
Maintenance..................... ............
Total Gatun Locks........ .......
Pedro Miguel Locks-
Superintendence........ .... ...............
Operation .................. .................
Maintenance.................. ...........I


40,228.67 .............. ..............
222,349.97 .............. ..............
S3,9K.S.05 .............. ..............

346,566.69 415.63 346,151.06


21,536.21
160l,23.5. V0
'41, 071.01


Total Pedro Miiguel Lock'-......... .. .. ..... ..21 2


119.09


261,750.73


Miraflures Lock'-
Superintendence... ............................ 2,209.86 ..... 28,209.6
Operat ion.................. ......................... 221,257.54 .............. 221,257.54
Maintenance ................... ....................... 263,049.91 .............. 263,049.91
Total Niraflore' Lncks........................... ...... 512,517.31 .............. 512,517.31
Miraflores spillway.................................... 773. 35 .............. 773.35

Total Incks ................ ............. .. 1,121,727.17 334.72 1,121,192.45
Gatun Dam, maintenance.................................... 38,390.25 62.44 38,327.81
Gatun spillway.......... ............................... 3.03..95 .............. 3,038.95
Damage to vessels in locks................................... 5,326.9S ............ .. 5,326.98
Damage to vessels in canal....................... ........13..21.50 .............. 13.221.50
Three months only. I Credit.
12951-22-6





REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA ('ANAL.


TABLE No. 25.-Statement of canal exp]cnses, earnings, and net expenses-Continued.


Canal Earnings Net canal
Expenses. expenses.

Channel maintenance.
Atlantic entrance.......................................... $2. '9. 39 ............ 2, 6. 39
Gatun Lake .............................................. 23N.y 9 .............. 2.3 .9
Gaillard Cut................................... ........ 1,079,026.6 .............. 1, 079,026.65
Miraflores Lake.......................................... 122.2 .............. 122.29
Pacific entrance. ........................................ 729, 381.62 .............. 729,381.62
Balboa Harbor.................. .... ............... 52,943.94 .............. 52,943.94
Removal floating obstructions..................... 34,055.99 .............. 34,055. 99
Floating derricks, maintenance........................ 65,097.36 .............. 65,097.36
Dredging division work................................ 8,378.86 $11,0'1.93 1 2,703.07
Total... ............................................. 1,971, 875. OS 1l.0 1.93 1,960,793. 1.'
Total.................................... 9.7.12,106. 73 2,48,766.60 7,263,640.13

Amortization................................................. 350,000.00 ....... ..... 350,00._X00
Depreciation.................................................. 305,377.50 ............ 305,377. 50

Grand total....................................... 10, 47, 74. 23 2,4R, 766. 60 7. 91J, 017. 16

'Credit.
NOTE.-The above table shows the canal expenses and the revenues w which are now applied to reduce
the expeniez, after which the balance is repaid to appropriations.
See also descriptive matter under "New accounting system," Section IV, for amortization.
When the new accounts were opened as of April 1, 1922, a business surplus was set up amounting to
51,100,309.54, made up of the net surplus of $480,724.95, shown in table No. 19 of the annual report for 1921,
and the interest on the investment in public works in Panama and Colon which had not heretofore been
taken up as a canal revenue. During the fiscal year 1922 the miscellaneous receipt revenues exceeded the
net canal expenses by $3,466,574.69. Net profits on business operations, including the interest on public
works in Panama and Colon, amounted to $323,259.16. Of this amount, $5.,,457.32 represents the interest on
public works which is covered into miscellaneous recei pt quarterly. The balance of $264.,iMl.S4, represrnt-
ing the profit on business operations, will now be covered in as miscellaneous receipts.

TABLE No. 26.-Detail of canal transit revenues.
Tolls. ............................................ .......................... 1, 193, 33. 47
Taxes, fees. finc-, licenses................. ................................ 45,201.62
Postal receipts ....... ............................................... .................. 16,S47.24
Interest on bank balances................................................................ 25,000.00
Proceeds of Government property..................................................... 4,416. 00
Miscellanou......... ............... ................................. ................... 743.99
Grand total............................................................... 11,35.592.32

NoTr.-Tolls ctirally collected on vessels transiting the canal amounted to $11,198.00S.51, but from this
amount must be subtracted refunds of $4,625.04, representior overcharges during prior years. Court fees
and fines amounted to $2,732.11n; licenses and taxes. 532'.,1 7.n2.

TABLE No. 27.-Statement of business expenses, revenues, and profit and loss, fiscal year
1922.


Expenses.


Ele irIL-lightirn' power system..................... $293,512. 22
Eler trig al wor k ................................... 09,.<04. 51
Telephone,t tclpgraph, and signal system.......... 2(1, 422 s'
W after s stm ...................................... 470,790.45
Muni> ipal rngineerinig work........................ 314,384.26
Public worl.s, Panama ............................. r13,736 47
Publi'- % orks, Colon ............................ 1 922 17
In' Inerator, CislotlJ ............................. 2,1 .5 79
liry ilo. Is an d shops, revenues:
Shop % or ................................... ... ..... ....
l 'r do. kjag, Halboa.. ........................ .............
IDr. C.Iok.. Cristolil. .......................... .........

Tui.dl ............... .. ..................... 1,97,5.233 49

Docks, wharves, and piers......................... 21,620 81


Revenues



$360,653.40
941,343 -
203,216.02
475,039.22
314,246.46
163,736.47
118,922 17
22, 49s 21

1,963. 799. 31
,'7,3 .1.. 62
21,.%44 2.j

2,073,222 16
44, K33. 5"


Fixed capi-
Profit or tal charge
loss. 3 per cent
per annum.


