Group Title: Circular ;
Title: Bull evaluation
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096329/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bull evaluation testing bulls for breeding soundness
Alternate Title: Testing bulls for breeding soundness
Physical Description: 1 folded sheet (6 panels) : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Plummer, Charles B.
Warnick, A. C ( Alvin C )
University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Extension Service
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1966
Copyright Date: 1966
 Subjects
Subject: Bulls -- Evaluation -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Cattle -- Breeding -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Charles B. Plummer, Jr. and Alvin C. Warnick.
General Note: Panel title.
General Note: "Feb. 1966"--Panel 6
General Note: University of Florida Agricultural Extension Service circular 218A
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096329
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 502147913

Full Text
CIRCULAR 218 A


bull

evaluation


By
CHARLES- B. PLUMMER, JR.
Agricultural Extension Sewice Veterinarian
ALVIN C. WARNICK
Associate Physiologist Agricultural Experiment Station
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE





Testin bl f aoeng s S E N

11 1PHYSCAL PAIT


and when added together they make up the total
semen score.


Purpose.-This test is to give the cattleman
reasonable assurance that the bulls to be use
during the coming breeding season will settle
50% or more of his cows on first service if bred
to potentially fertile brood cows. This test will
help the cattleman cull those bulls that are poor
potential breeders and help improve his calf crop
and shorten his breeding se?0on.


Evaluation Based on Semen
Quality and Physical Traits:

Bulls rated satisfactory must meet certain
minimum standards in both semen quality and
physical traits. Even though a bull has a satis-
factory semen score but is blind or has a broken
penis, he would not be classified as a potentially
satisfactory breeder for natural breeding. By
the same token, a bull that has very satisfactory
physical traits but has a very low semen score
would not be a potential breeder.


Method of Evaluation:

Semen collected by any artificial method is ,
evaluated by examining the sperm cells, using
the following criteria:
1. Vigor (movement).
2. Concentration (numbers).
3. Morphology (shape-normal or abnormal).
4. Percent alive.

Each of the above is given a numerical score
based upon microscopic and gross examination


Classification of bulls:
1. Satisfactory.
2. Questionable.
3. Culls or unsatisfactory.


SATISFACTORY


Bulls in this group are physically fit, have a
semen score of 60 or above, and are considered
to be capable of settling, on the first service, not
less than 50% of the fertile cows to which they
are bred.

QUESTION A BLE

Bulls are placed in this classification for one or
more of the following reasons: (1) Question as
to whether a truly representative sample of se-
men was collected; (2) questionable repairable
physical defects; (3) semen scores between 40-
and 59.

Bulls in this group may be expected to settle a
few cows, but the conception rate would probably


fall below 50% on the first service. Tlhe .aay
change, for better or worse, at a later.ldle, and
should be re-checked at the discretior"of the owner
and veterinarian.

UNSATISFACTORY

Bulls in this group have a semen score of less
than 40 and obvious physical defects with little
or no chance for recovery.

Time for Testing Bulls:

Bulls should be tested just before the beginning
of the breeding season. However, for various
reasons, the rancher may want to check at other
times. Yearling bulls may be checked, but often
the semen score will be low due to sexual imma-
turity. Young bulls will generally score higher
with increasing age.


Physical traits include an examination for:
1. General condition.
2. Legs and feet
3. Age and teeth.
4. Eyes.
5. Reproductive organs.
6. Diseases and parasites.
7. Miscellaneous defects. JAI





Summary:

Bull testing is another tool that can be used
by cattlemen to eliminate unsatisfactory bulls
that have little or no chance for settling cows.
The test is not designed to put emphasis on small
differences that may exist in the potential fertility
of bulls classified as satisfactory for use in natural
breeding programs.

It should not be assumed that a bull with a score
of 90 to 100 would necessarily be a better pros-
pective breeder than one with a score of 60, 70


or 80. On the basis of present knowledge and
techniques of semen evaluation, we do not believe
that differences in dollar value for natural breed-
ing can be assigned to 2 "satisfactory" bulls, one
of which has a higher score than the other.

First Printing May 1961
Second Printing Feb. 1966

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Act* of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida, and United
States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
M. O. Watkins, Director


- I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs