Citation
Annual Report

Material Information

Title:
Annual Report
Creator:
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights C.Z
Washington D.C
Publisher:
(multiple)
Panama Canal Company
For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
annual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
24 v. : ill. ; 23 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Politics and government -- Perodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
5th (1956)-28th (1979)
Issuing Body:
Also issued by Canal Zone Government
General Note:
Cover title
General Note:
Some years accompanied by supplements
Statement of Responsibility:
Panama Canal Company, Canal Zone Government

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
177519266 ( OCLC )
53060088 ( LCCN )
0475-6126 ( ISSN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Annual reports of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government
Succeeded by:
Annual report

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
2..1 I /9(


PANAMA


CANAL


COMPANY


CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT


ANNUAL REPORT

0


FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965























Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2009 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries

















http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportpana1965pana











PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT


December 29, 1965.

To THE STOCKHOLDER OF THE PANAMA CANAL COMPANY:
The story of the Panama Canal throughout the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1965, again demonstrates the importance of
this vital waterway to the industrial growth of the United
States and other nations of the world. A record volume of
78,899,012 long tons of cargo flowed through the Canal during
the year.
Since World War II extensive studies have been made of
the capacity of the Canal to meet the future requirements of
world commerce. On April 18, 1965, President Johnson
appointed a Commission, known as the "Atlantic-Pacific Inter-
oceanic Canal Study Commission," to make a full and com-
plete investigation to determine the feasibility of, and the
most suitable site for, the construction of a sea level canal
connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The Commission
is to complete its studies by June 30, 1968.
During the year, the Board deferred action on a number
of major .iprovement projects pending completion of the
Commission's studies. However, the Board is continuing a
careful evaluation of the need for improvement projects that
may be req lired to provide adequate service throughout the
remaining life of the Canal. Such projects include completion

I


11351--1





of the widening of Gaillard Cut to a minimum width of
500 feet, provision of greater channel depth, assurance of
sufficient storage capacity for water required for operation
of the locks as traffic increases, and provision of increased
amounts of electric power required by the Panama Canal
Company and Canal Zone Government.
The Board of Directors has also initiated investigation of
the feasibility of securing certain supporting services from
private sources instead of making further investment of
Company funds in capital plant to provide such services.




ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr.,
President.














CONTENTS


PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


INTRODUCTION Page
ORGANIZATION CHART Faces page 1
THE CANAL-A BRIEF DESCRIPTION 1
ORGANIZATION 1
TOLLS RATES 2
BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND GENERAL OFFICERS 3
COMPARATIVE TABULATION OF HIGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS 4
SUMMARY: PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OPERATIONS 5
Canal Traffic and Cargo Movements 5
Financial Review 5

CHAPTER I-REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC
OCEANGOING TRAFFIC 7
OTHER TRAFFIC 8
PRINCIPAL TRADE ROUTES-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC 8
NATIONALITY OF VESSELS 12
CARGO STATISTICS-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC 13
TRANSIT AVERAGES 13
DATA IN STATISTICAL CHAPTER 13


CHAPTER II-THE WATERWAY
TRANSIT OPERATIONS
LOCKS OPERATION
CANAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM .
WATER SUPPLY .
MAINTENANCE OF CANAL CHANNEL
ORIENTATION AND EXCURSION SERVICE
CHAPTER MI-SUPPORTING OPERATIONS
EMPLOYEE SERVICES
Supply and Community Service Bureau
Supply Division .
Procurement Division .
Community Services Division
TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITY SERVICES
Railroad Operations
Motor Transportation






CONTENTS


Page
Water Transportation Operations 24
Electrical Power System 25
Seismology 25
Communications System 26
Water System 26
Vessel Repairs 26
Harbor Terminals Operation 27
Printing Plant 28
PRINCIPAL ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 28
Canal Widening at Las Cascadas-Bas Obispo Reaches 28
Proposed Trinidad Dam 28
New Locks Towing Locomotives and Cranes 29
Construction, Alterations and Additions to Gorgas Hospital 29
Locks Engineering 29
Expansion of Electrical Power System 30
Additional Water Mains to Panama 30
Operations and Capital Construction by Contract 30
Other Projects 31
CHAPTER IV-ADMINISTRATION
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 33
MAJOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES 34
MAJOR PERSONNEL CHANGES 34
FORCE EMPLOYED AND RATES OF PAY 35
FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES PAID AT U.S. WAGE BASE 36
Turnover in Full-Time U.S. Citizen Isthmian Force 36
Turnover in Full-Time Non-U.S. Citizen Isthmian Force 36
Recruitment 36
Pay Adjustments 37
Cash Relief for Disabled Employees 37
INCENTIVE AWARDS 38
SAFETY PROGRAM 38
CHAPTER V-FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA
Financial Statements and Related Supplementary Reports
NARRATIVE STATEMENT 41
Equity of the U.S. Government 41
Capital Expenditures 41
Automatic Data Processing 42
Financial Tables
TABLE 1.-Comparative Statement of Financial Condition 42
Notes pertaining to financial statements 42
TABLE 2.-Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenses 45
TABLE 3.-Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government. 46





CONTENTS


Page
TABLE 4.-Statement of Source and Application of Funds 47
TABLE 5.-Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses 47
TABLE 6.-Transit Operations-Statement of Revenue and Operating
Expenses 48
TABLE 7.-Supporting Services-Statement of Revenue and Oper-
ating Expenses 49
TABLE 8.-Administrative and Other General Expenses 50
TABLE 9.-Inventories 51
TABLE 10.-Comparative Statement of Fixed Assets 52

Shipping Statistics
TABLE 11.-Ocean Traffic Through Panama Canal, Fiscal Years
1955-1965 54
TABLE 12.-Traffic by Months, Fiscal Years 1965 and 1964 54
TABLE 13.-Canal Traffic by Nationality of Vessel 55
TABLE 14.-Classification of Canal Traffic by Type of Vessel 56
TABLE 15.-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Nationality of Vessel 58
TABLE 16.-Frequency of Transits of Vessels Through Panama Canal 60
TABLE 17.-Segregation of Transits by Registered Gross Tonnage 62
TABLE 18.-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal 63
TABLE 19.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama
Canal From Atlantic to Pacific Segregated by Coun-
tries in Principal Trade Areas 65
TABLE 20.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama
Canal From Pacific to Atlantic Segregated by Coun-
tries in Principal Trade Areas 68
TABLE 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific 72
TABLE 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic 75
TABLE 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade
Routes, Atlantic to Pacific 79
TABLE 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade
Routes, Pacific to Atlantic 93
TABLE 25.-Small Vessels Transiting Canal 105

Other Statistics
TABLE 26.-Water Supply and Usage 106
TABLE 27.-Dredging Operations 106
TABLE 28.-Electric Power Generated 107
TABLE 29.-Number of Full-time Employees Paid at U.S. Citizen
Rates 107
TABLE 30.-Number of Full-time Employees Paid at Non-U.S.
Citizen Rates 108






CONTENTS


CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
ORGANIZATION CHART .
INTRODUCTION .
Canal Zone Government
Major Organizational Changes
Major Personnel Changes

CHAPTER I-PUBLIC HEALTH
Sanitation
Preventive Medicine and Quarantine
Division of Mental Health .
Veterinary Activities
Quarantine
Hospitals and Clinics


Page
111
112
113
113
113
S113


115
116
116
117
117
117


CHAPTER II-PUBLIC EDUCATION
General Description .
Enrollment .
Special Education .
Library-Museum .

CHAPTER III-PUBLIC ORDER AND PROTECTION
Police Activities .
Court Activities .
Advisory Pardon and Parole Board
Fire Protection
Civil Defense .

CHAPTER IV-POSTS, CUSTOMS, AND IMMIGRATION
Postal Service .
Customs, Immigration, and Shipping Commissioner Services
Visas .

CHAPTER V-LICENSES, INSURANCE, AND ESTATES
Licenses .
Insurance .
Administration of Estates
Foreign Corporations .

CHAPTER VI-MUNICIPAL IMPROVEMENTS
Roads and Streets .
Maintenance of Quarters, Hospitals, and Public Buildings .
Sewer System .





CONTENTS


CHAPTER VII-FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA
Financial Statements and Related Supplementary Reports
Page
NARRATIVE STATEMENT 137
Invested Capital 138
Capital Expenditures 139
Financial Results 139
TABLE I.-Comparative Statement of Financial Condition 138
TABLE 2.-Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government 140
i TABLE 3.-Statement of Operations 141
TABLE 4.-Comparative Statement of Fixed Assets 142

STATISTICAL DATA 143
Personnel Data 143
Area of the Canal Zone 144










PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


I I I
EXECUTIVE PERSONNEL OFFICE OF
PLANNING STAFF BUREAU GENERAL COUNSEL


CAPITAL L ROOET 00OLO ETE..

C 111L R-AFFIC STATISTICS E ALaUENTS AID PLACEMCENS A1,NST ITlt E HEAnINGS AND
FCONOU iC STUDIES ACEoS__ ANDOF SA-A 1 .0-NSTFRE0ATION .CE E.00 CS
COOLTFrIFN OF CA, SouCNL COEN T OMPUoMEN A Orr'c00
F CooRuS


I
PANAMA CANAL SAFETY
INFORMATION OFFICE BRANCH
INFOR-10lo OFFICER ChIEF
PUBLIC RELATIONS ATIVITIES SUPERVISION ANo PROMOTION
PUBLICATIONS OF SAFETY MEASURES
PRESS SERVICES DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT
CANAL Z.NE GUI.D SERVICE OF ACCIDENT PR ECNTlON


I
ADMINISTRATIVE ASST
TO PRESIDENT

GENERAL OorICE OaNAOEECNT
,N O -CRO-
COORDINATION OF 0 INSTRArI-E
SERIES ANO PrOCDU.ES, I-
CLUOlC GENERAL SU-ERSl,ON
The .XN SECUT CE ISison
DEPUTY EECUTIVE SECRETARY


_____________a


ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
DIRECTOR
OES N .. CO ... A" INWEC



MIETEAOROLOGY 6 ,YDnOoAPY
CHANNEL MAIENANCe


SUPPLY AND
COMMUNITY SERVICE
BUREAU
DIRECTOR


RMPLO.. ES OF.OFLSs

Guest IOUSE


MARINE
BUREAU

omEctoR
ANAL cAGTC0 rIO
FORT ORE AT"ON
LOC1 S ORE.-tON S AINTENANCE
BOARO OF LOCAL INSPECTORS
SOABDING PARTIES


TRANSPORTATION
AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
CiRECtoR

A ARINE ..ERIN G
FANAtA RAILROAo
IATEP TRANSPORrTATION











INTRODUCTION
THE CANAL
The Panama Canal is a lock canal that connects the Atlantic and the Pacific
Oceans through the Isthmus of Panama, traversing a distance of approximately
51 miles from deep water to deep water. In the dredged channel, the Canal
has a minimum width of 300 feet and a normal depth of 42 feet. The greatest
part of the Canal channel is at the level of Gatun Lake, the surface of which
fluctuates from a high of 87 feet above sea level in the rainy season to a low
of 82 feet above sea level in the dry season. Variation in the level of Gatun
Lake necessitates adjustment of allowable ship draft from a maximum of
39 feet to a minimum of 34 feet. In transiting the Canal a ship is raised in
three steps from sea level to the level of Gatun Lake, and subsequently
lowered in three steps to sea level at the other side of the Isthmus. The six
steps or flights of locks are in duplicate, to enable simultaneous lockage of
two ships transiting in the same direction or of ships passing in opposite
directions.
The past fiscal year marked the completion of 51 years of successful operation
of the Canal. The Canal was opened on August 15, 1914, and has served
world commerce without major interruption since fiscal year 1916, when the
last Canal-closing slide occurred in Gaillard Cut at the Continental Divide.
A total of 359,811 vessels of all types have made the Canal transit, of which
283,921 were oceangoing commercial vessels plying the various routes of
world trade. In addition, the Canal has been of incalculable service to the
United States and her allies in time of war.
ORGANIZATION
The Panama Canal Company Act, which created the Panama Canal
Company and defined its basic purposes, organization, rights, powers, and
obligations, was enacted June 29, 1948 (62 Stat. 1076), as amended by the
act of September 26, 1950 (64 Stat. 1041). This act became effective on
July 1, 1951, pursuant to the provisions of Executive Order 10263 of June 29,
1951. The charter of the corporation was reenacted with only minor modifica-
tions as part of the act revising the Canal Zone Code, approved October 18,
1962 (76A Stat. 1). The charter now appears in two Canal Zone Code
sections, 61-75 and 121-123.
In its capacity as owner of the Company, the U.S. Government is represented
by the Secretary of the Army, referred to as "Stockholder," in his individual
capacity as the personal representative of the President of the United States
for such purpose. The Company operates under the management of a Board
of Directors appointed by the Stockholder. The Company is charged with
the maintenance and operation of the Panama Canal and the conduct of the
business-type operations incident to such maintenance and incident to the
civil government of the Canal Zone.
1


11351--2






INTRODUCTION


The Company and the Canal Zone Government, the independent agency
of the United States charged with the civil government of the Canal Zone,
are closely interrelated in mission, organization, and operations. The com-
bined function of these agencies is the administration of the Panama Canal
enterprise as a whole. The Governor of the Canal Zone, who is appointed by
the President of the United States and who is charged with the administration
of the Canal Zone Government, under the supervision of the Secretary of the
Army, is ex officio a director and President of the Company.
The Panama Canal Company is expected (a) to recover all costs of operation
and maintenance of its facilities, including depreciation; (b) to pay interest
to the Treasury on the net direct investment of the Government in the Company,
and (c) to reimburse the Treasury for (1) the annuity payments to the
Republic of Panama under the convention of 1903 as modified by the treaty of
1936 between the two governments, and (2) the net costs of operation of the
Canal Zone Government, including depreciation on fixed assets. The interest
rate for the fiscal year 1965 as set by the Secretary of the Treasury was 3.457
percent. The Board of Directors is required to appraise, at least annually,
the Company's working capital requirements, together with reasonable fore-
seeable requirements for authorized plant replacements and expansion, and
to pay into the Treasury as a repayment of capital the amount of any funds
in excess of such requirements. All funds other than working balances are
carried with the U.S. Treasury.
The activities of the Company are classified under two major headings;
namely: (a) Transit Operations and (b) Supporting Services. Category
(a) embraces those functions directly related to the waterway and the transiting
of ships and to services to shipping, including maintenance of the Canal
channel, maintenance and operation of the locks, and maintenance of a bridge
across the Canal at Balboa. The supporting services include vessel repairs,
harbor terminal operations, a railroad across the Isthmus, a supply ship
operating between New Orleans and the Canal Zone, motor transportation
facilities, storehouses, an electric power system, communication system, a water
system, and service activities that are essential to employees' needs including
the operation of quarters, retail stores, and restaurants.
TOLLS RATES
The rates of Canal tolls remained unchanged during the year. These rates
are as follows:
(a) On merchant vessels, Army and Navy transports, tankers, hospital ships,
supply ships, and yachts when carrying passengers or cargo: 90 cents per iict
vessel-ton of 100 cubic feet of actual earning capacity; that is, the net tonnage
determined in accordance with the "Rules for the Measurement of Vessels
for the Panama Canal";
(b) On such vessels in ballast, without passengers or cargo: 72 cents per net
vessel-ton;
(c) On other floating craft: 50 cents per ton of displacement.
Tolls charges for the Canal are at the same level as were imposed on March 1,
1938. They are lower than those charged from the beginning of Canal
operations to 1938.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY AS OF JUNE 30, 1965

Board of Directors

Hon. STEPHEN AILEs, Stockholder
Washington, D.C.
Secretary of the Army.

Hon. STANLEY R. RESOR, Chairman of the Board
Washington, D.C.
Under Secretary of the Army.

ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr., President
Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Governor of the Canal Zone; Major General, U.S. Army.


CORNELIUS G. DUTCHER
Phoenix, Ariz.
Investor and Civic Leader.


Hon. J. KENNETH MANSFIELD
Washington, D.C.
Inspector General, Foreign Assist-
ance, Department of State.

C. ROBERT MITCHELL
Kansas City, Mo.
President, First Federal Savings &
Loan Association, Kansas City.

WALTER J. PEARSON
Portland, Oreg.
President, Pearson Insurance Co.,
Portland, Oreg.


Hon. JACK H. VAUGHN
Washington, D.C.
Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-
American Affairs.

JAMES A. WILLIAMS
Boston, Mass.
Vice President, Public Affairs, New
England Telephone & Telegraph Co.

Dr. CHARLES J. ZINN
Washington, D.C.
Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of
Representatives.

HOWARD C. PETERSEN
Radnor, Pa.
President, Fidelity-Philadelphia
Trust Co.


General Officers

Hon. STANLEY R. RESOR, Chairman of the Board
Maj. Gen. ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr., USA, President
Col. H. R. PARFITT, USA, Vice President
PHILIP L. STEERS, Jr., Comptroller
W. M. WHITMAN, Secretary






I INTRODUCTION

COMPARATIVE TABULATION OF HIGHLIGHTS OF OPERATIONS


Number of oceangoing transits:
Commercial-----------------------------
U.S. Government-----------------
Free---------------------------------------
Total-----------------------
Tolls earnings (including small vessels):
Commercial --------------- __
U.S. Government----- ----------
Total ----------------------
Total cargo transiting (long tons) -----------
Lockages:
Gatun ---------------
Pedro Miguel -----------
Miraflores-- ---------------
Terminals operations (tons of cargo handled, transferred,
and stevedored at piers)--------------- ----------
Oil handling (number of barrels pumped) ----------
Maintenance of channel (cubic yards dredged) ----
Number of full-time Company employees (as of June 30):
U.S. citizen__---------------------
Non-U.S. citizen -----------------
Total Company employees -


Fiscal year
1965 1964
11,834 11,808
284 285
85 91
12,203 12,184


$65,502,769
1,651,890
$67,154,659
78,922,931

10,999
11,925
11,360

2,389,373
36,792,557
3,144,200

2,461
8,979
11,440


$61,146,998
1,399,393
$62,546,391
72,168,690

10,918
11,347
10,841
2,394,453
35,512,392
4,778,800

2,537
8,917
11,454












SUMMARY

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OPERATIONS

Canal traffic and cargo movements.-During fiscal year 1965, Panama Canal
tonnage climbed to its highest figure in the history of the Canal, topping the
previous high record, 72,168,690, attained in 1964 by slightly over 6.5 million
long tons. The volume of cargo transiting the Canal in 1965 amounted to
78,922,931 long tons which is an increase of 6,754,241 tons, or 9.4 percent,
over last year's volume. Along with this increased cargo movement,
oceangoing transits and tolls also experienced a modest rise.
Oceangoing transits (including free transits) at 12,203 were only 19 above
last year, but tolls income amounting to $67,154,659 was $4,608,268 above
the income for fiscal year 1964. The volume of cargo per net ton on tolls-
paying vessels, or the load factor, was 1.02 tons for the year. During March,
Canal transits established a new high of 1,119 oceangoing transits for a daily
average of 36.1 ships.
Financial review.-Net revenues for 1965 totaled $1.5 million after charges
for interest costs totaling $11.4 million and the net cost of operations of the
Canal Zone Government totaling $18.4 million. The corresponding net
revenue for the previous year was $2.2 million.
Operations during the course of the fiscal year reflect the absorption of wage
increases and related costs in excess of $4 million.
Tolls revenue of $67.2 million and transits of 12,118 tolls-paying ships over
300 Panama Canal net tons set new all-time records. The corresponding tolls
revenue and vessel transits for fiscal year 1964 were $62.5 million and 12,093
ships, respectively.
Capital expenditures amounted to $10.6 million for the year. Improvements
to waterway facilities exceeded $4.2 million. The principal expenditure was
for the replacement of towing locomotives and cranes in the amount of $2.6
million. For supporting services operations the largest expenditure was for
a steam turbine-generator for the electric power system amounting to $2.4
million.
A major change in accounting technique was inaugurated on April 1, 1965,
with the installation of a computer. The first phase, now on the computer, is
that of inventory control. Systems studies and programming are in process
to expand the use of the computer for payroll and personnel procedures.













Chapter I



REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC

OCEANGOING TRAFFIC 1

During this past fiscal year the increasing growth in Panama Canal traffic
continued for the 13th year. Fiscal year 1965 established the highest year
of traffic since the Canal began operation. A grand total of 12,203 oceangoing
vessels transited the waterway, 284 of which were U.S. Government owned
or controlled vessels and 85 of which were free transits.
A total of 11,834 commercial ships transited, averaging 32.4 per day, and
for the fourth consecutive year exceeded the 11,000 mark. The Panama
Canal Company received $65,442,633 in tolls from commercial ships flying
the flags of 45 nations. Traffic of this type, amounting to 97 percent,
constitutes the bulk of the Company's workload.
Accompanying this rise in number of transits for the year in the oceangoing
commercial vessels was an 8.5-percent increase in cargo tonnage. The
76,573,071 long tons of commercial cargo that passed through the Canal during
fiscal year 1965 represent an average of 210,282 long tons per day. The total
tonnage was 6 million tons above last year's record and 9 million tons above
the previous record set in 1962. Of the 76.6 million tons of cargo, 5.8 million
moved in the U.S. intercoastal trade, 24.4 million tons were U.S. exports, and
19.4 million tons were imports of the United States for a total of 49.6 million
tons moving to or from the United States. This represents 64.8 percent of
the total cargo flow.
With the exception of U.S. intercoastal trade and that of Europe-west coast
United States/Canada, cargo movements to and from all the major geographical
areas of the world increased in 1965. The most significant change occurred
in the flow of cargo to and from the Far East. Other important increases are
shown in trade between the United States and South America. This year
cargo movements to and from the Far East increased 1,815,000 tons and
movements to and from South American ports rose by 4,555,000 tons.
1 Vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement) for vessels rated on net tonnage,
or of 500 displacement tons and over for vessels rated on displacement tonnage (naval vessels,
dredges, etc.).







REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC


A tabulation of the four principal features of oceangoing traffic for the past
3 years is shown below:
Fiscal year
1965 1964 1963
Number of oceangoing transits---------- 12,200 12,184 11,408
Net tonnage (Panama Canal measure-
ment) ---------------------- 77,207,090 71,793,761 66,744,515
Cargo (long tons of 2,240 lbs.) 78,878,276 72,149,451 63,867,919
Total tolls and tolls credits ------- $67,090,286 $62,493,860 $57,828,354

OTHER TRAFFIC

In addition to the oceangoing vessels, 687 tolls-paying small craft of less
than 300 net tons, Panama Canal measurement (or under 500 displacement
tons on vessels assessed on displacement tonnage), transited the Canal during
fiscal year 1965. Transits of small vessels have but slight effect on workloads
and tolls revenue volume, and are generally excluded from analysis of Canal
operations. Also excluded from the preceding table are statistics on 22 small
vessels, exempted from tolls, of the Government of the Republic of Panama,
war vessels of the Republic of Colombia, and 9 vessels transiting the Canal
solely for repairs at the Panama Canal shops. Further details on this traffic
will be found in table 25, chapter V, page 105.

PRINCIPAL TRADE ROUTES-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC

The following table shows the eight major Panama Canal trade routes ranked
according to the net vessel tonnage (Panama Canal measurement) moving
over them. The cargo tonnage moving over these routes is also shown with
comparable 1964 statistics and the percentage change.
The net tonnage is the calculated cargo capacity of the various ships whereas
the cargo tonnage is the actual weight of the cargo transported in long tons.
Total net vessel tonnage moving through the Canal increased 7.3 percent
over the previous year. Vessel tonnages moving over the eight main trade
routes increased by 4 percent and the tonnage transported over all the other
routes increased by 17.1 percent.
All eight main routes maintained their status in the lineup of principal trade
routes served by the Panama Canal. Seven of the routes shown reveal
increases in net ship tonnage. Only two of the eight experienced decreases
in cargo tonnage shipped, neither of which is significant.
The most significant change in volume occurred in the top-ranking east
coast United States-Asia route with a vessel tonnage increase of 895,000
measurement tons, or a 5.5-percent gain. The largest percentage increase
took place in the seventh ranking route, the east coast South America to west
coast United States movement. The route increased 30.6 percent, an increase
of 609,000 net tons moving between the two countries. Retaining its eighth
position in importance among the routes, the cast coast United States to west
coast Central America/Mexico trade reflects the second highest percentage
gain in net tonnage.







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Fiscal year
(in thousands of tons) Percent in-
Crease or
1966 1964 (decrease)
Panama Panama Panama
Canal Long Canal Long Canal Long
net tons net tons net tons
Trade route tons cargo tons cargo tans cargo
East coast United States-Asia -----------------------------...... 17,234 22,540 16,339 21,354 5.5 5.6
East coast United States-west coast South America--..----.. ....-------- 9,541 7,824 9,960 7,031 (4.2) 11.3
Europe-west coast South America----------------------------. 7,751 7,153 7,500 7,073 3.3 1.1
Europe-west coast United States/Canada---------....------------- 0,779 6,8S2 6,620 7,044 2.4 (2.3)
U.S. intercoastal (including Alaska and Hawaii)--------------....--. 4,020 5,823 4,566 6,088 7.8 (4.4)
Europe-Oceania -- ----------........ .. 3,233 2,378 3,148 2,158 2.7 10.2
East coast South America-west coast United States --.--........ 2,59S 2,838 1,989 2,355 30.6 20.5
East coast United States-west coast Central America/Mexico-.. 1,998 945 1,848 825 8.1 14.5
Subtotal------- -------------------------------.-- 54,054 56,3S3 51,970 53,928 4.0 4.6
All other routes-----------------------------------------20,681 20,190 17,663 16,622 17.1 21.2
Total -------------------- -- ----.... -...... 74,735 76,573 69,633 70,550 7.3 8.5

The only decline occurring in net vessel tonnage is shown in the east coast
United States to west coast South America route which experienced a drop of
419,000 measurement tons, representing a decline of 4.2 percent. The east
coast South America to west coast United States, retaining its seventh position
in importance among the routes, shows the highest percentage gain in net
tonnage. Two other substantial gains in net tonnage are shown in the fifth
and eighth ranking routes, but the fifth route, U.S. intercoastal trade, took
a drop of 4.4 percent in cargo tonnage.
The total volume of cargo moving through the Canal increased by 8.5
percent, or 6,023,000 long tons. The highest single route increase in volume
of cargo tonnage, 20.5 percent, occurred in the east coast South America to
west coast United States. The gain falls just short of that experienced by the
"all other routes."
A brief description of shipping engaged in these trade routes is given in the
following paragraphs:
East coast United States-Asia.-Although retaining the position of first place
in importance among the various routes served by the Canal the route this year
dropped back to more normal gains in both Panama Canal net tonnage and
volume of cargo moved. From the phenomenal increase of 27 percent last
year the gain in long tons of cargo transiting eased off to 5.6 percent, or 1.2
million tons as compared with a gain of 4.5 million in 1964.
The flow of cargo to and from the Great Lakes area increased substantially
with a gain of 251,000 long tons, contributed almost entirely by the Asian to
United States movement.
Total exports from the east coast United States to Asia rose to 17,611,837
long tons, 190,000 tons under 1964 exports, while Far East exports to the
United States increased to 4,928,259 tons for a gain of 1,186,491 tons, or 5.6
percent over the tonnage moving in fiscal year 1964.
The three most important increasing commodities moving in this trade from
the United States to Asia were coal and coke, phosphates, and soybeans. Other
commodities contributing substantial volumes were sorghum with 208,000 tons,
and rice with an increase of 112,000 tons over the 1964 totals. Exports of
scrap metal declined some 850,000 tons during 1965. In the eastbound move-
ment, shipments of iron and steel products to the United States accounted


11351--3






REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC


for 74.8 percent of the increased tonnage while sugar shipments rose by
some 126,000 long tons. Textiles and lumber shipments rose moderately.
East coast United States to west coast South America.-Although suffering
a modest decline in volume of shipping, this route retained its second place
position in importance. However, the volume of cargo increased by slightly
more than 11 percent.
Cargo tonnage moving over this route consists principally of the flow of
raw materials from South America to the United States. This year ores and
metals moving from South America over the route amounted to 4,196,000
long tons for a gain of 869,000 tons over fiscal year 1964. Iron ore alone
contributed 781,000 tons of this gain, or 89.5 percent of the total increase
over 1964. Sugar exports to the United States increased some 101,000
long tons.
The westbound volume of cargo increased only slightly in comparison with
the eastbound movement, contributing a total of 1,655,000 long tons moving
in this direction.
Europe to west coast South America.-Retaining its position as third-ranking
route of the year, the area experienced a very slight rise in net tonnage and
cargo movements. Trade this year contributed a total of 7,751,000 net vessel
tons of shipping to Panama Canal traffic in comparison with 7,500,000 net
tons in fiscal year 1964, a 3.3-percent rise in volume.
Raw materials, as in previous years, Atlantic-bound for European ports
contributed the principal cargo moving in this direction. During this fiscal
year 84.4 percent of the cargo moved from Pacific to Atlantic.
The flow of cargo from the west coast of South America to Europe increased
by 89,000 long tons, whereas the commodity flow from Europe declined by
9,000 tons.
Movements of bananas, fishmeal, and fish oil registered the most significant
advances, increasing some 434,000 tons in total, with fishmeal alone contribut-
ing 289,000 tons of the increase. These increases were offset to a considerable
extent by decreases in the movement of iron ore, coffee, and sugar in the
commodity flow from South America to Europe.
Europe to west coast United States/Canada.-Recording a modest increase
in the volume of shipping employed this fiscal year, this fourth-ranking route
in importance to the Canal experienced a decline of 2.3 percent in the volume
of cargo transported.
The significant rises in exports of oilseeds, lumber, sulfur, and petroleum
products of some 661,000 long tons to European ports was rno.r, than
offset by declining volumes amounting to 874,000 tons in wheat, barley, coke,
and metals.
The principal decrease recorded moving from Europe to the west coast area
was a decline of 22.5 percent in iron and steel manufactures in comparison
with the fiscal year 1964 figure of 262,000 long tons. Nominal increased
shipments from Europe to the area occurred in automobiles and paper and
paper products.
U.S. intercoastal (including Alaska and Hawaii).-In terms of percentage,
the third highest increase in net vessel tonnage over a single route through






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


the Canal this year was registered in this fifth-ranking route. The trade con-
tributed 4,920,000 net vessel tons of shipping to Panama Canal traffic this
year in comparison with 4,566,000 net tons recorded in 1964, a 7.8-percent
rise in volume. On the other hand, after a significant rise of 24 percent
registered in cargo volume transiting in 1964 over the 1963 tonnage, the
cargo tonnage declined 4.4 percent, or a total of 265,000 long tons, under 1964.
Although recording a net gain of some 931,000 long tons in cargo flow in
the westbound movement, 702,000 of which was increased tonnage of petro-
leum products, a total decline of 1,178,000 tons occurred in the eastbound
volume. This is a decrease of 30.8 percent under the volume of 3,820,000
long tons transiting in this direction in 1964.
Sugar, the leading export from Hawaii to the east coast of the United States,
decreased only slightly, 19,000 tons, under the 1964 figure. Canned food
products, also a leading commodity, declined some 52,000 long tons in
comparison with fiscal year 1964 when 260,000 tons were shipped.
The principal decrease suffered in the west coast to east coast movement
was due to decrease shipments of petroleum products which were down
1,158,000 long tons from the 1964 volume, a decline of 59.7 percent.
Europe to Oceania.-Ranking sixth in importance in trade via the Panama
Canal since 1955, the route showed a modest increase of 2.7 percent in net
vessel tonnage employed during 1965, and recorded a substantial increase
of 10.2 percent in cargo transported between the areas.
In this trade the bulk of the commodities flow principally between New
Zealand and Great Britain. This year, of the 2,378,000 long tons of cargo
moving over the route, 1,268,000 tons, or 53.3 percent, was trade between
the two countries.
Principal commodities contributing to the slight gain in the westbound
movement were iron and steel products and machinery with shipments of
iron and steel increasing 25.4 percent. In the eastbound flow substantial gains
were recorded in dairy and meat products, up 113,000 long tons. Fuel oil and
sugar exports also increased by 39.9 and 23.3 percent, respectively.
East coast South America to west coast United States.-This route retained
its position in seventh place and experienced the highest increases in Panama
Canal net vessel tonnage and cargo tonnage of any of the major routes. Net
vessel tonnage was up 30.6 percent and cargo tons rose 20.5 percent. In com-
parison with fiscal year 1964, a gain of some 609,000 net vessel tons and
483,000 long tons in cargo was contributed by the route.
The movement of cargo over this route consists almost entirely of a flow
of petroleum and products from Venezuela to the west coast of the United
States. Of the combined 2,838,000 long tons of cargo passing over the route
this year, 2,610,000 tons were petroleum and products bound for the west
coast of the United States. This is a percentage gain of 26.8 over lasi year's
commodity or some 551,000 long tons in the trade. United States to South
America shipments declined slightly from the preceding year.
East coast United States-west coast Central America/Mexico.-This route
retained its eighth-place position among the major routes served by the Canal,
and recorded the second highest percentage increases in volume of net






REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC


tonnage and cargo tonnage for fiscal year 1965. Net vessel tonnage volume
rose by 8.1 percent while cargo tonnage increased 14.5 percent over last
year's volume.
The bulk of the cargo moving in this trade is bananas, chiefly from Costa
Rica and Panama to the eastern ports of the United States. Banana shipments
this fiscal year rose some 70,000 long tons, while shipments of sugar rose
sharply and contributed an additional 77,000 tons over the volume shipped
in 1964. These two commodities accounted for 77.2 percent of the total cargo
moving in this direction. Moderately increased shipments of phosphate and
paper and paper products occurred in the Atlantic to Pacific movement.

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS
Forty-five nationalities were represented in the oceangoing commercial
traffic passing through the Canal during fiscal year 1965, the same number
as in the previous year.
Transits of U.S. registry, numbering 1,678 with an aggregate net vessel
tonnage, Panama Canal measurement, of 12,197,141 tons, ranked first among
the nations using the Canal. For the fifth consecutive year ships flying the
Norwegian flag attained second place in importance among the various nations
using the waterway. British ships, for the sixth year, ranked in third place.
Germany remained in fourth place. Following these 4 top nations in order of
importance based on number of transits were Liberian, Japanese, Nether-
land, Greek, Panamanian, and Swedish vessels to round out the 10 nations
who accounted for 81.7 percent of the commercial transits.
The 3,303 different commercial vessels made 11,834 transits for an average
of 3.58 transits per vessel, varying from 1 to 165 transits per ship. This year
the Honduran tanker Gulfoba transited the Canal 165 times, 41 transits more
than were made last year, and an all-time high record for a single vessel in a
fiscal year. The Seatown, of Panamanian registry, also a tanker, again placed
second in transiting honors with 114 transits to its credit. Both tankers are on
a shuttle run between Panama's new oil refinery at Las Minas Bay and Balboa.
Of the 11,834 oceangoing commercial transits made during fiscal year
1965, 9,555 were classified as general cargo vessels. This is a decrease of 151
vessels of this type under the number transiting in fiscal year 1964. All other
types of transits declined with the exception of ore vessels which rose to 1,642
transits, an increase of 308 vessels from the previous year.
U.S.-flag vessels decreased by 10 transits with a decline in long tons of cargo.
However, an increase of 141,120 Panama Canal net vessel tonnage is shown
over last year as well as a slight increase in tolls revenue.
An increase of 109 transits occurred in the foreign registry class with
Panama Canal net vessel tonnage increasing 5,014,865 net tons over last year's
volume. An additional 6,684, 429 long tons of cargo transited the Canal in
these ships for an 11.2-percent rise in such tonnage over the volume recorded
in fiscal year 1964.
This year ships of U.S. registry paid 16.4 percent of the total tolls collected
on large commercial carriers. Last year such vessels paid 17.5 percent of the
total tolls.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


CARGO STATISTICS-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC
Cargo flowing through the Canal during fiscal year 1965 established the
highest level attained since the Canal opened 51 years ago. The volume of
cargo transiting this year was 76,573,071 long tons. This is a gain of 6,017,000
tons, or 8.5 percent, over last year's volume, and surpasses the previous record
established in 1962 by 9,048,519 tons.
The Atlantic to Pacific movement of cargo recorded a high of 42,948,996
long tons, for an increase of 4,047,597 tons. Cargo moving in the Pacific to
Atlantic direction contributed a gain of 1,975,384 tons over the volume attained
in fiscal year 1964. Of the 11 commodity groups which have consistently
accounted for approximately 75 percent of the volume of cargo passing through
the Canal, only wheat and canned and refrigerated products declined in ton-
nage with the remaining 9 groups all increasing. Heaviest contributors among
those commodities which increased were iron and steel manufactures, petro-
leum and products, phosphate, and lumber. Iron and steel increased by
49.3 percent for a gain of 1,269,000 long tons; petroleum and products showed
a gain of 7.5 percent for a gain of 1,066,000 long tons. Percentagewise, phos-
phates were second with an increase of 36.9 percent, but contributed
only an additional 875,000 long tons over movements last year. Lumber ship-
ments rose by 12 percent, and sugar gained some 13 percent over fiscal year
1964 tonnages.

Average Tonnage, Tolls, and Tons of Cargo Per Transiting Vessel
The average measurement of tonnage, tolls, and tons of cargo per oceangoing
commercial vessel during fiscal years 1965 and 1964 is shown in the following
table:
Fiscal year
Average per vessel 1965 1964
Panama Canal net measured tonnage-- ____ ______ 6,315 5,910
Tolls__--------------------------------------- $5,530 $5,175
Tolls per Panama Canal net ton _._._. ___-____---------- $0.876 $0.877
Tons of cargo per laden transit _____ ________________ 6,467 7,180
Tolls per ton of cargo (laden vessels only) _________________ $0.753 $0.772

DATA IN STATISTICAL CHAPTER
Further particulars of traffic through the Canal are presented in chapter V
of this report.













Ck apter II


THE WATERWAY

The efficient and dependable operation of the Panama Canal is of vital
concern not only to maritime interests throughout the world but also to a host
of others whose livelihood and general welfare are dependent to some degree
upon an even flow of world commerce. The process of getting the ships
through the Canal and the performance of certain auxiliary or supporting
functions are grouped under the classification of Transit Operations, for pur-
poses of this report, and are the primary missions of the Marine Bureau and
the Engineering and Construction Bureau. These two bureaus must provide
for the transiting of ships, operation of the locks, vessels repairs, maintenance
of the Canal channel, meteorology and hydrographic work, operation of utility
systems, and the maintenance of all Canal supporting facilities.

TRANSIT OPERATIONS
Traffic control
During fiscal year 1965 there were 12,203 oceangoing vessels transiting
the Canal, 19 more than in fiscal year 1964. These vessels spent an average
of 14.3 hours in Canal Zone waters from time of arrival to departure. There
was an average of 33.4 ships per day with the highest peak in traffic being
reached in March 1965, when 1,119 oceangoing transits were made during
the month. A total of 1,008 vessels were recorded as holdovers during the
year, 318 of which were delayed because they required transit during daylight
hours. The remaining 690 vessels were delayed due principally to reduction
of capacity during periods of locks overhaul.
Tug operations
Certain vessels such as tankers, ore carriers, and those carrying hazardous
cargoes are selectively dispatched so that they will not meet or pass any other
vessel in the narrow sections of Gaillard Cut and are not permitted to proceed
unless they can clear the Cut and the locks during daylight hours. Such ships
are called "daylight clear-Cuts," and during fiscal year 1965 a total of 1,345
of this type transit moved through the waterway in comparison with 1,114
handled during 1964. In addition, there were 985 vessels which did not
require "daylight only" transit, but did require clear-Cut transit compared
with 960 such transits in fiscal year 1964. The total of 2,330 clear-Cut transits






THE WATERWAY


is significant because it means that almost 1 out of every 5 transiting vessels
required special treatment in Gaillard Cut. This fast growing category of
vessels increased 10.5 percent in fiscal year 1965 over the previous year volume.
There was a significant increase in the number of large vessels transiting
during the year. Although vessels continued to be built longer and wider,
their handling has become less difficult due to the completion of approximately
5 miles of widening in the Gaillard Cut channel, thus permitting the classifica-
tion of 1,696 vessels into the partial-clear-Cut category. From 646 in 1964,
a total of 848 vessels transited in 1965 with beams of 80 feet or over, while
vessels of over 575 feet in length increased from 1,036 to 1,325 in 1965.
Seven tugs of the Navigation Division were in service throughout the year-
three at the Atlantic terminal and four at the Pacific terminal. The tugs
operated a total of 19,348 revenue-hours in the servicing and assisting of ships,
in comparison with 18,535 revenue-hours in fiscal year 1964. Dredging Divi-
sion tugboats performed a total of 3,890 hours of service in assistance to
commercial shipping as well as to vessels of the U.S. Army and Navy.
Accidents to shipping
During fiscal year 1965, the Board of Local Inspectors were called upon to
investigate 35 marine accidents which occurred in Canal Zone waters, and to
fix the blame and responsibility for them. Of this total, 13 accidents occurred
at the locks, 5 occurred at other points in transit, and 17 occurred in the terminal
ports. This compares with 29 investigations in fiscal year 1964.
The Panama Canal Company was found wholly responsible for damages
incurred in 17 accidents. Seventeen of the accidents were determined to
have been caused by fault of the vessel or other causes for which the Company
assumed no responsibility, and one case was a divided responsibility between
the ship and Panama Canal Company. There were 407 transits per accident
during 1965, as compared to 487 in 1964.
Admeasurement and boarding party operations
During 1965, 684 new oceangoing vessels were measured and in addition
379 ships with structural changes were remeasured. This compares with
645 new ships and 455 with structural changes in the previous year.
The functions of the boarding party consist of all phases of routine boarding
which includes admeasurement of vessels for tolls assessment, inspection to
insure compliance with customs, immigration, quarantine, and navigation
regulations, and the performance of Deputy Shipping Commissioner duties
for seamen aboard the U.S.-flag vessels. There were 13,108 ships boarded
and inspected during the year as compared with 13,246 in fiscal year 19i4.
Aids to navigation
As of June 30, 1965, there were 2,106 navigational aids in service located
in the Canal proper, its approaches and terminal harbors, and the adjacent
coastal areas, all maintained by the Navigational Aids Unit of the Dredging
Division. Included in this total are the electrically operated fluorescent
luminaries which comprise the Gaillard Cut lighting system and the Gatun
and Miraflores approach lighting. Classified according to the type of illumi-
nants used are the following: gas operated, 82; electrically operated, 1,509;






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


battery operated, 101; and unlighted aids, 414. Outlying navigational aids
were visited for the purpose of inspection and servicing, and all aids were
maintained in good operating condition throughout the year.

LOCKS OPERATION
Gatun Locks near the Atlantic entrance to the Canal forms two continuous
parallel flights of three steps each which raise the ships 85 feet above sea level
and then lower them. The three flights at the Pacific entrance are divided
between Pedro Miguel Locks with one flight and Miraflores Locks with two
flights. Each of the twin chambers in each flight of locks has a length of
1,000 feet, a width of 110 feet, and a depth of 70 feet. Since the flights are
in duplicate, ships may pass in opposite directions simultaneously.
The duration of a lockage depends on many factors, including the size of
the ship, its handling characteristics, and whether the vessel is locked separately
or in tandem. This latter procedure is used to save overall time and water.
The normal lockage intervals are 40, 60, and 80 minutes at Pedro Miguel,
Miraflores, and Gatun Locks, respectively.
The number of large vessels passing through the locks in fiscal year 1965
was greater than ever before. Ten-locomotive lockages increased 12.5 percent
over the previous year, and 10-locomotive tandem lockages decreased 17.6
percent. There were 208 12-locomotive lockages in fiscal year 1965 as
compared with 138 the previous year. Total lockages for 1965 showed an
increase of 1,178, or 3.6 percent.
Lockages-Vessels handled
The number of lockages and vessels handled (including Panama Canal
equipment) is shown in the following table for the fiscal years 1965 and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Catun Locks:
Number of lockages ------------------------------ 10,999 10,918
Number of vessels ----------------------- 13,506 13,725
Pedro Miguel Locks:
Number of lockages -------------------- ---- 11,925 11,347
Number of vessels ------ ----------------- 15,103 15,008
Miraflores Locks:
Number of lockages --1------- ------ 11,360 10,841
Number of vessels --------------------------------- 14,574 14,514

CANAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
Canal widening program
The Canal widening program is one of several aimed at increasing the
capacity of the Canal by expediting the movement of ships in transit. It is
concerned with increasing the width of the usable channel in Gaillard Cut
from 300 to 500 feet.
The work of removing the nonrocky overburden from that part of the Canal
in Las Cascadas-Bas Obispo Reaches which was to be widened was completed
early in fiscal year 1965. A total of 5,585,337 cubic yards were removed at
a cost of $0.448 per cubic yard.


11351--4






THE WATERWAY


The remaining work required to complete the widening of Gaillard Cut
consists of the removal of 3,870,000 cubic yards, more or less, in Zone I
(material above elevation 90), and 7 million cubic yards in Zone II (below
elevation 90 subaqueous material). If the extra 5-foot depth design is used,
there will be an additional 650,000 cubic yards of this Zone II material.
Locks towing locomotives
New locomotives have been placed in service at all locks, resulting in fewer
personnel being required for lockage crews.
Experience with new locomotives has enabled larger ships to be locked with
fewer locomotives than originally anticipated. The present operation is now
handling larger ships and more lockages with 215 fewer personnel.
Continued improvements have been made in maintenance procedures on
new locomotives, resulting in savings in parts, material, and labor costs. Four
test locomotives are to be returned to Japan to be standardized and returned
to service, windlass and traction units removed for return and standardization.
These units and other usable parts will become spare parts for the 57
locomotives remaining in service.
Four maintenance shelters for servicing the new locomotives were built
under contract during the fiscal year. Two are at the north end each side
of Miraflores Locks, and two are located at the north end each side of Pedro
Miguel Locks.
24-hour locks outage concept
As a part of the 24-hour outage concept, overhaul of two gates was begun
in January 1965. A trial installation of the east wall hollow quoin cofferdam
was attempted, unsuccessfully. The cofferdam was redesigned and will be
altered by the Industrial Division. It is expected that the experimental
overhaul will be resumed in October 1965, at Miraflores Locks.

WATER SUPPLY
The supply of water necessary for the operation of the Panama Canal in
transiting of ships, the generation of electric power, and for municipal use,
is derived from several tributary streams that flow into Madden and Gatun
Lakes which serve as storage and flood control reservoirs of a drainage basin
comprising 1,289 square miles. All inflow from Madden Lake, whether
drawn for hydroelectric power or spilled for lake control, flows into Gatun
Lake and together with the runoff from the area below Madden Dam is used
for lockages, power generation, municipal purposes, or may be spilled to
control the operating level of Gatun Lake.
An average rainfall of 84.57 inches in the Canal Zone during fiscal year
1965 was approximately 11.04 inches below normal. Runoff during the
5-month "dry season," December through April, amounted to 241,069 acre-feet,
which was 70 percent below the 51-year average. This year the dry season
began on December 2, and ended on May 8, 1965, continuing 13 days longer
than the average dry season, and recording the 10th longest season in 51 years.
The total runoff from Gatun and Madden Dam Lake Basin for fiscal year
1965 was 12 percent below normal and amounted to 4,196,763 acre-feet.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Of this amount, 39 percent, or 1,624,541 acre-feet, was derived from the basin
above Madden Dam. A net drawdown on Madden Lake of 32.63 feet and
4.35 feet on Gatun Lake during the December-April period represents a draft
on storage from both lakes of 794,582 acre-feet. After deducting the evapora-
tion losses for both lakes of 527,571 acre-feet, the remaining yield or runoff
amounted to 4,056,589 acre-feet. This remaining yield was expended as
follows: 1,892,172 acre-feet furnished for lockages (average 31.4 per day);
1,535,009 acre-feet used to generate 96,688,200 kilowatt-hours at Gatun
hydroelectric plant; municipal requirements totaling 49,977 acre-feet; leakage
and miscellaneous losses amounting to 19,651 acre-feet; and the spilling of
559,780 acre-feet at Gatun Spillway to control the lake elevation.
Thermal power generation for water conservation began in December 1964
and continued through April 1965. A total of 201,855,700 kilowatt-hours was
produced. Of this amount, 22,939,400 kilowatt-hours were furnished from
December 10, 1964, to April 30, 1965, by Fuerza y Luz through interchange.
Sources and usages of water together with comparable data for the preceding
year are itemized in table 26, chapter V, page 106.

MAINTENANCE OF CANAL CHANNEL
The maintenance of the Canal Channel, its terminal harbors, the adjacent
navigable waterways of the Panama Canal, and special improvement projects
were accomplished during the year with two 15-cubic-yard dipper dredges and
two suction dredges of 28- and 10-inch capacity. Maintenance dredging totaling
3,144,200 cubic yards of material was performed in the Canal prism and
harbors. A total of 20,700 cubic yards of mined material was removed from
Mandinga Flare during the year. The material was used in the construction
of collision dikes at Piers 6 and 7 of the Thatcher Ferry Bridge.
In addition to these activities, it became necessary to remove slide material
moving into the Canal from the Cartagenita slide on the west side of Gaillard
Cut at the south end of Cerro Paraiso. The dredge Mindi removed 19,200
cubic yards of material, and another 35,000 cubic yards were removed by
dry excavation.
In January 1965, removal of the precipitous material above this slide was
begun. A dike is being constructed, with this spoil, across the Rio Grande
River which will provide a large settling basin for the silt to be dredged from
Gaillard Cut and Miraflores Lake.
A summary of dredging operations for the fiscal year 1965 is shown in
table 27, chapter V, page 106.

ORIENTATION AND EXCURSION SERVICE
During the year the Company provided two vessels, the launches Las Cruces
and the Reina Manuelita I, for orientation and excursion service through the
Canal. The launch Las Cruces, a 200-passenger vessel, made 414 trips,
carrying a total of 41,082 passengers and the Reina Manuelita I carried
1,803 passengers on 103 trips in partially transiting the Canal. The launch
Anayansi was used on 37 trips in connection with inspections, aids to navigation,
and Interoceanic Canal Studies.







20 THE WATERWAY

The Reina Manuelita I activity increased by 24 trips over fiscal year 1964,
with an increase of 514 passengers carried; the Las Cruces made 4 less trips
and carried 731 fewer passengers.
For the dry season months, January to March, two launches were used for
a total of 72 recreational trips.













Chapter III



SUPPORTING OPERATIONS

In support of the maintenance and operation of the waterway and incident
to the civil government of the Canal Zone, the Company conducts many
auxiliary operations that are essential to the accomplishment of its basic mission.
These include rail, ocean, and highway transportation; public-utility-type
services, the operation of retail stores and housing for employees; and a wide
variety of engineering, supply, and service functions. These services are also
made available to the other Federal agencies in the Canal Zone and, to a limited
extent, to the Republic of Panama.
EMPLOYEE SERVICES
Supply and Community Service Bureau
The principal objectives and responsibilities of the Supply and Community
Service Bureau consist of procurement of supplies and materials, and their
storage; distribution and sales; operation of theaters, restaurants, and bowling
alleys; operation of living quarters for employees; care of public buildings;
care of grounds, collection and disposal of trash and garbage; the operation
and maintenance of the Canal Zone cemeteries, and the operation of Summit
Gardens, Nursery, and Zoo.
SUPPLY DIVISION
Retail Stores, Warehousing, Manufacturing and Allied Operations
The retail stores, warehouses, and related operations make available food
supplies, clothing, general household items, and other essentials to U.S. citizen
employees and their families, to non-U.S. citizen employees residing in the
Canal Zone, and to members and U.S. citizen employees of the Armed Forces.
The retail stores in the Canal Zone include the operation of gasoline service
stations. Manufacturing and processing plants include a bakery, a dairy and
ice cream plant, and a laundry. Improved merchandising methods and
reduction of operation expenses were pursued throughout the year with a view
to eliminating or combining functions to reduce manpower and labor costs
with a minimum loss of service to customers.
The Milk Products Unit used a total of 598,976 gallons of raw milk in the
process of bottling fresh milk and 8,787 gallons in manufacturing other milk






SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


products. The 1,295-gallon daily average milk production this year is 1.7
percent higher than that of fiscal year 1964. The policy of purchasing surplus
fresh milk from approved Panamanian dairies continued throughout the year
at the rate of 3,000 quarts per day, 5 days per week. Milk purchased from
Panama suppliers this year totaled 195,750 gallons, an average of 2,041
quarts daily for the year.
Fifteen calves from the Mindi Dairy Farm were presented to Panama's
Ministry of Agriculture for distribution to various 4-S clubs in November 1964.
In April 1965, two calves were donated as prizes at the Chorrera Agricultural
Fair, and, in June, five were donated to the Divisa School of Agriculture.
Service center operations
The service centers and Tivoli Guest House provide certain essential sales
and recreational facilities for the employees of the Company/Government
organization, their dependents and guests, as well as others authorized to
receive Canal Zone privileges. These functions include cafeterias, soda
fountains, guest accommodations; recreational activities such as theaters,
bowling lanes and related activities; and merchandise sections. In addition,
rental space is conveniently furnished for the use of various licensee shops,
which include barber, beauty, tailor, cobbler, and dressmaking establishments,
and also union organizations.
During the fiscal year continued efforts were made toward maximum
utilization of automatic food and beverage vending machines. At year's end
50 Company-owned machines were in operation and 19 were on hand pending
installation. In addition, 23 machines were being operated in service center
facilities by contractual agreement.
Extensive renovation and improvement work was performed at the Tivoli
Guest House. An additional 29 rooms were air conditioned. Dining rooms
and other spaces were refurnished and redecorated to reflect as much as
possible the historical background associated with the Canal construction
period.
Storehouse branch
The organizational units of this branch include administrative, stock manage-
ment, warehousing, scrap, and salvage operations; excess disposal; and office
furniture and equipment pools. During the fiscal year, a continued program
of improvements and operating economies, realinements and consolidations
was pursued throughout the functional units of the branch. Rewarehousing
of the consolidated Motor Transportation and Storehouse auto parts in nto',,
in Motor Transportation Division areas was completed in August 1964. New
procedures have eliminated much of the paperwork in this operation.
This year sales of nonferrous metals approximating 494,000 pounds resulted
in a gross margin of approximately $131,000. Bids were opened on June 25,
covering approximately 7,000 tons of ferrous scrap; 5,480 tons were awarded
to two bidders for approximately $113,200. Thirty-eight locks towing
locomotives were converted to scrap during the year.
The new elementary school located at Fort Davis was supplied with equip-
ment and furniture during the first quarter of the fiscal year. Office furniture






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


for the new Gorgas Hospital in the amount of $46,000 was received in April
and installed by the contractor. The remaining $14,000 of this special
allotment will be obligated in fiscal year 1966. The first shipment of GSA
furniture, specially packed for export, was received in excellent condition.

PROCUREMENT DIVISION
Efforts continued throughout the year to develop new resources in the South
and Southwest to promote savings on inland freight and to permit maximum
use of the Company's supply ship.
The New Orleans Procurement Office placed into effect the direct purchasing
system. Under this system, resale and non-bid merchandise for resale that
was heretofore purchased by the New Orleans office is now purchased directly
from the Isthmus by the Procurement Section of the Supply Division.

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION
Employee housing
An experimental program to determine the feasibility of preventive main-
tenance of employee quarters continued through the year. A 5-year program
to incorporate all employee quarters buildings into the program was budgeted
to commence in fiscal year 1966. At year's end the transfer of responsibility
for custodial service in all Canal Zone Schools from the Schools Division to
the Housing Branch had been accomplished, to be effective July 1, 1965.
As of June 30, 1965, there were 2,507 family units in operation in U.S.
citizen communities, and 1,726 family units in Latin American communities.
Nine additional quarters buildings, representing 32 apartments, were con-
structed in the Pedro Miguel townsite. There was no other new quarters
construction during the year. Quarters presented for retirement consisted
of 14 buildings containing 94 apartments, all in the Latin American townsites.

TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITY SERVICES
Railroad operations
The Panama Railroad, connecting the terminal cities of Panama and Colon,
provides transportation across the Isthmus for both passengers and freight. In
addition, it furnishes industrial switching services to the major Company/
Government and Armed Forces warehouses and installations.
The 47-mile mainline is supported by 74 miles of sidings, yard, and industrial
track. Freight and passenger stations, locomotive and car repair shops are
maintained by the Railroad. It serves all Federal Government agencies on
the Isthmus and is a common carrier serving commercial interests in the Canal
Zone and the Republic of Panama. The Railroad also operates the Panama
Local Agency which is responsible for the receipt, delivery, and forwarding
of all railroad freight at the Panama City terminus.
Substantial economies were achieved on the railroad this year due to the
abolishment of positions, consolidations, and overtime reduction. In fiscal
year 1965 the Railroad Division maintained the same high level freight
workload as in the previous year. Canal Zone freight continued at a high level;






SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


however, the Republic of Panama freight over the line declined instead of
increasing as anticipated. The drop in high-revenue freight is attributed to
the slow economic recovery of business conditions in Panama following the
civil disturbances in early 1964, and a longshoremen's strike of 2 months in
the east and gulf ports of the United States.
Passenger business declined from 695,000 in 1964 to 648,000 in fiscal year
1965, a drop of 7 percent which was anticipated as transportation conditions
resumed a more normal trend following the disturbances in 1964.
Freight hauled decreased very slightly, some 2,000 tons under the previous
year. Freight services income improved 5.8 percent, or $65,000, over the
fiscal year 1964 figure due to improved composition and ocean freight rate
increases on through billed cargo effective the last 3 months of the fiscal year.
Comparative workload and income statistics are shown in the following table:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Passengers carried-------------------- 648,000 695,000
Revenue freight tons carried -------------- 196,000 198,000
Passenger service income --------------- $451,000 $505,183
Freight service income --------- ----- $1,143,000 $1,080,064
Switching and locomotive service income ------------- 87,000 $116,578
Net operating deficit ----------------- $89,000 $19,779
Motor transportation
This division operates consolidated motor vehicle repair shops and maintains
a motor vehicle fleet for use of the Company/Government. Supervision is
also exercised over a public bus transportation system operating in the Pacific
area under franchise.
Special operating economies resulted in a reduction of some $49,000 in
labor costs over the year. Transportation workload increased slightly, with
a 3-percent gain in total fleet mileage. Trans-Isthmian pilot runs that had
been curtailed due to the civil disturbances were resumed, dirt hauling and
a fleet increase contributed to the increase in mileage. A daily average of
2,638 schoolchildren of all grades were transported as compared with an
average of 2,554 during 1964.
To meet requirements for furnishing the wide variety of transportation
services, the motor vehicle fleet was maintained at the 624 unit level. During
the year a total of 37 new replacement vehicles were received.
Significant workload indices for the fiscal year in comparison with the
previous year are given below:
Fiscal year
1965 I 4
Vehicles in service ---------------------- 624 595
Vehicle mileage -------------------------------- 7,179,00 6,852,000
Trans-Isthmian freight hauled -------------------- 13,049 12,925
Schoolchildren transported (average per day) ------- 2,638 2,554
Repair shop services furnished others ------------------- $814,393 $771,425
Operating margin (or deficit) -------------------------- ($6,700) $9,710
Water transportation operations
This division operates one combination cargo-passenger steamship of 10,000
tons between the ports of New Orleans, La., and Cristobal, C.Z. This vessel
is restricted to the carriage of U.S. Government cargo and passengers.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Cargo workload increased by 14 percent over fiscal year 1964, while
passenger workload dropped by 2 percent under the previous year.
Shown below is a statistical comparison of the fiscal years 1965 and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Number of completed voyages ---- ------------- 27 27
Tons of freight carried ----------- ------- 108,191 95,187
Average number of tons per voyage -------------- 4,007 3,525
Number of passengers carried ---------------------------- 6,818 6,938
Average number of passengers per voyage 252 257
Operating margin -------------------------------- $26,000 $12,000
Electrical power system
The Panama Canal Company generates and transmits electric power for
use of the Company/Government, Armed Forces, employees, and associate
activities in the Canal Zone. It operates and maintains hydroelectric and
thermal electric generating stations, substations, switching stations, and
transmission lines and appurtenances.
The workload of the Power Branch, which is reflected by the total gross
power required to supply customer load, was 16.8 percent greater than that
for 1964. This increase was provided for by increased operation of the
system generating units and increased purchases of power from Fuerza y Luz
and the military. Due to a longer dry season and increased load, system
thermal generation was 8.8 percent greater than in 1964.
The total power generated during the year was 6.1 percent greater than
in 1964. A peakload of 75,200 kilowatts, occurring on May 3, 1965, was
the highest on record. Thermal generating plant operation was increased
during the period December 7 through June 30 to permit reduced operation
of the Gatun hydroelectric generators for dry season conservation of water in
Gatun Lake. Full load 24-hour operation of the two new Miraflores gas
turbines, and operation of the Cocoli, Agua Clara, and Coco Solo diesels
as required to supplement this thermal electric generation was accomplished
with the help of loaned labor and temporary employees.
The new transmission line connecting the Panama Canal power system with
that of the Compafiia Panamefia de Fuerza y Luz was energized on March 25,
1964. This interconnect was used during the dry season to receive power
to assist in our dry season operation. A Service Schedule B was added to our
power exchange contract with this company to permit our purchase of their
available surplus electrical energy.
The combined generated output of the power system for fiscal year 1965
was 444,380,700 kilowatt-hours. A total of 438,442,118 kilowatt-hours was
delivered to consumers as compared with 382,028,039 in the previous year.
Further particulars on electric power generated are shown in table 28,
chapter V, page 107.
Seismology
The seismological observatory at Balboa Heights is an important link in the
worldwide network of seismological stations. Situated in one of the major
earthquake areas of the world, its records are very much in demand. All
original records, after preliminary analysis, are mailed to Washington, D.C.,


11351--5






SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


for final interpretation by computer. There were 223 seismic disturbances
recorded on the Balboa Heights seismographs during fiscal year 1965.
Communications system
The communications system consists of two main exchanges located in
Balboa and Cristobal with small exchanges at Pedro Miguel, Gamboa, Gatun,
and Coco Solo. Their respective distribution systems are connected by one
trans-Isthmian trunk cable and a microwave radio communication system
between Camboa and Gatun. The system is independent of, but inter-
connected with, the systems in the cities of Panama and Colon, and the military
exchanges on all military reservations. The microwave facilities also provide
radio communications service for the Federal Aviation Agency, Marine Traffic
Control System, Dredging Division, and Meteorological and Hydrographic
Branch.
At the end of fiscal year 1965, there were 9,820 telephones in service as
compared with 9,400 telephones in use at the end of the preceding year, an
increase of 420.
Water system
The Water Branch continued to supply all the filtered water requirements of
the Canal Zone, including sales of water to vessels; Armed Forces installations;
the cities of Colon, Panama, and Cativa; and suburban Panama in the Republic
of Panama.
The Pacific area water system produced a record quantity of water due to
the continued growth of the suburban Panama areas and increased Armed
Forces activity within the Canal Zone. The total year's consumption for the
combined Atlantic and Pacific areas was 2,146.4 million cubic feet, an increase
of 4.3 percent over fiscal year 1964.
Included in the water system organization is a laboratory unit which performs
the necessary tests to assure the production and distribution of safe, potable
water. In addition to this primary function, the laboratory unit also performs
chemical, physical, and bacteriological tests for other Company/Government
units and outside agencies.
The following table shows the consumption of filtered water for municipal
purposes and for sale to vessels for fiscal years 1965 and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
(millions of cubic feet)
Canal Zone (including Armed Forces) 668.6 637.5
City of Panama and suburban Panama ---------------------1,158.1 1.119.4
Cities of Colon and Cativa--------------------------- 295.8 276.0
Sales to vessels____ __ ______________ 23.9 25.7
Total --------------------------------------- 2,146.4 2,058.6
Vessel repairs
A total of 467 vessels measuring 65 feet or over were repaired in the
Company's shipyard during the fiscal year, accounting for 1,711 ship-days.
Twenty-two vessels were drydocked during the year.
Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government sources continued
to provide the major portion of the division's workload throughout the entire






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


year, with a slight increase percentagewise. The Company/Government
operations and service requirements accounted for approximately 75 percent
of the total volume. Work consisted mainly of the usual floating equipment
overhaul and repairs in the Marine Bureau, the Dredging Division, and the
Locks Division. Of this total, the Marine Bureau provided approximately
30 percent and the Dredging Division 35 percent.
This year commercial work increased, particularly in the last quarter.
Repairs resulting from marine accidents in the Canal comprised a considerable
amount of income for the fiscal year. In most cases repairs amounted to those
necessary to enable the vessel to proceed to a port of call where finished,
permanent repairs could be conducted. Revenues from commercial sources
for ships repaired were $944,763.02 in comparison with $372,319 the previous
year. No major overhauls for the U.S. Navy or for foreign naval vessels
occurred during the year.
Harbor terminals operation
The prime functions of the harbor terminals operation are the movement
of local cargo and in-transit cargo across the Panama Canal Company docks
and piers at the ports of Cristobal and Balboa, and the performance of berthing
services to accommodate vessels requiring bunkers, water, stores, or to embark
and disembark local or in-transit cruise passengers.
The gross tonnage handled, transferred, and stevedored during the year
amounted to 2,389,373 tons, some 5,000 tons under the volume in 1964.
Transshipment cargo showed an increase of 12,128 tons over the previous year.
Local incoming cargo decreased 1,800 tons due to a decline in cargo imported
by the Republic of Panama (some 4,200 tons) offset in part by tonnage
increases of Company/Government and Armed Forces cargo. Local outward
shipments were down some 11,600 tons in 1965 due principally to decreased
exports by the Republic of Panama.
Comparative combined cargo movements in tons of cargo stevedored are
as follows:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Combined cargo movements between ships and piers_ 1,172,357 1,173,130
On the piers --------- ---------------------- 1,217,016 1,221,323
Total (revenue tons)---------- ------ 2,389,373 2,394,453
The marine bunkering operation, the other major function of this division,
increased 1,280,165 barrels, or 3.6 percent over the previous year, 36,792,557
barrels being handled. This is the highest recorded workload experienced by
the marine bunkering section. This increase is attributed chiefly to bunker
deliveries to vessels, up 6 percent over 1964 volume. Bunkering require-
ments increased by 941,894 barrels, or 5.4 percent, resulting in increased
receipts. However, the number of tankers discharging decreased in 1965,
four under the number discharging in 1964. Issues of petroleum products
to the Republic of Panama decreased some 47,300 barrels in 1965 as a result
of direct delivery of Panamanian consumer requirements from the new refinery
located in Panama at Las Minas Bay.







SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


The following comparative workload data is furnished for fiscal years 1965
and 1964:
Fiscal year
1965 1964
(barrels)
Combined receipts (Cristobal and Balboa) ------- 18,498,416 18,160,145
Combined issues (Cristobal and Balboa) -- 18,294,141 17,352,247
Total barrels of products moved --------------- 36,792,557 35,512,392
Tankers discharging (Cristobal and Balboa) ------ 428 432
Vessels bunkering---- _______ _--------_ 4,579 4,416
Printing Plant
The Printing Plant, located at La Boca, C.Z., on the Pacific side of the
Isthmus, is a Government field printing plant under the regulations of the Joint
Committee on Printing, Congress of the United States.
Production continued its steady rise during fiscal year 1965, the total
measured in production units being 8.3 percent higher than in the previous year.
This workload amounted to a total of 73,453,000 production units as compared
with 67,794,000 in 1964. Offset production continued to account for an
ever-increasing share of the printing workload. This year's figures show
offset printing was utilized for 78.6 percent of total production compared to
only 31 percent 6 years ago when the long-range program for modernization
of Plant equipment and conversion from letterpress to offset printing was
inaugurated.

PRINCIPAL ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
Canal widening at Las Cascadas-Bas Obispo Reaches
The widening of the Canal continued during the year by contract excavation.
This is one of several projects aimed at increasing the capacity of the Canal by
expediting the movement of ships in transit and is concerned with increasing
the width of the usable channel in Gaillard Cut from 300 to 500 feet. During
the past 11 years approximately two-thirds of the 8-mile-long Gaillard Cut has
been widened. The contract for the removal of the softer overburden
materials above elevation 95 feet from the widened area of Las Cascadas-Bas
Obispo Reaches to Mandinga River was completed early in fiscal year 1965.
A total of 5,585,337 cubic yards was removed at a cost of $0.448 per cubic yard.
The remaining work required to complete the widening of Gaillard Cut
consists of the removal of 3,870,000 cubic yards of Zone I (i.e., material above
elevation 90), and 7 million cubic yards of Zone II (below ce-I .sho 90
subaqueous) material. If the extra 5-foot-depth design is used, there will be
an additional 650,000 cubic yards of this Zone II material.
Trinidad Dam
At the close of fiscal year 1965, a restudy was being made of the contract
schedule for accomplishment of this project along with the widening of the
Canal through Las Cascadas and Bas Obispo Reaches. Studies were also
underway for relocation of the Guacha-Tern portion of the dam with redesign
of the embankment so as to reduce the quantity of high cost crushed rock for






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


the filter blanket. During September and October, doubt arose as to the
eventual accomplishment of this project, and no further work was performed
in the study. In June 1965, the Company terminated the contract with
consultants, on the basis that the project was indefinitely deferred.

New locks towing locomotives and cranes
Manufacture and delivery of the locomotives has proceeded about 2 months
ahead of schedule. Fifty-eight locomotives and two cranes were in service
as of May 1965, and the remaining locomotive and No. 3 crane were shipped
from Japan about June 20, 1965.
The new locomotives were installed on both lanes of Pedro Miguel Locks
as of September 19, 1964, and the installation of new machines at Miraflores
Locks was completed January 30, 1965. In general, the new towing locomo-
tives have performed very satisfactorily. They have noticeably speeded up
lockages because of their power and speed advantages over the old machines.
Delays to lockages because of locomotive troubles have been almost negligible.
Under a supplemental agreement with the manufacturer, four of the original
test machines are to be modified, and a change order was executed for
additional locomotive spare parts.
The old locomotives and cranes were retired from service and scrapped.
Four locomotives were retained for display and two were donated to the
National Museum of Transportation and the American Museum of Electricity.
Gorgas Hospital construction
The new Gorgas Hospital building was completed and put in service during
fiscal year 1965. Alterations to the existing plant, and this new 8-story,
air-conditioned hospital building were begun in fiscal year 1962 with the object
of consolidating all Gorgas Hospital activities into four buildings connected
by two pedestrian bridges and a tunnel.
The final phase of the construction of the addition, from April 9 to completion
on October 19, 1964, was performed under a negotiated contract with the
approval of the bonding company after the failure by default of the original
contractor. Liquidated damages, covering 183 days' default, in the amount
of $91,500, was assessed against the defaulted contract.
Locks engineering
This continuous engineering program is to provide improvements to locks
operations. During the year the Corps of Engineers in Buffalo was invited
to inspect the Panama Canal Locks and recommend the feasibility of
modernizing the locks control equipment and/or improving the locks operating
procedure. An official report of their recommendations is to be submitted.
The contract for installation of center wall turntables to turn the new locomo-
tives end to end was completed as well as the construction of nine repair
shelters to be used with the new machines.
In the 24-hour-outage overhaul concept a redesign of the cofferdam became
necessary as the result of an unsuccessful attempt at dewatering. Sketches
and drawings were prepared to show rising stem and cylindrical valve
overhaul schemes.







SUPPORTING OPERATIONS


Expansion of electrical power system
This program, begun in 1961, is designed to provide a system of approxi-
mately 100 megawatts by 1980. In fiscal year 1963 two gas-driven turbine
generators were installed at the Miraflores Power Plant to enlarge the capacity
of this facility.
Upon receipt of plans and specifications for tanks, control room structures,
and the electrical and mechanical installation of work, the awarding of all
major contracts for work on this project was begun. Contracts for the installa-
tion of the steamplant, the turbine generator, the circulating water system, the
fuel storage system, the electrical-mechanical system, the 44-kv. switchyard,
and for miscellaneous building construction were in progress at the end of
this fiscal year. The turbine, generator and condenser were located in place.
The turbine control room addition was approximately 50 percent complete;
the boiler 60 percent complete; the construction of the new tanks approximately
20 percent complete, and the circulating water system construction work was
35 percent complete.
Designs were prepared for two oil storage tanks of 54,165-barrel capacity
and others were started for the interconnection with Panama power system,
Atlantic area. Plans and designs were developed to include additional power
service to Fort Kobbe, and install new oil circuit breakers, switchgear units,
and related appurtenances at other important locations.

Water system improvements
The work of installing a 20-inch waterline from Balboa to Chorillo Hill
and from Balboa Pump Station to the National Avenue manifold in Ancon
was completed during the fiscal year. This work is part of the program aimed
at increasing the potable water supply of Panama City.
New pumps are being installed under contract at the Paraiso Raw Water
Pump Station. These will aid the greatly increased demands upon the Canal
Zone water system.

Operations and capital construction by contract
New contracts awarded in fiscal year 1965 were lower by $621,100 than
those awarded the previous year. Sixty-three contracts covering capital
construction (exclusive of architect-engineering contracts) were awarded for
a total of $5,335,800. Total work accomplished on all capital construction
during fiscal year 1965 amounted to $10,781,300.
Major capital items contracted for during the year were electrical-
mechanical installations for Miraflores Power Plant, $832,500; construction
of building "E" for Curundu Junior High School, $441,200; masonry, tile, and
ceilings for Curundu Junior High School, $335,300; air conditioning Curundu
Junior High School, $292,600; furnishing and erecting storage tanks at Mira-
flores, $274,400; construction of 44-kv. switchyard at Miraflores, $226,900;
electrical work for Curundu Junior High School, $219,600; additional power
service for Howard Air Force Base, $204,800, and approach and exit ramps
for Thatcher Ferry Bridge, $183,700.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 31

Other projects
Seven other contracts for account of the Company/Government awarded
for over $100,000 each were construction of play slabs for elementary schools,
$182,200; miscellaneous buildings and structures for Miraflores Power Plant,
$178,800; alterations and additions to Balboa Post Office, $134,200; replace-
ment of refrigeration equipment in Cold Storage Plant, Balboa, $119,000;
technical and procurement services and procurement of equipment and
materials in connection with re-powering of tug, Arraijan, $115,800; floor
coverings for Curundu Junior High School, $113,100; and air conditioning
elementary school at Balboa, $107,100.














Chapter IV



ADMINISTRATION

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
A plan to reorganize the Canal Zone Civilian Personnel Policy Coordinating
Board was implemented this fiscal year and resulted in a far smoother relation-
ship between the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government and
Department of Defense agencies in the Canal Zone on personnel matters.
In past years, the Board consisted of a member from the Canal agencies,
a member from U.S. Southern Command, and members from each of the local
Army, Navy, and Air Force organizations. A plan to reconstitute the Board
to consist of a representative of the Canal organization and a representative
of the local Department of Defense agencies was approved by the Secretary
of the Army on October 8, 1964. The new organization has been eminently
more satisfactory in terms of meeting the Canal agencies' special needs and
facilitating interagency cooperation.
The third phase of the three-phase Canal Zone Wage Adjustment Program
initiated in April 1962 and the Annual Review of Manual Category positions
based on changes in wages in the nine Naval shipyards in the United States
resulted in increases for all employees in the Manual category and for other
employees, particularly those on a Canal Zone wage base.
In February 1965, the Board of Directors considered a long-range staffing
program to resolve problems likely to be faced by the Canal organization by
retirement attrition of skilled and professional employees during the next
15 years whether or not any decision is made to proceed with the construction
of a sea level canal. In July the Board approved a plan submitted by the
Governor to meet long-range staffing needs. The program proposes three
basic methods of meeting the Canal's long-range staffing needs: (1) a large-
scale, wide spectrum management, professional, and clerical trainee program;
(2) the development of apprenticeships in several new occupational areas, and
(3) a significant expansion of the current apprenticeship program.
Probably the most important personnel management problem in fiscal year
1965 was the reduction and freezing of the 25-percent tropical differential which
had been added to U.S. citizen employees' pay since 1914. The amount of
the differential was reduced to 15 percent and its applicability amended to
cover only heads of household. U.S. citizen employees who were on the rolls

33


11351--6






ADMINISTRATION


of Canal agencies on the effective date of the change in the regulations had
the dollar amount of their differential fixed at the amount of differential they
were receiving on July 20, 1964. This reduction and freezing action of the
differential and the limiting of application to heads of household had a
significant impact both on employee morale in the entire Canal organization
and on pay administration in the Personnel Bureau.
During fiscal year 1965 two important items of employee legislation were
developed for submission. The first (H.R. 5990), amends the Cash Relief
Act of 1937 to increase the gratuity paid non-U.S. beneficiaries by $10 a month
to a maximum pension of $65 per month. The bill also would provide widows
of disability relief beneficiaries with a pension amounting to half that which
would be received by their husbands if still living. At the close of the fiscal
year, this bill had passed the House of Representatives and was pending in
the Senate.
The second legislative proposal would allow the U.S. Government to
participate as an employer in a group health insurance program for non-U.S.
citizen employees and retirees of U.S. Government agencies in the Canal Zone.
At the close of the fiscal year this proposed legislation was still being reviewed
by the Bureau of the Budget.
The Government Employees Salary Reform Act of 1964 provided for upward
adjustments in salaries of General Schedule and Postal employees continuing
the principle of comparability of pay between government and private industry
established by the Federal Salary Reform Act of 1962. The act was admin-
istratively implemented in the Company/Government on August 21, 1964,
effective retroactively to July 5, 1964.
The implementation of the Dual Compensation Act, Public Law 88-448,
enacted August 19, 1964, was approved by the Governor to be effective
December 1, 1964. This act was designed to simplify, modernize, and
consolidate the laws relating to the employment of civilians in more than one
position and the laws concerning the civilian employment of retired members
of the uniformed services. The act places a limitation on the amount of
military retired pay certain retired regular officers may receive while employed
as civilians in the Federal Government without reduction in their civilian pay.

MAJOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES
There were no major organizational changes in the Panama Canal Company
during the fiscal year.

MAJOR PERSONNEL CHANGES
Mr. Theodore C. Henter was promoted to Chief Hydrographer, effective
July 5, 1964, vice Mr. W. Houston Esslinger, retired.
Mr. Frank H. Lerchen was reassigned to Assistant Engineering and Construc-
tion Director effective July 19, 1964, vice Mr. Edward M. Browder, Jr.,
retired.
Lt. Col. Walter W. Fade, USA, was detailed from the U.S. Army as Planning
Engineer (Canal Studies) and Assistant to the Director, Engineering and






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Construction Bureau, effective August 2, 1964, vice Lt. Col. William R.
Wray, USA.
Mr. Charles McG. Brandl was reassigned as Chief, Construction Division,
effective September 6, 1964, vice Mr. Harold H. Feeney, retired.
Mr. Ernest W. Zelnick was promoted to Designing Engineer, vice Mr. Frank
H. Lerchen, reassigned, and Mr. Daniel M. Eggleston was promoted to Assistant
Designing Engineer, vice Mr. Ernest W. Zelnick, effective November 22, 1964.
Mr. John E. Fisher was designated as General Auditor effective
November 22, 1964.
Mr. Lawrence L. Jenrich was designated as Chief Accountant effective
November 22, 1964.
Mr. Thomas H. Scott was designated as Chief, Systems Staff, effective
November 22, 1964.
Mr. Elmer G. Abbott, Captain of the Port (Balboa), retired on December 21,
1964.
Mr. Robert Lessiack was promoted to Assistant Comptroller (Chief, Budget
and Rates) effective January 3, 1965, vice Mr. LeRoy B. Magnuson, retired.
Mr. Olen A. Dietz retired as Supervisory Maintenance Engineer (Atlantic)
effective March 29, 1965.
Mr. F. R. Johnson was promoted to Management Analysis Officer (Assistant
Chief, Executive Planning Staff) effective April 11, 1965, vice Mr. Thomas
E. Burrow, resigned.
Mr. Carl J. Browne was promoted to Supervisory General Engineer (Assistant
Engineering and Construction Director) effective May 2, 1965, vice Mr. Frank
H. Lerchen, retired.
Mr. Howard W. Osborn was promoted to Supervisory Maintenance Engineer
effective May 10, 1965, vice Mr. Carl J. Browne, promoted.

FORCE EMPLOYED AND RATES OF PAY
The full-time force employed by the Panama Canal Company on the Isthmus
of Panama as of June 30, 1965, totaled 11,284, an increase of 3 over the
number employed on June 30, 1964.
The full-time U.S. citizen force of the Panama Canal Company on the
Isthmus numbered 2,305 on June 30, 1965, as compared with 2,364 on
June 30, 1964, a decrease of 59, or 2.5 percent. The full-time non-U.S. citizen
force totaled 8,979 as of June 30, 1965, as compared to 8,917 on June 30, 1964,
an increase of 62, or 0.7 percent. The decrease in Company force from 1964
to 1965 resulted largely in the operating units due to reorganizations, reductions
in workload, and force ceiling restrictions. The greatest decreases were
reflected in the Marine Bureau and the Transportation and Terminals Bureau.
In addition to employees on the Isthmus there were 156 U.S. citizens
employed in the Washington and New Orleans offices on June 30, 1965.
Of the 156 in the United States, 4 were in the Washington office, 24 in the
New Orleans office, and 128 officers and crew on the SS Cristobal.
Employments are made under the Canal Zone Merit System, established by
the Canal Zone Wage and Employment Practices Act, 1958, Public Law
85-550 (72 Stat. 405.11 now Canal Zone Code, Title 2, Section 149) assuring






ADMINISTRATION


equal opportunity for citizens of the United States and Panama to obtain
employment in all Canal Zone U.S. Government agencies, in all nonsecurity
positions for which they qualify.
Since the Canal Zone Wage Plan was placed in effect in February 1959,
there has been considerable emphasis placed on training and utilization of
qualified non-U.S. citizen employees in U.S.-based, higher-paying positions.
Since that date, the number of non-U.S. citizens in U.S.-wage-base positions
has increased from 144 to 980, an increase of 836, or approximately 600 percent.
Rates of pay are established regardless of citizenship on a Canal Zone wage
base for occupational categories which can be filled by recruitment on the
Isthmus and on a U.S. wage base for those positions which would normally
be recruited from the United States. The current Canal Zone Wage Plan
contains the following job groups:
Non-manual category-white collar positions, including clerical, professional,
and administrative type jobs.
Manual category-blue collar workers, including laborers, semi and skilled
craftsmen, and related supervisors.
Special category, administrative-includes teachers, policemen, firemen,
postal workers, pilots, and miscellaneous and fee rate group.
Special category, wage board-includes floating equipment, power branch,
printing plant, railroad, apprentices, and learnership group.
Company/Government rate group-includes positions excluded from the
Canal Zone Pay Plan, such as executives, hospital, military, and employees in
the United States.
FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES PAID AT U.S. WAGE BASE'
For several years increasing emphasis has been placed on providing employ-
ment and promotion opportunities in higher paid positions to. non-U.S. citizens.
Since February 1959 the number of non-U.S. citizens in U.S.-base positions has
increased from 144 to 980, an increase of approximately 600 percent. During
fiscal year 1965 an increase of 121 such employment occurred.
Turnover in full-time U.S. citizen Isthmian force
During fiscal year 1965 there were 501 full-time terminations of U.S. citizen
employees (including 7 military) for whom replacement employment were
made. In addition, there were 27 U.S. citizen full-time employees added to
the force. Terminations show a decrease of 40, or 7.4 percent, under the
541 occurring in fiscal year 1964.
Turnover in full-time non-U.S. citizen Isthmian force
Exclusive of student assistants, 1,024 full-time employees were terminated
in the non-U.S. citizen group. All of these were replaced and there were
194 additional employment.
Recruitment
Of the 538 U.S. citizen full-time accessions in fiscal year 1965, only 91, or
about 17 percent, were recruited from the United States, and 447, or 83 percent,
I Statistics in this section cover both Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government
employees.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


were recruited locally. All of the 1,191 full-time non-U.S. citizen employ-
ments were local recruitments. These additions to the force for fiscal year 1965
represent an accession rate of 14 percent for U.S. citizens and 12 percent for
non-U.S. citizens.
The 91 employees recruited in the United States included 22 teachers for
the U.S. schools system, 12 interns and hospital residents, 18 skilled craftsmen,
and 39 medical and professional employees not available from Canal Zone
or Panama sources.
At the close of the fiscal year, there were 15 U.S. requisitions pending for
which selections had been made and 29 vacancies pending for which no
selection had been made. The 29 vacancies for U.S. recruitment included
positions for teachers, nurses, skilled craftsmen, pilots-in-training, and
pharmacists.

Pay adjustments
Virtually all employees of the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone
Govenrment received salary and wage increases during fiscal year 1965 in six
different wage adjustments, and the third phase of the three-phase Canal Zone
base adjustment. The total annual cost to the Company/Government of
these adjustments will be approximately $3,369,976. This figure includes
6.5 percent added for retirements costs. In comparison, the annual cost of
pay increases in fiscal year 1964 amounted to approximately $4,400,000
including retirement costs.

Cash relief for disabled employees
Effective October 5, 1958, with the implementation of section 13 of Public
Law 85-550 placing non-U.S. citizen employees under the Civil Service Retire-
ment Act, the Cash Relief Act of 1937 as amended was discontinued prospec-
tively. Beneficiaries on the Cash Relief Act rolls prior to that date continue
to draw Cash Relief Act benefits.
During fiscal year 1965 monthly payments for cash relief averaged $140,328
($130,256 in the Company and $10,072 in the Government). In fiscal year
1964 monthly payments averaged $150,713, about $10,385 more per month.
The total average monthly payment per case remained about $48.
During fiscal year 1965 there were 252 removals from the rolls due to death,
221 for the Company and 31 for the Government. The number of cash relief
beneficiaries as of June 30, 1965, was 2,825 (2,612 for the Company and
213 for the Government).
Now pending in Congress is bill H.R. 5541, which would increase the
maximum cash relief benefit from $55 to $65 per month. This would produce
a new average payment of $58 per month. Included in the bill is a provision
which would entitle widows of cash relief annuitants to an annuity equal to
one-half the rate which the husband would receive if he were alive. This bill
has passed the House of Representatives and is still pending in Congress.
During fiscal year 1965 there were no former employees eligible for
repatriation under this program.






ADMINISTRATION


INCENTIVE AWARDS
The Incentive Awards Program for the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone
Government is designed to encourage, recognize, and reward employees
at all levels for their constructive ideas and meritorious job performances
which result in increased efficiency and economy of operation.
This fiscal year 770 employee suggestions were submitted within the agency,
a decrease of 266 under the 1,036 submitted in 1964. During the year awards
were approved for 180 beneficial suggestions which were adopted. Benefits
were estimated to amount to about $54,790 for these employee suggestions.
Cash awards totaling $43,745 were made for adopted suggestions and 207
performance recommendations. Tangible benefits increased from $454,565
in fiscal year 1964 to $698,248 this year.
Some 212 honorary award nominations were received during the fiscal year,
in comparison with 150 award recommendations in fiscal year 1964.
In addition, a Superior Service Award was granted one employee for initiative
that resulted in an estimated tangible benefit of $360,000.
In observance of the 10th-anniversary year of the Incentive Awards Program,
seven special Presidential certificates were granted to individuals for their
beneficial suggestions resulting in tangible benefits estimated at $141,683.
Prompt processing of all suggestions has been an aid in this program.
Extensive written and pictorial publicity has been secured in Company publica-
tions and in Panama newspapers in both languages, and the presentation of
a series of 35-mm. slides during employee discussions on the program were
utilized to advantage.

SAFETY PROGRAM
The principal duties of the Safety Branch are to supervise and promote the
application of safety measures in all units of the Panama Canal Company and
the Canal Zone Government, and to develop and improve accident prevention
programs for those organizations, including the coordination of occupational
health, sanitation and fire prevention activities with the overall accident
prevention program.
During the year full-time safety supervisors and safety inspectors, responsible
for handling safety matters in the Marine, Engineering and Construction,
Transportation and Terminals, and Supply and Community Services Bureaus,
continued their activities. The Office of the Comptroller, Personnel, Civil
Affairs, and Health Bureaus utilized the services of employees assigned as
part-time safety assistants, in addition to their other duties, for harndhng safety
measures.
Membership was continued in the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad,
the Latin American counterpart and affiliate of the National Safety Council.
Such membership enables the Company/Government to maintain better safety
communication with non-English speaking or reading employees who are more
interested and responsive to such materials when provided in their native
language.
Statistics in this section cover both Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government
employees.






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


The highlight of the year in safety activities was President Johnson's
inauguration of Mission Safety 70 on February 16, 1965. The goal of the
Mission is to reduce by 30 percent the number of disabling injuries to Federal
workers. It is his desire that this goal be reached by 1970. In compliance
with requirements of the program, a detailed report of a careful and critical
review of the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government safety
program was forwarded to the President on May 10, 1965. As a result of
the review it was found that significant weaknesses in the execution of the
program existed, and in an effort to minimize or eliminate such weaknesses
several additional safety requirements were established in memorandum of
May 24, 1965, to all operating bureau directors.
The existence and goal of Mission Safety 70 has been widely publicized
to all employees and supervisors. The program will receive continuing
emphasis until the goal is reached.
Personnel of the Safety Branch and the Health Bureau are conducting a
feasibility study regarding the first-aid treatment of industrial injuries and
occupational diseases by a separate clinic or industrial health dispensary.
The Industrial Health Branch presently staffed by four physicians appears
to be the logical organization to head up and provide such treatments and
the study is being conducted with this objective in mind.
During the year, the Chief, Safety Branch, as Chairman of the ad hoc
committee appointed by the Governor/President to investigate the need for
and to develop suitable safety regulations to protect the health and safety of
all longshoremen employed aboard vessels in Canal Zone waters, completed
and submitted such regulations to the Office of the General Counsel. They
were published on June 28, 1965, as General Order No. 32, Regulations
Governing Stevedoring.
The Governor/President Safety Trophy, awarded each calendar year to the
bureau achieving the highest percentage improvement in disabling injury
frequency rate over its own previous 3-year average, was not awarded this year
since no bureau met the requirements. During the first half of the fiscal year
the accident rate continued higher than normal as it also was during the last
half of the preceding fiscal year. However, improvement was shown in the
last half of this fiscal year with the number of accidents for the January-June
period totaling 86 as compared to 112 for the January-June 1964 period.
Outstanding safety achievements were as follows: the Canal Zone Division
of Schools earned its ninth consecutive annual award for 100-percent participa-
tion in the National Safety Council School Safety Program which requires a
comprehensive and highly successful safety program throughout the Canal
Zone school system; and the Supply and Community Service Bureau earned
the National Safety Council's "Award of Merit" for outstanding safety
achievement for the period February 10, 1965, to May 23, 1965.
Three fatalities occurred during fiscal year 1965, two in the Transportation
and Terminals Bureau, and a third in the Dredging Division. The fatality
rate this year is equivalent to 1 accidental death for every 4,811 employees, as
compared to the national average of 1 death for every 4,662 workers employed,
as reported for calendar year 1963 by the National Safety Council. There was







ADMINISTRATION


one injury causing permanent partial disability as compared with five injuries
last year and there were no permanent total disability cases this fiscal year.
This year's disability injury frequency rate of 6.08 represents an 18-percent
decrease over last year's rate of 7.42. This is the 10th consecutive year that
the Company/Government frequency rate remained below the national
all-industry average, which in 1964 was 7.94, as reported by the National
Safety Council. This year's disabling injury severity rate of 728 represents
a 55-percent increase over last year's rate of 469. While the total number
of disabling injuries were fewer than in the previous year, the fact that there
were three fatalities as against one in the previous year accounts for the
increase in the severity rate.
Federal property damages were reported in the amount of $52,275 this year
compared to $52,161 last year.

Safety Statistics
Fiscal year
1965 1964
Employee-hours of exposure 29,125,244 28,850,835
Disabling injuries ------------------- ----- 177 214
Injuries causing permanent partial disability- 1 5
Injuries causing permanent total disability----------- 0 0
Frequency rate ------------------- 6.08 7.42
Severity rate2 ---------------------- 728 469
Number of fatalities__--------------- 3 1
Days charged --------------------- 21,213 13,521
1 Disabling injuries per million employee-hours of exposure.
2 Severity rate is the time charged in days, per million employee-hours of exposure.













Chaptet V


FINANCIAL REPORT AND

STATISTICAL DATA

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND RELATED SUPPLEMENTARY
REPORTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965
The financial statements of the Panama Canal Company appearing as tables 1
through 10, with the accompanying notes, present the financial position of
the Company at June 30, 1965, and the financial results of its operations for
the fiscal year then ended.
All statements have been examined by the General Auditor of the Panama
Canal Company and are subject to audit by the General Accounting Office.
Detailed audit reports of the General Accounting Office are directed to the
Congress and are presented as congressional documents.
A brief financial review can be found on page 5 of the introduction.
Supplementary information concerning funds, operating results, payments
to the U.S. Treasury, net direct investment of the U.S. Government, and
retained revenue is presented in the tabulations and comments which follow.

Equity of the U.S. Government
The net direct investment (interest-bearing) of the U.S. Government in
the Panama Canal Company was increased in excess of $1 million during the
year primarily as the result of the reversal of excess valuation allowances for
(1) early retirement of 25-cycle plant, $751,150, and (2) possible loss on
obsolete and excess stocks, $337,269. Retained revenue was charged with
$655,000 of abandoned construction projects, the costs of which were incurred
in prior years.
Capital Expenditures
Company capital expenditures amounted to $10.6 million. The budgeted
estimate for the year was $12.5 million. Expenditures in the transit operations
exceeded $4 million, the principal expenditure being $2.6 million for locks
towing locomotives. A total of $2.4 million was expended for purchase and
installation of a steam turbine-generator for the electric power system.

41


11351--7







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 1.-Comparative Statement of Financial


Assets
CURRENT ASSETS:
Fund balances with U.S. Treasury and cash:
Fund balance in U.S. Treasury checking
account---------------
Cash in commercial banks, on hand, and in
transit----------------

Accounts receivable:
Canal Zone Government and other U.S.
Government agencies -
Republic of Panama----------------
Other---------------------------

Inventories (note 1):
Materials and supplies (principally at
standard cost) less allowances for excess,
obsolete, and inactive stocks of $602,538
in 1964------- -------------
Merchandise held for sale (at average cost)-


Other current assets ------------
Total current assets ------------
FIxED ASSETS (note 2):
Cost-------------------------------
Less depreciation and valuation allowances --

THATCHER FERRY BRIDGE:
Capitalized construction costs--------
Less allowance for depreciation -

Fund balance with U.S. Treasury ----- --


DEFERRED CHARGES AND OTHER ASSETS -----


1965


$1,439,237
4,787,148
6,226,385


3,481,936
2,391,330
2,297,340
8,170,606



7,221,165
3,821,349
11,042,514

173,008
25,612,513

662,700,296
198,544,696
464,155,600

19,059,518
998,499
18,061,019
138,427
18,199,446
652,422
508,619,981


1964


$3,837,620
5,488,425
9,326,045


1,652,034
2,264,277
1,967,761
5,884,072



6,412,868
4,479,927
10,892,795

133,930
26,236,842

658,591,459
198,103,928
460,487,531

18,751,069
690,374
18,060,695
1,315,340
19,376,035
696,118
506,796,526


Automatic Data Processing
A major change in accounting technique was inaugurated on April 1, 1965,
with the installation of a computer. The first phase, now on the computer,
is that of inventory control. Systems studies in process will shortly result in
use of the computer for payroll and personnel procedures.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1. Inventories. Inventories of operating materials and supplies are stated
principally at standard cost. Inventories of merchandise for sale are stated
at average cost using the retail method for valuation.
Allowance for excess, obsolete, and inactive materials and supplies amounted
to $602,538 at June 30, 1964. During fiscal year 1965 this allowance was
charged with $265,000 for losses on excess, obsolete, and inactive stock. The






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Condition June 30, 1965 and 1964

Liabilities and equity
CURRENT LIABnrriEs:
Accounts payable:
U.S. Government agencies ____-________
Other_- ______________ ______


Due U.S. Treasury_ _-_-_ _-__
Accrued liabilities:
Employees' leave liability.-----------
Salaries and wages---------------
Claims for damages to vessels------_-_--
Other_________ ____ __


Other current liabilities -_________________
Total current liabilities --------------_-_
RESERVES:
Overhaul of locks___ .._.____
Maintenance of channels _____
Non-capital power conversion costs ---.------


EQUITrry OF U.S. GOVERNMENT (note 3):
Net direct investment, interest-bearing --------
Retained revenue, non-interest-bearing -------
Thatcher Ferry Bridge, non-interest-bearing--


1965


$2,375,019
3,566,421
5,941,440
2,010,493

11,317,778
1,486,317
618,180
1,081,919
14,504,194
958,448
23,414,575


1964


$1,615,239
4,030,337
5,645,576
1,904,532


10,369,027
1,733,976
252,750
863,085
13,218,838
861,117
21,630,063


1,559,862 2,020,548
---_-___ 49,230
178,080 178,080
1,737,942 2,247,858


329,830,278
135,437,740
18,199,446
483,467,464
508,619,981


328,812,302
134,730,268
19,376,035
482,918,605
506,796,526


The accompanying "Notes to Financial Statements" are an integral part of this
statement.

balance was closed out to the Company's interest-bearing investment. In the
future, inventory losses, if any, will be charged to operations.
2. Fixed assets. Fixed assets generally are stated at cost, or if acquired from
another Government agency at original cost to such agency. Valuation
allowances have been established in accordance with sections 62 and 412
of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code (1) to offset the cost of defense facilities and
suspended construction projects-principally the partial construction of a third
set of locks abandoned in the early part of World War II-totaling $89.7 million
(both the cost and the valuation allowances have been excluded from the
statement of financial condition) and interest during original construction
aggregating about $51 million and (2) to reduce to usable value the cost of
those fixed assets transferred to the Company from The Panama Canal (agency)
at July 1, 1951. Because of historical practice and a construing of the Canal






FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Zone Code as not requiring the depreciation or amortization of certain assets,
depreciation or amortization allowances have not been provided on titles,
treaty rights, and excavations of channels, harbors, basins, and other works
costing about $310 million. If these assets were depreciated at the rate of
1 percent per annum, there would be an annual charge against operations of
approximately $3 million. Depreciation allowances on all other fixed assets
are accumulated on a straight-line basis.
3. Equity of the U.S. Government. The equity of the U.S. Government
in the Company consists of the net direct investment, established in accordance
with section 62 of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code, and the retained revenue.
The Company is required to pay interest to the U.S. Treasury on the net
direct investment at a rate established by the Secretary of the Treasury.
The rates for 1965 and 1964 were, respectively, 3.457 and 3.328 percent.
The act of August 25, 1959 (73 Stat. 428), amended section 71 of title 2
of the Canal Zone Code to provide the Company with authority to borrow
funds from the U.S. Treasury not to exceed $10 million outstanding at any
time at interest rates to be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury.
The act of July 23, 1956 (70 Stat. 596), directed the Company to construct,
maintain, and operate a high-level bridge across the Canal at Balboa, for
which funds were appropriated. Because of national policy the costs of
construction and of maintenance and operation are to be treated as extraor-
dinary costs and are not to be related to the operations of the Company.
Maintenance of the bridge for the year amounted to $232,668, the cost of
which was financed from Company cash and the Company's interest-bearing
investment reduced accordingly as authorized by law.
Beginning with fiscal year 1966, the Company will be required to absorb
the cost of maintenance and depreciation on the bridge by general provision
included in the 1966 Public Works Appropriation Act.
4. Contingent and other liabilities. The Company is contingently liable
with respect to certain pending suits and claims. In addition, the Company
has outstanding at all times certain liabilities of indeterminable amounts
which are recognized in the accounts on an as-paid basis. These liabilities
include, principally, monthly relief benefits payable to retired alien employees;
repatriation costs earned by certain employees; benefits payable under provi-
sions of the Federal Employees Compensation Act; and commitments for
construction work, supplies, and services.
The maximum liability which could result from outstanding claims and
lawsuits is estimated to be $2.7 million. The relief payments to be made to
retired alien employees in fiscal year 1966 are estimated at $1.5 million.
Repatriation allowances are payable to certain employees who, after comple-
tion of two years of service, are entitled to such allowances upon termination
of their employment. The maximum liability for payment of repatriation at
future dates is estimated not to exceed $6 million. Commitments under
uncompleted construction contracts and unfilled purchase orders amounted to
$5 million at June 30, 1965.
The Company held at June 30, 1965, negotiable U.S. Government securities
and Republic of Panama securities in the face amount of $1,950,000 deposited







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 45

by customers and Panamanian insurance firms to guarantee contract per-
formnance and payment of tolls and other charges and, on behalf of the Canal
Zone Government, negotiable securities in the face amount of $543,500 to
guarantee payment of possible judgments against insurance companies
operating in the Canal Zone.

Table 2.-Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenses,
Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1965 and 1964

REVENUE: 1965 1964
Tolls ------------------------------------ $65,502,769 $61,146,998
Credit for tolls on U.S. Government vessels---- 1,651,890 1,399,393
Commodities sold -------------------------- 24,310,613 23,281,107
Service sales and rentals -------------- 29,735,045 27,219,173
121,200,317 113,046,671

OPERATING EXPENSES AND OTHER COSTS:
Payroll and related costs ------------ 62,807,256 58,785,601
Material and other operating expenses ------ 11,396,153 9,375,310
Cost of commodities sold ---------16,589,731 15,953,752
Depreciation ------------------------------ 5,948,495 5,524,986
Net cost of Canal Zone Government ------- 18,443,466 16,300,215
Interest on net direct investment of U.S. Govern-
ment ---------------------------------- 11,375,288 10,950,382
126,560,389 116,890,246
Less payroll and other costs transferred to Com-
pany capital projects and Canal Zone Govern-
ment programs --------------------------- 7,754,299 6,504,886
Total operating expenses and other costs--- 118,806,090 110,385,360
Net revenue before recognition of loss on dispo-
sition of fixed assets---- ------- 2,394,227 2,661,311
Deduct loss on disposition of fixed assets---- 851,788 499,406

NET REVENUE ------------- ---- -------------- $1,542,439 $2,161,905







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 3.-Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


EQUITY AT JULY 1, 1964 _---- -
Additions:
Net revenues------------
Reversal of excess valuation
allowances for:
Early retirement of 25-
cycle plant -----
Loss on obsolete and ex-
cess stock--------
Reactivation of plant ----
Loss on retirement of 25-
cycle plant charged to
operations in prior years,
instead of valuation allow-
ance established therefor-
Property transfers, other U.S.
Government agencies, net-

Reductions:
Abandoned capital construc-
tion projects-------
Reclassification of items pre-
viously capitalized ----
Thatcher Ferry Bridge:
Release excess construc-
tion appropriation-
Provision for deprecia-
tion------------
Funded maintenance
costs -----------
Municipal facilities, fi-
nanced from bridge
funds, transferred to
the Canal Zone Gov-
ernment------


Net direct Retained revenue, Thatcher Ferry
investment, non-interest- Bridge non-
interest-bearing bearing interest-bearing
$328,812,302 $134,730,268 $19,376,035

1,542,439


751,150
337,269
103,248


70,571


58,977
330,062,946


136,343,278 19,376,035


654,982

250,556


850,000

308,125


232,668


232,668


18,464
905,538 1,176,589


EQUITY AT JUNE 30, 1965------ 329,830,278 135,437,740 18,199,446






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 47

Table 4.-Statement of Source and Application of Funds,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965

SOURCE OF FUNDS:
Revenues ------- ------ ----- $121,200,317
Decrease in cash ----------------- -- ------ 3,099,660
Reversal of excess valuation allowance for obsolete
and excess stock -------------------------------- 337,269
Proceeds from disposition of fixed assets -------------- 101,613
124,738,859


APPLICATION OF FUNDS:
Operating expenses and other costs ---------------------
Less operating expenses not requiring expenditure
of funds:
Provision for depreciation ---------------- $5,948,495
Provision for maintenance of channels ------- 3,420,658
Provision for locks overhaul -------- 987,000
Loss on disposition of fixed assets ------ 851,788
Other -------. 166,235

Capital expenditures-------------------
Channel maintenance expenditures ...-- ----------------
Canal locks overhaul expenditures------------ ---
Thatcher Ferry Bridge maintenance --------------
Net change in other working capital----___----------------


119,657,878





11,374,176
108,283,702
10,614,095
3,469,888
1,447,687
232,668
690,819
124,738,859


Table 5.-Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


TRANsrr OPERATIONS (table 6) ---

SUPPORTING SERVICES (table 7):
Maritime services -------------
Employees' services-------
Transportation and utilities -
Other supporting services ----


Operating
Revenue expenses
$73,853,079 $32,299,554


11,155,433
26,277,689
6,571,192
3,342,924
47,347,238
121,200,317


9,290,307
26,215,710
6,365,089
2,999,758
44,870,864
77,170,418


GENERAL CORPORATE EXPENSES:
Net cost of Canal Zone Government --____-- _-----
Administrative and other general expenses (table 8) ---- -
Interest on net direct investment of the U.S. Government ----


NET REVENUE -_ ----


Operating
income
$41,553,525


1,865,126
61,979
206,103
343,166
2,476,374
44,029,899


18,443,466
12,668,706
11,375,288
42,487,460

1,542,439








FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 6.-Transit Operations, Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses,

Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965

REVENUE:
Canal tolls ------------------------------------------------------- $65,502,769
Credit for tolls on U.S. Government vessels------ ----- --- ----- ------- 1,651,890
Harbor pilotage, tug, launch, and other services -----------------------_______ 6,698,420
Total revenue -------------------------------------------------_ __________________ 73,853,079
Direct
OPERATING EXPENSEs: Expenses Depreciation
Navigation services and control ---. $11,986,397 $278,296
Operation and maintenance of locks 8,738,022 1,321,897
Provision for channel maintenance- 3,420,658
Dredging of channel and harbors-- 3,230,958 367,026
Diesel power generation-----_---- 1,323,426
Provision for periodic overhaul of
locks -- 987,000
Meteorology and hydrography serv-
ices -_ -_ 686,018 10,760
Locks security force ---------- 524,088
Annuity to Republic of Panama
(repayment to U.S. Treasury)- 430,000
Damage to vessels ----------- 429,312
Operation and maintenance of dams,
reservoirs, and spillways---- 85,889 113,700
Miscellaneous -------------- --- 266,948 6,036
Total operating expenses----...... 32,108,716 2,097,715 34,206,431
Less charges to other activities ---.....-------------------------1,906,877
Net operating expenses ---------------------------------------- 32,299,554

OPERATING INCOME ------------- ----------------------- -- 41,553,525




Table 7.-Supporting Services, Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965

I Revenues Operating expenses
n--


MAnRITIME SERVICES:
Marine terminals ......- --- ----. ....._..._-----------
Vessel repairs -------.-..... ...-.-_. __.......... _....._


EMPLOyEES' SERVICES:
d .1 ,' ..; rations ............................. ......
:I .*".- .i .- housing .. ....... ... .........
Latin American community housing ---------------.--...


TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITIES:
Railroad ---------- --...... ....- ..- .... ........
Motor transportation ..---...-.- ..---- .............
Water transportation -------------------...... .........
Power system---------------------.. . .-... ..
Communication system -.........----------.--...---- ...
Water system-----------------.--------.-......
Central air-conditioning system ------------------...-.....


OTHER SUPPORTING SERVICES:
Engineering and maintenance service -----------.... ....
Storehouse --.--------------------------- --...... .....
Scrap operations ----- ------------ --
Tivoli guest house.----------------------.-.............
Printing plant --------------- -------.--- -.. .. ......
(Irounds maintenance -------------... .. -...-. ---- --__-.
Procurement.--------. -------.------.. ... ....... .
(General community and custodial services--- ......--.....
Sea level canal support division ...-....___--_-..........



TOTAL..... ..--. .....-..... -


Sales of Sales of
commodities services
--.-------. $9,902,938
-...- ------ 1,252,495

11,155,433


$22,481,017


22,481,017



39,266




39,266


1,130,282
245,918
414,130





1,790,330


451,520


451,520

1,204,419
288,044
350,579
2,763,000
437,296
1,488,588

6,531,926

823,280
25.)300
50
233,922
43,157
364,705

41,788
20,192

1,552,594


Rental of
quarters






$2,543,801
801,351

3,345,152


Total
revenue
$9,902,938
1,252,495

11,155,433


Direct
expenses
$8,451,447
4,100,064

12,551,511


22,93%,537 8,714,203
2,543,801 1,559,333
801,351 719,079

26,277,689 10,992,615

1,204,419 1,805,457
288,044 2,665,494
389,845 3,271,056
2,763,000 4,475,916
437,296 778,879
1,488,588 1,366,770
--------- 148,331

6,571,192 14,511,903


..----- 823,280
..... 1,155 782
..----- 245,968
------ 649.052
.------ 43,157
......---. 364,705

....... 41,788
...- -.. 20,192

....... 3,342,924


Cost of
commodities
sold Depreciation
........... $289,618
----- ... 114,044

..-...----- 403,662


$15,424,398


15,424,398



24,578




24,578


11,685,052 ..-
5.534,424 867,888
75,384 88,896
567,439 183,971
648,657 -- -
1,640,619 --
277,384 --
757,638 ----
20,192 --......-..
21,206,789 1,140,755


283,605
561,569
131,635

976,809


Less charges
to other
activities
$560,820
3,104,046

3,664,866

1,139,125
29,431
9,556

1,178,112


Total
operating
expenses
$8,180,245
1,110,062

9,290,307

23,283,081
2,091,471
841,158

26,215,710


94,960 610,147 1,290,270
268,700 2,657,173 277,021
89,652 3,05,521 359,765
931,037 2,821,568 2,585,385
126,375 473,672 431,582
312,553 339,794 1,339,529
54,528 121,322 81,537

1,877,805 10,049,197 6,365,089


126,931 11,194,611 617,372
149,472 5,471,645 1,080,139
6,060 13,945 156,395
29,498 66,373 714,535
25,086 638,987 34,756
38,940 1,343,419 336,140
1,140 278,524 .--.----.-
9,355 726,764 40,229
--------- ---------- 20,192

386,482 19,734,268 2,999,758


24,310,613 19,691,473 3,345,152 47,347,238 59,262,818 16,589,731 3,644,758 34,626,443 44,870,864 2,476,374


Operating
income
or (loss)
$1,722,693
142,433

1,865,126

(350,544)
452,330
(39,807)

61,979

(85,851)
11,023
30,080
177,615
5,714
149,059
(81,537)

206,103

205,908
75,643
89,573
(66,483)
8,401
28,565

343,559

343,166







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 8.-Administrative and Other General Expenses,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965


EXECUTIVE DIRECTION:
Board of directors ----------------
Office of the president -------------
Information office -----------------
Tourist facilities--------
Office of the secretary
Consultants and advisers -
OPERATIONS DIRECTION:
General and special engineering services -----
Office of the engineering and construction director-
Office of the marine director --____________-
Office of the supply and community service
director ----- _-------
Office of the transportation and terminals director-
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT:
Office of the comptroller
Annual audit------------
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION:
Personnel bureau ---
Apprentice program ---- ---------
GENERAL SERVICES:
Administrative branch -- ------
Maintenance of buildings-
Public services ------ -------
Miscellaneous -----------
EMPLOYMENT COSTS:
Alien cash relief ------
Employees' home leave travel ---
Recruitment and repatriation -----------------
Leave liability variation---- ----___
Death and disability compensation ---------
Contribution for employees' health benefit associa-
tion -. _-____--_--_-____- -__- _
Medical and other services for alien cash relief
annuitants------- -- ___-- ______
Contribution for employees' group life insurance__
Transportation of employees' vehicles----------
Over-distribution of civil service retirement con-
tribution -------------_-
Miscellaneous------- _---------
OTHER EXPENSES:
Loss on disposition of fixed assets --------
Depreciation -------__---------
Law suits and tort claims --- ---------
Civil disturbances --

LESS REIMBURSEMENTS AND OTHER CREDITS:
Expenses allocated to Canal Zone Government --
Miscellaneous ------- _______

NET ADMINISTRATIVE AND OTHER GENERAL EXPENSES_


$19,764
719,168
449,897
70,780
78,723
178,069 $1,516,401

301,501
185,437
105,313

135,628
92,058 819,937

3,466,617
61,000 3,527,617

1,099,312
157,183 1,256,495


696,272
416,952
70,166
68,992

1,563,159
993,780
408,314
373,816
193,967

154,433

108,233
80,120
52,009

(38,984)
82,365

851,788
206,022
177,681
11,778


750,000
172,607


1,252,382













3,971,212




1,247,269
13,591,313


922,607

12,668,706







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY

Table 9.-Inventories, June 30, 1965

MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES:
Storehouse branch:
General materials and supplies-------------
Petroleum products --------------------------------
Scrap ------------------------------------------
In transit to Isthmus -


Other divisions' stock:
Locks division-------------------------
Vessel repair -------------------------------------
Railroad division----------------------------------
Marine terminals ---------------------------------
Water transportation-----------------
Motor transportation division --------------
Retail stores and allied operations --------------------
Service centers ---------------------
Printing plant --------------------
Dredging division------------------------------__---
Water system------------------------------------
Power system--__ ----------------------
Construction and maintenance activities


Manufacturing and repair work in progress:
Vessel repair--- ___-------------------------------
Other units -------------------------


Total materials and supplies

MERCHANDISE HELD FORB SALE:
Retail stores and allied operations:
In warehouses and in stores -
In transit ------------


Water transportation-----------------------------------
Service centers----------------------------------------
Tivoli guest house ---------------------

Total merchandise held for sale ---- ------ -----

TOTAL INVENTORIES -----------------------


$4,944,686
227,511
138,825
356,408
5,667,430


157,079
63,896
195,214
95,110
59,250
369
131,654
53,529
15,049
198,776
67,229
67,245
271,421
1,375,821

176,563
1,351
177,914

7,221,165



3,052,047
497,397
3,549,444

2,129
224,071
45,705

3,821,349

11,042,514














TRANSIT FACILITIES:
Titles and treaty rights:
Treaty payments to Re
Depopulation of Canal


Canal excavation, fills, and embankments:
Canal channel, harbors, and basins ________ _______
Dams___ ______
Locks excavations -----____-______________-__________-
Breakwaters ----------______________
Spillways -- --------------_________-__-___-____ .



Interest during construction -- _______________
Canal structures and equipment:
Locks division------____
Dredging division --------- ___ ____________
Dams and spillways-__- _______________
Port captains ____-_-__________
Aids to navigation ..____ .___ ___________ ______. ___
Meteorological and hydrographic branch -_______. ____
Industrial division ------__ ______ --
Engineering division ._ __.-- ___________-_____- _


Total transit facilities-----
SUPPORTING AND GENERAL FACILITIES:
Maritime services:
Harbor terminals ---____---
Vessel repair______________
Drydock excavation------


_---- 257,307,220
----___ 14,999,298
-_-_-_-- 11,613,816
____-___ 9,324,423
------ 1,733,998

294,978,755

---__- 50,892,311

__-___- 89,261,835
-____-__ 15,102,527
-_______ 10,048,474
-----_ 5,611,934
---_---- 2,877,508
202,299
266,539
_----__ 138,167

123,509,283
----___ 484,109,238


21,712.443
7,424,647
126,457
29,263,547


Table 10.-Comparative Statement of Fixed Assets, June 30, 1965 and 1964

1965

Depreciation
and valuation
Cost allowances
public of Panama, 1904 __ ________________________ __ $10,000,000
Zone ___________________________________ ______ __ 4,728,889 --

14,728,889


257,076,938
--- --- 14,999,298
-- 11,613,816
------ 9,324,423
- 1,733,998

-_- ---- 294,748,473

$50,892,311 50,892,311


40,907,101
9,851,304
4,312,531
2,705,382
1,443,206
123,509
188,647
62,017
59,593,697
110,486,008


16,713,263
4,277,418
63,229
21,053,910


86,284,828
14,873,938
10,036,511
5,897,404
2,803,731
227,511
250,228
142,766
120,516,917

480,886,590


21,334,590
7,363,192
126,457
28,824,239


Cost
$10,000,000
4,728,889
14,728,889


1964


Depreciation
and valuation
allowances













$50,892,311

41,513,478
9,457,889
4,198,831
2,824,052
1,374,174
141,678
182,752
59,013
59,751,867
110,644,178


16,318,927
4,170,658
63,229
20,552,814


__-- -
__ ____ ___
__________-
_________ -
-






Employees' services:
Retail stores and allied operations --------------
Service centers-----------------------------------------------
Housing division---- -- -------------------------------


Transportation and utilities services:
Railroad--------------------------------------------------
Motor transportation division ------------
Power system-------------------------------------------
Communication system-- --------------------------------------
Water system ....----------------
Water transportation division -----------------------
Central air-conditioning service ---- -------------------


Other supporting services:
Engineering maintenance .-----------------------------
Storehouse division------------ -------------------
Tivoli guest house -------------------------------
Printing plant__ _-- ------- ------ -------- --
Grounds maintenance ---- ---------------------------
Procurement ----- ----------------------------------------
Housing division---------------------------------------------


General facilities:
Miscellaneous Company buildings ___ --------------------
Miscellaneous office equipment____ -------------____--------------


Total supporting and general facilities-----------

CONSTRUCTION WVOK IN PROGRESS ----------------- ------
RETIREMENTS IN PROGRESS ------ -------- ---------------
FACILITIES HELD FOR FUTURE USE ------------------------


------------- 6,763,024
---------- 3,809,346
----------- 42,983,635

53,556,005

.- -----.- 12,085,538
--------- 3,521,085
------ 31,552,067
--------- 4,100,100
----- --- 13,500,219
--------- 4,631,1905
--------- 1,848,520
71,238,721

-------- 3,721,477
-- --- 4,333,388
------ 873,080
- -_ 636,935
------------ 599,795
---- --- --- 18,765
248,957
10,432,397

-__---- 6,258,937
- -_____-_-- 672,479
6,931,416

- --------- 171,422,089
------------- 5,462,416
------------- 578,330
------------- 1,128,223


662,700,296 198,544,696 658,591,459 198,103,928


3,199,587
1,502,653
14,898,124
19,600,364

9,806,298
1,659,298
12,139,612
2,733,632
6,986,309
3,797,734
136,608
37,259,491

2,086,158
1,899,875
497,220
227,270
367,180
12,321
107,211
5,197,265

3,258,737
408,848
3,667,585
86,778,615


498,290
781,783


6,968,612
3,712,292
42,774,699
53,455,603

12,071,904
3,139,308
31,481,813
3,933,534
13,048,587
4,593,820
1,702,240
69,971,206

3,602,874
4,148,310
821,991
659,620
565,033
20,581
269,603
10,088,012

5,860,717
625,421
6,486,138
168,825,198
5,647,068
2,031,853
1,200,750


3,297,457
1,440,799
14,345,971
19,084,227

9,735,458
1,545,018
12,804,282
2,612,000
6,673,987
3,706,800
82,080
37,159,625

1,955,060
1,733,971
470,660
209,814
333,419
11,952
116,369
4,831,245

2,980,178
374,604
3,354,782
84,982,693


1,660,114
816,943


----------


TOTAL ---------------









FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 11.-Ocean Traffic Through Panama Canal-Fiscal Years 1955

Through 1965


Total traffic.

Number Tons
of of
transits Tolls cargo


Traffic assessed tolls
on net tonnage basis

Number Panama
of Canal net
transit tonnage


Traffic assessed tolls on
displacement tonnage
basis

Number Displace-
of merit
transit tonnage


1955 ----------- --..--
1956 ..--------.. -----
1957.-----------
1958 ------------.--------
1959 ...................------
1960 ..-- ..- ..---- ...
1961 --..
1962. -----.....- ...
1963 -..--.---....
1964-..- ...----------------
1965 ... ------


1955 -----..
1956 ...------------------
1957-- -----.........-----------
1958 ------------------..
1959 ...............---------------
1960 ..------------------
1961...................----------
1962-........---..---------....---
1963...........-----------------
1964 -------------------
1965 ----......-------------...--



1955 -------------------
1956 -----------.............-------
1957 .........----------------
1958.------------------
1959 ------------------..
1960 --------------------
1961 ............------------------
1962 ...........-----------------
1963... ...-- --------- ---
1964 ------........-------
1965.-------------------


7,997
S,209
8,579
9,187
9,718
10,795
10,866
11,140
11,017
11,808
11,534


296
266
269
279
204
182

191
300
285
254



8,293
8,475
8,84S
9,406
9,922
10,977
11,054
11,340
11,317
12,093
12,11S


Commercial Ocean Traffic
$33,849,477 40,646,301
36,153,842 45,119,042
38,444,12S 49,702,200
41,795,905 48,124,809
45,528,728 51,153,096
50,939,428 59,258,219
54,127,877 63,669,738
57,289,705 67,524,552
56,368,073 62,247,094
61,098,312 70,550,090
65,442,633 76,573,071

Government Ocean Traffic
$1,190,367 839,305
1,215,SS3 1,150,121
1,117,467 922,173
972,110 791,310
965,643 1,012,842
813,313 804,581
997,842 1,149,934
1,028,396 1,126,418
1,460,281 1,115,352
1,395,548 1,177,269
1,649,048 1,923,538

Total Ocean Traffic
335,039,844 41,4S4,606
37,369,725 46,269,163
39,561,595 50,624,373
42,768,015 4S,916,119
46,494,371 52,165,938
51,752,741 60,062,800
55,125,720 64,S19,672
58,318,100 68,650,970
57,828,354 63,362,446
62,493,S60 71,727,359
67,091,681 78,496,609


Table 12.-Traffic by Months-Fiscal Years 1965 and 1964


July .
August ----------
September ---------
October _---.------.
November .--------
December-....--.--
January .........---------
February.......-------
March-.............
April ......---------
May-----------
June-------------

Total ...------
Average per month--


Number of
transit

1964 65 1963-64
1,004 944
1,034 946
970 923
1,018 980
o08 946
1,021 958
921 1,015
819 997
1,084 1,077
1,052 1,011
1,010 1,012
943 999

11,834 11,808
986 954


Panama Canal
net tonnage Tons of cargo Tolls


1964--65
6,069,346
6,273,555
6,095,409
6,251,961
6,231,182
6,425,276
5,691,902
5,196,236
7,106,826
6,723,947
6,537,708
6,138,466

74,734,814
6,227,901


1963-64
5,566,473
5,491,930
5,509,26S
5,862,742
5,583,490
5,578,589
5,S56,561
5,899,302
6,268,488
5,924,349
6,105,355
5,986,064

69,632,611
5,802,718


1964-65 1963-64 1964-65 1963-64
6,062,061 5,923,878 $5,313,002 t< q"- q=5
6,604,144 5,641,432 5,497,262 4 '- .- .
6,227,125 5,701,689 5,338,810 4,836,521
6,248,022 5,925,018 5,483,920 5,153,861
6,155,639 5,398,696 5,435,138 4,879,040
6,644,998 5,690,073 5,641,252 4,897,036
5,705,541 5,831,527 4,981,492 5,139,945
5,160,125 6,186,786 4,523,274 5,192,816
7,969,785 6,268,912 6,231,396 5,480,020
6,997,717 5,912,355 5,888,034 5,202,264
6,631,196 6,166,497 5,731,746 5,355,460
6,466,71S 5,902,327 5,377,307 5,221,869

76,573,071 70,550,090 $65,442,633 $61,098,312
6,381,089 5,879,174 $5,453,553 $5,091,526


NOTE.-The above includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement), or of 500
displacement tons and over on vessels paying tolls on a displacement tonnage basis. Statistics on these vessels, except
as relates to displacement tonnage, have been included in the table above.


7,953
8,157
8,540
9,162
9,682
10,745
10,823
11,096
10,973
11,756
11,777


227
219
199
224
172
148
160
166
213
184
216



8,180
8,376
8,739
9,386
9,854
10,893
10,983
11,262
11,186
11,940
11,993


38,567,769
41,202,961
43,628,210
47,924,345
52,153,563
58,301,926
61,826,002
65,37S.845
64,438,115
69,632,611
74,734,814


1,184,135
1,286,841
1,086,564
1,020,267
1,047,674
864,177
1,058,393
1,095,074
1,387,597
1,337,065
1,733,736



39,751,904
42,4S9,802
44,714,774
48,944,612
53,201,237
59,166,103
62,914,395
66,473,919
65,825,712
70,969,676
76,465,550


136,987
126,233
155,055
78,691
112,609
193,471
140,760
197,390
110,002
134,221
208,205


341,199
226,813
392,671
219,938
120,562
134,965
130,905
135,236
552,925
493,655
332,827



478,186
353,046
547,726
298,629
233,171
328,436
271,665
332,626
662,930
627,876
541,032








PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 13.-Canal Traffic' by Nationality of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1965
Measured Tonnage


Nationality
Argentinian ----....----......
Belgian ---- ---
Brazilian ----
British _
Bulgarian -------------
Chilean --------------
Chinese (Nationalist)-
Chinese (Republic)
Colombian ------------
Cuban ---------------
Danish --- -------
Ecuadorian -----------
Finnish -
French -- ________-- ____
German ---- --------
Ghanaian
Greek
Guinean ------------
Haitian ------------
Honduran ------
Icelandic ---- ---- ------- ----
Indian ------------
Indonesian ....... ... -.. .
Irish
Israeli
Italian ------- ---
Japanese ---------------
Korean (South) ------ ---
Kuwait---------------------.
Lebanese ---- ----- ----
Liberian --------------------
Mexican ----- ----
Netherlands
Nicaraguan----- -------
Norwegian
Panamanian ------------
Peruvian --------------
Philippine
Spanish
Swedish ----
Swiss
United States ----------
Soviet -
Venezuelan ------------
Yugoslavian -------- --
Total, fiscal year-
1965 ----------.
1964_--_---_
1963----------


Number of
Transits
1 _
49
3
1,339
2
115
103
17
246
5
283
25
27
172
1,186
1
575
4
1
268
2
8
2
12
59
192
804
15
2
34
1,118
42
618
62
1,446 1'
518
153
84
11
388
82
1,678 1:
48
17
17


Panama
Canal
Net

264,289
11,016
9,441,036
12,988
675,192
641,259
102,439
940,690
34,393
1,892,129
117,420
166,841
863,809
5,323,945
5,393
4,199,496
28,801
6,265
327,387
18,044
113,509
6,763
90,025
407,761
1,550,597
4,886,276
80,381
1,904
181,007
9,554,288
104,311
2,680,774
151,273
0,992,214
2,300,996
568,942
550,848
36,452
2,621,579
141,450
2,197,141
294,674
22,791
126,026


11,834 74,734,814
11,808 69,632,611
11,017 64,438,115


Registered
Gross

301,040
13,852
12,828,431
18,042
878,699
851,515
140,315
1,044,722
48,167
2,186,036
133,425
209,965
1,126,811
5,472,820
7,583
5,552,428
39,875
8,464
532,353
22,976
151,824
7,434
127,278
514,782
2,072,618
6,552,046
108,045
3,020
242,954
12,372,983
138,983
3,554,173
149,880
14,100,471
2,931,317
770,615
799,510
40,702
3,580,852
155,721
15,557,083
409,663
35,108
129,542

95,924,123
89,829,766
83,832,893


Tolls
$1,526
217,750
9,323
8,291,824
11,689
606,425
577,133
92,195
844,112
30,954
1,664,459
105,615
149,251
800,476
4,614,242
4,854
3,682,461
25,921
4,511
274,416
14,616
101,041
6,536
79,398
361,870
1,360,631
4,377,156
68,499
1,542
157,977
8,235,514
95,405
2,336,989
135,593
9,588,919
1,912,766
522,107
494,557
33,896
2,308,224
117,796
10,724,351
258,959
27,590
111,564

$65,442,633
61,098,312
56,368,073


Tons of
Cargo

187,124
9,969
8,846,718
22,582
827,651
823,032
134,075
395,192
52,719
1,789,141
40,370
158,873
709,310
3,520,170
8,965
5,734,249
46,518
152,223
15,904
210,758
2,166
139,266
438,729
1,223,355
4,909,656
72,675
565
246,060
13,233,873
118,465
2,612,450
93,580
13,188,315
2,260,665
774,426
347,839
31,346
2,573,845
66,915
9,986,170
388,336
28,291
150,540

76,573,071
70,550,090
62,247,094


1 Includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement),
or of 500 displacement tons and over on vessels paying tolls on displacement basis (dredges,
warships, etc.).
NoTE.-ln Canal traffic statistics, foreign naval vessels such as transports, supply ships, tankers,
etc., with a measurement of 300 net tons (Panama Canal measurement) and over, and vessels
of war, dredges, etc., with a displacement of 500 tons and over are classified as oceangoing com-
mercial vessels. Statistics on these vessels, except as relates to displacement tonnage, have been
included in the table above. As displacement tonnage cannot be combined with net tonnage the
following table shows statistics covering 57 vessels which transited the Canal during fiscal year 1965
and paid tolls on displacement tonnage:


Nationality
Argentinian ---------------
Brazilian --------- --- ---
British ----- -------
Chilean --------- ----
French --------------------------
German
Greek -------------------
Indonesian --------- -------
Mexican
Peruvian ------- ---------
Spanish ----- --
Swedish ------- -----------
United States ----------------
Do ----------------------------
Venezuelan -


Total- -------------------------


Type
Naval_ _-
Drydock
Naval
---do ---------
do --------
----do --------
do-
do-
do --
---do-
--do .--- -----
- -.do ---------
Dredge -
Barge-
Naval___


Displace-
Number of ment
transits tonnage Tolls
1 3,051 $1,526
1 800 400
11 45,686 22,843
3 7,272 3,636
15 76,405 38,202
1 5,708 2,854
1 1,825 912
1 898 449
6 9,756 4,878
6 27,167 13,584
2 4,050 2,025
1 4,120 2,060
1 2,067 1,033
1 2,830 1,415
6 16,570 8,285
57 208,205 5104,102








Table 14.-Classification of Canal Traffic1 by Type of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1965


CAnRO AND CARGO/PASSENGER SHIPS:
Tank ships, laden:
Number of transits ------------------...............
Panama Canal net tonnage----
Tolls.------------................. ....... ::.:.. :.......
Cargo (long tons)----------------------------------
Tank ships, ballast:
Number of transits .....-.._............_-__ -___....__.
Panama Canal net tonnage -------
Tolls -..-.- -----......--........-......... .........
Ore ships, laden:
Number of transits. -----.......----------...-----------------------...
Panama Canal net tonnage ---
Tolls.................-..... ..
Cargo (long tons) -----.--..........
Ore ships, ballast:
Number of transits ......................... ....
Panama Canal net tonnage -----
Tolls.................
Passenger ships, laden:2
Number of transits ---.--------------,. ....................
Panama Canal net tonnage --- ----
Tolls ---o ....---. ..... ....... :.:.;.....
Cargo (long tons) ---------..........__.-...........
Passenger ships, ballast:2
Number of transits- ------------------......... ...... ....
Panama Canal net tonnage....... ...........
Tolls..-- -------- -------- --.............. .............-
General cargo ships, laden:3
Number of transits ---------....-_..-.-....................
Panama Canal net tonnage ---...........................
Tolls ---- -- ----. --- --... --------------------
Cargo (long tons)--..-----------------------... .......
General cargo ships, ballast:3
Number of transits -------------------------......... .....
Panama Canal net tonnage ----------------
T olls -------.. .. ...........-.--- -- --------------------
OTHER Type, SHIPS:
Naval vessels:
Number of transit ---------------.....-..................
Displacement tonnage---------------------------
Tolls....- ...--........ ...........-- ----- ----


Vessels of U.S. registry

Atlanticto Pacific to
Pacific Atlantic Total
87 66 153
1,090,158 746,012 1,836,170
$981,142 $671,411 81,652,553
2,013,716 1,052,902 3,066,618


---------- 52
---------- 81S,067
.--.-----.. $5s9,O08

--.-.---.- 3
---------- 15,4Sf
---...---- $13,937
---------- 70,600

1 -- -------
5,173 -.---....
$3,725 ------


79
761,343
$6S5,209
146.780


74 153
725,005 1,486.348
$652,505 $1,337,714
308,014 454,794


Vessels offoreign registry

Atlantic to Pacific to
Pacific Atlantic Total
776 92 858
7,103,341 624,150 7,727,491
$6,393,007 $561,735 $6,954,742
12,676,866 936,962 13,613,828


52 26 553 570
818,067 203,175 4,620,683 4,823,R5S
$589,008 $146,286 $3,326,892 $3,473,178


Total traffic

Atlantic to Pacific to
Pacific Atlantic Total
863 148 1.011Ol
8,193,499 1,370,162 9,563.661
57.374,149 $1,233,146 SS,607,295
14,690,582 1,980,864 16,680,446

26 605 631
203,175 5,438,750 5,641,025
$146,286 $3,915,900 $4,062,186


3 -------. -- 125 125 - -
15,496 1,039,611 1,939,611 1
$13,937 --.--.----- $1,745,650 $1,745,650 ----------- $1
70,600 .....-----------. 4,160,705 4,160,705 ......---- 4

1 34 2 36 35
5,173 385,296 22,648 407,944 390,469
$3,725 $277,413 $16,306 $293,719 $281,138


82
743,528
$669,175
183,137


90 172 161
889,814 1.633,342 1,504,871 1
$800,832 $1,470,007 $1,354,384 $1,
328,615 511,742 329,917


584 633 1,187 3,290 3,928 7,208 3,864
3,754,770 3,650,562 7,405,332 20,609,205 21,290,448 41,899,653 24,363,975 24
$3,379,293 S3,285,506 $6,664,799 $18,548,235 $19,161,414 $37,709,689 $21,927,578 $22
3,334,153 3,053,834 6,387,987 24,513,115 23,707,942 49,221,057 27,847,268 26


66 47 113 912
26S.420 295,552 563,972 3,216,242
$193,262 $212,797 $406,059 $2,315,694


----.. -----. ... -- ------...... 34
--------- ---------- ----------- 128,252
------..- --------. -------- $64,126


135 1,047 978
760,759 3,977,001 3,484,662
$547,747 $2,863,441 $2,508,956


20 54 34
74,256 202,508 128,252
$37,128 $101,254 $64,126


128
,955,097


,759,587 $1,759,587
,231,305 4,231,305 -

2 37
22,649 413,117 Z
$16,306 $297,444

164 325
,614.819 3,119,690 r
453,337 $2,607,721
636,619 966,536 "

- .----- --------
.------- .... -------
------- ----------

4,531 8,395
,941,010 49,304,985 2
,446,910 $44,374,488
,761,776 54,609,044

182 1,160 H
.056,311 4,540,973 -
$760,544 $3,269,500

20 54
74,256 202,508
$37,128 $101,254 r


128
1,955,097


1





Cable ships, yachts, etc.:
Number of transit ...... 0-- -------------------------.- 6
Panama Canal net ton nage -------......-----.......-----.......---- 16,536
Displacement tonnage ..................--------------------------------- --------..........
Tolls .................-------------------------------------------------.....- 14,456
Cargo (long tons) ------------------------------....................... 2,121
SliMM'ARy:
Total cargo and cargo/passenger ships, laden:
Number of transit .........................------- ........-----------------------------.. 750
Panama Canal net tonnage .-------------------------------- 5,606,271
Tolls-------... ---.-------------------------------------- $5,045,644
Cargo (long tons).....-------------------......------ 5,494,649
Total cargo and cargo/passenger ships, ballast:
Number of transits ......--------...------------------------...................... 67
Panama Canal net tonnage --.------------------.....--......------------ 273,593
Tolls ---....... ---------....--- ---------6------------ $196,987
Total other type hips:
Number of transits ............------------ -------------- (
Panama Canal net tonnage -------------------------------- 1,536i
Displacement tonnage .- -- -----.. ----------
Tolls---..-..---------............---..-....--....-----...-.......---------------------.. $14,456
Cargo (long tons).. .---------- -.. ..---------- ------.. 2,121
Grand total ships:
Number of transits...----....----...........---------------------------.. 823
Panama Canal net tonnage .-------------------------------- 5,896,40
Displacement tonnage------------------------------------- ---------
Tolls ..--.---..---.....-----------------....................--------------.....---.. 5,257,087
Cargo (long tons) --.------..............------------------------ 5,4900,770


10
50,057
4,837
$42,100
4,050


746
5,137,005
64,623,359
4,485,350

99
1,113,619
$801,805

10
50,057
4,897
$42,100
4,050

855
6,300,741
4,S97
$5,467,264
4,489,400


16 39
66,593 609,116
4,897 --- --------
$56,556 $61,132
6,171 79,108


1,496
10,743,336
$9,669,003
9,979,999

166
1,387,212
$998,792

16
66,593
4,897
$56,556
6,171

1,678
12,197,141
4,897
$10,724,351
9,986,170


4,138
28,456,074
$25,610,467
37,373,118

972
3,804,713
$2,739,393

73
69,110
128,252
$125,258
79,108

5,183
32,329,903
128,252
$28,475,118
37.452,226


38
59,657
800
$45,470
461


4,225
24,744,023
$22,269,621
29,134,214

690
5,404,090
$3,890,945

58
59,657
75,056
$S2,598
461

4,973
30,207,770
75,056
$26,243,164
29,134,675


77 45
128,773 85,652
800 .........- .
$106,632 $75,588
79,569 S1,229


8,363
53,200,097
$47,880,088
66,507,332

1,662
9,208,803
$6,630,338

131
128,773
203,308
$207,856
79,569

10,156
62,537,673
203,308
$54,718,282
06.586,0901


4,888
34,062,345
$30,656,111
42,867,767

1,039
4,078,306
$2,936,380

79
65,652
128,252
$139,714
81,229

6,006
38,226,303
128,252
$33,732,205
42,948,996


I Includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over (Pariam Canal measurement) for vessels paying tolls on net tonnage basis, or of 500 displacement tons and over for vessels paying on displace-
ment tonnage.
2 Vessels certificated for more than 12 passengers.
Vessels certificated fur 12 passengers or less, or without passenger accommodations.


48
109,714
5,697
$87,570
4,511


4,971
29,881,088
$26,892,980
33,619,564

789
6,517,709
$4,692,750

68
109,714
79,953
$124,698
4,511

5,828
36,508,511
79,953
$31,710,428
33,624,075


93
195,366
5,697
$163,158
85,740


9,859
63,943,433
$57,549,091
76,487,331

1,828
10,596,015
$7,629,130

147
195,366
208,205
$264,412
85,740

11,834
74,734,814
208,205
$65,442,633
76,573,071









58 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 15.-Laden and Ballast Traffic by Nationality of Vessel
Fiscal Year 1965

Laden Ballast

Number Panama Number Panama
of Canal net of Canal net Tolls
Nationality transits tonnage Tolls transits tonnage
Belgian------------ 27 152,569 $137,312 22 111,720 $80,438
Brazilian ----------- 1 5,508 4,957 1 5,508 3,966
British ----------- -- 1,136 8,174,640 7,357,176 192 1,266,396 911,805
Bulgarian ---------- 2 12,988 11,689 ------
Chilean ------------ 108 648,058 583,252 4 27,134 19,536
Chinese (Natl.) --- 103 641,259 577,133 ----- __ -- --
Chinese (Rep.) --- 17 102,439 92,195---- ----
Colombian ------- 236 926,750 834,075 10 13,940 10,037
Cuban ..------------- 5 34,393 30,954 ---- -----
Danish --- -- 252 1,678,477 1,510,629 31 213,652 153,829
Ecuadorian----- 24 117,069 105,362 1 351 253
Finnish 26 161,809 145,628 1 5,032 3,623
French ------------- 135 779,615 701,654 22 84,194 60,620
German ------------ 931 4,323,041 3,890,737 254 1,000,904 720,651
Ghanaian 1 5,393 4,854 -
Greek__------- 501 3,655,061 3,289,555 73 544,435 391,993
Guinean --------- 4 28,801 25,921
Haitian-- --- -- 1 6,265 4,511
Honduran------ 154 214,990 193,491 114 112,397 80,926
Icelandic- 1 9,022 8,120 1 9,022 6,496
Indian ------- 7 107,304 96,574 1 6,205 4,468
Indonesian -------.--- 1 6,763 6,087 .......
Irish --------------- 11 81,001 72,901 1 9,024 6,497
Israeli -------- 55 379,347 341,412 4 28,414 20,458
Italian--------- 176 1,356,674 1,221,007 16 193,923 139,624
Japanese------- 787 4,772,428 4,295,185 17 113,848 81,971
Korean (South) 11 59,027 53,124 4 21,354 15,375
Kuwait -------- 1 952 857 1 952 685
Lebanese 29 153,624 138,262 5 27,383 19,716
Liberian -------- ---- 893 7,535,702 6,782,132 225 2,018,586 1,453,382
Mexican ----------- 29 85,682 77,114 7 18,629 13,413
Netherlands --------- 451 2,260,179 2,034,161 167 420,595 302,828
Nicaraguan----- 60 148,200 133,380 2 3,073 2,212
Norwegian 1,208 9,302,914 8,372,623 238 1,689,300 1,216,296
Panamanian----- 325 1,422,498 1,280,248 193 878,498 632,519
Peruvian -------- 144 549,362 494,426 3 19,580 14,098
Philippine 83 544,148 489,733 1 6,700 4,824
Spanish -------- 8 31,257 28,131 1 5,195 3,740
Swedish __..._____ 347 2,325,706 2,093,135 40 295,873 213,029
Swiss__- _---_- 44 88,620 79,758 38 52,830 38,038
United States ----- -- 1,505 10,777,560 9,699,804 171 1,419,581 1,022,098
Soviet ______-_ 43 259,964 233,968 5 34,710 24,991
Yugoslavian --------- 16 115,698 104,128 1 10,328 7,436
Venezuelan -------- 7 16,087 14,478 4 6,704 4,827
Total, fiscal year-
1965_---- 9,905 64,052,579 $57,647,322 1,872 10,682,235 $7,691.209
1964--- -- 9,826 60,531,787 54,478,608 1,930 9,100,824 6,552,593
1963--------- 9,098 55,097,940 49,588,146 1,875 9,340,175 6,724,926
NorE.-Above table involves only commercial vessels of 300 net tons or over, Panama Canal
measurement.










Notionalitu
Argentinian -...........------
Belgian ...------....------
Brazilian -------------
British --------------
Bulgarian .. -
Chilean ---------
Chinese (Nationalist) ..--
Chinese (Republic) ..--.
Colombian .-.-
Cuban......-....--
Danish ---------------........
Ecuadorian -------------
Finnish __._----------
French -_ --
German ..--.-..-------
Chanaian --------------
Greek -...........--..
Guinean ---------------
Haitian -------------
Honduran -------------
Icelandic ------ -----. -
Indian --..
Indonesian --------.-
Irish -- -
Israeli --. .-- ..---
Italian -..........
Japanese ---
Korean (South) --------
Kuwait .....-.. ...
Lebanese .----.- .-..
Liberian_. _. ---------
Mexican ---.- --......-
Netherlands .-----....-
Nicaraguann -_-- -----
Norwegian.... ...... .
Panamanian -... .....
Peruvian --------...--
Philippine....... ..
Spanish -.._ -..__..._.
Swedish ____- ___-..
Swiss ..n
United States-- -..--.-
Soviet-...............-
Venezuelan.....- ....--
Yugoslavian ...- ...----


Table 16.-Frequency of Transitst of Vessels Through Panama Canal-Fiscal Year 1965
Number of vessels making indicated number of transits

1 2 8 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 I6 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 80 81
I -- --- .... --- ...- .......-- --- --- --- --- -- --- -- -- --- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- -
.... 3 3 .. -. 1 1 --- --- --- --- --- -- -- -- --- -- I -- -- --- --- -- --- --- --- -
SI --- --- -- -- --- -..- ... -- -- -- --- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- --- -- -- --- --- -- --- --- --- ---
174 134 61 40 34 27 6 3 3 2 --_ 1 1 ... ...--- --- --- -- -- --- --- --- -- --- -- -- --- ---
2 --------------- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
5 2 .-. 1 -. ...-... 2 2 1 2 3 .. ... ... -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- -- --- ---
11 10 5 6 3 3 --- --- --- --- -- -- -- --- --- -- --- -- -- -- -- --- -- --- --- --- ---
5 6 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --
4 3 .. 1 1 1 .. 1 1 1 --- 3 4 1 --- 1 ... ... ...
3 1 -- --- -- --- --- -- --- -- --- --- -- -- --- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --
21 17 12 6 7 8 4 2 1 2 .-- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- ---
2 1 .--- ----- -- --- ..- --- --- ---- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
3 4 1 .. 1 1 --- -- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- -- --- -- --- -- -- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- ---
25 17 3 7 3 3 5 1 -- -- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- --
38 74 19 28 9 18 20 10 2 3 3 ... .. 3 2 3 1 5 -- 2 --- --- -- -- 2 ... 1 --- 1
1 --- --- -- --- ... -- -.- --- --- -- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -
119 63 32 22 3 9 --- --- --- --- --- -- --- -- --- --- 1 ..--- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
1 1 ....-- ... ... ... -- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
1 -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
1 1 1 1 .---... ...-- ...--- --- -- --- --- 1 1 1 --- 1 .--- 1 1--- -- --- -- --- --- --- --
I" -- --' -'-- ---. '-'-- '-'-- '-'-- "--- '-'-- '-'-- --- '-'-- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- ---
2 -. ...--. --- --- -- --- ----- --- -- -- - --. .. ..- --- --- -- --- - -- -
2 --- --- --- -- --- -- -- --- --- --- -- --- -- -- --- -- -
4 5 1 1 4 3 --- --- --..- --- --- ---... --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --
4 5 1 1 4 3
13 10 3 4 6 7 3 -- 1 1 2 ...--- -- -- -- -- --- --- --- -- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- ---
83 58 24 35 11 17 16 13 1 --- 1 --- --- -- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
1 3 --... 2 --. ......... ... ..... .... --- --- -- -- -- -- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- ---
1 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
13 6 3 -- --- -- --- --- -- -- -- --- -- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- --- ---
164 120 40 38 16 18S 6 2 --- 2 2 1 1 .- --- 1 1 1 --- --- --- .. 1 ..-- 1 --- --- ---..
10 1 ... --- -- --- 2 2 --... ..- -- --- --- --. --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- -- ---
26 43 12 4 7 7 3 3 1 ... --- 1 1 --- 2 ... ... --- .... --- -- -- --- -- -- --- --- ---
1 -... -... ..-- -- --.. --- --- -- -- 1 1 --- 2 -- --- -- -
114 123 50 44 27 32 14 9 5 1 2 2 2 -- ------.. --- -- --- ..-- 1 --- 1 --- --- --- --- --- -- --
39 29 5 3 2 2 2 2 2 ... 2 3 --_ 1 _-- 2 --- ... 2 ... ... 1 --- -- --- --- --- -- ---
4 3 2 1 2 1 3 3 3 2 1 --- 1 --..- --- -- -- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
1 4 ... 2 5 7 ...- ..- --- --- --- --- -- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
2 2 --. ..-- 1 -- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
27 24 13 12 9 22 7 ..--- ... ... ... ...--- ------ --- --- --- -- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
2 -- 1 -- - --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
2 ... 1.-
95 73 38 36 28 13 7 10 7 9 7 4 4 6 5 4 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 3 --- -- --- -- ---
26 11 .--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- -- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- -- --- ---
1 4 2 --. ...- ....- ...... -- -- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- -
3 7 .. --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- -- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --


Total, fiscal year-
1965 .... .. 1,059 868 330 296 178 199 101 62 28 24 22 18 12 14 10 15 9 12 5 6 3 2 3 1 1 6 .-
1964 ----------- 1,032 785 333 260 150 206 91 71 28 34 14 11 18 13 7 21 16 9 7 7 2 4 4 3 3 1
nlo9 .. ... 015 704 M0Q 27 17 in1n Q2 7q 2 31l 14 21 In 1C 7 13 11 17 5 4 2 3 2 6 -- 2 .


1 1 2 .
1 1 1 2
3 2 2 ...









Nationality
Argentinian-....----..---....-
Belgian ----------------
Brazilian--------------
British ------...-...--
Bulgarian ---.-------
Chilean..............----------
Chinese (Nationalist) ----
Chinese (Republic) -----
Colombian ..----------
Cuban .-----...------
Danish --...............----
Ecuadorian ........
Finnish ..............--
French ...............
eran-------------.. --..
Ghanaian ............--
Greek....----------------
htincan-- .i.. ...--....
Haitian ...-------------.........
Honduran. --.-.----.---
Icelandic ----------..........
Indian -----. ----------
I ndnesian ..........
Irish......-.........
Israeli... .......-.....
Italian ........-....-
Japanese ...------... .
Korean (South) -------.
Kuwait ----------------
Lebanese.............--------------
Liberian .......... ...
Mexican ---------.............------
Netherlands -.....-.....
Nicaraguan ----------...........---
Norwegian ...--.......
Panamanian -----..........-----
Peruvian --_....-_...--
l'lPhilippine ............--------------
Spanish--.........---....
Swedish..............----
Swiss.................-----------
United States ..--------.....
Soviet...............--------------..
Venezuelan.............------------
Yugoslavian ......---------

Total, fiscal year-
1965.-----------
1964 ..-....---
1963...........


S9 40





































I --.


S I .. 2 --
1 .-. 1 1 ..


Number of vessel making indicated number of transits

41 44 45 46 47 48 50 52 5S 58

















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- -. .- .- -. .- .- .- .- .- .-
- -. .- -. .- - .- .- .- .-
- .. .. -- - -- -- - -- - -
- -. .- .- -. .- .- .- .- .- .-
. - - - - - - -
. . - .-.- .- .- .- .- .-
- -. .- -. .- - .- .- .- .-
- -. .- -. .- - .- .- .- .-
- -. .- -. .- - .- .- .- .-


1 .. 2 --.. 1 -.-
1 2 --. 2 -.. I
1 3 1 2 ... .-


08 99


































--- ---
--- ---
--- --
.. ...

.. ..

--- .
--. ..
-.. _
--- -
.. .
-.. ..
--- ---
--- ---
--- --


1 --- --- --- --
1 1 1 2 1 1 ---. 1 --.
-- ... --- ... 1 ..- 1


Total Total
ships transit
1 1
9 49
2 3
489 1,339
2 2
18 115
3S 103
t11 17
23 246
4 5
SI 2S3
4 25
10 27
64 172
244 1,186
1 1
252 575
2 4
1 1
11 268
1 2
S 8
2 2
6 12
18 59
510 192
259 804
6 15
1 2
22 34
416 1,118
15 42
117 618
5 62
429 1,446
99 518
26 153
19 84
5 11
114 388
5 82
359 1,678
37 48
7 17
10 17


I .._ 1
_- 1 ._


Transit
per ship
1.00
5.44
1.50
2.74
1.03
6.39
2.71
1.55
10.70
1.25
3.49
6.25
2.70
2.69
4.86
1.00
2.28
2.00
1.00
24.36
2.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
3.2S
3.84
3.10
2.50
2.00
1.55
2.69
2.80
5.28
12.40
3.37
5.23
5.84
4.42
2.20
3.41
16.40
4.i7
1.30
2.43
1.70


3,303 11,834 3.58
3,154 11,SOS 3.74
2,938 11,017 3.75


I Includes only commercial vessels of :100 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement), or of 500 displacement tons and over on vessels paying tolls on displacement basis (dredges, warships, etc.).






Table 17.-Segregation of Transits' by Registered Gross Tonnage-Fiscal Year 1965
A average gross
2,000 4,000 0,000 8,000 10.000 1!,000 14,000 1,.000 18,000 Registered tonnage per vessel
Under to to to to to to to to and gross ---- -
Nationalil2 2,000 8,999 5,909 7,909 9,999 11,009 18,999 15,0999 17,999 over Total' tonnage 1965 1960
Belgian ------------------------------- 25 10 ..------ -------- 2 10 2 ------ -----. 49 301,040 68,144 6,781
Brazilian .... .. -. .. ... -. 2 ---- -------- ------- ---- -- ---.. ------- 2 13,52 6,92 --- --
British --- ----------- 1 28 63 270 355 243 122 34 9 93 1,328 12,S28,431 9.663 9.393
Bulgarian .------ ----- ------- 2 ........ ------- ------- -- --- 2 18,042 9.021 8,556
Chilean ------------I ----- 22 51 1 1 1 1 -------- 112 S78,699 7,840 7,910
Phinese (Nationalist --- ----- 7 55 26 15 .......----- ..-.. ..----- ------- ........ 103 51.515 8,267 ,525
Chinee (Republi) ---- ------ 1 10 3 3 --- -- ...... --- ..... 17 140.315 S,254 8,309
Colombian -. -- 69 6 155 -...-- -.-.- 15 -------- -------- -------- ------ 245 1,044,722 4,264 3.0652
Cuban ------ --------------- -- --- -.- ..- .... 5 ....------ ......... .....- ------ 5 48.167 9.633 ..----
Danish --- --- 1 25 104 61 49 .-----...... 21 ---... 4 18 293 2,1S6,036 7,724 6,75S
Ecuadorian ---------- 3 21 ........ -------- ....----- ----........ -------- --- ------- 24 133,425 5,559 5,25
Finnish ------- 2 4 3 1 .-------------...-----......-- -..--------......---.....---.... 27 209,965 7,776 7,951
French -- ---- -- --- 3 49 46 34 1 12 ... ..- 1 2 156 1,120i,811 7,223 7,531 1
German ------- ....- -- --. 127 607 158 140 64 34 30 12 10 3 1,185 5,472,820 4,618 4,576
Ohanaian 1 -------- ------ -------- 1 7,583 7,583 ..-- --- -
Greek -------------------------- 1 13 62 202 90 07 53 40 2 24 574 5,552,428 9,673 9.646 >
Guinea --------------------------------------------------- -------1 3 -- ............. ........ 4 3975 9,969 10764
Haitian 1 ....--- -----...... ------ 1 8,464 8,464 -
Honduran ............ 168 71 28 1 ..-- ---..... ---- .... .....--..-- ---- ---.... 26 532.353 1,9R6 2,376
elandic --------- -------- -------- -------- 2 ---------------- ---............---- -- ..-- 2 22,976 11,48 ..---
Indian --- "-- "I .- ... 1 0 6 8 1511 ,024 1 ,.976 21,0633
Indonesian ................. ----- ------ -------- .------- -----.. --- 1 6,866 6,806 ...-- --
Irish --------------- 2 --------------- ----- 12 127,270 10,606 9,892 a
Israeli ----------------------------------------------- 13 11 20 11 2 2 59 514,782 8,725 5,553 ^
Italian ------------------ ------- 2 4 33 82 7 37 3 2 22 192 2,072,618 10,705 9,572 0
Japanese .......... ... 56 13 4 211 442 42 34 ..----.... ...---- ----... 2 04 6,552,040 8,149 7,974 W
Korean (South) -------- 15 --------..-------- 15 100,045 7,203 6,476 H
Kuwait -----------2 ---------------- 2 3,020 1,510 ..
Lebanese .... . .. .- 3 28 3 .- 34 242,954 7,146 6,8 3 >
Liberian ----------------------------- 96 5 31 235 113 205 100 2 40 148 1,110 12,372,983 11,067 10,163
Mexican....... .....--------------- ----- 17 1 9 7 ---- --- ----- ----34 130,90 3 4,S00 2,974
Netherlands .. .........------------------------- 30 13 42 44 82 51 23 1 3 51 610 3,554,173 5,751 5,060
N icaragu an --- -- -- 1 01 .. . . . . . . 6 2 14 9 ,6 00 2 ,4 17 2 ,442 4 2.
Norwegian -............... 7 161 216 17 254 201 20q 23 70 119 1,446 14,100,471 9,751 9,083
Panamaniann ----------- 286 14 23 61 11 35 10 7 27 44 510 2,931,317 5,659 4,372 H
Peruvian ---19 47 31 31 16 3 -- 147 770,615 5,242 5,410
Philippine ...------------------ 1 2 2 09 10 -------- ------------------------ 84 799,510 9,510 9,074
Spanish ....... ... ............. ...- .... 2 5 -------- 1 -------- ..... .... .. ... ..-- - - - 6 40,702 5 ,060R 3,4 450
Swedish 0..... 6 27 126 132 35 21 3 20 17 387 3,560,852 9,253 8,502
Swiss .174 5 ... 0 .. .-.. .. .2 155,721 1,899 1,619
United States ---------- 76 3 144 509 529 90 33 140 63 1 1,676 15,557,083 9,2s2 9,002 17
Soviet....................-------------------..------------ 1 5 13 19 9 1 --------.----------------- 4 430,663 6,535 6,837
Venezuelan ------------------------- 8 ........ .. ..... ........- 2 1 --------. -------- --------- --------- 11 35,102 3,192 3,460 e
Yugoslavian -------.......--..----------------------- ---------------- 13 1 1 2 .... ........ 17 129,542 7,620 6,426 >

Total, fiscal year 1965 -- 1,404 1,172 1,234 2,373 2,484 1,141 728 351 252 632 11,771 95,923,555 8,149 7,697 >
Percent of total -----------------..----. 11.9 10.0 10.4 20.2 21.1 9.7 6.2 3.0 2.1 5.4 100.0
1 Includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over, Panama Canal measurement.
Excludes 57 vessels paying tolls on displacement tonnage basis and 6 transits where ,n re.ct--ed fnoa tnnnqin wc rppnrfoti







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 18.-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC 1965 1964 1963 1962
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt)-- 13,914 10,988 10,828 10,228
Coal and coke------------------------ 6,471 6,184 5,172 6,817
Phosphate------------------------------ 3,123 2,212 1,803 1,878
Corn----------------------------------- 2,245 2,274 1,310 1,105
Metal, scrap ------------------------ 2,117 3,047 1,700 3,215
Soybeans-------------------------------- 1,653 1,510 1,446 1,196
Manufactures of iron and steel------------ 1,546 1,440 1,282 1,690
Ores, various-------------------------- 1,195 1,184 771 718
Chemicals, unclassified-------------------- 796 700 565 638
Sugar---------------------------------- 660 536 774 2,105
Wheat---------------------------------- 632 622 468 705
Paper and paper products------------------ 573 491 340 359
Sulfur --------------- ------------------ 472 471 285 387
Machinery ------------------------------ 444 414 422 404
Fertilizers, unclassified------------------- 441 433 334 396
Automobiles and accessories ---------------- 393 385 309 289
Cotton, raw----------------------------- 355 390 341 397
Ammonium compounds-------------------- 306 310 225 484
Metals, various--------------------------- 296 354 299 399
Rice------------------------------------ 260 138 145 119
Flour, wheat----------------------------- 226 207 271 237
Chemicals, petroleum------------------- -- 220 222 147 N.A.
Canned food products--------------------- 212 219 194 207
Sorghum-------------------------------- 208 215 N.A. N.A.
Cement-------------------------------- 182 186 123 111
Asphalt --------------------------------- 161 178 167 194
Soda and sodium compounds --------------- 158 139 110 138
Asbestos -- ------ ------------- 151 130 115 134
Tinplate------- --------------------- 143 171 182 259
Resin ----------------------------------- 131 126 85 109
Glass and glassware 124 133 106 109
Pulpwood ----------------------------- 124 154 125 104
Clay, fire and china -------------- 112 99 60 57
Oil, vegetable ---------------------------- 109 116 116 119
Grains, unclassified ---------------- 106 202 159 23
Rubber, manufactured ------------ 104 104 97 87
Liquors and wines -------------94 88 91 91
Agricultural implements --------- ---------- 89 71 58 63
Coffee ---------------------------------- 88 75 91 91
Electrical machinery and apparatus 82 72 77 78
Potash -------------------- 77 170 144 124
Food in refrigeration 73 60 63 51
Tallow -----------------58 54 48 37
Salt------------------ 53 54 47 47
Groceries, unclassified ------------- 52 56 40 46
Tobacco -------------------------------- 52 52 41 50
Textiles -------------------51 67 67 66
Slag ------------ ------ 49 53 49 58
Marble and stone ---------------- 43 44 38 N.A.
Bricks and tile --------------------------- 42 26 34 38
Lumber --------------------------------- 41 50 47 38
Wax, paraffin ------------------- 41 40 39 35
Creosote -------------- 37 13 25 36
Molasses ------------------ 33 9 67 146
Cocoa and cacao beans ---------31 25 23 17
Skins and hides -------------------------- 29 25 25 26
Carbon black ---------------------------- 25 27 26 37
Railroad materials ------------------------ 23 42 30 16
Ammunition and explosives ---------------- 20 12 16 N.A.
All other ----------------------------- 1,403 1,032 1,024 1,099
Total, Atlantic to Pacific ------------- 42.949 38,901 33,086 37,707







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 18.-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC 1965 1964 1963 1962
Ores, various---------------------------- 7,418 6,876 7,036 7,760
Lumber ------------------------------- 4,724 4,204 3,833 3,617
Sugar -------------------------------- 2,460 2,223 2,121 2,476
Iron and steel manufactures---------------- 2,297 1,134 856 478
Fishmeal -------------------------------- 1,475 1,226 1,042 N.A.
Bananas--------------------------- 1,319 1,291 1,083 1,082
Wheat -------------------------------- 1,246 1,352 779 1,092
Metals, various (including tinplate)----------- 1,241 1,168 1,107 1,218
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt)----- 1,220 2,340 1,809 1,748
Food in refrigeration (excluding bananas)----- 974 980 950 822
Canned food products-------------------- 913 950 1,011 937
Nitrate of soda--------------------------- 770 730 697 884
Pulpwood------------------------------- 554 525 496 476
Oilseeds -------------------------------- 401 243 305 330
Coffee---------------------------------- 392 453 432 399
Sulfur ----------------------------- 324 122 28 14
Cotton, raw ---------------------------- 272 307 366 294
Borax --.--------------------------- 258 239 188 174
Fruit, fresh------------------------------ 238 247 194 269
Wool----------------------------------- 237 259 281 264
Barley-- ------------------------------- 227 360 438 1,064
Coal and coke -----_______ ______ 225 379 89 77
Phosphate ----------__---------------___________------ 222 159 156 150
Paper and paper products------------------ 218 204 180 197
Chemicals, unclassified ------------------- 208 203 174 189
Molasses ------------------------------- 208 222 157 111
Corn --- ------------------------- ------- 205 20
Oil, fish ------- __----------__ --- 188 94 177 119
Textiles --------------------------- ------ 186 132 130 117
Oil, coconut ------_____-______ 180 159 142 95
Copra -----_ __---------- 170 173 195 169
Rice ------------- _____----------------------_____ __ 143 150 215 241
Chemicals, petroleum ----_--____ ____ 127 102 125 N.A.
Porcelainware -----------__---------------- 115 103 83 78
Fruit, dried ---- ---------- 97 104 95 9S
Beans, edible ----------------------------__ 76 63 68 64
Rubber, crude ---------------------------____________ 72 83 101 105
Machinery -----------------------------__ 70 65 57 50
Electrical machinery and apparatus-- ------- 57 48 35 26
Potash _------------__-------------------- ______ 57 45 20
Vegetables, dry --- _-__-- ------- _____57 36 51 3S
Wines _-___ __ --___- _______- 57 59 73 71
Peas, dry -_ --_--- -------_________ 56 67 72 69
Skins and hides ----------------_____----------___ 55 60 49 56
Bricks and tile -------___-------------------__ _____ 54 45 32 27
Infusorial earth -------------------------________ 54 55 46 43
Grains, unclassified ----------------------- 52 91 140 72
Oats ------------- ------- ---------------- 50 174 14S 8
Tallow --- _-----_----__------ 44 51 24 44
Seeds. excluding oilseeds----------_____---------_ 43 51 48 39
Cocoa ---------------------------------- 32 30 34 27
Class and glassware --__ --------------------- 31 24 22 19
Rubber, manufactured--------------------__ ___ 28 30 39 34
Flour, wheat --- ----____ -------------- 27 41 82 59
Oil, whale ------------------------------_______ 27 45 34 27
Floor coverings --------------------------_____ 26 16 18 14
Automobiles and accessories ----------------__ 25 18 15 17
Oil, vegetable, miscellaneous --------------- 24 34 34 120
Groceries, unclassified--------------------- __________ 23 30 25 42
Hemp __ _____ ________ ------------- 22 22 20 19
Motorcycles and bicycles -------- ___---------- 20 8 4
All other ----------------------___ --------- 1,033 945 900 1,669
Total, Pacific to Atlantic -_-_--- --- 33,624 31,649 29,161 29,817





0 Table 19.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama Canal from Atlantic to Pacific During Fiscal Year 1965
Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Areas


To treat coast North America


To west coast South America


EAST COAsT NORTH AMERICA: United
United States: States
North Atlantic ports-----................................----------------- 932,074
South Atlantic ports--...--......----------------------------- 16,857
Gulf ports.....................................---------------------..... 2,043,164
Great Lakes ports----------------------------------- --........................................
United States (other)2 --- ------------------ 29,217

Total, United States----------------------------- 3,021,312
Canada................................----------------------------................ 36,720
Central America/Mexico ---------------------------- 15,510
Cristobal, C.Z. --....--....----------------------..------------ 16,969
WestIndies..-..----------.............-----....--....--------..........---------.......----- 1,614,635

Total, North America....-----......---.------------..---------- 4,705,146
Eunopr:
Belgium...............................------------......------------..... 123,495
British Isles..----------------..................------.---------------.............---.. 131,611
Denmark--.................................-------------.----............ 13,820
Finland...----..........------...--------......--.-----------------................-------- 87,301
France--....-----..........-----------------...............--------.............------ 26,551
Italy-------------------..........-----------------------............---.....-- 98,969
Netherlands-..............-------.......---.------------------------------- 55,033
Norway...-...-----------------.....-...........-------------...--------------.. 80,395
Spain-Portugal...---------------------------------------- .............14,063
Sweden -----..-----------------------------------------.. 41,118
West Germany ..--------------------------------------127,005
Europe (other)2 ----------------------------------------... 82,993

Total, Europe ......................................... 882,354

EAST CoAsT SOUTH AMERICA:
Argentina -------------------------------------------- 1,473
Brazil ....------------------........----------------.....-...........------------.. 33,077
British Guiana-----....-----------.........-----------------...........------ 1,949
Colombia -------------..... ------------------------------- 134,196
Netherlands Guiana --...----------------------------------- 31,929
Venezuela.-----------.------------------------------- 2,479,282
South America (other) ...---..........----------..--..------------------............... 1,737

Total, South America-.........----------....-------......--------.......------ 2,683,643
AsIA (Middle East).....-..-.....------------------------------------....... 12,135
AFRICA......---.--................---------..........----------------..............------------- 179,965

Grand total --.......................------------------.--.......----------------- 8,463,243
PERCENT OF IACIFIC-BOUND CARGO-----...............------....----------------- 19.70
See footnotes at end of table.


Canada
480

35,833


36,313
22,201

424,961

483,475

40,155
137,947
2,008
184
2,785
12,530
14,635
742
10,165
3,081
14,248
20,918

259,398

85
5,646
27,374
30
77,421


110,556
535
11,529

865,493
2.01


Central
America/
Mexico
73,368
8,927
218,650
1,945
2,827

305,717
20,666
34,463
48,330
292,345

701,521

102,557
20,074
1,554
1,499
2,633
19,745
106,690
405
217
3,714
90,968
26,272

376,338


Balboa,
C.Z.I
15,195
415
35,088
488

51,186

222,357
221,333

494,876

116
45









161


668 .......

26,122 1,874

952,006 292,270
5 .......
978,801 294,144
130 ---

2,056,790 789,181
4.79 1.84


Hawai-
ian
Islands
92,923
2,908
51,830

12,253

159,914


142,365

302,279

9,193
448
40
1
94
138
279

92
1,400
416

12,101

319



142,700
525

143,544
6

457,930
1.07


Total
1,114,040
29,107
2,384,565
1,945
44,785

3,574,442
79,587
49,973
287,656
2,695,639

6,687,297

275,516
290,125
17,432
88,985
32,063
131,382
176,637
81,542
24,445
48,005
233,621
130,599

1,530,352

2,545
38,723
29,323
1i2,222
31,929
3,943,679
2,267

4,210,688
12,806
191,494

12,632,637
29.41


Chile
323,245
5,326
443,669
943

773,183
11,349
20,854

595,991

1,401,377

66,464
55,974
3,316
5,271
27,532
7,658
28,389
1,310
12,947
5,387
69,589
15,545

299,382


3
644
17,079
811,040


828,766

52,656

2,582,181
6.02


Colom-
bia
73,444
5,444
89,451
2,895
5

171,239
9,758
317
20
8,915

190,249

24,514
11,720
276
20,828
532
9,083
11,571
915
1,613
3,809
25,734
10,079

120,674

2,794
1,753
3,153
200,052
2,490
106
2,212

212,550


523,473
1.22


Ecuador
60,991
33,764
72,598

3,472

170,825
3,553
28

45,008

219,414

39,621
7,557
597
337
4,288
3,201
14,809
2,917
833
6,975
19,441
8,125

108,701




922

338,827

339,749


667,864
1.55


Peru
145,410
8,200
357,196
179

510,985
9,062
2,327
20
263,045

785,439

101,070
62,928
1,881
16,496
26,905
10,576
54,933
12,091
1,624
14,154
72,898
18,022

393,578


6
635
149,195
385,128
4,636

539,600


1,718,617
4.0)


South
America
(other),
12,349
364
15,704

712

29,129
3,693

38,430

71,252

5,288
4,150
94
1,528
568
3,323
4,793
361
258
1,094
5,671
17,657

44,785




7

20,081

20,088


136,125
.32


Total
615,439
53,098
978,618
2,895
5,311

1,655,361
37,415
23,526
40
951,389

2,667,731

236,957
142,329
6,164
44,460
59,825
33,841
114,495
17,594
17,275
31,419
193,333
69,428

967,120

2,794
1,762
4,432
367,255
2,480
1,555,182
6,848

1,940,753

52,656

5,628,260
13.11








Table 19.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama Canal from Atlantic to Pacific During Fiscal Year 1965

Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Areas-Continued

To Oceania


EAST COAST NORTn AMERICA:
United States:
North Atlantic ports....---- --.-... ... .....
South Atlantic ports-------------......... ..........
Gulf ports -----------------------.-.-.-.-.- ......
Great Lakes ports ----.-.---.-..- ....-- -
United States (other)..-----........................

Total, United States----......-................ .
Canada----------- .............................
Central America/Mexico.............. _.... ...... .
Cristobal, C.Z... ....
West Indies ---------............. ....-- ..................

Total, North America -----------....--.......-.........

EUROPE:
Belgium.------.-. ..
British Isles------------------... ---------...........
Denmark.------------- -- -- ---.. .. . .. ......
Finland..----------------------------------------------...............
France-s--- -... ..
Italy..-- ....-- -- -.. .....- ... .... .......
Netherlands ----------........ ...... ... ... ... ... ... ..- .
Norway.----------.-. --.. -.-... .... ... .... .......
Spain-Portugal ----. --. -.. ... .. ...... ....... ... ...
Sweden ....- ._ _..... ........ ....... .....-... .... .
West Germany .....-- .....-- .... ..-...__...._____
Europe (other)2_ -------...---..-. ............. ...
Total, Europe .-.- ...-- ...-- ...-- ..-.. _.........

EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:

British Guiana...... ........
Colombia-.......... ...........- ... ... ........ ..... ....
Netherlands Guiana -------------------------------------
Venezuela -----------..... -.-..-..- .............. .
South America (other)2 ...................................

Total, South America...............-- ---------------
ASIA (Middle East)-...... --...-- ..-..-...--.. .........
AFRICA.... ... ..... .......... ..........

Grand total------_._ .. ... ........... .. ...
PERCENT OF PACIFIC-BOUNo CARGO--..................-----.


Australia British Oceania French Oceania
225,240 200 2,901
49,534 ---- .- 125
926,545 1,098 242
23,816 -
31,934 --------.-..... 61

1,257,069 1,298 3,329
229,904 --.---........... 653
56,945 -
72,391 ........... ... ... 1,343

1,616,309 1,298 5,325


20,282
------------ -- -
963

4,778


6180


26,103


497
24,067

6,149

745


589
1,005

33,052


5,253
2,312

192,972

6,095

3,245

14,784

224,661


New Zealand
40,422
4,313
379,842

3,479

428,056
28,872
31,527
103,064

591,519

33,490
462,391
3,527
4,277
3,755
31,089
2,683
1,153
4,174
18,705
11,653

576,897


118,867 ....---.-.-- ... ... 2,931 84,016
.-------------- --.....--...--..-- ................... 4

118,867 .................. 2,931 84,020

-----. -..................~.... 10,9948 .................

1,761,279 34,350 252,865 1,252,436
4,10 .08 .59 2,92


Oceania (other)'
9,036
155
12,928

2,307

24,426
150

17,421

41,997

549
8,060
------------------

9,974

5,761

1,294

16,137

41,775









14,475

98,247
.22


Total
277,799
54,127
1,320,655
23,816
37,781

1,714,178
259,579
88,472
194,219

2,256,448

39,789
517,112
3,527
4,277
213,813
48,468
2,683
1,153
4,174
23,913
43,579

902,488





205,814
4

205,818
34,423

3,399,177
7.91








EAST COAST NORTH AMERICA:
United States:
North Atlantic ports.....
South Atlantic ports ----...
Gulf ports ----......--
Great Lakes ports -------
United States (other)2. _-

Total, United States -.
Canada-------------....
Central America/Mexico-....
Cristobal, C.Z.'--------.....
West Indies .....--- -----.

Total, North America......

Eools'r


To British
Ant- East
arctica Indies
...... 15,976
--...... 1,041
----- 16,579
----.. 72
488

...... 34,156
---.. 6,854

...... 10
----.. 9,985

--...... 51,005


1e um ............-.....- .....
British Isles...----- ......
Denmark...........-- .... ..
Finland ------.........------....--------.......
France-................... 553
Italy .......- ... ..
Netherlands................ .....
Norway..---.. ....---. ..
Spai.i-Portugal.--.-...... ......
Sweden-.................... ...
West Germany..-........... .---
Europe (other)'...-------.......... 9,959

Total, Europe--......---------..... 10,512

EAST COAST SOUTH AMEnICA:
Argentina-....
Brazil---- ........-.. ......
British Guiana.... ----
Colombia-... ------- ......
Netherlands Guiana....-___
Venezuela..... ..-..... --.-
South America (other)2 ...... ......

Total, South America ... ..
AsrA (Middle East).............
AFacA......................... ......

Grand total....----..--......... 10,512
PERCENT OF PAcIFIc-BouND CARoo .02


China Formosa
111 142,489
9,590 40,230
15,226 400,193
.---.. 5,335
----....... 22,566

24,927 610,813
--....... 1,100
----- 21,958

122,620 .......

147,553 633,871


29 .....- .
1,580 .......



35 .......-

1,644 --.-


5,698


5,698


58,347
.14


147,553
.34


308
1

6
169
731



11

1,226




1,000



1,000
5

636,102
1.48


Hong Indo- Indo-
Kong China nesia
75,411 144,702 17,344
9,848 8,656 2,136
94,634 259,823 28,599
2,803 1,289 750
1,634 1,887 337

184,330 416,357 49,166
24,246 3 3,082
45 ....... ......

4,066 ....... 6,375

212,687 416,360 58,623


1,651
87



599



90

2,427


25



2,953


2,978


218,092
.51


96




114

211












416,571
.97


To Asia

Philip-
pine
Japan Islands Russia
8,026,090 161,235 13,827
254,806 36,106 .......
6,179,668 221,874 ....--.
146,652 6,940 --..---
36,440 5,873 .....

14,643,656 432,028 13,827
494,703 21,431 19,302
62,974 ....... .......
28,081 ....... ... ..
1,121,665 12,966 97,943

16,351,079 466,425 131,072


37,054
9,209

406
2,196
6,555
341

12,608
4,254

72,823


4,788

4,788



63,411
.15


591
269



962





1,822


3,835

3,835


South Thai- Asia
Korea land (other)'
80,270 37,345 120,914
20,397 7,623 6,103
626,004 49,745 154,625
64,727 371 12,456
13,308 1,094 7,598

804,706 96,178 301,693
2,359 8,460 10,680

- - - 4
----....... ----- 198

807,065 104,638 312,575


50


153"




58


312


11

105
96
356
117

107
3,076

3,868


Percent
oftotal
Pacific-
Grand bound
Total total cargo
8,835,714 10,842,992 25.24
396,533 532,865 1.24
8,046,970 12,730,808 29.64
241,395 270,051 .63
91,225 179,102 .42

17,611,837 24,555,818 57.17
592,223 968,801 2.26
84,977 246,948 .57
23,095 315,791 .74
1,375,824 5,217,071 12.15

19,692,953 31,304,429 72.89


39,654
9,577

671
2,586
10,834
458

12,773
11,415

87,968


591,916 1.38
959,143 2.23
27,123 .06
137,722 .32
306,925 .72
167,809 .39
350,434 .82
101,819 .24
43,331 .10
83,598 .19
463,640 1.03
264,980 .62

3,498,440 8.15


25,584 .......------- ---------.....----- ------- ------...... 25,584 30,923
214,634 24 -....------.. .------- 89 214,772 255,257
28,375 ..............----------------------.............----------- 28,375 62,130
19,524 ...--....- ....... ...---------------------------- 20,524 550,001
9,018 .----.......---------------------...... ...------- 9,018 43,427
1,165,013 1,124 ....... 1,179,576 6,884,251
2,162 -..------------- ...... ------------.............. 2,162 11,281

1,464,310 1,148 ------.....-------... 89 .....-------. 1,480,011 7,837,270
3 --....------------------....... --------------. 8 12,814
17,470 ....--------------..............------- ------.............. 17,470 296,043

17,905,485 469,395 134,907 807,377 104,727 316,443 21,278,410 42,948,996
41.69 1.09 .32 1.8S .24 .74 49.55


SIncludes both local and transshipped cargo.
'Also includes cargo not routed to permit segregation between definite countries.


.07
.60
.15
1.28
.10
16.03
.02

18.25
.03
.68


100.00 C3
-1








Table 20.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During Fiscal Year 1965
Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Areas


To United States


WEST COAST NORTH AMERICA:
United States.----------..............................--------------------------------------
Canada.........................-----------------------------......---...-----------------
Balboa, C.Z ......................................-----....---------
Central America/Mexico .....-----.--------------------------------
Hawaii ----------.. ---. ------------.---------------------

Total, North America-........------------..--..--------.................----------------

WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:
Chile--.-...............---------..-------......------...--. ------------------
Colombia --------.-----....--..--.---..-...................--------------....-----------..........-----
Ecuador-----------...................................----------------------------------------
Peru ---------...............................---------------------------------------------
South America (other)1 -----------..----------------------........------

Total, South America---..........-...-. -..........-----------

OCEANIk:
Australia................................--------------------------------.------------------
British Oceania .-----.....------.........-----..-----........--.....---...---------------
French Oceania ---------------------------------------------
New Zealand----- -------------------------------------------
Oceaia (other).......--------------.................................-------------------------------

Total, Oceania---------------------------- ----------------

ASIA:
British East Indies---------------------------------------------
China-----------------------------------------------------
Formosa----------.......------.....-------.........----------------...--------
Hong Kong...............----------------------------...................-------
India -------................................................----------------------------------------------
Indochina -. .-------- --........ ..------------............
Indonesia -- ------------------------------------------------
Japan .hil n ------------------------ --------.-----------------
Philippines -------------------- -----------------------------
ju . ... . ... . . .. . . . .. .. -
:., a r. I r .. .. .. .. .. .
Thailand --...-------------- ----------------------.-----
Asia (other)1--.....................------....--........------------------------------------

Total, Asia .....----.----------------..----------...-----------.........------..

Grand total.................................................-....-
PERCENT OF ATLANTIC-BOUND CARGO .............---------.--...--------------------


North
Atlantic
ports
1,793,269
1,067,777
23,963
354,019
214,915

3,453,913

2,502,866
114,036
322,441
1,039,499
7,253

3,986,095

305,064
8,400

86,356
660

400,480

10,076
1,403
119,617
111,048
1,615
394
20,687
1,381,148
950,655

10,894
34,519
40,289

2,682,345

10,522,863
31.30


South
Atlantic
ports
97,348
62,945
369
19,025
9,433

189,120

127,980
19,269
35,655
63,024
1,022

246,950

43,493

18,671

62,164

1,214
358
24,717
9,314
30

160,809
38,680
677
130
8,829

244,758

742,992
2.21


Gulf
ports
247,895
18,823
388
204,873
230,740

702,719

814,331
54,579
357,806
521,307
16,865

1,764,888

106,093
10,100

3,355


119,548


Great
Lakes
ports











9,839

9,839

46,074




46,074


United
States
(other)l Total
38,070 2,176,582
34,996 1,184,541
----.-- 24,720
61,401 639,318
10,000 465,088

144,467 4,490,249

68,177 3,513,354
38,785 226,669
6,945 722,847
46,989 1,680,658
.------ 25,140

160,896 6,168,668

76,859 577,583
13,796 32,296

2,385 110,767
....--- 660

93,040 721,306


18,020 ------- 2,426 31,736
733 ------ 2,494
70,294 5,928 1,715 222,271
10,078 3,789 1,926 136,155
17,554 .-------......-------.. 19,169
174 --- ---- 598
19,891 410 40,988
879,755 345,369 46,217 2,813,298
275,484 --....... 252,718 1,517,537
10,972 ------- ..-------... 22,543
2,641----- --------- 37,290
23,566 6,207 5,289 84,180

1,329,162 361,293 310,701 4,928,259

3,916,317 417,206 709,104 16,308,482
11.64 1.24 2.11 48.50


To other North America

Central
America/ Cristbhl, West
Canada Mexico C.Z.2 Indies


12,424
8,542
38
4,213

25,217

96,310
6,259
113
470

103,152

183,530

17,847

201,427

1
434
9,182
8,388

64
111,268
11,557

744
5,330

146,938

476,734
1.42


2,074
29

88,470

90,573

21,703


21,095
2

42,800

14,748




14,748

8,097

114
229

5,890
3,548
45


948

18,871

166,992
.50


5,487 295,452
729 122,006

7,861 10,493
546 2,285

14,623 430,236


2,506
346
66
1,815
1,060

5,793

1,327
9
2,562

3,898

2,951

267
2,959
3,025
21
19,037
1,293

571
1,138
3,470

34,732

59,046
.18


5,298
1
7,592
11,474
8,270

32,635

40,456
464
119
30,793
100

71,829

70
27,621
1,093
6,471
56
10,376

106,480
104
50,268
535
33
6,828

209,935

744,635
2.21


Total,
North
America
2,492,019
1,315,847
24,720
746,180
472,132

5,050,898

3,639,171
233,275
730,61q
1,715,512
34,472

6,353,048

817,694
32,760
25
161,969
760

1,013,208

42,855
30,549
232,813
154,087
22,479
10,974
46,963
3,053,631
1,530,536
50,268
23,649
39,205
100,726

5,338,735

17,755,889
52.81






To Europe


WEST COAST NORTH AMERICA:
United States--..................----------
Canada ---------- ---------
Balboa. C.Z ......- ..............
Central America/Mexico....---------
Hawaii ............................

Total, North America...........-----

WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:
Chile .......-...... ..... ...
Colombia -------------------------.
Ecuador..-------..........-..--------
Peru.-- ..- -------------
South America (other)' ------------

Total, South America-------------

OCEANIA:
Australia .. .... .---. ----
British Oceania ...--------------
French Oceania ---- -----------
New Zealand.................-----
Oceania (other)l...------------------

Total, Oceania.------. --------

ASIA:
British East Indies...............----
China ----.............-----
Formosa ..-.-.- ....... ........
Hong Kong..--------------------
India ....pan------ .------ .-------
Indochina es...-.. ...........-----
Indonesia....----- ... ........
J a p a n -.. . -.. . . . .
Philippines ------.-.-...-----------
Russia --.........................
South Korea .--- ---- ...
Thailand ....... ....
Asia (other).....--..---.-- ------

Total, Asia----------------------

Grand total ----...-. .......
PERCENT OF ATLANTIc-BouND CARGo.----

See footnotes at end of table.


101
604


7,330

136

40

8,211

821,566
2.44


777


26,724



168

27,983

4,199,502
12.49


British
Belgium Isles
107,644 351,589
108,616 2,074,661
63 .........
26,386 32,499
1,341 2

244,050 2,458,751

239,353 162,906
4,508 939
118,818 2,829
170,338 349,822
8,875 833

541,892 517,329

---. 27,689
232,631
2,060 120,654
25,353 806,049
...--.- 8,416

27,413 1,195,439


Den-
mark
40,696
785
49
24,948
43

66,521

32,261
1,031
567
25,179
402

59,440




755

755


126,716 845,345 64,254
.38 2.51 .19


Irish
Greece Republic Italy
35,422 11,351 340,054
22,775 40,298 210,264
------ ---.. 41
114 ..-... 36,042

58,311 51,649 586,401


France
197,312
79,113

24,771
419

301,615

95,862
706
8,588
357,570
750

463,476

3
4
53,222
27,025

80,254


48,032
1,404
13,607
296,273
68

359,384


Nether-
lands
724,515
292,141
26
56,567
1,950

1,075,199

420,313
7,169
25,119
1,263,195
13,947

1,729,743


507

20,778
4,351

25,636


Nor-
way
29,103
1,109

2,581

32,793

1,045
914
3,108
833
42

5,942




468

468


Poland
14,933
81,934

509,123

605,990


Spain-
Portugal
90,052
13,775
41
21,873

125,741


Sweden
63,227
2,169

9,356
120

74,872


--.---- 115,263 40,525
1,590 6 11,265
393 353 4,954
73,247 90,996 44,760
--....... 3 35

75,230 206,621 101,539

-- -- ------- ----....

--.---- -----.. 1,586

--....... ....... 1,586


"------ ,',.. .. --- -- 793 --
-..--- ....... 345 .-...- ..-.. .


----. 240 37,373 ..------------- 295
..--- ------. 20,654 ...... ............

-...... 3 139 ...... ..... ......


--... 243 59,519 --............. 295

60,070 946,028 2,890,097 39,203 681,220 332,657
.18 2.81 8.60 .12 2.02 .99


1

177,998
.53


West Europe
Germany (other)t
310,569 95,017
214,693 186,279

158,098 9,139
7,048 15,600

691,218 306,035


Total
2,411,484
3,328,522
220
912,397
26,523

6,679,146


250,641 190,307 1,606,448
45,284 6,156 80,972
291,861 19,711 489,901
1,107,236 160,523 3,944,377
26,636 12,498 64,089

1,721,658 389,195 6,185,794


9,134
26
39,844
2,378

51,382


23,478
42,312

20,215
6,803

92,808


13,055 1,612
-----.-.. 11,755
56 2,975
3 493


13,116 18,040

2,477,374 806,078
7.37 2.40


6,003

2,399

8,402




19


19


51,170
284,588
175,962
942,092
21,948

1,475,760




1,726


80,629
32,409
2,975
883

1,630

127,408

14,468,108
43.03







Table 20.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During Fiscal Year 1965
Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Areas-Continued


To east coast South America


To Middle East


WEST COAST NORTH AMERICA:
United States -------.......................-------------------------------------
Canada ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Balboa, C.Z.'-------------------------------------------------------------
Central America/Mexico .-....---------------------------------------------------------
Hawaii -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total, North America ...-------------- ---------------------------------------

WEST COAST SOUTH AERIrcA:
Chile -.....----------------------------------------------------------------------
Colombia ------------------------------------------------------------------
Ecuador-----......-------------------------------------------------------------
Peru....-----------------------------------------------------------------------
South America (other)1-------------------------------------------------------

Total, South America---.................-----------..-----------------------------------------

OCEANIA:
Australia----. ....--------- .- .-.---------------------------------------------------
British Oceania..--..------..-------......................-----------------------------------------------
French Oceania..------------------------------------------------------------------
New Zealand --..------....------------... ------ ---------------------------------...
Oceania (other)----------------------- --------------------------------------


Argen-
tina Brazil
20,526 23,706
8,288 43,502
29 3
1 492

28,844 67,703


Colom- Vene- A
bia zuela (
6,135 102,226
369 236,308
3,267 5
1,465 24,246

11,235 412,785


10
--- .- -. 4,539
415
.-- ----- 13,192

--- ---- 18,156


320




320


Total,Oceania -------------------------------------------------------------


ASiA
British East Indies...----..-- --------------------------------------------------
China --.......................---------------------------------------------------------------..---
Formosa..-.-...............---------------------------------..--.-----------------------------
Hong Kong. ... ...... ....... ................ ... ...--....... -. --. ------------.
HIong Kong-------.........-------------.......--.----------------------------------------
India ------------- ----------- ----------- -----------------------------------------
Indochina ....-.......................................................-.............
Indooesia .-...........---------------------------...-----..----------------------------------
Japan..............-...............-..---..------------------------------..................................-
Philippines --.............--------------------------------.----------------------------------
Russia----....................................................................-------------------------------
,,,r*lb L, r.. ........ ..... .... ........................... ........................
TI h..l-,,J .................................. ......... .................................
Asia (other)' ...------------------------------..................-----------------------------------

Total, Asia ............-----------------------------------------------------------------

Grand total--..-------.........---...................---------------------------------------------------....
PERCENT or ATLANTIC-BOUND CARGO-....----....----------------------------------- ----------


40,731





40,731

69,575
.21


1

------ ------


.----.- 2,500
38,463 54,438
.----- 5,107




383,463 62,056

106,166 91,768
.32 .27


2,851
280
3
19,508
5

22,647

1,784
2,876

670
3,260

8,590

205

3.516


9,384
157,923
19,987


10,536

201,551

645,573
1.92


South
Lmerica
other)1 Total
1,998 154,591
1,796 340,263
1 3,305
666 26,870
36 36

4,497 525,065

------ 2,861
---..... 4,819
..-..- 418
1,084 33,784
5

1,084 41,887

150 2,254
------ 2,876

2,933 3,603
....-- 3,260

3,083 11,993

8 214
1 1
547 4,064


4,767 16,651
18,810 310.365
1,292 28,386


382 I0,927

25,807 368,608

34,471 947,553
.10 2.82


India
3,815




3,815

8,772


7,786

16,558


Israel
8,501
27,155



35,656


511


2,500

3,011


Middle
Leba- East
non (other)1
4,930 1,035
10,297 3



15,227 1,038


726 17,128
65 65
44 88
223 11,000
.-- 340

1,058 28,621


----- -- -- -- -----


Total
18,281
37,455



55,736


84,357
.25


----- ----- -----

---- ---- --- --- --






Percent
To Africa of total
Atlantic- 2
Moaam- South Africa Grand bound
WEST COAST NORTH AMERICA: Egypt Kenya bique Africa Tunisia (other)t Total total cargo
United States ----------------------------------------------------------------- 4,158 7,130 13,303 56,395 9,975 5,735 96,696 5,173,071 15.39 >
Canada ---------------------------------------------------------------- --- ----------- 203 39,357 212,012 11,688 5,985 269,245 5,291,332 15.74
Balboa, C.Z.2 --------------------------------- ------------------------------.----.--------------------- -------- ------------------------ 28,245 .053
Central America/Mexico....-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1,65,447 5.01
Hawaii----------- ...............---------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------- 498,691 1.48
Total,NorthAmerica.........--------------------------------------------------------- 4,158 7,333 52,660 268,407 21,663 11,720 365,941 12,676,786 37.70 "'
WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: 0
Chile .........---------------------------- --- ------- ------- -------- ------ -- --- 5,265,60 15.66
Colombia------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3 3 319,134 .95 *
EcSdor ---- --------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- -------------- -------- -------- 1,221,032 3.63
Peru --------- ----------------------------------------- -------142--- ---------- ------ -- ------- 167 5,704,840 16.97
South America (other)'--------------------------------- ------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------- 8,906 .29
Total, South America-----..-------------------------------------------------------. 142 ----------------- 25 .--. 3 170 12,609,520 37.50
OCEANIA:
Australia---------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- 6871,116 2.39
British Oceania ...........................................-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------- -------- 320,224 .95
French Oceania -------------------------------. -------------------------------------.--- -------- --- ----------------- --------------- 175,987 .52
New Zealand....------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------- -------------------------------- ------- 1,107,664 3.30
Oceania (other)'-----------------------------....-----------.................----------------------------------- --- -------------------------- 25,968 .08
Total, Oceania--------......---... ...--- ...-------------------........ ..........------- -------------------........--------------- ------------------------.------ 2,500,961 7.44
AsIA:
British East Indies.....-----------..----...---------------------------------------------------------- ---------------- -------- -------- --------.... 43,069 .13
China ..------------------------..----------------------------------------------------..------..... ---------------- --------..--------------- 30,549 .09
Formosa... ....--------------. ........---------------........----------..........--- ..........-------- ...--... -------------------------------- ---------------- 233,970 .69
Hong Kong --------..---.......----....-----------....--------........-----------------------------..........-------- .....-------- ---------------- --------------------- 159,877 .47
India ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ -------------------------------------------.--------- 22,479 .07
Indochina ---------------------------------------------------.-------------------- -- -------------------------------------.--- -------- 10,974 .03
Indonesia ...------------------------------------------------------------------------------ -------------- -------- ------- ----- -------- 63,614 .19
Japan ...---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------- --------........------- -------- 2,057 2,057 3,452,62 10.27
Philippines..--------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- --------------- -------- -------- -------- -------- 1,59,331 4.73
Russia ------------------------------------------------- ------------------- -------- ---------.-------.------------------... ------ -------- 53,243 .16
SouthKorea ----------------------------------------------------------------------- ----.--- ------ ------- -------- -------- -------- 24,532 .07
Thailand ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- ----------------------- ------- -------- 39,205 .12
Asia (other)i ....---------------------------- -----..------------------------------------- -------------------------- ----------------------...... 113,283 .34

Total, Asia-....---------------------..--....--..--..-----------------------------------------...................................-------- ---------------------------- 2,057 2,057 5,836,808 17.36
Grand total ---------....................--------------------------------------------------------- 4,300 7,333 52,660 268,432 21,663 13,780 368,168 33,624,075
PERCENTOFATANTIC-BONDCAoo.....-- ......--------------------------...............................----------------------- ------ .02 .16 .80 .07 .04 1.09 100.00
"--
1 Also includes cargo not routed to permit segregation between definite countries. -
2 Includes both local and transshipped cargo.