$67,141.1 $1 q ,774 71 -
1.5,460.97 1,J:32 60
1,793.14 2601 90
4 241. 77 70,713.90
1137.80 2,377.93
............ 34,793.46
... ...... 223,663.86
312.42 2,284.93


97,9.S8 67
2.1212.77


26,784.11
101,105.4f0


2 Figures at 2 per cent in accordance with contract.


I Loss.






REPORT F UOUVEKNUN OF THIE PANAMA CANAL.


'FABLE Nt. 27.-- Stfatentrinl of business cpt ses, rceenues, and pro it awntI loss, fiscal year
1922-Continued.


Fixed capi-
Ex pens.s Revenues. Profit or talchargeh
loss. 3 per cent
per annum.

IFnel oil plants:
Handling fuel oil............... .....9,0346 254,019.0 64,9 34 ............
Fuel oil sales................... .......... 223. 4x1. 07 I, 4x. 61 136,992.43 ............
Tank rentals............ .................. 17.42627 24.319. 54 6,893.27 .........
Total................ ....... .... ..... 429.945 0 46ft'27 9% 34,1S2. IS 132,644..S2
Business storehouses....................... ... 1,3.'.. 944 36 1,39, 04,I 14 3 ,4 .59. 9' 9,059.9'.
Animal and motor transportation ................. 194. 42) 40 209,9'.2 27 15,-541 i7 7,422.46
Motor rar repair shop.... . ....... 20.7 07 22.74, 11 1.964.04 371.0.4
Building repairs and constni iun ................ s,713.77 lbl,345 :13 2, 6.31.fi ..........
Panama Canal press... ... 73.627. 79 70,978.07 1 2, i49.72 032.3
Quarters, gold....................... .........12I,327. 17 2117.944.91 .4,617 74 21.526.001
Quarters, silver .......... .. ... ...... 1 1.79. 112 17 17r 3 1 8,621.49 6r,0)' SI
Garages...................... ..... . ... . 1.123 7 12.421 17 i.297 39 2,764.92
Boathouses............... ....... .. .. .. 32C. 0i 674.61 .14'N 53 120.00
DIistrif t quartermaster supplies.
Fuel .............. .......... ...... 17.* 23 ............ .. ......
Gasoline. .............. ... . ... .............. 1I. 7 ..
General supplies............ ..... ........... .... I. 26i W _................. ...
Exchange of furniture... ....... . . ......... ....i
T otal.................. . . .. ... .' 0411 4 ii. 21 1 14, 91.' . ..
Hotel Tivoli...... ............... .. Ix7, 122. 1W 1696. 63 01. 1 17.169 00 .i,25. i'3
Restaurants............ ...... ........... .. 417,323 .i .374,n 2 I 1t 2..24 14 7,.5.22.91P
Building rentals......... ...... . .. .... :3.733 32 9. 05 i.ll i i ........
Land rentals............. .. .......... ..... 1,937 01 3.21f. 10 17 26 0 .........
Equipment rentals........................... ,.531J 2- 9. 77 1 -.2
Market rentals............ ................ . 226 61 4' 3 119 7- --
Sand and gravel............. ... ...'. ..... .. 10,292 32 i 1111 41) 1. -Is 7, 41 6
Sale of government proper ....... .......... .. 2,229 91 .4 0 23. ..........
Nautical charts and publications ................. 336 301 .3.16 30 ...................-
Fortifications division......................... 4.52,60). 02 4j2.615 0 5. 3 I 171. 1
Grand total......... .. .. .. .... 7,423,96P- 41 7.6.'N,77ii 25 261. n! '. 37,1i,N.-13


I Loss.


