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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Main
 Index of flowers














Title: Palms and flowers of Florida ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096253/00002
 Material Information
Title: Palms and flowers of Florida .. eighty drawings and descriptions
Physical Description: 27 p. : illus. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hall, Francis Dawson (Wyly), 1903-
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Pass-a-Grille Fla
Publication Date: c1940
 Subjects
Subject: Botany -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096253
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000665367
notis - ADK5740
oclc - 06567658
lccn - 42045269

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15-16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Index of flowers
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text

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PRICE 65 CENTS


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Sold by
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Maitland, Florida






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I should like to rise and go
Where the waving palm trees blow,
And toss their feathered lances high
Across the sunlit Southern sky.
Where the flowers on every hand
Bloom in nature's wonderland,
And their glowing colors seen
Like a rainbow in a dream.








EIGHTY-SIX DRAWINGS AND DESCRIPTIONS
By

FRANCES WYLY HALL
P. 0. Box 896
Neptune Beach, Florida
Copyrighted 1940
Reprinted 1942
Reprinted 1944
Reprinted 1945
Reprinted 1946
Reprinted 1948
Reprinted 1949
Reprinted 1952
Reprinted 1953
Reprinted 1955
Reprinted 1957
Reprinted 1958
Reprinted 1960
Author of:
SHELLS OF THE FLORIDA COASTS
BIRDS OF FLORIDA
FISH & FISHING IN FLORIDA






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University of Florida Libraries



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hearty appreciation."
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Royal Palm (Oreodoxa regia). (Royston-
ea regia). These trees, native to the ex-
treme southern part of Florida, are con-
sidered by many to be our most beautiful
palms. They tower nearly a hundred feet
igh, with glimmering, pale gray trunks,
and glorious crowns of darkly green, shin-
ing leaves. The massive trunks, 3 feet in
diameter, bulge at the base, taper, bulge
again, then rise smooth and straight, to the
point where the leaf shaft starts. From that
point to where the leaves diverge, it is
right green. The large graceful leaves are
12 feet long, with leaflets 2 to 3 feet long.
The fruit is small, % inch long, bluish in
color.









3






PALMS


Florida is justly famous for its
many palms, which lend their graceful
beauty as a background for its pic-
turesque scenes. They line our ave-
nues and highways, and dense jungles
of Cabbage and Palmetto palms are
to be found in most parts of the state.
Many a romance has flourished under
the palms and the sound of the wind
as it whispers through their leaves,
lingers in the memory, bringing a
nostalgic longing to return to the land
of the palm trees.

Palm trees are not to be taken too
lightly, but regarded with the respect
due their great age. Historians tell
us that palms are a very ancient
species of the plant world. They grew
in Montana and Asia, along with figs,
bread-fruit trees and a kind of orange
tree, in the Eocene period, some 55,-
000,000 years ago. The cycads are
even more ancient. Sago palms, cy-
cads and a group of plants between
the tree-fern and palms, first ap-
peared in the Permian period, 215,-
000,000 years ago, and by the time the
Mesozoic era rolled around 190,000,000
years ago, were found throughout the
world.

Nearly all the palms which are
native to the United States, or can be
grown in this country, can be found in
Florida. Many are tall, stately trees,
sometimes reaching a height of one
hundred feet, without branches, and
bearing at the top a magnificent
crown of immense leaves. These
leaves are long-lasting and only drop
off as new ones grow at the summit.
Some species form clusters by putting
out suckers at the base, while others,
such as the palmetto, grow from re-
clining trunks. The flowers are small,
but are produced in dense masses, of
striking appearance, with as many as
six hundred blossoms on a single tree.
Some of these flowers give forth a
strong, sweetish, musty odor which
attracts crowds of insects. The fruit
is sometimes a berry, sometimes a
nut, as the coconut, or a drupe, as the
date.


The tropical parts of America pro-
duce by far the greatest number of
species. Florida has about 12 native
palms, and many imported ones that
flourish in her climate. The Coconut
has become cosmopolitan, but many
palms have very narrow geographical
limits. The Coconut often grows near
the water and some of the nuts, when
they fall off, are washed away to
other shores, there to start life for
themselves.
Palms are extremely useful trees,
and are grown for their commercial
value in many countries. Some of
them provide food, drink and shelter,
to the native tribes, who are depen-
dent on them almost for their very
lives. The most useful are the Date,
the Coconut and the Cabbage, all of
which are popular in Florida as orna-
mental trees.
The familiar Cabbage palm has
numerous uses. The heart is eaten
as .a great delicacy, but to remove it
kills the tree. Medicine is made from
the berries, whisk brooms and build-
ing blocks from the fibre, tannin
from the roots, mats, rope and fans
from the leaves and log cabins from
the trunks.

There are more than one thousand
species of palms, divided into one-
hundred and thirty genera. There
are two types of palms, those with
pinnate leaves, or whose leaflets are
arranged along a central midrib, like
a feather, and those whose leaves are
shaped like a fan. The fan palms com-
prise about one-sixth of the whole
number of palms, and have larger
leaves than any other plant, although
some of the pinnate group have leaves
fifty feet long, and eight feet wide.
The trunk, or stem, is usually scarred
with rings or ridges where the old
leaves have fallen off, and sometimes
the broken bases of the leaf stalks re-
main on the trunk for a long time.
The leaves of the palm tree are
shiny. This is also true of many
tropical fruits, flowers and trees. It
is caused by a sort of varnish which
retains the moisture within the leaf,
thus protecting it from the intense
heat of the sun, and from protracted
dry spells.









































GROUP OF

COCONUT PALMS


The Coconut palm is one of
our best loved palms. Salt water
and brackish soils do not seem
to hurt it, and it is often seen
near the water's edge. (Page 6.)
The Royal palm is also one of
our native species (page 3) as
is the Cabbage palm (page 8)
the Silver palm (page 9) the
Blue Stem Dwarf Palmetto
(page 8) the Saw Palmetto
(page 9) and the Thrinax
species, including Thatch palm
(page 9) Key Thatch and Brit-
tle Thatch which is very similar.
The former has a heavy trunk,
about one foot in diameter, and
a base of exposed and matted
roots nearly two feet high. The
latter is without this base, more
slender of trunk. All grow to a
height of 25 to 30 feet.


FLORIDA'S

NATIVE PALMS

Needle Palm (Rhapidophyllum hys-
trix). Native. A low growing species
with usually a reclining trunk, cov-
ered with fibre, and armed with
spines. Fan-shaped leaves, erect and
stiff, cut into many segments, which
are toothed at the ends, dark green
above, grayish beneath.

Saw Cabbage Palm (Acoelornaphe
Wrightii). Native. Grows in clumps,
about 40 feet tall, with slender trunks.
Fan-shaped leaves, 2 to 3 feet across,
cleft about half-way, ,and these seg-
ments cut in turn. Leaf stalks are
long and armed with heavy spines.