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific


[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO-
West coast United States-----------
West coast Canada----------------
West coast Central America/Mexico ---
Balboa, C.Z -----------------------
West coast South America ----------
Chile -----------------------
Colombia- -------
Ecuador ----------------------
Peru ----------------------
Other ---- ------------------
Hawaiian Islands------------------
Oceania ------------------------
Australia------------------
New Zealand---------------
Other -----------------------
Asia ---------------------------
British East Indies------------
China -- ---------
Formosa--------------------
Hong Kong ------------------
India -------
Indochina ----------------------
Indonesia---------------------
Japan ----------------------
Pakistan---------------------
Philippine Islands -------- -
South Korea ---------------
Thailand--------
Other -----------------------
Total -------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO-
West coast United States --------
West coast Canada--- --------
West coast Central America/Mexico ---
Balboa, C.Z----------------------
West coast South America --------
Oceania --------------------
Australia --------------
New Zealand ---- ------
Other ----------------------
Asia -------------- ------------
China----------------------
Hong Kong-----------------
Japan-- ------------------
Philippine Islands ------- -----
U.S.S.R ---------------
Other--------------------
Total --
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMEMCA/MEXICO TO-
West coast United States--- ------
West coast Central America/Mexico ---
West coast South America-------------
Oceania --------------------------
Australia ------------------
New Zealand-------------------
Other--------------------------


1965
3,021
36
306
51
1,655
773
171
171
511
29
160
1,714
1,257
428
29
17,612
34
25
611
184
55
416
49
14,644
52
432
805
96
209
24,555

37
22
21
37
260
230
29
1
592
24
495
21
19
33
969

16
34
24
88
57
31


Fiscal year
1964 1963
2,077 1,447
8 7
284 187
46 25
1,612 1,398
665 702
235 196
179 85
518 411
15 4
192 207
1,069 771
835 603
215 154
19 14
17,802 13,529
52 44
381 314
183 123
47 19
384 207
121 239
14,979 11,483
66 24
482 371
822 533
108 68
177 104
23,090 17,571


18
13
29
34
187
158
29

621
26
544
30
4
17
902


27
12
111
78
33


121
18
12
44
193
163
30

324
11
277
13
23
712

4
29
6
83
51
32


1962
1,750
9
142
22
1,557
733
254
75
490
5
218
741
521
199
21
16,397
39
10
365
143
5
242
206
13,901
10
512
753
65
146
20,836

12
16
17
10
33
183
151
32

689
89
13
555
13
19

960

33
23
5
79
46
28
5






PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 73

Table 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO- 1965 1964 1963 1962
Continued
Asia --------------------- 85 38 30 50
Japan --------------------------- 63 30 25 36
Formosa ------------------------- 22
Other __---------------------- 8 _5 ___14
Total --------- 247 188 152 190

EAST COAST SouTH AMERICA TO-
West coast United States --------------- 2,684 2,177 2,812 2,323
West coast Canada ------------------- 110 56 53 45
West coast Central America/Mexico--- 979 809 472 241
West coast South America --------- 1,941 1,150 1,227 1,272
Chile --------------------------- 829 388 505 565
Colombia ----------------------- 212 172 23 146
Ecuador ------------------------ 340 280 177 142
Peru --------------------------- 540 310 522 419
Other ------------------------- 20 __--
Balboa, C.Z ----------------------294 252 219 193
Hawaiian Islands --------------------- 143 63 89 56
Oceania ----------------- 206 325 234 260
Australia ------------------------ 119 153 100 140
New Zealand -------------------- 84 172 134 119
Other ------------------------3 ---_ ____--1
Asia -- ---------- 1,480 1,301 1,222 719
Japan --- ------- 1,464 1,259 1,199 705
South Korea --------------------- __ 10 -- 1
Other ----------16 32 23 13
Total------------------------- 7,837 6,133 6,328 5,109
CBISTOBAL, C.Z., TO-
West coast United States -------- 17 50 48 33
West coast Central America/Mexico--- 48 52 18 3
West coast South America ------------------- 3 ----
Balboa, C.Z ------------------------- 223 263 183
Asia (Japan) ----------- -----28 7
Other territories ---------------------- -------- 3 13
Total------------------------- 316 375 252 49
WEST INDIES TO-
West coast United States --- ------ 1,615 1,147 1,017 1,669
West coast Canada ------------------- 425 301 272 250
West coast Central America/Mexico--- 292 265 589 586
Balboa, C.Z ----------------------221 208 190 364
West coast South America -------- 952 1,016 997 1,056
Chile -----------------------596 733 778 825
Colombia ----------------------- 9 1 1 3
Ecuador ------------------------ 45 9 41 35
Peru -----------263 272 176 186
Other -------------------------- __39 1 1 7
Hawaiian Islands ------------- 142 177 103 89
Oceania ---------------194 269 272 334
Australia ------------------------ 72 96 103 101
French Oceania ------------------ 1 2 1 1
New Zealand ----------------103 171 168 214
Other--------------------18 _____ 18

11351--11







74 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long t


WEST INDIES TO-Continued
Asia--------------------
British East Indies ---------------
China ------------------------
Hong Kong----------------
Indochina----------------------
Indonesia-------------------
Japan----------------
Philippine Islands ---------
South Korea --------------------
U.S.S.R--------------------
Other--------------------------
Total----------
EUROPE TO-
West coast United States -- ----
West coast Canada -----------
West coast Central America/Mexico ---
Balboa, C.Z __ -----------
West coast South America-
Chile -----------------
Colombia ----------------
Ecuador
Peru ---------------
Other-----------------
Hawaiian Islands ------------
Oceania--------------
Australia -----------------------
British Oceania ----------
French Oceania -----------
New Zealand -
Other -----------------------
Asia
Formosa ---------------
Japan
South Korea -------------
U.S.S.R -
Other
Other territories-- ------------
Total -------------
AFRICA TO-
West coast United States --------
West coast Canada -
West coast Central America/Mexico ---
West coast South America-
Oceania
Asia -------------------
Total-------------------

AsIA (MmDLE EAST) TO-
West coast United States ------
Asia --------------------
Other territories -------------
Total -----
Total cargo, Atlantic to Pacific ----


ons]
Fiscal year
1965 1964 1963 1962


1,376
10
123
4
6
1,122
13
98

5,217

882
260
376
967
299
121
109
394
44
12
903
26
33
225
577
42
88
1
73
4
10
11
3,499

180
12
53
34
17
296


1,164
16
212
3
18
860
15
5
22
13
4,547

853
229
359
976
274
142
109
413
38
17
879
27
21
157
647
27
109
2
98

9


3,422

151
19
34
13
14
6
237


1,014
11
335
9
4
7
570
20
57
1
4,454

769
179
317

1,128
407
157
105
440
19
28
826
49
18
103
625
31
116
1
110
1
4
1
3,364

157
7
42
1
33
240


2,363

779
2
14
1,152
1
70
344
1
6,711

850
196
299
13
1,170
400
181
78
480
31
23
926
44
18
138
654
72
138
4
113
4
17


3,615

134
9
11
3
41
198


12 6 6 34
1 1 7
5
13 7 13 39
42,949 38,901 33,086 37,707







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic


[Thousends of long tons]


WEST COAST UNITED STATES TO-
East coast United States ---------
East coast Canada ------------
East coast Central America/Mexico ----
Cristobal, C.Z ----------
East coast South America --------
Argentina -----------------------
Brazil--- --- -------------
Colombia-----------------------
Uruguay-- --------------
Venezuela ---------------------
Other---- -------------
West Indies ------------------------
British West Indies -
Cuba --------------------------
Haiti-Dominican Republic
Netherlands West Indies
Puerto Rico ---------------------
Other -------------------------
Europe-----------------------------
Belgium------------------------
British Isles ------------
Denmark---- --- ------
Finland -------------
France------ --------
Greece ---- -------------
Irish Republic
Italy ..--- --------------
Netherlands ------------
Norway
Poland ----------------
Spain-Portugal
Sweden
West Germany
Yugoslavia -
Other--------- --------
Asia (Middle East) -
India -
Israel-
Lebanon
Syria
Other
Africa
Kenya----------------------
Egypt--------
Mozambique
South Africa -----------
Tunisia-
Other
Total ------------
WEST COAST CANADA TO-
East coast United States
East coast Canada--------------------
Cristobal, C.Z -----------------------
East coast South America-
Argentina -----------------------
Brazil--------------------------


1965
2,177
12
2
6
155
21
24
6
1
102
1
295
33
20
5
236
1
2,411
108
352
41
15
197
35
11
340
725
29
15
90
63
311
10
69
18
4
8
5

97
7
4
13
56
10
7
5,173

1,184
9
1
340
8
44


Fiscal year
1964 1963
3,284 2,818
38 28
4 4
7 10
179 127
20 11
18 19
17 14
1
122 82
2__ _____
253 268
33 31
1
9 7
3 5
207 221
4
2,628 2,404
188 180
453 410
38 31
16 19
191 182
28 13
12 8
345 320
786 550
26 54
91- 40
91 16
52 65
294 394
7 9
101 113
17 20

13 14
3 3
-___ 1
1 2
108 73
7 3
6 14
9 7
40 35
------ ----
46 14
6,518 5,752


1,255
10
1
194
4
6


1,003
23
2
191
5
3


1962
2,961
31
6
8
122
16
24
17
1
61
3
219
24
4
5
183
3
2,557
132
381
36
16
146
49
12
196
631
32
102
88
56
594
5
81
91

7
24
44
16
257
4
3
10
26
33
181
6,252

1,098
26
2
126
5
6







76 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]
\VEST COAST CANADA TO-Continued 19
East Coast South America-Continued
Colombia -------------- --
Venezuela--------------
Other-------------------------
West Indies------------------------
British West Indies ---------
Cuba___ ---------
Haiti-Dominican Republic -----
Puerto Rico -------------
Other ---------------
Europe ----------------------------- 3
Albania --------------
Belgium----------------------
British Isles--------------------- 2
Bulgaria ------------------
France------ --------
Greece -
Irish Republic
Italy
Netherlands ---- ---------
Norway
Poland
Spain-Portugal-----------
U.S.S.R -
West Germany
Yugoslavia -
Other----_----- ------
Asia (Middle East)
Israel--- -------- -
Lebanon
Other
Africa --- -- ---
Egypt----------------
Mozambique
South Africa ---------- -
Tunisia ------------- ---
Other ----------------
Total------------------------ 5
WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICo TO-
East coast United States
East coast Canada --------------------
East coast Central America/Mexico ----
Cristobal, C.Z ------------
East coast South America-
West Indies
Europe ------ ---
Belgium ---- -_------ _
British Isles --- ------
Denmark _____
East Germany _
France- -----------
Italy--------- -----
Netherlands ---
Poland--------------_
Spain-Portugal __--------
West Germany
Other -------------
Other territories -------
Total---- -------- 1


Fiscal year
165 1964 1963 1962
--- ------ 1 5
286 180 181 105
2 4 1 5
122 103 127 142
28 23 24 22
__--------- 17
1 8 10 25
91 67 86 75
2 5 7 3
,329 3,333 2,399 2,296
_-__ 12 ---
109 155 164 131
,075 1,849 1,545 1,452
--- 90
79 63 52 40
23 13 2 1
40 30 26 10
210 113 118 124
292 413 242 144
1 1 3 9
82 136 20 21
14 43 11 26
53 25 ------
215 270 112 277
13 3 3 --


10
123 117 101 61
37 28__ 15 __21
27 27 14 19
10-------------------
1 1 2
269 199 307 176
9 9
39 25 39 31
212 127 224 101
12--- ----
6 38 44 44
,291 5,123 4,067 3,887


639

88
8
27
11
912
26
32
25

25
36
57
509
22
159
21

,685


540
61
11
36
14
407
25
16
22
20
19
34
71
13
147
40

1,069


438
57
10
24
11
368
20
15
24
17
43
68
6
121
54
8
916


517
2
39
8
19
11
296
13
15
30
8
12
59
16
119
24
1
893







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO-
East coast United States ----------
East coast Canada-- --------
East coast Central America/Mexico ----
Cristobal, C.Z--------------------
East coast South America --------
Brazil ----------------
Colombia --------------------
Venezuela --------------------
Other ----------- ------
West Indies ----------------------
British West Indies --------
Cuba -----------------
Netherlands West Indies ------
Puerto Rico------------
Other---- ------------
Europe -------
Belgium.---- ------ -----
British Isles -------------
Denmark
East Germany -
France
Greece -
Italy---- -- -----
Netherlands---------------
Norway --
Poland_-- __ _
Rumania
Spain-PortugaL -------
Sweden----------------
West Germany----------------
Yugoslavia -------------
Other -----
Asia (Middle East)
India ------------ ___
Israel ---..
Lebanon--------------------
Other -__-------------
Africa ..
Total
BALBOA, C.Z., TO-
East coast United States ---- __-- ___
East coast South America ---------
Europe
Other territories ------------
Total---------------
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS TO-
East coast United States
East coast Canada -----------
Europe---
British Isles------- -----
Netherlands ----------
Spain-Portugal ------
West Germany
Other___
Other territories ............
Total


1965
6,169
103
43
6
42

18
23
1
33

5
1
27

6,186
542
517
59
24
463
6
359
1,730
6
75
6
207
102
1,722
68
300
28
17
2
8
1

12,610

25
3


28

465
4
27

2
7
18
3
499


Fiscal year
1964 1963
5,419 5,669
212 268
38 24
4 6
32 37
9
8 8
22 19
2 1
33 45
1
14
1 2
32 28

6,097 5,803
539 324
825 988
54 48
3 14
441 430
21 1
686 835
1,481 1,265
11 21
74 47
5
197 165
111 111
1,312 1,294
49 35
288 225
15 9
9 -
9 - -
5 9
1
10 18
11,860 11,879


11
8
2

21

536
9
37

10
5
11
11
3
585


12
3
1
16

438
9
30
2
7
8
13
2
479


1962
7,219
256
10
6
45
16
6
20
3
73
7
47

18
1
4,927
381
770
33
192
3
363
1,493
20
22
157
87
1,225
19
162
46


46


12,582

7

1
1
9

633
3
24

7
5
12
3
663







78 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 22.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Pacific to Atlantic-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]


OCEANIA TO-
East coast United States ---------
East coast Canada -------------------
East coast Central America/Mexico --
Cristobal, C.Z ---------------
East coast South America-------------
West Indies-------- ---- ----
British West Indies --------
Netherlands West Indies-
Other-----------------------
Europe------------------------
Belgium----------------------
British Isles ------------
France-------------------------
Netherlands--------------------
West Germany -----------
Other -----------------------
Other territories
Total-------------------------

AsIA TO-
East coast United States --------
East coast Canada ------------------
East coast Central America/Mexico ----
Cristobal, C.Z ----------------------
East coast South America--
Argentina------ ---------
Brazil-------------------------
Colombia ----------------------
Netherlands Guiana --------
Venezuela ----------------------
Other--------------------------
West Indies--------------
British West Indies -
Cuba --------------------------
Haiti-Dominican Republic
Puerto Rico -----------
Other------------------------
Europe- ----------- -----
Belgium ------------------------
British Isles---------------------
Netherlands -------------
West Germany
Other -----------------------
Africa--------------------------
Total ---
Total cargo, Pacific to Atlantic ----


Fiscal year
1965 1964 1963 1962


721
201
15
4
12
72
67
2
3
1,476
27
1,195
80
26
51
97


781
175
10
2
22
60
59
1

1,279
21
1,031
81
23
42
81


729
215
7
2
22
46
40
2
4
1,206
27
942
97
27
48
65


615
189
7
2
12
40
36
1
3
1,200
25
984
77
24
31
59


S__ 201
2,501 2,329 2,227 2,066


4,928
147
19
35
369
41
38
62
4
202
22
210
25
122
16
38
9
127
8
28
60
13
18
2
5,837
33,624


3,551
92
5
38
222
27
37
42
8
99
9
155
23
82
16
26
8
80
7
14
33
16
10
1
4,144
31,649


3,255
75
6
39
237
28
75
38
81
15
158
20
102
13
16
7
55
6
1-
17
12
_1


3,825
29,161


2,956
77
5
38
198
54
38
27
78
1
138
16
96
6
16
53
53
5
14
17
14
3







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific
[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
UNITED STATES:
Bauxite--------------------------
Canned food products----------------
Cement---------------------------
Chemicals:
Petroleum_ ----------------------
Unclassified ------------------
Confectionery-----------------------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ------
Floor coverings -----------------
Groceries, unclassified----------------
Iron and steel manufactures-----------
Liquors-------------------------
Machinery-------------------------
Metals, miscellaneous-----------------
Paints and varnishes-----------------
Paper and paper products-------------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil ----------------------
Fuel-diesel oil-------------------
Gasoline------------------------
Kerosene-----------------------
Lubricating oil ------------------
Other and unclassified ------
Pharmaceutical products --------------
Phosphate ---------------
Soap and soap products ---------
Soda and sodium compounds------
Sulfur -----------------..............................
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous --------
All other and unclassified --------
Total. --- -----------------
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CANADA:
Canned fruit -----_-- -------
Phosphate--------------------------
Rice --------------
Soda and sodium compounds ------
All other and unclassified -
Total----------------
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds ---------
Chemicals, unclassified
Canned food products -----------................
Corn------------------
Fertilizers, unclassified
Iron and steel manufactures-
Lime-------------------
Machinery----___ _
Paper and paper products ---------
Petroleum and products:
Lubricating oil -- ___----- _--
Other and unclassified-------
Phosphate-- -------------
Potash .-----------------
Rice -------- -------
Wheat ______-___----------
All other and unclassified ---------
Total -------------------


Fiscal year
1965 1964 1963 1962
217 230 42
1 4 6 5
27 42 14 ------


127
137

2
-----
5
609
1
1
26
1
1

61
830
295
272
86
2
74
5
48

1
192
3,021



28
5
3

36


10
14
15
16
18
13
1
7
55

11
5
56
5
6
11
63
306


99
114
1
2
-----------------------------S
5
476
1
2
4
1
2

39
522
33
219
29
2
38
1
18
-------
8
185
2,077


1

7





15
13
13
18
25
6

7
38

10
4
26
16
11
20
62
284


76
103
3---
1
2
442
3
3
2
3
1


326
266
22
2
3
13
----5
28
86
1,447


2

6


8


6
15
8
11
21
8
1
6
19

6
5
8
2
6
5
60
187


N.A.
185
4
1
2
660
9
3
20
4
6

47
14
374
37
217
12
5
1
--5
39
40
18
47
1,750


3
---
6


9



13
1
16
10
2

5
5

6
5
4
1
3
35
37
143







80 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST 1965 1964 1963 1962
SouTH AMERICA:
Agricultural implements ------------ 20 12 9 15
Ammonium compounds ---------- 17 19 5 15
Asphalt --- --------------------------- 9 8 15 10
Automobiles and accessories ------ 47 44 44 49
Bricks and tile ------------------- ----- 15 10 14 10
Canned food products ----------------- 46 49 30 30
Carbon black --------- ---------- ------ 9 8 6 5
Chemicals, unclassified ---------------- 48 45 45 39
Clay, fire and china ----------- 8 5 5 6
Coal and coke --------------- 176 164 143 159
Corn ------------------------ 16 41 13 62
Cotton, raw --------------------- 5 9 6 6
Electrical machinery and apparatus --.-- 14 13 9 10
Fertilizers, unclassified --------- 12 26 5 7
Flour, wheat ------------------------ 89 98 84 78
Grains, unclassified -------------------- 12 11 1 8
Groceries, unclassified ---------- 4 10 5 7
Iron and steel manufactures -------77 69 65 92
Machinery -------------------------- 76 75 59 66
Marble and stone ----------------- 23 25 22 N.A.
Metals:
Miscellaneous ------------- 6 7 10 11
Scrap --------------- --- 41 18 -
Paper and paper products -------- 56 73 14 12
Petroleum and products:
Gasoline ------------------------ ------ 2 1 1
Lubricating oil ------------------- 60 56 53 70
Other and unclassified -------6 5 3 4
Phosphate --------------------------- 116 104 108 66
Potash ------------------------------ 15 8 8 1
Resin ------------------------------- 10 9 6 8
Rice ---------------- ------- 46 43 9 11
Rubber, manufactured -------------- 15 13 14 14
Soda and sodium compounds------ 10 16 16 13
Sulfur ------------------------------ 29 16 18 11
Tallow ------------------------------ 19 22 19 21
Tinplate ------------------ 10 17 15 19
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous --------40 37 25 41
Wax, paraffin ------------------------ 16 15 19 16
Wheat ------------------------------ 293 276 369 419
Woodpulp-------------------------- 10 16 17 20
All other and unclassified -------------- 134 118 89 125
Total---------------------------- 1,655 1,612 1,398 1,557
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO HAWAIIAN
ISLANDS:
Automobiles and accessories ------------ 3 3 5 2
Canned food products ---------- 3 4 5 4
Chemicals, unclassified --------- 2 4 3 3
Corn -------------------------------__8 14 32 32
Electrical machinery and apparatus---- 2 5 4 4
Grains, unclassified------------- 3 __ 2
Iron and steel manufactures ------------ 25 28 27 33
Liquors ----------------------------- 3 3 3 3
Machinery --------------5 7 6 9
Metals, miscellaneous ------------------- 2 1 1 1
Paper and paper products --------- ----- 2 2 3
Phosphate --------------------------- 22 22 16 16







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 81

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO HAWAIIAN 1965 1964 1963 1962
ISLANDS-Continued
Soybeans ---------------------------- 1 2 12 7
Textiles --------------- 1 3 2 2
Tinplate----------------------- 36 36 49 42
All other and unclassified -------------- 46 54 40 55
Total ----------------- 160 191 207 218
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO OCEANIA:
Agricultural implements--------------- 32 25 16 13
Ammonium and compounds ------ -- 5 6 1 2
Automobiles and accessories------ 42 46 23 19
Bauxite -------------------------- 41 80 48
Bricks and tile -------------------- 6 2 2 1
Carbon black ---------------------- 4 4 5 6
Chemicals:
Petroleum ----------------------- 7 7 14 N.A.
Unclassified ----------- 61 34 31 47
Clay, fire and china ---------- 30 30 20 11
Coke 3 -____ 11
Cotton, raw ------------ 18 24 15 16
Electrical machinery and apparatus ---- 5 4 6 4
Fertilizers, unclassified --------- 12 1 3 1
Glass and glassware------------------- 8 8 6 4
Iron and steel manufactures ------ 26 28 25 12
Machinery---------- ---------------- 63 50 49 37
Metals, miscellaneous -------------14 8 11 14
Ores, miscellaneous-- ----------- ------- 7 6 5
Paper and paper products -------------- 23 17 14 11
Petroleum and products:
Gasoline ------------------------ ___ ------ 34 4 1
Kerosene-----_______ ______ _-_-_ 2
Lubricating oil ----------- 83 108 117 128
Other and unclassified -------- ---- 11 10 7 10
Phosphate--------------------- ------ 720 47 13 2
Potash ------------------------------ 20 18 16 23
Resin ----------- ------- 18 14 13 13
Rice ------------- 7 7 6 3
Rubber, manufactured 13 16 15 17
Soda and sodium compounds ----- 8 5 2 1
Soybeans ---- ----------- 9 8 9 5
Sulfur ------------------------------ 258 297 174 241
Tobacco ------------------ 11 12 12 14
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous ------------- 11 6 5 5
Wax, paraffin .---------- 6 6 5 1
Woodpulp -------------------------- 7 7 7 4
All other and unclassified 1------------- 125 94 59 76
Total --------------- 1,714 1,069 771 742
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO ASIA:
Agricultural implements -------- 7 7 5 3
Ammonium compounds ---------------- 77 112 38 267
Ammunition and explosives ------------- 9 2 3 N.A.
Asphalt ----------------------------- 15 19 7 28
Automobiles and accessories ------------ 47 54 34 37
Barley ------------------------------ 10
Beans, edible ------------- 11 6 11 6
Canned food products ----------------- 90 95 68 75
Carbon black ------------------------ 10 14 14 24


11351--12







82 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]
Fiscal year
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO As --Con-
tinued: 1965 1964 1963 1962
Cement_ ----------------------------- 7 8 3 2
Chemicals:
Petroleum ------------------78 101 53 N.A.
Unclassified -------------- 283 261 158 108
Clay, fire and china ------------------- 54 49 28 29
Coal and coke --------------- 6,280 6,004 5,002 6,553
Cocoa and cacao beans -------- 9 6 5 3
Corn ------------------------------ 2,189 2,162 1,253 982
Cotton, raw ______ 316 348 302 359
Electrical machinery and apparatus---- 15 15 12 11
Fertilizers, unclassified ---------- 79 85 16 95
Fishmeal---------------- ------------ 5 5 ______ N.A.
Flour, wheat ------------ --------- 107 83 142 108
Glass and glassware -------------- 6 5 4 4
Groceries, unclassified ----------------- 9 13 7 7
Grains, unclassified ------------------- 71 167 145 4
Iron and steel manufactures --------134 151 141 147
Lumber ----------------------------- 9 22 14 12
Machinery -------------------------- 92 93 127 124
Metals:
Miscellaneous ------------------- 39 60 85 139
Scrap---------------- 1,910 2,760 1,603 2,853
Ores, miscellaneous ----------- 7 55 32 38
Paper and paper products -------------- 66 55 38 57
Petroleum and products:
Gasoline ------------------------ 31 14 15 30
Kerosene ----------------------- 1 __ 1
Lubricating oil ------------------- 381 363 324 309
Other and unclassified ------ 44 49 17 41
Pharmaceutical products --------------- 6 4 4 5
Phosphate------------------------- 1,997 1,893 1,515 1,655
Potash --- -------------- 7 16 14 12
Rags and waste ----------------------- 7 9 13 N.A.
Railroad materials --------------------- 1 13 2 1
Refrigerated food products ------------- 19 13 7 8
Rice ------------ 180 68 117 94
Resin------------------------------- 83 87 58 77
Rubber, manufactured ----------------- 53 51 51 42
Skins and hides ----------------------- 19 16 19 18
Soda and sodium compounds---- --- 29 22 25 24
Sorghum ---------------------------- 208 N.A. N.A. N.A.
Soybeans ---- ------------ 1,515 1,408 1,399 1,182
Sugar --------------___----__ 1
Sulfur ------------- -------------- 67 29 6 11
Tallow ---------------------------- 33 27 .2I 11
Textiles --- ------------------------- 19 30 24 20
Tinplate ----------------- 64 99 75 127
Tobacco _._____-------_ __37 34 25 33
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous ------------ 41 43 31 38
Wheat __---------------_ 304 294 83 149
Woodpulp_ _-------------------------- ___ 60 77 60 53
All other and unclassified ---- _____ 365 326 268 381
Total ------- ---_________---__ 17,612 17,802 13,529 16,397
EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Corn __--- ------ ----- -- -- ___ ______ 1
Wheat --_______-_____ __________ 23 23 7
All other and unclassified -------------- 26 23 18 21
Total -----___ --------___ 51 46 25 22







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST UNITED
STATES:
Asbestos ------
Petroleum and products: Gasoline ----
Paper and paper products -------
Ores, miscellaneous -----------
All other and unclassified -
Total ------------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST CANADA;
Bauxite-----------------------------
Chemicals, unclassified--------------
All other and unclassified --------
Total ----------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST SOUTH
AMERICA:
Asbestos ---------------------
Chemicals, unclassified --
Iron and steel manufactures-
Metals, miscellaneous-----------------
Paper and paper products
Woodpulp----------------
All other and unclassified-
Total ------------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA/MEXICO:
Iron and steel manufactures --------
Petroleum and products: Gasoline ----
Railroad materials-------------
Total -------------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO OCEANIA:
Asbestos
Automobiles and accessories-
Chemicals, unclassified -- ----
Iron and steel manufactures -------
Machinery --- -----------
Metals, miscellaneous ------------
Paper and paper products -- --
Tinplate _------------- ----
Woodpulp --- ---------
All other and unclassified-
Total -----------------
EAST COAST CANADA TO AsIA:
Asbestos
Chemicals:
Petroleum
Unclassified -
Coal-----
Corn
Grains, unclassified -
Metals:
Miscellaneous -----------
Scrap -
Ores, miscellaneous ----------- ---
Paper and paper products
Resin ----- _- __
Rubber, manufactured-


Fiscal year


1965 1964
7 3
11 ---

18 13
1
36 18

16 -
4 11
2 2
22 13


9 8
--- 1
1 1
4 3
9 12
1 2
13 7
37 34


9


1963 1962

111 --
1
8
1 7
121 iU

5
4 1(
8 7
17 ir


10


11 19 11
20 29 11

23 17 16
13 13 18
22 11 8
10 8 7
4 7 4
6 8 26
114 82 78
14 2 10
4 4 5
50 35 21
260 187 193

86 82 69


2
5
14
5

18
145
55
66
9
6


7
2


10
87
49
16
3
2


9
1
1
6
15
1
11
44


8
1
2
3
11
1
7
33



17

17

16
7
3
5
3
28
94
14
2
11
183

88

N.A.
8
14


42
326
25
13
6
2


2
5
5



0
7'

7







84 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


EAST COAST CANADA TO ASIA-Continued:
Slag ----------------------
Soybeans---------------------------
Wheat-----------------------------
Woodpulp--------------------------
All other and unclassified --------
Total--- _-------------

EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
WEST COAST UNITED STATES:
Molasses------------------ -
Ores, miscellaneous--- --_ _--
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-dieseloil
Gasoline
All other and unclassified---------
Total-----------------
EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
VEST COAST CENTRAL AEmcERICA/MEXICO:
Iron and steel manufactures-
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil ----------
Gasoline ------------ -
Kerosene
Railroad materials-
Sulfur ___
All other and unclassified-
Total ---------

EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
OCEANIA:
Sulfur
All other and unclassified-----____
Total ---------------

EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO
ASIA:
Ammonium compounds----
Fertilizers, unclassified
Metals:
Miscellaneous- -- -- ----
Scrap
Ores, miscellaneous ---- ------
Petroleum and products: Gasoline ----
Phosphate ---------------
Sulfur ----------------
All other and unclassified
Total __ ____-- _---
EAST COAST SouTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
UNITED STATES:
Bones and bonemeal-----------
Canned food products
Coffee -------------- ---
Iron and steel manufactures -------
Ores:
Bauxite -----------------------__
Manganese --------- ____


1965
35
121

3
22
592


Fiscal year
1964 1963
25 25
88 20
4
7 8
23 26
621 324


1962
24

100

41
689


- ----- ------ 14
_ _-_- 3 17


7
8
1
16


1
4


2
33


1 3


29 16 5
-- ---- 8
3
----------_ 3
---- -----_ 1
5 8 4
3 7
34 27 29


88

88


1
50
7
22
5
85


111

111


10

17

3

3
37


15

3

2
23



79

79


80
3
83


1
1 - -
5 7
30 50


2 3 2 4
11 26 29 37
-- ---- 2 8

34 41 42 44
15 40 ---







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
UNITED STATES-Continued; 1'
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil----- -------- 2
Fuel-diesel oil---------------
Gasoline- ------------------
Kerosene--- ---- -------------
Other and unclassified-------
All other and unclassified -- ------
Total ----- --------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
CANADA:
Coffee --- -----------
Ore, bauxite---------------------
Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil-_
All other and unclassified --------
Total ...------------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds--------------
Asphalt-----------------
Cement-----------------------------
Chemicals:
Petroleum _------------
Unclassified---------------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil- --------- ---
Fuel-diesel oil-------------------
Gasoline. -------------__ ------
Other and unclassified-------
All other and unclassified --------
Total-----------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST
SOUTH AMERICA:
Ammonium compounds ----------
Bauxite __---------------
Cement---__---_-----________
Fertilizers, unclassified ---------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil --- -----------
Fuel-diesel oil -----------
Gasoline ---- ..------------- _
Kerosene ..--- -----.-----------
Lubricating oil ---------------
Other and unclassified-_________
Salt
W heat ............
All other and unclassified --------
Total ----------------------- -----
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil---- -----
Gasoline -------------
Kerosene ------------
Other and unclassified ------- -
All other and unclassified --------
Total .


Fiscal year

965 1964 1963 1962


,257
121
111
121

12
,,684


1
27
77
5
110


21
27

1
5

789
56
18
59
3
979


8
7
22
20

951
645
159
43
13
34
11

28
,941


279
1

11
3
294


1,810
61
70
105
13
8
2,177


2,339
49
216
121
12
2,812


5 3
51 47

3
56 53


3
25
12

3
6

599
77
23
55
6
809



6
16
11

743
169
130
32
8
12
12
5
6
1,150


234
14
2
2

252


1,801
348
59

8
9
2,323


4
39

2
45


3 ---
20 19
5 3

N.A.


6

213
206
15
3
1
472



8
1
2

716
445
31


11

13
1,227


178
35
4
1
1
219


18
186
14
1

241



5
15

642
458
93
22

11
26
1,272


160
24
7
1
192







86 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of lonz ton


EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO OCEANIA:
Chemicals, unclassified-----------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil -- ----
Fuel-diesel oiL -------------
Gasoline --------------
Kerosene --------------
Lubricating oil----------------
All other and unclassified ---
Total---------------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO HAWAIIAN
ISLANDS:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil------- ----
Lubricating oil -
Kerosene
All other and unclassified-
Total-------------------
EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO AsIA:
Corn--__----------------
Cotton, raw -
Grains, unclassified -
Metal, iron
Ores:
Bauxite-
Iron _-----------------
Manganese
Tin ------------------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil -------
Fuel-diesel oil ------------
Gasoline -----------------
Lubricating oil--------
Other and unclassified-
Sugar ___________ _-
Wool -_ ---------------
All other and unclassified -----
Total -- ________ ___
CRISTOBAL, C.Z., TO WEST COAST UNITED
STATES:
Coffee ---------------
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil __-
Gasoline -------------
All other and unclassified
Total ---------- _____ -__-

CRISTOBAL, C.Z., TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA/MEXICO:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil_ _____----
Gasoline ----_ --------
Kerosene -- -- _____
Other and unclassified -------
All other and unclassified_ __-
Total _..._


Is]


1965


9
170
11
13
3
206



8

134
1
143


14
14
69

36
78
63

346
767
15
28
28

2
20
1,480




17


17



16
20
7
5

48


Fiscal year
1964 1963 1962


17
270
1
31

325




18
45

63

4
8
16
103


12
20
150

49
3
234




89

89


38 10
92 106
7 -
6

315 252
629 674

51 60
6
----- ----
5 7
27 24
1,301 1,222


102
20
119

17
2
260



7

49

56


50
156


181
245

13
13
12
8
6
720


49 48 33

50 48 33


13 5
33 10
5 3


51 18


3
3







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long ton


CIUSTOBAL, C.Z., TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil-----------------
Gasoline-------------------
Kerosene---------------------
All other and unclassified -
Total-------------------
CmSTOBAL, C.Z., TO ASIA:
Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil-
All other and unclassified
Total-----------------------
WEST INDIES TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES:
Coffee-----------------------
Molasses------------------------
Ore, bauxite ---------------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil--------------------
Fuel-diesel oil ------------
Gasoline --------------
Kerosene -------------
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified---------
Total-----------------
WEST INDIES TO WEST COAST CANADA:
Bauxite ----------------
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil ------------
Kerosene -
All other and unclassified --------
Total------------------
WEST INDIES TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA/MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds-
Chemicals, unclassified -
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil __
Fuel-diesel oil ------------
Gasoline --------------
Kerosene --------------
Lubricating oil -----------
Other and unclassified-
All other and unclassified- ___
Total-- --------------
WEST INDIES TO WEST COAST SouTH AMERICA:
Asphalt --------------
Fertilizers, unclassified ----------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil ----- ------
Fuel-diesel oil -----------
Gasoline_ -----------
Kerosene -.- ------- -- --
Lubricating oil --
Other and unclassified-
Salt _
Sugar __------------ __
All other and unclassified ---_---
Total


as]
Fiscal year
1965 1964 1963 1962


180
36
5
1
222

28

28

8

40

73
676
622
160
7
29
1,615

337

76
8
4
425


18
3

43
124
63
31
4
6
292

18
21

626
181
72
10
14
3
6
951


232 97
24 54
6 32
1
263 183


5
4
23
2
13


7 ------ _--- -
7 -

75 5 7

5 5 7


43
485
442
130
18
11
1,147

301




301


30
621
295
60
6
1,017


14
12

198
980
376
71

11
1,669


252 220

20 18
- - --
12
272 250


16
3


11
75
90
53

15
2
265

2
5

891
63
34
10
1
3
5
2
1,016


266
218
87
3
12
3
589


13
261
205
88
6
8
5
586


18 28


704
91
52
11
14
2
101
4
997


17
672
119
64
11
1
1
141
2
1,056







88 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA

Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


(Thousands of long toi


WEST INDIES TO BALBOA, C.Z.:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil---------------
Gasoline. ---------------
Kerosene----------------
Other and unclassified -------
All other and unclassified---------
Total------------------------
WEST INDIES TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS:
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil-----------------
Gasoline -------------
Kerosene -------------
Total----------------------
WEST INDIES TO OCEANIA:
Asphalt ----------------------------
Petroleum and products:
Fuel-diesel oil -----------
Gasoline-----------------------
Kerosene ----------
Lubricating oil ------ ------
Other and unclassified --------
Sugar ----------------
All other and unclassified -- _____-_
Total --------------

WEST INDIES TO ASIA:
Ammonium compounds ---------
Fish, refrigerated ------------
Machinery-------------------- -- -
Metals:
Iron
Scrap
Molasses
Ores:
Bauxite --- ------------
Copper ---------
Petroleum and products:
Crude oil --
Fuel-diesel oil----------------
Gasoline --- -----------
Kerosene ______-
Lubricating oil ---- _------
Sugar -- ----__-----
All other and unclassified -----_--
Total -- _-
EUROPE TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES:
Ammonium compounds ------__-_
Asbestos ____ ---- _- ____
Automobiles and accessories ---- ----
Beer -- ____________ .
Canned food products ----------
Chemicals, unclassified _..------
C reosote -.. ... .. .. .. .
Electrical machinery and apparatus----
Fertilizers, unclassified ----_---_ -
Food in refrigeration --------


ns]


1965

188
29
3

1
221



2
140
142

31

45
32
11
32
17
18
8
194


10
5

11
27

24
5

28
610

3
44
607
2
1,376

20
8
119
9
11
29
24
7
58
9


Fiscal year
1964 1963 1962


168
31
3
3
2
207


151
29


10
190


16 11

161 92
177 103


211
109
21
23

364



17
72
89


68 64 66


42
75
15
41

23
5
269

4
10
6


9
125
18
27
2
22
5
272


60
123
31
40

10
4
334


19
8 8
_---. 1


8 21
50 108


30 20 15
14 11 10


454
24
51
45
487
4
1,164

21
9
104
8
9
32
12
5
65
9


123
10
122
44
602
16
1,014

19
10
89
7
12
26
12
5
62
12


197
34
69
23
1,851
7
2,363

26
7
69
5
16
25
29
4
55
5







PANAMA CANAL COMPANY


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued


[Thousands of long tons]


EUROPE TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES-
Continued:
Glass and glassware ----------
Groceries, unclassified ----------
Iron and steel manufactures --.
Lumber ------------------------
Liquors and wines -----------
Machinery------------ ---------
Marble and stone----- -------
Metals, miscellaneous ---------------
Nitrate of soda------ -----------
Paper and paper products -------
Rope and twine----------------__---
Soda and sodium compounds-
Woodpulp-----------------------
All other and unclassified-
Total --------------------
EUROPE TO WEST COAST CANADA:
Asphalt -------------------------
Automobiles and accessories-------
Chemicals, unclassified -- -------
Clay, fire and china----------------
Creosote------------- -----
Glass and glassware___---------
Iron and steel manufactures-------
Liquors and wines -----------
Machinery---------------------
Metals, miscellaneous ----------
Ore, zinc -------------------
All other and unclassified --------
Total --------------------
EUROPE TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMEIucA/
MEXICO:
Ammonium compounds -
Automobiles and accessories-
Canned food products -----------
Cement ----------------
Chemicals, unclassified----- ----
Fertilizers, unclassified ---------
Glass and glassware -
Iron and steel manufactures-
Machinery _-------------
Metals, miscellaneous ------------
Paper and paper products ---------
Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil-
Phosphate---------------
Potash ----------------
Soda and sodium compounds -------
All other and unclassified --------
Total------------------
EUROPE TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA:
Agricultural implements --------
Ammonium compounds --------
Ammunition and explosives-
Automobiles and accessories-
Barley ---------------
Bricks and tile --------------


1965

54
7
111
10
53
31
13
35
10
103
5
2
2
152
882

41
13
6
6
12
13
92
8
10
12
7
39
259


45
7
7
5
24
129
7
61
13
4
9
8
7
3
47
376

11
71
4
20
5
5


Fiscal year
1964 1963


57
7
175
14
52
22
13
32
2
82
9
2
4
108
853

37
12
6
5

12
87
7
12
12
39
229


47
7
6
25
21
101
6
45
8
8
9
26
3
5
42
359

9
59
4
19
8
3


40
7
155
11
45
21
12
37
7
60
4
1
2
113
769

29
9
6
3
12
13
44
7
8
3
45
179


54
6
6
16
17
85
4
38
7
7
9
21
1
4
42
317

9
89
8
19
14
4


1962

48
8
228
7
44
18
N.A.
50
66
N.A.
2
8
130
850

25
16
5
7
5
7
65
9
9
4
44
196


55
5
5
15
12
84
4
41
7
9
6
12

5
39
299

14
75
N.A.
24
8
3


11351--13







FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA


Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes
Atlantic to Pacific-Continued
[Thousands of long tons]


EUROPE TO \WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA-
Continued:
Canned food products ---------
Cement --------
Chemicals, unclassified -- ---- -------
Coal -- ------------
Coke .--------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ------
Fertilizers, unclassified ----
Flour, wheat ---- -----
Class and glassware ---
Grains, unclassified ------------------
Groceries, unclassified--------- ----
Iron and steel manufactures- ----
Machinery --------
Metals:
Iron----------------
Miscellaneous---- ---- ---
Oats -------------
Paints and varnishes ---------
Paper and paper products -------- --
Petroleum and products: Other and un-
classified-------------------------
Phosphate -------------
Potash ----------------
Railroad materials -
Rice-------------------
Slag__----------------
Soda and sodium compounds ---
Sugar --- -.------
Textiles -- -----------
Vegetable oil, miscellaneous-
Wax, paraffin ____ __- __----_
Woodpulp --
All other and unclassified ------
Total -----------------
EUROPE TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS:
Fertilizers, unclassified-- -------
Ores, miscellaneous -----------
Sand ------
All other and unclassified-
Total ----------------------
EUROPE TO OCEANIA:
Agricultural implements-
Ammonium compounds -
Asphalt
Automobiles and accessories ------
Beer ------------------
Bricks and tile
Canned food products ---------
Cement -- --
Chemicals, unclassified
Clay, fire and china -
Coke----------------
Electrical machinery and apparatus ---
Fertilizers, unclassified
Flour, wheat---------------
Floor coverings --------------


Fiscal year
1965 1964 1963 1962


1
1
8

1
6













IL








19
91


8 16 37 40
6 21 27 17
55 71 75 64
4 5 2 2
4 9 1 35
.7 14 18 22
i1 84 117 118
9 9 22 19
.2 15 12 12
5
9 9 8 8
i2 193 182 206
69 66 70 64

33 18 25 21
6 8 5 5
5 4 5 -----
4 6 6 8
47 59 52 49

3 5 4 3
33 32 59 57
5 13 11 9
7 3 8 4
8 -
1 5 10 7
32 37 33 32
11 4 43 72
5 5 5 5
5 4 11 6
11 10 9 9
27 26 18 6
22 123 110 141
67 976 1,128 1,170

9 5 11 5
14
S---- 14 -
3 12 3 4
12 17 28 23

9 6 9 12
13 6 7 8
6 4 6 7
74 78 56 54
3 3 4 7
6 4 4 12
8 5 8 12
66 56 46 47
52 46 45 38
11 3 1 1
- --- 7 43
12 10 10 11
14 12 12 6
10 11 12 11
5 4 5 5




Full Text

PAGE 1

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965

PAGE 2

Digitized by the Internet Archive ir 2009 with funding from Univrsiy of Florida, George A. Smathers Lirie

PAGE 3

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY Balboa Heights, C.Z. OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT December 29, 1965. To THiESTOCKHOLDER OF THE PANAMA CANAL COMPANY: The story of the Panama Canal throughout the fiscal year ending June 30, 1965, again demonstrates the importance of this vital waterway to the industrial growth of the United States and other nations of the world. A record volume of 78.,899,012 long tons of cargo flowed through the Canal during the year. Since World War 11 extensive studies have been made of the capacity of the Canal to meet the future requirements of world commerce. On April 18, 1965, President Johnson appointed a Commission, known as the "Atlantic-Pacific Interoceanic Canal Study Commission," to make a full and complete investigation to determine the feasibility of, and the most suitable site for, the construction of a sea level canal connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The Commission is to complete its studies by June 30, 1968. During the year, the Board deferred action on a number of major --aprovement projects pending completion of the Commission's studies. However, the Board is continuing a careful evaitiation of the need for improvement projects that may be req Aired to provide adequate service throughout the remaining Life of the Canal. Such projects include completion 11351--l

PAGE 4

of the widening of Gaillard Cut to a minimum width of 500 feet, provision of greater channel depth, assurance of sufficient storage capacity for water required for operation of the locks as traffic increases, and provision of increased amounts of electric power required by the Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government. The Board of Directors has also initiated investigation of the feasibility of securing certain supporting services from private sources instead of making further investment of Company funds in capital plant to provide such services. ROBERTJ. FLEMING, Jr., President. n

PAGE 5

CONTENTS PANAMA CANAL COMPANY INTRODUCTION Page ORGANIZATION CHART .Faces page 1 THE CANAL-A BRIEF DESCRIPTION .1 ORGANIZATION .1 TOLLSRATES BOARD OFDIRECToRS AND GENERAL OFFICERS 3 COMPARATIvETABULATION OF IGLGHTs OF OPERATIONS .4 SUMMARY: PANAMA CANAL COMPANY OPERATIONS .5 Canal Traffi and Cargo Movements 5 Financial Review .........5 CHAPTER I-REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC OCEANGOING TRAFFIC. OTHER TRAFFIC .8 PRINCIPAL TRADE RouTEs-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC .8 NATIONALITY OF VESSELS .12 CARGO STATISTICS-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC 13 TRANSIT AVERAGES .........13 DATA IN STATISTICAL CHAPTER 13 CHAPTER II1-THE WATERWAY TRANSIT OPERATIONS 15 LOCKS OPERATION 17 CANAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 17 WATER SUPPLY MAINTENANCE OF CANAL CHANNEL 19 ORIENTATION ANDEXCURSION SERVICE 19 CHAPTER II-SUPPORTING OPERATIONS EMPLOYEE SERVICES 21 Supply and Community Service Bureau .21 Supply Division ........21 Procurement Division .......23 Community Services Division .23 TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITY SERVICES .23 Railroad Operations 23 Motor Transportation 24 *g. 5

PAGE 6

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PAGE 9

CONTENTS CHAPTER VII-FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Financial Statements and Related Supplementary Reports Page NARRATIVE STATEMENT .........137 Invested Capital ..........138 Capital Expenditures .........139 Financial Results 139 TABLE 1.-ItComparative Statement of Financial Condition .138 TABLE 2.--Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government .140 TABLE 3.-Statement of Operations .......141 TABLE 4.-Comparative Statement of Fixed Assets ....142 STATsTcAL DATA .1.4.3. .... Personnel Data 143 Area of the Canal Zone 144 VU

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES STOCKHOLDER BOARD OF DIRECTOR F_ PRESI DENT COMPTROLLER VICE PRESIDENT SECRETARY RESPONSIBLE ITI ES AS SET R ESPONSIBILITIES AS SE T RESPONSIBILITIES AS SET FORTH UN DE R ART ICLE V FOR TH UN 0ER AnT ICLE V FORTH LIN 0ER AR T ICLE IV SEC TiON 5, PANA NA CANAL SE CTION 4, PAN& MA CAN aL SE CTION 6, PANAMA CANAL COMPANY BYLAWS COMPANY BYLAWS COMPANY BYLAWS EXECUTIVE PERSONNEL OFFICE OF PANAMA CANAL SAFETY ADMINISTRATIVE ASST PLANNING STAFF BUREAU GENERAL COUNSEL INFORMATION OFFICE BRANCH TO PRESIDENT CHIEF DIRECTOR GENERAL COUNSEL INFORMATION OFFICER ChiEF LONG RANGE PLANNING EMPLOYEE UTILIZATION AND LITIGATION PUBLIC RELATIGNS ACTIVITIESSUPERVISION AND PROMOTION GENERAL GFFICE MANAGEMENT C APITAL BUDGET DEVELOPMENT LEGAL REVIE W PUBLICATIONS OF SAFETY MEASURES IN OFFICE OF GOVERNOR-PRES M ANAGEMENT STUDIES 8 SURVEfS EMPLOYEE -MANAGEMENT RELATIONS LEGISLATION PRESS SERVICES DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT COORDINATION OF ADMINISTRATIVE C ANAL TRAFFIC ST TISTICS EM PLOYMENTS AND PLACEMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS AND CANAL ZONE GUIDE SERVICE OF ACCIDENT PREVENTION SERVICES AND PROCEDURES, INE C 0NOMIC STUD IESA WAGE AND SALARY ADMINISTRATION PROCEEDINGS PROGRAM CLUDING GENERAL SUPERVISION ANNUAL AND MONTHLY REPORTS Cl VIL S ER VICE LIA I$SN BY THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASST OF COORDINATION OF CIVIC COUNCIL CENTRAL E MPL 0 MENT OFFICE THE AOMIN SERVICES DIVISION PROGRAMS DEPUTY EXECUTIVE SECRETARY MARINE ENGINEERING AND SUPPLY AND TRANSPORTATION BUREAUCONSTRUCTION COMMUNITY SERVICE AND TERMINALS BUREAU BUREAU BUREAU DIRECTOR DIRECTOR DIRECTOR DIRECTOR CANAL NAVIGATION DE 7tG N, CONSTR AND IN99PEC PROCUREMENT TERMINALS PIERS AND DOCKR MARINE TRAFFIC CONTROL MAI NTENANCE OF BJLtDiNGS, STOREHOUSES MARItIN E BU I'ME RING PORT P ERATiON STNU CTURES 8 UTILITIES EMPLOYEE SALES M OTOR TRAN SPORTATION LOCKS 0 PER AT ION 8 MAINTENANCE *STREET S, ROADS a SEWERS MPLOYEE S a QUARTERS PANAMA RAILROAO SHIP REPAIR PUBLIC UTILITY 'PERAT ONS SBU IDINGS AND GROU Nos WATER TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF LOCAL INSPECTORS SURE YS AN D MA ppIN G tC EMETERIES5 A D MEASUREMENT METEOROLOGY 8 HIOROGRAPH4Y GUEST HOUSE 9OARniNG PARTIES CHANNEL MAINTENANCE ncuegwrmn rorl

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INTRODUCTION THE CANAL The Panama Canal is a lock canal that connects the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans through the Isthmus of Panama, traversing a distance of approximately 51 miles from deep water to deep water. In the dredged channel, the Canal has a minimum width of 300 feet and a normal depth of 42 feet. The greatest part of the Canal channel is at the level of Gatun Lake, the surface of which fluctuates from a high of 87 feet above sea level in the rainy season to a low of 82 feet above sea level in the dry season. Variation in the level of Gatun Lake necessitates adjustment of allowable ship draft from a maximum of 39 feet to a minimum of 34 feet. In transiting the Canal a ship is raised in three steps from sea level to the level of Gatun Lake, and subsequently lowered in three steps to sea level at the other side of the Isthmus. The six steps or flights of locks are in duplicate, to enable simultaneous lockage of two ships transiting in the same direction or of ships passing in opposite directions. The past fiscal year marked the completion of 51 years of successful operation of the Canal. The Canal was opened on August 15, 1914, and has served world commerce without major interruption since fiscal year 1916, when the last Canal-closing slide occurred in Gaillard Cut at the Continental Divide. A total of 359,811 vessels of all types have made the Canal transit, of which 283,921 were oceangoing commercial vessels plying the various routes of world trade. In addition, the Canal has been of incalculable service to the United States and her allies in time of war. ORGANIZATION The Panama Canal Company Act, which created the Panama Canal Company and defined its basic purposes, organization, rights, powers, and obligations, was enacted June 29, 1948 (62 Stat. 1076), as amended by the act of September 26, 1950 (64 Stat. 1041). This act became effective on July 1, 1951, pursuant to the provisions of Executive Order 10263 of June 29, 1951. The charter of the corporation was reenacted with only minor modifications as part of the act revising the Canal Zone Code, approved October 18, 1962 (76A Stat. 1). The charter now appears in two Canal Zone Code sections, 61-75 and 121-123. In its capacity as owner of the Company, the U.S. Government is represented by the Secretary of the Army, referred to as "Stockholder," in his individual capacity as the personal representative of the President of the United States for such purpose. The Company operates under the management of a Board of Directors appointed by the Stockholder. The Company is charged with the maintenance and operation of the Panama Canal and the conduct of the business-type operations incident to such maintenance and incident to the civil government of the Canal Zone. 11351--2

PAGE 12

2 INTRODUCTION The Company and the Canal Zone Government, the independent agency of the United States charged with the civil government of the Canal Zone, are closely interrelated in mission, organization, and operations. The combined function of these agencies is the administration of the Panama Canal enterprise as a whole. The Governor of the Canal Zone, who is appointed by the President of the United States and who is charged with the administration of the Canal Zone Government, under the supervision of the Secretary of the Army, is ex officio a director and President of the Company. The Panama Canal Company is expected (a) to recover all costs of operation and maintenance of its facilities, including depreciation; (b) to pay interest to the Treasury on the net direct investment of the Government in the Company, and (c) to reimburse the Treasury for (1) the annuity payments to the Republic of Panama under the convention of 1903 as modified by the treaty of 1936 between the two governments, and (2) the net costs of operation of the Canal Zone Government, including depreciation on fixed assets. The interest rate for the fiscal year 1965 as set by the Secretary of the Treasury was 3.457 percent. The Board of Directors is required to appraise, at least annually, the Company's working capital requirements, together with reasonable foreseeable requirements for authorized plant replacements and expansion, and to pay into the Treasury as a repayment of capital the amount of any funds in excess of such requirements. All funds other than working balances are carried with the U.S. Treasury. The activities of the Company are classified under two major headings; namely: (a) Transit Operations and (b) Supporting Services. Category (a) embraces those functions directly related to the waterway and the transiting of ships and 'to services to shipping, including maintenance of the Canal channel, maintenance and operation of the locks, and maintenance of a bridge across the Canal at Balboa. The supporting services include vessel repairs, harbor terminal operations, a railroad across the Isthmus, a supply ship operating between New Orleans and the Canal Zone, motor transportation facilities, storehouses, an electric power system, communication system, a water system, and service activities that are essential to employees' needs including the operation of quarters, retail stores, and restaurants. TOLLS RATES The rates of Canal tolls remained unchanged during the year. These rates are as follows: (a) On merchant vessels, Army and Navy transports, tankers, hospital ships, supply ships, and yachts when carrying passengers or cargo: 90 cents per net vessel-ton of 100 cubic feet of actual earning capacity; that is, the net tonnage determined in accordance with the "Rules for the Measurement of Vessels for the Panama Canal"; (b) On such vessels in ballast, without passengers or cargo: 72 cents per net vessel-ton; (c) On other floating craft: 50 cents per ton of displacement. Tolls charges for the Canal are at the same level as were imposed on March 1, 1938. They are lower than those charged from the beginning of Canal operations to 1938.