2 Six months.


NOTE.-The above table does not include lie interest on th- in. rstment in bi!lili v orhs in Ilir h iiia if
Panama and Colon, and the inter-st on the zone proportion ofr th waterworl;s .hargeable to Pauana.
amounting to .5S,4.37.32. This interest is covered into mis' ellaneous receipts .iuarteily .iand was tlihrefcorr
removed to the surplus a .cuunt prior to closing the books. The table also shows for i oniparaltiv purposes.
what 3 per cent on the investment in each business division would amount to, but thiI' I comparison is not a
fair one in view of the fact that the divisions have not had a chance to adjust their rates anJ revenues to
the new order of things. The tixe I capital charge show\n against the water system ripreients 3 per cent
of the investment after deducting the amount charged to the Republic of Panama. which was tinel at 2
per cent by contract. The tied ( capital charge shown against public works in Panama andi public works
in Colon represents 2 per tent on the investment, plus the amount hargeable on the zone proportion and,
as stated before, the revenue is not shown in this statement. having been iransfcrred to the surplus fund.
The loss shown on sale of fuel oil, amounting to 536,992.4.1, was due to the fact that the price for fuel oil
during the past year has been maintained at a little below cost in order to dispose of the high-priced oil on
hand; the outside oil companies who are maintaining stocks of fuel oil here for sale are selling their oil at
considerably lower prices than the present stock value of Panama Canal fuel oil. This loss, however, was
offset by the profit made on pumping and handling fuel oil for outside companies.
Under Executive order dated December 3, 1921, beginning January 1, 1922, charges were made against
"gold" employees for house rent, electric current, stove fuel, water, etc., and these collections have had a
direct effect on the cost of operating the canal, as well as increasing the business revenues. The total
amount collected was $231,129.46. The house rental rates were fixed to include amortization and deprecia-
tion of the buildings ovlupied, a certain amount for repairs and maintenance of buildings, and the cost
of removing garbage. The charges for the other items were fixed separately. However, the first column
in the table under the heading of Rent"' includes the janitor servii e. lights, and water in bachelor quar-
ters. The janitor service for the six months amounts to 524,215.10: the electric current in ba. helor quarters
amounts to 35,049, and the water to 1901.50. Deducting these items from the first I'olumn leaves the net
amount of house rental (including garbage disposal) at $14.3,416.17.
Besides the rent and other charges collected from employees by pay-roll deduction, the employees have
paid for a considerable number of other items which were formerly furnished free, such aseleLtric bulbs,
kerosene used in lieu of other fuel, etc. A considerable amount of rent and other charges were also col-
lected from nonemploYees occupying Panama Canal quarters, and the revenue shown in this table includes
the rent charged to departments and divisions for such of their employees as are not required to pay rent
under the conditions of the employment. The cost of operating silver quarters is in excess of the rent
collected from silver employees. The rental rates charged silver employees have a direct bearing on the
wages paid to that class of labor.
The restaurants are being operated under contract so that the figures shown are not for the full fiscal
year. The loss shown under this heading was practi-cally the differential which has been maintained in
connection with subsisting bachelor employees as compared with the perquisites allowed married em-
ployees prior to January 1, 1922.
See also reference under "'New accounting system in Section IV.







7b REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE Nn. 2R.- 'nmparisnn Of expenses, revenues, ndm surplus in dntr.

CANAL TRANSIT OPERATIONS.


STaxes, Total 1 Net canal
Tolls. licenses, ees, transit transit Net
Tolls. fines, posta l revenues.
receiptsetc. revenues. expenses.


1914....................... $14,t18.68 I .... . .. $14,61<.68 $16,030.91 1151,412.23
1915...................... 4,343, 33.169 |.............. -1,34-3,3'3.f69 I4,123,128.09 220,255.00
1916...................... 2,399,30n.42 I 5158,711.96 2,35S,.542.38 1 6,999,750.15 14.441,207.77
1917....................... .-'631,7sl.rI.. I 171.,117.04 i 3,50 ,39. 70 (i, 788,047.60 1979,648.90
1918-...................... 6.264,.763.71 147.077.,7 i l,411,S43.28 5,920,342.94 491,500.34
1919-................. ..... 1.156, 11K9A 197,.9S.03 0,354,016.9S i 6,112,194.77 241,822.21
1920...................... S, 493,0,2.51' 442,7,-9.01 5,933, 71.57 '6,548,272.43 2,387,599.14
1921....................... 11,261.919.31 77s, 7..39 12,040, 11.70 9,328,300.14 1 2,711,816.56

Total .............. 44,563, 500. 9 1,901,291.00 41, 4t., 791. 9 45,986,067.03 480,724.95
To business surplus........ ... .... ..... 4.0.24.95 4),724. 95 ...............480,724.95

44 .5i5, 50. 9S 1, 420, .7.r'-. 0: 451., 9stl, 067. 03 4:5,986,067.03 ..............
1922....................... 11,193,.3%3.47 192.20S.S5 11,33.592.32 7,919.017.O3 :,466,574.69

53, 75S(, *.4. 45 1,612,774.90 i 7, 37 1,ht59. 3 5 53, 905,084.66 3.4Vol, 574.69


C'.N.AL BUSINESS IIPER.TIONS.


Business
revenues


1914 ........................................ .... ..
1915 ......................................................
1916. ........... .... ...........................
1917 ............................................
1918. ... ..................................--.......... ...
1919........ ..........................
1920 ................ .................................
1921......... ...............................


1t90, 29. 32
2,135.074.92
6, 4'S, 521.61
7.579.-5s.- 44
10,324,071.91
13, SM4, A1N1. IS
14,703,371.%2
15,232,317.0-


Total--..-... .......................... 70, "40,125.28
.A applied to offset excess of transit expenses over transit
revenues prior to July 1, 1921 ........................... ................

Net revenues carried to sui plus..... .. ....... ....
Interest on public works in Panama and Colon, etc., not I
included in net revenues in prior years..... ......... .........

Surplus to June 30, 1921 ........ ......... . .. ........ .
1922.... ..... .. ......... .. . ........... I7,747,227. 57

Total........ ......... .......... ..... 7,37,352.x5


Business
expenses. I


1,.95, 720. 71
2,191,475.70
6,476, 623.17
7.540,1.0.78
10,317,912.35 I
13,623, 53.92
14, 465,685.69
14, 66X, 105. 88


69,979,538.20
.................


I. I - -I -- ---


7,423,96.8.41


77,403,506.61


Net
revenues.


