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Title: Florida's Government and the 1961 Legislature /
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 Material Information
Title: Florida's Government and the 1961 Legislature /
Physical Description: 32 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Legislative Council
Florida Legislative Council
Donor: unknown ( endowment )
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1961
 Subjects
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
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Statement of Responsibility: Florida Legislative Council.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00097354
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 255009953

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
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        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text





































Ti





























FLORIDA'S GOVERNMENT
and the
1961
LEGISLATURE





































Welcome to Florida's Capitol!
In presenting you this booklet, the members of the Legislature hope
that you especially the young people who visit the Capitol will
study it and receive from it a better understanding and knowledge
of your State government.
Lawmaking is the main function of the Legislative branch of gov-
ernment, but involves also the Executive and Judicial branches. The
brief explanation on these pages is designed to simplify the lawmaking
process and make it more meaningful to you.
By their election, the members of the Legislature have the responsi-
bility of making the laws under which we all live. They wish each
of you a pleasant visit.
Most sincerely yours,







L. K. EDWARDS, JR., Chairman
Florida Legislative Council





















FLORIDA LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL
L. K. EDWARDS, JR. HARRY W. WESTBERRY
Chairman Vice-Chairman


Senators


Congressional
District


W. RANDOLPH HODGES
Cedar Key
JAMES E. CONNOR
Brooksville
WAYNE E. RIPLEY
Jacksonville
WILSON CARRAWAY
Tallahassee
CLIFF HERRELL
Miami Springs
L. K. EDWARDS, JR.
Irvine
IRLO O. BRONSON
Kissimmee
SCOTT KELLY
Lakeland
B. C. PEARCE
East Palatka


Representatives


WILLIAM V. CHAPPELL, JR.
Ocala
1 ROBERT T. MANN
Tampa
2 HARRY W. WESTBERRY
Jacksonville
3 RICHARD O. MITCHELL
Tallahassee
4 GEORGE L. HOLLAHAN, JR.
Miami 56
5 WILLIAM V. CHAPPELL, JR.
Ocala
6 EMMETT S. ROBERTS
Belle Glade
7 S. C. SMITH
Arcadia
8 HAL CHAIRS
Old Town


LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE BUREAU
(Research Staff-Sec. 11.19-.28, F.S.)


David V. Kerns, Director
L. K. Ireland, Jr., Fiscal Analyst
Robert L. Kennedy, Jr., Fiscal Analyst
John J. Parker, Assistant Analyst
Nell F. Leffler, Reference Librarian
Elizabeth W. Rasmussen, Office Manager


Arthur L. Cunkle, Economic Analyst
Mrs. Martha A. Bass, Legal Analyst
Robert C. Ryon, Newsletter
Nancy B. Kavanaugh, Secretary
Florence C. Rafnel, Secretary
Betty Jean Oxendine, Secretary










































W. RANDOLPH HODGES


PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE

Honorable W. Randolph Hodges of Cedar Key was born in Cedar
Key, Florida on February 5, 1914. He attended public schools in Levy
County. He was originally elected to the Senate in 1952, is now serv-
ing his third term, and was President pro tempore of the Senate in
the 1959 Legislature. Sen. Hodges was a member of the Levy County
Board of County Commissioners (1942-1952) and Mayor of Cedar Key
for two terms. He is a member of the Methodist Church and the fol-
lowing organizations: Masons, Lions, Levy County Sportsman's Club
and Farm Bureau. Sen Hodges is an ice manufacturer and a marine
and appliance dealer. He is married to the former Mildred Yearty and
they have three children.

5















THE FLORIDA SENATE
1961
W. Randolph Hodges, President
John Rawls, President Pro Tempore
Robert W. Davis, Secretary
LeRoy Adkison, Sergeant-at-Arms
Senatorial


Name


Di


Clayton W. Mapoles, Milton

Philip D. Beall, P. O. Box 862, Pensacola
Clyde Galloway, DeFuniak Springs
John Rawls, Marianna
Luther Tucker, Box 64, Crawfordville

Dewey M. Johnson, Quincy
Scott Kelly, P. O. Box 1651, Lakeland
Wilson Carraway, Box 870, Tallahassee
James E. Connor, P. O. Box 5,
Brooksville