Buccaneer Palm (Pseudophoenix
vinifera). Native. Trees about 25
feet high, with smooth, light trunks,
bulged in the middle. Pinnate leaves
are 4 to 6 feet long, dark green. It
bears orange scarlet fruits.

Scrub Palmetto (Sabal Etonia).
Native. This species resembles the
Dwarf Palmetto, except that the deep-
ly cleft, fan-shaped leaves have nu-
merous thread like fibres.

James Palmetto (Sabal Jamesiana).
This palmetto attains a height of 15
feet, has large heavily drooping leaves
on rather slender stems. The leaf
blades themselves are flat, without
the sharp bend at the midrib of most
palmettos. It is found in the far
south of Florida.

This covers the state's native
species. Many palms have been
brought here, from Madagascar, Afri-
ca, India, Brazil, the South Sea Is-
lands and other tropic countries.
Most of them flourish in our mild
climate, especially in Southern Flor-
ida and in the Keys. I have not
attempted to give all the varieties of
palms found in Florida but have
selected the ones which are more
widely planted, and most interesting.






























A l e x a n d e r' s Palm (Archontophoenix
Alexandrae). This palm, closely allied to
the "Seaforthia" and "Loroma," reaches a
height of 70 feet, with straight trunks,
bulging at the base, spineless, ringed with
scars. Leaves are large, graceful, 10 feet
long, leaflets rather stiff, deep green.
























Canary Island Date (Phoenix canariensis).
This is the handsomest of the many Phoenix
palms, with its huge, barrel like trunk, and
its crown of leaves, 20 feet long, with flat,
glossy, dark-green, densely-set leaflets.
Flowers are small, yellow, borne in dense
clusters, followed by small, bright orange
berries.


Cane Palm (Chrysalidocarpus lutescens).
Madagascar. Has several slender, smooth,
light brownish trunks, ringed with yellow.
It grows 10 to 15 feet high, with arching,
graceful leaves, forming a beautiful mass of
bright, yellow-green foliage. It is grown in
the southern half of the state.


Coconut (Cocos nucifera). Native to
southern Florida, grows 80 feet tall, with
brown, ridged trunks, bulging at the base,
and leaning at picturesque angles. The im-
mense, sweeping leaves are 12 to 18 feet
long. Small, whitish flowers are borne
beneath the crown. The coconuts, produced
in clusters, are 8 to 12 inches long.






























Cocos Plumoso (Arecastrum Romanzof-
fianum). Brazil. Trunk slender, tall, smooth,
with old leaf stalks near the top. Graceful,
arching leaves, the leaflets fine and droop-
ing. It bears great clusters of long strings
of tiny, yellow flowers, and immense clusters
of small, dark, round fruits.


Common Date Palm. (Phoenix dactyli-
fera). Africa, India. The palm of scripture.
Trunk is tall, straight, slender, ridged,
bearing at the top a crown of 40 leaves,
8 to 10 feet long. Flowers are yellow.
Fruit, the date, is red orange, borne in great
clusters. They do not mature in Florida.


Fish Tail Palm (Caryota urens). South-
ern Asia. 40 or more feet tall. The leaflets
are shaped like the tail of a fish. It has a
stout, smooth, widely ringed trunk, and
large spreading, drooping leaves. The seeds
look like long ropes of yellow beads. Each
year the bloom is borne lower on the trunk,
till it is near the ground, when the tree
dies. (Sketch shows leaf).


Spindle Palm (Hyophorbe Verschaffeltii).
Mauritius. 30 feet tall. It has a spineless,
smooth, heavy trunk, bulging just below
the leaf crown. Leaves are 4 to 6 feet long,
borne at the top, and close to the trunk,
with a yellow band extending the length of
the blade. Closely allied is "Hyophorbe am-
aricaulis" or "Bottle Palm," with a heavy
bottle-shaped trunk.






























Cabbage Palm (Sabal palmetto). Native.
Sometimes 80 feet tall, with a trunk 2 feet
in diameter, covered with "boot-jacks,"
which on old trees gradually drop off, leav-
ing the trunk scarred, and ridged. Leaves
are 5 feet across, grayish green, deeply cut,
drooping or twisted. Berry like, black fruits
are borne in great clusters.


Chinese Fan Palm (Livistona chinensis).
China; grows 30 feet tall, and has a stout
trunk, smooth, but ringed. Leaves ,are large,
cut into about 60 segments, characterized by
their graceful, distinctly drooping manner.
Leaf stalks are spiny along the lower part.
Fruit is grayish blue-green, %/ inch long,
olive shaped.


Dwarf Palmetto (Sabal minor). This is
the native "Blue Stem Palmetto." It is a
trunkless palm with smooth, stout, fairly
erect leaf stalks, which bear the large
leaves, 3 feet across, almost circular, cut
nearly to the stem, quite stiff, bluish green.
The fruits are black, % inch in diameter.
The flowers are borne in very long spikes.


Fiji Fan Palm (Pritchardia pacifica).
Fiji Islands; 30 feet tall, spineless, with a
slender, smooth straight trunk. The leaves,
3 to 4 feet across, are not deeply cut, and
the segments are fine and rather stiff.
It is not hardy, only adapted to southern
Florida, but is one of the most beautiful
of the fan-leaved palms.






























Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens). Native.
A heavy trunk twists along the ground, and
sends out the nearly circular, stiff, deeply
cut leaves, yellowish green, except along the
East Coast, where they are bluish. The leaf
stalks are spiny. It bears a profusion of
tiny, cream flowers of musty, sweet odor,
and small, black, berry-like fruits.


Thatch Palm (Thrinax floridana). Native
to Florida and West Indies; spineless, with
slender trunks, 6 inches in diameter, and
they grow 30 feet tall. Leaves are nearly
circular, deeply cut, glossy, light green
above, grayish beneath. Thrinax keyensis
has a trunk 1 foot thick, with a swollen
base of matted roots.


Silver Palm (Coccothrinax argentia). Na-
tive to the southern Florida keys, and Bis-
cayne Bay. It grows 25 feet high, with a
slender trunk, 6 inches thick, smooth, gray-
ish-brown. Leaves are deeply cut, thinish,
light shining green on top, silvery beneath,
borne on long, somewhat drooping leaf
stalks. Fruit is small, black-fleshed.


Thread Palm (Washingtonia filifera). Na-
tive to California and Mexico; very hardy,
it grows 50 feet tall, has a reddish-brown
trunk, heavy at the base, the upper part cov-
ered with bases of dead leaf stalks. Leaves
are 3 to 5 feet across, bright, shiny, yellow-
ish green, and stiff. At their tips are numer-
ous white threads. The leaf stalks are spiny.






