I 2 5,422. 39
I 25b, 400.7S
11,898.44
39,427.6ti
6,159.5b
61, 027.26
239,68t). 13
564,211.20


922,410.25

441, 6i5.30

480,724.95

(19,584.59


1,100,309.54
323,259.16


1,423,568.70


I Deficit.
The loss during fiscal years 1914and 1915 was charged to maintenance and operate ion, The Panama Canal.
and is included in the net canal expenses shown above.
The surplus for fiscal year 1922 includes $58,457.32, representing interest on public works, Panama and
Colon, which has already been covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts, leaving $264,801.84 to
be tooezed in.
When the new accounts were opened as of Apr. 1, 1922, a business surplus was set up amounting to
1,100l,30.3i4, niadc ii of the net surplus of 140,724.95, shown in Table No l of the annual report for 1921,
and the interest on the investment in public works in Panama and Colon, which had not heretofore been
taken up as a canal revenue. During the fiscal year 1922 the miscellaneous receipt revenues exceeded the
net canal expenses by S3,4A;j,574.b9. Net profits on business operations,including the interest on public works
in Panama and Colon, amounted to $323,259.16. Of this amount 558,457.32 represents the interest on public
works, which is covered into miscellaneous receipts quarterly. The balance of $264,801.84, representing
rhe profit on business opeiralions, will now le covered in as miscellaneous receipts.

TAB1I.E No. 29.-Pa-' -roll deductions front employees for rent, etc.'

ent.. ...... .... .. ................. .. .................. ............ ... 173,581.77
Electric current ... . .. ................... ...... 26,756.42
Water. ............ ........................ ..................................... 11,592.37
Fuel............... ... .......... ............. ....................... 11,498.18
Mfiscellaneousser ic s .. . ............... ....... ............... 7,700.72

Total..... ... .. .... .. .. ................... 231,129.46

Charging of rent for quarters and related services for gold employces was begun Jan. 1, 1922. This table
is summarized. Figlur-s are given in greater detail in table of same number in annual report of accounting
department.


I -


''







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 79


T ABLE No. 30.-Detail / reserves for depreciation.

'uinal transit properly r
Equipment-
Equi..... ...............................................(II *
Supply boats .. ............ ... ......... ..2..32. 92
Launches.... .. ......... ........ ........................... 7.. 96i. 27
Dredges.......... ............. ........................... 4, 127.76
Barges ........... .. ......... ..................... ....... .... .. 1 14977, 21
Crane boat. .. ... ... ..... ... ... .... ...... 16,149.21
cGradiers. ........ ....... ......... ..... ..... ............ 16,111.90
Drill bargess........................................................... 1, 156.25
Air-compressor barge ................................... ............ 7,507.40
Coal-hoist barge...... ............. ........................... 1,653.62
Road roller......... ................................ ....... 11,930.92
Steam shovels .. ................ .................... ..... 667.50
Automobiles...... .. ........................................ 459.13
Total equipment ...........................................................SI. .9. .12
Filed property...... ............................................................... 30, 377.50
Total vanal ti.insit property............. ................................ 1,661,266. 62

niisiness property, .
Eqiiipment-
Autom obiles......... ...... ................................... 158,102. 19
Shop equipment ................................................. .. 21,336.72
Total equipment........ ....... .... ........... ..................... 179,438.91
Fixed property-
Electnrw light and power systems...................................... 1,037.428.18
Water system........... ..................................... 2i,00. 00
Fuel-oU plants. ......................... ..................... 22, 7. 54
Hotels.................. ...... .............................. 6, 4. 5
Restaurants................... ........................................ 1,932.1.
Silver messes........... ... ...................................... 499.98

Total fixed property ... ...... .............. ................... 1,301,487.43

Total business property y..................................................... 1,480,926.34
i;rand total reserves for depreriation........................................ 3,146,192.96

TABLE No. 31.-Detail of reserve for repairs.

Canal transit property
Equipment-
Tugs.......... ... .... .. .. ... ... .................... 262,121.53
Supply boats.................... ......... .......... ................... ,380.66
Launches...... .............................. ............... 6,282.37
Dredges........................... .............................. 200,825.39
Barges................... .................................... .... 153,888.54
Crane boat ................... ..................................... ... .. ,822.67
Graders..................... ....................................... ... 15,592.28
Drill barges............... ....... .................................... 1,829.33
Coal-hoist barge. .............................................. 675.93
Road rollers................... ................... ................... 1,496.64
Total oquipment............ ............................................. $654,915.34
Fixed property, baseball stadium .................................................... 179.43
Total canal transit property .......... .................................... 655,094.77
liusiness property:
Equipment, shops,and dry docks .......... ........... ................. 63,093.71
Fixed property-
Electnric light and power systems. ............... ...................... 12,761.32
Shops and dry docks.......................................... 8119..7
Fuel-oil plants........................ ..... ....................... 19,927.27
Hotels.............................................................. 1,932.19

Total fixed property............................... ............................. 222,740.65
Total business property y........................................................ 285 834.36
Grand total reserve for repairs................................................................ 940,929.13

TABLE NO. 32.-Reserve for gratuity du rmploices.

Electrical division, electric lipht and power systems...... ................................. 69,. 43. 00
Municipal engineering division, water system............. .................... 49,702.IS
Mechanical division, shops, and dry docks ............ ................................. 251,071.77
Constructing quartermaster, building repairs and coInsruction............................... 23,455. 31
Fortifications....... ......................................................... 37,734.57

Total ................. ................... ......................... 431,80.90








I i l:'() IT (IF (:(IVERN oliF.- THI-: PANAMA (CANAL.


T'ABLE No. 33..--Dh'fil of cost of prefffcrtimn anmd di.stribition of fltcrtir curren.f.


Fi.-eal year
I 1921.


Fiscal year
10212.


(Iat!.n 1Lx11roielItric pwr..r )ilunt:
4prl'rarion and ninoinirmnee......................................
I{i -urrv for dt prI iriat lin .. ...... ........ .........
reserve for r air- ............................... .... ......... ...