W. T. Davis, Madison

C. W. (Bill) Young, 7851 45th St. N.,
Pinellas Park
Harry J. Kicliter, P. O. Box 1173,
Fort Pierce
Cliff Herrell (W.C.), 201 Curtiss Park-
way, Miami Springs
G. T. Melton, P. O. Box 971, Lake City
Charley E. Johns, Starke
Harry O. Stratton, Callahan
Houston W. Roberts, Route 5, Box 287,
Live Oak
Wayne E. Ripley, 224 Lynch Bldg.,
Jacksonville


strict Counties in District
1st Santa Rosa and
Okaloosa
2nd Escambia
3rd Walton and Holmes
4th Jackson
5th Liberty, Franklin
and Wakulla
6th Gadsden
7th Polk
Sth Leon
9th Citrus and
Hernando


10th Madison and
Taylor
11th Pinellas

12th St. Lucie, Indian
River and Martin


13th

14th
15th
16th
17th


Dade

Columbia
Union and Bradford
Nassau
Suwannee, Hamil-
ton and Lafayette


18th Duval














Senatorial
Name District
John A. Sutton, 64 E. Central, Orlando 19th
L. K. Edwards, Jr., Irvine 20th
W. Randolph Hodges, Cedar Key 21st


S. D. Clarke, Monticello
J. A. (Tar) Boyd, Box 901, Leesburg
Travis A. Gresham, Jr., 2110 First Street,
Fort Myers
Dempsey J. Barron, P. O. Box 1638,
Panama City
B. C. (Bill) Pearce, East Palatka
G. W. (Dick) Williams, Route 1,
Wauchula
E. William Gautier, 1200 Magnolia
Street, New Smyrna Beach
Edwin G. Fraser, Macclenny
Thomas E. (Ted) David,
2136 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood
Verle A. Pope, P. O. Box 519,
St. Augustine
J. Emory (Red) Cross, P. O. Box 411,
Gainesville
Irlo O. Bronson, Kissimmee

Sam M. Gibbons, P. O. Box 1363,
Tampa 1
Ralph J. Blank, Jr., 326 Pan-A Bldg.,
West Palm Beach
Ed. H. Price, Jr., Bradenton

Bernard Parrish, Box L, Titusville

J. C. Getzen, Jr., Bushnell


22nd


Counties in District
Orange
Marion
Levy, Dixie and
Gilchrist
Jefferson


23rd Lake
24th Lee, Hendry, Col-
lier and Monroe
25th Bay, Washington,
Calhoun and Gulf
26th Putnam
27th Hardee, Highlands,
DeSoto and Glades
28th Volusia


29th
30th


Baker and Clay
Broward


31st St. Johns and
Flagler
32nd Alachua

33rd Okeechobee and
Osceola
34th Hillsborough

35th Palm Beach

36th Manatee, Sarasota
and Charlotte
37th Seminole and
Brevard
38th Pasco and Sumter

















FLORIDA
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
William V. Chappell, Jr., Speaker
George G. Stone, Speaker Pro Tempore
Lamar Bledsoe, Chief Clerk


ALACHUA

BAKER
BAY

BRADFORD
BREVARD
BROWARD

CALHOUN
CHARLOTTE
CITRUS
CLAY
COLLIER
COLUMBIA
DADE


DESOTO
DIXIE
DUVAL


ESCAMBIA

FLAGLER
FRANKLIN
GADSDEN

GILCHR1ST
GLADES
GULF
HAMILTON
HARDEE
HENDRY
HERNANDO
HIGHLANDS
HILLSBOROUGH


HOLMES
INDIAN RIVER
JACKSON


Ralph D. Turlington, Gainesville
Osee R. Fagan, Gainesville
John J. Crews, Jr., Macclenny
Julian Bennett, Panama City
Leo C. Jones, Panama City
A. J. Thomas, Jr., Starke
James H. Pruitt, Eau Callie
Emerson Allsworth, Ft. Lauderdale
A. J. Ryan, Jr., Dania
Don Fuqua, Altha
David A. Hill, Punta Gorda
Allison R. "Baldy" Strickland, Inverness
S. D. (Sam) Saunders, Green Cove Springs
James L. Walker, Naples
F. W. (Shorty) Bedenbaugh, Lake City
George L. Hollahan, Jr., South Miami
David C. Eldredge, Miami
Carey Matthews, Miami
S. C. Smith, Arcadia
Hal Chaires, Old Town
John E. Mathews, Jr., Jacksonville
Harry Westberry, Jacksonville
George B. Stallings, Jr., Jacksonville
Reubin O'D. Askew, Pensacola
George G. Stone, Atmore, Alabama
W. L. Wadsworth, Bunnell
Oliver Nash, Apalachicola
W. M. Inman, Quincy
C. Fred Arrington, Havana
H. E. Lancaster, Trenton
Joe H. Peeples, Jr., Venus
Cecil G. Costin, Jr., Port St. Joe
J. W. McAlpin, White Springs
Frank Bass, Wauchula
Charles E. Miner, Clewiston
John L. Ayers, Brooksville
Howard Livingston, Sebring
Woodie A. Liles, Plant City
Robert T. Mann, Tampa
Tom Whitaker, Jr., Tampa
J. J. (Boy) Williams, Bonifay
L. B. "Buck" Vocelle, Vero Beach
J. M. Sims, Marianna
Robert Williams, Graceville









