Washington Palm (Washingtonia robus-
ta). California; named for George Washing-
ton. It grows 60 feet or more tall, with a
straight, slender trunk, which in the older
trees is covered with a matted collar of dead
leaves. Leaves are 3 to 5 feet across, deeply
cut, drooping at the tips, bright green in
color, borne on spiny leaf stalks.


Traveller's Palm (Ravenala). Madagas-
car. By piercing the base of a leaf stalk, a
quart of pure water may be obtained. The
trunk sends out leaves only on the two op-
posite sides, like a huge, flat fan. There are
20 to 24 flat, bright green, glossy leaves, 6
feet long. Large, dark, bluish fruits are
borne in clusters.


Screw Pine (Pandanus). This tropical
tree, while not a palm, is often taken for
one. Its appearance is odd, with its stilt
like aerial roots, which gradually push the
tree out of the ground. The angular
branches are light gray, scarred, forked,
bearing at the ends of the forks, tufts of
long, sword-shaped leaves. It bears a cone-
shaped, yellow, edible fruit.


Saga Palm. While not a true palm, this is
often called one. It is a native of Japan, is
hardy, and widely planted in Florida. It
reaches a height of 10 feet, with a heavy
crown of thick, waxy, stiff, dark green, fern
like leaves, 3 to 5 feet long, which form an
almost perfect circular mound of green.



























Hibiscus (Rosa sinensis). The Hi-
biscus, a native of China, is outstand-
ing among all Florida shrubs, and is
the official flower of Hawaii. It grows
to a height of ten feet, with hand-
some, evergreen leaves, large and
coarsely toothed. The common type
bears showy, scarlet flowers, 5 inches
across, which last for but a single day,
but the plants bloom all the year.
Others are pink, white or salmon, sin-
gle or double. Recent hybrids have
blossoms as large as 9 inches across.
Florida is a land where flowers
revel in the hot sunshine, where tropic
vines climb rampant over porches and
walls, and fling their clusters of gor-
geous blossoms high into the trees.
Species that have to be carefully cul-
tivated in greenhouses in the north,
grow luxuriantly in Florida's warm
climate. I have not the space to de-
scribe nearly all of them, so have
selected those which are tropic or
semi-tropic, and those most interest-
ing to our visitors. However, I should
like to mention a few here, which are
not included in this small book. First,
I have left out Florida's state flower,
the Orange blossom, and ,also the
Poinsettia, as these two are already
known to everyone. Then there is the
night-blooming Cereus, and the night-
blooming Jasmine, both of which are
lovely and fragrant, but not seen by
many tourists. The Tree Orchids are
interesting, though they are not really


Orchids but air plants, belonging to
the same family as the Spanish Moss.
They look much like long-leaved Pine-
apple Plants, and grow on the trunks
and limbs of trees. The bloom is in-
conspicuous. There is, too, the mis-
called Purple Allamanda, which is
really Cryptostegia, and a source of
rubber. A very interesting one is the
Trumpet Flower, ,a shrub similar to
the Oleander in appearance, which has
large, bell-shaped, apricot colored
flowers, followed by spiny seed pods,
which contain the "Sailor's Lucky
Beans." One of our native vines is the
"Cats Claw Vine," with its small
pointed leaves, large yellow tubular
flowers, 'and the characteristic, tiny,
three pronged "claws" by which it
climbs. I'll also mention the "Garlic
Vine," which has large, dark green
leaves, and masses of lavender and
purple flowers, and gets its name
from the odor of garlic given off by
the leaves, when crushed.

Florida, also boasts many beautiful
flowering trees, including the purple
flowered Jacaranda, the flaming Royal
Poinciana, the Mountain Ebony, with
its orchid like blooms of lilac, and
the Florida Holly, with its masses of
red berries. There is a book on the
market, "Florida Trees," by Snyder,
which will be found helpful along this
line.

Of course, Florida's climate is ideal
for many of the northern flowers, and
one sees quantities of Petunias, Phlox,
Roses, Zinnias, Altheas and many
others.
I have not included many of the
wild flowers, especially the small ones,
as there is a very good book available
on them, "Florida Wild Flowers,"
by Baker.
I have made every effort to have
the information I have given authen-
tic, drawing the flowers from life, and
checking my own descriptions against
"Bailey's Cyclopedia of Horticulture."
Two of the experts at the Smithsonian
Institute, at Washington, D. C.,
checked the Latin names of the flow-
ers. There is always some difference
of opinion where common names are
concerned, as they often differ in dif-
ferent localities.
I hope this book will give you at
least a "speaking acquaintance," with
many of our loveliest flowers.


























Allamanda. One of the most popu-
lar vines, also used as a shrub, in
Florida, and seen throughout the state,
It is a native of Brazil -and Central
America. The leaves are long, pointed
smooth, light green, and grow in
whorls of three or four. The vine
bears numerous large, showy, lemon
yellow trumpet-shaped flowers, 2
inches long.


Bougainvillea. This native of South
America, is the most brilliant and
popular of all our flowering vines. It
bears numerous large, crimson, purple,
or salmon colored bracts, in groups
of three, each group enfolding three
tiny white flowers. The leaves are
smooth, oval and pointed. It blooms
in winter and spring, the bloom-bracts
remaining in perfect condition for a
long time. The bougainvillea is used
as covering for walls and porches, or
trimmed for borders.


Brazilian Glory (Ipomoea). This
native of Brazil, which belongs to the
same family as the northern Morning
Glory and the Moonflower, is one of
our popular winter flowering vines. It
grows rapidly, and forms a dense
screen, because of its large thick
leaves, which are 3 to 10 inches
across, heart-shaped or three lobed. It
gears rich magenta crimson flowers.


Cape Honeysuckle (Tecoma ca-
pensis). This evergreen vine, a native
of the West Indies, belongs to the
Trumpet-creeper family. It is becom-
ing naturalized all along the Gulf
Coast. The leaves are pinnate, with
7 to 9 leaflets growing opposite along
each leaf stem. They are bright green,
coarsely toothed. The trumpet like
flowers, 2 to 3 inches long, are vivid
red orange, with long yellow stamens,
and are borne in loose clusters.


























Carolina Yellow Jessamine (Gelse-
mium sempervirens). This native Flor-
ida vine is one of the joys of early
spring in the state. It climbs over
porches and into trees, blooming pro-
fusely from late January till April.
The stem is twining and purplish,
leaves glossy and evergreen. The
vivid yellow flowers, 11/2 inches long,
bell-shaped, and very fragrant, are
borne in clusters of two to six.


Cherokee Rose (Rosa laevigata).
This charming vine, a native of China
and Japan, naturalized in Florida, is
seen along our roadsides, blooming in
January if the winter is warm. It has
a trailing stem, armed with thorns, and
the evergreen leaves, which grow in
threes, are dark and glossy. The very
abundant white flowers are borne sing-
ly on the branches, and -are 1 to 2 inches
across, and delightfully fragrant.


Chalice Vine (Solandra grandiflora).
This showy tropical vine is a native of
Mexico. The leaves .are large, shiny and
fleshy. The flowers are cup-shaped,
on slender tubes. They are 5 inches
across, and fragrant. A greenish white
when they first open, they turn to a
rich brownish yellow. Solandra guttata
has bright yellow flowers with pur-
plish lines in throat. Blooms in winter.


Confederate Jasmine (Trachelosper-
mum jasminoides). This is not a true
jasmine, but is often called one. It
is a valuable evergreen vine through-
out the state, strong growing, high
climbing. The leaves are dark, leath-
ery and glossy, attractive the year
round. It blooms profusely in early
spring, bearing numerous clusters of
small, pure white, very fragrant flow-
ers, which look like miniature pin-
wheels, about 1 inch across.





Fringed Hibiscus (Hibiscus schizo-
petalus). This lovely Hibiscus is a
native of tropical East Africa. The
branches of the shrub are sparse, and
the leaves are scattered, but the
bloom more than compensates for
this. The flowers 'and buds sway
from long, pendant stems. Our or-
namental shrub has large blossoms
and small pods, but we are all famil-
iar with another member of the fam-
ily, Hibiscus esculentus, which is the
popular garden vegetable, Okra, with
its small flowers 'and large pods. In
China, the Hibiscus Rosa sinensis,
or Rose of China, is valued for the
buds which are used in curries and
soups. A hybrid with yellow flowers,
which can be grown from seed, has
been developed, Hibiscus manihot.


Gaillardia or Blanket Flower (Gail-
lardia). The Gaill-ardia, carefully cul-
tivated in northern gardens, grows
wild in Florida, and brightens road-
sides and fields with patches of gay
color. They bloom the year round and
I have seen them in all parts of the
state. From a thick clump of long,
narrow leaves, more or less toothed,
rise the flowers, each on its own
stem. In one variety the ends of the
petal split to form tiny three-petal
flowers. The deep orange-red with
yellow-tipped petals is the most com-
mon. Some have a purplish cast with
white-tipped petals. The name Blan-
ket Flower is very appropriate, for
they literally blanket the ground in
places.

Passion Flower or Maypop (Passi-
flora incarnata). One of the most
beautiful, unusual and appealing of
our native flowers is the Passion
Flower. It received its name from
the Spaniards when they saw it in
South America, who saw in the plant
a resemblance to the crucifixion. The
fringed corona represents the halo
about Christ's head, or, the crown of
thorns; the pistil is for the three
nails; the five stamens are five
wounds; the sepals and petals stand
for ten of the disciples; the young
seed pod is the vinegar soaked sponge;
the tendrils are the whips; the leaves
(three or five lobed) represent the
hands of Christ. The blossoms are
fragrant, about two inches across.
Though usually purple, there is also
a white variety with a pale laven-
der corona, and -another has a green-
ish white flower with the corona
blue on the tips, white in the middle
and purple at the base. The vine
bears an edible fruit two inches
long. It prefers a dry soil, and can
often be seen along the shoulders of
the roads.


Dwarf or False Poinciana (Poinci-
ana pulcherrima). These little shrubs
or trees, members of the Pea family,
are one of the showiest of our native
flowers. It is not unusual to see
them by the dozens in vacant lots,
along roads, in fields, or, carefully
planted in front yards. In the south-
ern part of Florida they bloom in
late winter, in early spring in the
northern part. The branches are
drooping, bearing clustered racemes
of the red-orange flowers. The flowers
are followed by seed pods 3 4 inches
long.

Water Hyacinth (Eichornia cras-
sipes). This native of tropical South
America has become naturalized in
Florida, and has taken possession
of many streams, lakes and rivers,
until it has become a curse to navi-
gation, and so much money has been
spent trying to clean it out, that it
is called the "Million-dollar-weed."
However, the sight of an .acre or so
of these plants in bloom, a cloud of
bluish-orchid, is so beautiful as to
call to mind the saying, "a thing of
beauty is a joy forever." The leaf
stalks are globular, and inflated with
air, forming buoys by which the
plant floats. In full bloom it bears
a spike of about eight lovely flowers,
1 inches across. It is found
throughout the state, and blooms the
year round, though most vigorously
in late fall and early winter. A
close relative is the Pickerel Weed
(Pontederia cordata) whose dense
spikes of bluish-purple flowers bright-
en wet ditches along the highways.

Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia in-
dica). One of the finest of our south-
ern shrubs is the Crepe Myrtle, used
largely for yards and gardens. If the
bloom is examined the reason for the
name, Crepe Myrtle, becomes ap-
parent. The flowers are generally
pink, from deep, watermelon, to pale
shades, sometimes with a lavender
tinge. There is a white variety,
which is less common. The shrub
often grows as tall as a small tree.

Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia re-
ginae). This odd tropical plant, al-
ways of interest to visitors to Florida,
reaches a height of 3 feet. The leaves
are stiff, concave, 1 foot or more
long, with sturdy stalks. About six
orange and purplish-blue flowers, are
held in a nearly horizontal spathe,
6 inches long, and boat-shaped. The
plant is a close relative of the
banana. It is a native of South
Africa, and one of our winter bloom-
ing herbs.







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14





Oleander (Nerium oleander). The
popular Oleander is a native of the
Mediterranean and Asia Minor. It
is hardy in Florida, and is widely
used for street and roadside plant-
ing, and as an ornamental shrub,
over the entire state. It blooms near-
ly all the year, but more profusely in
late winter and early spring. It
grows as tall as a small tree. The
leaves are glossy as in many trop-
ical plants. The gloss serves as pro-
tection against the hot sun. The
leaves exude a milky juice when
broken, and cattle have become ill
from eating them. The flowers are
single or double, pink, white, peach
or red, sometimes fragrant, and
borne in large clusters.

Pitcher Plant or Spotted Trumpet
Leaf (Sarracenia minor). An extreme-
ly interesting plant is the Spotted
Trumpet Leaf, one of the insect
catching family. The leaves, which
have a hollow tube down one side,
are baited with a sweet nectar to
lure the passing victim. Once having
entered beneath the overhanging hood,
the trapped insect dashes itself
against the transparent spots on the
back of the arch of the leaf, until it
falls exhausted into a fluid at the
base of the tube. Here it is dissolved,
and consumed as food by the plant.
The flowers are 'about 2 inches
across, borne one on a stalk. The
plant grows 8-20 inches high, in low
ground.

Shrimp Plant (Beloperone). This
unusual tropical American shrub, 3-5
feet high, bears numerous heads of
over-lapping, reddish-bronze floral
bracts, at the end of which emerge
small, slender white flowers, each
having two petals and long stamens.
This combination of bracts and flow-
ers has a close resemblance to a boiled
shrimp. It grows in any part of the
state, and blooms during most of the
year.

Blue Spiderwort (Tradescantia re-
flexia). These charming, delicate
flowers must be seen in the morning,
before they wilt in the heat of the
day. They grow wild in Florida, in
low y soil. The Spiderwort is
known by other common names that
seem to me more appropriate and at-
tractive. It is called Day or Dew
Flower, Nine O'clocks, and Trinity.
The flowers are 1 inch across, and
the plant grows about 2 feet tall.
The familiar Wandering Jew, and
Moses-in-the-Bullrushes (see page
28) are of this same family. Other
varieties of the Spiderwort have
white or pinkish flowers.


Cypress Vine (Quamoclit pennata).
This dainty, scarlet flowered climber
has long been a garden favorite. It
has escaped cultivation in Florida,
and often tries to take possession of
our vegetable gardens. The flowers
are small, % of an inch across. It
blooms in late winter and early
spring.
Most of the visitors to Florida are
interested in the Air Plants. The
best known of these is the Spanish
Moss (Dendropogon usneoides) a
plant of the pineapple family. Some
people do not care for the Spanish
Moss, especially when they first see
it. I have heard them say it is dark
and depressing, weird and unnatural.
To me it is beautiful, hanging from
the branches of the great oaks, with
the bright shafts of sunlight stream-
ing through it in golden lances, or
again, blowing like banners in the
breeze, on a windy day; or at night,
drifting ghost-like, calm and peace-
ful, touched to silver by the moon.
These Air Plants are called Epi-
phites, by the botanists. They are not
parasites, and do not hurt the trees
to which they cling, unless they be-
come so dense as to shut off the
sunlight. In early spring the moss
blooms, but the flowers are so tiny,
that they often are not noticed. They
are three-petal flowers, pale yellow-
ish.
Tree orchids, also Epiphites, are
often seen in the southern part of
the state. Usually they are attached
to trees in hammocks or swamps,
where the air is damp. Showiest of
these is Tillandsia fasciculata, with
bright red bracts and spikes of 2
inch long, blue flowers. The grayish
leaves grow in a cluster from the
base of the plant. They are 1-2 feet
long, very slender, recurved and
pointed. Another showy one is Til-
landsia utriculata, a large, light
green orchid, with pale, cream flow-
ers. This one grows on a stem some-
times several feet tall and branched.
The orchid most people can see with
no difficulty is Tillandsia recurvata,
the hardiest of them all. It grows
like a small gray tuft on the trees,
and attaches itself to telegraph or
telephone wires. The narrow, gray-
ish leaves are 2-5 inches long, and
it bears small, blue flowers.


























Pithecoctemium. There are 23 spe-
cies of this tropical bignonia-like
climber, which is a native of Brazil
and Mexico. The dark green leaves
are smooth, pointed, and grow in
threes or have the center leaf trans-
formed into a tendril. The flowers are
large, two inches long, trumpet-
shaped, white with yellow throats, and
fragrant. The fruit is a capsule, short,
thick and covered with prickles or
warts. The vine blooms in late winter
and early spring.


Sky Flower of India (Thunbergia
grandiflora). This is one of the most
gorgeous blue flowered vines to be
found in Florida. It has large, heart-
shaped, overlapping leaves. The flow-
ers are a lovely, clear, azure blue, be-
coming whitish in the throat, about 3
inches ,across. A white variety has long
hanging clusters of white flowers with
yellow throats. Grows over 30 ft. high.


Queen's Wreath (Petrea volubilis).
This native of the American tropics,
is a woody vine, with large, rough,
prettily veined leaves. It bears grace-
ful clusters, 8 inches long, of very
lovely flowers, about 2 dozen in a clus-
ter. Each flower has a calyx of gray-
ish blue, like a five pointed star, with
a violet-like flower of royal purple,
in the center. Blooms profusely in
winter and spring.


Vanilla (Vanilla aromatica). The
Vanilla is a climbing orchid, and a na-
tive of Mexico. It is tall growing,
with thick stems, from the joints of
which grow stout, light green, waxy
leaves, 'and aerial rootlets. Beautiful,
yellow, trumpet-shaped, fragrant flow-
ers, about 4 inches across, are borne
in large clusters. The vine also bears
a pod, from which the Vanilla of com-
merce is obtained. It blooms in winter.



























Coral Vine (Antignon leptopus).
This is the Mountain Rose, or Coral-
lita of Mexico. A strong grower, it
climbs high over porches and walls,
fastening itself securely by tendrils.
In southern Florida it blooms all the
year. Its alternate, many veined leaves
are light green, heart-shaped, 3 to 5
inches long. The small flowers are
heart shaped, a beautiful coral pink,
borne in long sprays of from 6 to 15
blooms.


Italian Yellow Jasmine (Jasminum
Humile). This Jasmine is a native of
tropical Asia, hardy in Florida, and
when given support, climbing to a
height of 20 feet. The branches are
smooth and angular, leaves thick and
usually grow in threes. The flowers
are small, % inch across, bright yel-
low, very fragrant and borne in loose
clusters.


Flame Vine (Bignonia venusta).
This popular, tropical vine, a native
of Brazil, excels in brilliance of color
and bundance of bloom. It climbs by
tendrils over fences, walls and porches,
and high into trees. It blooms in
winter. The leaves are light green,
smooth and pointed. The flowers,
borne in dense drooping clusters that
nearly cover the vine, are trumpet-
shaped, and flaming orange in color.


Jasmine (Jasminum illicifolium).
There are more than a hundred spe-
cies of Jasmines, vines or shrubs, grow-
ing in the warm parts of the world.
This type has glossy, pointed leaves,
and terminal, loose clusters of very
fragrant white flowers, 1 inches
across, and purplish pink underneath.
It blooms in late winter and spring,
is popular in Florida, and can be
trained as a vine or a willowy shrub.


























Mexican Flame Vine (Senecio con-
fusus). This tropical vine from Mex-
ico, is becoming one of our most
popular vines, as it is an almost con-
stant bloomer, and thrives throughout
the state. The leaves are light green,
pointed, toothed edges, and grow alter-
nately. The daisy like flowers, borne
in loose terminal clusters, have yel-
low centers and bright, reddish orange
petals.


Pandorea (Tecoma Ricasoliana).
This tropical beauty, a native of South
Africa, is one of the handsomest of
our flowering vines. Foliage is open,
light green, with pinnate leaves, the 7
to 9 leaflets growing opposite, with the
odd one at the end. They are toothed
with long slender points. Lovely flow-
ers, borne in large, drooping clusters,
are of orchid pink, with lines of deeper
orchid. The blososms are slightly
fragrant, and the calyx is white.