Total cost............................... . ....

Kilowatt hours .. .................. . .... .
I nit cost.................................

%I irallorv? steam-electric power plant: 1


n





T
T
A

B
C
G
E;
cI


Trans
T
H
R


$62. 123.1 $4.15,207.31
51.080.00 5.2,;0. 00
1.39.5.00 2,'8.50. 00

111.. .4..1 1 00,37.30

39,376,112 49,219,471
0. 0019 0.0020


Operation and maintenance................. ........... .............I 127. M $'4, fi-.6. 99
uiurvT for de.-pr>.tiati ion.................... ............ ...... ...I 2.,600.on 26, 400. 00
r!r.-v for repairs........................................ ........ .. 7 00 1,n90. 00

Total cost..................................... .......... ... I 117.492. 112,F46..9

Siln. alli hours....... ....... ......................... -1.014 IS.394
nit cost.......................... ....................... $0. 2212 S6. 1241
'otal cost, both plants............................... .... 232.091.7\1 1213.50. 2S
otdl kilowatt hours.............................. ....... ... ..... 900. 126 9.267. 6.
averagee cost per kilowatt hour.............................. So. 0039 50. 004:

at ion of substations:
ailboa ........... ..... ....... .. .. .......472. 97 9.
ristobal.... ............................... .................. I 24. 500. 9. 1i ,2. 7S6.7
iatun.. ......................................................... 07 24 138.3
lirallore .. ............................................................. 27.4:4.24 2.5. -4.19


amjuua........................................... ..I 1.51.:,21.41
i'serve for depreciation....................................... 52. 620. 00 .5. .00.00
reserve for repairs........................................ .. ...... .. 900.00 1, 00

Tutall cost...................................................... .... l.. 023.61 143, 799. 7

mission lines:
n-pe l ion and maintenance....... ........................ .............. 34.703.32 .51. 7
*-T\rve for depreciation.......... ...............................1 27,000.00 27,600.00
reserve for repairs........................................................ 2.910.0 910.00

Totaleost.................................. ............. ............... 4.643.32 I 70.061.75.


Di i ritulllon liune-
Inspection and maintenance................................... ... .19, 414..57
Reserve for depreciation............................................. .. s .iK, 1 00

Total cost....................................................... ........ 14. .7

Grand total cost ilisriztllitd-. power.................................. 532.273.21

Total kilowatt hours.............................................. 59,900, 126
Unit cost................................................................. o0.00o 9


4.1i. 641. YU
43, 800. 00

x9.44-1..<0

51S, 07. 58

49, 267. N65
50.0105


I M.iratiores Staunli pO',.r plant igs generally op'raIecd a- a reserve generative station. During the fiscal
year 1921 peak load werre carried throughout the year which could not be generated at the hydroelectric
station, and during Ihe month of October and Novemler picked up additional load account of aulo-
transformer failure at thi: h'.drueleciri. station. Duruing the fileal %var 1922 the Miraflore' sleamn power
plant wa-~ maintain*Il Inl th i.i-L- Oif 1sand-l'. -irrvii- s'l \ wa, reqiUir-I in carry load on 1.1 occasion-.








REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA CANAL.


TABLE No. 34.-Detailed cost of production of water per 1,000 gallons.


Ancon-Balboa-Panama system:
Operation, pump station, Gam boa.
Operation, pump station, Balboa..
Operation, filtration plant, Mira-
flores............................
Maintenance, water mains........

Total ...........................

Distribution of water:
Panama ..............
Canal Zone, other than Army and
Navy .........................
U. S. Army and Navy. Fort Clay-
ton, Corozal, and Balboa.....
Commercial shipping..............
U. S. Army and Navy vessels.....
Panama R. R. steamships .......

Total...........................

-atun system:
Operation, pump station, Agua
Clara..........................
Operation, filtration plant, Agua
Clara............................
Maintenance, reservoir, Agua
Clara............................
Maintenance, water mains........

Total ...........................

Distribution of water.
Canal Zone, other than U. S.
Arm y...........................
U. S. Army, Fort Davis, and
Fort Sherman.................

Total............ ........

Cristobal-Culon system:
Operation, pump station, Mount
.Hope.........................
Operation, filtration plant. Mount


Fisial year 1921.,


Total rn-t Quantity.



58, 9.51.27 W3, 8,240 S
42, 92,. 13 2, 670,160

92,169.77, 3,400,869
68,890.67 3,S08,290

262,940.02 3,0 s,240


Unit
cost.



10.0155
.0161

.0271
.0181

.076N


Fiscal year 1922.


Total cost.



$61,605.72
41,654.45

S1,262.6.-5
59,425. 87

243,94R. 69


Quantity. j cost.



3,325,480 $0.0185
2,14.3,772 .0194

2,786,935 .0292
3,325,480 .0179

3,325,4.80 .OR.50


....... ..... 1,091,256 ................... 1,048,626 ......

............ 2,265,563 .................. 1,966,249 ........

407,168 ........ ............ 2S1,60S ....
............ 25. 19 .................... 20,2 4 .......
............ 1IS, 299 ........ ............ S,458 ........
............ 760 ........ ............275 ........

............ 3, 08, 240 ........ ............ 3,325,480 ........


20,655.37 451,394 .0458

19,364. 7 451,394 .0429

12,974.80 431,394 .0287
,!462.08 451,394 .0187

61,157. 12 451,394 1 .1361


............ 204,657 .........

