• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Administration and supervision
 Legal appendix 1
 Agricultural education
 Business, distributive, and cooperative...
 Home economics education
 Trade and industrial education
 Practical nurse training
 Area vocational education...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Florida. State Dept. of Education
Title: Florida state plan for the extension and improvement of vocational education
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096242/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida state plan for the extension and improvement of vocational education
Alternate Title: State plan for the extension and improvement of vocational education
Physical Description: 101 p. : illus. ;
Language: English
Creator: Florida Department of Education
Donor: unknown ( endowment )
Publisher: Florida Department of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1959
 Subjects
Subject: Technical education -- Curricula   ( lcsh )
Vocational education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Florida Department of Education bulletin 70A-1
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096242
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 21320591

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Foreword
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Administration and supervision
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Legal appendix 1
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Agricultural education
        Page 20a
        Page 20b
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Business, distributive, and cooperative education
        Page 36a
        Page 36b
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Home economics education
        Page 48a
        Page 48b
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Trade and industrial education
        Page 64a
        Page 64b
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
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        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Practical nurse training
        Page 82
        Page 82b
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Area vocational education programs
        Page 96a
        Page 96b
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Back Cover
        Page 102
        Page 103
Full Text



February, 195S


FOR THE EXTENSION AND IMPROVEMENT OF

375.0 15-ICATIONAL EDUCATION

F 6 3(o J_

Division of Vocational and Adult Education
THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Thomas D. Bailey, Superintendent
Tallahassee, Florida


Bulletin 70A-1













UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES

L .'I BRARIIIp S











VOCATIONAL EDUCATION


Bulletin 70A-1


February, 1959


FLORIDA

STATE PLAN FOR THE EXTENSION AND IMPROVEMENT OF

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION












STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION


Hon. LeRoy Collins, Governor, President of the Board

Hon. R. A. Gray, Secretary of State

Hon. Richard W. Ervin, Attorney General

Hon. J. Edwin Larson, State Treasurer

Hon. Thomas D. Bailey, State Superintendent of Public Instruction,
Secretary, and Executive Officer of the Board













FOREWORD


This Plan for Vocational and Related Education, approved February 3,
1959, by the State Board for Vocational Education, is intended to pro-
vide assistance in clarifying the purposes which these important state-
wide programs are to serve within the public school structure and in
defining the conditions under which they should function for greatest
effectiveness.

Essentially, the Plan is a description of state operations, citing laws,
establishing standards, outlining procedures and identifying responsi-
bilities of various agencies, groups, and individuals in the respective
vocational and related instructional areas.

It is anticipated that these provisions will contribute materially to the
extension and improvement of the total program of public education in
Florida.






State Superintendent of Public Instruction
and Executive Officer, State Board for
Vocational Education








TABLE OF CONTENTS


Section Page

Foreword ........................................... ..... .......... i

Table of Contents ................................................... ii

I Administration and Supervision ................................... 1

The State Board for Vocational Education and State Staff--
Creation, Organization, and Functions ........................ 1
The State Plan ............................. .............. ..... 8
State Supervision of the Program ....... .......................... 8
State Fiscal Procedures and Practices ..- .... ............... 11
Travel Regulations ....................................... .... 13
The Local Administration of Programs of Vocational
Education ......... ............... ........ ...... ..... ...... 14

Legal Appendix ............ ........................................... 18

Power of State Board to Cooperate with the Office of
Education in the Administration of the Smith-Hughes
and George-Barden Acts ............... ........ .... ........... 18
Legal Provisions Dealing Specifically with Vocational
Education .................................................... 18
Acceptance of Responsibility .................................... 19

II Agricultural Education .......... ................................... 21

Plan for Supervision ................................ ........... 21
Program of Instruction .. ...................................... 23
Advisory Comm ittees ............................................. 30
Program of Teacher Training .......... .... ..... ...... 31
Plan for Coordinating Studies, Investigations, Research,
and Preparation and Distribution of Professional and
Technical Material for Employed Teachers ................... 35

III Business, Distributive, and Cooperative Education ................ 37

Plan for Supervision .......................................... 37
Programs) of Instruction ......... .......... .................. 41
Representative Advisory Committee .............................. 44
Program of Teacher Training ............................ 44
Plan for Coordinating Studies, Investigations, Research,
and the Preparation and Distribution of Professional and
Technical Material for Employed Teachers ................... 47








Section Page

IV Home Economics Education .... ............ ........ ... ............. 49

Plan for Supervision ........................................... 49
Program of Instruction .........*******............******...*****........******.....**** 52
Program of Teacher Education ................................. 56
Provisions for Research and Studies in Home Economics
Education ................................................. .. 63

V Trade and Industrial Education (Industrial Education) ............... 65

Plan for Supervision .............. ............. .... ............ 65
Program of Instruction ............... ................ ......... 70
Representative Advisory Committees .......................... 77
Program of Teacher Training Including Training of
Industrial Supervisory Trainers ............................ 77
Plan for Coordinating Studies, Investigations, Research,
and the Preparation and Distribution of Professional and
Technical Material for Employed Teachers ................. 80

VI Practical Nurse Training ......................... ........... 83

Plan for Supervision .......... ............................... 83
Program of Instruction .......................... ............ 85
Advisory Committees .......................................... 91
Program of In-Service Training for Teachers, Teacher
Trainers, Supervisors, and Directors ...................... 93
Plan for Coordinating Studies, Investigations, Research,
and Preparation of Professional and Technical Material
Relating to the Practical Nursing Education Program ....... 95

VII Area Vocational Education Programs ............................. 97

Plan for Supervision .................... .... ................ ... 97
Accounting, Budgeting, Fiscal Methods, and Procedures ...... 98
Plans, Policies, and Methods .................................. 99






























SECTION I

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION





~ -. --
I- -.
I ----- -----.~ -
~~1co2kSIOojj'i~j
I -


I -~


F LORIDA

STATE PLAN FOR THE EXTENS,|I.-AID IMP

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION



SECTION I. ADMINISTRATION AN3 SUI


The legal authority requiring or permitting admfi*Str
relationships, or procedures described in this part of
in the Legal Appendix which appears at the end of this


1.0 THE
Crec

1.1


1A


)N"~



8 A


viewed


STATE BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ANI2STATE STAFF--
ition, Organization, and Functions

The State Board. The State Board of Education shall cons of te
governor, the secretary of state, the attorney general, the" $tate
treasurer, and the state superintendent of public instruction; po
which the governor shall be the president and the state superinte de.t
of public instruction shall be the secretary and executive officers! -"
(Section 229. 15 Florida Statutes)


It shall be the responsibility of the State Board to require to be kept
by the secretary such records as are necessary to set forth clearly
all actions and proceedings of the State Board. (Section 229. 09 (2)
F. S.)

"State Board" means the State Board of Education designated as the
State Board for Vocational Education. (Section 229. 26(1) F. S. )
Hereafter, all reference to the State Board in the Plan refers to the
State Board for Vocational Education.

It shall be the responsibility of the State Board to constitute the State
Board for Vocational Education required by the acts of congress; to
cooperate with the Office of Education in the administration of all acts
of congress relating to vocational education.. .and to provide for the
proper conduct of the vocational education. .program, and for the
articulation of this work with other phases of the state program.

1.2 The State Board Staff. The state superintendent and executive officer
will designate such professional and clerical personnel as may be
necessary for the efficient operation of the program.

1.3 The Executive Officer. The state superintendent, and by law









DrVMOW OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT ED1W&7JDN
STATIC DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLABA~EE.S FLORI3DA
1956-5


State Board of Education
State Board for Vocational Education


BuDiness Education
Distributive Cooperative Education
Hopne Economics Education
industrial Arts Education
Vocational Agriculture Education
Trade and Industrial Education
Practical Nurse Education
Technical Education



L.---


State Superintendent of Public lutrucgon

ateirector
vision of Vocational and Adult Education


All Services
Florida State UniveraiiV
Home Econoic, Trade and Indoatrial Education. Distributive Education
University of Florida
Agriculture Education. Trade and Industrial Education, Distributive Educa
University of Moami
HoMe Eco ics. Trade and Industrial Education. Distributive Education


I------------"L

- -COUNTY BOARDS OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Superintendents Secretaries


Legend: Administrative-----
Operational----......---






-3-


designated as the executive officer, shall be elected for a term of
four years, or until the election and qualification of his successor.
(Article IV, Section 20, State Constitution)

The state superintendent shall act as secretary and executive officer
of the State Board in matters pertaining to vocational education, to
recommend to the State Board, and, when approved by the Board, to
execute plans for cooperating with the federal government for the con-
duct of the vocational education program in the State; to designate
such assistants as are necessary to carry out properly the program
and plans; to carry into effect such rules and regulations as the State
Board may adopt for the promotion of vocational education; to keep all
necessary records and make all required reports, and to provide for
the proper articulation of vocational education with all phases of educa-
tion in the State. (Section 229. 17 (9) F. S. )

The state superintendent shall recommend ways and means of coopera-
ting with the federal government in carrying out any or all phases of
the educational program in which, in his opinion, cooperation is de-
sirable. He shall recommend policies for administering funds which
may be appropriated by congress and apportioned to the State for any
or all purposes, and shall execute such plans as are approved.
(Section 229. 17 (10) F. S.)

1.4 The State Director. The general coordination and direction of voca-
tional education will be the responsibility of the state superintendent
and executive officer of the State Board for Vocational Education of
Florida. The state superintendent and executive officer may recom-
mend to the State Board for Vocational Education the selection and
appointment of a director of vocational education to assist the state
superintendent and executive officer of the State Board in the discharge
of these duties and responsibilities. The director of vocational educa-
tion shall be directly responsible to the state superintendent and execu-
tive officer and, through the state superintendent and executive officer,
shall be responsible to the State Board for Vocational Education for
all vocational activities under the control of the State Board for Voca-
tional Education, and for the coordination of vocational education
with other educational activities.

The director of vocational education shall be responsible under the
state superintendent and executive officer for the general administra-
tion, coordination, supervision, and promotion of vocational education
in the State. He shall make such recommendations to the state
superintendent and executive officer, and through him to the State
Board for Vocational Education for the promotion and improvement of
vocational education in any or all of its phases and in the administra-
tion thereof. He shall have specific responsibility to coordinate






-4-


activities in the field of vocational education with those of all other
educational fields in the State.

1.41 Qualifications for Position, Including Required Education and
Experience. Since the position has responsibility in connection
with all phases of vocational education which may be offered in
Florida and the coordination of programs of vocational agricul-
ture, home economics, industrial education, distributive educa-
tion, and vocational guidance with other educational activities,
the following training and experience will be required for the
director: a master's degree, with training in vocational education;
technical and professional education, including professional
courses in vocational and general education; experience in an
approved state or local vocational education program. In
addition to formal education, training, and experience which shall
be considered and evaluated in the selection and appointment of
the director of vocational education, due consideration shall also
be given to those factors having to do with personal habits,
philosophy, understanding of andabilityto get along with people,
and other characteristics which, while intangible in details, are
nevertheless essential to the proper functioning of the programs
to be administered.

1.5 Supporting Professional Staff.

1. 51 Administrative Assistants. Two assistants are provided whose
relationships with the division of vocational education are des-
cribed in the organizational chart under 1. 2. They serve as
administrative assistants to the state director; assemble and
organize materials for budgets, reports, and statements; are
responsible for maintenance of supplies and equipment; take in-
ventories, receive visitors, and answer inquiries; check expense
accounts and reports; and handle correspondence regarding
routine matters. Qualifications include graduation from an
approved college with a degree in education, public administration,
business administration, or closely related fields. Equivalency
in experience may be accepted in lieu of a college degree.

1.52 Instructional Problems Coordinator. A coordinator for problems
of vocational instruction, whose relationship with the division of
vocational education is described in the organizational chart under
1.2, works with assistant directors at the sectional level; assists
the director in coordinating both credit and non-credit teacher-
training programs in two or more fields of vocational education;
assists county superintendents and/or other local administrative
personnel in the improvement of vocational instruction; and co-
ordinates the programs of vocational teacher training of the






-5-


approved institutions of higher learning, the State Department
of Education, and local county levels. Qualifications shall in-
clude a master's degree and shall meet all requirements of
teacher trainer in one of the fields for which he has responsi-
bilities.

1.53 Research and Survey Specialist. A specialist, whose relation-
ship with the division of vocational education is described in the
organizational chart under 1.2, conducts studies on various
phases of vocational education and makes findings and recom-
mendations available for general use or consideration; assists
local school officials in planning and organizing surveys to deter-
mine training needs; conducts special studies of a research
nature; keeps the state director and state supervisors informed
as to trends, both state and national, in vocational research and
makes recommendations. Qualifications include a master's de-
gree and specialization in one vocational service.

1. 54 Educational Materials Specialist. A specialist, whose relation-
ship with the division of vocational education is described in the
organizational chart under 1.2, works with state supervisors at
the section level; establishes format and samples used as guides
in preparing materials of instruction; assists in determining
duplication and distribution procedures; maintains and operates
a lending library; informs personnel of materials available;
assists with and coordinates the duplication of reports of the
research and survey specialist. Qualifications include a master's
degree and specialization in one vocational service.

1.55 Consultant for Industrial Arts. A consultant and supervisor for
industrial arts, whose relationship with the division of vocational
education is described in the organizational chart under 1.2,
works with the vocational education administration, the state
supervisor for industrial education, the professional staff and
the general education supervisory staff in coordinating the indus-
trial arts program with the total educational program; advises in
the development of courses of study and in the revision of state
bulletins; assists local school officials in planning and organizing
new industrial arts programs with recommendations for cur-
riculum offerings, shop plans and equipment, and class organi-
zation; provides materials and assistance for the improvement
of instruction; maintains liaison between industrial arts teacher-
education institutions and the State Department of Education in
recommending standards for teacher certification and keeping
teacher-education programs abreast of teacher needs and cur-
riculum changes. Qualifications include a master's degree with
a major in industrial arts from an approved institution and five
years of successful industrial arts teaching experience.










1.56 Consultant for Business Education. A consultant and supervisor
for business education, whose relationship with the division of
vocational education is described in the organizational chart under
1. 2, works with the vocational education administration, the
state supervisor of distributive and cooperative education, and
the professional staff and the general education supervisory staff
in coordinating the business education program with the total
educational program; serves as consultant in vocational schools,
and in other areas where vocational business education programs
are in operation, and in general high schools; clarifies the re-
lationship existing between vocational and general education
offerings in this field; serves as supervisor of vocational office
occupations and evening business education programs and business
education cooperative offerings in vocational and general high
schools; advises in the promotion and development of all business
education programs; provides materials and assistance in the
improvement of instruction; maintains liaison between business
education teacher-training institutions and the State Department
of Education in matters of teacher certification and curriculum
development. Qualifications include a master's degree with a
major in business education from an approved institution and
five years of successful teaching experience in business education.

1.6 Employing State Staff. The state superintendent shall designate such
assistants as are necessary to carry out properly the program and
plans of vocational education. The state superintendent shall remove
from office for cause any person appointed by him.

1.61 There is no relationship at present of state or local civil ser-
vice or other personnel classification and compensation systems
to the employment of personnel,

1.7 Delegation of Authority. No authority is delegated by the State Board
to any other person or agency to act for the State Board.

1.8 State Advisory Committees.

1. 81 A General State Advisory Committee for Vocational Education.
A general state advisory committee for vocational education
may be organized for the state programs if deemed advisable
and necessary by the state superintendent and executive officer
of the State Board.

1.81-1 Composition. The general state advisory committee
for vocational education will be composed of outstand-
ing persons in the fields of vocational and technical
education.






-7-


1.81-2 Appointment. Individuals will be appointed to mem-
bership by the state superintendent and executive officer
of the State Board upon the recommendation of the state
director of vocational education.

1.81-3 Term of Office. The term of office shall be for one
year.

1.81-4 Duties. The duties of the general state advisory com-
mittee will be to counsel and advise the State Depart-
ment of Education on problems and programs related to
vocational and technical education. A report covering
each meeting will be transmitted to the state super-
intendent and executive officer.

1.81-5 Meetings. Meetings will be called by the executive
secretary, who will be the state director of vocational
education.

1.81-6 Frequency of Meetings. Meetings will be called when
deemed necessary.

1. 82 State Advisory Committees for Agriculture, Distributive, Home
Economics, and Industrial Education. General program-wide
advisory committees may be organized as follows:

1.82-1 Composition. The service-wide advisory committees
will be composed of outstanding persons in the respec-
tive fields.

1. 82-2 Appointment. Individuals will be appointed to member-
ship by the state superintendent and executive officer
upon the recommendation of the state director who will
be provided with nominations by the appropriate state
supervisors.