PAGE 13

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PAGE 15

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PAGE 17

Chapter I REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC OCEANGOING TRAFFIC 1 During this past fiscal year the increasing growth in Panama Canal traffic continued for the 13th year. Fiscal year 1965 established the highest year of traffic since the Canal began operation. A grand total of 12,203 oceangoing vessels transited the waterway, 284 of which were U.S. Government owned or controlled vessels and 85 of which were free transits. A total of 11,834 commercial ships transited, averaging 32.4 per day, and for the fourth consecutive year exceeded the 11,000 mark. The Panama Canal Company received $65,442,633 in tolls from commercial ships flying the flags of 45 nations. Traffic of this type, amounting to 97 percent, constitutes the bulk of the Company's workload. Accompanying this rise in number of transits for the year in the oceangoing commercial vessels was an 8.5-percent increase in cargo tonnage. The 76,573,071 long tons of commercial cargo that passed through the Canal during fiscal year 1965 represent an average of 210,282 long tons per day. The total tonnage was 6 million tons above last year's record and 9 million tons above the previous record set in 1962. Of the 76.6 million tons of cargo, 5.8 million moved in the U.S. intercoastal trade, 24.4 million tons were U.S. exports, and 19.4 million tons were imports of the United States for a total of 49.6 million tons moving to or from the United States. This represents 64.8 percent of the total cargo flow. With the exception of U.S. intercoastal trade and that of Europe-west coast United States/ Canada, cargo movements to and from all the major geographical areas of the world increased in 1965. The most significant change occurred in the flow of cargo to and from the Far East. Other important increases are shown in trade between the United States and South America. This year cargo movements to and from the Far East increased 1,815,000 tons and movements to and from South American ports rose by 4,555,000 tons. I Vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement) for vessels rated on net tonnage, orof 50 dsplacement tons and over for vesels rated on displacement tonnage (naval vesels, 7

PAGE 18

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 9 Fiscal year (in thousands of tons ) Percent increase or 1965 1964 (decrease) Panama Panama Panama Canal Long Canal Long Canal Long net tons net tons net ions Trade route ions cargo tons cargo tons cargo East coast United States-Asia---.--------------.----------17,234 22,540 16,339 21,354 5.5 5.6 East coast United States-west coast South America -----_---_--9,541 7,824 9,960 7,031 (4.2) 11.3 Europe-west coast South America-----------------_---__---7,751 7,153 7,500 7,073 3.3 1.1 Europe-westcoastUnitedStates/Canada-----------_--6,779 6,882 6,620 7,044 2.4 (2.3) U.S. intercoastal (including Alaska and Hawaii) ------------4,920 5,823 4,566 6,088 7.8 (4.4) Europe-Oceania -------------------------------------------3,233 2,378 3,148 2,158 2.7 10.2 East coast South America-west coast United States.-------. -_2,598 2, 83 8 1,989 2,355 30.6 20.5 East coast United States-west coast Central America/Mexico. ---1,998 945 1,848 825 8.1 14.5 Subtotal ---------.--------.---------.------.----------. 54,054 56,383 51,970 53,928 4.0 4.6 All other routes ------------------------------------------.20,681 20,190 17,663 16,622 17.1 21.2 Total -----------------.---._--_---------.74,735 76,573 69,633 70,550 7.3 8.5 The only decline occurring in net vessel tonnage is shown in the east coast United States to west coast South America route which experienced a drop of 419,000 measurement tons, representing a decline of 4.2 percent. The east coast South America to west coast United States, retaining its seventh position in importance among the routes, shows the highest percentage gain in net tonnage. Two other substantial gains in net tonnage are shown in the fifth and eighth ranking routes, but the fifth route, U.S. intercoastal trade, took a drop of 4.4 percent in cargo tonnage. The total volume of cargo moving through the Canal increased by 8.5 percent, or 6,023,000 long tons. The highest single route increase in volume of cargo tonnage, 20.5 percent, occurred in the east coast South America to west coast United States. The gain falls just short of that experienced by the "call other routes." A brief description of shipping engaged in these trade routes is given in the following paragraphs: East coast United States-Asia.-Although retaining the position of first place in importance among the various routes served by the Canal the route this year dropped back to more normal gains in both Panama Canal net tonnage and volume of cargo moved. From the phenomenal increase of 27 percent last year the gain in long tons of cargo transiting eased off to 5.6 percent, or 1.2 million tons as compared with a gain of 4.5 million in 1964. The flow of cargo to and from the Great Lakes area increased substantially with a gain of 251,000 long tons, contributed almost entirely by the Asian to United States movement. Total exports from the east coast United States to Asia rose to 17,611,837 long tons, 190,000 tons under 1964 exports, while Far East exports to the United States increased to 4,928,259 tons for a gain of 1,186,491 tons, or 5.6 percent over the tonnage moving in fiscal year 1964. The three most important increasing commodities moving in this trade from the United States to Asia were coal and coke, phosphates, and soybeans. Other commodities contributing substantial volumes were sorghum with 208,000 tons, and rice with an increase of 112,000 tons over the 1964 totals. Exports of scrap metal declined some 850,000 tons during 1965. In the eastbound movement, shipments of iron and steel products to the United States accounted 11351--3

PAGE 20

10 REVIEW OF CANAL TRAFFIC for 74.8 percent of the increased tonnage while sugar shipments rose by some 126,000 long tons. Textiles and lumber shipments rose moderately. East coast United States to west coast South America.-Although suffering a modest decline in volume of shipping, this route retained its second place position in importance. However, the volume of cargo increased by slightly more than 11 percent. Cargo tonnage moving over this route consists principally of the flow of raw materials from South America to the United States. This year ores and metals moving from South America over the route amounted to 4,196,000 long tons for a gain of 869,000 tons over fiscal year 1964. Iron Ore alone contributed 781,000 tons of this gain, or 89.5 percent of the total increase over 1964. Sugar exports to the United States increased some 101,000 long tons. The westbound volume of cargo increased only slightly in comparison with the eastbound movement, contributing a total of 1,655,000 long tons moving in this direction. Europe to west coast South America.-Retaining its position as third-ranking route of the year, the area experienced a very slight rise in net tonnage and cargo movements. Trade this year contributed a total of 7,751,000 net vessel tons of shipping to Panama Canal traffic in comparison with 7,500,000 net tons in fiscal year 1964, a 3.3-percent rise in volume. Raw materials, as in previous years, Atlantic-bound for European ports contributed the principal cargo moving in this direction. During this fiscal year 84.4 percent of the cargo moved from Pacific to Atlantic. The flow of cargo from the west coast of South America to Europe increased by 89,000 long tons, whereas the commodity flow from Europe declined by 9,000 tons. Movements of bananas, fishmeaL, and fish oil registered the most significant advances, increasing some 434,000 tons in total, with fishmeal alone contributing 289,000 tons of the increase. These increases were offset to a considerable extent by decreases in the movement of iron ore, coffee, and sugar in the commodity flow from South America to Europe. Europe to west coast United States/ Canada.-Becording a modest increase in the volume of shipping employed this fiscal year, this fourth-ranking route in importance to the Canal experienced a decline of 2.3 percent in the volume of cargo transported. The significant rises in exports of oilseeds, lumber, sulfur, and petroleum products of some 661,000 long tons to European ports was more than offset by declining volumes amounting to 874,000 tons in wheat, barley, coke, and metals. The principal decrease recorded moving from Europe to the west coast area was a decline of 22.5 percent in iron and steel manufactures in comparison with the fiscal year 1964 figure of 262,000 long tons. Nominal increased shipments from Europe to the area occurred in automobiles and paper and paper products. U.S. intercoastal (including Alaska and H awaii).-In terms of percentage, the third highest increase in net vessel tonnage over a single route through

PAGE 21

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 11 the Canal this year was registered in this fifth-ranking route. The trade contributed 4,920,000 net vessel tons of shipping to Panama Canal traffic this year in comparison with 4,566,000 net tons recorded in 1964, a 7.8-percent rise in volume. On the other hand, after a significant rise of 24 percent registered in cargo volume transiting in 1964 over the 1963 tonnage, the cargo tonnage declined 4.4 percent, or a total of 265,000 long tons, under 1964. Although recording a net gain of some 931,000 long tons in cargo flow in the westbound movement', 702,,000 of which was increased tonnage of petroleum products, a total decline of 1,178,000 tons occurred in the eastbound volume. This is a decrease of 30.8 percent under the volume of 3,820,000 long tons transiting in this direction in 1964. Sugar, the leading export from Hawaii to the east coast of the United States, decreased only slightly, 19,000 tons, under the 1964 figure. Canned food products, also a leading commodity, declined some 52,000 long tons in comparison with fiscal year 1964 when 260,000 tons were shipped. The principal decrease suffered in the west coast to east coast movement was due to decrease shipments of petroleum products which were down 1,158,000 long tons from the 1964 volume, a decline of 59.7 percent. Europe to Oceania.-Ranking sixth in importance in trade via the Panama Canal since 1955, the route showed a modest increase of 2.7 percent in net vessel tonnage employed during 1965, and recorded a substantial increase of 10.2 percent in cargo transported between the areas. In this trade the bulk of the commodities flow principally between New Zealand and Great Britain. This year, of the 2,378,000 long tons of cargo moving over the route, 1,268,000 tons, or 53.3 percent, was trade between the two countries. Principal commodities contributing to the slight gain in the westbound movement were iron and steel products and machinery with shipments of iron and steel increasing 25.4 percent. In the eastbound flow substantial gains were recorded in dairy and meat products, up 113,000 long tons. Fuel oil and sugar exports also increased by 39.9 and 23.3 percent, respectively. East coast South America to west coast United States.-This route retained its position in seventh place and experienced the highest increases in Panama Canal net vessel tonnage and cargo tonnage of any of the major routes. Net vessel tonnage was up 30.6 percent and cargo tons rose 20.5 percent. In comparison with fiscal year 1964, a gain of some 609,000 net vessel tons and 483,000 long tons in cargo was contributed by the route. The movement of cargo over this route consists almost entirely of a flow of petroleum and products from Venezuela to the west coast of the United States. Of the combined 2,838,000 long tons of cargo passing over the route this year, 2,610,000 tons were petroleum and products bound for the west coast of the United States. This is a percentage gain of 26.8 over Iast year's commodity or some 551,000 long tons in the trade. United States to South America shipments declined slightly from the preceding year. East coast United States-west coast Central America/Mexico .-This route retained its eighth-place position among the major routes served by the Canal, and recorded the second highest percentage increases in volume of net

PAGE 22

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PAGE 23

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 13 CARGO STATISTICS-COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC Cargo flowing through the Canal during fiscal year 1965 established the highest level attained since the Canal opened 51 years ago. The volume of cargo transition this year was 76,573,071 long tons. This is a gain of 6,017,000 tons, or 8.5 percent, over last year's volume, and surpasses the previous record established in 1962 by 9,048,519 tons. The Atlantic to Pacific movement of cargo recorded a high of 42,948,996 long tons, for an increase of 4,047,597 tons. Cargo moving in the Pacific to Atlantic direction contributed a gain of 1,975,384 tons over the volume attained in fiscal year 1964. Of the 11 commodity groups which have consistently accounted for approximately 75 percent of the volume of cargo passing through the CanaL, only wheat and canned and refrigerated products declined in tonnage with the remaining 9 groups all increasing. Heaviest contributors among those commodities which increased were iron and steel manufactures, petroleum and products, phosphate, and lumber. Iron and steel increased by 49.3 percent for a gain of 1,269,000 long tons; petroleum and products showed a gain of 7.5 percent for a gain of 1,066,000 long tons. Percentagewise, phosphates were second with an increase of 36.9 percent, but contributed only an additional 875,000 long tons over movements last year. Lumber shipments rose by 12 percent, and sugar gained some 13 percent over fiscal year 1964 tonnages. Average Tonnage, Tolls, and Tons of Cargo Per Transiting Vessel The average measurement of tonnage, tolls, and tons of cargo per oceangoing commercial vessel during fiscal years 1965 and 1964 is shown in the following table: Fiscal year Average per vessel 1965 1964 Panarma Canal net measured tonnage_ _-_-----_-----_-__-__-__----_--_--_6,315 5,910 T o lls __ __ _ __ _ _ _ _-__ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _____$ 5 ,5 3 0 $ 5 ,17 5 Tolls per Panama Canal net ton_ __-___-__--_-_-_-_--_-___---_ -$0.876 $0.877 Tons of cargo per laden transit _____-____-_-___-____-_--__6,467 7,180 Tolls per ton of cargo (laden vessels only)_ ___-_-_ ---_ --_-_-__ -_-_ -$0.753 $0.772 DATA IN STATISTICAL CHAPTER Further particulars of traffic through the Canal are presented in chapter V of this report.

PAGE 25

CAapter II THE WATERWAY The efficient and dependable operation of the Panama Canal is of vital concern not only to maritime interests throughout the world but also to a host of others whose livelihood and general welfare are dependent to some degree upon an even flow of world commerce. The process of getting the ships through the Canal and the performance of certain auxiliary or supporting functions are grouped under the classification of Transit Operations, for purposes of this report, and are the primary missions of the Marine Bureau and the Engineering and Construction Bureau. These two bureaus must provide for the transiting of ships, operation of the locks, vessels repairs, maintenance of the Canal channel, meteorology and hydrographic work, operation of utility systems, and the maintenance of all Canal supporting facilities. TRANSIT OPERATIONS Traffic control During fiscal year 1965. there were 12,203 oceangoing vessels transiting the Canal, 19 more than in fiscal year 1964. These vessels spent an average of 14.3 hours in Canal Zone waters from time of arrival to departure. There was an average of 33.4 ships per day with the highest peak in traffic being reached in March 1965, when 1,119 oceangoing transits were made during the month. A total of L,008 vessels were recorded as holdovers during the year, 318 of which were delayed because they required transit during daylight hours. The remaining 690 vessels were delayed due principally to reduction of capacity during periods of locks overhaul. Tug operations Certain vessels such as tankers, ore carriers, and those carrying hazardous cargoes are selectively dispatched so that they will not meet or pass any other vessel in the narrow sections of Gaillard Cut and are not permitted to proceed unless they can clear the Cut and the locks during daylight hours. Such ships are called "daylight clear-Cuts," and during fiscal year 1965 a total of 1,345 of this type transit moved through the waterway in comparison with 1,114 handled during 1964. In addition, there were 985 vessels which did not require "daylight only" transit, but did require clear-Cut transit compared with 960 such transits in fiscal year 1964. The total of 2,330 clear-Cut transits 15

PAGE 26

16 THE WATE RWAY is significant because it means that almost I out of every 5 transiting vessels required special treatment in Gaillard Cut. This fast growing category of vessels increased 10.5 percent in fscal year 1965 over the previous year volume. There was a significant increase in the number of large vessels transiting during the year. Although vessels continued to be built longer and wider, their handling has become less difiult due to the completion of approximately 5 miles of widening in the Gaillard Cut channel, thus permitting the classifcation of 1,696 vessels into the partial-clear-Cut category. From 646 in 1964, a total of 848 vessels transited in 1965 with beams of 80 feet or over, while vessels of over 575 feet in length increased from 1,036 to ,325 in 1965. Seven tugs of the Navigation Division were in service throughout the yearthreeat the Atlantic terminal and four at the Pacifi terminal. The tugs operated a total of 19,348 revenue-hours in the servicing and assisting of ships, in comparison with 18,535 revenue-hours in fscal year 1964. Dredging Division tugboats performed a total of 3,890 hours of service in assistance to commercial shipping as well as to vessels of the U.S. Army and Navy. Accidents to shipping During fiscal year 1965, the Board of Local Inspectors were called upon to investigate 35 marine accidents which occurred in Canal Zone waters, and to fix the blame and responsibility for them. Of this total, 13 accidents occurred at the locks, 5 occurred at other points in transit, and 17 occurred in the terminal ports. This compares with 29 investigations in fiscal year 1964. The Panama Canal Company was found wholly responsible for damages incurred in 17 accidents. Seventeen of the accidents were determined to have been caused by fault of the vessel or other causes for which the Company assumed no responsibility, and one case was a divided responsibility between the ship and Panama Canal Company. There were 407 transits per accident during 1965, as compared to 487 in 1964. Admeasurement and boarding party operations During 1965, 684 new oceangoing vessels were measured and in addition 379 ships with structural changes were remeasured. This compares with 645 new ships and 455 with structural changes in the previous year. The functions of the boarding party consist of all phases of routine boarding which includes admeasurement of vessels for tolls assessment, inspection to insure compliance with customs, immigration, quarantine, and navigation regulations, and the performance of Deputy Shipping Commnissioner duties for seamen aboard the U.S.-flag vessels. There were 13,108 ships boarded and inspected during the year as compared with 13,246 in fiscal year 1964. Aids to navigation As of June 30, 1965, there were 2,106 navigational aids in service located in the Canal proper, its approaches and terminal harbors, and the adjacent coastal areas, all maintained by the Navigational Aids Unit of the Dredging Division. Included in this total are the electrically operated fluorescent luminaries which comprise the Gaillard Cut lighting system and the Gatun and Miraflores approach lighting. Classified according to the type of illuminants used are the following: gas operated, 82; electrically operated, 1,509;

PAGE 27

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PAGE 28

is THE WATERWAY The remaining work required to complete the widening of Gaillard Cut consists of the removal of 3,870,000 cubic yards, more or less, in Zone I (material above elevation 90), and 7 million cubic yards in Zone II (below elevation 90 subaqueous material). If the extra 5-foot depth design is used, there will be an additional 650,000 cubic yards of this Zone II material. Locks towing locomotives New locomotives have been placed in service at all locks, resulting in fewer personnel being required for lockage crews. Experience with new locomotives has enabled larger ships to be locked with fewer locomotives than originally anticipated. The present operation is now handling larger ships and more lockages with 215 fewer personnel. Continued improvements have been made in maintenance procedures on new locomotives, resulting in savings in parts, material, and labor costs. Four test locomotives are to be returned to Japan to be standardized and returned to service, windlass and traction units removed for return and standardization. These units and other usable parts will become spare parts for the 57 locomotives remaining in service. Four maintenance shelters for servicing the new locomotives were built under contract during the fiscal year. Two are at the north end each side of Miraflores Locks, and two are located at the north end each side of Pedro Miguel Locks. 24-hour locks outage concept As a part of the 24-hour outage concept, overhaul of two gates was begun in January 1965. A trial installation of the east wall hollow quoin cofferdam was attempted, unsuccessfully. The cofferdam was redesigned and will be altered by the Industrial Division. It is expected that the experimental overhaul will be resumed in October 1965, at Miraflores Locks. WATER SUPPLY The supply of water necessary for the operation of the Panama Canal in transiting of ships, the generation of electric power, and for municipal use, is derived from several tributary streams that flow into Madden and Gatun Lakes which serve as storage and flood control reservoirs of a drainage basin comprising 1,289 square miles. All infow from Madden Lake, whether drawn for hydroelectric power or spilled for lake control, flows into Gatun Lake and together with the runoff from the area below Madden Dam is used for lockages, power generation, municipal purposes, or may be spilled to control the operating level of Gatun Lake. An average rainfall of 84.57 inches in the Canal Zone during fiscal year 1965 was approximately 11.04 inches below normal. Runoff during the 5-month "dry season," December through April, amounted to 241,069 acre-feet, which was 70 percent below the 51-year average. This year the dry season began on December 2, and ended on May 8, 1965, continuing 13 days longer than the average dry season, and recording the 10th longest season in 51 years. The total runoff from Gatun and Madden Dam Lake Basin for fiscal year 1965 was 12 percent below normal and amounted to 4,196,763 acre-feet.

PAGE 29

PANA'MA CANAL COMPANY 19 Of this amount, 39 percent, or 1,624,541 acre-feet, was derived from the basin above Madden Dam. A net drawdown on Madden Lake of 32.63 feet and 4.35 feet on Gatun Lake during the December-April period represents a draft on storage from both lakes of 794,582 acre-feet. After deducting the evaporation losses for both lakes of 527,571 acre-feet, the remaining yield or runoff amounted to 4,056,589 acre-feet. This remaining yield was expended as follows: 1,892,172 acre-feet furnished for lockages (average 31.4 per day); 1,535,009 acre-feet used to generate 96,688,200 kilowatt-hours at Gatun hydroelectric plant; municipal requirements totaling 49,977 acre-feet; leakage and miscellaneous losses amounting to 19,651 acre-feet; and the spilling of 559,780 acre-feet at Gatun Spillway to control the lake elevation. Thermal power generation for water conservation began in December 1964 and continued through April 1965. A total of 201,855,700 kilowatt-hours was produced. Of this amount, 22,939,400 kilowatt-hours were furnished from December 10, 1964, to April 30, 1965, by Fuerza y Luz through interchange. Sources and usages of water together with comparable data for the preceding year are itemized in table 26, chapter V, page 106. MAINTENANCE OF CANAL CHANNEL The maintenance of the Canal Channel, its terminal harbors, the adjacent navigable water-ways of the Panama Canal, and special improvement projects were accomplished during the year with two 15-cubic-yard dipper dredges and two suction dredges of 28and 10-inch capacity. Maintenance dredging totaling 3,144,200 cubic yards of material was performed in the Canal prism and harbors. A total of 20,700 cubic yards of mined material was removed from Mandinga Flare during the year. The material was used in the construction of collision dikes at Piers 6 and 7 of the Thatcher Ferry Bridge. In addition to these activities, it became necessary to remove slide material moving into the Canal from the Car-tagenita slide on the west side of Gaillard Cut at the south end of Cerro Paraiso. The dredge Mindi removed 19,200 cubic yards of material, and another 35,000 cubic yards were removed by dry excavation. In January 1965, removal of the precipitous material above this slide was begun. A dike is being constructed, with this spoil, across the Rio Grande River which will provide a large settling basin for the silt to be dredged from Gaillard Cut and Miraflores Lake. A summary of dredging operations for the fiscal year 1965 is shown in table 27, chapter V, page 106. ORIENTATION AND EXCURSION SERVICE During the year the Company provided two vessels, the launches Las Cruces and the Reina Manuelita I, for orientation and excursion service through the Canal. The launch Las Cruces, a 200-passenger vessel, made 414 trips, carrying a total of 41,082 passengers and the Reina Manuelita I carried 1,803 passengers on 103 trips in partially transiting the Canal. The launch Anayansi was used on 37 trips in connection with inspections, aids to navigation, and Interoceanic Canal Studies.

PAGE 30

20 THE WATERWAY The Reina Manuelita I activity increased by 24 trips over fiscal year 1964, with an increase of 514 passengers carried; the Las Cruces made 4 less trips and carried 731 fewer passengers. For the dry season months, January to March, two launches were used for a total of 72 recreational trips.

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Chapter III SUPPORTING OPERATIONS In support of the maintenance and operation of the waterway and incident to the civil government of the Canal Zone, the Company conducts many auxiliary operations that are essential to the accomplishment of its basic mission. These include rail, ocean, and highway transportation; public-utility-type services, the operation of retail stores and housing for employees; and a wide variety of engineering, supply, and service functions. These services are also made available to the other Federal agencies in the Canal Zone and, to a limited extent, to the Republic of Panama. EMPLOYEE SERVICES Supply and Community Service Bureau The principal objectives and responsibilities of the Supply and Community Service Bureau consist of procurement of supplies and materials, and their storage; distribution and sales; operation of theaters, restaurants, and bowling alleys; operation of living quarters for employees; care of public buildings; care of grounds, collection and disposal of trash and garbage; the operation and maintenance of the Canal Zone cemeteries, and the operation of Summit Gardens, Nursery, and Zoo. SUPPLY DIVISION Retail Stores, Warehousing, Manufacturing and Allied Operations The retail stores, warehouses, and related operations make available food supplies, clothing, general household items, and other essentials to U.S. citizen employees and their families, to non-U.S. citizen employees residing in the Canal Zone, and to members and U.S. citizen employees of the Armed Forces. The retail stores in the Canal Zone include the operation of gasoline service stations. Manufacturing and processing plants include a bakery, a dairy and ice cream plant, and a laundry. Improved merchandising methods and reduction of operation expenses were pursued throughout the year with a view to eliminating or combining functions to reduce manpower and labor costs with a minimum loss of service to customers. The Milk Products Unit used a total of 598,976 gallons of raw milk in the process of bottling fresh milk and 8,787 gallons in manufacturing other milk 21

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22 SUPPORTING OPERATIONS products. The 1,295-gal-lon daily average milk production this year is 1.7 percent higher than that of fiscal year 1964. The policy of purchasing surplus fresh milk from approved Panamanian dairies continued throughout the year at the rate of 3,000 quarts per day, 5 days per week. Milk purchased from Panama suppliers this year totaled 195,750 gallons, an average of 2,041 quarts daily for the year. Fifteen calves from the Mindi Dairy Farm were presented to Panama's Ministry of Agriculture for distribution to various 4-S clubs in November 1964. In April 1965, two calves were donated as prizes at the Chorrera Agricultural Fair, and, in June, five were donated to the Divisa School of Agriculture. Service center operations The service centers and Tivoli Guest House provide certain essential sales and recreational facilities for the employees of the Company/Government organization, their dependents and guests, as well as others authorized to receive Canal Zone privileges. These functions include cafeterias, soda fountains, guest accommodations; recreational activities such as theaters, bowling lanes and related activities; and merchandise sections. In addition, rental space is conveniently furnished for the use of various licensee shops, which include barber, beauty, tailor, cobbler, and dressmaking establishments, and also union organizations. During the fiscal year continued efforts were made toward maximum utilization of automatic food and beverage vending machines. At year's end 50 Company-owned machines were in operation and 19 were on hand pending installation. In addition, 23 machines were being operated in service center facilities by contractual agreement. Extensive renovation and improvement work was performed at the Tivoli Guest House. An additional 29 rooms were air conditioned. Diing rooms and other spaces were refurnished and redecorated to reflect as much as possible the historical background associated with the Canal construction period. Storehouse branch The organizational units of this branch include administrative, stock management, warehousing, scrap, and salvage operations; excess disposal; and offie furniture and equipment pools. During the fiscal year, a continued program of improvements and operating economies, realinements and consolidations was pursued throughout the functional units of the branch. Rewarehousing of the consolidated Motor Transportation and Storehouse auto parts inventory in Motor Transportation Division areas was completed in August 1964. New procedures have eliminated much of the paperwork in this operation. This year sales of nonferrous metals approximating 494,000 pounds resulted in a gross margin of approximately $131,000. Bids were opened on June 25, covering approximately 7,000 tons of ferrous scrap; 5,480 tons were awarded to two bidders for approximately $113,200. Thirty-eight locks towing locomotives were converted to scrap during the year. The new elementary school located at Fort Davis was supplied with equipment and furniture during the first quarter of the fiscal year. Offie furniture

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 23 for the new Gorgas Hospital in the amount of $46,000 was received in April and installed by the contractor. The remaining $14,000 of this special allotment will be obligated in fiscal year 1966. The first shipment of GSA furniture, specially packed for export, was received in excellent condition. PROCUREMENT DIVISION Efforts continued throughout the year to develop new resources in the South and Southwest to promote savings on inland freight and to permit maximum use of the Company's supply ship. The New Orleans Procurement Office placed into effect the direct purchasing system. Under this system, resale and non-bid merchandise for resale that was heretofore purchased by the New Orleans office is now purchased directly from the Isthmus by the Procurement Section of the Supply Division. COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION Employee housing An experimental program to determine the feasibility of preventive maintenance of employee quarters continued through the year. A 5-year program to incorporate all employee quarters buildings into the program was budgeted to commence in fiscal year 1966. At year's end the transfer of responsibility for custodial service in all Canal Zone Schools from the Schools Division to the Housing Branch had been accomplished, to be effective July 1, 1965. As of June 30, 1965, there were 2,507 family units in operation in U.S. citizen communities, and 1,726 family units in Latin American communities. Nine additional quarters buildings, representing 32 apartments, were constructed in the Pedro Miguel townsite. There was no other new quarters construction during the year. Quarters presented for retirement consisted of 14 buildings containing 94 apartments, all in the Latin American townsites. TRANSPORTATION AND UT]LITY SERVICES Railroad operations The Panama Railroad, connecting the terminal cities of Panama and Colon, provides transportation across the Isthmus for both passengers and freight. In addition, it furnishes industrial switching services to the major Company/ Government and Armed Forces warehouses and installations. The 47-mile mainline is supported by 74 miles of sidings, yard, and industrial track. Freight and passenger stations, locomotive and car repair shops are maintained by the Railroad. It serves all Federal Government agencies on the Isthmus and is a common carrier serving commercial interests in the Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama. The Railroad also operates the Panama Local Agency which is responsible for the receipt, delivery, and forwarding of all railroad freight at the Panama City terminus. Substantial economies were achieved on the railroad this year due to the abolishment of positions, consolidations, and overtime reduction. In fiscal year 1965 the Railroad. Division maintained the same high level freight workload as in the previous year. Canal Zone freight continued at a high level;

PAGE 34

24 SUPPORTING OPERATIONS however, the Republic of Panama freight over the line declined instead of increasing as anticipated. The drop in higrh-revenue freight is attributed to the slow economic recovery of business conditions in Panama following the civil disturbances in early 1964, and a longshoremen's strike of 2 months in the east and gulf ports of the United States. Passenger business declined from 695,000 in 1964 to 648,000 in fiscal year 1965, a drop of 7 percent which was anticipated as transportation conditions resumed a more normal trend following the disturbances in 1964. Freight hauled decreased very slightly, some 2,000 tons under the previous year. Freight services income improved 5.8 percent, or $65,000, over the fiscal year 1964 figure due to improved composition and ocean freight rate increases on through billed cargo effective the last 3 months of the fiscal year. Comparative workload and income statistics are shown in the following table: Fiscal year 1965 1964 Passengers carried --_ __------------_ --_ 648,000 695,000 Revenue freight tons carried__ _ --------___-_-_-_--196,000 198,000 Passenger service income-_--_ ----__----___ ______ _-_-$451,000 $505,183 Freight service income,_---_ ----------_-------$1,143,000 $1,080,064 Switching and locomotive service income_ _---__-_--_---$87,000 $116,578 Net operating deficit_-_--_ -----_-_----------------_ $89,000 $19,779 Motor transportation This division operates consolidated motor vehicle repair shops and maintains a motor vehicle fleet for use of the Company/Government. Supervision is also exercised over a public bus transportation system operating in the Pacific area under franchise. Special operating economies resulted in a reduction of some $49,000 in labor costs over the year. Transportation workload increased slightly, with a 3-percent gain in total fleet mileage. Trans-Isthmian pilot runs that had been cur-tailed due to the civil disturbances were resumed, dirt hauling and a fleet increase contributed to the increase in mileage. A daily average of 2,638 schoolchildren of all grades were transported as compared with an average of 2,554 during 1964. To meet requirements for furnishing the wide variety of transportation services, the motor vehicle fleet was maintained at the 624 unit level. During the year a total of 37 new replacement vehicles were received. Significant workload indices for the fiscal year in comparison with the previous year are given below:Ficlya 1965 1964 Vehicles in service---_ _---------------------------. 624 595 Vehicle mileage_--------------------------------7,179,00 6,852,000 Trans-Isthmian freight hauled_----------------13,049 12,925 Schoolchildren transported (average per day)_ -_-_--__-__---_ 2,638 2,554 Repair shop services furnished others-_ _--_ ___ ---_--$814,393 $771,425 Operating margin (or deficit)__ _ _------__ _ -____--($6,700) $9,710 Water transportation operations This division operates one combination cargo-passenger steamship of 10,000 tons between the ports of New Orleans, La., and Cristobal, CZ This vessel is restricted to the carriage of U.S. Government cargo and passengers.

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 25 Cargo worload increased by 14 percent over fiscal year 1964, while passenger worload dropped by 2 percent under the previous year. Shown below is a statistical comparison of the fiscal years 1965 and 1964: Fiscal year 1965 1964 Number of completed voyages_ ----_-___-_-_-----_-_---_---27 27 Tons of freight carried _. ------_------------------_____108,191 95,187 Average number of tons per voyage_ _-_----_---_-_--_-__-_--_---_--_4,0(Y7 3,525 Num ber of passengers carried_ _-_--__---_---__---_---_-_ -_-_-_ -6)6818 6,938 Average number of passengers per voyage __-__-__-_--_-____ 252 257 Operating margin _-_-__ -_ --__-__-----_----_--_ -$26,000 $12,000 Electrical power syste-m The Panama Canal Company generates and transmits electric power for use of the Company/Government, Armed Forces, employees, and associate activities in the Canal Zone. It operates and maintains hydroelectric and thermal electric generating stations, substations, switching stations, and transmission lines and appurtenances. The workload of the Power Branch, which is reflected by the total gross power required to supply customer load, was 16.8 percent greater than that for 1964. This increase was provided for by increased operation of the system generating units and increased purchases of power from Fuerza y Luz and the military. Due to a longer dry season and increased load, system thermal generation was 8.8 percent greater than in 1964. The total power generated during the year was 6.1 percent greater than in 1964. A peakload of 75,200 kilowatts, occurring on May 3, 1965, was the highest on record. Thermal generating plant operation was increased during the period December 7 through June 30 to permit reduced operation of the Gatun hydroelectric generators for dry season conservation of water in Gatun Lake. Full load 24-hour operation of the two new Miraflores gas turbines, and operation of the Cocoli, Agua Clara, and Coco Solo diesels as required to supplement this thermal electric generation was accomplished with the help of loaned labor and temporary employees. The new transmission line connecting the Panama Canal power system with that of the Compansia Panamenia de Fuerza y Luz was energized on March 25, 1964. This interconnect was used during the dry season to receive power to assist in our dry season operation. A Service Schedule B was added to our power exchange contract with this company to permit our purchase of their available surplus electrical energy. The combined generated output of the power system for fiscal year 1965 was 444,380,700 kilowatt-hours. A total of 438,442,118 kilowatt-hours was delivered to consumers as compared with 382,028,039 in the previous year. Further particulars on electric power generated are shown in table 28, chapter V, page 107. Seisnology The seismological observatory at Balboa Heights is an important link in the worldwide network of seismological stations. Situated in one of the major earthquake areas of the world, its records are very much in demand. All original records, after preliminary analysis, are mailed to Washington, D.C., 11351--5

PAGE 36

26 SUPPORTING OPERATIONS for final interpretation by computer. There were 223 seismic disturbances recorded on the Balboa Heights seismographs during fiscal year 1965. Communications system The communications system consists of two main exchanges located in Balboa and Cristobal with small exchanges at Pedro Miguel, Gamboa, Gatun, and Coco Solo. Their respective distribution systems are connected by one trans-Isthmian trunk cable and a microwave radio communication system between Gamboa and Gatun. The system is independent of, but interconnected with, the systems in the cities of Panama and Colon, and the military exchanges on all military reservations. The microwave facilities also provide radio communications service for the Federal Aviation Agency, Marine Traffic Control System, Dredging Division, and Meteorological and Hydrographic Branch. At the end of fiscal year 1965, there were 9,820 telephones in service as compared with 9,400 telephones in use at the end of the preceding year, an increase of 420. Water system The Water Branch continued to supply all the filtered water requirements of the Canal Zone, including sales of water to vessels; Armed Forces installations; the cities of Colon, Panama, and Cativa; and suburban Panama in the Republic of Panama. The Pacific area water system produced a record quantity of water due to the continued growth of the suburban Panama areas and increased Armed Forces activity within the Canal Zone. The total year's consumption for the combined Atlantic and Pacific areas was 2,146.4 million cubic feet, an increase of 4.3 percent over fiscal year 1964. Included in the water system organization is a laboratory unit which performs the necessary tests to assure the production and distribution of safe, potable water. In addition to this primary function, the laboratory unit also performs chemical, physical, and bacteriological tests for other Company/Government units and outside agencies. The following table shows the consumption of filtered water for municipal purposes and for sale to vessels for fiscal years 1965 and 1964: Fiscal year 1965 1964 (millions of cubic feet) Canal Zone (including Armed Forces)_ ------_ _------.__---_-_-_ 668.6 637.5 City of Panama and suburban Panama -------1,158.1 1,119.4 Cities of Colon and Cativa_ --_ __-__-__------__--------_-_-_295.8 276.0 Sales to vessels _-_-_._-----_-____-_--_--_-___---____----_----__--23 .9 25.7 T otal__----_--_-_--____--_--_____-_-__---___-_2 ,14 6.4 2 ,058 .6 Vessel repairs A total of 467 vessels measuring 65 feet or over were repaired in the Company's shipyard during the fiscal year, accounting for 1,711 ship-days. Twenty-two vessels were drydocked during the year. Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government sources continued to provide the major portion of the division's workload throughout the entire

PAGE 37

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 27 year, with a slight increase percentagewise. The Company/Government operations and service requirements accounted for approximately 75 percent of the total volume. Work consisted mainly of the usual floating equipment overhaul and repairs in the Marine Bureau, the Dredging Division, and the Locks Division. Of this total, the Marine Bureau provided approximately 30 percent and the Dredging Division 35 percent. This year commercial work increased, particularly in the last quarter. Repairs resulting from marine accidents in the Canal comprised a considerable amount of income for the fiscal year. In most cases repairs amounted to those necessary to enable the vessel to proceed to a port of call where finished, permanent repairs could be conducted. Revenues from commercial sources for ships repaired were $944,763.02 in comparison with $372,319 the previous year. No major overhauls for the U.S. Navy or for foreign naval vessels occurred during the year. H arbor terminals operation The prime functions of the harbor terminals operation are the movement of local cargo and in-transit cargo across the Panama Canal Company docks and piers at the ports of Cristobal and Balboa, and the performance of berthing services to accommodate vessels requiring bunkers, water, stores, or to embark and disembark local or in-transit cruise passengers. The gross tonnage handled, transferred, and stevedored during the year amounted to 2,389,373 tons, some 5,900 tons under the volume in 196-4. Transshipment cargo showed an increase of 12,128 tons over the previous year. Local incoming cargo decreased 1,800 tons due to a decline in cargo imported by the Republic of Panama (some 4,200 tons) offset in part by tonnage increases of Company/Government and Armed Forces cargo. Local outward shipments were down some 11,600 tons in 1965 due principally to decreased exports by the Republic of Panama. Comparative combined cargo movements in tons of cargo stevedored are as follows: Fiscal year 1965 1964 Combined cargo movements between ships and piers 1,172,357 1,173,130 O n the piers_ _______----.-----_____------__---1,217,016 1,221,323 Total (revenue tons) --_-_--_--_--_--_-----_ --_ -----_ --_ 2,389,373 2,394,453 The marine bunkering operation, the other major function of this division, increased 1,280,165 barrels, or 3.6 percent over the previous year, 36,792,557 barrels being handled. This is the highest recorded workload experienced by the marine bunkering section. This increase is attributed chiefly to bunker deliveries to vessels, up 6 percent over 1964 volume. Bunkering requirements increased by 941,894 barrels, or 5.4 percent, resulting in increased receipts. However, the number of tankers discharging decreased in 1965, four under the number discharging in 1964. Issues of petroleum products to the Republic of Panama decreased some 47,300 barrels in 1965 as a result of direct delivery of Panamanian consumer requirements from the new refinery located in Panama at Las Minas Bay.

PAGE 38

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 29 the flter blanket. During September and October, doubt arose as to the eventual accomplishment of this project, and no further work was performed in the study. In June 1965, the Company terminated the contract with consultants, on the basis that the project was indefinitely deferred. New locks towing locomotives and cranes Manufacture and delivery of the locomotives has proceeded about 2 months ahead of schedule. Fifty-eight locomotives and two cranes were in service as of May 1965, and the remaining locomotive and No. 3 crane were shipped from Japan about June 20, 1965. The new locomotives were installed on both lanes of Pedro Miguel Locks as of September 19, 1964, and the installation of new machines at Miraflores Locks was completed January 30, 1965. In general, the new towing locomotives have performed very satisfactorily. They have noticeably speeded up lockages because of their power and speed advantages over the old machines. Delays to lockages because of locomotive troubles have been almost negligible. Under a supplemental agreement with the manufacturer, four of the original test machines are to be modified, and a change order was executed for additional locomotive spare parts. The old locomotives and cranes were retired from service and scrapped. Four locomotives were retained for display and two were donated to the National Museum of Transportation and the American Museum of Electricity. Gorgas H ospital construction The new Gorgas Hospital building was completed and put in service during fscal year 1965. Alterations to the existing plant, and this new 8-story, air-conditioned hospital building were begun in fiscal year 1962 with the object of consolidating all Gorgas Hospital activities into four buildings connected by two pedestrian bridges and a tunnel. The final phase of the construction of the addition, from April 9 to completion on October 19, 1964, was performed under a negotiated contract with the approval of the bonding company after the failure by default of the original contractor. Liquidated damages, covering 183 days' default, in the amount of $91,500, was assessed against the defaulted contract. Locks engineering This continuous engineering program is to provide improvements to locks operations. During the year the Corps of Engineers in Buffalo was invited to inspect the Panama Canal Locks and recommend the feasibility of modernizing the locks control equipment and/or improving the locks operating procedure. An official report of their recommendations is to be submitted. The contract for installation of center wall turntables to turn the new locomotives end to end was completed as well as the construction of nine repair shelters to be used with the new machines. In the 24-hour-outage overhaul concept a redesign of the cofferdam became necessary as the result of an unsuccessful attempt at dewatering. Sketches and drawings were prepared to show rising stem and cylindrical valve overhaul schemes.

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30 SUPPORTING OPERATIONS Expansion of electrical power system This program, begun in 1961, is designed to provide a system of approximately 100 megawatts by 1980. In fiscal year 1963 two gas-driven turbine generators were installed at the Miraflores Power Plant to enlarge the capacity of this facility. Upon receipt of plans and specifications for tanks, control room structures, and the electrical and mechanical installation of work, the awarding of all major contracts for work on this project was begun. Contracts for the installation of the steamplant, the turbine generator, the circulating water system, the fuel storage system, the electrical-mechanical system, the 44-kv. switchyard, and for miscellaneous building construction were in progress at the end of this fiscal year. The turbine, generator and condenser were located in place. The turbine control room addition was approximately 50 percent complete; the boiler 60 percent complete; the construction of the new tanks approximately 20 percent complete, and the circulating water system construction work was 35 percent complete. Designs were prepared for two oil storage tanks of 54,165-barrel capacity and others were started for the interconnection with Panama power system, Atlantic area. Plans and designs were developed to include additional power service to Fort Kobbe, and install new oil circuit breakers, switchgear units, and related appurtenances at other important locations. Water system improvements The work of installing a 20-inch waterline from Balboa to Chorillo Hill and from Balboa Pump Station to the National Avenue manifold in Ancon was completed during the fiscal year. This work is part of the program aimed at increasing the potable water supply of Panama City. New pumps are being installed under contract at the Paraiso Raw Water Pump Station. These will aid the greatly increased demands upon the Canal Zone water system. Operations and capital construction by contract New contracts awarded in fiscal year 1965 were lower by $621,100 than those awarded the previous year. Sixty-three contracts covering capital construction (exclusive of architect-engieering contracts) were awarded for a total of $5,335,800. Total work accomplished on all capital construction during fiscal year 1965 amounted to $10,781,300. Major capital items contracted for during the year were electricalmechanical installations for Miraflores Power Plant, $832,500; construction of building "E" for Curundu junior High School, $441,200; masonry, tile, and ceilings for Curundu junior High School, $335,300; air conditioning Curundu junior High School, $292,600; furnishing and erecting storage tanks at Miraflores, $274,400; construction of 44-kv. switchyard at Miraflores, $226,900; electrical work for Curundu junior High School, $219,600; additional power service for Howard Air Force Base, $204,800, and approach and exit ramps for Thatcher Ferry Bridge, $183,700. 6b

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 31 Other projects Seven other contracts for account of the Company/Government awarded for over $100,000 each were construction of play slabs for elementary schools, $182,200; miscellaneous buildings and structures for Miraflores Power Plant, $178,800; alterations and additions to Balboa Post Office, $134,200; replacement of refrigeration equipment in Cold Storage Plant, Balboa, $119,000; technical and procurement services and procurement of equipment and materials in connection with re-powering of tug, Arraijan, $115,800; floor coverings for Curundu junior High School, $113,100; and air conditioning elementary school at Balboa, $107,100.

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Chapter IV ADMINISTR ATION PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION A plan to reorganize the Canal Zone Civilian Personnel Policy Coordinating Board was implemented this fiscal year and resulted in a far smoother relationship between the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government and Department of Defense agencies in the Canal Zone on personnel matters. In past years, the Board consisted of a member from the Canal agencies, a member from U.S. Southern Command, and members from each of the local Army, Navy, and Air Force organizations. A plan to reconstitute the Board to consist of a representative of the Canal organization and a representative of the local Department of Defense agencies was approved by the Secretary of the Army on October 8, 1964. The new organization has been eminently more satisfactory in terms of meeting the Canal agencies' special needs and facilitating interagency cooperation. The third phase of the three-phase Canal Zone Wage AdjustMent Program initiated in April 1962 and the Annual Review of Manual Category positions based on changes in wages in the nine Naval shipyards in the United States resulted in increases for all employees in the Manual category and for other employees, particularly those on a Canal Zone wage base. In February 1965, the Board of Directors considered a long-range staffing program to resolve problems likely to be faced by the Canal organization by retirement attrition of skilled and professional employees during the next 15 years whether or not any decision is made to proceed with the construction of a sea level canal. In July the Board approved a plan submitted by the Governor to meet long-range staffing needs. The program proposes three basic methods of meeting the Canal's long-range staffing needs: (1) a largescale, wide spectrum management, professional, and clerical trainee program; (2) the development of apprenticeships in several new occupational areas, and (3) a significant expansion of the current apprenticeship program. Probably the most important personnel management problem in fiscal year 1965 was the reduction and freezing of the 25-percent tropical differential which bad been added to U.S. citizen employees' pay since 1914. The amount of the differential was reduced to 15 percent and its applicability amended to cover only heads of household. U.S. citizen employees who were on the rolls 33 11351--6

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34 ADMINISTRATION of Canal agencies on the effective date of the change in the regulations had the dollar amount of their differential fixed at the amount of differential they were receiving on July 20, 1964. This reduction and freezing action of the differential and the limiting of application to heads of household had a significant impact both on employee morale in the entire Canal organization and on pay administration in the Personnel Bureau. During fiscal year 1965 two important items of employee legislation were developed for submission. The first (H.R. 5990), amends the Cash Relief Act of 1937 to increase the gratuity paid non-U.S. beneficiaries by $10 a month to a maximum pension of $65 per month. The bill also would provide widows of disability relief beneficiaries with a pension amounting to half that which would be received by their husbands if still living. At the close of the fiscal year, this bill had passed the House of Representatives and was pending in the Senate. The second legislative proposal would allow the U.S. Government to participate as an employer in a group health insurance program for non-U.S. citizen employees and retirees of U.S. Government agencies in the Canal Zone. At the close of the fiscal year this proposed legislation was still being reviewed by the Bureau of the Budget. The Government Employees Salary Reform Act of 1964 provided for upward adjustments in salaries of General Schedule and Postal employees continuing the principle of comparability of pay between government and private industry established by the Federal Salary Reform Act of 1962. The act was administratively implemented in the Company/Government on August 21, 1964, effective retroactively to July 5, 1964. The implementation of the Dual Compensation Act, Public Law 88-448, enacted August 19, 1964, was approved by the Governor to be effective December 1, 1964. This act was designed to simplify, modernize, and consolidate the laws relating to the employment of civilians in more than one position and the laws concerning the civilian employment of retired members of the uniformed services. The act places a limitation on the amount of military retired pay certain retired regular officers may receive while employed as civilians in the Federal Government without reduction in their civilian pay. MAJOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES There were no major organizational changes in the Panama Canal Company during the fiscal year. MAJOR PERSONNEL CHANGES Mr. Theodore C. Henter was promoted to Chief Hydrographer, effective July 5, 1964, vice Mr. W. Houston Esslinger, retired. Mr. Frank H. Lerchen was reassigned to Assistant Engineering and Construction Director effective July 19, 1964, vice Mr. Edward M. Browder, Jr., retired. Lt. Col. Walter W. Fade, USA, was detailed from the U.S. Army as Planning Engineer (Canal Studies) and Assistant to the Director, Engineering and

PAGE 45

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36 ADMINISTRATION equal opportunity for citizens of the United States and Panama to obtain employment in all Canal Zone U.S. Government agencies, in all nonsecurity positions for which they qualify. Since the Canal Zone Wage Plan %vas placed in effect in February 1959, there has been considerable emphasis placed on training and utilization of qualified non-U.S. citizen employees in U.S.-based, higher-paying positions. Since that date, the number of non-U.S. citizens in U.S.-wage-base positions has increased from 144 to 980, an increase of 836, or approximately 600 percent. Rates of pay are established regardless of citizenship on a Canal Zone wage base for occupational categories which can be filled by recruitment on the Isthmus and on a U.S. wage base for those positions which would normally be recruited from the United States. The current Canal Zone Wage Plan contains the following job groups: Non-manual category-white collar positions, including clerical, professional, and administrative type jobs. Manual category-blue collar workers, including laborers, semi and skilled craftsmen', and related supervisors. Special category, administrative-includes teachers, policemen, firemen, postal workers, pilots, and miscellaneous and fee rate group. Special category, wage board-includes floating equipment, power branch, printing plant, railroad, apprentices, and learnership group. Company/Government rate group-includes positions excluded from the Canal Zone Pay Plan, such as executives, hospital, military, and employees in the United States. FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES PAID AT U.S. WAGE BASE For several years increasing emphasis has been placed on providing employment and promotion opportunities in higher paid positions to. non-U.S. citizens. Since February 1959 the number of non-U.S. citizens in U.S.-base positions has increased from 144 to 980, an increase of approximately 600 percent. During fiscal year 1965 an increase of 121 such employments occurred. Turnover in full-time U.S. citizen Isthmian force During fiscal year 1965 there were 501 full-time terminations of U.S. citizen employees (including 7 military) for whom replacement employments were made. In addition, there were 27 U.S. citizen fu.11-time employees added to the force. Terminations show a decrease of 40, or 7.4 percent, under the 541 occurring in fiscal year 1964. Turnover in full-time non-U.S. citizen Isthmian force Exclusive of student assistants, 1,024 full-time employees were terminated in the non-U.S. citizen group. All of these were replaced and there were 194 additional employments. Recruitment Of the 538 U.S. citizen full-time accessions in fiscal year 1965, only 91, or about 17 percent, were recruited from the United States, and 447, or 83 percent, I Statistics in this section cover both Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government employees.

PAGE 47

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38 ADMINISTRATION INCENTIVE AWARDS 1 The Incentive Awards Program for the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government is designed to encourage, recognize, and reward employees at all levels for their constructive ideas and meritorious job performances which result in increased efficiency and economy of operation. This fiscal year 770 employee suggestions were submitted within the agency, a decrease of 266 under the ,036 submitted in 1964. During the year awards were approved for 180 beneficial suggestions which were adopted. Benefits were estimated to amount to about $54,790 for these employee suggestions. Cash awards totaling $43,745 were made for adopted suggestions and 207 performance recommendations. Tangible benefits increased from $454,565 in fiscal year 1964 to $698,248 this year. Some 212 honorary award nominations were received during the fiscal year, in comparison with 150 award recommendations in fiscal year 1964. In addition, a Superior Service Award was granted one employee for initiative that resulted in an estimated tangible benefit of $360,000. In observance of the 10th-anniversary year of the Incentive Awards Program, seven special Presidential certificates were granted to individuals for their beneficial suggestions resulting in tangible benefits estimated at $141,683. Prompt processing of all suggestions has been an aid in this program. Extensive written and pictorial publicity has been secured in Company publications and in Panama newspapers in both languages, and the presentation of a series of 35-mm. slides during employee discussions on the program were utilized to advantage. SAFETY PROGRAM' The principal duties of the Safety Branch are to supervise and promote the application of safety measures in all units of the Panama Canal Company and the Canal Zone Government, and to develop and improve accident prevention programs for those organizations, including the coordination of occupational health, sanitation and fire prevention activities with the overall accident prevention program. During the year full-time safety supervisors and safety inspectors, responsible for handling safety matters in the Marine, Engineering and Construction, Transportation and Terminals, and Supply and Community Services Bureaus, continued their activities. The Office of the Comptroller, Personnel, Civil Affairs, and Health Bureaus utilized the services of employees assigned as part-time safety assistants, in addition to their other duties, for handling safety measures. Membership was continued in the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, the Latin American counterpart and affiliate of the National Safety Council. Such membership enables the Company/Government to maintain better safety communication with non-English speaking or reading employees who are more interested and responsive to such materials when provided in their native language. I Statistics in this section cover both Panama Canal Company and Canal Zone Government employees.

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 39 The highlight of the year in safety activities was President Johnson's inauguration of Mission Safety 70 on February 16, 1965. The goal of the Mission is to reduce by 30 percent the number of disabling injuries to Federal workers. It is his desire that this goal be reached by 1970. In compliance with requirements of the program, a detailed report of a careful and critical review of the Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government safety program was forwarded to the President on May 10, 1965. As a result of the review it was found that significant weaknesses in the execution of the program existed, and in an effort to minimize or eliminate such weaknesses several additional safety requirements were established in memorandum of May 24, 1965, to all operating bureau directors. The existence and goal of Mission Safety 70 has been widely publicized to all employees and supervisors. The program will receive continuing emphasis until the goal is reached. Personnel of the Safety Branch and the Health Bureau are conducting a feasibility study regarding the first-aid treatment of industrial injuries and occupational diseases by a separate clinic or industrial health dispensary. The Industrial Health Branch presently staffed by four physicians appears to be the logical organization to head up and provide such treatments and the study is being conducted with this objective in mind. During the year, the Chief, Safety Branch, as Chairman of the ad hoc committee appointed by the Governor/President to investigate the need for and to develop suitable safety regulations to protect the health and safety of all longshoremen employed aboard vessels in Canal Zone waters, completed and submitted such regulations to the Office of the General Counsel. They were published on June 28, 1965, as General Order No. 32, Regulations Governing Stevedoring. The Governor/President Safety Trophy, awarded each calendar year to the bureau achieving the highest percentage improvement in disabling injury frequency rate over its own previous 3-year average, was not awarded this year since no bureau met the requirements. During the first half of the fiscal year the accident rate continued higher than normal as it also was during the last half of the preceding fiscal year. However, improvement was shown in the last half of this fiscal year with the number of accidents for the January-June period totaling 86 as compared to 112 for the January-June 1964 period. Outstanding safety achievements were as follows: the Canal Zone Division of Schools earned its ninth consecutive annual award for 100-percent participation in the National Safety Council School Safety Program which requires a comprehensive and highly successful safety program throughout the Canal Zone school system; and the Supply and Community Service Bureau earned the National Safety Council's "Award of Merit" for outstanding safety achievement for the period February 10, 1965, to May 23, 1965. Three fatalities occurred during fiscal year 1965, two in the Transportation and Terminals Bureau, and a third in the Dredging Division. The fatality rate this year is equivalent to 1 accidental death for every 4,811 employees, as compared to the national average of I death for every 4,662 workers employed, as reported for calendar year 1963 by the National Safety Council. There was

PAGE 50

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Ckapte. V FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND RELATED SUPPLEMENTARY REPORTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30,1965 The financial statements of the Panama Canal Company appearing as tables I through 10, with the accompanying notes, present the financial position of the Company at June 30, 1965, and the financial results of its operations for the fiscal year then ended. All statements have been examined by the General Auditor of the Panama Canal Company and are subject to audit by the General Accounting Office. Detailed audit reports of the General Accounting Office are directed to the Congress and are presented as congressional documents. A brief financial review can be found on page 5 of the introduction. Supplementary information concerning funds, operating results, payments to the U.S. Treasury, net direct investment of the U.S. Government, and retained revenue is presented in the tabulations and comments which follow. Equity of the U.S. Government The net direct investment (interest-bearing) of the U.S. Government in the Panama Canal Company was increased in excess of $1 million during the year primarily as the result of the reversal of excess valuation allowances for (1) early retirement of 25-cycle plant, $751,150, and (2) possible loss on obsolete and excess stocks, $337,269. Retained revenue was charged with $655,000 of abandoned construction projects, the costs of which were incurred in prior years. Capital Expenditures Company capital expenditures amounted to $10.6 million. The budgeted estimate for the year was $12.5 million. Expenditures in the transit operations exceeded $4 million, the principal expenditure being $2.6 million for locks towing locomotives. A total of $2.4 million was expended for purchase and installation of a steam turbine-generator for the electric power system. 41 11351--7

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42 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table I.-Comparative Statement of Financial Assets 1965 1964 CURRENT ASSETS: Fund balances with U.S. Treasury and cash: Fund balance in U.S. Treasury checking account_ __-_---_ --_ ---_-_ --_ ---_-_ ---$1,439,237 $3,837,620 Cash in commercial banks, on hand, and in transit -__---_---________ 4,787,148 5,488,425 6,226,385 9,326,045 Accounts receivable: Canal Zone Government and other U.S. Government agencies _---_-_--__--_--_--3,481,936 1,652,034 Republic of Panama --_--_-_---_-_---2,391,330 2,264,277 Other________-_--__-______2,297,340 1,967,761 8,170,606 5,884,072 Inventories (note 1): Materials and supplies (principally at standard cost) less allowances for excess, obsolete, and inactive stocks of $602,538 in 1964_ __-_------------7,221,165 6,412,868 Merchandise held for sale (at average cost)3,1821,349 4,479,927 11,042,514 10,892,795 Other current assets-----------------173,008 133,930 Total current assets --_-----___--_-_25,612,513 26,236,842 FIXEDAsSETS ( .ote 2): Cost_ __--____-_--------_---------662,700,296 658,591,459 Less depreciation and valuation allowances_---_ 198,544,696 198,103,928 464,155,600 460,487,531 THATCHER FERRY BRIDGE: Capitalized construction costs_ _----_---_-----19,059,518 18,751,069 Less allowance for depreciation_ --_----_----_998,499 690,374 18,061,019 18,060,695 Fund balance with U.S. Treasury_ ---_---_-___-_ 138,427 1,315,340 18,199,446 19,376,035 DEFERRED CHARGES AND OTHERAsSETs _---_----652,422 696,118 508,619,981 506,796,526 Automatic Data Processing A major change in accounting technique was inaugurated on April 1, 1965, with the installation of a computer. The first phase, now on the computer, is that of inventory control. Systems studies in process will shortly result in use of the computer for payroll and personnel procedures. NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 1. Inventories. Inventories of operating materials and supplies are stated principally at standard cost. Inventories of merchandise for sale are stated at average cost using the retail method for valuation. Allowance for excess, obsolete, and inactive materials and supplies amounted to $602,538 at June 30, 1964. During fiscal year 1965 this allowance was charged with $265,000 for losses on excess, obsolete, and inactive stock. The

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 43 Condition June 30, 1965 and 1964 Liabilities and equity 1965 1964 CURRENT LIABILMrES: Accounts payable: U.S. Government agencies ------_-_--_$2,375,019 $1,615,239 Other -_------_---_-_--_-_-_-3,566,421 4,030,337 5,941,440 5,645,576 Due U.S. Treasury_.___----------2,010,493 1,904,532 Accrued liabilities: Employees' leave liability --_----_--11,317,778 10,369,027 Salaries and wages__-------__ ----_ L,486,317 1,733,976 Claims for damages to vessels_ ---._-618,180 252,750 Other-------_ _-__.------.-1,081,919 863,085 14,504,194 13,218,838 Other current liabilities ---_-_---_-------958,448 861,117 Total current liabilities---_----_-_-23,414,575 21,630,063 RESERVES: Overhaul of locks_-----__---------_--1,559,862 2,020,548 Maintenance of channels -----------------.----_49,230 Non-capital power conversion costs_-____---_ 178,080 178,080 1,737,942 2,247,858 EQurrYOF6U.S. GOVERNMENT (note 3): Net direct investment, interest-bearing --_--_-329,830,278 328,812,302 Retained revenue, non-interest-bearing_ ----_-135,437,740 134,730,268 Thatcher Ferry Bridge, non-interest-bearing-18,199,446 19,376,035 483,467,464 482,918,605 508,619,981 506,796,526 The accompanying "Notes to Financial Statements" are an integral part of this statement. balance was closed out to the Company's interest-bearing investment. In the future, inventory losses, if any, will be charged to operations. 2. Fixed assets. Fixed assets generally are stated at cost, or if acquired from another Government agency at original cost to such agency. Valuation allowances have been established in accordance with sections 62 and 412 of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code (1) to offset the cost of defense facilities and suspended construction projects-principally the partial construction of a third set of locks abandoned in the early part of World War II-totalingr $89.7 million (both the cost and the valuation allowances have been excluded from the statement of financial condition) and interest during original construction aggregating about $51 million and (2) to reduce to usable value the cost of those fixed assets transferred to the Company from The Panama Canal (agency) at July 1, 1951. Because of historical practice and a construing of the Canal

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44 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Zone Code as not requiring the depreciation or amortization of certain assets, depreciation or amortization allowances have not been provided on titles, treaty rights, and excavations of channels, harbors, basins, and other works costing about $310 million. If these assets were depreciated at the rate of I percent per annum, there would be an annual charge against operations of approximately $3 million. Depreciation allowances on all other fixed assets are accumulated on a straight-line basis. 3. Equity of the U.S. Government. The equity of the U.S. Government in the Company consists of the net direct investment, established in accordance with section 62 of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code, and the retained revenue. The Company is required to pay interest to the U.S. Treasury on the net direct investment at a rate established by the Secretary of the Treasury. The rates for 1965 and 1964 were, respectively, 3.457 and 3.328 percent. The act of August 25, 1959 (73 Stat. 428), amended section 71 of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code to provide the Company with authority to borrow funds from the U.S. Treasury not to exceed $10 million outstanding at any time at interest rates to be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury. The act of July 23, 1956 (70 Stat. 596), directed the Company to construct, maintain, and operate a high-level bridge across the Canal at Balboa, for which funds were appropriated. Because of national policy the costs of construction and of maintenance and operation are to be treated as extraordinary costs and are not to be related to the operations of the Company. Maintenance of the bridge for the year amounted to $232,668, the cost of which was financed from Company cash and the Company's interest-bearing investment reduced accordingly as authorized by law. Beginning with fiscal year 1966, the Company will be required to absorb the cost of maintenance and depreciation on the bridge by general provision included in the 1966 Public Works Appropriation Act. 4. Contingent and other liabilities. The Company is contingently liable with respect to certain pending suits and claims. In addition, the Company has outstanding at all times certain liabilities of indeterminable amounts which are recognized in the accounts on an as-paid basis. These liabilities include, principally, monthly relief benefits payable to retired alien employees; repatriation costs earned by certain employees; benefits payable under provisions of the Federal Employees Compensation Act; and commitments for construction work, supplies, and services. The maximum liability which could result from outstanding claims and lawsuits is estimated to be $2.7 million. The relief payments to be made to retired alien employees in fiscal year 1966 are estimated at $1.5 minlion. Repatriation allowances are payable to certain employees who, after completion of two years of service, are entitled to such allowances upon termination of their employment. The maximum liability for payment of repatriation at future dates is estimated not to exceed $6 million. Commitments under uncompleted construction contracts and unfilled purchase orders amounted to $5 million at June 30, 1965. The Company held at June 30, 1965, negotiable U.S. Government securities and Republic of Panama securities in the face amount of $1,950,000 deposited

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 45 by customers and Panamanian insurance firms to guarantee contract performance and payment of tolls and other charges and, on behalf of the Canal Zone Government, negotiable securities in the face amount of $543,500 to guarantee payment of possible judgments against insurance companies operating in the Canal Zone. Table 2.-Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenses, Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1965 and 1964 REVENUE: 1965 1964 Tolls -___-_---_ --__ -------_ --------_ --_ -$65,502,769 $61,146,998 Credit for tolls on U.S. Government vessels_ -_-_-1,651,890 1,399,393 Commodities sold -----_-_ --__ --_--_---_-__24,310,613 23,281,107 Service sales and rentals_ _-__--__--___--_ -29,735,045 27,219,173 121,200,317 113,046,671 OPERATING EXPENSES AND OTHER COSTS: Payroll and related costs _--_-_-_-____-_-_ 62,807,256 58,785,601 Material and other operating expenses_ _--_-_---_11,396,153 9,375,310 Cost of commodities sold ---_-_-_---____-_16,589,731 15,953,752 Depreciation --____--_______-_____---__ 5,948,495 5,524,986 Net cost of Canal Zone Government_ ------_-_---_ 18,1443,466 16,300,215 Interest on net direct investment of U.S. Governm ent_-_______---__ _____-_______ 11,375,288 10,950,382 1261,560,389 116,890,246 Less payroll and other costs transferred to Company capital projects and Canal Zone Government programs__________-___-_-----7,754,299 6,504,886 Total operating expenses and other costs_ --118,806,090 110,385,360 Net revenue before recognition of loss on disposition of fixed assets -_________-______--2,394,227 2,9661,311 Deduct loss on di-sposition of fixed assets___--__851,788 499,406 NET REVENUE -----__-___--_______-__-________ -$1,542,439 $2,161,905

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46 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 3.-Statement of Changes in Equity of the U.S. Government, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965 Net direct Retained revenue, T hatcher Ferry investment non-interestBridge noninterest-b;earlng bearing interest-hearing E(2urrY AT JULY 1, 1964_--.--_-.-$328,812,302 $134,730,268 $19,376,035 Additions: Net revenues --------. 1,542,439 Reversal of excess valuation allowances for: Early retirement of 25cycle plant_ -------751,150 Loss on obsolete and excess stock-----.---337,269 Reactivation of plant --_-103,248 Loss on retirement of 25cycle plant charged to operations in prior years, instead of valuation allowance established therefore_ 70,571 Property transfers, other U.S. Government agencies, net58,977 Reucios:330,062,946 136,343,278 19,376,035 Abandoned capital construction projects__---_----654,982 Reclassification of items previously capitalized-__-_250,556 Thatcher Ferry Bridge: Release excess construction appropriation--_850,000 Provision for depreciation --------308,125 Funded maintenance costs _---_-_---232,668 Municipal facilities, financed from bridge funds, transferred to the Canal Zone Government ----_____. 18,464 232,668 905,538 1,176,589 EQurrY AT JUNE 30, 1965 -_-----329,830,278 135,437,740 18,199,446

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PANAMACANAL COMPANY 47 Table 4.-Statement of Source and Application of Funds, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965 SOURCE OFFUNDs: Revenues__ -----------$121,200,317 .-Decrease in cash-3,099,660 Reversal of excess valuation allowance for obsolete and excess stock _ _ ____-----____ _----337,269 Proceeds from disposition of fixed assets___--------101,1613 124,738,859 APPLICATION oF FUNDs: Operating expenses and other costs__--------___--119,657,878 Less operating expenses not requiring expenditure of funds: Provision for depreciation --------------$5,948,495 Provision for maintenance of channels----3,420,658 Provision for locks overhaul_--_--_---_-987,1000 Loss on disposition of fixed assets -----__851,788 Other_. _---__---__-. 166,235 11,374,176 108,283,702 Capital expenditures ----------10,P614,095 Channel maintenance expenditures------------------_ 3,469,888 Canal locks overhaul expenditures----------___ 1,447,687 Thatcher Ferry Bridge maintenance---------_----232,668 Net change in other working capital -_-_-______._________ -690,819 124,738,859 Table 5.-Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965 Operating Operating Revenue expenses income TRANSrr OPERATIONS (table 6) -_-__ $73,853,079 $32,%299,554 $41,553,525 SUPPORTING SERVICES (table 7): Maritime services__-___-_____11,155,433 9,2905,307 1865,126 Employees" services_ _-_-------_--_-_ 26,277,689 26,215,710 61,979 Transportation and utilities___--6,571,192 6,365,089 206,103 Other supporting services_ _-_-_-_3,342,924 2,999,1758 343,166 47,347,238 44,870,864 2,476,374 121,200,317 77,1170,418 44,029,899 GENERAL CoRPoRATE EXPENSES: Net cost of Canal Zone Government_____----_-____--___ 18,443,466 A dministrative and other general expenses ( table 8) _-------_--_ -12,668,706 Interest on net direct investment of the U.S. Government_ _-_-_-_11,1375,288 42,487,460 N ET R EVENUE ___---------___________-____--______ 1,542,439

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48 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 6.-Transit Operations, Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965 REvENUE: Canal tolls ------.-----------------------.-.--._ ------------.---$65,502,769 Credit for tolls on U.S. Government vessels -_----_--------------------1,651,890 Harbor pilotage, tug, launch, and other services ----------------.---.--6,698,420 Total revenue ------------------------------------------------_ 73,853,079 Direct OPERATINr, EXPENSES: Expenses Depreciation Navigation services and control ---$11,986,397 $278,296 Operation and maintenance of locks 8,738,022 1,321,897 Provision for channel maintenance-. 3,420,658 Dredging of channel and harbors_3,230,958 367,026 Diesel power generation ----.----1,323,426 Provision for periodic overhaul Of locks---_-------._--------__987,000 Meteorology and hydrography services __ -------_ --._ __-_____-686,018 10,760 Locks security force ._-.-__-----524,088 Annuity to Republic of Panama (repayment to U.S. Treasury)430,000 Damage to vessels___._--_-__-__-429,312 Operation and maintenance of dams, reservoirs, and spillways _----_--_85,889 113,700 Miscellaneous --_ ___-_.--266,948 6,036 Total operating expenses-___-32,108,716 2,097,715 34,206,431 Less charges to other activities ------.-----------1,906,877 Net operating expenses__ _----------------------------.-----32,299,554 OPERATING INCOME -------.---.------__.--------------------------------41,553,525

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Table 7.-Supporting Services, Statement of Revenue and Operating Expenses, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965 Revenues Operating ex penses C"Cost of Less charges T otal O perating > Sales of Sales of Rental of Total Direct commodities to other operating income M ARITIME SERVICES: commodities services quarters revenue expenses sold Depreciation activities expenses or (loss) M arine terminals. ...-.-----.--.--.-----------------$9,902,938 --_--_-_-----. $9 ,902,938 $8, 451, 447 .-----$289, 618 $560, 820 $8,180, 245 $1,722, 693 Vessel repairs.---.-----..-------.-..---0-*-----------1,252,495 --------1,252,495 4,100,064 ---------114,044 3,104,046 1,110,062 142,433 .--.--11,155,433 ---.---. 11,155,433 12,551,511 -..--.-. 403,662 3,664,866 9,290,307 1,865,126 EMPLOYEES' SERVICES Marketing operations.------.-.--_-.-.---.$22,481,017 451,520 ----.---22,93 ,,537 8,714,203 $15,424,398 283,605 1,139,125 23,283,081 (350,544) 0 U.S. community housing.------.-. ------. ---.----------------------. $2,543,801 2,543,801 1,559,333 --_.----561,569 29,431 2,091,471 452,330 r Latin American community housing.------. -. --------------------------801,351 801,351 719,079 .--------._ 131,635 9,556 841,158 (39,807) I' _',8101 _451,520 3,345,152 26,277,689 10,992,615 15,424,398 976,809 1,178,112 26,215,710 61,979 TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITIES: Railroad.--_..----..----.----.---------------------1,204,419 -----.--. 1,204,419 1,805,4,57 .-.----. 94,960 610,147 1,290,270 (85,851) M otor transportation. .....----------.---------.-.------288,044 -.---.-.288,044 2, 665,494 ---.--.-. -268,700 2, 657,173 277,021 11,023 Water transportation.--.--.--.---------.-.---.-.----.39,266 350,579 -..---.389,845 3,271,056 24,578 89,652 3, 5,521 359,765 30,080 Power system ...---.----------..-.-..--------------2,763,000 -.----.2,763,000 4, 475,916 ---.----. 931,037 2, 821,568 2,585,385 177 ,615 Communication system .-----. .----.------------.-----------. .-_437, 296 _-.--.437,296 778,879 __-.------126,375 473, 672 431,582 5,714 W ater system .--._ -----. ------. ------__ ...-------.------1,488,588 -------.-1,488,588 1,366,770 .--.-.----. 312,553 339,794 1,339,529 149,059 Central air-conditioning system --..---_-------------.--.----------------------------148,331 ---------.54,528 121,322 81,537 (81,537) 39,266 6,531,926 ---------. 6,571,192 14,511,903 24,578 1,877,805 10,049,197 6,365,089 206,103 OTHER SUPPORTING SERVICES: Engineering and maintenance service.--...-.-.----------823,280 .---. 823,280 11,685,052 --.-.-----126,931 11,194,611 617,372 205,908 Storehouse_.-..--.------.-.-.-.---.-.--.--.----.1,130,282 2 5,j 0 .-.-.-.1,155 782 5,534,424 867,888 149,472 5,471,645 1,080,139 75,643 Scrap operations. ...._. .---------------------245,918 50 _-_--_-----_ 245,968 75,384 88, 896 6,060 13,945 156,395 89,573 Tivoli guest house. .....----------_----------414, 130 233,922 ._-_-----648.052 567, 439 183,971 29,498 66,373 714,535 (66,483) Printing plant.-.-----_.--.------.--__-_-..----------------.----43,157 --. -. --43, 157 648, 657 -.--.25,086 638,987 34,756 8,401 Grounds m aintenance----.----_---. -. ..--------------------.-----364,705 ----..-364, 705 1, 640, 619 -..---38,940 1,343,419 336,140 28,565 Procurem ent.-----. -_ ---------------------.--------------------------------------------277,384 .--.-----1,140 278,524 .--.--.-.--. -------General community and custodial services_.-.-----_-------------41,788 -----.-.-. 41,788 757,638 ----.--.9,355 726,764 40,229 1,559 Sea levelcanal support division .-_----_----___.-----------20,192 .----.--20,192 20,192 .--.--.-..--.--. .--20,192 ---------.1,790,330 1,552,594 -------.-3,342,924 21,206,789 1,140,755 386,482 19,734,268 2,999,758 343,166 TOTAL.---. -------. -----------.-.-.---------. 24,310,613 19,691,473 3,345,152 47,347,238 59,262,818 16,589,731 3,644,758 34,626,443 44,870,864 2,476,374 *:ii I

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50 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 8.-Administrative and Other General Expenses, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1965 EXECUTIVE DIRECTION: Board of directors_____-_____-_____--$19,764 Office of the president_______-_____-_____-719,168 Information office______--_______-__--__-__-_449,897 Tourist facilities _-_-_____---____-_ 70,780 Offi e of the secretary --__ _____-____78,723 Consultants and advisers_ -__--___--_-_ 178,069 $1,516,401 OPERATIONS DIRECTION: General and special engineering services -__----_301,501 Offie of the engineering and construction director185,437 Office of the marine director ---____---____-__ 105,313 Ofice of the supply and community service director_ ___________________ _ -135,X28 Office of the transportation and terminals director_ 92,058 819,1937 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: Office of the comptroller_--_____--_--____---3,466,617 Annual audit______-_-_-__ -__ -__-______61,000 3,527,617 PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION: Personnel bureau_ __ _______-__-_-_ -1,099,312 Apprentice program _--____--_ --__----_-157,183 1,256,495 GENERAL SERVICES: Administrative branch --__---_ -----_--696,272 Maintenance of buildings-_------_---_-----_ -----_ -416,952 Public services___----___--_______ --_ ___ 70,166 M iscellaneous_ _-_-_---_ ---_-_-___ -__ -__ _ ------_ 68,992 1,252,382 EMPLOYMENT COSTS: Alien cash relief_---_-______________-______-1,563,159 Employees' home leave travel -_-_--_--_-__--_----_ --_ 993,780 Recruitment and repatriation_ -_---_-_ _--__-_ -_ --408,314 Leave liability variation ----__-_---_----_-_ --373,816 Death and disability compensation____---____-_ 193,967 Contribution for employees' health benefit associatio n _ __-_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _-_-_ _ _ 1 5 4 ,4 3 3 Medical and other services for alien cash relief annuitants -_______ ---__ -____-_-______ 108,233 Contribution for employees' group life insurance_-80,120 Transportation of employees" vehicles__--___-_-52,009 Over-distribution of civil service retirement contrib u tion ______--_______-_____-____________ (3 8,9 84 ) M iscellaneous ____---_----______-______-_-_-82,365 3,971,212 OTHER EXPENSES: Loss on disposition of fixed assets___---_--____851,788 D epreciation ---_ __ _-_________-_______ 206,022 Law suits and tort claims______--_-_-_______-__ 177,681 Civil disturbances _-_-_-____--_-_--_ -__ 11,778 L,247,269 13,1591,313 LESS REIBURSEMIENTS AND OTHER CREDITS: Expenses allocated to Canal Zone Government__ 750,000 Miscellaneous_-___-------___-----172,607 922,607 NET ADMINISTRATIVE AND OTHER GENERAL EXPENSES12,668,706

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 51 Table 9.-Inventories, June 30, 1965 MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES: Storehouse branch: General materials and supplies_---__ ___------_-_-_----$4,1944,6 Petroleum products __-_---_---_--_-____ 227,511 Scrap _-___--_____ ----_-----_---------__ 138,825 In transit to Isthm us_--_-_---_-_----__---_--_ 356,408 5,667,430 Other divisions' stock: Locks division__--------__ _ _ _-_ __-__--_157,079 Vessel repair--_ ------_----------------63,896 Railroad division_-----------------------195,214 M arine terminals_-----------------------95,110 W ater transportation______--------------59,250 Motor transportation division -------------_----369 Retail stores and allied operations_____---_ -___ ---_ -_131,654 Service centers _--_-_-_ ---_ ---_----_--_-_----------53,529 Printing plant_--_----_-__-__---_--------___-__15,049 Dredging division________ --------__ ------_-_ --_ 198,776 W ater system __________--___--___--_ ---_-_---_-67,229 Pow er system --__---_ -----_--_-----__ _ _ _-___67,245 Construction and maintenance activities__ -__-_-_------_-_271,421 1,375,821 Manufacturing and repair work in progress: V essel repair _ _ --__--_--__-__--_____________--176,563 O ther units____-_--_------_ --_____ -_ -___ 1,351 177,914 Total materials and supplies--_ -___________---__7,221,165 MERCHANDISEHELD FOR SALE: Retail stores and allied operations: In warehouses and in stores __-_-_-______--------_3,052,047 In transit-------------------___ _-_-__---_--__ _ 497,397 :3,549,444 W ater transportation __--__---_-_-____--_--_-_-----_---___ 2,129 Service centers_____--______--------------_----__-_--_-_224,0711 T ivoli guest house ___--_____-_______-______-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ 45,705 Total m erchandise held for sale___ _______ ---_-------_------_ 3,821,349 TOTAL INVENTORIES-_-_-_____________-_____________ 11,042,514

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52 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA -.4 o (M Peq w 0 eq oco b o IGo t 00 0 V cl 01 -t 17 1 i ci 01 0. 41 M c' tv 00 in 10 -0 V-4OOM ICD 1 p 01 111t-otcirICD cv -4 i o 4"1Ve 0 -1 10 rP-4 eq lu i i I | 1 I i Q3| | | 1 | 1 | | | | 0 00 oo no -N It _4 M MM Ii| 10 c) rP1 r-I r-m 1. 00 rI c 00 cl 0 I | | Q 0 CV CM i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -[ -----11 C' Ln c' o 00 Cv) co cl tcl cl | | 1 4 ~~~ 6M cc ,: | iI i Icq 0 | 1 1 I | 10 1-1 c I i i I i do c6 r-e6 c o6 of -i c i oo Ii cr o (m 4 15 C6 64 4 4 e G | |16CVL Ii C 14 rt e rq 10 -4 -4 M in 00" rI 00 c i 1 614 01 c I I i I I I rsAI I I i | | 1 i I 4 .0 | | 1 I I I 4.0 i 1 1 1 1 i I c% | 1 I I 1 | | cd P4 i I i i I i I I I 1 1 0 1 1 1 c |$| 0 cd rA | cd 1 0| 0 cd 5 | | | 1 I --0 -, .Z: LA -0 1 L VI I bo 0 c-I I r. I cl > 0 q I > EM a -.5 k 0 1 Q)a dG Z, ~ ~ ~ ce -c c0 czE w0'n z 0

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Employees' services: Retail stores and allied operations___-_-_-_____ _--____-__ _________--______6,763,024 3,199,587 6,968,612 3,297,457 Service centers____--__-__--____-__-_-_-----_----______________-3,809,346 1,502,653 3,712,292 1,440,799 Housing division _----------------_--------------------------------___ ___ 42,983,635 14,898,124 42,774,699 14,345,971 53,556,005 19,600,364 53,455,603 19,084,227 Transportation and utilities services: Railroad_ -------------------_ -----------_-----------------_---12,085,538 9,806,298 12,071,904 9,735,458 M otor transportation division_ -_-_---_------_--_-_---_---_-_-_-_---_--_-_-_-_-_3,521,085 1,659,298 3,139,308 1,545,018 Power system ____-___----------------------------___-_-_-_________ 31,552,067 12,139,612 31,481,813 12,804,282 Communication system _ __--_____--__-_-_-_ -_ -__-___-______-____ 4,100,100 2,733,632 3,933,534 2,612,000 W ater system ---__ _ ____-____---______-_-_--_-____-____._____ 13,500,219 6,986,309 13,048,587 6,673,987 W ater transportation division. __-______-_-____________-_---___---____ 4,631,195 3,797,734 4,593,820 3,706,800 Central air-conditioning service -_________-_----_---__________--_-______-______ 1,848,520 136,608 1,702,240 82,080 71,238,724 37,259,491 69,971,206 37,159,625 Other supporting services: Engineering maintenance___--___-_-__________-____-________________ 3,721,477 2,086,158 3,602,874 1,955,060 Storehouse division_ -_-------_ ------_-_ ----_-_-------_ ------_-__ 4,333,388 1,899,875 4,148,310 1,733,971 Tivoli guest house -__---_ -_ ---_-_-_ -----_-_-_-_-_-_-----_-_-_---_-__---873,080 497,220 821,991 470,660 Printing plant-_--__ ----_ --__ ---_---___---__---__--__---__--636,935 227,270 659,620 209,814 Grounds m aintenance_ ------_ -----_-_-_-_-_-----_---_-_-----_---_---_-__---599,795 367,180 565,033 333,419 Procurem ent -----_---__----______-___--______ 18,765 12,321 20,581 11,952 Housing division_ -______________----__ --_____ --__ -__-_____-___248,957 107,241 269,603 116,369 10,432,397 5,197,265 10,088,012 4,831,245 General facilities: Miscellaneous Company buildings__ _ -____-_____._-_________________--__-6,258,937 3,258,737 5,860,717 2,980,178 Miscellaneous office equipment_-_-______________________-_____________672,479 408,848 625,421 374,604 6,931,416 3,667,585 6,486,138 3,354,782 Total supporting and general facilities --_____________________----____-_-___-_ 171,422,089 86,778,615 168,825,198 84,982,693 CONSTRUCTION WORK IN PROGRESS .------_ -._------------_-------_------_ ---. -_-_ 5,462,416 _-_--_-__-_--5,647,068 -----RETIREMENTS IN PROGRESS --._------------_--_-__-_----------_------------.--________-_578,330 498,290 2,031,853 1,660,114 FACILITIES HELD FOR FUTURE USE -----_-_-_---_------_-------_-------------------1,128,223 781,783 1,200,750 816,943 TOTAL --------------------------------------.------------------.-----------------_ 662,700,296 198,544,696 658,591,459 198,103,928

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54 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table II.-Ocean Traffc Through Panama Canal-Fiscal Years 1955 Through 1965 Trafc assessed tolls on Traffc assessed tolls displacement tonnage Total traffhL on net tonnage basis basis Number Tons Number Panama Number Displaceof of of Canal net of ment transits Tolls cargo transits tonnage transits tonnage Commercial Ocean Traffr 1955 __ --_--------_-----------_ 7,997 $33,849,477 40,646,301 7,953 38,567,769 44 136,987 1956_ --_ _--_-_-_-_-_---8,209 36,153,842 45,119,042 8,157 41,202, 961 52 126, 233 1957 --------.----.8,579 38,444,12s49,702,200 8,540 43,628,210 39 155,055 1958.-_-.---------_---.9,187 41,795,905 48,124,809 9,162 47,924,345 25 78,691 1959. -----_.__.--.-9,718 45,528,728 51,153,096 9,682 52,153,563 36 112,609 1960__-----------.-----.-10,795 50,939,428 59,258,219 10,745 5S,301,926 50 193,471 1961 -. -_----__----.--10,866 54,127,877 63,669,738 10,823 61,826,002 43 140,760 1962 .-----..----_-_-_--.11,149 57,289,705 67,524,552 11,096 65,378,845 53 197,390 1963 -----_-----..11,017 56,368,073 62,247,094 10,973 64,438,115 44 110,002 1964 -__-.-----_-----11,80S 61,098,312 70,550,090 11,756 69,632,611 52 134,221 1965. --------------.----.--11,S34 65,442,633 76,573,071 11,777 74,734,814 57 20S,205 Government Ocean Traffi 1055_ _-_----_----_ --_-_ ----_ ----296 $1,190,367 838,305 227 1,184,135 69 341,199 1956_---_---_-----------266 1,215,S83 1,150,121 219 1,286,841 47 226,813 1957 ---------------------269 1,117,467 922,173 199 1,086,564 70 392,671 1958 .------------------279 972,110 791,310 224 1,020,267 55 219,938 1959 ----------_----------204 065,643 1,012,S42 172 1,047,674 32 120,562 1960 --------_----------1S2 813,313 804,581 148 864,177 34 134,965 1961 ---------------------_ 188 997,S42 1,149,934 160 1,088,393 28 130,905 1962..---------------191 1,028,396 1,126,418 166 1,095,074 25 135,236 1963.--------------------300 1,460,281 1,115,352 213 1,3S7,597 87 552,92S 1964 .----.------------285 1,395,54S 1,177,269 184 1,337,065 101 493,655 1965.-----_-------__2S4 1,649,048 1,923,538 216 1,733,736 68 332,827 Total Ocean Traffc 1955.----.---------8,293 $35,0199,S44 41,484,606 8,1S0 39,751,904 113 478,186 1956 -------------------8,475 37,369,725 46,269,163 8,376 42,469,802 99 353,046 1957 -.------------------8,84S 39,561,595 50,624,373 8,739 44,714,774 109 547,726 1958.--.----------------_9,466 42,76S,015 4S,916,119 9,386 4S,944,612 80 298,629 1959_.----.-.-------9,922 46,494,371 52,165,938 9,854 53,201,237 6S 233,171 1960 ---------------------10,977 51,752,741 60,062,800 10,893 59,166,103 84 328,436 1961._----------------11,054 55,125,720 64,819,672 10,983 62,914,395 71 271,665 196 -.--------------------11,340 58,318,100 68,650,970 11,262 66,47-3,919 78 332,626 1963.---------------------11,317 57,82S,354 63,362,446 11,186 65,825,712 131 662,930 1964.-------------.------12,093 62,493,S60 71,727,359 11,940 70,969,676 153 627,876 1965. -----_------12, 11S 67,091,081 7S, 496,609 11,993 76, 468,550 125 541,032 Table 12.-Traffic by Months-Fiscal Years 1965 and 1964 Number of Panama Canal transits net tonnage Tons of cargo Tolls 1964-65 1963-64 1964-65 1963--64 1964--6.5 1963-611 1964-65 1963-64 July. -----_---_ 1,004 944 6,069,346 5, 566,473 6,062,061 5, 923,878 $5,313,002 $4,897,9'5 August.-__-.-.---_ 1,0)4 94 6,273,555 5,491,930 6,604,144 5,641,432 5,497,262 4,841,525 September .------970 923 6,08S,409 5,509,268 6,227,125 5,701,689 5,338,810 4,836,521 October_ _--_--_-_--_-_1,018 980 6,251,961 5,862,742 6,248,022 5,925,018 5,483,920 5,153,861 November.-__._--988 946 6,231,182 5,583,490 6,155,639 5,398,696 5,435,138 4,879,040 December-----.----1,021 958 6,425,276 5,578,589 6,644,998 5,690,973 5,641,252 4,897,036 January._.-----.--921 1,015 5,691,902 5,856,561 5,705,541 5,831,527 4,981,492 5,139,946 February.------.--819 997 5,196,236 5,899,302 5,160,125 6,186,786 4,523,274 5,192,816 March ----------.---_ 1,084 1,077 7, 106,826 6, 268,488 7, 669,785 6,268,912 6,231,3q6 5,480,020 April----.-----.--1,052 1,011 6,723,947 5,924,349 6,997,717 5,912,355 5,888,034 5,202,264 May.--------------1,010 1,012 6,537,708 6,105,355 6,631,196 6,166,497 5,731,746 5,355,460 June.------------943 999 6,138,466 5,986,064 6,466,718 5,902,327 5,377,307 5,221,869 Total ------. 11,834 11,808 74,734,814 69,632,611 76,573,071 70,550,090 $65,442,633 $61,098,312 Averagepermonth__ 986 984 6,381,089 5,879,174 5,453,553 $5,091,526 NOTE.-The above includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement), or of 500 displacement tons and over on vessels paying tolls on a displacement tonnage basis. Statistics on these vessels, except as relates to displacement tonnage, have been included in the table above.

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Table 14.-Classification of Canal Traffic' by Type of Vessel-Fiscal Year 1965 Vessels of U.S.registry Vessels of foreign registry Total tragic CARGO AND CARGO/PAS8ENGER,9HTPS: Atlantic to Pacific to Atlantic to Pacifc to A tlantir to Pacific to Tank ships, laden: .Pacific Atlantic Total Pacific Atlantic Total Pacific A4tlantic Total N um ber of transits_ -.._-------_--------_-_-------------_ ----__ --._87 66 153 776 82 858 963 148 1.011 Panama Canal net tonnage ----------.--.-------.-.---.-1,090,158 746,012 1,836,170 7,103,341 624,150 7,727,491 8,193,499 1,370,162 9,563,661 Tolls ----------------------------------------------------$981,142 $671,411 $1,652,553 $6,393,007 $561,735 $6,954,742 $7,374,149 $1,233,146 $8,607,29.5 Cargo (long tons) --.-------------.-------.--.-.----. 2,013,716 1,052,902 3,066,618 12,676,866 936,962 13,613,828 14,690,582 1,989,864 16,680,446 Tank ships, ballast: Number of transits-------------------------------------------.----52 52 26 553 579 26 605 631 Panama Canil net tonnage. -------_-_ -----_ --.-. ------_ --. -_--_--.818,067 818,067 203,175 4,620,683 4, q23,858 203,175 5, 438,750 5,641,925 Troshss-------------.---------------$589,008 $589,008 146,286 $3,326,892 3,473,178 $146,286 $3,915,900 $4,062,186 Or shps laden: Number of transits --------------------------------. ----------. 3 3 ------.---125 125 ----.-.---. 128 128 Panama Canal net tonnage --------.----.---------------------.-15,486 15,4S6 -.---.---1,939,611 1,939,611 -.-.---. 1,955,097 1,955,097 Tolls ---------------------------. -----------. --------$13,937 $13,937 ----...$1,745,650 $1,745,650 .-------.$1,759,587 $1,759,587 Oi Cargo (long tons). _------------------------_._-----__.__ .____ .____ ...70, 600 70, 600 -.----4,160,705 4,160,705 .-.-.--. 4,231, 305 4, 231,305 Ore ships, ballast:Z N um ber of transits.___-.-___-. --. -_-.__ -_ -_ -__ ----____ I -_ -_____ -_ 1 34 2 36 35 2 37 > Panama Canal net tonnage..-.-.------.--._------_--_--5,173 ----.--. 5,173 385,296 22,648 407,944 390,469 22,648 413,117 Tolls_..._.-----___--_----_--_-___--_---______---___-$3,725 -------.-. $3,725 $277,413 $16,306 $293,719 $281,138 $16,306 $297,444 Passenger ships, laden:2 Number of transits -----------------------.---------------79 74 153 82 90 172 161 164 325 Panama Canal net tonnage.-------------------.--._ 761,343 725,005 1,486,348 743,528 8q9,814 1,633,342 1,504,871 1,614,819 3,119,690 Tolls. ....--------.---------.-$0 5,209 $6.52,505 $1,337,714 $669,175 8S09,832 $1,470,007 $1,354,384 $1,453,337 $2,807,721 Cargo (long tons) ---.---------.-----.--146,780 308,014 454,794 183,137 328,615 511,742 329,917 636,619 966,536 Passenger ships, ballast:2 General crgo ships lae:3 Number of transits ..-------.--------.-.584 693 1,187 3,2;0 3,928 7,208 3,864 4,531 8,395 Panama Canal net tonnage.------.-.----.--------_---_3,754,770 3,650,562 7,405,332 20,609,205 21,290,448 41,999,653 24,363,975 24,941,010 49,304,985 Tolls ..-.-.-.-.---------------_------_-_------_-_-------.-----_ $3,379,293 $3,285,506 $6, 664,799 $18,548,285 $19,161,4M $37,709, 689 $21,927,578 $22,446,910 144,374,488 Cargo (long tolls). .------_---_-_-.--__-_._-_--_-_-_---3,334,153 3,053,834 6,387,987 24,513,115 23,707,942 48, 221,057 27,847,268 26,761,776 54,609,044 General cargo ships, ballast:3 Num ber of transits. .--.-_------.----_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ --. -. ---. 66 47 113 912 135 1,047 978 182 1,160 Panama Canal net tonnage --.--.----.--------_--.----.--_--268,420 295,552 563,972 3,216,242 760,759 3,977,001 3,484,662 1,056,311 4,540,973 Tolls ---------_ _$193,2 2 212,797 69064754 $2, 853,444 $2,563,941 $7,5,,44 $3,269,500 OTHER TyPE, SHIPs: Naval vessels: Number of transits ---------------------------------------------.--.-.-----.-----.-.-. 34 20 54 34 20 54 Displacement tonnage ------_---------------.------------------.---. .-----. -------. 128,252 74,256 202,508 128,252 74,256 202,508 TS ll ..-.-._----------------------------_ --_-_ --------_ -------_--__--_-_---_ --_-__-_--__$6_,126.$37,.2864,01,257 ,$68,12,2537,4286$17128540,25

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Cable ships, yachts, etc.: W Number of transits.--.--------------..-.-----.-.-6 10 16 39 38 77 45 48 93 Panama Canal net tonnage.------..-.-.---.--.---. 16,536 50,057 66,593 69,116 59,657 128,773 85,652 109,714 195,366 z Displacem ent tannage. ----------------.----. ....--.---------4,897 4,897 ----------800 800 -.-. --5,697 5,697 > I Tolls. ---------. ....--.-.--.-.-_----.--.$14,456 $42,100 $56,556 $61,132 $45,470 $106,692 S75,588 $87,570 $163,158 S Cargo (long Uns)._-._-.---_.-.-..--.-.-. 2,121 4,050 6,171 79,108 461 79,569 81,229 4,511 85,740 > Total cargo and cargo/passenger ships, laden: Numbeof transits.-.---.---....---..750 746 1,496 4,138 4,225 8,363 4,888 4,971 9,859 PanmaCaalne tnnge._._._. ,66,715,137,065 10,743,336 28,456,074 24,744,023 53,200,097 34,062,345 29,881,088 63,943,43 Tolls.-..---------.--.------._--_.-.-.-$5,045,644 $4,623,359 $9,669,003 $25,610,467 $22,269,621 $47,880,088 $30,656,111 $26,892,980 $57,549,091 > Cargo (long tons)._.-----------_----.-.---.---5,494,649 4,485,350 9,979,999 37,373,118 29,134,214 66,507,332 42,867,767 33,619,564 76,487,331 Total cargo and cargo/passenger ships, ballast: Number of transits.--. ------.---. ----------------. ---. --. 67 99 166 972 690 1,662 1,039 789 1,828 Panama Canal net tonnage. _------------------.---------_------. 273,593 1,113,619 1,387,212 3,804,713 5,494,090 9,208,803 4,078,306 6,517,709 10,596,015 0 Tolls. ..------------------------.----.-$196,987 $801, 805 $998,792 $2, 739, 393 $3, 890,945 $6, 630,338 $2,936, 380 $4, 692, 750 $7 ,629,130 Total other type hips:I Num ber of transits. _. ._. ...-------.-----.---.-.-_-.-_---_6 10 16 73 58 131 79 68 147 > Panama Canal net tonnage.-----_---------._----.-----16,536 50,057 66,593 69,116 59,657 128,773 85,652 109,714 195,366 Displacement tonnage. .._ ..-.--_.---.-.---.-.---_----.-_--4,897 4,897 128,252 75,056 203,308 128,252 79,953 208,205 Tolls. -----------------.---.........---.$14,456 $42,100 $56,556 $125,258 $82,598 S207,856 $139,714 $124,698 $264,412 Cargo (long tons). ...._-.--_------------_-_--_--.----.--2,121 4,050 6,171 79,108 461 79,569 81,229 4,511 85,740 Grand total ships: Number of transits.--.-.--------_-.--.----.-----.-823 855 1,678 5,183 4,973 10,156 6,006 5,828 11,834 Panama Canal net tonnage. -----------------.--.------.--5,896,4C0 6,300,741 12,197,141 32,329,903 30,207,770 62,537,673 38,226,303 36,508,511 74,734,814 Displacement tonnage. ...-----------.-----------------4, 897 4, 897 128,252 75,056 203, 308 128, 252 79,953 208,205 Tolls...------.--.-_-.--. ---. -. --. -----------. ----$5,257,087 $5,467,264 S10,724,351 $28,475,118 $26,243,164 $54,718,282 $33,732,205 S31,710,428 $65,442,633 Cargo (long tons).----.----------_._----.-.--.-_._._-.--5,496,770 4,489,400 9,986,170 37,452,226 29,134,675 66,586,901 42,948,996 33,624,075 76,573,071 Includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons an d over (Paniama Canal measurement ) for vessels paying tolls on net tonnage basis, or of 500 displacement tons and over for vessels paying on displacement tonnage. 2 Vessels certificated for more than 12 passengers. 3 Vessels certificated for 12 passenger,; or less, or without passen er apeommodat ions.

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Table 16.-Frequency of Transits I of Vessels Through Panama Canal-Fiscal Year 1965 Number of vessels making in dicated number of transits Nationality 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 18 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 A rgentinian .-------.---I ------. ----..---.-.----. --. ---------------------B elgian _. -----_. ..-.-. 3 3 .-.-I I .-.---.---_ ---1 -----------.----Brazilian --. ----. .--I I -.-.--------------------------------------------British.------------.-. 174 134 61 40 34 27 6 3 3 2 --1 1 -. .-1 -. --. ---------------B ulgarian --.--------_2 --------------------.---.---------------------C hilean.-.---.---.5 2 --I ..--2 2 1 2 3 .-.-. -. ----------------------------Chinese (Nationalist).---11 10 5 6 3 3 --. ---------------------------Chinese (Republic).----5 6 --.-----------------------------------------C olom bian ..---.--_-4 3 .-.1 --I --.I -I 1 --3 4 1 --I I .------------C uban .-.--------3 1 ----------------------------------------------D anish _. -.----.---21 17 12 6 7 8 4 2 1 2 .--. I ------------------------Ecuadorian.----.---2 1 ..-. ----. -.------------------------1 -----------------Finnish .---------.3 4 1 ----I I .------.-----. ---------------------------------French-____---__-_._--__ 25 17 3 7 3 3 5 1 -. ------.-. .-. -----------------.--._ --. --------IT1 Germ an-__--------.-38 74 19 28 9 18 20 10 2 3 3 --. -_. 3 2 3 1 5 .2 -. --._-.-. 2 .-1 .Ghanaian._--------. I ------------------------------------------------------------G reek --__-.-_---.-119 63 32 22 3 9 ----------.-.--.1 -.---1 --1 1 -------.------Guinean ----------__ I --1 ----------------------------------------------.----------H aitian.-._--.---.I ----------.-----------------------------------------Honduran.-.--__--_-1 1 1 1 --------------I I I -1 --1 --I ------------------------Icelandic.-.-.----_-I ----------------------------------------------------------Indian __.-.-_.___._ 8 ------------------------------------.-----------Indonesian ___--._-.__2 -------------------------------------------------Irish ________-__-_ 2 3 .-_ -------------------. --------------.----------Israeli.-.-.____-.-_ 4 5 1 1 4 3 ------------------------------. --------------Italian.___--_ --_13 10 3 4 6 7 3 --1 1 2 ---------------------------------Japanese__---____ .__83 58 24 35 11 17 16 13 1 -I --------.-----.--------------------K orean (South) -. _.-1 3 --2 -------------------------------------------K uwait. ---.__ ---_ -_. --I ---.---------------------------------------------Lebanese _.-__.__-_ 13 6 3 -. --. ------..---.------------.-----.---.----------Liberian.---.-..164 120 40 38 16 IS 6 2 .-2 2 1 1 -.--. I I I ---.---.I --.-I --. --I ----M exican .___-__.10 1 ..-.-. --2 2 -------.--.--. -----------. -----------Netherlands.--_-.26 43 12 4 7 7 3 3 1 --1 -2 ------------.------------I -.-N icaraguan.---------1 .---. --------. -------1 1 ----2 .------------. ----------Norwegian_.--______-114 123 50 44 27 32 14 9 5 1 2 2 2 .--.-------1 .------------------Panamanian.-_-_--39 29 5 3 2 2 2 2 2 --2 3 1 --2 .-_. 2 .--. ------------------Peruvian--. --_ ______4 3 2 1 2 1 3 3 3 2 1 ---I --.--.-----.---------------------Philippine.---__--_ -_ 1 4 .2 5 7 -------------------..--------------------Spanish __.-.__--_ -_ 2 2 --. --I -------------------------------------------Swedish._____.---.__-27 24 13 12 9 22 7 ----------------------------------------> Soviet__.--------.----26 11 -----------------------------------------------------t: Venezuelan ._.-.-.--1 4 --2 .--.-.------------.----------------------------> Yugoslavian.------.3 7 .--.----------------------------------------------------Total, fiscal year1965.--.---.1,059 868 330 296 178 199 101 62 28 24 22 18 12 14 10 15 9 12 5 6 3 2 3 1 1 6 --1 1 2 1964.-.-. 1,032 785 333 260 150 206 91 71 28 34 14 11 18 13 7 21 16 9 7 7 2 4 4 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 1963.--.---.-915 704 308 279 178 190 83 73 23 31 14 21 10 16 7 13 11 17 5 4 2 3 2 6 .2 .3 2 2

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Number of vessels making indicated number of transits p Total Total Transits Nationality 82 33 84 35 86 88 89 40 41 44 45 46 47 48 50 52 53 58 71 95 98 99 11 I 124 165 ships transits per -ship Argentinian -.-..-.----------.---------------------------------------I 1 1.00 > Belgian.----. -. ...--. .------.-. --------------------------------------9 49 5.44 Brazilian.---.---------..-----.--. ---..-----------------------------------2 3 1.50 > British -----. ----._ _ I ...--. I ---.------.----------.--------------------. 489 1,339 2.74 Bulgarian-.--------.------.----------. ------------------------------------2 2 1.00 Chilean..--.----.--.-. -.--------------------------------------------18 115 6.39 > Chinese (Nationalist).---. ------. -----.-.-.----------------------------------38 103 2.71 Chinese (Republic).---_. .--. .----. ------. .-. ----. -------------------------------11 17 1.55 > Colombian.--.--. .-.-. --. --..--.---.------------------------------23 246 10.70 r Cuban.----.---.-.-----. ----. --. .--.---------. -----------------------------4 5 1.25 Danish--.--. --. --. -..--..--. -..---.--.-------------------------------. 81 283 3.49 Ecuadorian.---.---.-. ..-..---. -.--.-.--...-.--. --. ---------------------. --. 4 25 6.25 0 Finnish .--. ---_--. .-. ---. --. -. ..-. ..-..-. .------..----.--------------. .-10 27 2.70 French ------------.---.--. -------.--.-----------------. ----------------------64 172 2.69 I German. ------. ..-.--.--. -..-. --.-.-.--.---.-------------------------244 1,186 4.86 > G hanaian_.--___--_---.--...--..-----.---------------------. --. ----I 1 1.00 G reek..--.---. -.--.-. ..-.-.-----------------. ------------.------. --. 252 575 2.28 0GuRinean.----.---.--. ..-. -.--. .--. --. .------. -----. ---.--------------.----.----2 4 2.00 H aitian..-. -----. -.-. .-...-. -..-. ---. ..--. -------.----------------------1 1 1.00 Honduran.---.-.--.-_ --_---.--. .--.-. ..-. --. -. -------. ----------------1 11268 24.36 Icelandic.-. ----. ...-. .-. ----. .-. .--. -. ---. --.-------------------. ----.2 2.00 Indian..--.-.--..-.--.-.----------..-.------------------.----.-.-8 8 1.00 Indnnesian------.-. ..--. --.--.-.--------.------.----------. ------------2 2 1.00 Irish...-.----.---.-.--. .--.-.--. -. --.-. .-.-. ------------. .-------..6 12 2.00 Israeli---.-------.---..-.-.-. --.--.-. --. --. -------.---.-----------.--.------18 59 3.28 Italian.__----.--.---.--.-.-. .--. ...-. .-.---. --. ----. ---.--------. ----_--50 192 3.84 Japanese.--.-.----------_-..----. -.--. ---.--.-. .--. -.--.----.----. --. .----.-_259 804 3.10 Korean (South) ------_ ..--.--. .-. -. .-. -.-. .-.-..----------. --.------. -----.6 15 2.50 K uw ait ..--.-.----.-.-. .-. -. .-.--....-. -. .-.-.-.-.--. -----.-.1 2 2 .0 0 Lebanese.----.--. --.-. ..-..--..--.-..---.-. .-. --------.-. ---. .-----.22 34 1.55 Liberian.-----.--.-_-...---...-. .-..-. ..-----. .---. --.--..-.-.-.-.-.416 1,118 2.69 M exican -------. ....-. -. --. ..-.---. ..-.-.-.------.---.----. .-._.-..-15 4 2 2 .80 Netherlands.--.-------. -. ..2 1 1 -.1 -. .---. --1 ----------------.-----. 117 618 5.28 N icaraguan_.__.-----. -.-...--. -------.---------------.---------..-------. 5 62 12.40 N or w egian .--.-----.-_ .--. ....-.-. ------.-..-.-. 2 --. --. .---------. ----.....---429 1, 446 3 .37 Panam ani n ......--. .-. -...-. .----.--. I --..--------. -. --------. .99 518 5.23 P eru vian .-.-----..---. -..--. -..-. ..---. ..-. .-....-.-.--------_.---.2 6 15 3 5 .8 4 P hilippine .-------------....-. ..-. --. --.----------..--..-. .-. -._ __ __ __ ---_ 19 84 4 .42 S panish --------_. ...------..----..---.--. ---.-. --. .-------.--. -. -. ..5 it 2 .20 Sw edish .-----.-. ...--. ...----. --. ---.-. ---. -----. -..----. --. .-.-. -.114 388 3 .4 0 S w iss-.---.-. --. ---. --. ..-. .I .--. -..I -...--...-. -.---.-. .--. --. .5 82 16 .40 United States.-.---.--..-. ..--. ---..-..-. .---. --. -. --..--. .-. --. --.-..-. 35) 1,678 4.67 S o v iet. ......-.--.--.-.--.-.-. ...--.-.-.--....-...-..---------------------------. -----.3 7 4 8 1 .3 0 Venezuelan---.----------.----.--. --. ----.---..-----------.--------. .-.--7 17 2.43 Y ugoslavian -.---..-..--. ----. ---. -..-----------. .-------. --. .--. .--. .10 17 1.70 Total, fiscal year1965.------.-1 --.4 1 1 --2 ..I .-2 1 --.-. .-. -.----.----..1 3,303 11,834 3.58 C 5 1964 ----.-. --1 --2 .--. 1 2 .2 --. 1 -.I 1 1 2 1 1 --I ---.I .3,154 11,808 3.74 1963. -----. I --.I I --1 1 3 1 2 ....1 -. ----. ------I -.I -. ----2,938 11,017 3.75 Includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over (Panama Canal measurement), or of 500 displacement tons and over oil vessels paying tolls oil displacement basis (dredges, warships, etc.).

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Table 17.-Segregation of Transitsl by Registered Gross Tonnage-Fiscal Year 1965 2,000.Average gross ,0 ,000 ,000 8,00 10,000 1 ,000 14,000 18,000 18,000 Registered tonnage per vessel Under to to to to to to to to and .gross Bega N---Aai -ionality------2,000 3,999 5,999 7,099 .9,099 11,999 13,.9.99 15,.999 17,999 0 ver Total 2 lonnarge 1965 1 9r,4 ---in. .-.------.---25 10 --_--------_-2 10 2 -------------49 301,040 6,144 C,,7 1 1 Braziian. ----------------------.----. 2 ------------------------------.2 13,852 6 q26 British --------.--._--81 28 63 270 385 243 122 34 9 93 1,329 12,828,431 9,660 9,393 Bulgarian. --------------.-----.--.-----....2 -------------------------.------.....2 18,042 9,021 8,556 Chilean .---I --.----22 51 is Is --__---_*I I -------112 878,699 7,846 7,910 Chinese (Nationalist) ---------------7 55 26 15 --------------.--.-----.103 851,515 9,267 9,525 Chinese (Republic) --------------------1 10 3 3 ---------------.------------17 140,315 8,254 .9,390 Colom bian. -------.--69 6 155 ----._ _--15 -------------------.-..-. 245 1,044,722 4,264 3,652 C uban ------------------------------------5 ----------------------------.--.5 49, 167 9,633 .--Danish .-25 104 61 49 -------21 ---4 ,7 Finndish ----------_2 4 ---------------------------------------24 133,425 5,559 5,295 Fin sh ..2 4 3 8 --------------------27 209,965 7,776 7,951 Prench._ -----------3 9 49 46 34 1 12 .----. 1 2 156 1,126,811 7,223 7,531 7 German.--------------127 607 158 140 64 34 30 12 10 3 1,185 5,472,820 4,619 4,576 Ghanaian .----------------..------------------------------.----------1 7,583 7,5s3 .-Greek.--------.------1 13 62 202 90 87 53 40 2 24 574 5,552,429 9,673 9,646 G uinean. ------.------.----. --1 _-__-3 ---------------------------. 4 39,875 9,969 10,764 H aitian .-------------------. ---. ----_--1 --------------------------.----.-.1 9,464 9,464 ---H onduran -------------168 71 28 1 -_-_-_-_ _.----___________-----------------. 26,q 532,353 1,98 2,376 feela nd ic .---------. _----------_---2 -------_-___ .--_._ ------. 2 2 2 ,97 6 1 1 ,4 8 8 .---. Indian -, ------._---------___-__----_----__ _------I .------6 8 15 1,924 18 ,978 2 1,633 In d o n esia n ----------.--------_ ..----_---_---_--_ __ -_-----_ --_ --__ ._ -_ ---1 6 ,8 6 6 6 ,8 6 6 .-Irish.------------------------------------------1 9 2 --_____. -------..----.12 127,279 10,606 9,892 t Israel.-------------------------------13 11 20 11 _-._--2 --._--2 59 514,782 8,725 5,553 I Italian .------_-.------------_ ---. -2 4 33 82 7 37 3 2 22 192 2,072,618 10,795 9,572 0 Japanese _---_.----__56 13 4 211 442 42 34 --. -.--.2 804 6,552,046 8,149 7,974 Korean (.South) -----------------------------_ 15 _-_--.-.--------------------.-------. --.-.-15 108,045 7,203 6,476 K u w a it. _ _--------.---_2 --. -__ -__ __-_ .__ __-_ _--_ __-_--. .------------.......-. .-. ..2 3 ,0 2 0 1 ,5 10 ..Lebanese ---------. -------_----------------.------. 3 28 3 _---_-_-_ -_ --_____-. _--._.__ --__ __ -34 242,954 7,146 6,883 > Liberian. ..--.----_-.-.--.--_----_-96 59 31 235 11M 205 109 82 40 14S 1,118 12,372,983 11,067 10,163 M exican .----.------_----------17 1 .----_-_ 9 7 ---_ ---_--_----__--__----__ ._ __. ...34 138 ,983 4 ,088 2 ,97 4 Netherlands. .__ -----__--_-_.-----_3 OS 13 42 44 82 51 23 1 3 51 618 3,554,173 5,751 5,600 N icaraguan.-------_-_-_------.-----1 61 -------------------------------------------. .----. 62 149,889 2,417 2,442 Norwegian.----------------7 161 216 187 254 201 208 23 70 119 1,446 14,100,471 9,751 9,083 Panamanian.----.---.--.-__.--------286 14 23 61 11 35 10 7 27 44 519 2,931,317 5,659 4,372 > Peruvian.--.---_--.-------------19 47 31 31 16 3 ---. -_ _------. ----..-.--.147 770,615 5,242 5,410 Philippine ------__ -----__ -__ .---------.-1 2 2 69 10 ----.---..-.-. .-._--84 799,510 9,51S 9,874 Spanish -.---_--___--_ ---_ --_ .-__-2 5 -------I -.--.-.-----.--. ---------.--..8 40 ,702 5 ,088 3 ,450 Swedish.---_---.---_--__------------.----.6 27 126 132 35 21 3 20 17 387 3,580,852 9,253 9,502 S w iss ...-_-___-_-------.-_-----------_ --. 7 7 ------_-------___ .__ 5 --------------. ..-----. ......__ --8 2 15 5 ,7 2 1 1 ,89 9 1 ,8 19 > United Statcs-------.____ -. -.----. 76 3 144 509 529 98 33 140 63 81 1,676 15,557,083 9,282 9,002 Soviet -------------------------.---.-.1 5 13 19 9 1 -.-.-.-.--. --.-. -48 4q9,663 8,535 9,837 V enezuelan ..._------.-----.8 -------------. --. --. 2 1 -.-----------. -.---_ _.-----. 11 35,108 3,192 3,460 Yugoslavian -----------------------------------...13 1 1 2 --.-.--_--.--_--.17 129,542 7,620 6,426 > Total, fiscal year 1965-----_-.--1,404 1,172 1,234 2,373 2,484 1,141 72S 351 252 632 11,771 95,923,555 8,149 7,697 > Percent of total---------------. 11.9 10.0 10.4 20.2 21.1 9.7 6.2 3.0 2.1 5.4 100.0 I Includes only commercial vessels of 300 net tons and over, Panama Canal measurement. 2 Excludes 57 vessels paying tolls on displacement tonnage basis and 6 transits where no registered gross tonnage was reported.

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 63 Table 18.-Principal Commodities Shipped Through Canal [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC 1965 1964 1963 1962' Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt)___13,914 10,988 10,828 10,228 Coal and coke -------------------6,471 6,184 5,172 6,817 Phosphate -------------------------3,123 2,212 1,803 1,878 Corn -----------------.-------------2,245 2,274 1,310 1,105 Metal, scrap ------------------------2,1117 3,047 1,700 3,215 Soybeans --------------------------1,653 1,510 1,446 1,196 Manufactures of iron and steel ------------1,546 1,440 1,282 1,690 Ores, various ------------------------1,195 1,184 771 718 Chemicals, unclassified ----------------796 700 565 638 Sugar-----------------------------660 536 774 2,105 Wheat---------------------------632 622 468 705 Paper and paper products --------------573 491 340 359 Sulfur__---__-_-___--_--_-__-------472 471 285 387 Machinery___-___----___---------444 414 422 404 Fertilizers, unclassified----__--_-___----441 433 334 396 Automobiles and accessories_----_-------393 385 309 289 Cotton, raw -------------------------355 390 341 397 Ammonium compounds -----------------306 310 225 484 Metals, various-----------------------296 354 299 399 Rice---------------------------------260 138 145 119 Flour, wheat--------------------------226 207 271 237 Chemicals, petroleum__--__--_____---_-220 2 22 147 N.A. Canned food products-_---_-----------212 219 194 207 Sorghum----------------------------208 215 N.A. N.A. Cement-----------------------------182 186 123 111 Asphalt ----------------------------161 1718 167 194 Soda and sodium compounds------------158 139 110 138 Asbestos__-___-_______--_--__---151 130 115 134 Tinplate -_----_ _ ___________---___143 171 182 259 R esin -____-____-__-__-_--__________-_-_131 126 85 109 Glass and glassware___-_-____------------124 133 106 109 Pulpwood_-----_---------------------_ 124 154 125 104 Clay, fire and china--------_------------_112 99 60 57 Oil, vegetable_----------_---------109 116 116 119 Grains, unclassified_--__-----------106 202 159 2*3 Rubber, manufactured------_-_---_-104 104 97 87 Liquors and wines_ ---------------_-----_94 88 91 91 Agricultural implements---------------89 7 1 58 63 Coffee_--_--_____-------------------88 75 91 91 Electrical machinery and apparatus ---_--__82 7 2 77 78 Potash __-_-__________-___--_____77 170 144 124 Food in refrigeration--__-_______------_ 73 60 63 51 Tallow _________ -----_---__-_-----58 54 48 37 Salt_______--__-____--___-____-53 54 47 47 Groceries, unclassified_-___-____-___---52 56 40 46 Tobacco__--_______-_-_----__-____52 52 41 50 Textiles_--_-__-___ -----------51 67 67 66 Slag -_-__ ----_--_-_-_-49 53 49 58 Marble and stone -___----_-_--_--_--43 44 38 N.A. Bricks and tile_____-----_-_-____ ---42 26 34 38 Lumber__ -__-----_-------_ 41 50 47 38 W ax, paraflm'n-_----____ __-_--_----_-41 40 39 35 C reosote_ ___-_-__-_---__---_____37 13 25 36 M olasses_ ---___-______--_-______-33 9 67 146 Cocoa and cacao beans_____----__-__--__ 31 25 23 17 Skins and hides_____-_--------_-29 25 25 26 Carbon black_ --_____-_-_-________ 25 27 26 37 Railroad materials__-__------------23 42 30 16 Ammunition and explosives____---_________ 20 12 16 N.A. All other__--______ ----_-__--_ -_ -____ 1,403 1,032 1,024 1,099 Total, Atlantic to Pacific _-_---_----_-_ -42,949 38,901 33,086 37,707

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Table 20.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During Fiscal Year 1965 Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Areas To United States To other North America North South Great United Central Total, Atlantic Atlantic Gulf Lak es States America/ Crish~b-7, W est North WEST COAST NORTH AHERICA: ports ports ports ports (other)' Total Canada Mexico C.Z.2 Indies America United States. .___. .......-----------------. --------. .----1,793,269 97, 348 247,895 .-.----. 38,070 2, 176, 582 12, 424 2, 074 5,04 7 295,452 2, 492,019 Canada. .-.-.-----.-.-.--.---.--.--.--.--.------1,067,777 62,945 18,823 .--.-. 34,996 1,1S4,541 8,542 29 729 122,06 1,315,847 B alboa, C .Z.2 __._._._.__.__.__._._._.23,963 369 388 .-----------. 24, 720 .--..---. --------. .._ -24,720 Central America/Mexico. -----------------.-.-.------.-----. --. .--.-354,019 19,025 204,873 ---. 61, 401 639,318 38 88, 470 7,861 10,493 746,180 Hawaii....-----------.-.---. --.----.--.-..---214,915 9,433 230,740 ---.--. 10,000 465,088 4,213 .-.-. 546 2,285 472,132 Total, North America.-.----....-.--..-.-.-.3,453,943 189,120 702,719 --.--. 144,467 4,490,249 25,217 90,573 14,623 430,236 5,050,898 WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: Chile. .......--. ....--------.-----------------------2,502,866 127,980 814,331 -.-.--68,177 3,513,354 96,310 21,703 2,506 5,298 3,639, 171 04 Colombia. ....-.-. .......-----.------.---------.------.---114,036 19,269 54,579 ..-.38,785 226,669 6,259 -.-.-346 1 233,275 4 Ecuador.-.-...-------..-.-.--...-.-..-322,441 35,655 357,806 --.6,945 722,847 113 .--. -66 7,592 730,618 > Peru. ----------....--..-.--.-..--.-----------1,039,499 63,024 521,307 9,839 46,989 1,680,658 470 21,095 1,815 11,474 1,715,512 ; South America (other)' .---.-.-.---.-..--.--------. 7,253 1,022 16,865 .--. .25,140 -.-. 2 1,000 8,270 34,472 Total, South America.-.---.-.-.-.-.---.--.--. -.--------3,986,095 246,950 1,764,888 9,839 160,896 6,168,668 103,152 42,800 5,793 32,635 6,353,048 OCEANIA: Australia.----.-.--.-.-.-.---.------.-.-.-.-------305,064 43,493 106,093 46,074 76,859 577,583 183,5S0 14,748 1,327 40,456 817,694 B ritish O ceania...-.-.-. --. .-----. --. -. --. --.--.-.-----8,400 -.-. 10,100 -.--.13,796 32,296 .--..-.--. .-.-464 32,760 New Zealand .--. -.---.------.-.-----.-.-----. --. ---8 ,3565 18,671 3,355 .--. -2 .,385 110,7f67 17,847 .-.-..-. 2,562 30,793 161,969 O ceania (other)l.------.-.-.-.-.-..-.--------.-660 .-.-..--.--.-.-.-------660 -. -. --.-. -. 100 760 Total, Oceania.----.--.--.-..------.--.-.--.-.-.---400,480 62,164 119,548 46,074 93,040 721,306 201,427 14,748 3,898 71,829 1,013,208 ASIA: British East Indies.-.-. --..----...-. .-.------10,076 1,214 18,020 ---.2,426 31,736 1 8,097 2,951 70 42,855 C hina._-----.-.-.-----.---___-.---.-...-.--...---1,403 358 733 -.--.---.-2,494 434 .--.----.-. 27,621 30,549 Formosa. -. ----. --. -. -. --. -. --.-. -------. -. -. ---119,617 24,717 70,294 5,928 1,715 222,271 9,182 ....267 1,093 232,813 Hong Kong ..--------.----.--.--.-..-..--.--111,048 9,314 10,078 3,789 1,926 136,155 8,388 114 2,959 6,471 154,087 > India .-....-..---.---..-----.-...--1,615 ----.-. 17 ,554 -. -.-.19 ,169 ------229 3 ,025 56 22 ,479 Indochina .--.-..---.-.--.-.-..-.-...---394 30 174 --...-.--. 598 .-. -.--..10 ,376 10 ,974 Cn Indonesia.-----..-.---.-.-.-.-..---...-.--20,687 .-.--19,891 ------.410 40,988 64 5,890 21 --..46,963 0Philippines..-.-...-.-.-.-.-.-----.--.-..-.-950,655 38,680 275,484 .252,718 1,517,537 11,557 45 1,293 104 1,530,536 Russia.---------. ---.--.--....-..--..-----------.-.---------.-------------------------------------------50,268 50,268 South K orea. ------.-----._ ...-...---------.----------10,894 677 10,972 ...--.-. 22,543 -.-.-. ------. 571 535 23,649 T hailand. ....._ --.-.-.---.--.-.---.-..-.--..34,519 130 2,641 ..-. ..37,290 744 --..1,138 33 39,205 Asia (other)'.--.-.-. -. ---. -. ------. ---. ---. .-------.40,289 8,829 23,566 6,207 5,289 84,180 5,330 948 3,470 6,828 100,726 > Total, Asia.-.--.-.-.---.-.-.--.--.-.---.-------. -.-2,682,345 244,758 1,329,162 361,293 310,701 4,928,259 145,938 18,871 34,732 209,935 5,338.735 > Grand total..-.-.--.-.-.-...-.-. 10,522,863 742,992 3,916,317 417,206 709,104 16,308,482 476,734 166,992 59,046 744,635 17,755,889 PERCENT OF ATLANTIc-BoUND CARGO.----.----.--------------31.30 2.21 11.64 1.24 2.11 48.50 1.42 .50 .18 2.21 52.81

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T'o Europe British DenIrish NetherNorSpainWest Europe WESTCOAST NORTH AMERICA: Belgium Isles mark France Greece Republic Italy lands way Poland Portugal Sweden Germany (other)I Total United States -------.-----.-.--107,644 351,589 40,696 197,312 35,422 11,351 340,054 724,515 29,103 14,933 90,052 63,227 310,569 95,017 2,411,484 Canada.----.-----------.--------108,616 2,074,661 785 79,113 22,775 40,298 210,264 292,141 1,109 81,934 13,775 2,169 214,603 186,279 3,328,522 Balboa, C.Z.2. --.-. 63 -.-49 --.-------.-.--41 26 -. --. -.----41 -----------.---220 Central America/Mexico-.---.-----. 26,386 32,499 24,948 24,771 114 ---.--36,042 56,567 2,581 509,123 21,873 9,356 158,998 9,39 912,397 Hawaii-------------------------.-1,341 2 43 419 -------.--------1,950 -----.----.--.---120 7,048 15,600 26,523 Total, North America -.----------244,050 2,458,751 66,521 301,615 5831 516956,401 1,05,9 327365,9 2,41 74,872 691,218 306,035 6,679,146 WEST COAST SOUTiaAMERICA: Chile ----.--.---------.-----------239,353 162,906 32,261 95,862 3,937 6,003 48,032 420,313 1,045 -.----115,263 40,525 250,641 190,307 1,606,448 Colombia------------------.-------4,508 939 1,031 706 --.--.1,404 7,169 914 1,590 6 11,265 45,284 6,156 80,972 Ecuador.-..---.-. -.--.118,818 2,829 567 8,588 -------.13,607 25,119 3,108 393 353 4,954 291,861 19,711 489,903 Peru-------------------------.----170,338 349,822 25,179 357,570 2,006 2,399 296,273 1,263,195 833 73,247 90,996 44,760 1,107,236 160,523 3,944,37'7 South America (other)'.-----------8,875 833 402 750 .----. -.---. 68 13,947 42 -. 3 35 26,636 12,498 64,089 Total, South America -----.-----5189 517,329 59,440 4636 5,943 8,402 359,8 ,2,4 5,942 752026611153 1,721,658 389,195 6,185,794 OCEANIA: Australia.---. --. .-.-------_--.27,689 .-----3 ----------------------------------------. ----.-.---23,478 51,170 British Oceania.-. .-.--.----__.-.232,631 ---. 4 -------. -.---.507 ----------------.-----9,134 42,312 284,588 French Oceania-------------------2,060 120,654 .-.-. 53,222 -----------------------------------. ---.-. ------. 26 ---175,962 New Zealand.----.-.---.------25,353 806,049 755 27,025 .-. 19 -.---20,778 468 --.-..----1,586 39,844 ~20,215 942,092 Oceania (other), -------------------.8,416 -------.------.-.---.--------4,351 ---------------------. 2,378 6,803 21,948 Total, Oceania -------.-----27,413 1,195,439 755 80,254 .--.19 -.---.25,636 468 ---------. 1,586 51,382 92,808 1,475,760 ASIA:-B rC h tind .----.--.----------------------------------------------.--------Formosa. -.---. --__ __-.------101 206 ---------------.-. ---..------. 793 .------------.-------56 .--.1,156 Hon gKong. -.------.------604 777 ------------.---. .--.----345 -----------------. ------------.--.----.1,726 I n i ----d ------------h---------------------------------------------------------~ -Japan------------.--------7,330 26,724 -----.--.----. -----240 37,373 ---. --.--. 295 ------13,055 1,612 86,629 Phlpies --------------------------------------------------.-.-------.--.----. 20,654 ----------------------.--.----. 11,755 32,409 Rusa ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------..--.-2,97 2,975 Sut ~o e ------------1 6 1 8 --------------3 13 ----------~ 1 -4---Asa (other)' --------.--.------40 168 ---.-----------.-------------. 215 ---------.---------.---. 2 1,205 1,630 Total, Asia ---------------------8,211 27,983 --.----.--.------.---243 59,519 -----295 1 13,11 18,040 127,408 Grand total--------------------.-821,566 4,199,502 126,716 845,345 64,254 60,070 946,028 2,890,097 39,203 681,220 332,657 177,998 2,477,374 806,078 14,468,108 PEnCENT OF ATLANTic-BouND CARGO ----2.44 12.49 .38 2.51 .19 .18 2.81 8.60 .12 2.02 .99 .53 7.37 2.40 43.03 See footnotes at end of table.