Pandorea (Tecoma jasminoides).
This, a native of tropical Australia,
has evergreen leaves, dark and shin-
ing, smooth, oval, drawn into long
points, grow in threes. The vine bears
clusters of large, trumpet-shaped
flowers, three inches long, white and
pinkish purple throats. The blooms
are produced during most of the year.


Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus grandi-
florus) Alsocalled "SleepingHibiscus."
This shrub has good thick foliage. The
leaves are large, coarsely toothed, and
evergreen. The flower hangs bell-like
on a weak stem, and keeps its bright
red petals closely furled. The plant
blooms the year round, and the flow-
ers remain in perfect condition for a
long time. It is grown in quantities
throughout the State.


























African Yellow Daisy. Native. The
dull green leaves are jagged and
toothed like those of the sunflower, to
which family it belongs. The hairy
stems when broken, give forth a sticky
juice smelling like turpentine. The
golden yellow flowers 11/2 to 2 inches
across, have centers of dark, rich
brown, almost black. It grows in
colorful clumps, 12 to 18 inches high,
and is a constant bloomer.


Azalea (Ericaceae). Florida has
three native Azaleas; Azalea cane-
scens, which has flowers of pink to
deep rose, Azalea austrina is yellow to
orange, tinted with red. Both of these
bloom in February to early spring.
Azalea serrulata is white, blooming in
summer. They all have smooth glossy
dark green leaves. Azaleas bloom
throughout Florida, in masses of
breath-taking beauty. One of the
most popular varieties is the large-
flowered, magenta Formosa.


Angel's Trumpet (Datura). This
tropical American shrub belongs to
the same family as the potato. Grows
6 feet high, with large wavy-toothed
leaves. The flowers, 3 to 4 inches long
are white, yellow or lavender with a
pleasant odor. One variety develops
three trumpets, one within the other,
while others are single or double. It
blooms nearly all the year, and bears a
spiny fruit, called a thorn apple. Datu-
ras contain strong poisonous narcotics.


Bag Flower (Clerodendron). West
Africa; either a vine or shrub. The
leaves are dark, oval pointed, many
veined and grow opposite or in threes.
The calyx of the flower is as showy as
the bloom, being of white, with five
pointed lobes, which clasp the long,
slender tube of the flower. The flowers
are a dark, blood red, small, borne in
loose, branching clusters.



























Blue Leadwort (Plumbago capen-
sis). This shrub (sometimes a vine)
is a native of South Africa and widely
used throughout Florida. The branches
are delicate, and the small, oval, light
green leaves, grow in clusters along
their joints. The flowers borne in
rounded clusters, are a pale azure
blue, to % of an inch across. It
blooms in winter and spring.


Camellia japonica. China and Japan;
will thrive in all parts of Florida,
though better suited to the northern
half. It is a handsome rather large
shrub, with glossy, dark green foliage,
producing in winter, beautiful, perfect
flowers, creamy white, pink, red or
variegated. Some varieties are double.
The Camellia is one of the most prized
of our flowering shrubs.


Bottle Brush (Callistemon). Austra-
lia. This shrub gets its name from the
Greek "kallos" beauty, and "stemon"
stamen, and its lovely scarlet stamens
give it its beauty. It grows 6 to 10
feet high, with many branches, and
thick evergreen leaves, small, slender,
dull green. The small green flowers
grow in a spike, almost hidden by the
inch long bright red stamens.


Caster Oil Plant (Ricinus commu-
nis). India and Africa; naturalized
here, and grows 6 feet high. The dark
red stems are thick, smooth, fleshy.
Handsome leaves, to 2 feet across,
are cut into 7 or 9 lobes, with toothed
edges, green on top, red veins, and
purplish red beneath. It bears clusters
of small balls, covered with bright red,
soft spines. Caster oil comes from
the seeds.


























Chenille Plant (Acalypha hispida).
Tropical, large growing shrub, with
large, heart-shaped leaves, of light
green, with toothed edges. The flower
is unusual and showy. It resembles
the drooping tail of a monkey in
shape, and looks like bright red chen-
ille. The name "Chenille Plant" prob-
ably comes from the French word,
meaning caterpillar. The "tails" are
/2 inch in diameter, sometimes 2
feet long, and are borne in consider-
able numbers.


Cherokee Bean (Erythrina). This
Florida variety of the beautiful Coral
Tree of India, flaunts its flaming soar-
let blooms along our roadsides in late
winter and spring. The flowers
are 1 to 2 inches long, extremely
slender. It produces a bean like pod,
which opens in summer to display
bright red beans. Cultivated it is a
prized garden plant.


Coral Plant (Russelia juncea). This
tropical plant, or shrub, is quite dif-
ferent from our other shrubs. It has
many drooping, willowy branches, and
very few leaves, with those few being
so small as to be almost unnoticeable.
The slender, wirelike branches remind
one of lovely, pale green spray. The
plant bears long sprays of tubular
coral flowers, about one inch long.


Elder (Sambucus simpsonii). Elder
grows wild in great quantities through
most of the state. It is a large, woody
shrub, bearing numerous, flat-topped
heads, 4 to 8 inches across, of tiny
white flowers, which are followed by
great clusters of the small black ber-
ries, so loved by birds. The leaves are
pinnate, each leaf having 5 to 9
leaflets.



























Flame of the Woods (Ixora). This
tropical, handsome shub is a native
of India. It is an evergreen, growing
4 to 8 feet high, with smooth, dark
green leaves. Star-like flowers of
bright red, about % of an inch across,
are borne in small clusters. There are
less common varieties of white and
yellow. The Ixora is a winter bloonm-
ing shrub, though it bears more pro-
fusely in spring and summer.


Golden Dewdrop (Duranta). Native
of the American tropics, hardy
throughout the state. It makes a large,
rather willowy shrub, with slender
branches. The leaves are small 1l,
smooth and bluntly oval. Bluish vio-
let flowers, small and dainty, are
borne in early spring, and into the
fall, followed by racemes of golden
berries that last all winter, from which
the shrub gets its common name.


Gardenia (Gardenia florida). This
tropical shrub, a native of China, be-
longs to the Madder family. The ever-
green foliage is very attractive, leaves
dark green, glossy and pointed. The
plant blooms freely in later winter,
bearing magnificent, waxy white flow-
ers with a cloying sweet fragrance.
This is the Cape Jasmine of poetical
fame in the old South. It is hardy,
and thrives throughout the state.


Lantana (Lantana). Native of tropi-
cal America. It has a spicy smell when
the leaves are crushed. The leaves are
rough with toothed edges. The tiny
flowers grow in heads, about 1 % inches
across, orange, white, yellow or red
and yellow. The "Weeping Lantana"
is a vine, with small drooping heads of
lavender flowers. The orange and red
type is naturalized along the beaches.
It blooms nearly the year round.



