WILLIAM V. CHAPPELL, JR.


SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE

Honorable William V. Chappell, Jr., of Ocala was born in Kendrick,
Florida on February 3, 1922. He was educated in the public schools
of Ocala and the University of Florida where he received LL.B. and
B.A. degrees. He was originally elected to the House of Representa-
tives in 1954 to represent Marion County and is now serving his fourth
term. Rep. Chappell was Prosecuting Attorney for Marion County from
January 1950 through January 1954. He is a member of the Methodist
Church and the following organizations: Junior Chamber of Commerce
(Past President), Young Democrats (Past Vice President), Lions
(Past President), Elks, Masons, American Legion, and Chamber of
Commerce. Rep. Chappell is a practicing attorney and is married to
the former Marguerite Gutshall. They have four children.

9

















JEFFERSON
LAFAYETTE
LAKE

LEE
LEON

LEVY
LIBERTY
MADISON
MANATEE

MARION

MARTIN
MONROE

NASSAU
OKALOOSA

OKEECHOBEE
ORANGE

OSCEOLA
PALM BEACH

PASCO
PINELLAS


POLK


PUTNAM
ST. JOHNS

ST. LUCIE
SANTA ROSA
SARASOTA

SEMINOLE

SUMTER
SUWANNEE
TAYLOR
UNION
VOLUSIA

WAKULLA
WALTON
WASHINGTON


George H. Anderson, Monticello
H. M. (Mack) Land, Mayo
Welborn Daniel, Clermont
W. H. (Bill) Reedy, Eustis
Bruce J. Scott, Fort Myers
Mallory E. Home, Tallahassee
R. O. (Dick) Mitchell, Tallahassee
Frank Marshbum, Bronson
R. L. Hosford, Hosford
Otis R. Peavy, Madison
Wilbur H. Boyd, Palmetto
Robert E.. Knowles, Bradenton
William G. O'Neill, Ocala
William V. (Bill) Chappell, Jr., Ocala
W. R. Scott, Stuart
Bernie C. Papy, Key West
Jack A. Saunders, Key West
T. H. "Tommy" Askins, Fernandina Beach
Jack C. Nichols, Niceville
James H. (Jimmy) Wise, Crestview
W. Allen Markham, Okeechobee
Mrs. George W. (Beth) Johnson, Orlando
John L. Ducker, Winter Park
J. J. Griffin, Jr., St. Cloud
Jerry Thomas, Lake Park
Emmett S. Roberts, Belle Glade
Joe A. McClain, Dade City
James T. Russell, St. Petersburg Beach
Charles R. Holley, St. Petersburg
Douglas J. Loeffler, Clearwater
Lawton M. Chiles, Jr., Lakeland
Ray Mattox, Winter Haven
Ben Hill Griffin, Jr., Frostproof
James N. Beck, Palatka
F. Charles Usina, St. Augustine
A. H. (Gus) Craig, St. Augustine
Rupert Jasen Smith, Ft. Pierce
William H. Byrom, Milton
Ralph A. Erickson, Sarasota
G. M. (Gus) Nelson, Sarasota
Mack N. Cleveland, Jr., Sanford
Gordon V. Frederick, Sanford
E. C. Rowell, Wildwood
Leon N. McDonald, Live Oak
Ken Smith, Perry
C. A. Roberts, Lake Butler
Frederick B. Karl, Daytona Beach
James H. Sweeny, Jr., DeLand
Bobby Russ, Crawfordville
E. Bert Riddle, Westville
Ralph C. Carter, Chipley