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Table 20.-Origin and Destination of Cargo Through the Panama Canal from Pacific to Atlantic During Fiscal Year 1965 Segregated by Countries in Principal Trade Areas-Continued To east coast South America To Middle East South Middle ArgenColomVeneAmerica LebaEast WEST OASTNORT AMEICA:tina Brazil bid zuela (other) I Total India Israel non (other)t Total UnE te S tatA __-----___------_-__. -. _------.---.----. -------.---20,526 23,706 6,135 102,226 1,998 154,591 3,815 8,501 4,930 1,035 18,281 Canada.---------.--------------------------------------------------------------------8,288 43,502 369 286,308 1,796 340,263 -----27,155 10,297 3 37,455 Balboa, C.Z.Z .---.-.-----------------------------------------------------------29 3 3,267 5 1 3,305 -..-.-.---.-------.. Central America/Mexico------------------.---------------------------------------------. 1 492 1,465 24,246 666 26,870 --.---------------------Hawaii .------.-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------. 36 36 .------------------.-.---Total, North America --------------------------.--------------------------------28,844 67,703 11,236 412,785 4,497 525,065 3,815 35,656 15,227 1,3 55,736 ChE l ----------A------------------T-------------A-E--CA10 2,851 -.---_-2,861 8,772 511 7,119 726 17,128 T Coom i-. --------. -.-.---.------------------------.----------------------------------4,539 280 ---4,819 ---------65 65 Z cuor i----. --------.----.--.---------.------------------------------------------.-------,415 3 ---418 ------4 44 88 P r -.------.-.-----------------------------------------13,192 19,508 ~1,084 33,784 7,786 2,500 491 223 11,000 Z South America (other)' --.-.-------------.------------------------------------------------------------. 5 -.--. 5 ---.-. -._--. 340 .-.-340 Total, South America.-.-.---------..--.------------------------------------------------18,156 22,647 1,084 41,887 16,558 3,011 7,994 1,058 28,621 OCEANIA: Australia.--.__.--_---_-.-----.---..-.-----------.----------------------.----------320 1,784 150 2,254 ----..--.---------British Oceania -.----.--...---. .---.-------.------.--------------------------------------2,876 .-.2,876 .--.-. .-. .----------French Oceania. ..---.-------..-----------------.-------------------------------------------------------------------------0 New Zealand.-------------------. ---. ---.---.--.----.---.-----------------------------------. 670 2,933 3,603 -.---. .--.------------Oceania (other)' ---..--.------.----.----------------------------------. ----------------3,260 ----.3,260 .-.----.-.---.---------Total, Oceania.-----.-.---.--------.-----------------.---------------------------------. 320 8,590 3,083 11,993 -.--. .-.--.---ASIA: British East Indies.----.-.-. ...----.-----------------.------------------------------1 205 8 214 .--.------------------Cn China --.._----__ _-_-_ _.--_ _-----.--.---.-----.----------.------------.---------.--------------------------------------------Form osa ...._--_. -_ ---.._ ...--.....-----. -----------------1 1 -------------------------H ong Kong. .___----.----.----_.-----_. ------..-. .-.-----------1 3,516 547 4,064 -.-.-------.------------India..-._ _ .-. -. ---. ......----.-----------------------------------------------Indochina. -----.-. .---.------------.--------.--------------------------------------------------------------------------Indonesia ---.....----.------------------------.-.-.-.-----.-------.2,500 9,384 4,767 16,651 .--.-.--.--------Japan.----------------------------------------.---_---40,731 38,463 54,438 157,923 18,810 310.365 --------.-. ------------Philippines--.----------------.-..---.---.-.-.-.-------------5,107 19,987 1,292 26,386 ----.-.-------------> Russia-----. .---.--.-----.-------------------------------------------South Korea ------------------------------------.-.---------------------------------------------Thailand--------..-----.------------------------------------------------Asia (other) ..-.--------.-.--------------. -. ---. ---. --.--.---.--.9 10,636 382 10,927 ---..-------------Total, Asia.--..-.--.---. .---. .-------.----------------------40,731 383 62,056 201,551 25,807 368 8 -------------------Grand total.-_----------------------------------__----. ._.--. 69,575 106,166 91,768 645,573 34,471 947,553 20,373 38,667 23.221 2,096 84,357 PERCENT OF ATLANTIC-BouND CARGO.---.-------------------------------.---.------------.21 .32 .2 1.92 .10 2.82 .06 .12 .07 .-..25

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To AfricaPecn AtlanticMozamSouth -Africa Grand bound 'WEST COAST NORTH AMERICA: Egypt Kenya bique Africa Tunisia (other), Total total cargo United States--------------------------------------------------------------4,158 7,130 13,303 56,395 9,975 5,735 96,696 5,173,071 15.39 > Canada.-..-.-.-.--.-.-.....-....-..----.-.-. -. 22 33 33 ,, 577 2122, 122 11,, 888 5,, 885 22 9,,245 5,, 99 ,, 322 15.7 Balboa, C.Z. __ __ _ _ ._ __----------.-------------------.----------------------------.--------------.------.------. --.--. -28,245 .08 0 Central Am erica/M exico...---.-...-.-..-.-----------.-. .-.--------..--. -.---. ----.-.1,685,447 5.01 H aw ai ._.-.-.-....-.--.-. _. --. ...-.--. -. -. ----.-----------------------------.----. ---. ---. -. 44 9 ,, 9 111 .4 Total, North America.----. --------.----.--. -. .----._.------4,158 7,333 52,660 268,407 21,663 11,720 365,941 12,676,786 37.70 WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: C hile .---------. ..........----------------. -----.-.---.--.---. -_---.-.--.-. __ __ -.--. -_ ------.-.--.--.-.-._.---__. _-._ _. ....5 ,2 65 ,608 15 .6 6 0 Colombia -.-----. --.-.-------------------------------------------------------. -----------------.---. -----.3 3 319,134 .95 E cuador. ...------. --------------------------.-. ...--. ..-. -.--.-.-.-.-.--.-._._--_-_-.-.-. ._ -----__--__ ---. -._ ---_ -_ 1,221,032 3 .63 Peru. ...-----------.--.-----------.-----.--------.-.----.-------142 .--. .25 ------.------167 5,704,840 16.97 South America (other)'.-.-.-.---.-----------------------------------_-_.---.------------.-.----------.--. -------98,906 .29 Total, SouthAmerica..-.......-...-. --.-.---4 2 -....25 ------3 170 12,609,520 37.50 OCEANIA: A ustralia .---.-. -. -----. --. ---. ---------_ ---_ ------.-----------------------------. ------------------.-----.-----------------.-.----. ....--. 871,118 2.59 B rritish O cea ....-.-.-_-.---.-_-.-.--.-.-.-----.---------------.--.--_-_-_.-.--..----.....--_ .-_.__-_-_-__ _-_---_ -_ ---_ --_-_ 3_. 0 ,2 2 42 4. 5 F rench O cean ia ..............._---.--.---------------.-._-----.-.------.---_-----_.----_ ._----------------. .._ .__. .._ .___ ..175 ,987 .5 2 N ew Z eala nd .......................--._-----_.------.-_--------.---_--.--_-.---------.-.-.-.----_-. ---. .-.---_-_-_.-_.-__ -.-___.--.-_-_ 1 ,1, 0 77 6 443 .0 O ceania (other)' -. ------.----------. ...-. .-_.---.-----.----. .----.-_ .__ ..._-.--.--__-. .-_ ----_ --. .-_--_-. 25 ,968 .0 8 T otal, O ceania .._.-....-. -. ---._. --. ----. -. -. ----__ .---...-._ --. ----__ --._ -._ ---__ -_._ -. --22 00 ,, 6 1177 .4 ASIA: B ritish E ast Indies...-.-. -. -_.-------.-----. ......_ ---__ --.-.-. .-.---------. -_ --.---. .-..43 ,069 .13 C h in a ...-.-..----.-_. ---. --_._ --.-_ -----.-_ --__ _ _---. _--__ _ _--.__-___ _-_ _ _-__ ._-_ ._. _ __ ._ _-._ _-__ _-__ _ 3 0 ,5 4 9 .0 9 F orm osa ._.-.------. ----. ---------_._ _ _. _ _. ._ -.--___--____ --____ ___--_. -_--___ --. .______ .__ _. --233 ,970 .69 Hong Kong ..._ ._ _ _ ._ _ _.----------.-------.------------------------------.--.----------------.-------------.-------. 159,877 .47 India.-__-.-____._. .__._______-__------------------------------------.-----. .-.----------.------. ----.---_. -..-.22,479 .07 In d ochina ..-. -. ---. --------------..__-_-----_--.-_.__ --__ -----. -_ --_ -._ -----.-. --__ -. --_ ---_._ -._. -.-___ __ --___ -_ __.11 ,, 744.0 In d o n esia .-----.--------------.--.----.---__-_. .-. -_ ._ ..._ _ _ .._. __ _. -_ ._-___ __ -_ ____-_ _____.-_. --_____ -_.-.-.-. -.-_ -6 3 ,6 14 .19 Japan. ---__-.-_---_------------------------------------.--------------------------_-.--------------. ------.-------2,057 2,057 3,452,682 10.27 Philippines .--.-__-_----_---_---_-_-_ --_-_-_---------------------------------.-. ---------------------.----..1,589,331 4.73 Russia.._.---_ ---_ --_ --__ --_-__ -----------------------------------------.----.------.------.--.-...-..-.53,243 .16 South K orea .-.-.---. ---. ---_--.__. ----. -_. --. --_ ---.-. --. -.__.__ -. -. --_. -. _--.-_ --.__ --_-. --__._. -.-__ -_ --.-__. -_. ___. 244 322 .7 T hailan d .------.---------.------. ----_.-_.-_. -_ _ _ .._ _ _ .._ _ _ __._--_--.--_ .--__ -____ -.-_. -_-_-_ ..39 ,205 .12 Asa ( t e ) ------------------------------------------------------------------------.-.....-----.-. .-.-_. .----113,283 .34 T otal, A sia .--. ----. -----_---.-----.----.--__ ._-__-__ _ ._ __ ._ _ _ ____.-._ ______-_____.--____._ __._--2,057 2,057 5,836,808 17.36 Grand total --------------------------_---------.--. -. ...4,300 7,333 52,660 268,432 21,663 13,780 368,168 33,624,075 PERCENT OF ATLANTIC-BOUND CARGO.-.-. ---. -. -. --. -----. --.___._ -___ -. _______. .02 .16 .80 .07 .04 1.09 100.00 1 Also includes cargo not routed to permit segregation between definite countries. 2 Includes both local and transshipped cargo.

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PAGE 80

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74 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 21.-Cargo Shipments by Trade Routes-Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST INDIES TO-Continued 1965 1964 1963 1962 Asia ___------_-_-__----------------1,376 1,164 1,014 2,363 British East Indies _____---__ ----_10 16 11 --China_ --_---------_--------123 212 335 779 Hong Kong_------_--_ -_-_-----4 3 9 2 Indochina___--_-______-_---------__-4 Indonesia______--__--_______-_ 6 18 7 14 Japan _--__-_----_---___ -___-_ 1,122 860 570 1,152 Philippine Islands____-_--__13 15 20 1 South K orea _--_--_--_--_-__-___-_5 _--__70 U.S.S.R____-----------_------98 22 57 344 O ther____-___-----_____-----___ 13 1 1 Total_ _____-__________---_-5,217 4 47 4,454 6,711 EUROPE TOWest coast United States__.-_______-_-__ 882 853 769 850 West coast Canada_ _------__-_____-_ 260 229 179 196 West coast Central America/Mexico --376 359 317 299 B alb oa, C .Z __ ___--_--____--_--__--_--13 West coast South America_ _---__--__ -967 976 1,128 1,170 Chile_ _----_---_-299 274 407 400 Colombia -----------121 142 157 181 Ecuador ------------109 109 105 78 Peru --------------394 413 440 480 Other -------------44 38 19 31 Hawaiian Islands -----------12 17 28 23 Oceania ----___------903 879 826 926 Australia ------------26 27 49 44 British Oceania ----------33 21 18 18 French Oceania ---------225 157 103 138 New Zealand ----------577 647 625 654 Other -------------42 27 31 72 Asia ----------------88 109 116 138 Formosa ------------1 2 1 4 Japan -------------73 98 110 113 South Korea _---_----_--___-1 4 U .S.S.R _-------_--4 Other__ 10 9 4 17 Other territories -----------11 1 Total_ ----_ ---_--_---_._-3,499 3,422 3,364 3,615 AFPJCA TOWest coast United States -------180 151 157 1,34 West coast Canada ---------12 19 7 9 West coast Central America/Mexico _____---34-----West coast South America -------53 13 42 11 Oceania_-_----_ 34 14 1 3 Asia-_ --__0-_-_ 17 6 33 41 Total__ _ _ __-----------296 237 240 198 AsIA (MMDLE EAST) TGWest coast United States ___ 12 6 6 34 Asia -_____-___-1 1 7 O ther territories ___-----__--__-_---__-5 T otal_ _ ____----------__ _-13 7 13 39 Total cargo, Atlantic to Pacific_ _-----42,9449 38,901 33,086 37,707

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PAGE 83

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 79 Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific [Thousands of long tons]Ficlya EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST, UNITED STATES: 1965 1964 1963 1962 Bauxite_-_---_--__-_----_217 230 42 --Canned food products ---_______--_-1 4 6 5 Cem ent__-_----.-_ -----_ 27 42 14 --Chemicals: Petroleum __ __ -------_-_-----127 99 76 N.A. Unclassified------_ ----------137 114 103 185 Confectionery------------_--__ _----1 -----Electrical machinery and apparatus ----2 2 3 4 Floor coverings ----------------__--__ 1 1 Groceries, unclassified -_-----_-_---5 5 2 2 Iron and steel manufactures__--------609 476 442 660 Liquors____-----_--__--_ _1 1 3 9 M achinery -_-_____-___-_--_ _-_-1 2 3 3 Metals, miscellaneous___--_-__--_-___26 4 2 20 Paints and varnishes________------1 1 3 4 Paper and paper products_____-----__ 1 2 1 6 Petroleum and products: C rude oil_--_____-__ -__ -----_-_ --____ ----__ 47 Fuel-diesel oil__________---___ 61 39 _--14 Gasoline_---_--____ --___ --_ -__ 830 522 326 374 Kerosene -__------_-_ -_-295 33 -----_ 37 Lubricating oil --_--__----_--_ 272 219 266 217 Other and unclassified-__---_--_86 29 22 12 Pharmaceutical products ----_-__---__ 2 2 2 5 Phosphate -____---___--_-__ __--74 38 ___--_ 1 Soap and soap products_--_----__--_ 5 1 3 --Soda and sodium compounds --__-_--_ 48 is 13 39 Sulfur ___----_-_ -------_ -_ --_ -_ -__ -------40 Vegetable oil, miscellaneous_ -----_____1 8 28 18 All other and unclassified -______---__ 192 185 86 47 Total --___-_--------____-___ 3,021 2,077 1,447 1,750 EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST CANADA: Canned fruit___--____-_ ----_-__ -_--1 2 3 Phosphate _------_-_--_-_--_ 28 --------R ice __---_ ___--__ _-_ _ -----5 7 6 6 Soda and sodium compounds_ _----__ 3_ ___------All other and unclassified ------------------T otal_ _ _ ____-------36 8 8 9 EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO: Ammonium compounds_---__----_____10 15 6 --Chemicals, unclassified ---__----__ 14 13 15 13 Canned food products_---__--_---__15 13 8 1 C orn ___------__--_-_ _ _ _16 18 11 16 Fertilizers, unclassified_ ____---_---_ 18 25 21 10 Iron and steel manufactures__---___-13 6 8 2 L im e____--___ ----__ -_________-1 _1 M achinery____________--_____7 7 6 5 Paper and paper products__---_-___--__ 55 38 19 5 Petroleum and products: Lubricating oil_---____-___--____ 11 10 6 6 Other and unclassified____--_-_-__ 5 4 5 5 Phosphate -_-_--____-_-_____-____--__ 56 26 8 4 P otash _-_ -___________--___-_________ 5 16 2 1 Rice 6 11 6 3 W heat___--___--_______________ 11 20 5 35 All other and unclassified _-______--__-__ 63 62 60 37 Total__---___-________ _-_______306 284 187 143

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 81 Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year EAST COAST UNITED STATES To HAwAmAN 1965 1964 1963 1962 ISLANDs-Continued Soybeans___________---_--------1 2 12 7 Textiles___----__-_-_--_----------1 3 2 2 Tinplate_ --.____ ---------------36 36 49 42 All other and unclassifed _-__-_---___ 46 54 40 55 Total_--_-_-_-_--__------160 191 207 218 EAST COAST UNITED STATES TO OCEANIA: Agricultural implements___--__-------32 25 16 13 Ammonium and compounds_ _-_-__-_--_----5 6 1 2 Automobiles and accessories_ _--_----_-42 46 23 19 B auxite ____.---_-_-_ ____-_--_-_--__--_ 4 1 80 48 --Bricks and tile_______-______--6 2 2 1 Carbon black__ __-_--___ 4 4 5 6 Chemicals: Petroleum _--_-______-_7 7 14 N.A. Unclassified_________-____-___61 34 31 47 Clay, fire and china_--_-_____-_-_______ 30 30 20 11 C oke ______-____-____---_ ----3 ______ 11 Cotton,raw __--_ --______-___ 18 24 15 16 Electrical machinery and apparatus 5 4 6 4 Fertilizers, unclassified__-------12 1 3 1 Glass and glassware 8 8 6 4 Iron and steel manufactures -------26 28 25 12 Machinery_ _-__ 63 50 49 37 Metals, miscellaneous___-------14 8 11 14 Ores, miscellaneous-__ 7 6 5 Paper and paper products --------23 17 14 11 Petroleum and products: G asoline __ _ _____---------34 4 1 Kerosene_ _____ _ _ __ 2 Lubricating oil_ 83 108 117 128 Other and unclassified -------11 10 7 10 Phosphate-______-_-_-__ 720 47 13 2 Potash _______-----__--_--__20 18 16 23 R esin ____---_____-___--_________ 18 14 13 13 R ice -_ --_ _ -_ _ _ _ ---_ _ -_ -_ -_ _ _ 7 7 6 3 Rubber, manufactured _______________ 13 16 15 17 Soda and sodium compounds_--__-_____8 5 2 1 Soybeans -_____-___ 9 8 9 5 Sulfur_ _-__-_-___-_______-_ 258 297 174 241 T obacco _---__-____________--_--___ 11 12 12 14 Vegetable oil, miscellaneous___ __--___-11 6 5 5 W ax, paraffi n______________--___-_____ 6 6 5 1 W oodpulp_ _________ 7 7 7 4 All other and unclassified __________-125 94 59 76 Total__ _ __--__-___--__________-1,714 1,069 771 742 EAST COAST UNITED STATES To ASIA: Agricultural implements_--_-___-__-____ 7 7 5 3 Ammonium compounds -___________-___ 77 112 38 267 Ammunition and explosives_ _--_-_-_-_-_ 9 2 3 N.A. A sphalt._ _ _ _________------15 19 7 28 Automobiles and accessories -------47 54 34 37 B a rley _ -----_---_ _---_ _10 ----------Beans, edible__---------11 6 11 6 Canned food products ---------90 95 68 75 Carbon black_ __---_____--_-_ 10 14 14 24 11351--12

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V2 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year EAST COAST UNITED STATES To AsI-Continued: 1965 1964 1963 1962 C em ent___-_____-_____--_-___-7 8 3 2 Chemicals: Petroleum _-_-___--__--------_. 78 101 53 N.A. Unclassified_ ----------------283 261 158 108 Clay, fire and china_--__-----54 49 28 29 Coal and coke_-_------------6,280 6,004 5,002 6,553 Cocoa and cacao beans_------_---9 6 5 3 Corn__ _ _____-----------------2,189 2,I162 1,253 982 Cotton., raw ____----___ --_-__--.316 348 302 359 Electrical machinery and apparatus --_--_ 15 15 12 11 Fertilizers, unclassified _--_--_--_.79 85 16 95 Fishmeal__-_--_----_ -----------5 5 -_-___ N.A. Flour, wheat_ _--___--_-_ ---------107 83 142 108 Glass and glassware____-_-__--.---.--. 6 4 4 Groceries, unclassified----_--_9 13 7 7 Grains, unclassified__----_---------71 167 145 4 Iron and steel manufactures ---_-----134 151 141 147 Lumber -----------_-----------9 22 14 1 C Machinery _---___-_--_ --____--92 93 127 124 Metals: Miscellaneous_ __----_-____---. 39 60 85 139 Scrap_______----__------1,910 2,1760 1,603 2,8 3 Ores, miscellaneous_---___---_ -----7 55 32 38 Paper and paper products_--__------. 66 55 38 57 Petroleum and products: Gasoline_________--_-.------31 14 15 30 K erosen e ___-___--___ _---I.___-_ Lubricating oil____-------__--_381 363 324 309 Other and unclassified_---______-_44 49 17 41 Pharmaceutical products_ __-_-___ 6 4 4 5 Phosphate_-______ -_ --__ -___ --1,997 1,893 1,515 1,655 Potash ___________-__-__---_-_____ 7 16 14 12 Rags and waste_________-_-_____7 9 13 N.A. Railroad m aterials__----__--____-__ 1 13 2 1 Refrigerated food products -____-_--__-19 13 7 8 Rice -_ ----_ ----__---_-----_ 180 68 117 94 R esin ___________ -----_ _--83 87 58 77 Rubber, manufactured_----_---_--__ 53 51 51 42 Skins and hides -___-___---_-_______ 19 16 19 18 Soda and sodium compounds______-_-__ 29 22 25 24 Sorghum _--__-____----___--____ 208 N.A. N.A. N.A. Soybeans______--_-__-____ -_ ---_-_ 1,515 1,408 1,399 1,182 S u g a r _ __ _ _ -_ -_ _ _ _ _-__ _ .__ _. _ _._ 1 Sulfur _ --__-______-___.__--_____ 67 29 6 11 Tallow __________-__--_--___--33 27 26 11 Textiles_ _____-______-___--___ 19 30 24 20 Tinplate _____________--__--___--__-64 99 75 127 Tobacco __ _-___-_________-______ 37 34 25 33 Vegetable oil, miscellaneous__---______-41 43 31 38 Wheat ---___-__-____-____-_______-__ 304 294 83 149 W oodpulp -_________________________ 60 77 60 53 All other and unclassified__--___-____ 365 326 268 381 Total ____--________.__________-1-7,612 17,802 13,529 16,397 EAST COAST UNrrED STATES To BALBOA, CZ: C orn __ _ _ _ _ _ _ 2 __ _ __1 W ~h eat __ ______-_-_ -__ -_ _____ ______ 2 3 2 3 7 _-All other and unclassified___--_______-_26 23 18 21 T otal ---___-_-_-_-_-___-_____-_--___ 51 46 25 22

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 83 Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST UNITED I STATES: 1965 1964 1963 1962 A sb esto s _-_ --__ -----_ _ _ -_ __ _ -7 3 ------Petroleum and products: Gasoline___--11 ___l Paper and paper products______________1 1 2 Ores, miscellaneous_____--__---__--18 13 8 5 All other and unclassified__ _ _ ----_--_1 1 5 Total_______ _ _------_ _36 18 121 12 EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST CANADA: Bauxite-__ -__-___ -_ ------------16 ___ 5 Chemicals, unclassified____-__--__4 11 4 10 All other and unclassified _-_-____ -___ --_2 2 8 7 Total_______-_______ -_-____ -_ 22 13 07 17 EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: Asbestos -_--_--------------------9 8 9 8 Chemicals, unclassified_ __--_____------1 1 1 Iron and steel manufactures____---__--__ 1 1 1 2 Metals, miscellaneous_-____----___ --4 3 6 3 Paper and paper products --__---__--_9 12 15 11 W oodpulp__ -----------__-_---------1 2 1 1 All other and unclassified_--_-___-____ 13 7 11 7 T otal____._-_-______--____-_ 37 34 44 33 EAST COAST CANADA TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO: Iron and steel manufactures__ -__-_-_ 9 10 -----Petroleum and products: Gasoline_ -----_ __--_----17 Railroad m aterials ___---__---_____ 11 19 11 --T otal_ _ _ ____---_______---20 29 11 17 EAST COAST CANADA TO OCEANIA: A sbestos__--__-__-_____--___--_----__ 23 17 16 16 Automobiles and accessories__________--_ 13 13 18 7 Chemicals, unclassified-_ -----_______ 22 11 8 3 Iron and steel manufactures________--__10 8 7 5 M achinery__-_-_________-____4 7 4 3 Metals, miscellaneous__ _ __----_-__-6 8 26 28 Paper and paper products__--_-__--_--114 82 78 94 Tinplate ----__-_______-___--_--___14 2 10 14 W oodpulp ---_________--________ 4 4 5 2 All other and unclassified -__--__-_____50 35 21 11 T otal __-___--_-_-_-_________ 260 187' 193 183 EAST COAST CANADA To ASIA: Asbestos__-_-__-_____________86 82 69 88 Chemicals: Petroleum _-__----_-_--___ 2 4 ---N .A. Unclassified_--_____-_____-_ 5 4 7 8 C o a l __ __ _ __ _--_ __--_ ---_ _ _ __ ---2 14 C o rn _ _ --------_ _ _ ---_ _-_ 14 ---------Grains, unclassified -_----_ -_----_ __--5 _-------Metals: M iscellaneous__--___---____-_____ 18 24 10 42 Scrap ___--_-__-__-_ -----_______ 145 236 87 326 Ores, miscellaneous____--__ -__ --_-_ 55 72 49 25 Paper and paper products __---_____66 36 16 13 R esin ___-_________-------____-9 9 3 6 Rubber, manufactured -------------__6 7 2 2

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84 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year EAST COAST CANADA To AsIA-Continued: 1965 1964 1963 1962 Slag ________--_-____ --_-_-__ -_ ----35 25 25 24 Soybeans __-_---__-_------------121 88 20 --W~heat__ _-____-_--____--___----__-_ 4 -----100 W oodpulp-_ -.-____-__--___3 7 8 --All other and unclassified__--_-_-____-_ 22 23 26 41 Total______--_____--_____---_--____ 592 621 324 689 EAST COAST CENTRAL AmERICA/MEXICO TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES: M olasses____-__----------_ __ ------_-_-___--14 O res, m iscellaneous___--____ --_____ --____-_____3 17 Petroleum and products: F uel-diesel oil_______--_-___-____ 7 --------G aso lin e ----_ _ -_ _ _ _ -_ -_ _ 8 --------All other and unclassified_ __________-1 ---1 2 T otal___-__-_ ___________-_ -16 --4 33 EAST COAST CENTRAL AmERICA/MEXICO TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO: Iron and steel manufactures -___ ----_--___-1 3 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil___ __-___-_--29 16 5 G asolin e _-_ _ --___ __ _ _ __ _ _ __----_ 8 15 K erosen e _ ___ __ ____-----__ __---3 Railroad m aterials __----___--___ ___ ___ ___-1 3 Sulfur 5 8 4 All other and unclassified _____ 3 7 2 Total ______---_-_----_ -____ -34 27 29 23 EAST COAST CENTRAL AmERICA/MEXICO TO OCEANIA: Sulfur ________------88 ill 80 79 All other and unclassified_ _ _ ___----------3 T otal__ _-_-__--____--___ --__ 88 ill 83 79 EAST COAST CENTRAL AmEmRCA/MEXICO TO ASIA: Ammonium compounds _-----_---_ -_ --_ --_9 Fertilizers, unclassified _ _______-----4 -----Metals: M iscellaneous -__--_______--1 10 15 26 S c ra p _ _--_ ------__ _ _--_----_ _-_--8 Ores, miscellaneous_ _ _--__----__-50 17 9 _ Petroleum and products: Gasoline______-7 --------P h osp h ate _-_ _ __ -__ _ _ __ __ _ __ -_ _ -3 Su lfu r --_ __ ---__ --_ ---____ -_--_-22 All other and unclassified -__-___-____ 5 3 5 7 Total_ -__ -_____-85 37 30 50 EAST COAST SouTH AmERICA TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES: Bones and bonemeal ______ __-_ __ _ _ 5 Canned food products ----------------2 3 2 4 Coffee-----------------------------11 26 29 37 Iron and steel manufactures_____________ __-__ -2 8 Ores: Bauxite__--_-___----____-_______34 41 42 44 M anganese __ _ _--______----_ 15 40 ------

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 85 Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons]Ficlya Os .I IIml isca .Sear EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST I UNITED STATEs-Continued: 1965 1964 1963 1962 Petroleum and products: Crude oil_ ___----_--_----_ 2,257 1,810 2,339 1,801 Fuel-diesel oil -------_121 61 49 348 Gasoline_ --70 216 59 Kerosene_ 121 105 121 -Other and unclassified ----------13 ---8 All other and unclassified_ ___-----12 8 12 9 Total____--_-_________________-2,684 2,177 2,812 2,323 EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST CANADA: C offee __ ____ __________________-1 5 3 4 Ore, bauxite___________-_--_____27 51 47 39 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil__ 77 -------All other and unclassified_____----__-_-_ 5 ---3 2 Total -__-______110 56 53 45 EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO: Ammonium compounds__--_--____--_-21 3 3 --A sphalt_--________-________--_-----27 25 20 19 C em en t_____ __--________________-___-_ 12 5 3 Chemicals: Petroleum _----_-____-__-___ 1 3 _--__N .A U nclassified _____-_______-_--__ 5 6 6 --Petroleum and products: Crude oil _____-___-________ 789 599 213 18 Fuel-diesel oil__------______-__---_ 56 77 206 186 Gasoline -_-----_ -___-----__18 23 15 14 Other and unclassified___-__-__-__ 59 55 3 1 All other and unclassified____-_--_____ 3 6 1 --Total ___________-_----_-_-__-_-_ 979 809 472 241 EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: Am m onium compounds_ -------8 _--_-----_-_--_____ B auxite __________-_-____________-7 6 8 5 C em ent_____----_________--__ ____ 22 16 1 1 Fertilizers, unclassified --__________20 11 2 --Petroleum and products: Crude oil__---____________-__---_ 951 743 716 642 Fuel-diesel oil_________--__________ 645 169 445 458 G asoline_--__-_____-_--___-______ 159 130 31 93 K erosene ____---______-___-_____ 43 32 ____-_ 22 Lubricating oil___--_-_____________ 13 8 -----Other and unclassified___--________ 34 12 --S alt _-_ -_ -_ _ -_ _ _ -_ _ _ _ _ _ 1 1 12 1 1 1 1 W ~h e a t _-_ -_ _ --_ _-__ _-_-__ _ _-__ _ _-_ -__ _ --All other and unclassified -_______---_-_ 28 6 13 26 Total_______-__-______-_____-_ 1,941 1,150 1,227 1,272 EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA To BALBOA, C.Z.: Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil ____________-_____ 279 234 178 160 G asoline -__-_____--__-______-___ 1 14 35 24 K erosene -___----__ -_____ --_______-_ 2 4 7 Other and unclassified -__-__-__--_11 2 1 _____All other and unclassified___ ______ 3 _-__ -__ I Total _-__--__________________ 294 -252 219 192

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 87 Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued LThousands of long tons] Fiscal year CRISTOBAL, C.Z., To BALBOA, .6.: 1965 1964 1963 1962 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil -------_ --_--_-_----_ ---180 232 97 5 Gasoline_-_-________---_36 24 54 4 Kerosene______-___ -___-_5 6 32 2 All other and unclassified__--____-__--1 1 ___--2 T otal _---_-_ -------_----___-_--___ 222 263 183 13 CRISTOBAL, C.Z., To ASIA: Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil__ 28 7-----All other and unclassified_-----------------Total -----_-_--------------------28 7 -----WIEST UNDIES TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES: Cofee_ ___-______-8 5 5 7 M classes_ ____--_-_----___ 14 O re,, bauxite -_____-_----_-_______ 40 13 ---12 Petroleum and products: Crude oil_ -____-__________ 73 43 30 198 Fuel-diesel oil____-__________ 676 485 621 980 Gasoline________--_--______622 442 295 376 Kerosene___________-_______-160 130 60 71 Other and unclassified -_-___-___ 7 18 -----All other and unclassified ___-_______--11 6 11 Total_-__-_-_-____-_-___-_-1,615 1,147 1,017 1,669 WEST UNDIES TO WEST COAST CANADA: Bauxite---_ _ -------------_ 337 301 252 220 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil_-_________-____76 ---20 18 K erosen e __-_ _-_---___ __ ___ _-_ 8 --------All other and unclassified________6____ 4 12 Total __-________--__-______425 301 27 2 250 WEST UNDIES TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERCA/MEXICO: Ammonium compounds___-___-_ 18 16 -Chem icals, unclassified --------_ 3 --_--__--_--_-3 Petroleum and products: Crude oil ____----_-----_ 43 11 ---13 Fuel-diesel oil ____-____________124 75 266 261 Gasoline -____-__-____--___ 63 90 218 205 Kerosene______---__-_____--____31 53 87 88 L ubricating oil ______________-_-______ __--3 6 Other and unclassified_______-----_ 4 1 -a 12 8 All other and unclassified_ _____--_ 6 2 3 5 Total__ ____-__________-___-____ 292 265 589 586 WEST UNDIES TO WEST COAST SourH AMERICA: A sphalt____-________ ___-__18 18 28 Fertilizers, unclassified __ _ _ _ ------------Petroleum and products: C ru d e o il _ _ _ --_ _ _ _ __------_ _ _ _ ----17 Fuel-diesel oil __________-_______ 626 891 704 672 Gasoline__ _ ____________----__ 181 63 91 119 Kerosene_ _____--____-______72 34 52 64 Lubricating oil __-__--_______10 10 11 11 Other and unclassified -_______-___ 14 1 14 1 Salt____ _ _ _ _ _ 3 3 2 1 Su gar __________---_-___________-__--5 101 141 All other and unclassified_--___--____ 6 2 4 2 Total _____________________-951 1,016 997 1,056

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88 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST INDIES To BALBOA, C.Z.: 1965 1964 1963 1962 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil__----_-------------188 168 151 211 Gasoline_________--_--------29 31 29 109 K erosene __----_-----3 3 --_ -__ 21 Other and unclassified ----------3 ---23 All other and unclassified___-----1 2 10 _ Total_ _ _____----_ ------221 207 190 364 WEST UNDIES To HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil --------_--_-_ 16 11 G a solin e _--_-_ --_-----_ 2 _--_ -_ -_ -__. 17 Kerosene_ _--_ --_-_--_--_-_--_ 140 161 92 72 Total____________ ----14 2 177 103 89 WEST INDIES TO OCEANIA: Asphalt__ _ ___________ 31 68 64 66 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil -____--_____ -_ -____ 45 42 9 60 G asoline _______________________32 75 125 123 K erosene__ _ ___--_---_________-11 15 18 31 Lubricating oil________-_______ 32 41 27 40 O ther and unclassified __________-____ 17 ____-_ 2 _-Sugar ___-___________--_-____18 23 22 10 All other and unclassified_____________-8 5 5 4 Total_ ___________---_______194 269 272 334 WEST INDIES To ASIA: A mm-oniumn com pounds ____________ --_---_ 4 _____19 Fish, refrigerated_ _________----10 10 8 8 Machinery_ ___5 6 1 Metals: Iro n _ _----------------9 _ Scrap_ _____-____ 11 26 8 21 M olasses__ _______-----____-27 ____-_ 50 108 Ores: Bauxite __--____----____-24 30 20 15 Copper _______-----_-5 14 11 10 Petroleum and products: C ru d e o il _ _ _ _ _ -------_ _ _--_ _ _----_ Fuel-diesel oil _-__---__ -___610 454 123 197 G asoline _____________-______ __-___ 24 10 34 Kerosene -_____--______ -___ 3 51 122 69 Lubricating oil _.________-_-______ -44 45 44 23 Sugar -___ -__-______-____ -___ -_ 607 487 602 1,851 All other and unclassified -________ 2 4 16 7 Total ___----___--_-____-___-_ 1,376 1,164 1,014 2,363 EUROPE TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES: Ammonium compounds -______________20 21 19 26 A sbestos ___--______________-----8 9 10 7 Automobiles and accessories ___--_____. 119 104 89 69 Beer ___ __ _ __ _ 9 8 7 5 Canned food products ________---11 9 12 16 Chemicals, unclassified_ ___29 32 26 25 C reosote ---_-_--__-_____-__-__ 24 12 12 29 Electrical machinery and apparatus______7 5 5 4 Fertilizers, unclassified_______-__ -_____ 58 65 62 55 Food in refrigeration _ _--_____-____9 9 12 5

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 89 Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year EUROPE TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES1965 1964 1963 1962 Continued: Glass and glassware------_---54 57 40 48 Groceries, unclassified___-----__----7 7 7 8 Iron and steel manufactures --_------111 175 155 228 Lumber____-_-____-------10 14 11 7 Liquors and wines--__---.-53 52 44 44 Machinery___--_ --_ ----------_31 22 21 18 Marble and stone_ _ -__-------13 13 12 N.A. Metals, miscellaneous_______--_ ---35 32 37 50 Nitrate of soda_ -___-___----10 2 7Paper and paper products_----------103 82 60 66 Rope and twine_-____-_-----_ 5 9 4 N.A. Soda and sodium compounds__--__---2 2 1 2 W oodpulp _________-_--_-_____ _2 4 2 8 All other and unclassified__ _--____-___152 108 113 130 Total-__ -______---_____--882 853 769 850 EUROPE TO WEST COAST CANADA: Asphalt___________----__------41 37 29 25 Automobiles and accessories_------13 12 9 16 Chemicals, unclassified -----6---6 6 6 6 5 Clay, fire and china ---------------6 5 3 7 Creosote_ __-_--_-_-_-. ------_ ------12 _---12 5 Glass and glassware-_-------__----_13 12 13 7 Iron and steel manufactures__--___--_92 87 44 65 Liquors and wines-_--_-_---_-_--_8 7 7 9 M achinery ----_--___-_---_____ -__-10 12 8 9 Metals, miscellaneous ----___----_-12 12 3 4 Ore, zinc _-----------------7 --------All other and unclassified__---_--_--_39 39 45 44 Total -_-_---___-___--________259 229 179 196 EUROPE TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/ MEXICO: Ammonium compounds____-------_--45 47 54 55 Automobiles and accessories_--__-___--_ 7 7 6 5 Canned food products______--_-___7 6 6 5 Cem ent_________-___6_-__ -_ -___ 5 25 16 15 Chemicals, unclassified __---__ --_ --_-__ 24 21 17 12 Fertilizers, unclassified______-__-______ 129 101 85 84 Glass and glassware____--____--__ -__ -_ 7 6 4 4 Iron and steel manufactures___________-61 45 38 41 M achinery _-_-_--___---______-_ 13 8 7 7 M etals, miscellaneous -___________-__--_ 4 8 7 9 Paper and paper products _-__-_-_--9 9 9 6 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil_8 -------Phosphate______________________ 7 26 21 1 P o ta sh -_ __ __ __ _-_ __ ___ _-_-_ _ _--3 1 Soda and sodium compounds_ __--_-__-_--_ 3 5 4 5 All other and unclassified______--__-____ 47 42 42 39 Total __----_____________ 376 359 317 299 EUROPE TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: Agricultural implements_----__-___-_-__ 11 9 9 14 Ammonium compounds -----__------71 59 89 75 Ammunition and explosives____--------_ 4 4 8 N.A. Automobiles and accessories____--_-__-__ 20 19 19 24 B arley ___-_-_----_-_---_--____-5 8 14 8 Bricks and tile --__-____--_--5 3 4 3 11351--13

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90 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year EUROPE TO WEST COAST SOUTH AmERICA1965 1964 1963 1962 Continued: Canned food products_ ___-18 16 37 40 Cement __----_-------16 21 27 17 Chemicals, unclassifed-------_--85 71 75 64 Coal_ __--------------4 5 2 2 Coke ---------4 9 1 35 Electrical machinery and apparatus_ ----17 14 18 22 Fertilizers, unclassified --------61 84 117 118 Flour, wheat_ ------------9 9 22 19 Glass and glassware----------_-12 15 12 12 Grains, unclassified --------------5 Groceries, unclassified ----------9 9 8 8 Iron and steel manufactures ------182 193 182 206 Machinery -------------69 66 70 64 Metals: Iron _--___---___-33 is 25 21 M iscellaneous ___--__________6 8 5 5 O a ts _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _--_ __ _-__ _--5 4 5 Paints and varnishes________--______-__ 4 6 6 8 Paper and paper products_ _____--_____47 59 52 49 Petroleum and products: Other and unclassified _______________--____-3 5 4 3 Phosphate__--__-_____--__----_____-_33 32 59 57 P otash __ __ ____--___--_______--_5 13 11 9 Railroad m aterials_ ___---.______-_____7 3 8 4 R ic e -_ _._ _ _ _ _ -_ -_ _ -_ _ -_ -_ _ _ -8 ---_ __-_ _ _ S la g __-__ -____ __--_ _-_ __ _1 5 1 0 7 Soda and sodium compounds____--____-32 37 33 32 Sug r -__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __11 4 43 72 T extiles__-_-___---____-__-_--_-___-_ 5 5 5 5 Vegetable Oil, miscellaneous__--___-_____ a 4 11 6 W ax, paraffin____--__-___-__-_-__-____ 11 10 9 9 W oodpulp -_----________-_________-_ 27 26 18 6 All other and unclassified_ _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_12 2 123 110 141 T otal_ --_-_-__ -_-__ -_-_-_-_-__-_-_ 967 976 1,128 1,170 EUROPE To HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Fertilizers, unclassified --------9 5 11 5 Ores, m iscellaneous ------------------14 S a n d _ _ _ _ __------------------1 4 --All other and unclassified --------3 12 3 4 Total__---__ ---_---____-12 17 28 23 EUROPE TO OCEANIA: Agricultural implements --------9 6 9 12 Ammonium compounds_-------13 6 7 8 A sphalt_ _--__ ---_--__--__6 4 6 7 Automobiles and accessories -------74 78 56 54 B eer -----------------3 3 4 7 Bricks and tile ------------6 4 4 12 Canned food products ---------8 5 8 12 Cement ____ --____----66 56 46 47 Chemicals, unclassified ____-----52 46 45 38 Clay, fire and china _ _ ___------11 3 1 1 C o k e _ _-_ -_ -_ -_ --_ -_ _ _ _ -_ _ -_ _ ----_ -_ -7 4 3 Electrical machinery and apparatus__.-__12 10 10 11 Fertilizers, unclassified_-____---____ 14 12 12 6 Flour, wheat____---_ -__--_---___ 10 11 12 11 Floor coverings_____-_______---5 4 5 5

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 91 Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year EUROPE TO OCEANIA-Colitinued: 1965 1964 1963 1962 Glass and glassware--------------.-16 20 18 18 Iron and steel manufactures ------_---.178 142 125 147 Liquors and wines___-__----_-------_16 12 15 12 Machinery-__-__.-_---_ 62 49 45 45 Metals, miscellaneous _--__-____-----10 19 14 10 Paper and paper products___----____--16 16 18 21 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil _-_-__----18 8 8 --G asoline_____ ---__------1 17 -__-__ 16 Lubricating oil__--____-----24 24 50 49 Other and unclassified -__-__-___-1 9 9 1 Phosphate ---__-__--___-_ _ __-__-_ 4 12 12 Potash ________________---___-______-3 69 60 57 R ice _____--_--------------_.4 1 2 2 Salt __--___-_______--____ __--__ 38 38 30 32 Slag _______-__-_______-_-__---7 18 13 2 1 Soda and sodium compounds -__-_______ 9 7 8 8 Su gar _____________________6 5 4 4 S u lfu r __ ____--_ ___ _---------_ _ -7 ------T exties __-_-________-_____11 10 10 13 T inplate _____--____--_ _____---_-___4 4 5 13 W oodpulp -_____________--__11 8 7 10 All other and unclassified__---_--__---178 144 141 161 Total_____---_ ---_ --___--__902 879 826 926 EUROPE To ANTARCTICA: Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil10 -------All other and unclassified ------------------T otal -_ ----_------_--_ 10 ----------EUROPE To ASIA Ammonium compounds 1 Chemicals: Petroleum -----------_--_-_ 3 __-_-_N .A Unclassified____ -------9 7 13 5 Fish, refrigerated -----_----4 3 13 --Iron and steel manufactures -------2 4 2 7 M achinery_ _-----__---6 7 8 8 Metals: Miscellaneous 6 3 6 19 Scrap_ 4 1 __-_-3 M olasses__ ____-----______--1 2 11 19 Phosphate ____ -______ _6 2 Potash _____-___________________-___ 21 27 30 15 Soda and sodium compounds__---_---_13 25 4 13 All other and unclassified--_-_--_---_-22 27 23 46 T otal _______--_-_-______ --_ --88 109 116 138 ASIA (MIDDLE EAST) TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES: Petroleum and products: Crude oil_ _ -----_____----_--_ 25 All other and unclassified_______--____-_ 12 6 6 9 T otal_ ----_.__ -_ -_--_ ---__ -_ -___--_ -_ -12 6 6 34 AFRICA TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES: A sbestos______----_ ----------_-5 4 3 4 Cocoa and cacao beans___--_--__-12 12 9 5 Coffee _____--_-----__-__----_--_-_-49 25 40 28 C orn _-_ ---_ ----_-_ _-------_ --------_ _ -----1 1 H em p._____-__ ____ -__ -__ --_ -7 4 4 5

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92 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 23.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Atlantic to Pacific-Continued [Thousands of long tons]Ficlya AFRICA TO WEST COAST UNITED STATES1965 1964 1963 1962 Continued: Iron and steel manufactures_________-_ __--4 8 13 M etal, iron ___--_-_-______-_---___---_2 10 4 3 Petroleum and products: Crude oil----_ _-____ 29 32 --Ores: Bauxite_______________-_-76 44 31 41 C hrom e _________ ____________-__--6 ____-2 M anganese-__--__________ -_____13 1 12 11 Other and unclassified__--__________ 1 3 ---1 All other and unclassified______________15 9 14 10 Total _-------_ ---__ ___ _-_ --_ 180 151 157 134 AFRICA TO WEST COAST CANADA: C offee __ _--____-__________-_-____-___ 4 3 3 4 S u g a r __ _-___ ___ _ __-_ _ _-_ _-_ _ -1 1 ------W in e _-_ _ _ --_ -_ --_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 ------All other and unclassified -__________--_ 7 4 4 a T otal_____--__-___ ____--_______-___ 11 19 7 9 AFRICA TO WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/ MEXICO: C o rn _ _ _ _ _ __--__ _-_ _ _ _ _ _-_ 3 4 ------All other and unclassified------------------T o ta l --_--_ _ _ _ _---__ _ _ _-3 4 ------AFRICA TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: A sp h alt _----_ _ _ _ ----__ _-_-_5 ------Petroleum and products: Crude oil__---__--_33 --Phosphate __ _____----_____--48 _____9 10 Skins and hides_ __---_--_____ ---3 -----S la g _ -_ -_ _ _ _-_ __ _ _---__ 4 5 ------All other and unclassified--------------T otal_ __-_-____-__--__-__-_______52 13 42 10 AFRICA TO OCEANIA: Cem ent____--_---__--___--------32 --------P h osp h ate _-___-_ -_ ---_-___ --_ ____ _1 1 ------W ine -___---_ __----------_ --__-__ 2 ---2 W oodpulp--__---__-_---_ -I --All other and unclassified_---________--2 1 1 1 Total_ -____--_ --_ -_ -_____ --34 15 1 3 AFRICA To ASIA: Fish, refrigerated------------6 6 5 4 Phosphate___-___-_--_______-_ -10 __-27 36 All other and unclassified_--_________-___ --I Total--------------------17 6 33 41

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 93 Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trades Routes Pacific to Atlantic [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST COAST UNITED STATES To EAST COAST 1965 1964 1963 1962 UNITED STATES: A sp h alt_ _-_---_----------_ -__ --__-_ -_-___ 2 5 Canned food products ---_---_-__---110 126 77 84 Chemicals: Petroleum ----------------_ 123 98 122 N.A. Unclassified_---_------------81 113 94 112 Fruit, dried_-_-------------11 21 9 6 Lumber___--_-----_----_ -934 822 843 988 Metals: Aluminum _______-___ 5 Lead ________ ____-_-__---6 16 12 8 M olasses_-____ -__ -___-_-_-10 14 -----Paper and paper products_ __ ____ 3 6 11 Petroleum and products: C rude oil__---_--__-___________-82 ___--54 Fuel-diesel oil6__-_____________ 502 1,784 1,365 1,308 G asoline_____________________ 43 33 75 15 K erosene --____-----__-_ 30 9 6 --Lubricating oil_--__-_--____-_____ill 97 42 97 Other and unclassified __-__-_13 16 9 66 T a llo w _ _ _ _ _-_ _ --_ --_ --_ -_ _ _ _ _8 ------Vegetable oil, miscellaneous__---__--_--_ 1 10 17 22 W ine _____-___________-_e_______ 48 47 54 62 W oodpulp_________ -_____________ __ 8 47 75 All other and unclassified______________72 59 35 28 Total_______ ______________2,177 3,284 2,818 2,961 WEST COAST UNITED STATES To EAST COAST CANADA: Canned food products_----_-__---_ 5 19 25 27 Iron and steel manufactures_ --__-__--6 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil _ 18 All other and unclassified__ _-_-_____ 1 1 3 4 T otal_____-_-_________-__-12 38 28 31 WEST COAST UNITED STATES To EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO: Fertilizers, unclassified _-_ __-__ 4 Paper and paper products__--___--___-__ 1 4 -----All' other and unclassified___-___-___-__ T o tal _ _ _ _ _ _ _--_ _ _ --_ -_ -_ 2 4 4 WEST COAST UNITED STATES To EAST COAST SOUTH AMERICA: Beans, edible S-__--________--_-____-9 6 4 7 B orax ____-__ _________________ 3 2 4 5 Canned food products-______---_-_ 7 10 13 12 Chemicals, unclassified________-___15 5 7 5 Fruit, fresh (excluding bananas) -__---8 7 4 3 Infusorial earth -_---_--_________ 5 4 4 4 M achinery-_____--_________---3 4 4 5 Iron and steel manufactures____-----_-_ 3 27 2 3 Metal, aluminum ___-___--_-____1 7 1 3 Paper and paper products -__---_--__10 12 10 11 Peas, dry__-------__-___-_ -_7 10 9 8 Vegetable oil, miscellaneous___-____ 6 4 4Vegetables, dry __------_____--_ 7 2 1 _--

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94 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year \X'EST COAST UNITED STATES To EAST COAST 1965 1964 1963 1962 SOUTH AMiERICA--Coltinu~ed: W h ea t _ _ _-_ _ _ ----_ _ ---_ --_-_-_ _ _ _ 9 6 W oodpulp____-___-_______----.__ 29 35 21 15 All other and unclassified___ --__---_--42 35 33 41 Total__ _ _ ____----_-_---155 179 127 122 WEST COAST UNITED STATES TO CRISTOBAL, C.Z.: L um ber ----------------__I__-__-_3 --Paper and paper products 1 2 2 All other and unclassified --------3 5 5 --T otal _._---_---_--_5 7 10 --WEST COAST UNITED STATES TO WEST UNDIES: Beans, edible 7 1 7 6 3 Canned food products ----------28 30 60 56 Fish, refrigerated_---_---___--4 3 3 1 Lumber_ __-_-_-_ 20 10 29 19 Paper and paper products ---------13 11 8 9 Rice----._ ----_-------__----117 109 112 102 Soda and sodium compounds ------------8 --V egetables, dry _-_-_--_-_-_-_-__ 2 1 2 --W h eat _ _ _ _------_ __------1 3 --------All other and unclassified _---_.-91 82 40 29 Total _---_ --_ --_-___ --__-295 253 268 219 WEST COAST UNITED STATES To EUROPE: A sp h alt _ _ --_ _ _ __--_ __-_ _ _--2 6 --Barley ___-_____________________-56 159 366 770 Beans, edible-___-___ -_______20 18 23 9 Borax_ ______--------250 232 178 164 Canned food products _------270 231 292 255 Chemicals, unclassified 24 29 11 13 C oal _-------------_ -_ _ 14 15 --Coke -___________ 201 305 64 75 C opra __ _____------___---7 1 7 --C o rn _ __-----_ __----_-_ _ -_ _------_ 2 0 Cotton, raw _____---_____---58 73 73 87 Flour, wheat ___----_----__-__4 3 30 41 Food in refrigeration ___---__-_-__18 19 20 10 Fruit: D ried _--__--_ -__--._ --_ 62 61 59 70 Fresh (excluding bananas)________--_ ill 126 105 160 Grains, unclassified__ _____---_-_--20 37 69 27 Groceries, unclassified_ -__________ 4 7 5 6 H oney ______----______--_____-1 6 5 2 Infusorial earth __________---_-___47 34 34 29 Lumber _______________------196 224 194 118 M achinery __--____--____-___-_ 13 8 10 8 Manufactures of iron and steel_ --_----114 105 2 2 Metals: Alum inum ____________.__.____.___ 53 42 38 21 Copper_ _ --___---_____-______28 24 36 43 Scrap ___---___----__---19 5 6 19 Other and unclassified__--__--_--_ 12 8 5 8 O a ts _ __---_-_ _ __----_ _ _ _ -_ _ _ 1 3 --O ilseeds_ ______-_----__ __ _--___105 31 65 8 O re, m angaqese ______-__________ _-_ __._______ 5 ---

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PANA MA CANAL COMPANY 95 Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST COAST UNITED STATES To EUROPE1965 1964 1963 1962 Continued: Paper and paper products___---__-----46 31 33 33 Peas, dry _________--______ --_ --___-40 44 53 46 Petroleum and products: C rude oil__--_-__-__ --_-___ -__ -----__ 20 38 --K erosen e ___-__ _ _ _ _-_ _ _ _ _ _ 2 1 ------Lubricating oil__----_--___--26 2 3 2 Other and unclassified__ _--______-214 142 71 3 Rags and waste --_____ ----_-___ 4 a 5 N.A. R esin __--_____-__---____ -_ --_-__3 7 6 8 R ice _____--______ --___ --_ --_-_ _ -_ 12 31 43 81 Seeds, excluding oilseeds ---_-__--__-__ 20 96 20 14 S la g _ _ _-_ --_ _ _ ----_ _ _-_ __ _-_ 9 ------T allow -__-_____--____--_ --_--__6 6 5 4 Vegetables, dry__----___-______---_-_ 15 16 14 7 Vegetable oil, miscellaneous__--_____-__12 11 2 1 W ~heat --___-______-___________ 20 140 47 108 W oodpulp__--_--__ ---_-___ ----_ _192 202 182 124 All other and unclassified_______----_ 106 113 146 161 Total_ __._-_-___ -__ -_-____ -_________ _ 2,411 2,628 2,404 2,557 WEST COAST UN=TD STATES To AFRICA: B arley ___ _-_-_-_-_ __--_ __10 _-----15 7 Chemicals, unclassified_--________---__ 12 9 4 --Flour, w heat_--_-_-__--_--_ ___----12 Lum ber_____-_____--__-_--_9 6 8 5 Paper and paper products_--_--_-___23 24 22 20 T allow ______--_--_-_--__--______9 6 2 5 W ~h eat-_ -_ __ -__ --_ _ _ __ -_ __ _ ---_ _ 4 1 _ __4 9 All other and unclassified_--_--_---_34 22 25 18 T otal _---____-___-____-_____ 97 108 73 254 WEST COAST UNITED STATES To ASIA (MIDIE EAST): B a rle y -_ -_ -------_-_-_-_ ---__ _ _ -_ _ -_ -_ _ 2 --C otton, raw -_-_-___-_--------_____-_4 1 1 1 F lou r, w h eat __---------_____ ______ _____ 3 --L um b er ______--___---___---_-_____ 3 2 1 R ice _ _-_-_-_ __-_ _ ___ _ _ _--1 1 2 12 T a llo w _ _ _--------------_ _-_ _-_ _-_-_ _-__ _ 2 W h eat _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -_ _ _ -6 4 All other and unclassified_______--_____10 13 8 16 T otal_ _ ___--_ _---_-________-18 17 20 94 WEST COAST CANADA To EAST COAST UNITED STATES: Lumber__ _ _--________---_-___-1,149 1,209 989 L068 Paper and paper products_________----6 3 3 3 P otash _ _-_ _ -_ _ _ _ -_ _ _ ---_ _ -2 4 3 6 ----W oodpulp _____________________-5 7 10 27 All other and unclassified___-__--_ I --Total_ _ ___---_--____---__-____ 1,185 1,255 1,003 1,098 WEST COAST CANADA To EAST COAST CANADA:225 L um ber __ _ __--_--___--__-___-____9 10 -22 ARl other and unclassified__________--___ _-____ -____1 1 T total _. _ ____-____-_________ 9 10 23 26

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96 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST COAST CANADA To EAST COAST SOUTH 1965 1964 1963 1962 AMERICA: Flour, w heat_________-_-----------_-----_-_ 10 _-Paper and paper products_--__---__--__5 3 3 3 Potash ----_---_ --_ --------------33 _-------Sulfur_ _____-_--_--_ ---------27 10 _----W~heat______________-__-------253 151 148 84 Woodpulp___----------------16 15 20 31 All other and unclassified_________--___6 15 10 8 Total______--_-_---_ --_-_ --__ -_ -340 194 191 126 WEST COAST CANADA TO WEST UNDIES: Flour, wheat -_______---____-_8 8 17 9 Lumber_ -__---_----_-__--108 83 105 87 W h eat __-__ -_ ---_ --_ --_ __ -----_ _ -8 -_ _-2 2 W oodpulp___---_ -----_-_--___----I _----------7 All other and unclassified_ _--______-5 4 5 17' Total ___--_-____-_-----__-__ 122 103 127 142 WEST COAST CANADA To EUROPE: Asbestos___-______--_-_--_-8 9 17 12 Barley -__________--__-__-_---148 201 71 80 Canned food products__--_--___---_-17 17 15 9 Fibers, miscellaneous_-_-__-_--_ 1 6 1 2 Flour, wheat_----------_-___-_ -3 19 1 4 Food in refrigeration_______--_-----6 6 4 3 Fruit, fresh (excluding bananas) --_---14 14 12 12 Grains, unclassified_--_-_--_---.----27 45 67 4 2 Infusorial earth_-___---------1 9 6 8 Lumber____-----------------1,-609 1,1273 1,127 848 M ach in ery _ _--_ -_ -_ _ --_-----_--_ _ _10 -----Metals: Aluminum _____--___-__-__ 38 48 60 42 Lead ____-------_-____--_---42 42 46 39 Zinc _____-_____-_------63 62 56 60 Other and unclassified_--_----_--_ 4 7 2 1 O ats_---_-_-____---__-____-_____--_-_ 44 170 1297 O il, fish _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _---6 4 O ilseeds_-________-_ --_____ -__ -137 67 85 155 Ores, miscellaneous_ -_-_-_-_-_-_-__-_6 33 8 8 Paper and paper products -__--__---_81 89 73 73 Rags and waste____---___--_---9 __-_--N.A. Seeds, excluding oilseeds___________8 7 7 6 S o y b ean s _--_ -_ _ -_ _ _ _-_ _-1 1 _ --_ _ _ ---S p ices _ _ _ _ _ _ __---__ _ _-_ _7 5 1 3 Sulfur -_______________________229 92 13 --W heat___-________-___________-482 838 383 687 W oodpulp__---______________-__--___290 231 199 164 All other and unclassified___________--38 29 16 31 Total ___________--______-----3,329 3,333 2,399 2,296 WEST COAST CANADA To AFRICA: Lum ber ____-____--____---___ 136 114 135 117 M etal, aluminum _-______________-_ 11 14 10 9 O ilseed s _-_ ---_ _ ------_--__ _ _ _ __ --__ 12 14 Paper and paper products___ ____----2 4 2 4 Sulfur _--____-_-____ _ -_ --__ --_ _58 19 15 --W~heat -_____-____-__________-52 34 129 31

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 97 Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trades Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST COAST CANADA To AFRICA-Continued: 1965 1964 1963 1962 Woodpulp____-----------------2 5 1 1 All other and unclassified -----------8 9 3 --Total_-------_-----------------269 199 307 176 WEST COAST CANADA To AsIA (MIDDLE EAST): Lumber____--__ --------------_--12 7 3 13 Sulfur __-------------10 _-------W h eat --_ --_ ----_-----_---_ -__ __ 18 9 --All other and unclassified ---__------_ 15 3 3 8 Total -_----__ --_ --_ -------_ 37 28 15 21 WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO EAST COAST UNITED STATES: Bananas _-__------__-____--297 227 213 185 Coffee_-__-_----_--_------20 30 17 20 Food in refrigeration_--__---------_7 6 3 2 Lum ber____--_-__--_ ---__ --_ --_4 2 3 6 M olasses___--___-__-_-_ ____---__-__ 24 28 ___-__ 15 O ilseeds______--___---_-________ 3 4 3 4 Ores: Iro n _ _ __ _ ----_-----_ _---_--2 2 ------Manganese ---__-_-___-___79 99 87 130 Sugar _________-______ __--_196 119 77 153 All other and unclassified -__________9 4 35 2 Total-___-_-_----_--___-639 541 438 517 WEST COAST CENTRAL AmErIuCA/MEXICO TO EAST COAST CENTRAL AmERICA/MEXICO: W heat _ _______ _ __-------_ 86 59 57 38 All other and unclassified_ -_-_-__-___-2 2 _----_ 1 Total _____--__-_-_----_ _-88 61 57 39 WEST COAST CENTRAL AmERICA/MEXICO TO EAST COAST SouTH AMERICA: Beans, edible --_-_--_ 8 6 1 1 C op ra _ _ --__-__-____--___-____1 13 2 --Food in refrigeration -__-_-_____-_ ___ ___--___-2 --Lumber_--------------__ _ _ 2 5 3 11 O ilseeds___--_-_---____ --_ --_-_ _-__ 4 13 1 All other and unclassified__--___--_--_16 8 3 6 Total_----------_-______--27 36 24 19 WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO TO CRISTOBAL., C.Z.: C offee _----_--------_____-__ -_ 1 3 1 1 Cotton, raw---__--__ ---__ -_--__ 3 3 3 2 L um ber ___________-----_ --_ -_-1 1 2 1 All other and unclassified_-_____---___ 3 4 4 4 T otal -__-____--___ ---_ -_-____ 8 11 10 8 WEST COAST CENTRAL AmMRCA/MEXICO TO WEST UNDIES: B arley _ _ _ _ _ _ _-------------------2 _-Chem icals, unclassified --------_-_ ----_--__-_Food in refrigeration_-_-___ ____-2 4 5 5 Lumber---_____ 5 4 _--___ I All other and unclassified ---________--_ 3 3 4 5 T total -___-_________________10 14 11 11 11351---14

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98 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST COAST CENTRAL AmERICA/MEXICO TO 1965 1964 1963 1962 EUROPE: Bananas_-------_---_------------16 ---1 15 Coffee___-_--------__-_-_--------61 79 62 68 Corn_-------------------------196 -------Cotton, raw_ _------_-------------121 130 175 99 Fertilizers, unclassified--------------_--7 ---_----Honey_-__ -----------------3 3 5 4 Lumber---_ ------------43 52 31 32 Oilseeds_-_--___--_-_----86 70 59 65 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil-7 -------Rice ---_--__ -_-----------------23 --Sugar---_-_-----_---------------20 -------Tobacco ________-_________-----4 6 3 1 Wheat --------------------_-----341 51-----All other and unclassified ----_--_-_------_ 14 9 9 12 Total -_-------_--_-_------_912 407 368 296 WEST COAST CENTRAL AM:ERCA/MEXICO TO AFRICA: Rice___-------------------------_--__8 All other and unclassified ------------------Total --_-------------_---_ 8 WEST COAST SourH AmESCA To EAST COAST UNITED STATES: Ammonium compounds_----------5_ -------Bananas_ --------------------573 690 610 611 Canned food products ------------5 5 6 7 Chemicals unclassified_-----------9 4 22 24 Cocoa an cacao beans-----------13 13 15 10 Coffee_--------------------191 203 229 207 Cotton, raw----------------------3 9 12 6 Fertilizers, unclassified_-----------_--_ ---_--__ -__ 2 120 Fishmeal ----------------------213 252 138 N.A. Food in refrigeration_-_---------7 8 6 4 Fruit, fresh (excluding bananas) ------29 29 21 22 Guano ----------------------------8 7 8 Iron and steel manufactures_ ---2 _--7 Lumber ------_-_---_--------50 46 26 Metals: Copper -----------------------306 279 239 276 Iron __-__--_____________ 14 11 4 34 Lead ___---__________--_____17 20 18 21 Zinc _____-__----____-__ 16 12 12 10 Other and unclassified ----_------3 4 11 3 Molasses ----___-_--_---_--____---86 126 127 80 Nitrate of soda_____-___ -__ --___-__ 375 364 354 450 Oil, whale6-___ __--______5 7 6 6 Ores: Antim ony__--__--__-_-_______-4 2 2 25 Chrome -------------------21 ________--Copper________----__-_ -_ ____ 39 32 17 33 Iron_________________________ 3,583 2,802 3,089 4,379 Lead --______--______________ 5 11 4 1 M anganese__6________-_____7 5 19 22 Tin __----_ ___-_---__ _-17 13 3 1 Zinc __________-_-________ 59 54 58 56 Other and unclassified---__--___-105 82 67 86 P otash _________ ___________ ___ _-____ 6 17 --