1.82-3 Term of Office. The term of office shall be for one
to three years.

1.82-4 Duties. The duties of the program-wide advisory com-
mittee members will be to counsel and advise the State
Department of Education on problems and programs re-
lated to the respective services. A written report of
each meeting will be presented to the state director of
vocational education for review and implementation.

1. 82-5 Meetings. Meetings will be called by the executive





-8-


secretaries, who will be the state supervisors of the
services concerned, upon the approval of the state
director of vocational education.

1. 82-6 Frequency of Meetings. Meetings will be called when
deemed necessary.

1.83 Additional state advisory committees may be established in
technical education, business education, industrial arts educa-
tion, and other vocationally related areas of instruction if
deemed advisable and necessary by the state superintendent and
executive officer of the State Board.


2.0 THE STATE PLAN

2. 1 Adoption Procedures. The state director, after consultation with
appropriate supervisors and other interested administrative, voca-
tional, and educational personnel, submits recommendations for
amendments to the State Board through the executive officer. Follow-
ing approval by the State Board, two copies shall be submitted to the
Office of Education. The transmittal letter from the state super-
intendent and executive officer to the assistant commissioner of voca-
tional education shall (1) identify the material transmitted, and (2)
indicate the date on which it was adopted by the State Board.

2.2 Clearances and Approvals. Since the attorney general is a member
of the State Board, clearances and approvals by him and his office
are automatic.

2.3 Enforcement. All rules and regulations and minimum standards
adopted or prescribed by the State Board in carrying out the provisions
of the school code shall, if not in conflict therewith, have the full
force and effect of law. (Section 229.06 F. S.)

It shall be the responsibility of the State Board to provide for the
proper enforcement of all laws relating to the state system of public
education and of all regulations or actions of the State Board.
(Section 229. 08 (19) F. S.)


3.0 STATE SUPERVISION OF THE PROGRAM

3.1 General Policies. The State Board will provide adequate supervision
of vocational programs within the division of vocational education
through the respective vocational sections. The Board shall have the
authority to employ such additional supervisors and other assistants




-9-


as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of the vocational
education acts. All state supervisors shall determine conformity of
the programs with the requirements of the State Plan, insure that all
federal moneys are expended in conformity with provisions of the State
Plan, check and recommend approval of requisitions for reimbursing
local schools, and provide proper supervision needed for vocational
schools or classes organized and conducted under provisions of the
State Plan.

3. 2 Verification of Qualifications.

3.21 Employment of Professional Personnel. The state director
examines and verifies the qualifications of professional personnel
to be employed and makes recommendations to the state super-
intendent and executive officer in conformity with the standards
of the State Plan.

3.22 Professional Personnel Employed by Approved Teacher-Train-
ing Institutions. The state director examines and verifies the
qualifications of professional personnel to be employed by the
approved teacher-training institutions and makes recommenda-
tions to the state superintendent and executive officer in con-
formity with the standards of the State Plan.

3.23 Professional Personnel Employed by Local Boards. The state
director verifies the qualifications of the professional vocational
personnel to be employed by the local boards of education and
makes recommendations to the proper certifying authorities for
the licensing of directors, supervisors, coordinators, and all
teachers of vocational and technical education.

3.3 Evaluation of Programs. Evaluation of vocational programs is pro-
vided by periodic program visitations of state and area supervisory
personnel who observe and examine the adequacy of the facility, the
effectiveness of instruction, the placement and follow-up of graduates,
and who also determine that all state and federal funds are expended
in compliance with the State Plan and State Board regulations.

3.4 Teacher Training.

3.41 Provision for Teacher Training. It shall be the responsibility
of the State Board to assist in providing adequate teacher train-
ing for teachers of vocational classes by qualified teacher-
trainers and supervisors.

3.42 Agreements with Approved Teacher-Training Institutions.
When authorized by the state superintendent and executive officer,





-10-


the state director may enter into agreements with the proper
representatives of the approved training institutions to provide
for training of prospective and in-service teachers through
approved courses. Procedures are outlined in a bulletin en-
titled "Administrative Policies and Procedures Covering State
Board and Approved Teacher Education Institutions" which
covers general considerations, budget and contractual situations,
and appropriate administrative details.

3.43 Supervision and Standards. Teacher training is required to be
under the supervision of the State Board. The State Board is
responsible for the designation of agencies which train teachers
as well as for the supervision of their teacher-training work.

3,44 In-Service Teacher Training. When authorized by the State
Board, local boards of education may employ qualified teacher-
trainers to conduct in-service teacher training for employed
instructors of vocational education classes under the same pro-
visions as the State Board.

3.5 Research, Studies, Investigations, and Experimentation.

3.51 Types of Research and Sponsoring Agencies. Research may be
conducted by the State Board for Vocational Education through
the State Department of Education by approved teacher-training
institutions, and by county boards of public instruction through
the local director of vocational education, when the research is
confined to one of the following areas of study:

Identifying and determining vocational training needs
Methods of instruction
Supervision of instruction
Instructional facilities and materials
Employment and occupations
Placement and follow-up of trainees
Standards for organization and administration of programs
Evaluating instruction
Selection and training of teachers
Methods of coordinating training with employment needs
Any other research that will function directly in the
furtherance of any or all of the federally aided fields of
vocational education.

3.52 Publication and Distribution. Such studies shall be published
and distributed to those persons concerned with the nature of
the studies being developed and to any other persons interested
in the: vocational education program.






-11-


3.6 General Conditions. The program will be designated to extend and
improve vocational education in the State of Florida as follows:

3.61 Control. All training and services provided will be under
public supervision and control.

3. 62 Purpose. The controlling purpose of the training program is
to fit individuals engaged in or preparing to engage in useful
employment.

3.63 Grade. The training will be of less than college grade. College
grade is considered training for college credit or that which
might be applicable to a baccalaureate degree.

3.64 Costs, Costs of instruction supplementary to the vocational
instruction will not be paid from federal or matching funds.

3.65 Space and Equipment. Space and equipment for vocational
instruction will be adequate and shall conform with minimum
standards as prescribed by the State Board.

3.66 Courses of Study. Courses of study will be adequate as deter-
mined by the approval of the respective state supervisors.

3.67 Methods of Instruction. Methods of instruction will be appro-
priate for vocational subjects.


4.0 STATE FISCAL PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES

4.1 Public Control of Funds. The State School Fund, the interest on
which shall be exclusively applied to the support and maintenance of
public free schools, shall be derived from.... The proceeds of all
lands that have been or may hereafter be granted to the State by the
United States for public school purposes, donations to the State when
the purpose is not specified, appropriations by the State, the proceeds
of escheated property or forfeitures, twenty-five per cent of the sales
of public lands which are now or may hereafter be owned by the State.
(Article XII, Section 4, State Constitution)

4.2 Custody of Federal Funds. The state treasurer shall be the treasurer
and custodian of all state funds for vocational education and other
state funds for the public school program. He shall receive and pro-
vide for the proper custody and disbursement of these funds in accord-
ance with the provisions of law. (Section 236. 17 F. S.)

4.3 Prorating of Costs. Proration of costs of administration, research





-12-


covering all fields, and salaries of staff members for vocational and
non-vocational responsibilities are determined as equitably as pos-
sible among the several vocational services. These may be indicated
according to a budget or on a time assignment basis.

4.4 Contracts and Agreements with Local Schools. Applications for re-
imbursement are submitted by local boards of public instruction,
outlining the conditions of the request. After careful consideration
by the state director and state supervisor, a written agreement con-
firming the allocation is furnished the local board, stipulating the con-
ditions under which final reimbursement will be forthcoming.

4.5 Claims for Reimbursement.

4.51 Content of Claims. Expenditures authorized by the director
upon the recommendation of the respective state supervisors
may be made for the following: (1) state and local administra-
tion and supervision, (2) salaries and travel of authorized state
and local administrative, supervisory, or instructional personnel,
(3) fees and travel of consultants and resource personnel, (4)
travel and expenses incurred in holding state advisory com-
mittee meetings, (5) cost of approved teacher training for both
pre-service and in-service teachers, (6) expenses of conferences
called by the state director and respective state supervisors for
the purpose of improving the supervisory or instructional pro-
gram, (7) instructional equipment and supplies, (8) the develop-
ment and reproduction of instructional materials, (9) the pur-
chase of educational materials and teaching aids, (10) tost of
recruitment and selection of teachers and students, (11) cost
of research projects, including surveys to determine training
needs, (12) clerical salaries for clerks and handling corres-
pondence, records, and reports on vocational education pro-
grams, and (13) any other expenditures allowable under the
federal acts and any other federal regulations pertaining to this
law.

4.52 Procedures Used. Visitations by the state or area supervisors
are made to confirm all requests for reimbursement and to
assure that fees collected from students in adult classes are not
used for matching federal funds.

4.53 Approval of Reimbursements. At agreed intervals or upon com-
pletion of the course, the local boards shall provide the State
Board with sworn affidavits that there have been expended moneys
in conformity with the agreement and State Plan and that they
are now entitled to reimbursement. This is substantiated by
signed salary and travel vouchers stating the instructor's name,






-13-


certification number, position, and the amount of salary or
expense paid.

4.6 Records and Reports. Records and reports received from schools
consist of applications for approval to operate vocational courses
which list the type of course, name of instructor, salary to be paid
the instructor, length of course, and other pertinent information; an
attendance record for each class which lists the number of students
enrolled, their attendance, and the number of hours taught during the
course; a course outline covering the content that is to be taught; and
an annual narrative report covering the operation of the vocational
training program.

4.7 Program Review. Programs are reviewed by the state and area super-
visors through frequent visits to the local centers involved to verify
the propriety of the expenditures claimed for reimbursement of match-
ing funds. Failure to conform to the written agreement may cause the
local board to forfeit all entitlement to reimbursement from federal
or matching funds when so deemed necessary by the State Board to
enforce the provisions of the State Plan.

4.8 Audits of State Board Accounts. An annual audit is made of state and
local receipts and expenditures by the state auditor and his staff to
ascertain if funds are spent in accordance with state laws and State
Board regulations, and to determine the accuracy of accounting. No
audits are made by independent auditors.


5.0 TRAVEL REGULATIONS

Travel regulations are established by the state legislature and supplemented
by State Department of Education standardized travel regulations for those
persons whose official travel is reimbursable from federal or matching
funds.

5.1 Official Travel Policy for Vocational, Instructional, and Supervisory
Personnel.

5.11 Within the School Service Area. (A service area is defined as
the school area in which the person concerned is employed.)
Reimbursement for authorized official travel (transportation
only) necessary for the maintenance or promotion of vocational
education may be approved. Reimbursed travel will be approved
by the appropriate state supervisor and by the local school
officials.

5. 12 Within the State but Outside the Service Area. County boards





-14-


of public instruction may be reimbursed for vocational person-
nel travel and per diem expenditures to approved conferences
and group meetings which are authorized by the county super-
intendent and the state director and which are called by the appro-
priate state supervisor. Such reimbursement shall conform to
written agreements with the county.

Reimbursement conforming-to State Department of Education
travel policy may be covered by an approved sectional formula
or may be recommended by the state supervisor and authorized
by the state director to county boards of public instruction to
cover expenses of individuals or groups whose services are
loaned to the State Department of Education for advisory or con-
sultative purposes.

5.13 Outside the State. Reimbursement may be made for out-of-state
travel in accordance with state policies when requested by the
state supervisor and prior approval is given by the state director
and/or state superintendent and the local chief school official.


6.0 THE LOCAL ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCA-
TION

6.1 County Administration. Responsibility for the organization and con-
trol of the public schools of the county shall be vested in the county
board of public instruction. Responsibility for the administration of
the schools and for the supervision of instruction in the county shall
be vested in the county superintendent of public instruction as the
secretary and executive officer of the county board. (Section 230.03
(2) and (3) F. S.)

The county boards of public instruction are responsible for the admin-
istration of the vocational education programs on all levels within their
respective counties. Hereafter, the terms"county board" and "local
board" are used synonymously. There are no district or city school
boards authorized by law in the State of Florida.

6.2 Local Director of Vocational Education. County programs of voca-
tional education, to be fully effective, should be under the direction
of a qualified director for the administration of two or more fields
of vocational education..

(1) Type I Organization. In counties of 50, 000 population or over,
the county board of public instruction shall, with the approval
of the state superintendent and executive officer, appoint a local
director of vocational education.






-15-


When the state allocates the county eight or more instructional
units in a single vocational area such as distributive education,
industrial education, vocational agriculture education, or voca-
tional home economics education, and in which the local director
is not qualified, the county board of public instruction shall
appoint a supervisor to aid in the general coordination of the pro-
gram. He shall hold the same general qualifications as the local
director of vocational education with specialization in the field to
be supervised.

(2) Type II Organization. In counties of less than 50, 000 population,
allocated eight or more Minimum Foundation Program special
vocational instructional units, there should be appointed by the
county board of public instruction, with the approval of the state
superintendent and executive officer, a local director of vocational
education or a single vocational service supervisor or coordinator
who may act as local director.

(3) Type III Organization. In counties of less than 50, 000 population,
allocated less than eight Minimum Foundation Program special
instructional units in all vocational areas, the county board of
public instruction may appoint a local director of vocational educa-
tion, a supervisor or coordinator of vocational education, or it
may designate one person as a head teacher to assist the super-
intendent in administering the program.

When no person is designated to administer the vocational pro-
gram within a county, the county superintendent of public instruc-
tion shall be responsible for its operation. No federal funds will
be used to reimburse the salary of county superintendents acting
in such a capacity.

6.21 Responsibilities of the Local Director of Vocational Education are:

6. 21-1 Public Relations. He maintains active relations with
the public of his community. He makes full use of the
advisory committees) for vocational education and
serves as an ex-officio member.

6.21-2 Program Planning. He directs occupational surveys to
determine the vocational training needs of the community
and provides for the establishment and maintenance of
those classes where training is desirable and needed.

6.21-3 Program Operation. He sees that each instructor pro-
vides himself with a course of study and planned lessons.
He provides for a continued program of instructional






-16-


supervision aimed at the improvement of teaching.
He sees that all classrooms and facilities are properly
equipped, provides for an adequate program of train-
ing, and keeps the county board and county superintend-
ent informed of needed equipment and supplies.

6.21-4 Program Evaluation. He periodically evaluates the
effectiveness of the vocational education program to
determine if it is adequately meeting the training needs
of the community. Frequent evaluation of instruction
will be made to ascertain its effectiveness and to deter-
mine the need for improvement.

6. 21-5 In-service Teacher Training. He provides a planned
program of in-service teacher training for all instruc-
tors, using, when available, the facilities and personnel
of the approved teacher-training institutions and other
qualified teacher trainers.

6.21-6 Budgets. He assists the county superintendent of
public instruction in formulating annual budgets for the
operation of the vocational education program within
the county.

6.21-7 Requisitions and Purchases. He makes requisitions
and recommends purchases of equipment, supplies,
instructional materials, and other needed items neces-
sary for the effective operation of the vocational educa-
tion program within the county.

6.21-8 Records and Reports. He keeps all records and makes
whatever reports are required by the county board and
county superintendent of public instruction, the State
Board for Vocational Education, and the United States
Office of Education. He is expected to submit these
reports promptly when due and makes available to pro-
per school authorities all records for which he is respon-
sible.

6.21-9 Personnel. He recruits new teachers and recommends
to the county superintendent of public instruction the
appointment of all personnel under his supervision. He
is responsible for seeing that all professional personnel
are qualified and properly certified.

6.21-10 Conduct. His behavior will be such that it represents
the best traditions of the teaching profession of which






-17-


he is a part. His habits and actions will reflect sound
judgment and personal integrity.

6.22 Qualifications of Local Director of Vocational Education. The
local director of vocational education shall possess a baccalau-
reate degree from a standard four-year institution of higher
learning. He shall hold a Graduate or higher certificate which
includes thirty semester hours in administration and supervision,,
twelve of which must have been earned at the graduate level.
He must have attained the age of twenty-three years, had three
years of successful teaching experience as a teacher of vocational
education classes, and met the professional education and work
experience requirements in at least one vocational service.

6.3 Advisory Committees. Local advisory committees on vocational
agriculture, distributive education, home economics, and industrial
education and other related areas may be set up as described in
Sections II, III, V, VI, and VII of this Plan.

6.4 Public Control of Funds. The county current school fund consists of
funds derived from the county school tax levy, from capitation taxes,
from appropriations by county commissioners, from any and all other
distinctly county sources for school purposes, from national forest
funds, from gifts and other sources from which funds may be used for
the general support of the county school system. (Section 236.24 F. S.)