TIE THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT


Under its Constitution, the powers of the state government of
Florida (like those of the United States and of the other American
States) are divided among three branches. This division, known as
the doctrine of separation of powers, is based on principles intended
to protect the rights of every person.
The Legislative branch is the law-making branch, setting the main
policies of the government through the laws it enacts. The Executive
branch, headed by the Governor, sees that the laws are enforced and
administers the day to day activities of the government. The Judicial
branch, composed of the courts, interprets the laws -makes their
meaning clear when it is questioned and, on the basis of their mean-
ing, decides disputes between individuals or between the state and an
individual.
Although the Constitution provides for these three separate and
distinct branches of government, it provides for checks and balances
to prevent any one branch from becoming all-powerful; for instance,
the Governor is given power to veto acts of the Legislature and the
Courts are given power to declare acts unconstitutional. Similarly, by
amending a statute, the Legislature may revise a policy of one of the
other branches. The three branches are, therefore, not wholly
unconnected but are inter-locked in order to give each a constitutional
control over the others.

THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
Composition, Organization, and Powers
Florida has a legislature composed of two houses the Senate and
the House of Representatives. Each house is the sole judge of the
qualification and election of its own members and has the power to
choose its own officers and to make its own rules of procedure. All
sessions of the House of Representatives are open to the public; and
sessions of the Senate are open to the public except during executive
sessions, when all outsiders are cleared from the chamber and the
doors are closed. Either house of the Legislature may initiate legisla-
tion on any subject.
The Constitution fixes the number of senatorial districts at thirty-
eight, and each district is represented by a senator. The districts must
be as nearly equal in population as is practical, without dividing any
county, and where a senatorial district is composed of two or more














counties, the counties of the district can not be completely separated
by a county of another district.
The Constitution provides that the five most populous counties
shall have three representatives each, the next eighteen shall have
two each, and the others shall have one each. This makes a total of
ninety-five representatives on the basis of the present sixty-seven
counties.
At its regular session every tenth year ending in 5, the Legislature
is required to reapportion the representation in the House of Repre-
sentatives and the Senate according to the last Federal census. This
is accomplished by fixing the number of representatives each county
shall have and by dividing the State into senatorial districts.

Personnel
The President of the Senate presides over the Senate, and the
Speaker of the House presides over the House of Representatives.
The President Pro Tempore and the Speaker Pro Tempore preside
when requested to do so by the President or Speaker, or when either
is unable to serve. These presiding officers are elected by their re-
spective bodies and serve for two years. In addition to the presiding
officers, each house elects other officers from outside its membership.
The most important of these are the Secretary of the Senate and the
Chief Clerk of the House. They are responsible for keeping clear
and accurate records of the proceedings of the body each serves.
A Sergeant-at-Arms is elected by each house to assist the presiding
officer in maintaining order and in making available necessary equip-
ment, supplies, and services. Each house also selects pages, reading
clerks, and a chaplain. In addition to these, attaches are appointed
to perform the necessary clerical work.

Compensation
Members of the Legislature receive $1,200 per year in monthly
installments of $100 each. While the Legislature is in a regular,
special or extraordinary session, members also receive a daily allow-
ance of $15 and travel expenses of 100 per mile for one round trip
each week to and from home to Tallahassee.

Election and Terms of Office
The Constitution provides that members of the Legislature be














elected at the general election in November of even-numbered years
preceding the April meeting of the regular session of the Legislature.
Candidates are nominated in party primary elections held prior to
the general elections. Members of the Legislature must be qualified
electors (21 years of age and a citizen of the United States who has
lived in Florida at least one year and has lived in his county at least
six months) in the counties or districts from which they are chosen.
No person may serve as a member of the Legislature while holding
a profitable office or appointment under the United States Government
or this state.
Each Senator serves a term of four years, and each House member
is elected to serve a term of two years. Half of the members of the
Senate and all of the members of the House are elected every two
years. Terms of office begin at the end of election day.

Legislative Sessions
Regular sessions of the Legislature begin on the first Tuesday after
the first Monday in April of odd-numbered years and are limited to
sixty days. A regular session may, by a three-fifths vote of the mem-
bership of both houses, be extended for no more than a total of thirty
days. The extra days do not have to run without a break, and recesses
may be taken by the joint action of both houses. However, a regular
session may not be extended beyond the first day of September of
the same year. During an extended session, no new legislation may be
introduced except by a two-thirds vote of the members of the House
seeking its introduction.
The Governor may call extra sessions of not more than twenty days
each. When the Governor calls a meeting of the Legislature for a
special session, the Legislature may consider no other business than
that for which it is called or such other matters as the Governor may
call to its attention, except by a two-thirds vote of each house.
The Legislature may call itself into an extra session for all purposes
as if convened in regular session but limited to thirty days in the
following manner: twenty percent of its members must file written
certificates with the Secretary of State stating that conditions warrant
an extra session; when the Secretary of State receives the required
number of certificates, it is his duty to poll the members of the Legis-
lature; when he receives an affirmative vote of three-fifths of the mem-
bers of both houses, he notifies each member by registered mail of the
day and hour on which the extra session will convene; the extra ses-