Periwinkle (Vinca). This tropical
little flower grows wild over much of
Florida. It reseeds itself, and new
plants spring up after a rainy spell.
When cultivated it makes a lovely
colorful border, and is excellent for
window boxes, growing 1 to 2 feet
high. The leaves are glossy and oval
in shape. The flowers are rosy purple
or white, sometimes with a reddish
center. The stems of the pink Peri-
winkles are reddish, those of the white
ones are yellowish green.


Canna (Canna flaccida). The Can-
na grows in quantities in marshy
places in Florida. It has stout, lance-
shaped leaves. The stem of the flower
rises two feet or more before bear-
ing a few yellow blooms, 3 to 4 inches
long, shaped like an iris. The culti-
vated Canna is seen in many gardens,
and bears an abundance of large,
showy flowers, red or yellow tinged
with red.


Caladium. This plant, native of
South America, is valuable for its
foliage. The leaves are a foot or more
long, arrow-shaper, each borne singly
on its stem, brilliantly colored, in
many combinations and patterns. The
flower, rising on a single stem, is
a fleshy spike, enclosed in a large,
grenish white bract, shaded with
greenish bronze at the base. It is-
sembles a Jack-in-the-Pulpit.


Wax Privet (Ligustrum lucidum).
This native of China and Japan, is
a valuable evergreen shrub for Florida
gardens. It is hardy, makes excellent
hedges, and is widely used for large,
dark, mass plantings. The foliage is
thick, leaves dark green and glossy.
Its tiny white flowers are borne in
dense, compact, terminal clusters, and
are very fragrant. It blooms in late
winter and early spring.


























Amaryllis (Amaryllis belladona).
South Africa; a bulbous, semi-hardy
lily, reducing in late winter, a num-
ber of flat, dull green, lance like leaves,
12 to 18 inches long, arranged in two
rows. The stem is sturdy, 18 inches
high, bearing at the top several large,
funnel-shaped flowers. They are bright
red, fragrant, and lovely. The hybrids
are variegated, white, pink and red.


Crinum (Crinum amabile). This lily
has a heavy stem, a foot high, from
which grow some 25 light green, glos-
sy leaves, 2 to 3 feet long, 3 to 4 inches
wide. A tall, dark red stalk bears 6 to
10 lovely, fragrant flowers, with long,
slender curling petals, white, tinged or
banded with purplish red, with the
flower tube of the same color. It
blooms several times a year. Our
white, native variety called "Swamp
Lily of Florida," blooms in swamps.


Calla Lily (Araceae). The wild
Calla is a native bog plant. The real
flower is the yellowish, fleshy spike,
in the center, which is wrapped in the
large, sheathing white bract. Leaves
are dark green, glossy, heart-shaped,
with regular parallel veins. Each leaf
is borne singly on a long slender
stem. The cultivated Calla richardia,
has a larger, more flaring bract.


Lotus (Nelumbo). The beautiful
Lotus is a patriarch among flowers,
found in the ancient art of the Egyp-
tians, the sacred flower of the Hindus,
and it symbolizes female beauty to the
Greeks and Chinese. Flowers and the
large leaves are borne well above the
water, each on its own stem. The lily
like flowers are delicately fragrant.
Our native Lotus has beautiful yellow
flowers, the East Indian Lotus is pink,
and the Japanese variety is white.



























Cathedral Bells (Bryophyllum).
From the Greek, meaning "spouting
leaf." Lay a leaf on moist sand, and
new plants will grow from the edges,
or pin one to a curtain and it will
start to grow. It has thick, light
green leaves, indented around the
edges. The veins and indentures are
purple. Pale greenish and bronze,
bell-shaped flowers 2 inches long, are
borne in open, branching, drooping
clusters, in fall and winter.


Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia splen-
dens). This odd looking plant comes
from Madagascar. The sinuous stems
are covered with stout spines nearly
an inch long. The branches are few, as
are leaves, which are small, thin, light
green. Near the ends of the branches,
a single stalk grows, which bears small
clusters of tiny flowers, closely clasped
by two, broadly oval, flat, red bracts.


Century Plant (Agave americana).
Native. The leaves are stiff, or curling
back, armed with teeth, green or band-
ed with cream, sometimes 6 feet tall.
The inconspicuous flowers are borne
on a huge stem, like a giant candela-
bra, often 20 feet high. After flower-
ing the plant dies to the ground, but
the roots send up new shoots. Two
famous Mexican drinks, mescal and
pulque, are made from the juice.


Devil's Back Bone (Pedilanthus).
This is ,a low growing succulent plant
native to tropical America. The stems
are heavy, fleshy, light green, angular,
jointed and branching, and when
broken exude a milky juice. The leaves
grow singly at the joints. The flowers
are bright red, less than an inch long,
blooming in winter. Other common
names are "Angel's Slipper" and "Red
Bird Cactus."


























Moses in the Bullrushes (Rhoeo
discolor). This odd plant, a native of
Mexico has now become naturalized
in Florida. It has a short, stout stem,
lance like, pointed, rather stiff green
leaves, which are royal purple on the
under side. Rising from the axil of the
leaf is a small, boat-shaped bract,
holding the tiny white flowers. It is
also called "Sailor in a Boat." The
foliage makes this a handsome plant.


Sea Fig (Mesembryanthemum).
This tropical plant, a native of South
Africa, is low growing, succulent, with
queer, triangular or round, long,
pointed, light green leaves, which are
solid and heavy. The solitary flower,
borne on a heavy, fleshy stem, is
lemon yellow or pink, about 2 inches
across, with slender, curling petals 1
inch long. The plant is popular in
California where it is seen in all
colors of the rainbow.


Prickly Pear (Opuntia). This cacti
was brought to the Spanish colonies
by the early explorers, and grown for
its sweet, insipid, purple fruit. The
plant is semi-erect, 2 to 5 feet high,
coarse, profusely branching, with
spreading, flat, pad-like spiny joints,
2 to 4 inches long, which bear the
lovely, lemon yellow flowers, in
strange contrast to the ungainly
stems. A less common variety has
red flowers.


Spanish Bayonet (Yucca filamen-
tosa). Native. From a thick cluster of
stiff, pointed, very sharp sword like
leaves, grows a large spike of waxy
white, bellshaped flowers, in late
winter and early spring. It is fertil-
ized by the Yucca moth, which lays
its eggs in the flowers. The fruit pod
is naturalized along the Gulf coast
The Yucca gloriosa forms a queer mis-
shapen "tree" called Joshua Tree.