Any fund received for reimbursement of expenses incurred by the
county current school fund for vocational education, funds from fees,
gifts, donations, funds from philanthropic agencies, or any other
funds whatever from sources which properly belong to the county cur-
rent school fund shall be deposited to the credit of and become a part
of that fund. (Section 236. 28 F. S.)

6.5 Audits. An annual audit is made of local receipts and expenditures by
the state auditor and his staff to ascertain if funds are spent in accord-
ance with state laws and State Board regulations, and to determine
accuracy of accounting. Such reports shall be made available to mem-
bers of the State Board for Vocational Education and to members of
the staff as may be designated by the executive officer. No audits are
made by independent auditors.






-18-


LEGAL APPENDIX 1/


1.0 Power of State Board to Cooperate with the Office of Education in the
Administration of the Smith-Hughes and George-Barden Acts. It shall be
the responsibility of the State Board to constitute the State Board for Voca-
tional Education required by the acts of congress; to cooperate with the
Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior (subsequently
renamed the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare) in the adminis-
tration of all acts of congress relating to vocational education and vocational
rehabilitation; to have all necessary authority to cooperate with the Office
of Education in the administration of these acts; to administer any legisla-
tion pursuant thereto enacted by the State, and to administer the funds pro-
vided by the federal government and the State for the promotion of voca-
tional education in agricultural subjects, trade and industrial subjects,
distributive education, home economics subjects, and in vocational reha-
bilitation; to approve plans for the promotion of vocational education in such
subjects as an essential and integral part of the public school system of the
State and to provide for the preparation of teachers in such subjects; to fix
the compensation of such officials and assistants as may be necessary to
administer the provisions of any federal acts relating to these subjects in
the State, and to pay such compensation and other necessary expenses of
the administration from funds appropriated for these purposes.; to provide
for the making of studies and investigations relating to vocational education
in such subjects, to promote and aid in the establishment by local com-
munities of schools, departments, or classes; to prescribe qualifications
for the teachers and supervisors of such subjects, and to have full authority
to provide for the certification of such teachers and supervisors; to cooper-
ate with local communities in the maintenance of schools, departments, or
classes or to establish such schools, departments, or classes under its
own direction and control; to establish and determine by general regulations
the qualifications to be possessed by persons engaged in the training of
vocational teachers; and to provide otherwise for the proper conduct of the
vocational education and vocational rehabilitation program and for the
articulation of this work with other phases of the state program. (Section
229. 08 (9) F. S.)

2.0 Legal Provisions Dealing Specifically with Vocational Education.

2. 1 Florida Acceptance Act. The State Board is authorized, in its dis-
cretion, to accept the provisions of any act of congress appropriating
and apportioning funds to the State for use in connection with any



I/ Although this material follows Section I immediately, it should be recog-
nized that the legal material applies to the plan as a whole.






-19-


phase of the state system of public education. (Section 220.082 F. S.)

2.2 Other Laws Relating to Cooperation with the Federal Government.
The State Board shall... (a) approve plans for cooperating with the
federal government in carrying out any or all phases of the educational
program in which it may find cooperation to be desirable, and to pro-
vide for the proper administration of funds which may be appropriated
by congress and apportioned to the State for any or all educational
purposes; (b) the State Board of Education shall prescribe regulations
under which contracts, agreements or arrangements may be made with
agencies of the federal government for funds, services, commodities,
or equipment to be made available to the public tax-supported schools,
school systems and educational institutions under the supervision or
control of the State Board of Education; (c) all contracts, agreements
or arrangements made by public tax-supported schools, school systems
or educational institutions under the supervision or control of the State
Board of Education involving funds, services, commodities, or equip-
ment which may be provided by agencies of the federal government
shall be entered into in accordance with regulations prescribed by the
said board of education and in no other manner. (Section 229.08 (10)
a, b, c)

2.3 Court Decisions. Does not apply.

3.0 Acceptance of Responsibility. The State Board for Vocational Education
directs and authorizes its executive officer and secretary to inform the
United States Commissioner of Education of any statutory change or inter-
pretative opinion or judicial decisions that affect the state's vocational
education program.







-20-












M. S1~


SECTION II

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION






-21-


SECTION II

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


1. 0 PLAN FOR SUPERVISION

The State Board for Vocational Education will, upon recommendation of
the state superintendent, who is by law the executive officer, designate
and employ to serve under the state director, a full-time state super-
visor and other supporting staff assistants to supervise the state-wide pro-
gram of agricultural education.

1. 1 Special Duties of the State Supervisor and Area Supervisors. The
state supervisor, assisted by the area supervisors, shall be respon-
sible for supervising and coordinating the state-wide program; deter-
mining if all programs and classes comply with existing statutory
laws, State Board regulations, and policies of the executive officer
and state director; recommending approval of the allocation of Mini-
mum Foundation Program special instructional units in agricultural
education and determining if they are utilized in conformance with the
requirements of this Plan; recommending to the state director appoint-
ment of personnel employed in the agricultural education section;
assisting the state director in formulating the biennial budget for the
receipt and expenditure of federal and state vocational funds; recom-
mending to the state director reimbursement to counties from federal
and/or state vocational funds for program development and operation;
cooperating with approved teacher-training institutions in providing
an adequate program of pre-service teacher training; assisting
county superintendents, local directors, and other vocational educa.-
tion personnel in the establishment and improvement of local programs;
recommending to the state director nominations for appointment to
the State Advisory Committee for Agricultural Education; promoting
vocational research; developing instructional materials; and providing
leadership to the state-wide program of agricultural education.

1. 2 Qualifications of State Supervisor.

1.21 Professional Preparation in Agricultural Education. The state
supervisor shall have a bachelor's degree in agricultural educa-
tion from an approved institution and in addition shall have
secured a master's degree in agricultural education from an
approved institution of higher learning.

1.22 Experience in Agricultural Education. The state supervisor
shall possess at least three years of successful educational
experience as an administrator or supervisor of agricultural
education. In addition, he shall have had at least two years of






-22-


successful experience as a teacher of vocational agriculture in
an approved high school department of vocational agriculture.

1.3 Qualifications of Area Supervisors.

1.31 Professional Preparation in Agricultural Education. The
qualifications of the area supervisors shall be the same as those
of the state supervisor except that there will be no requirement
for previous supervisory experience, and the completion of a
master ts degree may be waived upon approval of the executive
officer.

1.32 Experience in Agricultural Education. The area supervisor
shall have had at least three years of farming experience ac-
quired after reaching 15 years of age and,shall have had at least
two years of successful experience as a teacher of vocational
agriculture in an approved high school department of vocational
agriculture.

1.4 Duties and Qualifications of Supporting Professional Staff other than
Area Supervisors. The supporting professional staff may include, in
addition to the area supervisors, a program specialist, an executive
secretary of FFA, a specialist for Negro schools, an adult secretary
of NFA, and any other specialists whose services are desirable.

1.41 Duties of Supporting Professional Staff other than Area Super-
visors.

1.41-1 Program Specialist. The program specialist shall assist
the state supervisor of agricultural education to coordi-
nate and supervise the program of vocational agricultural
education and shall work on special problems assigned
by the state supervisor. He shall direct and supervise
the Negro program of vocational agricultural education,.
coordinate the publication of educational materials by
the section, and promote and coordinate the farm
mechanics and livestock programs for the section.

1.41-2 Executive Secretary of FFA. The executive secretary
shall assist the state supervisor and the supervisory
staff in coordinating and supervising the program of
activities of the Florida Association, Future Farmers of
America.

1.41-3 Specialist for Negro Schools. The specialist for Negro
schools shall serve as state advisor of the Florida Associ-
ation, New Farmers of America, and shall be responsible






-23-


for the improvement of the Negro program in vocational
agriculture under the direction and supervision of the
program specialist.

1.41-4 Adult Secretary of NFA. The adult secretary shall
assist the state supervisor, the program specialist, and
the supervisory staff in coordinating and supervising the
program of activities of the Florida Association, New
Farmers of America.

1.42 Qualifications of Supporting Professional Staff other than Area
Supervisors. The qualifications of the supporting professional
staff shall be the same as those of the area supervisors.

1.5 Duties and Qualifications of Local Supervisory Personnel.

1.51 Duties of the Local Director of Vocational Education, of Super-
visors, and/or Coordinators. Local supervision in counties of
more than 50, 000 population is primarily the responsibility of
the local director of vocational education. However, in those
counties where the local director is not qualified in agricultural
education or where the size of the program justifies a support-
ing supervisory staff to assist the director, additional personnel
may be desirable.

1.52 Qualifications of the Local Director of Vocational Education, of
Supervisors, and/or Coordinators. The local director of voca-
tional education will meet the qualifications set up in Section I,
6.22, of this Plan.

1.52-1 Professional Preparation in Agricultural Education.
The local supervisor or coordinator shall have the same
professional preparation as that required of an area
supervisor in vocational agriculture.

1. 52-2 Experience in Vocational Agriculture. The local super-
visor or coordinator shall have the same experience as
that required of an area supervisor in vocational agri-
culture.


2.0 PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION

The following types of classes may be included in agricultural education:
all-day, young farmer, adult farmer, and adult vocational agriculture
classes.






-24-


2. 1 Program Characteristics. The program of instruction in vocational
agriculture will deal with practical farm problems found in the com-
munity and will relate to the students enrolled in the class. Teachers
shall submit an annual program of work each year which is reviewed
by the area supervisors.

2. 2 Bases of Course Content. The course content in agricultural educa-
tion is based on the supervised farming programs of the students en-
rolled in the class. The course calendars are reviewed with the
teachers each year by the area supervisors during supervisory visits.

2.3 Enrollment Age and Grade Placement. Persons enrolled are over 14
years of age or are in the ninth grade.

2.4 All-Day Classes. All-day classes will be organized for boys enrolled
in public high schools who are interested in agriculture and who de-
sire to become farmers and have an opportunity for conducting a
supervised farming program.

2.41 Provisions for Supervised Farming Program. The local ad-
ministrators will allow the teacher of vocational agriculture
time to provide, instruction and supervision of students in super-
vised farming programs.

Supervised farming experiences are obtained when the student
conducts his program on the home farm and has complete con-
trol by ownership or lease agreement. The supervised farming
program should include productive enterprise projects, im-
provement projects, and supplementary farm jobs,

An individual farming program of satisfactory scope for each
student must extend over a period of at least six months of each
year.

In lieu of adequate facilities on the home farm, teachers may
approve any one of the following plans as a substitute:

2.41-1 Assistance to the student in gaining satisfactory experi-
ences by renting land in the community.

2.41-2 Provision for experiences on a school farm.

2.41-3 Placement of the student for farm experiences on a
farm in the community. The experiences must be planned
to cover phases of the teaching program and must be
under the supervision of the agriculture teacher.






-25-


2.42 Length of Courses and Class Schedules. The minimum number
of students for a class under no circumstances shall be less than
nine. The course will be designed to meet the needs of persons
over 14 years of age. A minimum of 500 hours of on-farm instruc-
tion per year is recommended in connection with the student's
supervised farming program. The course for all-day classes
will be a minimum of three years in length. A four-year course
of study is recommended and should be conducted in the majority
of schools. The total hours of instruction for the four years
will depend upon the plan adopted by each high school.

2.42-1 All-Day Classes. The length of the daily sessions and
the number of class sessions per week will be deter-
mined by the plan adopted by each school, which may
select as a minimum one of the following:

Plan I. I/ Two consecutive 60-minute periods of
class instruction per day, five days per week, for one
year; and one 60-minute period of instruction per day,
five days per week, for the other years.

Plan II. Two consecutive 60-minute periods of class
instruction per day, two days per week, and one 60-
minute period per day, three days per week, for each
class each year.

Plan II. (Modified) One 60-minute period per day,
five days per week for each class for two years, two
consecutive 60-minute periods per day two days per
week, and one 60-minute period three days per week,
for each class for two years. (This assumes that there
is a four-year program of vocational agriculture in
operation. A teacher may have four classes divided
into Agriculture I, II, III, and IV; or three classes,
Agriculture I (9th grade), II (10th grade), and III (11th
grade and 12th grade combination). If the latter system
is employed, Agriculture III should be taught one year
and Agriculture IV the next. )

Plan III. Two consecutive 45-minute periods of class
instruction per day, five days per week, for each class
each year.

1/ The double period for vocational agriculture may be arranged for any one
of the classes (Agriculture I, II, IlI, or IV). However, it is recommended
by the State Department of Education that the double period be arranged
for Agriculture III and IV.






-26-


2.43 Qualifications of Teachers. Regular teachers of all-day
classes shall be graduates of institutions approved by the State
Board for Vocational Education. They must have completed
the four-year college curriculum in agricultural education
which provides training to meet the provisions specified in the
State Plan for Vocational Education.

2.43-1 Professional Preparation in Agricultural Education.
The teacher of vocational agriculture must be a graduate
of an approved institution, with a major in agricultural
education.

2.43-2 Technical Preparation in Agriculture. Each teacher
will have a minimum of 20 semester hours in science
and not less than 50 semester hours in technical agri-
culture, the latter to include credit in farm crops, soils,
animal husbandry, poultry, agricultural economics,
agricultural engineering, horticulture, and other applied
areas.

2.43-3 Experience in Farming. The teacher of vocational agri-
culture must have a minimum of three years of farm
experience acquired after 15 years of age.

2.44 Provisions for Employing Regular Teachers of Vocational Agri-
culture. Regular teachers are employed on a twelve-month
basis. Counties may approve a teacher's absence from his
community for a period of not more than three weeks to attend
summer school for professional improvement provided this
approval shall not be given annually. Teachers should obtain
approval for leave from the county board of public instruction,
and such approval shall be officially entered on the board
minute s.

It is expected that each county board of public instruction will
allow the teacher a vacation period not to exceed two calendar
weeks per year.

2.45 Official Travel Policy for Teachers, Consultants, and Local
Coordinators. (See Section I, 5. 1)

2.46 FFA or NFA Activities. FFA or NFA activities are accepted
as parts of the instructional program.

Each department of vocational agriculture will have either a
chapter of Future Farmers of America or New Farmers of
America. The teacher of vocational agriculture is responsible






-27-


for the following accomplishments:

Organizing a chapter and securing a charter
Securing the necessary paraphernalia
Seeing that a program of work is planned
Seeing that regular meetings are held and that
parliamentary procedure is followed
Seeing that the adopted program is followed
Seeing that all chapter records are kept and that
accurate reports are submitted to the state office.

2.5 Young and Adult Farmer Classes.

2.51 Provisions for Enrollees.

2.51-1 Young Farmer Classes. The minimum number of pupils
for a class will be eight. The minimum age for a student
will be 16, and the course of study will be especially
designed to meet the needs of young farmers who are
between the ages of 16 and 24. The course of study will
continue from year to year and be adjusted to meet the
needs of students who are enrolled. The length of class
sessions shall be a minimum of 120 minutes. The mini-
mum number of class meetings per year shall be 10 and
the total hours per year not less than 20. There should
be a minimum of 50 hours of on-the-farm instruction
per class throughout the year. The class instruction will
extend over a minimum period of six months and be
timed to correspond with the seasonal sequence of prob-
lems as they arise in the farming programs of the en-
rollees. The teacher will assist the student in making
adjustments in his farming program and in securing the
proper type of farm credit. Records and reports will
be required of each student in order to determine his
progress.

2.51-2 Adult Farmer Classes. The minimum number of students
for a class will be 10. The course of study is to be con-
tinuous from year to year and is to be modified in terms
of improved practices or skills needed by farmers in the
community. Class sessions shall be not less than 120
minutes in length. The minimum number of class meet-
ings per year will be 10 with not less than 20 clock
hours devoted to group instruction. The course class-
room instruction should extend over a minimum period
of six months. Each member of the class will be required
to plan and adopt improved practices on his farm. These






-28-


practices will probably be of a managerial nature, and
in some cases it may be necessary for the individual
farmer to learn new skills.

The teacher of agriculture will be expected to give at
least 50 hours of on-the-farm instruction per class dur-
ing the year to farmers enrolled, helping them to carry
out improved practices that are planned for economic
benefit to the farms. Farmers will be expected to keep
records on these improved practices since the agricul-
tural teacher will be required to submit a final report
to the state office not later than December 31 of each
calendar year.

2.52 Qualifications of Teachers of Young and Adult Farmer Classes.

2.52-1 Training for Teaching. The training shall be the same as
that required for regular teachers as outlined in Section
II, 2.43-1 and 2.43-2.

2.52-2 Experience in Farming. Experience shall be the same
as that required for regular teachers as outlined in
Section II, 2. 43-3.

2.53 Program Compliance with State Plan Requirements. Program
compliance with State Plan requirements will be accomplished
by regular program reviews by the state supervisor, the pro-
gram specialist, and the area supervisors.