sion must convene sometime between fourteen and twenty-one days
after the Secretary of State has mailed the notices.
If during the regular session at which the Legislature is required
to reapportion itself, it fails to do so, the Governor shall, within thirty
days after the session adjourns, call a special session for the purpose
of reapportionment. During such a session, reapportionment is the
only business that can be considered, and the session cannot be
adjourned until reapportionment is accomplished.

Rules
Each session, each house of the Legislature adopts rules of pro-
cedure which are printed in booklet form along with committee
assignments made by the presiding officers.

Committees

Standing committees which serve during a session are listed accord-
ing to subject matter in the rules of each house. Members are ap-
pointed by the presiding officers of their respective houses on the
basis of special knowledge and interest in the subject matter of a
particular committee.
Most committees exist for the purpose of considering bills referred
to them and recommending action to the house of which they are a
part. A committee's work usually begins after a bill has been intro-
duced and referred to it by the presiding officer. Persons desiring to
speak for or against matters being considered by a committee may do
so in hearings which are open to the public. When a committee com-
pletes its work, the bill is returned to the house from which it was
referred. House committees may recommend the passage or rejection
of a bill, passage of a bill with amendments, or passage of a substi-
tute bill. Senate committees may make any of these recommendations,
or they may return a bill without a recommendation. A bill with an
unfavorable report cannot be considered further by either house
unless two-thirds of the members present vote to consider it.
Committees also exist for the purpose of managing expenditures
and employing necessary personnel, and some committees are de-
signed merely to supervise the progress of legislation to make sure the
rules are followed. The rules committees are designed to aid the
presiding officers in the interpretation and enforcement of rules; and
also, late in the session, they determine the order in which legislation














shall be considered. There are also special committees which receive
assignments not normally handled by standing committees. An im-
portant type of special committee is the conference committee. When
the two houses cannot agree on a matter, the presiding officer of each
appoints an equal number of members to serve as a joint committee
for the purpose of trying to adjust the differences. This joint com-
mittee is called a conference committee. These special committees
are terminated when they complete their assignments.
Interim committees are those which make legislative studies during
the period between legislative sessions. During the 1959-61 biennium,
there were eleven interim committees doing research and planning on
major state problems. The subjects studied by these committees are
congressional district reapportionment, disposition of abandoned
property, finance and taxation, the 1959 insurance code, interstate
cooperation, investigation of organizations, statutory revision, mental
health, poultry production, prison and convicts, and public roads and
highways.

Legislative Council
The Legislative Council is a permanent committee of the Legis-
lature; it is composed of eighteen members, the President of the
Senate, the Speaker of the House, and a senator and a representative
from each of Florida's eight congressional districts. Through sub-
committees composed partly of Council members and partly of other'
legislators, studies are conducted on selected topics between sessions;
these currently include appropriations and auditing, education, finance
and taxation, governmental organization, health and welfare, judiciary
and constitutional revision, roads, state institutions, and traffic safety
and insurance.
The Legislative Council employs and supervises a permanent re-
search staff known as the Legislative Reference Bureau; these em-
ployees are selected for their research ability and their knowledge
in the fields of law, political science, public administration, economics,
and governmental accounting. During a session the Bureau assists
the entire Legislature and its committees; between sessions, it per-
forms the research for the Council's study committees; and assists
interim legislative committees or commissions created by the Legis-
lature. It is also available to answer the request of any legislator for
factual information on legislative problems. The Bureau maintains
(Continued on Page 18)








The Government THE PEOPLE OF THE Of Florida




....LEGISLATIVEI JUDICIAL

LEGISLATURE


SENATE *: HOUSE

38 Members :*: 95 Members

Secretary::::: Chief Clerk EXECUTIVE




Legislative Interim SECRETARY ATTORNEY SUPT. OF COM'R.
Council Committees GENERAL GOVERNOR TREASURER PUBLIC OF
S I ATE INSTRUCTION AGRICULTURE