............ 246,737.......

..... ....... 451,394 ........


32,342.97 1,934,775 .0167
-~ - I 1


Hope....................... 27,97'.01 1,'934,775 .01431
Maintenance, reservoir, Mount
Hope............................ 14,572.)2 5 1,934,775 .0075
Maintenance, water malns.........| 24, 543. 0 1,934,775 .0127

Total........................... 99,436.51 1.934,775 .0514


Distribution of water: I
Colon............... ............ 73:3379 .......
New Cristobal................... ............ 52,929 ........
Canal Zone, other than U. S. Army............. 757,860 ........
U. S. Army and Navy, submarine I
base, Fort Randolph, France
Field, and Cristobal............. ... 275,65 .......
Commercial shipping. .................... 74,309 .......
U.S. Armyand Navy vessels.................... 14,302 ........
Panama R. R. steamships......... ........... 26,341 ........

Total................. ............ 1,934,775 ........
Additional raw water furnished to
cold-storage plant direct from reser-
voir and through mains for short
distance only, estimated.......... .............. .350,000 ........

Grand total..................... ............ 2,484,775 ........


21,758.51

14,204.11

8,032.07
6,671.27


1 50,665.96


380,627

380,627

380,627
3SO,627


.0572

.0373

.0211
.0175


380,627 .1331


............ 181, 0M 3 ........

............ 199,584 .......

............ 380,627 ........


:32,412.50 1,552,495 .0209

226', 61. 22 1,552,495 .0146

9, 3.5.63 1,552 -295 .0063
21,732.93 1,552,495 .0140
16,)29. 2S I 1,552,149'5 .0558


64S,722
46, 505
521,607


245,704 ........
65,376.......
........... I 5,963 ........
............ 18,618 ........

............ 1,552. 495 ........


............ 730,000 ..... ..

............. 2,2S2.495 ........


_ I ~


............
............
............


I"'"'''
..~.....








REPORT OF GOVERNORR OF THE PANAMA (ANAL.


TABLE No. 35.-Dredging operations.


Gaillard Cut. Pacific entrance. Balboa innerharbor.


Total rcost. Cost. n Cost. n Cost. t
co- 1. Iost. co~t.


ginig:
>ipperdredges....... .il,:3319. 72 S2,.7, '63." 'u1.210 51l9'3,076.74 80. 4464 51s,399.00 SO. 5.41
u t ion relge:- .... 223,9S ............ .... 211201.11 .0981 12.784.01 .1362

Total lredgirl .. ) 72.5,i325. 4 2%7i.M3.9k .20)4 109,27,.55 157.5 2.,,h3.01 .230;
Towit'g: I I~


Towihg: i
Tugs and o-v .... 618,546.00 447,267.97 I
Hiscellaneou< floating '
equipment ......... .4,929. 0 26,273. 72

Total towing....... 1.7.3, 47. 473,541. r9


Other expuiip-e>
Hyd*raulih gradr- ...-
Pipeline' .. .........
Sluicing.............
Bla ini. ..............
Drilling............... I
Surveys .............. I
Channel lights........
Dikes.................
Water lines...........

Total other erpensp-.

Division overhead........

Total..............
Indircwet charges..........

Grand total.........


6.f,977. 15 6',977. 1


i. T, 10-H. .1 .
15. 111.3. 44
I.7'.. 43
346.09
46 1.31.62
194.79
1, 491. It
314.94


15, 10:3. 44-
i,71'.'. 43
346.09
31,100.25
494.79

311.94.


16, 752. 13 115, 12F.. 119

11, 83. 15 9S, IF34. 20


1,74,%,436. 62
195.959. 45

1.944,396.07


Quantities excavated I
(cubic yards):
Dipper dredges-
Earth... ........ 592, k10
Rock............. 1.31...490
Suction dredges,
earth............... 2.247,400

Total............. 4,155,700


974, 5h4. 96
104, 461.69


.3114 160,643.02 .3t20 l 111,635.01 .3757

.11-2 27. 32n.2 21 .tn5 1,313. )7 I .U109
.*129t. 17.963.23 .072.3 11,970.X. .0981


.MU."l9 .... ........ .... ..... .........
..35. ,72. 9.3 .0163 1.431..i I .0152
0 11 . .. ..... ...

.0002 ............ ....... .......... .. .
.021 1 13, :.5.. 75 .0052 1,474.62 .0121
.000(3 .
........ 1,491. 1 i. .11006 ............ ...
.0012 ........ ........ ... .............


.794 5.,0,720.4 I .0195

.IJ6 2 7x 137. 74 0300

R, A7,3 72r, 160. .36| .2795
.0727 s6,.325. 12 .0332


1.079,026.65 .7512 sl2,423.4-1 .3127



432,710 1.... 47,8001 ........
1, 003,5900 ...... 291,900 ........

....... .. ..... . 2,153,600 ........

1,436,300 ..... 2,597,300........
1'


2,906.20 .1123

4,711.21 .0385

47,.771.30 1 .3912
5,172.64 .0423

52,943.94 .4.J32



12,300 ........
16, 000 ........

93,.OO ........

122, inn ........


1 I83.4l3.86 of the cost of dredging at the Pacific entrance wa.- paid from construction appropriate ion and
the balance of $729.3-41.62 was paid from maintenance and operation appropriation. The expenditure of
$W3,043.)%6 is the last t hat will be made for construction from the con.itruii'tlon appropriations, the balance i
in those appropriations having been released for transfer to the -Iurpinul fund.