2.6 Adult Vocational Agriculture Classes.

2.61 Provisions for Enrollees. Any person who qualifies for enroll-
ment in a young or adult farmer class may enroll in an adult
vocational agriculture class.

The minimum enrollment shall be 12, with an average attendance
of 10 students being maintained,

The course shall be based on a specialized unit or problem in
agricultural production, processing, marketing, improving the
home and farm, or in the area of farm mechanics.

The class sessions shall be not less than 120 minutes in length.
Laboratory work and field trips may be a part of the classroom
instructional program and 1-1/2 clock hours will be required
for each hour of classroom credit.






-29-


An adult vocational agriculture course may be organized on the
basis of a Minimum Foundation unit or a fractional part there.

Each member of the class will be required to plan and adopt im-
proved practices within the scope of the unit covered in the instruc-
tional program, and it may be necessary for individuals to learn
new skills.

2.62 Qualifications of Teachers of Adult Vocational Agriculture Classes.

2.62-1 Preparation. Special teachers will be employed to teach
adult vocational agriculture classes. The individual act-
ing as the teacher shall have at least completed high school
and be a recognized authority in his vocation. Before a
special teacher is approved for a class, he must be
appropriately certified.

2.62-2 Experience in Farming or in Related Specialized Fields.
A person selected as a special teacher must have had at
least three years of recent and practical experience in
the occupational area in which instruction is to be given.
In most cases the instruction will be in the nature of
skills. Examples include areas such as electric or
acetylene welding where students desire to construct or
repair farm machinery, the processing of food, the
construction of terraces, the draining of land, the in-
stallation of irrigation systems, the operation of farm
machinery, the installation and maintenance of farm
plumbing systems, and the construction of farm buildings.

The follow-up or on-the-farm instruction will be given
by a regular teacher of agriculture.

2.7 Facilities. The county board of public instruction, where vocational
agriculture units are approved, is responsible for providing minimum
approved facilities for each department. In addition, the following
shall be included:

2.71 Classrooms. A classroom of minimum size to meet state re-
quirements, but sufficiently large to accommodate the largest
vocational agriculture class in the school, should be provided,
and it should be equipped with tables, chairs, and storage facili-
ties.

2.72 Office. An office of sufficient size to accommodate the office
furniture and equipment necessary for the teacher should be pro-
vided.






-30-


2.73 Farm Mechanics Shop. A minimum of 100 square feet of work
area per student for the largest class should be provided. Part
of this area may include a designated outside work area. The
farm mechanics shop should be properly equipped to meet the
needs of the students enrolled. An annual budget should be pro-
vided to purchase additional equipment and to maintain present
shop equipment. The use of the farm mechanics shop for any
purpose other than vocational agriculture must not in any way
detract from or interfere with the farm mechanics program.

2.74 Land Laboratory or School Farm. A land laboratory or school
farm of sufficient size to demonstrate approved practices in
technical agriculture and to teach skills in farm operation and
management should be provided. The department should contain
the necessary equipment for efficient operation of these facilities.

2.75 Budget for Instructional Supplies. The school will provide in its
budget from local or Minimum Foundation Program current
expense funds a sum adequate to provide teaching supplies for
the classroom, farm mechanics shop, and land laboratory or
school farm, in addition to the budget for equipment.

2.76 Library. A library containing the necessary books, bulletins,
magazines, and other reference materials concerned with types
of farming in the area will be provided to meet the needs of stu-
dents.


3.0 ADVISORY COMMITTEES

Each agriculture department shall have a local advisory committee to
serve as consultant on matters of course content, methods, procedures,
and standards. The committee should consist of persons selected for
their interest in and concern with agricultural education.

3.1 Duty. The local advisory or consulting committee shall serve in an
advisory capacity to local school personnel in the planning and evalu-
ating of programs in agricultural education and shall assist in inter-
preting the program to the public.

3.2 Term of Office. The term of office shall be for two years and it shall
be so arranged that only half of the committee members will be re-
placed in any one year.






-31-


4. 0 PROGRAM OF TEACHER TRAINING

4.1 Approved Teacher-Training Institutions. The University of Florida,
Gainesville, and the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
(N), Tallahassee, have been designated by the State Board for Voca-
tional Education to give the technical training in agriculture and the
professional training in agricultural education which will prepare
teachers for the public schools. These institutions have also been
designated to provide instruction for in-service teachers leading to
advanced degrees and/or certificates. The program of training at the
two institutions will be conducted in cooperation with the State Board
for Vocational Education through its representatives.

4.2 List of Approved Institutional Offerings. Titles, brief descriptions,
and semester hours credit of courses in agriculture education teacher
training for which federal vocational and state matching funds may be
used for reimbursement are outlined in a supplement contained in
"Administrative Policies and Procedures Covering State Board and
Approved Vocational Teacher Education Institutions."

Approved institutions of higher learning may offer additional elective
agriculture education courses taught by approved agriculture, education
teacher trainers. Federal agriculture education monies and state
matching funds may be used for reimbursement of such courses only
upon prior recommendation of the state supervisor and written approval
of the state director.

4.3 Provision for Technical Agriculture Courses for Qualifying Teachers.
It is expected that no individual will qualify to teach vocational agri-
culture with less than 50 semester hours of technical preparation in
agriculture in addition to courses in science.

4.31 Areas in Technical Agriculture and Minimum Hours Suggested
in Each Area.

Animal Husbandry, including 10 to 15 semester hours
Dairying and Poultry
Farm Crops and Soils 6 to 9 semester hours
Horticulture 9 to 12 semester hours
Agricultural Engineering 6 to 12 semester hours
Agricultural Economics 3 to 9 semester hours
Forestry 3 to 6 semester hours
Entomology 3 to 6 semester hours

The minimum number of hours in each area provides for some
elective courses in order to qualify individuals for special farm-
ing areas. At least 10 semester hours of electives will be re-






-32-


quired if only the minimum number of hours in each area is taken.

4.4 Qualifications of Members of the Teacher-Training Staff.

4.41 Technical and Professional Preparation.

4.41-1 Technical Preparation in Agriculture. Members of the
teacher-training staff must have met all technical re-
quirements in agriculture for a regular teaching position
in vocational agriculture as required by the State Plan
for Vocational Education. Preference will be given to
those who have had additional work.

4.41-2 Agricultural Education. A member of the teacher-train-
ing staff shall have a baccalaureate degree in agricultural
education from an approved institution and, in addition,
must have completed one year of graduate work in agri-
culture or education--preferably a combination of both--
and hold a master's degree.

4.42 Farming and Professional Experience.

4.42-1 Farming Experience. The individual must have had at
least three years of farm experience acquired after reach-
ing 15 years of age.

4.42-2 Teaching, Supervisory, or Administrative Experience in
Approved Programs of Agricultural Education, The in-
dividual must have had at least three years of successful
teaching experience in an approved agriculture department.

4.5 Conditions for Approval of State Institutions to Train Teachers of
Vocational Agriculture.

4.51 Standards Regarding Facilities and Staff. The institution will
provide facilities and a technical staff which will furnish adequate
training for prospective teachers of vocational agriculture.

4.51-1 Faculty. The institutions shall employ staff members for
teaching who have degrees in technical agriculture and
who are qualified by training and experience for teaching
and research in the specific area to which they are
assigned. Some provision should be made to insure the
professional growth of the faculty.

Each member of the technical agriculture staff shall have
a master's or higher degree with a graduate major in the






-33-


specific area of his teaching and research assignment or
shall have a bachelor's degree in that area and be working
under the direct supervision of a staff member who has
an advanced degree in that area. (For example, an in-
structor in dairy science should have a master's degree
in dairy science.) Graduate degrees in agriculture do
not qualify individuals for teaching the various fields of
agriculture on the college level.

The institution shall employ a staff in technical agriculture,
providing instruction in the following offerings: terracing,
drainage and irrigation; farm mechanics, farm power and
machinery (including rural electrification); farm crop,
soils,and soil fertility; animal husbandry; general and
applied entomology; farm forestry production and manage-
ment; general horticultural production; principles of
plant physiology and pathology; animal diseases and hygiene;
farm management (including farm finance, taxation, and
insurance); and agricultural economics (including market-
ing of farm products).

The technical staff members shall have experience in the
application of these sciences to current agricultural prob-
lems.

The institution shall maintain and support active research
programs in these fields.

The institution shall employ a resident staff in agricultural
education, each member of which has a mater's or higher
degree in vocational education and is qualified by training
and experience to teach college level courses in agricul-
tural education, conduct research in agricultural educa-
tion, prepare teaching aids for teachers of vocational
agriculture, engage in in-service training activities, and
assist in the selection and placement of trainees. Facili-
ties shall be provided for off-campus student teaching in
which a minimum of one qualified supervisor shall be pro-
vided for each twenty student teachers while these are
engaged in student teaching.

4.51-2 Laboratory Facilities. The institution shall provide satis-
factory classrooms, laboratories, and other facilities
necessary for the training of teachers of agriculture.
These facilities shall include a farm owned and operated
by the institution, with sufficient acreage for the production
of the major crops common to the area on a scale large








-34-


enough to permit the demonstration of approved farm
practices (including the use of major farm equipment) and
to provide land for a comprehensive agricultural research
program.

Whenever instruction is offered in any of the following
classes of livestock or poultry, the following minimum num-
ber of birds or animals shall be owned and managed by
the college. In all cases, the institution should maintain
a minimum of three classes, including at least one class
of cattle:

Dairy One practical breeding unit of at least 20
milking cows
Beef One practical breeding unit of at least 15
breeding cows, a bull, and 20 feeder and
stocker cattle
Sheep A farm flock of 25 breeding ewes
Poultry 1, 000 birds, including layers, broilers,
and turkeys
Swine One breeding unit of 8 to 10 sows.

The institution shall provide classroom and scientific
laboratory facilities of recognized college standard for
food processing and preservation (including meats or
dairy products), plant pathology, horticulture, crops,
soils, farm machinery, farm mechanics, soil conserva-
tion, livestock, poultry, livestock sanitation and animal
hygiene, and any other areas particularly applicable to
the State.

In the field of related science, laboratories shall be
available for work in bacteriology, botany, chemistry,
genetics, physics, and zoology.

The institution shall maintain a general library of recog-
nized college standard, including materials in the field of
agriculture. The agriculture library shall contain a
comprehensive list of reference books in the various fields,
a complete file of USDA bulletins, State Agricultural Ex-
periment Station and Extension Service publications, Ag-
ricultural Yearbooks, and publications of other states
having similar types of agriculture, in addition to farm
magazines and periodicals and the leading scientific
journals pertinent to the principal areas of agriculture.
The reference materials available shall apply to all types
of farming in the State, including not only major enter-










-35-


prises but minor and contributory undertakings as well.
In all cases, the library shall include a minimum of
2, 500 volumes of different titles in the field of agriculture
in addition to an adequate supporting library. The library
shall be under the supervision of a trained librarian.

Facilities for the training of potential teachers in the use
of audio-visual aids should be available.

4.52 Procedures for Determining Whether the Applying Institution has
Facilities and Staff for Technical Instruction at Least Equal to
Those of the State College of Agriculture. Adequacy of facilities
and staff for technical instruction will be determined by a cora-
mittee appointed by the state superintendent of public instruction
and executive officer upon the recommendation of the state director
who will be provided with nominations by the state supervisor.


5.0 PLAN FOR COORDINATING STUDIES, INVESTIGATIONS, RESEARCH,
AND PREPARATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF PROFESSIONAL AND TECH-
NICAL MATERIAL FOR EMPLOYED TEACHERS

Research may be conducted by the teacher-training institutions, by county
boards of public instruction through the local coordinators, and by the
State Board for Vocational Education through the State Department of Educa-
tion, when the research is confined to one of the following areas of study:

Identifying and determining agricultural training needs
Methods of instruction
Supervision of instruction
Instructional facilities and materials
Agricultural employment and occupations
Placement and follow-up of trainees
Standards for organization and administration of agricultural
education programs
Measuring effectiveness of instruction
Selection and training of teachers
Methods of coordinating training with agricultural needs
Any other studies that might have direct bearing on the expansion
and improvement of vocational agricultural education.

Professional and technical material will be prepared and distributed to
employed teachers by the Educational Materials Laboratory, Division o:0
Vocational and Adult Education.





-36-

































SECTION III

BUSINESS, DISTRIBUTIVE, AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION






-37-


SECTION III

BUSINESS, DISTRIBUTIVE AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION


1.0 PLAN FOR SUPERVISION

1. 1 Specialized State Supervision

1.11 Supervisory Provisions. The State Board for Vocational Education
will, upon recommendation of the state superintendent, who is by
law the executive officer, designate and employ to serve under the
state director, a full-time state supervisor and other supporting
staff assistants to supervise the state-wide programs of business,
distributive, and cooperative education.

1.12 Provision for Reimbursement of State Supervisor's Salary from
Federal Funds. A proportionate share of the state supervisor's
salary is provided from federal funds and the remainder from state
funds, reflecting the approximate adjustment of reimbursable
salary for the federally approved program of distributive education.

1. 13 Arrangements for Coordinating the Supervisor's Activities with
those of other Members of the State Staff. Area supervisors are
located strategically throughout the State and meet periodically in
the State Board headquarters to coordinate activities.

1.2 Special Duties of the State Supervisor and Area Supervisors. The state
supervisor, assisted by the area supervisors, shall be responsible for
supervising and coordinating the state-wide program; determining if all
programs and classes comply with existing statutory laws, State Board
regulations, and policies of the executive officer and state director; de-
termining if classes meet minimum or acceptable standards of operation,
including facilities, equipment and curriculum; recommending approval
of the allocation of Minimum Foundation Program special instructional
units in business, distributive and cooperative education and determining
if they are utilized in conformance with the requirements of this Plan;
recommending to the state director appointment of personnel employed
in the business, distributive and cooperative section; assisting the state
director in formulating the biennial budget for the receipt and expendi-
ture of federal and state vocational funds; recommending to the state
director reimbursement to counties from federal and/or state vocational
funds for program development and operation; cooperating with approved
teacher-training institutions in providing an adequate program of pre-
service and in-service teacher training; assisting county superintendents,
local directors, and other vocational education personnel in the estab-
lishment and improvement of local programs; recommending to the state
director nominations for appointment to the State Advisory Committee






-38-


for Business, Distributive and Cooperative Education; promoting
vocational research; developing instructional materials; and providing
leadership to the state-wide program of business, distributive and
cooperative education.

1. 3 Qualifications of the State Supervisor.

1.31 Professional Preparation in Distributive Education. The state
supervisor shall have graduated from a standard four-year college
and, in addition, shall have secured a master's degree with
specialization in business, distributive and cooperative education
from an approved institution of higher learning.

In addition, he shall possess at least three years of successful
administrative or supervisory experience in the field of business,
distributive or cooperative education.

1.32 Technical Preparation in Distribution. The state supervisor shall
have completed eight semester hours of technical distributive occu-
pational subjects.

1.33 Teaching Experience in Distributive Education. The state super-
visor shall have had at least two years of successful teaching
experience in one or more of the fields of vocational business, dis-
tributive or cooperative education as operated in accordance
with the State Plan.

1.34 Work Experience. The state supervisor shall have had at least
three years of practical work experience as a wage earner in
business and/or industry.

1.4 Qualifications of the Area Supervisors. The qualifications of area super-
visors shall be the same as those of the state supervisor with the possible
exception that completion of a master's degree may be waived under un-
usual circumstances upon approval of the executive officer.

1.5 Duties and Qualifications of Supporting Professional Staff other than
Area Supervisors. The supporting professional staff may include, in
addition to the area supervisors, specialists in instructional problems,
research and surveys, educational materials, a business education con-
sultant, and any other specialists whose services are desirable.

1.51 Duties of Supporting Professional Staff other than Area Supervisors.

1.51-1 Business Education Consultant. Duties and qualifications
are outlined in Section I, 1. 56 of this Plan.






-39-


1.51-2 Other Specialists. As the need arises and it is desirable
to employ additional personnel for specialized business,
distributive and cooperative education areas, such per-
sons will assist the state supervisor in the supervision
and coordination of the state-wide program in the spe-
cialized vocational fields for which they are trained.

1.52 Qualifications of Supporting Professional Staff other than Area
Supervisors.

1.52-1 Professional Preparation in Distributive Education.
Coordinators, consultants, or specialists of in-school
activities shall possess a baccalaureate degree from a
standard four-year college with specialization in busi-
ness, distributive or cooperative education.

1.52-2 Experience in Business, Distributive and Cooperative
Education. Coordinators, consultants, or specialists of
in-school services shall possess three years of adminis-
trative, supervisory, or teaching experience in business,
distributive or cooperative education.