Legislative Reference Bureau I

SI StatutoryRevision State
and Bill Drafting Attorneys Ex-Offiio Bards or Commisins

l ,


. AGENCIES OFFICERS) PERFORMING FUNCTIONS INTERNAL TO GOVERNMENT


EDUCATION


Children's Commission
Boarc of Education
Department of Education
Board of Control
Ed. T.V. Commission
Library Board
Board of Com'rs. of State Institutions
Texttook Purchasing Board
Vocational Education, Board of


NATURAL RESOURCES

S Board of Conservation
S Geological Survey
Water Resources Department
Soil Conservation Board
Board of Forestry
Game & Fish Commission
Parks and Historic Mem. Comm.
Stephen Foster Mem. Comm.
St. Augustine Historic Comm.



INDUSTRY PROMOTION

Department of Agriculture"
Apprenticeship Council
Citrus Commission
Development Commission
Egg Commission
. Hotel and Restaurant Commission
Ind trial Commission
CMilCommission
Nuar Development Commission


GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

Governor & Administrative Officers
'Budget Commission
Industrial Commission
*Personnel Board
Parole Commission Examining Board
"Purchasing Commission ..
Development Commission
*Textbook Purchasing Board
Commissioner of Agriculture
Board of Education
*Trustees of I. & I. Fund
SBoard of Com'rs, of State Institutions
Treasurer


FINANCE

Comptroller
Governor
Treasurer
Board of Administration
Finance Committee
Trustees of I. & 1. Fund
Development Commission
Board of Education
S Budget Commission
Industrial Commission
Ex. Bd. for Dept. of Public Safety
Trustees of Teachers
'Board of Conservation
Board of Com'rs. of State Institutions
Game and Fish Commission
Auditing Department
......- *.-., .. *.*.*.*.*... *...... ... ...... .. .. .. .. .. .. .X:+: :-. +:*: : : *:
REVENUE
Beverage Department R u
Comptroller iCom'r, of Revenue)
Motor Vehicle Com'r.
Racing Commission
Secretary of State
Treasurer

LEGAL & LAW ENFORCEMENT
Attorney General
Beverage Department
Military Department
Motor Vehicle Commissioner
Railroad & Public Utilities Comm.
Secretary of State
Sheriff's Bureau
Treasurer

MILITARY
SArmory Board
SCivil Defense Council
Governor
Military Department
Reserve Liaison Officer
":::":"""'"""""": :: ':'''::


Council for the Blind
Children's Commission
Crippled Children's Commission
Board of Education
Board of Control
Board of Health
Military Department
Pardon Board
'Board of Com'rs. of State Inst.
Tuberculosis Board
Veteran's Conlmission
'Board of Vocational Ed.
Div. of Vocational Rehabilitation
Welfare Board


AGENCIES (OFFICERS) RENDERING DIRECT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC


TRANSPORTATION
Motor Vehicle Commissioner
*Ex. Bd. for Dept. of Public Safety
:::: Road Board
Railroad & Public Utilities Commission
::' Treasurer


CONSUMER PROTECTION.


Beverage Department
Comptroller iBanking Comnius ioner,
Board of Conseirvation
Development Coinlnl Soni
Game & Fish Conmmission --
Board of Health
Hotel and Restaurant Conmmissioner
Industrial Coinmission
Motor Vehicle Comminloner
Ex. Bd for Deparitinet ot Pub. Safety
I & Public Utilities Comimission
Road Board
Secretary of State
Securities Commission ol.
Treasurer (Ins. Comnr. & Fire Marshali
Board of Accountancy
Board of Architecture
Ba bers' Sanitary Commniissioi
Board of Basic Sciences Examiners
Beauty Culture Board
Board of Chiropody Examiners
Board of Chiropractic Examiners
Board of Dental Exalilners
Board of EIIn ineer Exatminers
Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Board of Massage
Board of Medical Examiners
Board of Naturopathic Examiners
Board of Nulrsing
Board of Dispensing Opticians
Board of Optometry
Board of Osteopathic Examiners
Board of Pharmacy
Board of Psychology
Real Ftate Comlmitslion
Sanit.,rian's Registration Board
Pest Control Commission t
Board of Veterinary Examiners
Watchmaker's Comtmission t





SOCIAL SERVICES 1:


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a reference library on legislative subjects as a reservoir of information
for all these functions.
The results of the Bureau's research and of the Council's studies
and recommendations are made available to each member of the
Legislature so that members can act on the subjects with more in-
formation than they otherwise might have.