TABLE No. 36.-Statement of money orders issued and paid by the Canal Zone and
Canal Zone orders paid by other administrations, fiscal years 1907 to 192&, inclusive.'


Total Canal Zone money orders
issued........................... $63,901 523.56
Total Canal Zone money orders paid 63,207,917.27

Total Canal Zone orders out-
standing unpaid............ 693,606.29
Due United States by theCanalZone. 201,.50.. 79
Due Costa Rica by the Canal Zone.. 296.25
Due Martinique ly the Canal Zone. 26.00
Overages............................ 20.66

Total........ ................ 895,457.99


Money-order funds:
Cash on deposit with collector.
Panama Canal................... Sl7,09b. 52
Cash due from post-
masters............... 17,400.44
Less fees included...... 40.97
17,359.47

Total.... .. .... .......... S95,457.99


I This table is summarized. Figures are given in greater detail in 'table of same nunmic'r in annual
report of accounting department.


Dr-di
s







REPORT OF GOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA C'ANAL. 83

TABLE No. 37.-Postal scrvice-Statement showing the money-order business of the
Canal Zone during the fiscal year endi d June 30, 192-?.1

Number of money orders issued, including deposit money orders........................... 111,371
Amount of above ............ ..................................................... $2,642,502.30
Interest paid on deposit money orders..................................................... 9,085.58
Money orders paid b\ Canal Zone post offices:
United States.. .............. .......... ................................... 215,240.75
Costa Rica ..................................... ......................... .....100.35
Canal Zone... .. .......................................... ............... 1,233,330.06
Canal Zone money orders paid by:
Martinique.... ............... .......... ............................. ......................... 133.40
Costa Rica... ... ........ .......................................... 1,425.15
UniteliI States.. .... ................... ............................................ 1,663,933.12

This table is summarized. Figures are gi'.vn in greater detail in liable orsnnie number in annual report
of accounting department.

TABLE No. 38.-Postal service-Statement of uid;ftcld I'd rVirt.. fiscal years 19u7 to 192',
inclusive.'

M iscellneo s 2............... ... ... ...... .. ...................... ......................... 11,491.67
Mon -order fees ............... ................................ ....................... 254,695.40
Stamp sales..... ............. .... ..................... .... ................ 1,321,806.70
Box rents .............................................................................. ... 63,537.90
Newspaper postage ...................................... ................. ........ 14,182.37
Total revenue.......... .......................................................... 1,665,714.04
Inttl ti- on m ne rlr funds 2.......... ......... ....................................... 132. 12. 2

1 This table is s'ummarised. Figures are given in greater detail in table of same number in annual
report of acrcouninc dipartmnent.
2 Since 1917.
3 Since 1915.

TABLE N>. 39. -PeI' il service --Statement of postal revenues, fiscal year ended June 80.
1922.'

M iscellaneu< ................. ..... ...... ................ ................ 2,152.09
M oney-order ees. ...... ........ ...... ....... ....... ... ................................. 0, 1 3. 56
-tamp sales.... ... ............................... .................... 93, R'3. 241
Box rent ................. ............. ...... ................ ................... 10,637.50
Newspaper postage.................................................................. 1,525.87
Total revenue.-................ .. .................. ........... ........ ... ....... ... 117,152.26
Interest on none. -order funds.............................................................. 32,696.81

1 This table is sumnnIarrhed. Figuiile are given in greater detail in table of same number in annual
report of accounting depart rent.

TABL.E No. 40.-Postal Service-Statement of postal savings and deposit money order
transactions for fiseI year ended June .JO, 19'.'

Postal savings certificates:
Balance July 1, 1921............... ... .......... ........................... $458.00
Issued................... .......................................................
Paid.................................................................................... 250.00
Balance unpaid June 30, 1922............................................................ 208.00
D)eposir money orders:
Balance Julv 1, 1921.................................... ....................... 619,635.00
Issued............... ............................................... 862, X0.00
Paid ................... ...................................................... 1,045,315.00
Balance unpaid June 30. 1922 ........................................................... 437.200.00

SThis tablt is uijmm-iripld. Figures are given in erratcr detail in table of same number In annual
report of a **1onn iIng department.








64 I:EPORT OF CIOVERNOR OF THE PANAMA ('ANAL.


TAI.KE No. 1:1.-irnimtiri f income and e.rpenses, huremu nof rrhbs dnd playgrounds,
July 1, /19?1, to June .i0, 192l.'.


Ancon. La Boca. Balboa. Pedro I'araiso.


Sodafountaini i'.n"iltory,
July 1, 1921......... $341.49 $165.87 $1,138.03 275.'s\ $128.69
1'igars and caudy inven-
lory, July 1,1921...... 1,769.19 461.28 3,628.27 3M4.74 646.53
Si1lable merchandise in-
ventory. July 1. 1921... 1,0(7 33 ............4,13.11 1W3.42...........
Total *".rpenditlires. fis-
cal vear 1'22........... 59,078.-1 16 I,37i. l 116, 630. 1, 21 119 16,144. 19
Farning. fiscal year 1922. 3,816.4ti 1, ,7-1.43 I 9,125.01 I '968.17 1 4,074. 15
Total .............. i6.012 51 I1>,,7"7.09 ,13 5,3. 11 I I; n(l.?9 20,993.56

Soda fountain inventory,
Jine 30. 1922............ 345 S7 151.43 19.95.71 222.16 152.03
('igars and candy inven-
tory, June 30, 1922..... 1,216.43 495.26 3,119.24 240.05 562.01
Salable merchandise in-
ventory, June30,1922.. 1,549.03 ........... 5,198.10 188.04 ...........
Total income, fiscal year
1922.................. 62,901.18 18,148.80 126,042.25 14,400.64 211,279.52
Total ............. 66,012.51 1, 77 09 13.3,36.5.3 li)i. 9 21,993. r


Gatun.