Coordinators, consultants, or specialists of out-of-
school services shall possess the same work experience
requirements as a teacher of the business or distributive
pursuit to be coordinated.

1.6 Duties and Qualifications of Local Supervisors. Local supervision in
counties of more than 50, 000 population is primarily the responsibility
of the local director of vocational education. (Section I, 6. 2) However,
in those counties where the local director of vocational education is not
qualified in business, distributive or cooperative education or where
the size of the program justifies a supporting supervisory staff to assist
the director, additional personnel may be desirable.

1.61 Duties of Local Supervisors, Coordinators, and Assistant
Pr inc ipals.

1.61-1 Local Supervisor of Business, Distributive and Coopera-
tive Education (county-wide). The county supervisor of
business, distributive and cooperative education shall
be responsible for the supervision of the local business,
distributive and cooperative program. He shall assist
teachers in upgrading instruction, work with advisory
committees in determining curricula, assist teachers
in securing instructional materials and other needed
teaching aids, recruit teachers and make recommendations






-40-


for appointment of same to the local director (or county
superintendent), provide for the in-service training of
teachers, and perform what other supervisory functions
a person in this position might be assigned by the county
superintendent or local director.

1.61-2 Local Coordinator of Business, Distributive and Coopera-
tive Education (program-wide). The local coordinator
of business, distributive and cooperative education shall
be responsible for the coordination of a major program
within the county such as vocational business education,
cooperative training education, or adult distributive
education. He shall act as liaison between industry and
the school on matters of determining training needs,
placement of trainees, and upgrading of workers through
school training. He shall work with craft committees on
course content, and shall perform what other coordina-
ting functions a person in this position might be assigned
by the county superintendent or the local director.

1.61-3 Assistant Principal or Department Head of Business,
Distributive and Cooperative Education (school-wide).
Where the principal of a vocational school (day or evening)
or a comprehensive high school is not qualified in business,
distributive and cooperative education, and the program
is large enough to justify the employment of an assistant
principal or department head, such person shall assist
the principal in the administration and supervision of the
in-school business, distributive and cooperative educa-
tion program.

A teacher of business, distributive and cooperative educa-
tion subjects may be designated as department head of
business, distributive and cooperative education in any
school, provided the time devoted to supervisory and
coordinating duties is equal to or exceeds that spent in
teaching.

1.62 Qualifications of Local Supervisors, Coordinators, and Assistant
Principals.

1.62-1 Local Supervisor of Business, Distributive and Coopera-
tive Education (county-wide) and Assistant Principal
(school-wide). Qualifications shall be the same as those
outlined for a local director of vocational education in
Section I of this Plan, with specialization in business,
distributive or cooperative education.






-41-


Local Coordinator of Business, Distributive or Coopera-
tive Education (program-wide). The local coordinator
shall be a graduate of a standard institution with a four-
year degree and, in addition, shall have secured 12 semes-
ter hours of approved business, distributive or coopera-
tive education teacher-training courses, including three
semester hours each in administration of vocational
education, supervision of business, distributive or co-
operative education, and school-community employee-
employer relationships.

1.62-2 Technical Preparation in Distribution. The local co-
ordinator shall have a minimum of eight semester hours
in technical distributive occupational subjects.

1.62-3 Teaching Experience in Business, Distributive or
Cooperative Education. The local coordinator shall
have at least three years (144 hours per year minimum)
of experience in teaching business, distributive or co-
operative subjects.

1.62-4 Experience in Business, Distributive or Cooperative
Occupations. The local coordinator shall have a mini-
mum of two years of work experience at the journeyman
or trained employee level in a business, distributive or
cooperative pursuit.

1.62-5 Department Head of Business, Distributive and Coopera-
tive Education (school-wide). The department head shall
have the same preparation and experience as the local
coordinator of business, distributive or cooperative
education.


2.0 PROGRAMS) OF INSTRUCTION

2. 1 Procedures Ensuring that Instructional Content is Functionally
Applicable to the Field of Distribution. Business, distributive and
cooperative education may include training in manipulative, technical,
and related vocational subjects for persons either employed or about
to be employed in an office occupation; in distributive occupational
subjects such as merchandising, buying and selling, and wholesaling
for persons either engaged in or about to be engaged in distributive
occupations. Cooperative training education may include specialized
in-school training on a cooperative basis for high school students who
wish to become employed in distributive occupations, office occupations
or diversified occupations while still attending high school.





-42-


2. 2 Enrollment and Organization.

2. 21 Evening or Part-time Extension Enrollees. Persons enrolled
in evening or part-time extension classes in either business or
distributive occupations shall be at least 16 years of age and
shall have legally left the full-time school to engage in employ-
ment. Enrollees in evening and part-time extension classes
shall be employed (or temporarily unemployed) in the occupation
for which instruction is supplemental. To be considered supple-
mental, the instruction must be such as to increase the skill or
knowledge of the workers in the business or distributive pur-
suit in which they are employed.

2. 22 Part-time Cooperative Enrollees. Part-time cooperative
classes in business, distributive and diversified programs may
be conducted for persons who are enrolled in a vocational,
technical, or secondary high school or in any other day school
for adults and who receive on-the-job training through part-time
employment in business, distributive or diversified occupations.

Student-learners enrolled in part-time cooperative training
classes shall be at least 16 years of age and be legally employed
in a business, distributive or diversified occupation under
agreement (preferably written) between the school and the em-
ployer. Such employment shall be in conformity with federal,
state, or local employment regulations. When employment is in
establishments engaged in inter-state commerce, such employ-
ment shall be at least at the legal minimum wage, except when
an exemption certificate is secured from the Wage Determina-
tion and Exemption Branches of the Wage and Hour Division,
United States Department of Labor, permitting employment at
a sub-minimum wage. In certain occupations declared hazard-
ous by the United States Department of Labor under the Fair
Labor Standards Act, or by State Regulations, student-learners
must be 18 years of age unless specific exemption has been
obtained to permit those between the ages of 16 and 18 to work
at such occupations.

Only those classes composed entirely of persons employed in
distributive occupations may be reimbursed from federal or
matching funds.

The training provided through the operation of cooperative pro-
grams shall be for skilled or semi-skilled occupations which
offer opportunities for training and advancement, and the instruc-
tion shall be designed to enlarge the vocational intelligence of
the enrollees.






-43-


2.3 Procedures and Records used by the State to Assure that Enrollees
Meet Requirements. The responsibility for maintaining records on
individual enrollees is delegated to local supervisory personnel.
Such records and reports are checked periodically by the state super-
visor's office.

2.4 Evening and Part-time Extension Classes. An evening extension
class is defined as one which is conducted during the non-working
hours of the enrollees. A part-time extension class is one conducted
during the usual working hours of the enrollees.

2.41 Qualifications of Teachers and/or Coordinators of Evening and
Part-time Extension Courses.

2.41-1 Professional Preparation in Distributive Education. No
specific training is required for teachers of evening or
part-time extension classes other than in-service train-
ing that may be required by local boards of public instruc-
tion.

2.41-2 Technical Preparation in Distribution. Technical train-
ing for a part-time instructor is desirable, but may not
be required if he has been successful in the special as-
pect of the occupation which he is teaching.

2.41-3 Experience in Business or Distributive Occupations.
Teachers of evening and part-time extension classes in
business and distributive education which are organized
for less than 540 hours shall possess at least six years
of practical experience in the occupation to be taught, a
minimum of two years of which shallhave beenatthe trained
employee level. In any occupation requiring employees
to be licensed by a legally constituted federal, state, or
local licensing agency, such teachers shall hold a valid
license to work in that occupation.

2.42 Qualifications of Teachers used for Special Assignments. This
provision does not apply.

2.5 Part-time Cooperative Classes.

2.51 Time Plans for Classes and Employment. Enrollees in part-
time cooperative classes shall be employed for at least half
of the usual working week of the occupation in which they are
employed, and in no case shall the weekly hours of employment
be less than 15. The time at work shall equal or exceed the
time in clock hours devoted to school instruction throughout the





-44-


year. In no case shall the time at school and the time at work
be such as to violate legal employment regulations.

In programs covering either one or two school years, an average
of two class periods per day must be devoted to related voca-
tional subjects.

2.52 Qualifications of Teacher-Coordinators.

2.52-1 Professional Preparation in Business or Distributive
Education. A teacher-coordinator shall be a: graduate of
a standard institution with a four-year degree, including
six semester hours of professional vocational courses
such as those concerned with the principles and philosophy
of vocational education, and the organization and coordi-
nation of distributive cooperative education.

2.52-2 Technical Preparation in Business or Distributive Educa-
tion. A teacher-coordinator shall have a minimum of
six semester hours of course work which is related to
the distributive occupational subjects to be taught.

2.52-3 Experience in Business and/or Distributive Education.
A teacher-coordinator shall have a minimum of two years
of practical work experience in occupations considered
either business or distributive.

2.53 Qualifications of Teachers and/or Coordinators of Sectional
Cooperative Classes. No sectional cooperative classes are in
operation.


3.0 REPRESENTATIVE ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Teacher-coordinators of each business, distributive and cooperative train-
ing program and all evening and part-time extension teachers should have
a representative advisory committee to serve as consultant on matters of
course content, methods, procedures, and standards in their respective
fields of instruction. The committee should consist of persons selected as
representative of the business occupational fields.


4. 0 PROGRAM OF TEACHER TRAINING

The Statets general plan for providing and supervising teacher training
is outlined in Section I of this Plan.







-45-


4.1 Teacher-Training Plan for Business, Distributive and Cooperative
Education. In order to receive the benefits of the appropriations in
the acts for the training of teachers, coordinators, and supervisors
of business, distributive and cooperative education, the training shall
be conducted under the supervision of the State Board for Vocational
Education. Such training shall be given only to persons who have had
adequate vocational experience in the occupations for which they are
preparing themselves or who are acquiring such experience.

No federal or state funds shall be allocated any institution or agency
for business, distributive and cooperative teacher training without
the approval of the State Board for Vocational Education.

The State Board for Vocational Education, through its authorized
representatives, shall approve and designate all business, distributive
and cooperative teacher-training institutions and all personnel em-
ployed to carry out the function of business, distributive and coopera-
tive education teacher training, as well as the courses to be offered.

County boards of public instruction may employ qualified teacher
trainers to perform the same duties and give the same instruction as
those attached to designated institutions, provided the person selected
is approved by the State Board and is a member of the appropriate
vocational department of an approved institution of higher learning.

It shall be the responsibility of the State Board for Vocational Educa-
tion to establish close coordination between teacher training and
teacher certification.

4.11 Pre-Service Teacher Training. Approved teacher-training
institutions will provide pre-service teacher training for those
who have the necessary business, distributive and cooperative
occupational experience and who are preparing for teaching
through the same courses and instruction provided for in-service
teachers.

For prospective teachers who have been offered positions but
who lack the basic teacher training required for initial certifi-
cation, a teacher apprenticeship will be provided. This appren-
ticeship will consist of observation of instruction, practice
teaching, and directed study under the supervision of an approved
business, distributive and cooperative teacher trainer serving
on the staff of an approved institution of higher learning.

Pre-service teacher training for part-time teachers may be con-
ducted by local boards of public instruction through qualified
supervisors. Such training will not be for college or certification






-46-


credit and may be of an informal type.

4.12 In-Service Teacher Training. In-service teacher training,in-
cluding non-credit and credit work may be provided for teachers,
coordinators, and supervisors in keeping with provisions out-
lined in "Administrative Policies and Procedures Covering State
Board and Approved Vocational Education Institutions. "

In-service teacher training for part-time teachers may be con-
ducted by local boards of public instruction through qualified
supervisors. Such training will not be for college or certifica-
tion credit and may be of an informal type.

4.2 Qualifications of Teacher-Training Enrollees. All persons enrolling
in approved business, distributive and cooperative education teacher-
training courses shall possess the minimum occupational experience
required of a qualified teacher, except that enrollees who will fulfill
the requirement by or before completion of the course of study may be
entered on the same basis as other candidates.

4.3 Approved Institutions of Higher Learning Providing Personnel Train-
ing in Business, Distributive and Cooperative Education. The Florida
State University, Tallahassee; The University of Florida, Gainesville;
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (N), Tallahassee;
and The University of Miami, Coral Gables, shall be designated as
the institutions of higher learning approved to train business, distribu-
tive and cooperative teachers, coordinators and supervisors.

4.4 Approved Teacher-Training Courses. Titles, brief descriptions, and
semester hours credit of courses in business, distributive and coopera-
tive education teacher training for which federal vocational and state
matching funds may be used for reimbursement are outlined in a
supplement contained in "Administrative Policies and Procedures
Covering State Board and Approved Vocational Teacher Education Insti-
tutions. "

Approved institutions of higher learning may offer additional elective
vocational courses taught by approved business, distributive and
cooperative teacher trainers. Federal vocational and state matching
funds may be used for reimbursement of such courses, when applicable,
only upon prior recommendation of the state supervisor and written
approval of the state director.

4.5 Qualifications of Teacher Trainers.

4.51 Professional Preparation in Distributive Education. A full-time
teacher trainer shall have graduated from a standard four-year






-47-


college. In addition, he shall have secured a master's degree
with specialization in business, distributive and cooperative
education from an approved institution of higher learning.

4. 52 Technical Preparation in Distribution. A full-time teacher
trainer shall possess a minimum of eight semester hours in
technical distributive occupation subjects.

4. 53 Teaching Experience in Distributive Education. A full-time
teacher trainer shall possess at least two years of successful
teaching experience as a teacher of business, distributive and
cooperative education classes which meet the standards of the
State Plan. In addition, he shall have at least three years of
experience in a responsible administrative, supervisory, or
teacher-training capacity in the field of business, distributive
or cooperative education.

4.54 Experience in Distributive Occupations. A full-time teacher
-trainer shall have at least three years of practical work experience
as a wage earner in a distributive or vocational business educa-
tion pursuit.

4.6 Criteria for Designating Teacher-Training Institutions.

4.61 Minimum Professional Offerings in Distributive Education. A
designated teacher-training institution shall offer a minimum of
nine semester hours of professional preparation in distributive
education annually.

4.62 Minimum Technical Offerings in Distribution. Technical offer-
ings may be provided by related colleges with a minimum of
eight hours of course work being selected by the student in con-
sultation with his faculty advisor.


5.0 PLAN FOR COORDINATING STUDIES, INVESTIGATIONS, RESEARCH,
AND THE PREPARATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF PROFESSIONAL AND
TECHNICAL MATERIAL FOR EMPLOYED TEACHERS

Research may be conducted by the teacher-training institutions designated
in Section III, 4.3, by county boards of public instruction through the local
director of vocational education, and by the State Board for Vocational
Education through the State Department of Education, when the research is
confined to one of the following areas of study:

Identifying and determining distributive and vocational business
education needs






-48-


Methods of instruction
Supervision of instruction
Instructional facilities and materials
Distributive and business employment occupations
Placement and follow-up of student learners
Standards for the organization and administration of the program
Measuring the effectiveness of instruction
Selection and training of teachers
Methods of coordinating training with distributive and business needs
Any other studies that might have direct bearing on the expansion and
improvement of business, distributive, and cooperative education.

Professional and technical material will be prepared and distributed upon
request to employed teachers by the Educational Materials Laboratory,
Division of Vocational and Adult Education.


































SECTION IV

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION
.-,o i.,' o





-49-


SECTION IV

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION


1.0 PLAN FOR SUPERVISION

The State Board for Vocational Education will, upon recommendation of the
state superintendent, who is by law the executive officer, designate and em-
ploy to serve under the state director, a full-time state supervisor and other
supporting staff assistants to supervise the state-wide program of home
economics education.

1.1 Special Duties of the State Supervisor and Area Supervisors. The state
supervisor, assisted by the area supervisors, shall be responsible for
supervising and coordinating the state-wide program; determining if all
programs and classes comply with existing statutory laws, State Board
regulations, and policies of the executive officer and state director;
determining if all classes meet minimum or accepted standards of opera-
tion, including facilities, equipment, and curriculum; recommending
approval of the allocation of Minimum Foundation Program special in-
structional units in home economics education and determining if they
are utilized in conformance with the requirements of this Plan; recom-
mending to the state director appointment of personnel employed in the
home economics section; assisting the state director in formulating the
biennial budget for the receipt and expenditure of federal and state voca-
tional funds; recommending to the state director reimbursement to
counties from federal and/or state vocational funds for program develop-
ment and operation; cooperating with approved teacher-training insti-
tutions in providing an adequate program of pre-service and in-service
teacher training; assisting county superintendents, local directors, and
other vocational education personnel in the establishment and improve-
ment of local programs; recommending to the state director nominations
for appointment to the State Advisory Committee for Home Economics
Education; promoting research; developing instructional materials; and
providing leadership to the state-wide program of home economics edu-
cation.