Journals and Calendars
Each house publishes a daily journal and a daily calendar. These
are placed on members' desks before the session begins each legis-
lative day. The Chief Clerk prepares the information which appears
in the journal and calendar of the House, and the Secretary of the
Senate prepares the information appearing in the journal and
calendar of the Senate.
Senate and House Journals are similar in form, each giving an
account of all actions taken during a legislative day.
The calendars of the Senate and House show what business is
scheduled for consideration each day. Bills are placed on the calen-
dar in the order that the reports are received from committees. In
the House, a bill receiving a favorable committee report may be
placed ahead of its regular order on the calendar by a two-thirds
vote of the members of the Committee on Rules and Calendar. In
the Senate, a bill may be placed ahead of its regular order by a
motion from the floor and a majority vote of all members present.


Forms of Legislative Expression
Legislative proposals may be in the form of bills, joint resolutions,
concurrent resolutions, resolutions and memorials.
A bill is a proposed law. A joint resolution is a proposal to amend
the State Constitution. A concurrent resolution is a proposal express-
ing the opinion or will of both houses of the Legislature, whereas a
resolution expresses the opinion or will of only one house. A me-
morial is a petition or prayer, addressed to the President of the United
States, the Congress or some official agency of the United States
Government, requesting action or expressing the Legislature's view-
point respecting a matter which is within the jurisdiction of the official
or agency addressed; it is adopted by both houses in the same manner
as that of a concurrent resolution.














Bills
There are several kinds of bills. A general bill contains proposed
legislation which would affect the entire state. A local bill contains
proposals which would affect a particular county or town named in
the bill. A local bill must either be advertised in the area to be
affected, prior to its introduction in the Legislature, or it must contain
a provision whereby the voters in the area will be allowed to vote
to accept or reject the measure should it be passed by the Legislature.
A general bill of local application is designed to affect areas within
a particular population bracket or other descriptions stated in the
bill. The criteria used are usually chosen so that only one particular
area is included in the effect of the bill.

Bill Drafting Service
The Attorney General provides a bill drafting service which is
available to members of the Legislature and other public officials on
request. Over half of the bills introduced during recent sessions have
been prepared in the office of the Attorney General.

How a Bill Becomes a Law
(See Chart on Page 21)
The Introduction. Bills may be introduced by Senators or members
of the House of Representatives in their respective houses of the
Legislature. One or more members of either house may introduce a
bill. When a bill has been prepared in its proper form, it is delivered
to the Secretary of the Senate, if the bill is to be introduced in the
Senate, or the Chief Clerk of the House, if the bill is to be introduced
in the House. It is checked for compliance with the constitution and
the rules of the house in which introduction is sought, and it is given
a number.
First Reading. If the bill meets the requirements, it is read for
the first time by title only. The presiding officer then refers it to the
committee he deems appropriate. The original bill is then delivered
to the chairman or Secretary of that committee.
A second copy of the bill is given to the bill clerk, and it is kept
by him for the use of the members. The third copy is given to the
Sergeant-at-Arms, who makes it available for the use of the general
public. The fourth copy is made available to the news reporters, and


















OUTLINE OF MAJOR STEPS IN THE FLORIDA

LEGISLATIVE PROCESS


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES SENATE


GOVERNOR'S ACTION
(A VETO IS RETURNED TO HOUSE)
(WHERE BILL ORIGINATED)


SECRETARY OF STATE
FOR INCLUSION IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
AND PRINTING














ranking executive officers of the State the Governor, Secretary of
State, Attorney General, Treasurer, Comptroller, Commissioner of
Agriculture, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction. After hold-
ing public hearings, the Budget Commission decides what amounts
it will recommend that the Legislature make available to the agencies.
The requests of the agencies and the recommendations of the Budget
Commission are printed and bound in report form and submitted to
the Legislature.
Members of the appropriations committees of both the House and
Senate meet with the Budget Commission for its hearings. After
these hearings, the appropriations committees divide into four inde-
pendent subcommittees. Each subcommittee is assigned a group of
state institutions and agencies. It visits and confers with the officials
of these organizations on their respective budgets and reports its
findings to the main committee. This procedure enables the com-
mittees to secure information regarding agency requests before the
session convenes.
When the Legislature meets, the appropriations committees hold
hearings of their own to secure additional information when neces-
sary. Each of the committees introduces an appropriations bill in
its respective house of the Legislature. The bills take the same
course as other general bills, but it is usually more difficult to get
both houses to agree on all items in the bills, and a conference com-
mittee is usually appointed to resolve the differences. This con-
ference committee is normally composed of the chairman and two
other members of the appropriations committee of each house.
Although the Governor's approval or veto of any other act applies
to the whole act, he may veto any distinct item or items in an appro-
priations act without affecting the rest of the bill. The Legislature
may override an item veto in the same manner as was described for
the veto of any other act.

Impeachments
The Governor, members of the Cabinet, Justices of the Supreme
Court and Judges of the District Courts of Appeal and Circuit Courts
may be removed from office only by impeachment. The House of
Representatives has the sole power to impeach; that is, to bring
charges against any of the above-mentioned officers for a misde-
meanor in office. The Senate tries all impeachments, and the Chief
Justice of the Supreme Court presides at all trials except in the trial


















GOVERNOR

of

FLORIDA

Honorable C. Farris Bryant, Ocala attorney,
is Florida's 34th Governor. He received
his B.S. degree from the University of
Florida and his LL.B. from Harvard Uni-
versity. He was a member of the Florida
Legislature from 1947 to 1955, and served
as Speaker of the House in 1953. He was a
member of the Legislative Council from
1949 to 1955 and served as its chairman
from July 15, 1950 until May 31, 1951.


C. FARRIS BRYANT

The FLORIDA CABINET


TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State


DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture


THOMAS D. BAILEY
Supt. of Public Instruction


RAY E. GREEN
Comptroller


;D)WIN LAISUIN
Treasurer


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has charge of the Capitol building and grounds. He issues charters
and certificates of incorporation to corporations, and certificates of
election to successful candidates for public office.

Attorney General
He is the legal advisor to the Governor and other officers in the
Executive Department, represents the State in legal proceedings, and
is responsible for the continuous revision of the Florida Statutes. He
is the constitutional reporter of the Supreme Court.

Comptroller
He examines requests for the payment of salaries and other obli-
gations of the State and issues warrants to pay them. He is the state
bank examiner and also collects a major portion of the taxes levied
by the State.

Treasurer
He keeps the funds and other securities belonging to the State,
keeps the general accounts, and as Insurance Commissioner and State
Fire Marshal, he enforces laws relating to insurance and fire pre-
vention.

Superintendent of Public Instruction
He is the chief administrative officer over the public school system.
He is also executive secretary of the State Board of Education. This
board is the rule-making body for the public schools, and it has super-
vision over the Board of Control, which governs the State's institu-
tions of higher learning.

Commissioner of Agriculture
He has duties related to the protection of the agricultural industry
of the State and inspects foods and drugs, weights and measures, and
gasoline to see that the required standards are maintained. He keeps
all records pertaining to public lands and has supervision of the
State Prison.

"Little Cabinet"
The full-time administrative heads of several large state agencies,
who are responsible to the Governor, are often referred to as his













The


SUPREME


COURT


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T77
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ELWYN THOMAS
Chief justice


GLENN TERRELL
Justice


E. HARRIS DREW
Justice


J. FHANK HObSON
Justice


CAMPBELL THORNAL
Justice
29


w A m
B. K. ROBERTS
Justice


STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
Justice


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CAPITOL


CENTER


STATE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE


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ST. AUGUSTINE ,





MADISON


JEFFERSON ST







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GAINES


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KEY TO BUILDINGS AND PARKS
(Agencies named in parenthesis are those by which
some buildings may be popularly known but not
necessarily the exclusive occupants).
A The Capitol (Legislature, offices of Governor and
members of the Cabinet)
B Supreme Court Building (Supreme Court, District
Court of Appeal and the State Library)
C Caldwell Building (Industrial Commission)
D Holland Building (Road Department)
E Knott Building (Depts. of Education, Conserva-
tion and the Legislative Reference Bureau)


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COURTESY .ALLEN MORRIS
FLORIDA HANDBOOK


F--Whitfield Building (Railroad Commission, Parole
Commission)
G Mayo Building (Department of Agriculture)
H Martin Building (Motor Vehicle Commission)
I--Carlton Building (Comptroller's Office, Develop-
ment Commission, Beverage Dept., Merit System,
Hotel Commission and State Auditor)
j Park honoring Former Secretary of Rtate R. A.
Gray
K- Park honoring Federal Circuit Judge Curtis L.
Waller
M Proposed State Office Building
N Road Department Annex




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