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 99 Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year WEST COAST SOUTH AMfERICA To EAST COAST 1965 1964 1963 1962 UNITED STATE S-Continued: Soda and sodium compounds_-_-.__--_ ----7 -----Sugar---_--.------.------388 287 488 653 All other and unclassified_----------24 23 23 31 Total__ -_---__--6,169 5,419 5,669 7,219 WEST COAST SouTH AMERCA To EAST COAST CANADA: Coffee ___-_-____-_---_--_---__ 3 5 6 4 Lumber ---_---___ -----------3 2 4 3 M etal, zinc_---___--_-----------______ --___10 11 Ores: Iron-_--_---_---_--91 189 244 228 Z in c __-------__ ----------_ -----14 ----_3 All other and unclassified_____---_----6 2 4 6 Total_ _--_________________ 103 212 268 255 WEST COAST SourH AMERICA To EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/MEXICO: Fishmeal________----__-----__ 21 19 13 N.A. Nitrate of soda____-________-_10 9 9 7 Pap er and paper products____----_--9 5 1 _____AW other andunclassified_ --_-----_-_3 5 1 3 Total_________*__--_-_-__ 43 38 24 10 WEST COAST SouTH AMERICA TO CRISTOBAL, C.Z.: Beans, edible__-------------1 1 2 2 M olasses_--_-_-__-__.---------__ ------1 Ore, antimony --------------------_-_-_ ---___ I -All other and unclassified --_----_--__ 5 3 2 4 T total ______ _____ -___ -_ -_ 6 4 6 6 WEST COAST SouTH AMERICA To EAST COAST SOUrH AMERICA: Fertilizers, unclassified_---------------___-__ ______ 15 Fishmeal -_-------_ ------_ ---_ ----19 17 16 N.A. Lumber-------------__-1 1 2 1 Oil, fish --__ ----_----------_ 12 4 3 --Potash------------------. -----__ 2 -R ice _-._--_----_ ._--_ -----___-__ ______-3 Nitrate of soda-------------------------_6 9 All other and unclassified --_--__---_-_ 10 10 8 17 Total_-__-___--___--_ _ _42 32 37 45 WEST COAST SourH AMERICA TO WEST UNDIES: Beans, edible_ _-------_---3 _ ___8 12 Fish, refrigerated__ ---_-____--___27 31 25 17 Canned food products_ _-_---____-_-____ __--___-2 F ishm eal--_ -_ ---_ --_-----_-------_____-_ 2 N .A M metal, copper___ --__ -_-_ ------____-2 --Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil _____ ____------_-4 R ic e -_ ---_ -_------__ __ _--_ _ ----_ _ _ -_ --_ _ -3 3 All other and unclassified -_____-_____-_ 3 2 6 7 Total_ ________---__-_-____33 33 45 73

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102 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year OCEANIA To EAST COAST CENTRAL AMiERICA/ 1965 1964 1963 1962 MEXICO: Wool -------__---------------12 9 6 7 All other and unclassified -__--____-_-3 1 1 --Total--_---------___---------15 10 7 7 OCEANIA To EAST COAST SourH AM:ERCA: Copra_-__----------------------6 16 17 10 All other and unclassified______-----_-_6 6 5 2 Total _--_--___-----------------__12 22 22 12 OCEANIA TO WEST INDICES: Canned food products_----_____---16 9 9 8 Dairy products, refrigerated____------_ 8 8 6 6 Flour, wheat_-_-_-_----_---------9 8 3 --Iron and steel manufactures_--_--__--8 7 5 3 Meat, refrigerated -_-------------17 14 12 13 Tallow_-----_------__ -_------2 4 4 1 All other and unclassified__ -___--_--_12 10 7 9 Total___---__-------------.-----72 60 46 40 OCEANIA To EunoPE: Canned food products___-----------50 37 37 32 Cocoa and cacao beans_ -----_------2 4 5 3 Copra ------------------------71 70 78 67 Dairy products, refrigerated_--_--__--_ 262 217 218 200 Fruit, fresh (excluding bananas)_--___-47 42 29 53 Groceries, unclassified_-______--__ 1 6 1 1 Meat, refrigerated ---_--_---------370 302 286 294 Metals: Lead_____---_----_-----------_-15 14 4 23 Other and unclassified _____6 9 14 5 Oil, coconut ___--_ ----_ ----_18 27 20 21 Ores: Zinc ___--_ -----_ --_ ----9 ----5 Other and unclassified-_-_-___---_ 3 1 3 3 Petroleum and products: Fuel-diesel oil_ -_--6 _--_----Phosphate_ ---------214 153 147 148 Seeds, excluding oilseeds--------5 9 8 8 Skinsandhides________-_-_ --_ -21 20 22 23 Sugar____-____----____-_____-189 152 117 77 T aflow -_____-----___--___-_----_ 21 18 8 19 W ool -___-_______----_-___--_136 167 178 172 All other and unclassified________--___-36 25 26 51 Total___-_-___-_-___--___ 1,476 1,79 1,266 1,200 ASIA To EAST COAST UNITED STATES: Automobiles and accessories_-_-_--_12 5 5 4 Bricks and tile_-_-_-----45 41 28 21 Canned food products_____-__-__-115 110 106 88 Chemicals,unclassified__-__-_----24 17 13 13 Cofee_--_______ ---__ ----_ -_ 5 8 8 5 C opera ________-_____________-_33 45 37 36 Electrical machinery and apparatusI_-__42 33 23 15 Fibers, miscellaneous ----______--12 10 8 15 Fish, refrigerated_.--__-_--_-_ 10 10 14 13 Floor coverings _--_ --__ -_--__---.21 15 11 11 Glass and glassware ---_ ------22 20 17 15 Groceries, unclassified-----.-__10 11 10 26

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 103 Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons]Ficlya .ASIA To EAST COAST UNITED STATES-1965 1964 1963 1962' Continued: Hemp, manufactured --__-__-___-_21 21 20 19 Iron and steel manufactures_--_____-___ 1,858 828 672 307 jute ______-_____-_______---_____ 15 23 23 15 Lum ber_---_-_-___--_--_-____319 265 210 184 M achinery__--______-______-_--__-___32 21 20 18 Metals, miscellaneous______-___-___65 40 26 15 M olasses_-_______-_-30 --Motorcycles, bicycles, and parts____-_18 6 2oils: Coconut___----__ -___-121 118 120 68 Vegetable, miscellaneous --------1 3 9 6 W hale-_--______-_ ----_ 11 26 12 7 Ores: Chrome____________----_--_ -_-202 218 186 286 M anganese____--_-----_-_-_-----_ 11 8 20 11 Other and unclassified_______---_-_ 3 2 5 12 Porcelainware_-___-------____ ----_ 90 84 71 67 Rubber: Crude_---__--_-_____ --_ -_ ----62 79 97 102 Manufactured_-_--__-_-___ 16 21 29 25 Spices __ __-_-_-_-____ ___6 6 6 4 Sugar___-_____--_--____ 1,074 948 948 1,094 Textiles-__--__--_--___--____ 143 105 102 92 Tobacco-_____-_---_-_-____-______-12 6 5 5 All other and unclassified_--_--_-__--_-___ 467 398 392 357 Total_____-___ --_ _-____-4,928 3,551 3,255 2,956 ASIA To EAST COAST CANADA: Canned food products___-__-_---_5 5 5 4 Iron and steel manufactures -______--_52 19 12 4 Lum ber -____-___-_----_ -_ ---___ 22 15 9 10 T extiles ___--_________-_________ 9 5 3 3 Ore, chrom e -___-_-___________ 9 10 9 26 Porcelainw are_--_-___-______-________6 8 3 4 All other and unclassified_--__-_-______44 30 34 26 Total_ ________________----_ -_ -__ 147 92 75 77 ASIA To EAST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA/ MEXICO: C opera -----__-_ --__ -____ __ 6 Iron and steel manufactures___-__-__2 ___-__ I -Rubber, crude__-_______-______-6 2 ---1 All other and unclassified_______-___-_ 5 3 4 4 T otal____ _ _ ____----_19 5 5 5 ASIA To EAST COAST SoSHAmERICA: Chemicals'. unclassified____-____-_ 3 4 5 3 C opra __---______-____-____ 42 23 51 51 C creosote _-__-_--____________ 1 4 -Electrical machinery and apparatus_____4 6 5 3 Iron and steel manufactures --________-_ 209 113 114 90 M achinery __---____-____-_-________ 7 4 4 7 Metals, miscellaneous ____________10 10 6 4 Porcelainware ---___--_-_____________ 3 3 2 2 Railroad m aterials__--__ _____ _-___11 ___--_ __-1 T exties-____-__--_-__-_-_____-______ 6 5 6 6 T inplate -_-_-__-____--_____________24 15 13 2 W ood oulp --___ _________ _______ _____ ______ 4 -__-__ All other and unclassified_----__--_____ 49 34 27 29 Total_--__--________-____--_____-__ 369 221 237 198

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104 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 24.-Important Commodity Shipments Over Principal Trade Routes Pacific to Atlantic-Continued [Thousands of long tons] Fiscal year ASP, TO CRISTOBAL, C.S.: 1965 1964 1963 1962 iron and steel manufactures ---_ ----_-4 4 3 2 jute __--_-_------_--------2 2 4 2 Lum ber -___-_-_-_-___-_-----1 3 3 5 Rubber, crude -___-----__-__-2 2 3 --T extiles _____----__----_-_-3 3 6 4 All other and unclassified____-_-___--23 24 20 25 T otal ____-___-_----------__35 38 39 38 ASIA TO WEST INDIES: B eans, edible ___---------__-_____ ___-_-_ --_-_11 Bricks and tile_-----------------_3 2 1 2 Canned food products___---__ --__ -__ -2 3 8 _-Chem icals, unclassified_______-_-_-_ __--4 2 Cement__--_--.---------------4 3 1 4 C oal________----__ -_-_ ---__-___ 23 27 10 _-Electrical machinery and apparatus-_--__ 4 2 1 1 Fish, refrigerated-----------.---7 10 3 1 Glass and glassware----_---------4 1 1 1 Iron and steel manufactures___--_--_--21 17 11 8 Lumber_______ -_ -_ --__ _-__46 23 58 33 Machinery_-_----------4 9 3 2 M eat, refrigerated _-----__---------__--10 -----Paper and paper products_------_-_ -----3 3 10 Porcelainware__----------------13 4 5 3 R ic e _----_ ---------_ --------_8 --------Soybeans ___________-_--5 ---T extiles _--____-___--________--19 9 9 8 T inplate __-_-_----_________-____ 3 9 2 12 W oodpulp---_ -____-__---__-6 4 9 7 All other and unclassified_--_-__-____-___ 36 19 29 33 Total ___-----____-______--210 -155 158 138 ASIA To EUROPE: Canned food products --_--____-----10 10 9 12 Chemicals, unclassified_____--------21 4 2 2 Food in refrigeration_-__----------2 5 2 2 Iron and steel manufactures ----------10 6 3 3 Lumber___-----------------12 7 8 7 oils: Coconut -----------------32 9 1 --Whale_---_--------.--_ 9 9 ____-6 Paper and paper products -----------4 5 4 3 Alother and unclassified_----_-----__--_ 27 25 26 18 T otal _---_.---_--_---__---__-_ __-_-127 80 55 53

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PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 105 Table 25.-Small Vessels' Transiting Canal Fiscal year 1965 Atlantic to Pacific to Fiscal year Commrcil (tllspayig):Pacific Atlantic Total 1964 Number of transits: Assessed on net tonnage_--_--__ 288 283 571 622 Assessed on displacement tonnage___---_ ___---__2 7 9 5 Total, transits_ ----------290 290 580 627 Panama Canal net tonnage__-----_30,022 32,883 62,905 57,587 Displacement tonnage_----_----_ 403 2,497 2,90 2,092 Tolls __-----------------_ -_$25,056 $28,873 $53,929 $48,686 Cargo (long tons)_ -------------_ 11,526 9,172 20,698 19,202 Government (tolls credit): Number of transits: Assessed on net tonnage_ _-_-_----12 12 24 23 Assessed on displacement tonnage_---___-____--______ 45 39 84 96 Total, transits_ _-----_-_--__---57 51 108 119 Panama Canal net tonnage --_____-_ 354 259 613 969 Displacement tonnage ___--_---_-_ 5,380 2,322 7,702 6,291 Tolls -______--______-_-_-$2,945 $1,347 $4,292 $3,844 Cargo (long tons)_-------------------Combined Commercial/Government: Number of transits: Assessed on net tonnage --_-----300 295 595 645 Assessed on displacement tonnage______-___-----47 46 93 101 Total, transits_-_--------347 341 688 746 Panama Canal net tonnage___---_30,376 33,142 63,518 58,556 Displacement tonnage__-_-----__-5,%783 4,819 10,602 8,383 Tolls .---_----_-__---_ --_--_-_ --_-_ --_ -$28,001 $30,220 $58,221 $52,530 Cargo (long tons) ---------------11,526 9,172 20,698 19,202 1 Includes vessels under 300 net tons (Panama Canal measurement), or under 500 displacement tons for vessels assessed on displacement tonnage. This traffic is not included in any of the summaries of oceangoing traffic. 11351--15

PAGE 113

106 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 26.-Water Supply and Usage Percent of usage, Fiscal year fiscal year 1965 1964 1 1964 MADDEN AND GATUN LAKE WATER SUPPLY: (Acre-feet) Total runoff, Madden Lake Basin---____ 1,624,541 1,826,262 Evaporation from Madden Lake_ _---_--_-45,363 44,444 Available for Madden Lake uses_ -------_ 1,579,1178 1,1781,818 Total runoff, Gatun Lake (area below M adden)__ _____--__-__-_-2,572,222 2,859,527 Subtotal -_-______---___ -----_ 4,151,400 4,641,?345 Evaporation from Gatun Lake_ ---_-_-_---482,208 478,834 Available for Gatun Lake uses_ ---_-_3,669,192 4,162,511 MADDEN LAKE WATER USAGE: Madden hydroelectric power_ _-_-_---_---_-1,520,363 1,508,425 94 83 Madden spillway discharge___---91,850 313,705 6 17 Total, Madden Lake usage_ -----_-----_ 1,612,213 1,1822,130 100 100 Madden Lake volume__-_-__--_---__336,249 369,284 Gain or loss in storage__ --__--___-_ -33,035 -40,312 GATUN LAKE WATER USAGE: Gatun hydroelectric power_________--___ 1,535,009 1,453,719 38 35 Gatun and Pedro Miguel lockages---_-1,892,172 1,880,854 46 45 Municipal and other uses_ __--_-----__ 69,628 68,044 2 2 Subtotal ______-__---___--_ 3,496,809 3,402,617 86 82 Gatun spillway discharge -_-_-_-__-_---_559,780 776,951 14 18 Total, Gatun Lake usage -----_____---4,056,589 4,179,568 100 100 Net annual runoff, Gatun Lake Basin_ _-_-3,669,192 4,?162,1511 Gatun Lake volume_ --___--_3,935,813 4,290,174 Gain or loss in storage-____-__-_--__--_-354,1361 +23,1255 Table No. 27.-Dredging Operations, Fiscal Year 1965 [Cubic yards] Location Earth Rock Total CANAL PRIsm DREDGING: Atlantic entrance maintenance_ _-_-___-_-_317,1700 --_-_--_-_317,700 Pacific entrance maintenance_ -Gatun Lake and Gaillard Cut maintenance1,097,400 153,000 1,250,400 Harbors maintenance_ _-_--_-__-___------__-_1,575,000 1,100 1,576,100 Total, Canal prism _-_--_-__-_--_--_-__----2,990,100 154,100 3,144,200 AUXILIARY AND CONSTRUCTION DR]EDGING: Empire Reach and Mandinga Flare Cut widening project_ -_ __-_--______ 200 20,500 20,700 Total, Canal dredging_ _----_-_-_ --_--2,990,300 174,1600 3,164,900 Grand total, fiscal year 1965 _-__-__2,990,300 174,600 3,164,900 Grand total, fiscal year 1964_ _--_-_-_ 4,413,600 566,500 4,980,100

PAGE 114

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT Balboa Heights, C.Z. OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR December 29, 1965. The Honorable THE SECRETARY OF THE ARMY., Washington, D.C. My DEAR MR. SECRETARY: I have the honor to submit the fourteenth annual report of the Governor of the Canal Zone reviewing the fiscal year ended June 30, 1965. Very respectfully, ROBERT J. FLEMING, Jr., Governor. ill

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT PRESIDENT OF UNITED STATES] SECRETARY OF ARMY : GOVERNOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR INTERNAL SECURITY OFFICE OF CIVIL AFFAIRS HEALTH OFFICE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY BUREAU BUREAU CHIEF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY DIRECTOR DIRECTOR ADVISOR TO THE GOVERNORPRESIDENT ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATIONS AND POLICIES SCHOOLS PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND m S STAFF ON ALL INTE LLIGENCE GOVERNING BUSINESS ACTIVITIES IN THE POLICE AND FIRE PROTECTION HOSPITALIZATION AND MEDICAL AND AND SECURITY MATTERS. CANAL ZONE, INCLUDING LICENSES FOR INPOSTA L SERVICE DNA LNC SUPERVISES AND CONDUCTS THE AUTHORSURANCE COMPANIES AND FOREIGN CORLIBRARY AND MUSEUM ENVIRONMENTALCSSANITATION IZED SECURITY PROGRAM FOR THE COMPORATIONS, PURCHASE PRIVILEGES IN THE CUSTOMS SERVICE VTRNR EII CANAL ZONE, ADVANCE AUTHORIZATIONS SHirPING COMMISSIONERVERIAYMDCN PANY -GOVERNMENT. FOR PERSONS TO ENTER THE CANAL ZONE. ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES MENTAL HEALTH RESPONSIBLE FOR COORDINATION OF ADVISOR AND LIAISON OFFICER ON DIPLOLICENSING INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY REOUIREMATIC RELATIONS. IMMIGRATION SERVICE MENTS OF ARMED FORCES AND OTHER CIVIL DEFENSE U.S. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IN THE CUSTODIAN OF THE SEAL OF THE CANAL PROBATION AND PAROLE CANAL ZONE EXCLUSIVE OF MILITARY ZONE GOVERNMENT. INSTALLATIONS. CONSULAR OFFICER FOR ISSUANCE OF UNITED STATES IMMIGRATION VISAS. MAGISTRATE COURTS. EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO PRESIDENT, PANAMA CANAL COMPANY. PROTOCOL OFFICE

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Jntrocluction CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT The Canal Zone Government is an independent agency of the executive branch of the Government, directly under the President of the United States, but by delegation (of responsibility) the Secretary of the Army represents the President in the supervision of Canal Zone Government affairs. Administrative and executive authority is vested in a Governor who is also ex officio President of the Panama Canal Company. The Governor is appointed by the President of the United States with the approval of the Senate. The Canal Zone Government encompasses the usual functions of government and public health, including civil affairs, schools, libraries, postal service, magistrates' courts, police and fire protection, hospitals and other health services, and highways and sewers. The Panama Canal Company, with which the Canal Zone Government is closely interrelated in purposes, organization, and operations, provides administrative, accounting, and personnel management and other services to the Canal Zone Government on a reimbursable basis. MAJOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES There were no major organizational changes in the Canal Zone Government during this fiscal year. MAJOR PERSONNEL CHANGES Lt. Col. Otis Bridgeford, USA, was detailed from the U.S. Army to serve as Superintendent, Coco Solo Hospital, effective July 11, 1964, vice Col. Charles L. Lynch, USA. Col. Roosevelt Cafarelli, USA, was detailed from the U.S. Army as Assistant to the Governor effective July 25, 1964, and was reassigned as Health Director effective August 18, 1964, vice Col. Robert J. Kamish, USA, reassigned as Assistant to the Governor effective August 18, 1964. Colonel Kamish was relieved from duty with the Canal Zone Government effeCtive August 21, 1964. Mr. William E. LeBrun was promoted to Assistant Chief of Internal Security effective August 2, 1964, vice Mr. Ivan D. Hilliard, retired. Col. Harry D. Offutt, Jr., USA, was detailed from the U.S. Army to serve as Director, Gorgas Hospital, effective August 5, 1964, vice Col. Edward Sigerfoos, USA, relieved from duty. 113 11351--16

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114 INTRODUCTION Dr. Charles L. Latimer, Jr., was promoted to Assistant Director of Schools (Deputy Superintendent of Schools) effective August 13, 1964. Mr. David A. Speir was promoted to Director (Secondary U.S. Schools) effective August 15, 1964, vice Mr. Theophil F. Hotz, promoted to Assistant Superintendent and Director, U.S. Schools, effective May 10, 1964. Dr. Donald W. Skinner was appointed Dean (Canal Zone College) effective August 23, 1964, vice Dr. Charles L. Latimer, promoted. Mr. Robert S. Herr was promoted to Director of Posts effective October 11, 1964, vice Mr. Earl F. Unruh, retired. Dr. Senate M. Schaeffer was employed as Superintendent, Corozal Hospital, effective January 11, 1965, vice Dr. Stuart W. Hollingsworth, resigned. Col. H. R. Parfitt, USA, was appointed Lieutenant Governor-Vice President effective June 26, 1965, vice Col. David S. Parker, USA, relieved from duty.

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Chapter I PUBLIC HEALTH SANITATION Malaria eradication continued utilizing bi-yearly insecticide residual applications at land licensee sites, maintaining drainage ditches and larviciding throughout the 50 square miles of sanitated areas surrounding the 15 Canal Zone townsites. Blood smear surveys completed in coordination with this activity were all negative. This year malaria incidence showed an increase of 26.7 percent in the number of new cases reported. Of the total of 19 cases for the fiscal year, 7 were determined to have originated in the Republic of Panama. Comparative figures for fiscal year 1964 are 15 cases, with 7 of these originating in Panama. Control of other pest insects, particularly pest mosquitoes, is a concurrent activity with the eradication of malaria mosquito vectors. Spot checks were made during the year for the presence of Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito, and for the presence of plague infection in rats as well as for the rat flea, Xenopsylla cheopsis; all were reported negative. On the Atlantic side, Telfers Island, an area of over 900 acres dominated by mangrove trees, continued to provide a mosquito breeding problem, due to the impounding of water during dredging operations and the resultant deep cracks in dried mud after the pumping operation. Control has been maintained by larviciding the impounded water and extensive ditch digging and maintenance to provide effective drainage in the low areas. The Gamboa area has a higher total mosquito indice compared with other areas in the Canal Zone. A small number of Anophelene mosquitoes, malaria vectors, and Culex mosquitoes, encephalitis vectors, are included in the weekly totals. However, the majority of recorded mosquitoes are the Mansonia species, pest mosquitoes which develop on aerated roots of aquatic vegetation in the Chagres River and the stream inlets into the Canal. In early 1963, one of the possible mosquito control improvements considered for this area was the use of manatees. At the end of fiscal year 1965, a total of 10 manatees had been established in the Chagres River; 5 are free in the river, and 5 have been penned in a small lagoon for observation of aquatic vegetation removal. No definitive results are apparent as yet in this experiment. 115

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116 PUBLIC HEALTH PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND QUARANTINE During fiscal year 1965, the general health of the residents in the Canal Zone as reflected by available mortality and morbidity indices continued good. The infant and maternal mortality rates have long been considered sensitive indices to the effectiveness of a community's health resources. There were no maternal deaths recorded during 1965. For calendar year 1964, the infant mortality rate for white children under I year per 1,000 live births decreased to 1.08 from 2.01 in 1963. For the non-white group the Canal Zone infant mortality rate is 20.97, giving an overall rate of 14.4 per 1,000 which is lower than in the United States. The mortality of Canal Zone residents, reflected in specific death rates and principal causes of deaths, shows a predominance of deaths due to those chronic illnesses which usually affect the older adult population. During calendar year 1964, 40.6 percent of the Canal Zone resident deaths were caused by heart dise-ase, cancer, vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system, while 22 additional deaths were attributed to pneumonia. There were no quarantinable diseases introduced into the Canal Zone during fiscal year 1965, although heavy traffic existed between foreign areas heavily infected and endemically seeded with quarantinable diseases. Similarly, no epidemics were reported, nor were there outbreaks of any serious communicable diseases introduced by way of foreign shipping or aircraft. For the third straight year, the Zone has been free of diphtheria and poliomyelitis. Eleven cases of hepatitis occurred, up slightly from the previous year. Among the communicable diseases which rose in incidence during the year were venereal diseases, hepatitis, measles, mumps, streptococcal infections, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, and scarlet fever. Declines in incidence were reported for amebiasis, chickenpox, and malaria. DIVISION OF MENTAL HEALTH During its second year of operation, the Division of Mental Health moved closer to the achievement of the long-range goals of a full mental health program for the Canal Zone including the establishment of a Community Mental Health Center, accreditation of Corozal Hospital, and the establishment of a psychiatric residency training program. Corozal Hospital remains the primary inpatient treatment facility in the Canal Zone. The Psychiatric Service workload at Gorgas Hospital this year showed an encouraging trend, resulting from the increased emphasis on preventivev" psychiatry and care on an outpatient rather than inpatient basis. As a result, the monthly average admissions dropped from 31 in 1964 to 19 in 1965. In conjunction with the planning for a full mental health program, a portion of the old Gorgas Hospital Administration Building will be utilized as a community mental health center. The purpose of the Community Mental Health Center will be to provide care facilities in the Canal Zone of the type and quality consistent with the recommendations of the Federal Government for communities of similar size in the United States and will include day-care facilities.

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT 117 VETERINARY ACTIVITIES Neither canine nor feline rabies were reported during fiscal year 1965. However, bat rabies, first detected on the Isthmus in 1959, continued to pose a hazard to the health of the Canal Zone residents. Surveillance over its incidence was maintained during the year by routine sampling of bat popudations. A total of 4.6 percent of the 480 bats examined at the Veterinary Public Health Laboratory during the year demonstrated rabies virus. Although this represents a decline from the previous year experience of 7.4 percent, the potential risk is still of significance. The Mindi Dairy herd remains free from brucellosis. Eradication was accomplished in fiscal year 1964. The program in the approved dairies in the Republic, operating under the direction of Panama's Ministry of Agriculture, was accelerated during the year and produced gratifying results. At Mindi Dairy 843 animals were skin tested with tuberculin during fiscal year 1965 with no positive reactors found. Tuberculosis in Panamanian herds supplying milk to the Canal Zone is also controlled by the test and slaughter method. Rigid control was exercised over the importation of animals into the Canal Zone, and through the Canal Zone into the Republic of Panama, to prevent the introduction of diseases of agricultural or public health significance. Foot-and-mouth disease was not detected in animals examined aboard vessels arriving in the Canal Zone during the year. No cases have been found since fiscal year 1955 when 38 were observed in a shipment of cattle from Colombia. The workload at the Animal Quarantine Station-Hospital declined approximately 30 percent in animal confinement days during the year, reflecting the effect of the reduction in the period of quarantine imposed upon imported dogs and cats, from 120 to 30 days. Outpatient visits to the clinic increased slightly, 0.6 percent over the previous year. A total of 29,762 hospital and quarantine confinement days and 8,375 visits to the outpatient clinic were reported for the year. QUARANTINE The Quarantine Section is concerned with the prevention of the introduction and dissemination of communicable diseases and especially the six quarantinable diseases (smallpox, yellow fever, cholera, plague, typhus, and relapsing fever) and their vectors into the Canal Zone or adjacent areas by vessels or aircraft arriving in the Canal Zone. No noteworthy disease incidence was evident during the year. Two trends, over a 5-year period, are of interest: a decrease in upper respiratory infections, and a gradual increase in venereal disease, reflecting the same pattern being recognized on a worldwide basis by the World Health Organization. Over the last 4 years there has been a substantial reduction in the number of unvaccinated persons who must be held in surveillance when they arrive in the Canal Zone. From a high of 14,498 people arriving without a valid vaccination in 1962, this group has declined to 4,659 in 1965. HOSPITALS AND CLINICS Corozal Hospital is the only hospital in the Canal Zone charged with the institutional care and treatment of mental illness. In January 1965, Corozal

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118 PUBLIC HEALTH began admitting patients on a 7-day-a-week, 24-hour-a-day basis. Direct admissions began to be taken from all medical facilities in the Canal Zone. Previously, all admissions were transferred from Gorgas Hospital. Remarkable strides in the treatment of acute episodes of psychiatric diseases were evident in year-end statistics. While admissions rose 43 percent (from 212 in fiscal year 1964 to 304 in fiscal year 1965), discharges kept pace. The result was an average of 201 inpatients per day, compared with an average of 207 in fiscal year 1964. The average period of hospitalization for patients admitted during fiscal year 1965 was only 3 weeks. During March 1965 the new Gorgas Hospital annex was opened. The new annex provides a tremendous improvement in patient care facilities; inpatient bed accommodations are now almost entirely private or semi-private. The improved accessibility of the business and general offices to the clinics, medical records, and admitting office has simplified coordination and administrative procedures and control. Health insurance processing has been simplified; patient processing has improved materially, accompanied by an elimination of many complaints and an improvement in community relations. Associated with the move into the annex was extensive procurement of new equipment, office furniture, and furnishings. Vigorous action has been taken to strengthen both the residency and internship training programs. The goal is to provide top-quality medical care for the Canal Zone population and to enhance Gorgas Hospital's image as a medical center for Latin America. A consultant group from the United States conducted a review of the resident and itern training programs at Gorgas Hospital during November 1964. The group was invited to evaluate the entire Gorgas teaching program for interns and residents, prompted by placement of the surgery and ophthalmology services residency programs on probation. By the end of the fiscal year most recommendations to improve the teaching program had been put into effect and new positions bad been authorized and/or filled to complete the professional staff. A total of 20 residents were trained during the year in the specialty areas of surgery, orthopedics, medicine, obstetrics, ophthalmology, pathology, and pediatrics. The hospital received 14 interns under the National Intern Matching Plan, 4 more than employed in the previous year. Coco Solo Hospital is the health center on the Atlantic side of the Isthmus for U.S. Government employees and their dependents, members of the Armed Forces and their dependents, beneficiaries of the Veterans' Administration, personnel and passengers of vessels in transit, residents of the Canal Zone, and others entitled to hospital privileges. In general, a continuous gradual increase in workload has been recorded in the hospital over the past 4 years, particularly in the clinics. The average daily census decreased slightly to 89 in fiscal year 1965 in comparison with 91.3 during fiscal year 1964. Inpatient admissions and average bed occupancy declined fractionally in 1965. Clinic visits, on the other band, were up appreciably in medicine, by 31 percent; surgery and orthopedic, 35 percent;

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT 119 ear-nose-throat, 47 percent; eye, 16 percent; pediatric, 7 percent; and general outpatient, 10 percent. During the year a program of cataract surgery for selected cases among the disability retirees was initiated. At year's end, 20 patients had achieved improved visual acuity. The death rate from all causes for the Canal Zone population, including employees and non-employees, was 3.229 per 1,000 population in calendar year 1964 as compared to 2.57 in 1963. The live birth rate for the Canal Zone was 14.45 per 1,000 population in calendar year 1964 as compared to 12.75 per 1,000 population in 1963. Palo Seco Hospital is the facility in the Canal Zone charged with the institutional care and treatment of Hansen disease. During fiscal year 1965 three Palo Seco patients were discharged back to their community under the control of a new rehabilitation program conducted by the Republic of Panama. This action offers increased hope to many of the patients and also presages the possibility of eventually closing out the Palo Seco facility. The patient census declined from 103 at the beginning of the year to 101 patients at the close. Of the remaining patients, 97 are the responsibility of the Republic of Panama and 4 are the responsibility of the Canal Zone Government. During the fiscal year two discharges, one death, and one readmission occurred. The number of adult patients and patient days in Canal Zone Government hospitals for the fiscal years 1965 and 1964 are presented in the following table: Fiscal year 1965 1964 Number of adult patients admitted: Gorgas Hospital__ _ __ _---------------------------8,612 8,573 Coco Solo Hospital_ -------__ -__---_-------------2,838 3,044 Average length of adult patient stay: Gorgas Hospital (patient days) ------------------_----11.5 12.9 Coco Solo Hospital (patient days) -----------------------9.7 9.6 Adult patient days: Gorgas Hospital_ ----------_-_ -_ --_ --_--__-_-_---__ -__95,419 96,433 Coco Solo Hospital_ ___ _------------------.------__ 32,517 33,305 Corozal Neuropsychiatric and Domiciliary Hospital_------_--73,187 75,884 Palo Seco Hospital -_ -_ --_--__---_-_--_-36,149 37,337

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Chapter II PUBLIC EDUCATION GENERAL DESCRIPTION The Division of Schools operates schools in English for U.S. citizens as follows: 12 kindergartens; 13 elementary schools, grades 1 through 6; 2 junior high schools, grades 7 and 8; 2 senior high schools, grades 9 through 12; and a Canal Zone College, grades 13 and 14 with certain courses at the third-year college level. Schools are operated in the Spanish language for pupils of Latin nationalities as follows: 3 kindergartens; 4 elementary schools, grades I through 6; 3 junior high schools, grades 7 and 8; and 2 senior high schools, grades 9 through 12. A program of special education is offered for mentally retarded, physically handicapped, blind or partially blind, deaf or partially deaf, speech defective children, and those needing remedial reading. Enrollments in all schools, kindergarten through college, for the 1964-65 school year totaled 13,813, a decrease of 1.1 percent under the previous school year. Enrollments in the U.S. schools increased by 0.5 percent, while enrollments in the Latin American schools decreased 5.6 percent. The Canal Zone College enrollment increased from 903 in the previous year to 1,053 during 1964-65, an increase of 150 students, or 16.6 percent. A tabulation of October 15th day-school enrollments of Canal Zone College for the past 4 years indicates that enrollments have risen from 343 pupils in 1961-62 to 1,053 in 1964-65. This is an increase of 710 students, or 207 percent, during this 4-year period. The College curriculum has been expanded to include third-year college courses. The State Department provided 11 scholarships at the Canal Zone College for students from the Republic of Panama during the school year. The associate in arts degree was awarded to 60 graduates of the College at the close of the school year. Major College building projects completed or underway at the end of this fiscal year included additional dormitory facilities at the College at an expenditure of $130,000 and library and classroom additions, $566,000. In the U.S. elementary schools curriculum studies were carried forward in handwriting, mathematics., and music. Work in language arts and elementary physical education will be emphasized next school year. In the U.S. secondary schools, curriculum committees were actively studying the fields 121 11351--17

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122 PUBLIC EDUCATION of industrial arts, home economics, art, music, speech-dramatics, health, boys' physical education, girls' physical education, driver education, and vocational guidance. With the exception of the work of the music and speech-dramatics committees, which will be continued next year, these committees completed a 3-year cycle of curriculum study in which all of the secondary level courses were reviewed. This work resulted in new curriculum guides for texts in many courses and the modification or addition of courses in each field. Selected classes were designated as advanced achievement sections in Balboa High School, Cristobal High School, Diablo and Cristobal junior High Schools, and in grades 4, 5, and 6 of the elementary schools. The first regular summer school for the U.S. schools was held. Enrollment was limited to students who failed a course in the regular year. Nine teachers taught 25 classes of English, social studies, and mathematics. For the first time an in-service course in teaching elementary physical education was offered in conjunction with Canal Zone College. A total of 17 teachers, specialists, and assistants participated in the course. During February and March 1965, two committees from the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools visited the Isthmus to conduct the formal 10-year evaluation for continued accreditation of both Canal Zone high schools and the Canal Zone College. ENROLLMENT Enrollments in kindergarten through college in the U.S. schools increased 53 students, or 0.5 percent, from October 15, 1963, to October 15, 1964. For the corresponding period in the Latin American schools, enrollments in kindergarten through grade 12 decreased by 205 students, or 5.6 percent. Full-time students enrolled in special education classes increased by 12. The total number of tuition students enrolled in U.S. schools decreased from 720 to 696; Panamanian tuition students decreased from 255 to 252; tuition students of other nationalities increased from 48 to 55. There were no tuition students in the Latin American schools. The following table shows total enrollment for 1964-65 school year compared with the previous year. As of October 15th 1964 1963 U .S. citizen schools6________________________________ 10,353 10,300 Latin Am erican schools________-___---._____ -___ -____-_ 3,459 3,664 T otal__--__-___--_-__ ____ _-__-_ _-____-_____ -_ __13 ,8 12 13 ,9 64 SPECIAL EDUCATION In its eighth year of operation the Special Education Services provided 3,789 individual examinations for children. A total of 230 children were enrolled in full-time special education classes; 1,423 were enrolled in part-time classes conducted by itinerant teachers. Twenty-one children were confined to their homes or the hospital for an extended period of time and were provided with the services of a visiting teacher. In the U.S. schools, there were 26 special education teachers, and in the Latin American schools, there were 12 special education teachers, plus a full-time teacher at the Palo Seco Hospital and 3 half-time teachers at the Gatun juvenile Prison and Gamboa Penitentiary.

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT 123 Classroom instruction for juvenile prisoners was continued at the Gatun juvenile Prison with five youngsters receiving instruction five times weekly. Classes were also conducted for children at the Palo Seco Hospital. Classes for illiterate and semi-literate convicts at the Gamboa Penitentiary were continued and 40 inmates received instruction. LIBRARY-MUSEUM The Panama Canal Library was established in 1914 by order of Gen. George W. Goethals for the purpose of providing official reference services for the Panama Canal. Small community libraries, also initiated in the Canal Zone by the foresight of General Goethals, grew rapidly and in 1918 became part of the Panama Canal Library. With the re-organization in 1951, the Panama Canal Library became the Canal Zone Library-Museum. The library system consists of 11 units-the main library, 3 branches, 4 circulating libraries, 3 job-site libraries, and extension services furnished to the Gorgas Hospital patients' library and to the U.S. elementary schools in the Canal Zone. The workload increased in all measurable areas during the year. The circulation of materials rose to an all-time high of 515,000 compared to 440,400 in fiscal year 1964. Reference questions answered increased to 24,200, or 9.5 percent, as compared with the volume of 22,100 during fiscal year 1964. A significant development during fiscal year 1965 was the implementation of the Federal Depository Documents Program which became fully operational. The service provides easy access to a mass of materials published by the Federal Government and improves the facilities of the library as a center of information in many areas and on many levels.

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Chapter III PUBLIC ORDER AND PROTECTION POLICE ACTIVITIES The organized strength of the Police Division was increased from 272 to 339 during fiscal year 1965. Five police privates assigned to the pier gate at Cristobal were relieved by Terminals Division security guards and reassigned to police duties. During the year four armored trucks and two personnel carriers were placed in service for possible use during civil disturbances. Three trucks and one personnel carrier are stationed at Balboa and one of each at Cristobal. Major additional improvements and changes in the administration and operation of the penitentiary were made during the year. These include the additional assignment of three patrolmen, increased supervision of prisoners by custodial personnel, initiation of an incentive pay program for inmates, improvement in the serving of hot meals to inmates, installation of mercury vapor lights around the entire compound, installation of sanitary facilities in both towers, completion of the penitentiary chapel, and the start of construction on a new fence alarm system. The number of Part I offenses (serious offenses such as burglaries, larcenies, robberies, felonious assault, etc.) reported to police increased from 1,548 in fiscal year 1964 to 1,638 in fiscal year 1965. The number of traffic accidents increased from 981 to 1,086, and the number of these accidents involving personal injury or fatality decreased from 248 to 236. Statistics relative to the Police Division during fiscal year 1965, in comparison with figures for fiscal year 1964, are presented in the following table: Fiscal year Classification of Arrests 1965 1964 M ale --_____ ___ ___ __-_ _____--____ _-__ ____ _-_ 5 ,4 92 4 ,4 84 Female --_---_ __ __ _-----------------_----------571 403 T otal_---___ ----_ ----__ -_----____--__-____.6,063 4,887 Arrests made with warrants --------____ __ ________---_-_----_. 133 121 Arrests made without warrants __---_ -----_---_----_ __ ___ 5,930 4,766 T otal__----___________-_-___-__________6,063 4,887 125

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126 PUBLIC ORDER AND PROTECTION Fiscal year Classification of Arrests 1965 1964 Residents of the Canal Zone ---------------2,207 1,661 Residents of Panama_ -------------.---3,728 3,046 T ransients__-----_---__---__----__-128 180 T otal _---_---_-----_---_---_---_6,063 4,887 Charges for traffic violations4,862 3,800 Charges for misdemeanors_---------------1,277 1,159 Chares for felonies_ __-_---_---__-----_130 145 T otal ------------------------__ 6,269 5,104 COURT ACTIVITIES The Magistrates' Courts are judicial units of the Canal Zone Government with duties and functions prescribed by law. The Courts are under the administrative supervision of the Executive Secretary of the Canal Zone. This fiscal year Cou-t activities increased in both criminal and civil cases for a total rise of 26 percent over last fiscal year. Civil actions handled increased by 77 cases, or 82.8 percent, while additional criminal cases amounted to 1,249, or a 24.9-percent increase over the previous fiscal period. Fines, costs, and forfeitures increased by 27.2 percent. A summary of activities at the Magistrates' Courts, Cristobal and Balboa, during fiscal year 1965, in comparison with figures for fiscal year 1964, is shown in the following table: Cristobal Balboa Total Cases handled: 1965 1064 1965 1964 1965 1964 Crime inal -_ --_-__-----_-_--_-_-----_1,207 1.454 5,058 3,562 6,265 5,016 C ivil ---. ----------_-_-_--_---------------162 36 8 57 170 93 Total _-_----_-_------_------_-_-__._-1,369 1,490 5,066 3,619 6,435 5,109 Disposition of criminal cases: Conviction _----------_-----_-_-_----_-__-_-_----------. 1,120 1,385 4,702 3,209 5,822 4,594 Aquittal -__________---.-----_----___.____ 38 27 M4 122 183 149 D ism issal _-_------___---____-------_. 21 24 133 153 154 177 Held for District Court --_------_-------_----_--28 18 78 78 106 96 Total ._ -----_--------_----_-----_-------------_ 1,207 1,454 5,058 3,562 6,265 5,016 Convictions in which execution of sentence was suspended and defendants placed on prob~atiou _---------_--_-__-_----_123 164 342 312 465 476 Rearrested for violating terms of probation. -_---------_15 14 12 7 27 21 Fines im posed. ----------_____-----------_-----_---_------_ -$14,464 $14,585 $47,826 $34,391 $62,.290 $48,976 ADVISORY PARDON AND PAROLE BOARD The Advisory Pardon and Parole Board is appointed by the Governor. Under the provisions of section 1.1 of the Governor's Regulations Governing the Granting of Pardons, Commutations of Sentences, and Parole, effective January 2, 1963, the Board consists of five members. The Advisory Pardon and Parole Board acts in an advisory capacity to the Governor in regard to applications for pardon and commutation of penitentiary sentences and with respect to requests for revocation of deportation orders. Subsequentto January 2, 1963, the Board became authorized under the provisions of Executive Regrulation No. 23 to make recommendations to the Governor on applications for parole submitted under the provisions of the

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT 127 revised Code which established a parole system for Canal Zone offenders (6 C.Z.C. secs. 6621-6625). During the year the Board considered 25 applications for parole, reviewed 10 cases in which parole had previously been denied, and considered 4 applications for pardon after service of sentence. The Board submitted recommendations to the Governor in each of these cases. The Governor granted parole in seven cases and pardons in all four cases. The Board also considered and submitted recommendations on seven applications for revocation of orders deporting persons from the Canal Zone following service of sentences of imprisonment. The Governor revoked deportation in four cases, and revoked three paroles. FIRE PROTECTION The Fire Division is responsible for firefighting in all civilian and military areas of the Canal Zone including ships in Canal waters, brush, ammuntion and chemical storage areas, missile sites and aircraft crash rescue firefighting at Fort Sherman air strip. This Division is also responsible for rescue and certain emergency lifesaving operations in all areas of the Canal Zone, which consist mainly of first aid, resuscitation, and release of trapped persons. The Air Force and the Army are responsible for aircraft crash rescue firefighting at Albrook and Hov.ard Air Force bases only. Two new fire companies were added to the Division during the fiscal year, one in the Balboa District and one in the Cristobal District. At the end of the fiscal year 1965, there were six stations and seven companies in operation on the Pacific side, and four stations and five companies on the Atlantic side. The two new companies increased the personnel of the Fire Division by 22 employees and established a total force of 151 for the year in comparison to 129 for fiscal year 1964. Comparative general statistics on firefighting operations are presented in the following table: Fiscal year 1965 Fiscal year 1964 Number Property Number Property of fres loss of fres loss Panama Canal Company/Canal Zone Government 326 $8,61-2 371 $376,178 Armed Forces -_ -_--_. 310 394,255 282 3,920 Federal Aviation Agency--1 Private (including ships) 88 41,426 107 198,785 Total 728 $444,293 7 61 $578,883 Calls for emergency aid 246 215 Value of property involved in fires $34,064,973 $35,343,819 CIVIL DEFENSE During August 1964, field work was completed for the National Fallout Shelter Survey Updating Program. The data indicate that there presently are 68,740 existing shelter spaces in the Canal Zone having acceptable protection factors. A study is being conducted to determine how best to match people with usable shelter space. Shelters in the Canal Zone stocked with Federal fallout shelter supplies were increased from 20 to 81 percent during the year. This is based on the 1962 survey of 38,107 spaces of which 31,128 are now stocked. .a.

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128 PUBLIC ORDER AND PROTECTION At year's end the construction of the Balboa Emergency Operations Center at Sosa Hill was practically complete. The station is being furnished to the Canal Zone Government by the Office of Civil Defense, Department of Defense, under authority of Federal Civil Defense Act. All remaining material for the National Communications System radio station was supplied during the year. The station, when completed in September 1965, will be under the operational control of the Canal Zone Government acting through Chief, Civil Defense, and will be maintained by USARSO Signal Section. The station is being installed in the new Balboa Emergency Operations Center.

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Chapter IV POSTS, CUSTOMS AND IMMIGRATION POSTAL SERVICE At the close of the fiscal year 19 postal units were in operation. There were 10 post offices or branch post offices in operation in civilian communities, 5 on Army reservations, 2 on Naval reservations, and 2 on Air Force bases. A mail handling unit was in operation at the Civil Affairs Building, Ancon. During the year an airmail set of stamps and a souvenir folder commemorating the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal were placed on sale at the Balboa Post Office. Besides the regular force of 5 philatelic order fillers, 10 student assistants were also utilized in processing the large number of orders requested by philatelists. This anniversary issue was the largest in orders and revenues received for any one issue. In conjunction with the 50th anniversary, two postal service personnel officially represented the Panama Canal at the New York World's Fair. Sales of the anniversary stamps, souvenir folders, and 50th anniversary books were made at the Fair. With the continuing increase of the military population and their dependents, the amount of mail handled., both dispatched and received, increased substantially over the previous year. The increase in mail handled over the previous year amounted to 9.2 percent. Work force increased by three regular employees as a result of this increased workload. Operations for the past 2 fiscal years are summarized in the following tables: Fiscal year Receipts: 1965 1964 Sale of postage stamps, stamped paper, box rents, permit mailings .-___-__------------$1,117,039 $1,001,421 Interest on investments of Postal Savings and money order funds_ _-__-_ ---_._ -_---_---_-_-_ 99,764 110,132 Money order fees collected 72,115 68,407 Other receipts ___ ______35,7(Y7 14,729 Total receipts__--___ --_-__ --.___---_____ $1,0324,625 $1,194,689 Statistics relative to the physical volume of the operations of the Canal Zone Postal Service for the past 2 years are covered in the following table: 129 11351-18

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130 POSTS, CUSTOMS, AND IMMIGRATION Fiscal year Registered, certified and insured articles handled: N um ber sent __-_-_-_---______-_--______-__-_-_-__-_99,146 107,522 N um ber received _----_--__-_-_-_-_-_-_--_-__-_-__-___-__-_133,378 146,982 Dispatchies of surface mail handled: N um ber sent_____________.__________-__________-2,405 2,789 N um ber received ____--_____-__-___-_____-___-______ 2,821 2,810 Dispatches of airmail handled: N um ber sent ___________-___-_-_______-________-18,447 18,655 N um ber received _____-__.___-____-_____________35,874 33,287 CUSTOMS, IMMIGRATION, AND SHIPPING COMMISSIONER SERVICES In addition to customs, this division also is responsible for immigration, shipping commissioner, and contraband control activities. Custom services continued to enforce export control regulations of the Department of Commerce or Department of State on exportations of material from the Canal Zone, including transshipments of cargo and bunkering of vessels at Canal Zone ports. On June 11, 1965, while outside Canal Zone waters, the Norwegian vessel Nidareid was involved in a collision with the Cuban vessel Aracelio Iglesias, causing extensive damage to the Cuban vessel. Canal Zone immigration authorities were alerted and preparations were made to house the 55 crew members of the Cuban vessel. However, the vessel was brought to Pier 14 in Balboa, and pumping operations effectively eliminated the danger of sinking and the crew was permitted to remain aboard. The matter of immigration controls on persons previously admitted and the enforcement of immigration regulations in the Canal Zone is delegated to the Immigration Service of this division. This service is also charged with the operation of the Immigration Station at Corozal. During the fiscal year, the Station handled 1,720 cases involving a total of 5,668 detention days, or an average census of 15.4 daily, as compared with 1,609 cases, 5,050 detention days, and a 13.8 daily average census during the previous fiscal year. The Shipping Commissioner and his deputies have the same authority with respect to U.S. merchant seamen as Commissioners in the U.S. ports and U.S. consuls in foreign ports. During, fiscal year 1965, 984 crew-list visas were issued and $1,658 in fees collected at Balboa and 941 crew-list visas issued and $1,642 in fees collected at Cristobal as compared with 1,080 crewlist visas and $1,912 fees collected at Balboa and 992 crew-list visas and $1,788 fees collected at Cristobal during the previous year. The following is a statistical summary of the more important items handled by the Customs Division during fiscal year 19,65, together with comparable figures for fiscal year 1964:Ficlya 1965 1964 Vessels entered from sea_ _----------------13,578 13,422 Passengers disembarked, vessels --------------9,566 10,308 Passengers disembarked, aircraft --------------28,169 21,993 U.S. seamen discharged or signed on ------------334 299 Other seamen discharged or signed on ------------4,947 4,970 Number of detention days, Immigration Station 5,668 5,050 Contraband irregularities investigated ------------414 350

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Chapter V LICENSES, INSURANCE, AND ESTATES LICENSES The mission of the License Section is to issue, administer, and effect collection of the appropriate fees for vehicular, land, and miscellaneous licenses and permits in conformity with all existing laws, treaties, regulations, policies, and tariffs. The Canal Zone Government policy to gradually depopulate the Canal Zone of agricultural land licensees by attrition was carried out as it has been since its inception in 1951. Fifteen agricultural land licenses, covering a total of 38% hectares of land, were terminated; 8 by reason of death of the licensee, and 7 were terminated due to need of the land for military pu-poses. As of June 30, 1965, there were approximately 57,000 licenses and permits in force. Issuance of a new type land license was inaugurated, effective July 1, 1964. This new license covers the assignment of an area of land and water for boat recreational purposes in the Gamboa area. To date 51 recreational sites have been issued at an annual rate of $12 each. As a result of a comprehensive economic review, new rental rates for lands in the Canal Zone have been established and approved, effective April 1, 1965. Requirements for the licensing of cats became effective for the first time during the fiscal year. A total of 266 cat licenses were issued. Principal types of licenses handled during fiscal year 1965 in comparison with the corresponding figures for fiscal year 1964 are shown in the following table: F iscal year 1965 1964 V ehicle licenses -----_---_-_ ---_-_-__-_-_-_-_-_--------17,870 16,764 Motor vehicle operator licenses and permits __-_-_-_-_--_--_12,324 10,588 Vehicle registrations transferred_ _-_-_-_-_-___-_-_--_--4,297 3,493 D og licenses_______--_-__________-___-__-__-_---____ 2,514 2,134 Land licenses in force at year's end_ _-_--_--_-_-----_-__-___----743 704 Annual revenue_ _-_-_--_----_ -_-_-_--------------_-_ --__----_ $232,244 $204,599 133

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Chapter V1I MUNICIPAL IMPROVEMENTS ROADS AND STREETS A combined length of 144.37 miles of streets and highways within the Canal Zone was maintained during the year. Maintenance included all types from minor grass cutting and cleaning of ditches to major replacement of concrete and asphalt paving. MAINTENANCE OF QUARTERS, HOSPITALS, AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS The regular maintenance of quarters was continued throughout the year. Maintenance work included small individual jobs, on inspection and call basis, covering minor plumbingr repairs, interior painting, roof repairs, mason-y patch work, drilling masonry walls for termite treatment, touch-up painting and carpentry repairs due to deterioration and termite damage. The experimental program of preventive maintenance was continued on the group of 38 houses (57 apartments) in the Ancon area which was started in fiscal year 1964. This fiscal year the experimental program of preventive maintenance was started on a group of 23 houses (54 apartments) in the Paraiso area. In addition, in the Margrarita area 26 houses (61 apartments) were begun in August 1964, and 12 more houses (48 apartments) were added to the program in January 1965. Routine maintenance work was performed on the buildings and equipment at the hospitals. Steamplants were operated and overhauled. Miscellaneous repairs involving masonry, plumbing, refrigeration, air conditioning, icemakers and water coolers, carpentry, painting, sheetmetal, roofing, and steam lines were also performed during the year. Miscellaneous services were furnished the Federal Aviation Agency in its local activities. These are a continuing service: miscellaneous on-call repairs to quarters at Cardenas, maintenance of storm sewers, sanitary sewers, water system, electrical distribution system; streets including street lighting and traffic signals; and maintenance of key equipment and associated communication system in the new Air Route Traffic Control Center/International Flight Service Station building, service furnished on a 24-hour basis. In addition, microwave links were rented to the FAA to serve their various installations on the Isthmus. 135

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136 MUNICIPAL IMPROVEMENTS Maintenance of the Thatcher Ferry Bridge during the fiscal year consisted of spot painting approximately 40 percent of the bridge with two coats of red lead and two coats of aluminum paint. In addition, 36 bolts were replaced in expansion joints. SEWER SYSTEM The length of sanitary sewers and storm drains maintained by the Maintenance Division is 204.57 miles. The work performed included maintenance of sewer pump stations in Balboa, Gamboa, Paraiso, Rainbow City, Cristobal, Margarita, Fort Davis, Coco Solo, and France Field; comminutor at Pedro Miguel and Sewage Treatment Plant in Rainbow City.

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Chaptez VII FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND RELATED SUPPLEMENTARY REPORTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 Presented herewith are the financial statements of the Canal Zone Government for the year ended June 30, 1965. These statements with their related notes which appear as tables 1 through 4 present the financial position of the agency at June 30, 1965, and the financial results of its operations for the fiscal year then ended. The accompanying statements have been examined by the General Auditor of the Panama Canal Company and are subject to audit by the General Accounting Office. Activities of the agency are initially financed by congressional appropriations. Operating appropriations are available for obligations only in the year for which the appropriations are made. Capital appropriations are available until expended. The agency's operating accounts are kept on an accrued cost basis, including depreciation of fixed assets, in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, while the status of appropriated funds is determined on an obligations incurred basis in accordance with Government requirements. The agency's revenues are derived from charges to individuals and other Government agencies using its services. All revenues thus received are remitted to the U.S. Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. The excess of total accrued costs, including depreciation, over revenues (net cost of Canal Zone Government) is payable to the U.S. Treasury by, and treated as an expense of, the Panama Canal Company in accordance with the requirements of section 62 of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code. All operating and capital funds expended by the Canal Zone Government are thus eventually returned to the U.S. Treasury, with no cost to the U.S. taxpayer. The agency also operates a postal savings and money order system. Funds on deposit in the postal savings account are invested in U.S. Government securities at rates of interest to cover the 2 percent interest paid to depositors and expenses of the service. 137 11351--19

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138 FINANCIAL REPORT AND STATISTICAL DATA Table 1.-Comparative Statement of Financial Assets 1965 1964 CURRENT ASSETS: Fund balances with U.S. Treasury and cash: Fund balances in U.S. Treasury checking account__--------------------_ $10,894,874 $10,027,281 Cash on band and in transit-----------212,914 253,983 11,107,788 10,281,264 U.S. Treasury bonds and notes at cost --__-_--_--3,600,000 4,100,000 Accounts receivable: U.S. Government agencies_ -_--_-----__ 406,157 795,784 Republic of Panama -------------_ 984,585 771,950 Other---------------503,263 537,417 Accrued interest receivable on postal fund investments -------._--_-_-.------15,076 16,847 1,909,081 2,121,998 Inventory of hospital supplies -------_---_------220,624 206,209 Other current assets -------------------19,880 12,867 Total current assets_---------------_-_ 16,857,373 16,722,338 FXEDAssETS (table 4): Cost__--___---_ __-------_ -----69,097,065 63,760,403 Less depreciation and valuation allowances_-_-_ 22,616,999 21,283,824 46,480,066 42,476,579 63,337,439 59,198,917 Invested Capital Invested capital consists of fixed assets and inventories of materials and supplies less allowances for depreciation and obsolescence of fixed assets, and less the potential liability for employees' accrued leave, which under the law is not an obligation against appropriated funds until paid. Certain fixed assets amounting to $281,000, which represents defense expenditures by the Department of Defense and excess facilities transferred to the Canal Zone Government, have been eliminated from these statements. Table 2 shows the status of this fund and appropriated funds at the beginning and end of the year, and summarizes the changes which occurred during the year.

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT 139 Condition, June 30, 1965 and 1964 Liabilities and equity 1965 1964 CURRiENT LIABILITIEs: Accounts payable: Due U.S. Treasury_---_------------$2,796,226 $2,853,723 Panama Canal Company and other U.S. Government agencies ----------------_-_-2,779,929 1,155,841 5,576,155 4,009,564 Postal money orders payable------_-_-----641,726 669,489 Less advance deposits with U.S. Post Office Department__-__----------------------_ 306,452 207,363 335,274 462,126 Postal savings certificates --------------3,355,772 4,013,751 Accrued liabilities: Salaries and wages_------------_ 486,177 645,425 Other_-_-__------------. _-9,01() 3,781 495,187 649,206 Other current liabilities_-.------------_-_76,60-2 57,612 Total current liabilities -----------9,839,040 9,192,259 EMPLOYEEs' LEAvE LIABIrrY (unfunded)'*_------2,589,653 2,365,420 EQUITY OF U.S. GOVERNMENT (table 2): Operating funds _----------------__ _ 236,317 182,337 Capital funds--__--_-_----_ ---__-6,561,392 7,141,533 Invested capital_-------------------44,111,037 40,317,368 50,908,746 47,*641,238 63,337,439 59,198,917 No-rzs: 0 (a) The cost of annual leave of Canal Zone Government employees is recorded in the accounts as taken. The unfunded liability for employee leave is adjusted at the end of each leave year (January 2 for fiscal year 1965), rather than at June 30, based on an actual inventory of leav&hour credits and at current hourly rates of pay. Significant changes between these dates resulting from pay changes are taken into account as such changes occur. (b) The Canal Zone Government has outstanding commitments in the amount of $1,948,634 under uncompleted construction contracts and unbilled purchase orders, and an estimated liability of about $115,000 for relief payments to be made to retired alien employees in fiscal year 1966. The maximum liability which could result from outstanding claims and lawsuits is estimated to be $153,500. Capital Expenditures Capital expenditures amounted to $5.4 million. The largest expenditure was for the construction of a new junior high school in the amount of $3.1 million, while the second largest expenditure, $800,000, was for alterations and additions to Gorgas Hospital. Financial Results The net cost of operating Canal Zone Government amounted to $18.4 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1965, as compared to $16.3 million for the preceding fiscal year. The net costs of Canal Zone Government are absorbed as expense of the Panama Canal Company, which in turn reimburses the U.S. Treasury for this amount. Further details are set out in table 3 of the accompanying statements.

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CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT 141 Table 3.-Statement of Operations, Year Ended June 30, 1965 Operating Ex penses Net cost of operations Other borne by Accrued non-fund Panama Funded Deprecharges Canal CrvrL FUNCTIONS: costs ciation and credits Total Recoveries Company Office of director. ..-.--.------$126,808 $180 -----. $126,988 -.--.-. $126,988 Customs and immigrration --------.604,690 756 .------_ 605,446 $31,898 573,548 Postal service_.-..--.-.-.---1,347,447 5,903 ---.-. 1,353,350 1,324,815 28,535 Police protection.-...-.-.----2,949,414 43, 413 ----.-2, 992,827 22,416 2,970,411 Fire protection.---.---------.--1,116,086 30,913 $879 1,147,878 582,965 564,913 Judicial system .----.-.-. 107,828 1,741 .-.--109,569 63,109 46,460 Education..-.-.-.---------8,055,331 380,576 ------_ 8,435,907 4,809,540 3,626,367 Public areas and facilities.-.--.1,250,400 629, 499 ---.---1,879,899 ----.----1,879,899 Library --.--.-.------. --. 218,125 684 .----. 218,809 6,390 212,419 Internal security.-.-..-..185,641 --._-.--. -.._-. 185,641 .-.-----185,641 Civil defense....--.-.---.-_ 32,287 4,884 ..----_37,171 ----------. 37,171 Licenses and other fees.--.---.--.-44,750 228 -.-.44,978 169,053 (124,075) 16,038,807 1098,777 879 17,138,463 7,010,186 10,128,277 HEALTH AmD SANrTATION: Office of director.-------.--.--. 143,402 .--.--. ---.143,402 1,640 141,762 Hospitals and medical services: Gorgas Hospital and clinics-._--5,997,177 115,132 -.---. 6,112,309 3,577,135 2,535,174 Coco Solo Hospital and clinics.-2,076,861 71,118 -----. 2,147,979 1,082,114 1,065,865 Corozal Hospital.-.----.----1,021,340 29,671 76 1,051,087 77,093 973,994 Palo Seco Hospital.---.-.-.-. 202,011 7,426 98 209,535 214,106 (4,571) Public health centers.---------. 193,920 --.-.-------_ 193,920 17,684 176,236 Other public health services: Sanitation_.-.--.-.-.---436,890 3,211 43 440,144 6,186 433,958 Garbage collection.----------157,000 .----. .-----. 157,000 -----. 157,000 Preventive medicine and quarantine. ---.--. -. -188,089 1,425 ..-189,514 -. -----189,514 School health unit..-.----. 71,435 ---.---..-.---71,435 .-.-.71,435 Veterinarian services.-.----172,539 2,942 .-.-.175,481 54,975 120,506 Cemeteries, operation and maintenance.-.--.----.---. 73,679 996 ----.-74,675 20,485 54,190 10,'734,343 231,921 217 1,966,481 5,051,418 5,915,063 GENEzAL EXPEN13ES: Office of the Governor .-------.-129,703 .-_ ---.-.-.-129,703 ..-.-129,703 General and administrative expense.-. 750,000 .--.-. ---. .-.-. 750,000 .---.-----750,000 Net increase in employees' accrued leave-_.-.-. --------. -. -.----.-. .-. ----224,233 224,233 ---.-----224,233 Recruitment and repatriation.-------268,053 .--. ---_--.-. --. 268,053 --.-.-----268,053 Employees' home leave travel -----. 448,437 -------.------. 448,437 -.---.-448,437 Transportation of employees' vehicles 25,259 -----------.-. 25,259 ---.-.25,259 Government buildings and sites.-. 366,732 35,363 ----.-. 402,095 145,510 256,585 Alien cash relief ---.---.---.--120,859 ---------.-.-.120,859 --.-. -120,859 Net loss or (gain) on plant retirements -----.--..----.59,260 59,260 -.----. 59,260 Miscellaneous charges and credits.186,568 27,972 --.---. 214,540 96,803 117,737 2,295,611 63,335 283,493 2,642,439 242,313 2,400,126 TOTAL -----.--------.---.-_----_-.---29,068,761 1,394,033 284,589 30,747,383 12,303,917 18,443,466

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 08507 9589


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