1.2 Qualifications of the State Supervisor.

1.21 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Economics Edu-
cation. The state supervisor shall have graduated from a stand-
ard four-year college, and, in addition, shall have secured a
master's degree with specialization in home economics education
from an approved institution of higher learning.

1.22 Experience in Vocational Home Economics Education. The state
supervisor shall possess at least five years of successful experience





-50-


teaching home economics in secondary schools in several types
of communities, three years of which must have been in home
economics programs approved for reimbursement, and shall
have had successful experience in programs for adults.

The state supervisor shall have had. at least two years of success-
ful experience as a directing teacher at an intern teaching center
of homemaking education, or successful supervisory experience
as a city, county, or area supervisor.

1.3 Qualifications of Assistant State Supervisor. At present no plans have
been made for such a position.

1.4 Qualifications of Area Supervisors.

1.41 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Economics
Education. The area supervisor shall have completed a standard
four-year college curriculum in home economics and shall pos-
sess a bachelor's degree from an institution approved for certi-
fication of home economics teachers to teach in reimbursed de-
partments.

The area supervisor shall have a master's degree in home eco-
nomics. Under unusual circumstances this regulation may be
waived.

1.42 Experience in Vocational Home Economics Education. The area
supervisor shall possess at least five years of teaching experience
in secondary schools, at least two years of which shall have been
in a vocational homemaking program, including work in a home-
making program for adults.

The area supervisor shall possess at least two years of success-
ful experience as a directing teacher of an intern teaching center,
or successful supervisory experience as a city, county, or area
supervisor, or in teacher education.

1.5 Duties and Qualifications of Supporting Professional State Staff other
than Area Supervisors.

1.51 Duties of Supporting Professional State Staff other than Area
Supervisors.

1.51-1 Specialist in Homemaking Education in Negro Schools.
The specialist shall be directly responsible to the state
supervisor on all matters involving homemaking education
in Negro schools. This individual shall be responsible






-51-


for the improvement of instruction and shall work under
the leadership of the area supervisors in improving Negro
homemaking education programs. This person shall serve
as NHA adviser and shall work closely with teachers and
with district and local NHA advisers in the guidance and
promotion of NHA as an integral part of the homemaking
program.

1.52 Qualifications of Supporting Professional State Staff other than
Area Supervisors.

1.52-1 Professional Preparation in Home Economics Education.
Professional preparation shall be the same as that for an
area supervisor.

1.52-2 Experience in Vocational Home Economics Education.
Experience requirements shall be the same as those for
an area supervisor.

1.6 Duties of Local Supervisors.

1.61 County Supervisors. See Section 1, 6.2(1). The local supervisor
shall be responsible for the supervision of the local home economics
education program. This individual shall assist teachers in up-
grading instruction, work with advisory committees in determin-
ing curricula, assist teachers in securing instructional materials
and other needed teaching aids, recruit teachers and make recom-
mendations for appointment of same to the local director (or
county superintendent), provide for the in-service training of
teachers, and perform what other supervisory functions a person
in this position might be assigned by the county superintendent or
the local director.

1.7 Qualifications of Local Supervisors.

1.71 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Economics Edu-
cation. The local supervisor shall be a graduate of a four-year
college curriculum in home economics from an accredited college
or university approved for training vocational home economics
teachers. In addition, this person shall have a master's degree
with at least a minor in education or home economics education
and shall meet the certification requirements prescribed by the
State Board for Vocational Education to teach in a vocational pro-
gram in home economics as well as those requirements prescribed
by the Florida State Board of Education for the supervision of
special subjects.





-52-


1.72 Experience in Vocational Home Economics Education. The local
supervisor shall have at least three years of successful teaching
experience, including at least one year of experience in a voca-
tional program in home economics involving work with both in-
school and adult groups. At least two years of the teaching
experience or graduate work shall have been within a three year
period just prior to employment as supervisor.


2. 0 PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION

2. 1 Program for In-School Groups.

2. 11 Purpose and Scope of the Program. The vocational program in
homemaking education shall be designed to meet the homemaking
needs of persons fourteen years of age and over. The program
should provide for instruction in the areas of child care and de-
velopment; clothing and textiles; food and nutrition; health, home
safety, and home care of the sick; housing; personal, social and
family relationships; and consumer problems and home manage-
ment.

2. 12 Methods for Determining Curriculum Offerings. Local needs are
considered in establishing the local program which is in turn re-
flected in the state program as developed in the Florida Home-
making Education bulletin.

2. 13 Organization. Each class shall have a minimum of five 60-minute
periods a week gross (not less than 55 consecutive minutes net)
or the equivalent devoted to homemaking education. Time should
be provided in the teacher's schedule for planning and/or con-
ferences with pupils regarding their home projects.

A minimum of two years of instruction in homemaking education
shall be provided, including the required year in high school
(9th grade and above). The program of the ninth grade in a junior
high school may be approved if the school is articulated with a
senior high school that is vocationally approved. Pupils enrolling
in Homemaking II shall have satisfactorily completed the compre-
hensive homemaking course required of girls before graduation
from an accredited high school in the State of Florida.

Advanced courses (third and fourth years) are desirable; however,
advanced courses less than a year in length may be offered above
the minimum two-year requirement in a vocational program.

A minimum of forty home visitations per year is required for each





-53-


vocational instructional unit.

2. 14 Evaluation. Continuous evaluation is used as a basis for program
revision and should be planned at the time tentative objectives or
goals are determined.

2. 15 Administrative Relationships and Arrangements. A minimum of
nine students and a recommended maximum of 24 as a class en-
rollment shall comply with the standards prescribed by the State
Department of Education.

The homemaking education department shall be planned and
equipped so as to provide for experiences in all areas of home-
making. Plans for new departments or for major alterations and
remodeling should be submitted to the State Department of Educa-
tion for approval.

Sufficient space should be available for individual and group
activities and discussions, and adequate storage facilities should
be provided.

Furnishings and equipment of a suitable type and standard to
demonstrate desirable and possible practices in the average home
of the community shall be provided.

Provision should be made for adequate care and upkeep of building
and equipment.

The school will provide in its budget from local or Minimum
Foundation Program current expense funds a sum adequate to pro-
vide teaching supplies for the classroom. This is in addition to
the budget for equipment.

Opportunities will be made for supervised experiences in the home
which contribute to pupil growth and development, and participa-
tion in school and community projects that contribute to family
well-being is encouraged.

Future Homemakers of America and New Homemakers of Ame:ica
(FHA and NHA) activities are recognized as parts of the instruc-
tional program. Each department of homemaking education will
have either a chapter of FHA or NHA.

2. 2 Program for Out-of-School Groups.

2. 21 Purpose and Scope. Programs in homemaking education are in-
tended to provide instruction which will enable families to improve





-54-


the quality of family living through the more efficient develop-
ment and utilization of human and material resources. Anyone
over 16 years of age who evidences mental and physical compe-
tency to profit from the instruction is eligible for instruction in
homemaking.

2.22 Methods for Determining Offerings. Programs for out-of-school
youth and adults offer experiences in the different areas of home
and family living. In some communities these may be provided
in the same year while in others the offerings. may extend over
a longer period of time.

2.23 Organizational Plans. A series of short unit courses represent-
ing different areas of homemaking should be promoted. Courses
should not be repeated except for new enrollees. Advanced short
unit courses maybe provided in areas of homemaking for which
more advanced training is desired.

To relate instruction to the problems of the homemaker, it is de-
sirable for the instructor to visit the home to guide the homemaker
and to relate the in-class instruction more closely to home prob-
lems and situations.

Evening school courses may be offered at any time during the
day or evening and at any time during the calendar year.

2. 24 Plans for Evaluation. Continuous evaluation is used as a basis
for program revision and should be planned at the time tentative
objectives or goals are determined. Follow-up of the program
will include working with individual families on their homemaking
problems.

2.25 Administrative Relationships and Arrangements. Space, equip*
ment, maintenance, and teaching materials may be used when in
a suitable location and when available.

In remote areas not accessible to, homemaking education centers,
portable equipment may be made available where it can be used
to advantage for demonstration purposes,

Current expenses for instruction involving consumable supplies,
janitorial services, lights, heat, and other supplies of. a general
nature shall be provided, insofar as possible, through public
school funds.

Teaching materials shall be provided from public school funds.
These may include source materials such as books, magazines,










bulletins, pamphlets, and brochures; illustrative materials;
films, filmstrips, and slides; demonstration facilities; field
trips, and other devices and materials which serve as instruc-
tional aids.

A minimum average attendance of 10 is necessary for an evening
school class in home economics to be fully reimbursed by state
or federal funds for vocational education. Reimbursement on a
lesser number will be prorated.

Time compensation should be provided for required home visita-
tion, project supervision, and for the promotion and organization
of homemaking programs for adult groups beyond the eight-hour
school day. Two kinds of programs may be organized for adults -
the evening school program and the part-time program.

2.3 Qualifications of Teachers for In-School Groups.

2.31 Home Economics Teachers.

2.31-1 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Economics
Education. Teachers in vocational programs shall possess
a bachelor's degree in home economics from a standard
college or university meeting the requirements for prepa-
ration of vocational teachers as prescribed by the State
Board for Vocational Education, and they shall meet the
certification requirements prescribed by the State Board
of Education.

2.32 Home Economics Teachers Returning to Teaching After an Absence
of Ten or More Years. These qualifications are the same as the
regular certification requirements for teachers of other areas.

2.33 Teachers for Child Development Laboratory in the Home Economics
Program.

2.33-1 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Economics
Education. Qualifications for such teachers will be sub-
mitted to the United States Office of Education for approval
when such programs are definitely planned.

2.4 Qualifications of Teachers for Out-of-School Groups.

2.41 Home Economics Teachers.

2. 41-1 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home
Economics. Teachers holding a certificate to teach in





-56.


the day school reimbursed program will not need a
special certificate for teaching in the adult program. The
teacher of adult courses in evening and part-time programs
shall meet state requirements for certification as pre-
scribed in the State Certification Bulletin approved by
the State Board.

2. 41-2 Experience in Vocational Home Economics Education.
The teacher shall have a comprehensive background of
homemaking experience with particular emphasis upon the
phase which she is to teach.

2.42 Teachers from Other Fields. There is no provision for such
teachers at present.

2.5 Time Requirements when Smith-Hughes Funds are to be Used. Part-
time programs are open to homemakers 14 years of age and over,
provided the instruction is designed for persons over 14 years of age.

Part-time programs or classes organized under the Smith-Hughes Act
must, in accordance with the requirements of the Act, be organized
for a minimum of 144 hours of instruction during the school year. The
instruction given in any one unit of the 144-hour combination shall not
be a repetition of that given in any other unit of the course.

2.6 Official Travel Policy for Teachers,. Consultants, and Local Coordi-
nators. (See Section I, 5. 1)


3.0 PROGRAM OF TEACHER EDUCATION

The state's general plan for providing and supervising teacher training is
outlined in Section I of this Plan.

3.1 Pre-Service Training.

3. 11 Institutional Standards to be Maintained.

3.11-1 Provision for Cooperative Relations Between the State
Supervisory Staff in Home Economics Education and the
Institution, Staff members in the home economics depart-
ment in the institutions, including home economics educa-
tion, subject matter areas, and the supervisory staff in
the home economics section will work cooperatively in the
development of the program for teacher education.


3. 11-2 Procedure for Selecting Directed Teaching Centers, The






-57-


teaching center should be selected from eligible schools
by the teacher-training institution in cooperation with the
home economics section of the State Department of Edu-
cation.

3.11-3 Provision for the Administration and Supervision of
Directed Teaching. The state supervisor, the head teacher
trainer, and the coordinator for intern teaching at the
approved institutions shall cooperatively plan for the pro-
gram of directed teaching.

3. 11-4 Faculty. An institution approved for the preparation of
teachers shall have not less than five full-time home eco-
nomics staff members, one of whom shall be a qualified
teacher trainer. Staff members shall possess at least a
master's degree, and the staff shall include persons with
advanced training who are prepared to teach in the area
of food and nutrition; clothing, textiles, and related art;
child care and family relationships; and family economics
and home management.

The related staff members shall have experience in the
application of their respective sciences to current home-
making problems.

Staff members shall have at least a master's degree and
must teach in their major or minor field of specialization.

3. 11-5 Facilities. Teacher-training institutions must provide
adequate space and equipment. Equipment must be modern
and should represent desirable practices in home economics.
A home management house must be provided so that stu-
dents may secure management experience. A nursery or
play school must either be maintained by the institution
or be available to provide required observation and par-
ticipation experiences in child care.

Adequate library facilities should be provided by the insti-
tution, including current materials for all phases of the
home economics program.

Provision must be made by the institution for required
courses in education and for internship experiences.

3.11-6 Curriculum. A minimum of 120 semester hours, exclu-
sive of physical education and hygiene, will be accepted
for qualifying teachers of vocational programs in home




-58-


economics.

The following semester hour range is recommended for
professional home economics education courses, for re-
lated fields, and for electives.

Home Economics 31 to 42 semester hours
Related Fields 31 to 42 semester hours
General 31 to 42 semester hours
Professional 31 to 42 semester hours
Electives 13 to 25 semester hours

Approved institutions may be reimbursed for home eco-
nomics courses approved by the home economics section.

3. 11-7 Provision for Supervised Experiences of Prospective
Teachers. The schools selected for such experiences
shall be those which are approved by the home economics
section.

Arrangements for intern teaching will be made by the head
teacher trainer in cooperation with the coordinator of
intern teachers of the institution and the home economics
section. The directing teacher shall possess the qualifi-
cations outlined in Section IV, 3, 33-1, 3. 33-2. Teaching
shall be under the immediate full-time supervision of the
regular classroom teacher and under the general super-
vision of the teacher training institution. Intern teaching
shall be restricted to students who have maintained a
general scholastic average of C and who possess desirable
personal qualifications.

The intern shall have directed observation and participa-
tion experiences with formally organized adult groups
whenever possible,

Internship during the senior year shall be of not less than
eight weeks duration and may extend to twelve weeks in
which case a seminar preceding or following the teaching
period may be a part of the experience. A minimum of 90
clock hours of observation, participation, and teaching in
high school classes is required of which not less than 54
clock hours shall be spent in class instruction.

Each student shall be urged to participate in a variety of
home activities which will help to provide managerial
experience. Such activities shall be planned and followed






-59-


through with ,designated faculty members.

Experiences in the home management residence shall in-
clude those which are typical of family living such as
counseling, living within a specific income, purchasing
for the home, planning recreational activities, assuming
social responsibilities, and taking care of emergency
situations in addition to customary managerial responsi-
bilities. A minimum of five to six weeks should be pro-
vided under the supervision of a qualified director.

Directed observation and experience involving participa-
tion with children in the nursery school shall be provided
whenever possible.

Each student shall be required to participate in the
activities of one or more community groups as time and
opportunity permit.

3.11-8 Plans for Periodic Evaluation of the Teacher Education
Program. The program of teacher education will be
evaluated periodically by the state supervisor and the area
supervisors of home economics education.

3. 12 Institutions Designated by the State Board to Prepare Vocational
Home Economics Teachers. The following institutions are desig-
nated by the State Board for the preparation of home economics
teachers: The Florida State University, 'Tallahassee; The
Florida A & M University (N), Tallahassee; and the University
of Miami, Coral Gables.

3. 12-1 Institutions Approved and Reimbursed. The Florida State
University and the Florida A & M University (N) are re-
imbursed.

3. 12-2 Institutions Approved but Not Reimbursed. The Univer-
sity of Miami is approved but is not reimbursed.

3.2 In-Service Training of Employed Teachers.

3.21 Plan for In-Service Training.

3.21-1 Purposes. The purposes of in-service teacher training
include assisting teachers in the development of an effec-
tive program, directing them in determining methods and
objectives, and helping them to appraise the results of
instruction.





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3.21-2 Responsibilities of Individuals Engaged in In-Service
Teacher Training. The state supervisor of home economics
education shall assume responsibility for directing the in-
service training of teachers and shall carry out or delegate
responsibilities in this field of service.

The area supervisors of home economics education and
the specialist in homemaking education in Negro schools
shall share with the state supervisor the responsibility for
in-service training of teachers in the State.

County supervisors of homemaking education shall assume
responsibility for the in-service training of teachers
within a county and shall be under the administration of
the county superintendent.

Teacher educators may participate in the in-service train-
ing of teachers by assisting them in the development and
evaluation of programs and in helping them to recognize
the relationship and contribution of home economics to the
total school program.