$424.72
614.80
1,128.96

23,534.56
233.93
26,938.57


360.35
795.85
807.70

23,974.97
25,938.87


Gatun
silver.


3182.29
513.25


13,490.49
2,030.46
16,216.49


206.34
284.44


15,725.71

16,216.49


Criiobal. Cristobal R rank. Balboa 11. C. P. General tal.
i.ilver. ed boathouse.! stock. secretary.
I-- -- ___________________________-- --
,Soda fountain inventory,
July 1, 1921............. $520.44 $215.65 $122.15 45.31 .......... .......... $3,560.45
Cigars and candy inven-
tory, July 1, 1921...... 1,727.40 1,064.41 214.30 112.75 ............ ....... 11,116.92
Salable merchandise in-
ventory, July 1, 1921.... 684.42 ........... ........... 340.45 ......... ............,137.69
Bureau clubs and play-
Eround- stock inven-
tury, July 1. 1921 ................ 16,618.91 ........... 16,618.91
Total exppnliiture-, fiscal I
year 1u22- ...............: 2 1. 1. 15 4I 0,4 .4 11, 69 4.1 ..1 .I') 70, 05N.45 4 1,5311.34 442,205.99
Earnings, fiscal year 19229.21 S 1 .l.9 1..4y9 7 9.'2 31 3,201.96 1,310.74 37,304.32
Total................ 62.491i.92 51,961. S 13.737..47 7, lji. 2 X3,475.40 2,841.08 514,94.4.28

Soda fountain inventory, .
June 30, 1922 ......... 3 12 12. .3 21 91 ............ .......... 3,07b. 51
I igars and candy inven-
tory. June30, 1'2'...... 969.06 904.00 378.75 1 57.85 ....................... 9,103.74
Salable merchandise in- I
ventory June30, 1922.. 747.00 .......... ........... 297.10 ............ .......... ,786.907
Ilureau clubs and play-
eroilni, stiocmk inven-
tory. June i.n, 1922 ..... ........ . ........ ......... 14,126.35 .......... 14,126.3.5
Tolal income, i'cjal year
1922.................... 1.0,414 11 1 -19, .301 13,251.34 :,1iJ. Jl 69,349.03 2,841.08 483, 4s.71
Tot' a .............. 62,496.92 50,'961t.' 113,755.47 7, U5,..2 83,475.40 2,841.08 518,944. *2

1 In-lcatelosie-

TABLE N'. 44. -Buriuai ifJ clubs and 'pleygrwr'i nld.. balance shut. June 3, 19,.'.

ASSETS. LIABRITIES.
Cash on hand: Surplus.
I- LretariL.' balances.... T7, IIt. 461 To June .io. 1921........ $77,217.24
fI'LposiiiI with collector linii V.. 21 P'rofi. current fiscal
-- $107,471.67 year.................. J7,31i14.J-
Inventories: I114, .21.5.6
Soda fountain.......... 3,07H.51 Accounts payable:
'igKrs and candy....... 9,103.74 Audited vouchers...... i,'-In. x7
Silabl enn m'rchunidi .... si,7s6. 97 Panama Kailroad Co.
Bureau clubs and play- (swimming pool t.... 200.00
grounds stock........ 14,126.35 ----- 'iI'-1. %7
--- 35,095.57
Accounts receivable: registered bills.. 7.159.19
otl:l ..... .. ............. 111, 526.43 Total............ ................ 1.i,.526i.4:







REPORT ()1' G()':RN(> OF THIE PANAMA CANAL.


TABRI FNO. No. .-Couminiis8iry mipfons issr(d. ioll. and honored dwurinq the fiscal year



Issued on
pay-roll Sold for cash.
deduw lion.

Books, 52.35 silver ... .......... .................................... $36,572.50 $265, 020.00
Books, 1$5 silver........... ....... ................................... 1 I .00 29,40. 00
Books, 37.50 silver....................................................... 566, 257.50 5,467.50
Books, rT gold............ ...................................... 43,085.00 464,675.00
Book, 5 gold............ ... .................................... 1,133,220.00 736,275.00
Tolal value.............................................. 2, 96.3, 635..00 I 1, 4(n, 17.


COMMISSARY COUPONS HONORED.
Comnnissarics. ............ .................................................. $3, 885,875.05
Hotels and messes................................................................. 247,281.55
Ancon nursery.................. ........................................................... 195.52
Marine equipment.................. ....................................................... 337. 4
Panama Canal club houses................................ ........................... ...... 113,863.89
Army and Navy Y. M. C. A ....................................................... 3,712.71
Y. W C. A ................................................................ 1,669.15
Dispensaries......... ...... ....................................................... 39. 0
Restaurants under contract.... ...... ..................... ............................... 31,112.07
Total value .............................................. ... .................... .4,294,086.39

1 This table is summarized. Figures .iro given in greater detail in table of same number in annual report
of accounting department.








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