INDEX OF FLOWERS


Acalypha hispida ........................................ 23
African Yellow Daisy ................................. 21
Agave americana ...... ................................ 27
A ir p lants ............................ ........... ... 17
A llam anda ......... ............................................. 12
Amaryllis .............. ....... 26
Amaryllis belladona ........................... 26
Angel's Trumpet .................................... 21
Antignon leptopus ......................................... 19
A raceae .................. .................................... 26
Azalea ........... ............ 21
B ag F low er .................................................... ..... 21
B eloperone ......................... ............................ 17
Bird of Paradise ................................. 14
Blue Leadwort ................................................... 22
Bignonia venusta ................................... 19
Bottle Brush .............. ............................ 22
B ougainvillea .............. .................................... 12
Brazilian Glory ............................................. 12
Bryophyllum ..................................... 27
Caladium ....................... 25
C alla L ily ............................. ................................. 26
Callistemon ..................................... ............. 22
Camellia japonica ........................................ 22
C an n a ............................ ............................. 25
Cape Honeysuckle .............................. 12
Carolina Yellow Jessamine .................. 13
Caster Oil Plant ..................................... 22
Cathedral Bells ...................... ................ 27
Century Plant ........................ ................. 27
Chalice Vine .............................. ........... 13
Chenille Plant ......................... ................. 23
Cherokee Bean ...................................... 23
Cherokee Rose ........................... ......... 13
Clerodendron ..................................... .... 21
Confederate Jasmine .......................... 13
Coral Plant ......... ............. ................ 23
C oral V in e .............................................................. 19
Crepe Myrtle ................................................ 14
Crinum ....... ...... ........... ... 26
Crown of Thorns .................................... 27
Cypress Vine ............................................... 17
D atura ........................................... .............. 21
Devil's Back Bone ................................. 27
D uran ta ................................ ................................ 24
Dwarf Poinciana ........................................... 14
Eichornia crassipes ....... ....................... 14
E ld er ....................... .............................................. 2 3
Ericaceae ...................... 21
Erythrina ...................... 23
Euphorbia splendens ......................... 27
Flame of the Woods ..... ...................... 24
Flame Vine .................. 19
Fringed Hibiscus ............ ........................ 14
G aillardia ......................................................... 14
G ardenia ..................................................................... 24
Gelsemium sempervirens ................. 13
Golden Dewdrop ..................................... 24
H ibiscu s ..................................................................... 11
Hibiscus schizopetalus ............................. 14


Ip om ea ............ ............................ 12
Italian Yellow Jasmine ..................... 19
Ix ora ............................... ..... ......... ...................... 24
Ja sm in e ......................................................... ... 19
Jasm ine hum ile ................................................ 19
Jasmine illicifolium ........................... 19
Lagerstroemia indica ................................ 14
Lantana ............. .. ... ........... 24
Ligustrum lucidum .............................. 25
Lotus ................................................. 26
Malaviscus grandiflorus .......................... 20
Mesembryanthemum ....... ....... 28
Mexican Flame Vine ....... ...... 20
Moses in the Bullrushes ................... 28
Nelumbo ............................................................ 26
N erium oleander .............................................. 17
Oleander ............ ... ............ 17
Opuntia ...................................... ........... 28
Pandorea jasminoides ................................. 20
Passiflower incarnata ........................ 14
P assion F low er .................................................. 14
Pedilanthus ....... ............. .............. 27
P eriw in k le ................ ........... ................................ 25
P etrea volubilis ............................................. 18
P itch er P lan t ........................................................ 17
Pithecoctemium .......................................... 18
Plumbago capensis ............................ 22
P rickly Pear .. ...... ................................. 28
Quamoclit pennata ................................. 17
Queen's Wreath ....................................... 18
R hoeo discolor ............................................. ... 28
Ricinus communis ................................ 22
R osa laevigata ................................................... 13
R osa sin en su s ................................... ................. 11
Russelia juncea .. ............................... 23
Sambucus simpsonii .................................... 23
Sarracenia minor ..................... ............. 17
Sea Fig ............ .......... 28
Senecio confusus ......... .......... 20
Shrimp Plant ............................................ 17
Sky Flower of India ........................... 18
Solandra grandiflora ........................... 13
Spanish Bayonet ................................... 28
S panish M oss ...................................................... 17
Spiderw ort .............. ........................................ 17
Strelitzia ........ .............................................. ... 14
Tecoma capensis .................................... 12
Tecoma jasminoides ................................... 20
Tecoma ricasoliana ........ ........ 20
Thunbergia grandiflora ................... 18
Tillandsia .............. ............................... ........... 17
Trachelosperum jasminoides ............... 13
Tradescantia reflexia ........................ 17
T ree O rch ids ......................................................... 17
T urk's C ap ..................................................... 20
V an illa ........................................................................ 18
V in ca ......................................................................... .... 2 5
Water Hyacinth ....................................... 14
Wax Privet ......... 25
Yucca filamentosa ................................. 28









INDEX OF PALMS


A alexander's Palm ............................................. 6
Acoelorraphe Wrightii ........ .. 4
Archontophoenix Alexandrae ........... 6
Arecastrum Romanzoffianum ............ 7
C abbage P alm ........................................... ... 8
Canary Island Date Palm ..................... 6
Cane Palm ...................... 6
Caryota urens ................... 7
Chrysalidocarpus lutescens .................. 6
Chinese Fan Palm ........................... 8
Coccothrinax argentia ............................. 9
Coconut Palm ....... ..... .............. 6
Cocos nucifera ............ 6
Cocos Plumosa ............. 7
Common Date Palm ........................ 7
Dwarf Palmetto ...... .............. 8
Fiji Fan Palm ................ 8
Hyophorbe Verschaffeltii ................. 7
Livistona chinensis .. ........... ........... 8
Oreodoxa regia ................ 3
Pandanus ....................... ......... 10
Phoenix canariensis .................................... 6


Phoenix dactylifera ....................................... 7
Pritchardia pacifica ... .. ........... 8
Pseudophoenix vinifera ........................... 4
R aven ala ................................................................. 10
Rhapidophyllum hystrix ........................ 4
R oy al P alm .. ............................................. 3
Sabal Etonia ........................................ 4
Sabal Jamesiana .................................... 4
Sabal Minor .............................. ................... 8
Sabal Palmetto .......................................... 8
Sago P alm .............................. ....................... 10
Saw Palmetto ............................ .................. 9
Screw P ine ........................ ............................. 10
Serenoa repens .................................................. 9
S ilver P alm ....................................................... 9
Spindle Palm ..................... ................... 7
Thatch Palm ..... ............ .................... 9
Thread Palm ............................................... 9
Thrinax ................. 4
Traveller's Palm ............................... 10
Washington Palm ......... ........................ 10
Washington filifera .......... ............ 9
Washingtonia robusta .. ..................... 10




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