College subject-matter instructors and other specialists
or consultants in home economics education and in related
fields may be used to render special services in strengthen-
ing homemaking programs by means of workshops and
conferences. These services shall be planned and ar-
ranged by the state supervisor of home economics educa-
tion and staff members.

3.21-3 Methods to be Used. Objectives may be attained by pro-
viding periodic training for employed teachers in refresher
courses, workshops, conferences, seminars, and clinics
which are related specifically to pertinent problems.

Informal continuous in-service training is effected through
classroom observation and follow-up conferences with the
teacher, principal, and county superintendent; preparation
and dissemination of materials of instruction; directed
inter-visitation of schools by teachers, followed by dis-
cussion and evaluation; individual and small group con-
ferences on common problems; guiding curriculum and
other group-study programs; advising teachers on types
of professional improvement; professional reading and
supplementary experiences; encouraging membership
and participation in professional organizations; and guid-
ing teachers in developing an effective year-round program.







-61-


Special, short-unit, intensive, and refresher courses and
workshops to meet professional and current needs of
teachers may be offered by approved colleges, with or
without college credit, either on campus or in the field.
The state supervisor of home economics education, in
consultation with others concerned, shall determine the
need, type of course, and instructor, and shall make pro-
vision for this service to be offered to groups of teachers
employed in federally-aided programs and in other pro-
grams having vocational objectives.

3.22 Employment of Consultants. Qualified consultants may be em-
ployed on a part-time basis for the training of teachers in
specialized areas.

3.3 Qualifications of Teacher Educators.

3.31 Head Teacher Educator.

3.31-1 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Eco-
nomics. The head teacher educator shall have received
a bachelor's degree in home economics from a college
or university approved for training vocational home
economics teachers. In addition, this person shall have
a master's degree in home economics education. In
institutions offering graduate programs, the head teacher
educator shall have had nine hours of course work beyond
the masters degree.

3.31-2 Experience in Home Economics Programs. The head
teacher educator shall have had five years of home eco-
nomics teaching experience in the secondary schools,
two of which shall have been in reimbursed programs.
This person shall have had experience in the teaching of
adults and shall have had two years of teacher-training or
supervisory experience, a part of which shall have been
in the area of student teaching.

3.32 Assistant Teacher Educators.

3.32-1 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Eco-
nomics. An assistant teacher educator shall possess a
bachelor's degree in home economics from a college or
university approved for training vocational home economics
teachers. In addition, this person shall have a master's
.degree in home economics education.







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3.32-2 Experience in Home Economics Programs. An assistant
teacher educator shall possess three years of home eco-
nomics teaching experience in the secondary schools, two
of which shall have been in reimbursed programs. This
person shall have had experience in the teaching of adults
and shall possess two years of teacher-training or super-
visory experience, a part of which shall have been in the
area of student teaching.

3.33 Supervising Teachers in Directed Teaching Centers.

3.33-1 Professional and Technical Preparation in Home Eco-
nomics. A directing teacher shall hold a bachelorTs
degree in home economics and shall meet state certifi-
cation requirements for teaching in a vocational home
economics program. In addition, this person shall possess
a minimum of nine semester hours of graduate study in
home economics and education.

3.33-2 Experience in Teaching Home Economics. A directing
teacher must possess not less than two years of teaching
experience in home economics, one of which shall have
been in a vocational program.

3, 4 Graduate Program in Home Economics Education.

3.41 Nature and Extent. A graduate program which will meet the
requirements of a masters degree in home economics and/Or
home economics education and which will prepare candidates for
positions of leadership in teacher education will be provided, in-
cluding technical and professional courses such as psychology,
guidance and counseling, community organizations, adult educa-
tiont supervision, administration, subject matter courses in
various areas of home economics, methods of research applied
to curriculum development, instructional procedures, and
evaluation. In addition, courses, seminars, or workshops deal-
ing with contemporary issues affecting home economics curricula
shall be offered.

3,42 Additional Conditions to be Maintained. There is no provision
for conditions in addition to those described in Section IV* 3. l1-1
to 3.11*8.

3.43 Institutions Designated to Offer a Graduate Program. The same
institutions identified in Section IV, 3.12 of this Plan are desig-
nated to offer graduate programs in home economics education.






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4.0 PROVISIONS FOR RESEARCH AND STUDIES IN HOME ECONOMICS
EDUCATION

Studies and research will be carried on which will contribute to the educa-
tional improvement of the vocational program in homemaking education.
They will be organized and conducted by the teacher-training institution
concerned and by the State Board for Vocational Education through the
State Department of Education in cooperation with the home economics
section. They will deal with critical problems in the program of vocational
homemaking and will be planned to provide valid and reliable data to assist
in problem solution.

Professional and technical material will be prepared and distributed upon
request to employed teachers by the Educational Materials Laboratory,
Division of Vocational and Adult Education.

































SECTION V

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
(INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION)







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SECTION V

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
(INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION)


1. 0 PLAN FOR SUPERVISION

The State Board for Vocational Education will, upon recommendation of
the state superintendent, who is by law the executive officer, designate
and employ to serve under the state director a full-time state supervisor
and other supporting staff assistants to supervise the state-wide program
of industrial education, including trade and technical training.

1. 1 Special Duties of the State Supervisor and Area Supervisors. The
state supervisor, assisted by the area supervisors, shall be respon-
sible for supervising and coordinating the state-wide program; deter-
mining if all programs and classes comply with existing statutory laws,
State Board regulations, and policies of the executive officer and state
director; determining if all classes meet minimum or accepted stan-
dards of operation, including facilities, equipment, and curriculum;
recommending approval of the allocation of Minimum Foundation Pro-
gram special instructional units in industrial education and determin-
ing if they are utilized in conformance with the requirements of this
Plan; recommending to the state director appointment of personnel
employed in the industrial education section; assisting the state director
in formulating the biennial budget for the receipt and expenditure of
federal and state vocational-technical funds; recommending to the state
director reimbursement to counties from federal and/or state voca-
tional-technical funds for program development and operation; coop-
erating with approved teacher-training institutions in providing an
adequate program of pre-service and in-service teacher training;
assisting county superintendents, local directors, and other vocational
education personnel in the establishment and improvement of local
programs; recommending to the state director nominations for appoint-
ment to the State Advisory Committee for Industrial Education; pro-
moting research; developing instructional materials; and providing
leadership to the state-wide program of industrial education, including
the related services provided by industrial arts.

1.2 Qualifications of the State Supervisor.

1.21 Professional Preparation in Industrial Education. The state
supervisor shall have graduated from a standard four-year col-
lege, and, in addition, shall have secured a master's degree with
specialization in industrial education from an approved institution
of higher learning.











1.22 Experience in Industrial Education. The state supervisor shall
possess at least three years of successful educational experience
as an administrator or supervisor of industrial education.

1.3 Qualifications of Area Supervisors. The qualifications of area super-
visors shall be the same as those of the state supervisor with the
possible exception that the completion of a master's degree may be
waived under unusual circumstances upon approval of the executive
officer.

1.4 Duties and Qualifications of Supporting Professional Staff other than
Area Supervisors. The supporting professional staff may include, in
addition to the area supervisors, specialists in industrial problems,
research and surveys, educational materials, industrial arts, tech-
nical education, practical nursing, supervisory training, employee
education, peace officers' training, REA job and safety training, rail-
road training, commercial vehicle driver training, school bus driver
and maintenance training, and any other where the need for such ser-
vice is desirable.

1. 41 Duties of Supporting Professional Staff other than Area Super-
visors.

1.41-1 Industrial Arts Consultant. Duties and qualifications
are outlined in Section I, 1. 55, of this Plan.

1.41-2 Practical Nursing Coordinator. Duties and qualifications
of the coordinator in practical nurse education are in-
cluded in Section VI of this Plan.

1.41-3 Technical Education Consultant. The consultant for
technical education shall provide supervision and co-
ordination of the state-wide program of technical educa-
tion.

1.41-4 Supervisory Trealing Coordinator. The coordinator of
supervisory training shall provide supervision and co-
ordination of the state-wide program of industrial mana-
gerial, supervisory, and foremanship training.

1.41-5 Employee Education Coordinator. The coordinator of
employee education shall provide supervision and co-
ordination of the state-wide program of industrial work-
ers' education.

1.41-6 Peace Officer Training Coordinator. The coordinator of
peace officer training shall provide supervision and co-







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ordination of the state-wide program of police and law
enforcement training.

1. 41-7 REA Job and Safety Training Coordinator. The coordi-
nator of REA job and safety training shall provide super-
vision and coordination of the state-wide program of rural
electrification and other public utility job and safety
training.

1.41-8 Railroad Training Coordinator. The coordinator of rail-
road training shall provide supervision and coordination
of the state-wide program of railroad training.

1.41-9 Commercial Vehicle Driver Training Coordinator. The
coordinator of commercial vehicle driver training shall
provide supervision and coordination of the state-wide
program of commercial vehicle driver and maintenance
training.

1. 41-10 School Bus Driver and Maintenance Training Coordinator.
The coordinator of school bus driver and maintenance
training shall provide supervision and coordination of the
state-wide program of school bus driver and maintenance
training.

1.41-11 Other Staff Personnel. As the need arises and it is de-
sirable to employ additional coordinators for specialized
industrial education training areas, such persons shall
assist in the supervision and coordination of the state-
wide program of the specialized vocational-technical
field for which they are trained.

1.42 Qualifications of Supporting Professional Staff other than Area
Supervisors.

1.42-1 Professional Preparation in Industrial Education. Co-
ordinators, consultants, or specialists of in-school
activities shall possess a baccalaureate degree from a
standard four-year college with specialization in indus-
trial education.

Coordinators, consultants, or specialists of out-of-school
activities shall possess a high school diploma or a state
certificate of equivalency and shall have completed not
less than fourteen semester hours of professional voca-
tional-technical courses, exclusive of observation and
practice teaching, in an approved teacher-training pro-







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gram, including three semester hours each in found.
tions of vocational-technical education, teaching methods
in vocational-technical education, and special methods
in industrial education.

1.42-2 Experience in Industrial Education. Coordinators, con-
sultants, or specialists of in-school services shall
possess three years of administrative, supervisory, or
teaching experience in industrial education.

Coordinators, consultants, or specialists of out-of-school
services shall possess the same work experience require=
ments as a teacher of the industrial pursuit to be co-
ordinated.

1.5 Duties and Qualifications of Local Supervisors. Local supervision
in counties of more than 50, 000 population is primarily the responsi-
bility of the local director of vocational education. However, in those
counties where the local director is not qualified in industrial educa-
tion or where the size of the program justifies a supporting super.
visory staff to assist the director, additional personnel may be desir-
able.

1.51 Duties of Local Supervisors, Coordinators, Principals and
Assistant Principals.

1.51-1 Local Supervisor of Industrial Education (county-wide).
The county supervisor of industrial education shall be
responsible for the supervision of the local industrial
education program. This person shall assist teachers
in upgrading instruction, work with advisory committees
in determining curricula, assist teachers in securing
instructional materials and other needed teaching aids,
recruit teachers and make recommendations for appoint-
ment of same to the local director (or county super-
intendent), provide for the in-service training of teachers,
and perform what other supervisory functions a person
in this position might be assigned by the county super-
intendent or local director.

1.51-2 Local Coordinator of Industrial Education (program-wide).
The local program coordinator of industrial education
shall be responsible for the coordination of a major pro-
gram within the county, such as day trade or technical
preparatory, evening trade or technical extension, part-
time trade or technical extension, or part-time general
continuation. This person shall act as a liaison between






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industry and the school on matters of determining training
needs, placement of trainees, and upgrading of workers
through school training. The local program coordinator
shall work with craft and occupational advisory committees
on course content, and shall perform what other coordina-
ting functions a person in this position might be assigned
by the county superintendent or local director.

1.51-3 Principals of Vocational Schools and Technical High
Schools (school-wide). All-day- vocational-technical schools
utilizing a total of eight or more special instruction units
in reimbursable vocational education classes should em-
ploy a full-time principal to administer and supervise the
total school program.

1.51-4 Assistant Principals or Department Head of Industrial Educa-
tion (school-wide). Where the president of a community
junior college or principal of a vocational-technical school
(day or evening) or a comprehensive high school is not
qualified in industrial education, and the program is large
enough to justify the employment of an assistant principal
or department head, such person shall assist the president
or principal in the administration and supervision of the in-
school industrial education program.

1.52 Qualifications of Local Supervisors, Coordinators, Principals, and
Assistant Principals.

1.52-1 Professional Preparation in Industrial Education. Quali-
fications of supervisors, principals, and assistant princi-
pals shall be the same as those outlined for a local director
of vocational education in Section I of this Plan, with
specialization in industrial education.

Local Coordinator of Industrial Education (program-wide).
He shall have a minimum of two years of work experience
at the journeyman or trained employee level in an indus-
trial pursuit and shall have secured a high school diploma
or a state certificate of equivalency plus twenty-six
semester hours of approved industrial education teacher-
training courses, including three semester hours each in
administration of vocational-technical education, supervision
of industrial education, and school-community employee-
employer relationships.

1.52-2 Experience in Teaching in Industrial Education. The
coordinator shall have at least three years (144 hours per
year minimum)-of experience in teaching industrial subjects.






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2.0 PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION

Industrial education may include training in any industrial pursuit, skilled
or semi-skilled trade, craft, or occupation which directly functions in the
designing, producing, processing, assembling, maintaining, servicing, or
repairing of any product or commodity; any other occupation which is
usually considered to be technical and in which workers such as nurses,
laboratory assistants, draftsmen, and technicians are employed and which
is not classified as agriculture, distribution and other business, professional,
or homemaking; and any occupation which is industrial in nature.

2.1 Evening and Part-Time Trade or Technical Extension Classes. An
evening trade or technical extension class is defined as one conducted
during the non-working hours of the enrollees. A part-time trade or
technical extension class is one conducted during the usual working
hours of the enrollees.

2.11 Procedure to Be Used by State to Assure That Enrollees Will Be
Qualified. Persons enrolled in evening or part-time trade or
technical classes shall be at least 16 years of age and shall have
legally left the full-time school to engage in employment. En-
rollees in evening and part-time trade or technical extension
classes shall be employed (or temporarily unemployed) in the
occupation for which instruction is supplemental to their jobs.
To be considered supplemental, the instruction must be such as
to increase the skill or knowledge of the workers in the industrial
pursuit in which they are employed.

Part-time trade or technical extension classes, including supple-
mental instruction for apprentices, must be organized for 144
hours or more per year. If Smith-Hughes funds are used to re-
imburse evening trade or technical extension classes, such
classes must also be organized for 144 hours or more per year.
If George-Barden funds are used, evening trade or technical
extension classes may be organized and conducted for less than
144 hours per year.

2.12 Provision for Supervisory, Foremanship, and Apprentice Train-
ing.

2., 12-1 Supervisory and Foremanship Training. Supervisory and
foremanship training may be conducted by local boards of
public instruction. Approved teacher-training institutions
may also conduct such training when requested by in-
dustry and approval is obtained from the State Board.
Instruction may include training of conference leaders,
classes inhuman relations, job supervision, and similar






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offerings.

2.12-2 Apprenticeship Training. The purpose of apprenticeship
related instruction will be to impart to apprentices the
technical knowledge and related information of the trade.
Supplementary manipulative skills training may be offered
in apprenticeship related classes when it is not available
on job training, but it should not deter or hinder the
primary purpose of the instruction, that of providing the
students with the necessary technical knowledge and re-
lated information needed in the trade.

Persons enrolled in apprentice training shall be inden-
tured to a joint or plant apprenticeship committee and
registered with the Florida Apprenticeship Council. Other
on-the-job trainees may be admitted to apprenticeship
classes if they are employed in a learner's capacity in
the industrial occupation for which related instruction
is offered, upon the recommendation of the joint or plant
apprenticeship committee or school official in charge of
the local industrial education program.

2. 13 Qualifications of Teachers of Evening or Part-Time Trade and
Technical Extension Classes.

2. 13-1 Experience in Industrial Occupation. Teachers of eve-
ning or part-time trade or technical extension classes
shall have had at least six years of practical experience
in the occupation to be taught, a minimum of two of which
must have been at the journeyman or trained employee
level. In any occupation requiring employees to be
licensed by a legally constituted federal, state, or local
licensing agency, such teachers shall also hold a valid
license to work in that occupation.

2. 13-2 Training for Teaching. No specific training is required
for teachers of evening or part-time trade or technical
extension classes other than the in-service training that
may be required by local boards of public instruction.

2.2 Part- Time Cooperative Classes.

2. 21 Procedure to Be Used by the State to Assure That Enrollees
are Qualified and That Instruction Is Designed to Increase
Specific Occupational Competence. Part-time cooperative
classes in industrial programs may be conducted for persons who






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are enrolled in and who receive part-time instruction in a voca-
tional or technical high school or any other day school for adults
and who receive on-the-job training through part-time employ-
ment in industrial occupations.

Student-learners enrolled in part-time cooperative training
classes shall be at least 16 years of age and be legally employed
in an industrial occupation under agreement (preferably written)
between the school and employer. Such employment shall be in
conformity with federal, state, or local employment regulations.
When employment is in establishments engaged in interstate
commerce, such employment shall be at least at the legal mini-
mum wage, except when an exemption certificate is secured
from the Wage Determination and Exemption Branches of the Wage
and Hour Division, United States Department of Labor, permit-
ting employment at a sub-minimum wage. In certain occupations
declared hazardous by the United States Department of Labor
under the Fair Labor Standards Act, or by State Regulations,
student-learners must be 18 years of age unless specific
exemption has been obtained to permit those between the ages
of 16 and 18 years to work at such occupations.

Only those classes composed entirely of persons employed in
industrial occupations may be reimbursed from federal and state
matching funds.

The training provided through the operation of cooperative pro-
grams shall be for skilled or semi-skilled occupations which
offer opportunities for training and advancement, and the instruc-
tion shall be designed to enlarge the vocational and technological
intelligence of the enrollees.

2.22 Time Plans for Classes and Employment, and Non-Reimburse-
ment of Sectional Classes. Enrollees in part-time cooperative
classes shall be employed for at least half of the usual working
week of the occupation in which they are employed, and in no case
shall the weekly hours of employment be less than 15 hours per
week. The time at work shall equal or exceed the time in clock
hours devoted to school instruction throughout the year. In no
case shall the time at school and the time at work be such as tc
violate legal employment regulations.


In programs covering two or more school years, an average of
at least one regular class period a day must be devoted to related





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vocational or technical instruction in classes limited to the
cooperative group. In a program covering less than two school
years, an average of two class periods a day must be devoted
to related vocational or technical subjects.

Federal or state matching vocationalotechnical funds may not
be used to reimburse sectional cooperative classes where voca-
tional or technical students other than industrial are enrolled.

2.23 Qualifications of Teacher*Coordinators.

2.23-1 Training for Teaching. Shop and laboratory instructors
who are to coordinate the training of student-learners
placed on the job from their respective shops or labora-
tories shall meet the qualifications of an all-day trade or
technical teacher in the industrial area they are to co-
ordinate as outlined in Section V* 2.42 of this Plan. All
other coordinators should meet the certification require-
ments of an industrial teachercoordinator of specialized
part-time cooperative training,

Z. 23*2 Experience in Trade or Industrial Pursuits. Shop and
laboratory instructors who are to coordinate training'
shall meet the experience requirement as outlined in
Section V, 2.42-1 of this Plan.

2.24 Qualifications of Non*Teaching Coordinators. Coordinators of
part-time cooperative classes who have no teaching responsi-
bilities shall meet the same qualifications as a local coordinator
of industrial education as outlined previously in Section V, 1.51-2
of this Plan.

2. 25 Qualifications of Teachers and/or Coordinators of Sectional
Cooperative Classes. This provision does not apply.

2.3 Part-time General Continuation Classes for Industrial Workers.

2.31 Procedure to Be Used by the State to Assure That Enrollees Are
Qualified and That Instruction WillBe Designed Primarily to In-
crease the Civic Intelligence of Ehrollees. Part-time general
continuation classes may be organized for workers in industrial
pursuits who have left the full-time day school and who are en-
rolled for instruction which is designed to increase their civic
intelligence rather than to develop specific occupational compe-
tence. Enrollees in part-time general continuation classes must
be atifeast 16 years of age and less than 18 years of age.






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2.32 Time Plans for Classes and Employment. Enrollees in part-
time general continuation classes shall be employed in an indus-
trial pursuit for at least half of the usual working week of the
occupation in which they are employed, and in no case shall the
weekly hours of employment be less than 15 hours per week.
The time at work shall equal or exceed the time in clock hours
devoted to school instruction throughout the year. In no case
shall the time at school and the time at work be such as to vio-
late legal employment regulations.

2.33 Qualifications of Teachers.

2. 33-1 Experience in Industrial Education. Teachers shall have
a minimum of two years of practical work experience
in occupations considered industrial.

2.33-2 Training for Teaching in Industrial Education. Profes-
sional preparation requirements shall be the same as
those for a teacher-coordinator of part-time cooperative
training as outlined in. Sction V, 2. 23 of this Plan.

2.4 Day Trade and Technical Preparatory Classes, Types A, B, and C.
Type A or B day preparatory classes may be operated in schools
organized to offer instruction for not less than nine months and not
less than 30 hours per week to students who have not entered upon
employment and who are regularly enrolled in the full-time day school.
High school students to be eligible to enroll in either a type A or type
B trade or technical class shall be at least 14 years of age and shall
have satisfactorily completed the ninth grade. All other enrollees
shall be at least 16 years of age. Type C day trade preparatory
classes shall be used to train single and multi-purpose operators to
meet the special needs of persons over 16 years of age who have
legally left the full-time school and who wish brief, intensive prepa-
ration for entrance into employment when special job requirements
are such that the equivalent of such training would enable those trained
to enter industry and meet definitely explicit job requirements.

2.41 Time Plans for Types A, B, and C Day Trade or Technical
Preparatory Classes. Type A day trade preparatory classes
shall be organized to offer trade shop instruction on a useful or
productive basis, supplemented by additional related instruction
which must have direct functioning value in the trade or occupa-
tion for which training is being given. Instruction in practical
work will be considered to be on a useful or productive basis
when it consists of organized, systematic training in processes,
operations, and principles involved which are selected with re-
gard to the suitability, quality, quantity, and production methods






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customarily observed in industrial pursuits for which the train-
ing is being given. Instruction in related subjects will be con-
sidered to be of direct functional value in the trade or occupation
for which training is being given when it is taught to segregated
shop groups, individually or closely allied, and is coordinated
with the practical instruction. Remedial or academic subject
matter will not be considered related vocational instruction.
Trade shop instruction shall be organized for at least one-half
of the school day and be not less than three consecutive class
periods per day. Related instruction shall be organized for at
least one class period per day in addition to instruction given in
the shop.

Type B day trade classes are to be organized and operated on
the same basis as type A classes, except that the related instruc-
tion is given by the trade shop instructor as an integral part of
the shop work rather than as separate additional units.

No Type A or B day trade shop course shall be established for
less than 1080 hours of instruction and no student shall be
scheduled for less than this amount except twelfth grade transfer
students who transfer from a school in which such training was
not available. In high school programs, the minimum course
requirement shall be offered in the eleventh and twelfth grades
only. In vocational high schools, the tenth grade shop program
shall be considered in addition to the minimum time requirement
stated above.

Technical classes shall be operated to include as much time as
type B day trade classes with not less than two consecutive
periods daily devoted to laboratory experiences.

Type C classes may be operated for less than nine months per
year, for less than 30 hours per week. Type C courses shall
not be set up as a substitute for type A or type B all-day trade
preparatory classes and shall not attempt to train persons for
entrance into the skilled trades or those occupations requiring
an established long-term apprenticeship period, except when the
amount of shop instruction meets the time requirements of the
type B program.

Type C technical preparatory classes are designed to train
technicians at the post-high school level. The time and age re-
quirements established for type C day trade preparatory classes
shall also apply to this type of technical training.


2.42 Qualifications of Shop or Laboratory Teachers.






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2.42-1 Experience in the Industrial Occupation to Be Taught.
Types A and B day trade shop and technical laboratory
teachers shall have had at least six years of practical
experience or its equivalent in the occupation to be taught,
a minimum of two of which must have been at the journey-
man or trained employee level, except that only two years
of experience as a mechanic, technician, or engineer shall
be required of graduates of four-year college technical
institutes or schools of engineering approved by the
State Board for those teachers teaching trade or technical
courses. In any occupation requiring employees to be
licensed by a legally constituted federal, state, or local
licensing agency, such teachers shall also hold a valid
license to work in that occupation.

2.42-2 Professional Training in Industrial Education. Types A
and B day trade shop or technical laboratory teachers
shall have acquired a high school diploma or state certifi-
cate of equivalency plus 20 semester hours of teacher
training, including a minimum of 14 hours of approved
industrial education teacher-training courses. Day
trade shop or technical laboratory teachers may be pro-
visionalized for a period not to exceed five years if they
possess the required work experience, a high school
diploma, and two semester hours of approved industrial
teacher-training courses.

2.42-3 Qualifications of Day Trade and Technical Preparatory
Type C Teachers. Teachers of type C trade or technical
preparatory classes who teach courses organized for
less than 540 hours per year shall meet the same require-
ments as evening or part-time trade and technical ex-
tension teachers. Those teaching classes organized for
540 or more hours per year shall meet the same require-
ments as other day trade or technical teachers.

2.43 Qualifications of Day Trade Related Instruction Teachers. Day
trade related instruction teachers shall have the same qualifi-
cations as day trade shop teachers, except that only two years
of work experience is required in one of the industrial occupa-
tions for which instruction is being given.

2.5 Industrial-Plant Training. No part of the funds spent under this Plan
may be expended in industrial-plant training programs except such
industrial -plant training be bona fide vocational-technical training and
not a device to utilize the services of vocational-technical trainees for
private profit. Use of funds for industrial-plant training shall be







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justified only when the local school system cannot otherwise provide
adequate equipment and supplies and such are available in an industrial
plant, provided the requirements for public school supervision and
control and other requirements of the federal acts and this Plan are
met.


3.0 REPRESENTATIVE ADVISORY COMMITTEES

In those counties having or anticipating preparatory trade or technical
programs, a general advisory committee for industrial education with repre-
sentation from both employer and employee groups shall be appointed.
This committee shall act in an advisory capacity and assist local school
officials in developing and operating a sound program of industrial education
at all levels and in all phases.

Each full-time instructor of a trade shop or technical laboratory and all
evening and part-time trade or technical extension teachers should have a
representative craft or occupational advisory committee to serve as con-
sultant on matters of course content, methods, procedures, and standards
in their respective fields of instruction. The committee should consist of
persons selected as representatives of the craft or occupation. There should
be at least two at the employing level and two at the trained workers' level,
preferably from representative management organizations and labor groups.
Where feasible, existing joint apprenticeship committees should be used
as day trade craft committees, particularly where the training is for
entrance into the apprenticeable trade which the committee represents.


4.0 PROGRAM OF TEACHER TRAINING INCLUDING TRAINING OF INDUS-
TRIAL SUPERVISORY TRAINERS

The State's general plan for providing and supervising teacher training is
outlined in Section I of this Plan.

4.1 Teacher-Training Plan for Industrial Education. The training shall
be conducted under the supervision of the State Board for Vocational
Education. Such training shall be given only to persons who have had
adequate vocational-technical experience in the line of work for which
they are preparing themselves or who are acquiring such experience.

No federal or state funds shall be allocated to any institution or agency
for industrial education teacher training without the approval of the
State Board for Vocational Education.

The State Board for Vocational Education, through its authorized repre-
sentatives, shall approve and designate all industrial teacher-training







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institutions and all personnel employed to carry out the function of
industrial education teacher training as well as the courses to be
offered.

County boards of public instruction may employ qualified teacher
trainers to perform the same duties and to give the same instruction
as those attached to designated institutions, provided the person se-
lected is approved by the State Board for Vocational Education.

It shall be the responsibility of the State Board for Vocational Educa-
tion to establish close coordination between teacher training and
teacher certification.

4.11 Pre-Service Teacher Training. Approved teacher-training in-
stitutions will provide pre-service teacher training for those who
have the necessary industrial occupational experience and who
are preparing for teaching through the same courses and instruc-
tion provided for in-service teachers.

For prospective teachers who have been offered positions but
who lack the basic teacher training required for initial certifi-
cation, a teacher apprenticeship will be provided. This appren-
ticeship will consist of observation of instruction, practice
teaching, and directed study under the supervision of an approved
industrial education teacher trainer serving on the staff of an
approved institution of higher learning.

Pre-service teacher training for part-time teachers may be
conducted by local boards of public instruction through qualified
supervisors. Such training will not be for college or certifica-
tion credit and may be of an informal type.

4.12 In-Service Teacher Training. In-service teacher training, in-
cluding credit and non-credit work,may be provided teachers,
coordinators and supervisors in keeping with provisions out-
lined in "Administrative Policies and Procedures Concerning
State Board and Approved Vocational Teacher Education Institu-
tions. "

In-service teacher training for part-time teachers may be con-
ducted by local boards of public instruction through qualified
supervisors. Such training will not be for college or certifica-
tion credit and may be of an informal type.

4.2 Qualifications of Teacher-Training Enrollees. All persons enrolling
in approved industrial education teacher-training courses shall possess
the minimum trade or occupational experience required of a qualified






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teacher, except that teachers who will fulfill the requirements by or
before completion of the course of study may be enrolled on the same
basis as other teachers.

4.3 Approved Institutions of Higher Learning Providing Personnel Train-
ing in Industrial Education. The Florida State University, Tallahassee;
The University of Florida, Gainesville; The Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University (N), Tallahassee; and the University of Miami,
Coral Gables, shall be designated as the institutions of higher learn-
ing approved to train industrial teachers, coordinators, and super-
visors.

4.4 Teacher-Training Courses Approved for Reimbursement.

4.41 Titles, brief descriptions, and semester hours credit of courses
in industrial education teacher training for which federal voca-
tional and state matching funds may be used for reimbursement
are outlined in a supplement contained in "Administrative Poli-
cies and Procedures Covering State Board and Vocational Teach-
er Education Institutions. "

Approved institutions of higher learning may offer additional
elective vocational-technical courses taught by approved indus-
trial education teacher trainers. Federal vocational-technical
and state matching funds may be used for reimbursement of
such courses, when applicable, only upon prior recommendation
of the state supervisor and written approval of the state director.

4.5 Duties of Teacher Trainers. Duties shall include the preparation for
teaching certificates of those who have qualifying work experience in
the field in which they expect to be certified and employed. This may
be done by means of resident campus courses at an approved teacher-
training institution which will help prospective and in-service teachers
to meet certification requirements, and by extension courses which
will assist in-service teachers to meet their respective certification
requirements or will upgrade instruction.

4.6 Qualifications of Teacher Trainers.

4.61 Professional Preparation in Industrial Education. A full-time
teacher trainer shall have graduated from a standard four-year
college. In addition, this person shall have secured a master's
degree with specialization in industrial education from an
approved institution of higher learning.

4.62 Teaching Experience in Industrial Education. A full-time
teacher trainer shall possess at least two years of successful






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teaching experience as a teacher of industrial education classes
which meet the standards of the State Plan. In addition, this
person shall have at least three years of experience in a respon-
sible administrative, supervisory, or teacher-training capacity
in the field of industrial education.

4.7 Duties of Industrial Supervisory Trainers. Industrial supervisory
trainers shall provide instruction for industrial supervisors and fore-
men in such courses as human relations, fundamentals of supervision,
job instruction training, effective communication, effective speaking,
and conference leadership training.

4.8 Qualifications of Industrial Supervisory Trainers. Industrial super-
visory trainers shall have at least six years of successful work expe-
rience in industry or its equivalent, two of which shall have been at the
supervisory level. In addition, they shall possess at least the minimum
requirements for a teacher in the general field of work in which the
conferences are to be held. These persons must have demonstrated
ability to lead conferences, and they must have an adequate understand-
ing of human relations.


5.0 PLAN FOR COORDINATING STUDIES, INVESTIGATIONS, RESEARCH,
AND THE PREPARATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF PROFESSIONAL AND
TECHNICAL MATERIAL FOR EMPLOYED TEACHERS

Research may be conducted by the teacher-training institutions designated
in Section V, 4. 3, by county boards of public instruction through the local
director of vocational education, and by the State Board for Vocational
Education through the State Department of Education, when the research
is confined to one of the following areas of study:

Identifying and determining industrial training needs
Methods of instruction
Supervision of instruction
Instructional facilities and materials
Industrial employment and occupations
Placement and follow-up of trainees
Standards for the organization and administration of industrial
education programs
Measuring effectiveness of instruction
Selection and training of teachers
Methods of coordinating training with industrial needs
Any other studies that might have direct bearing on the expansion
and improvement of industrial education.

Professional and technical materials will be prepared and distributed upon






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request to employed teachers by the Educational Materials Laboratory,
Division of Vocational and Adult Education.


































SECTION VI

PRACTICAL NURSE TRAINING




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