• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Roles and responsibilities
 Dual role of homemaker - changing...
 Exploratory experiences
 Evaluation of values and inter...
 Bibliography
 Appendixes
 Back Cover






Group Title: Bulletin Florida Dept. of Education
Title: A Resource guide for exploration of the occupation of homemaking
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096232/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Resource guide for exploration of the occupation of homemaking
Alternate Title: Exploration of the occupation of homemaking
Physical Description: iv, 69. p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Department of Education
Donor: unknown ( endowment )
Publisher: Florida Living
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subject: Home economics -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Housewives   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida, Dept. of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Education Section.
General Note: Cover title: Exploration of the occupation of homemaking.
General Note: "Florida pre-vocational home economics education."
General Note: "October 1973 ... reprint 1974."
General Note: Florida Department of Education Bulletin no. 75 H-20
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096232
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22331309

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Roles and responsibilities
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Dual role of homemaker - changing roles
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Exploratory experiences
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Evaluation of values and interests
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Bibliography
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Appendixes
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Back Cover
        Page 70
        Page 71
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A RESOURCE GUIDE


FOR


EXPLORATION OF THE


OCCUPATION OF HOMEMAKING









STATE OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION


HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION SECTION


This reprint of a public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$197.02 or $.19 per copy to provide direction and resource materials for
Florida Economics teachers who are instructing in the pre-vocational
program.



FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS BULLETIN MAY BE SECURED THROUGH
MISS ALLIE FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR, HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION, KNOTT
BUILDING, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304








32~zs oo9257










INTRO UCTI 0 N



The pre-vocational program in Florida has three major purposes:


To provide students with an orientation to the many career oppor-

tunities available in the world of work.

To assist students in developing personal competencies important

to success in almost any occupation.

To provide students with exploration experiences in occupational

clusters according to their choice.


COURSE STANDARDS


Section: Home Economics Education

Accreditator Title: Exploration of the Occupation of Homemaking

Accreditator Code No.: 2705 U.S.O.E. No.: 09.0299

Course Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to explore
the occupation of homemaking.

Course Description: This course is one of a series of exploratory courses
encompassing the various occupations utilizing home economics knowledge
and skills. It serves as an introduction to the occupation of homemaking
and is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the occupa-
tion. Instruction is focused on the major concept of the role and
responsibilities of the homemaker, including the changing role of men
and women and the dual role of the wage earner and homemaker. Hands on
exploratory experiences are provided in the areas of Clothing and Textiles,
Food and Nutrition, Housing and Home Furnishings, Home Management and
Consumer Education, and Human Development. The course content includes a
study of the role of the homemaker; management of family resources; basic
needs and care of small children; selection and care of clothing; basic
sewing techniques; protection of the community environment; selection,
care and maintenance of the family dwelling; and the planning, preparation
and serving of family meals.

Teacher-Student Ratio: 1 to 24

Facilities: Refer to VTAE Facility Standards Bulletin





SEPTEMBER 1973


RECOMMENDED PRE-VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION

The Schema below follows the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Division guidelines for pre-vocational education


A STUDENT AT THE
SEVENTH GRADE LEVEL
MAY ENROLL IN



ORIENTATION
TO
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONS
(6-9 WEEKS)

AND MAY ALSO ENROLL IN
PERSONAL
CAREER ORIENTATION

(6-9 WEEKS)

Course is a part of
co m.prehensive
orientation involving
other occupational
categories and may be
a segment of a wheel.
(see note)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO SCHOOL
OFFERINGS


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12-18 WEEKS)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
NINTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO
SCHOOL OFFERINGS,
ANY OF THESE NOT
PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED IN



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12, 18 or 36 WEEKS)


* COURSE TITLES FOR HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS:
EXPLORATION OF THE OCCUPATION OF HOMEMAKING
EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE
SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


** EXPLORATION OF HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS


INCLUDES ALL OF THE ABOVE CLUSTERS


Note: A combination of these two courses could be equal to one semester of home economics reported under
code # 2701.








ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


PARTICIPANTS:


EDITOR:


DIRECTOR:


TYPIST:


Fredrica Anderson, Home Economics
Teacher, Robinswood Junior High
School, Orlando

Pamela Thomas, Home Economics Teacher,
Lookhart Junior High School, Orlando


Martha Lemons


Edna Warner


Elaine Munoy











TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction . . . . . . . . .
Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . .

Table of Contents . . . . . . . .


ii
iii
iv


Concept I -
Concept II -
Concept III -
Sub-concept -
Sub-concept -
Sub-concept -

Sub-concept -
Sub-concept -
Sub-concept -

Concept IV


bibliography .

Appendix .


Roles and Responsibilities . . . .
Dual Role of Homemaker Changing Roles

Exploratory Experiences . .
Management . . . . . . .
Consumer Education . . .. .
Clothing and Textiles .. . . .

Child Care . . . . . . .
Food and Nutrition . . . .
Housing and Home Furnishings . . .
Evaluation of Values and Interests . .



. 0 a a a a 0 . S . .
S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S





CONCEPT I Roles and Responsibilities
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will identify
roles that are
assumed by the
homemaker.





















2. The students
will cite jobs
performed by the
homemaker which
would be con-
sidered profess-
ional or support-
ive occupations
of work.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Define role.

2. Write out case studies to be role played
by pupils.

3. Discuss homemaking responsiblilities.

4. Comment on Phyllis Diller's methods of care
of the home.

5. Prepare display of cartoons illustrating the
many responsibilities of the homemaker.

6. Invite a full time homemaker to class to
discuss her duties in the home.

7. Discuss "Tasks of a Homemaker."

8. Give a demonstration on handling problems
of a full time homemaker.

9. Discuss whether or not homemaking should be
considered an occupation.

10. Give your opinion on the subject, "What's
a Housewife Worth?"


1. Define the terms professional and supportive.

2. Select from want ads occupations related
to the job of homemaker.

3. Interview a resource person from a professional
and/or supportive occupation which is related
to the occupation of the homemaker.




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Homemaking is a challenging occupation.
Typically, a housewife has the job of
managing the household, caring for the
children, doing the housework. Society
generally views her efforts as import
tant,time consuming, "basic to a healthy
society," even responsible for having
kept the fires of civilization burning
brightly and make this a better world for
all of us," as someone once put it.
Dr. David Reuben in Everything You Always
Wanted to Know About Sex But Were Afraid
to Ask has written, "Just being a house-
is the world's most diversified and de-
manding job. Many a housewife simulta-
neously operates a short-order cafe, a
one-day laundry service, a diversified
purchasing agency, a child-care center,
a continuous cleaning and home manage-
ment operation, and a 24-hour-a-day coun-
seling service. In her spare time she
fills in with interior decorating, cloth-
ing manufacturing, childbearing, garden-
ing, gourmet cooking, and cost accounting
At the same time, she is wife and lover
to her adoring husband. By comparison,
forty hours a week in an office seems
like a vacation."
Sure she's indispensable...does every
kind of job and then some. But suppose
you added it all up in dollars and cents:


Job
nursemaid
dietitian
food buyer
cook
dishwasher
housekeeper
laundress
seamstress
practical nurse
maintenance man
gardener
chauffeur


Hours/week Pay/hour
44.5 $ 2.00
1.2 6.00
3.5 2.50
13.1 3.50
6.2 2.50
17.5 2.00
5.9 2.50
1.3 3.00
.6 3.50
1.7 2.50
2.3 2.00
2.0 2.50
9.6 hrs.$235.40
per wk. 40 hr.


Footnote:
1. Changing Times, The Kiplinger


1
wk.


Magazine, April, 1973. Vol. 27, No. 4,
pp. 11-13.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 32-35.

Cross, Aleene.
Introductory Homemaking,
p. 90

Diller, Phyllis.
Housekeeping Hints.

Appendix #1
"Tasks of a Homemaker"
"Occupations of a
Homemaker"

Noeflin, Ruth.
Careers in Home Economics,
pp. 143-160.


Resource Persons
1. Interior Decorator
2. Upholsterer
5. Housekeeper
4. Maintainance Man
5. Carpet and Floor Cleaner
6. Drapery Maker
7. Dietitian
8. Cook and Chef
9. Nurse and Nurse's Aide
10. Day Care Center Worker
11. Economist




CONCEPT II Dual Role of Homemaker Changing Roles
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will recognize
and identify the
changing role of
men, women and
teenagers.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Take the "Grab Bag Pretest" (In a bag put
articles connected with the changing role
of men, women and teenagers. Students
will draw out an object and demonstrate
how it should be used. Examples: apron,
baby diaper, check book, car keys, pot,
pan, needle and thread, gardening gloves,
dishwashing rubber gloves, detergent,
paint, eggbeater.)

2. Discuss changes in the roles of women as
revealed in the film,"Marriage and Careers."
Do you believe these changes are for the
best interest of society?

3. Interview ten students in school. Find out
what tasks they perform in the home.

4. Invite a working mother to talk to the class
concerning the ways she manages two jobs.

5. Collect cartoons which illustrate the
changing roles of men and women.

6. Invite a social welfare worker to discuss
his/her opinions concerning mothers working
outside the home.
7. Debate the topic, "Should women work after
marriage?"

8. Discuss television programs which illustrate
traditional roles of men and women and
those which illustrate the changing roles.
Which programs are most effective?

9. Give examples of advertisements that depict
the changing roles of men and women.

10. Discuss the following statements:

a. "Women should not work if there are small
children at home."
b. "Every high school graduate should attend
college."
c. "Fathers should earn the living; there-
fore they should not be expected to help
with household chores."




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


1. The changes taking place in the roles
of men in the family are only part of
changes occurring throughout society.
The challenge for wife or mother or
children is to help create the kind
of feeling in the home where the
husband and father is no longer ex-
cluded but takes a larger part.

All family members can try to learn
ways of making time spent together,
on limited energy and resources, more
meaningful rather than more demanding.

The opportunity of each family to
create its own roles and patterns of
relationships may be seen as opportu-
nity for learning and exploring to-
gether, not just a means for cre-
ating frustrations.


RESOURCES


Filmstrip:
Marriage and Careers


Working Mother





Resource Person -
Social Worker

McCall's, July, 1975, p. 22.



Teacher Resource:
Penney's Forum Fall/
Winter 1970, pp. 8-9.



Transparencies:
(Make transparency for
"Family Life Cycle"
and "Family Stages")

Craig, Hazel.
Homes With Character,
pp. 57-66.





CONCEPT II Dual Role of Homemaker Changing Roles
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


11. Examine the handout. On it are two lists
of commonly purchased items. One list is
composed of items usually purchased by boys
and the other a list of items usually pur-
chased by girls. Give the boys the girls'
list, and the girls the boys' list. Esti-
mate the cost of each item.

Girls' Items Boys' Items
a. metal finger a. baseball glove
nail file b. ticket to pro-
b. pound of ground football game
chuck c. hair cut
c. loaf of bread d. mini bike
d. tube of lipstick e. rocket model
e. hair spray f. Snoopy Poster
f. shampoo & set

12. Take the test, "What are Your Attitudes?".
Teacher note: Teacher will have to re-word
questions and work orally with class for
understanding.

13. Illustrate on the bulletin board items which
have contributed to the changing role.
Locate pictures or bring in actual old house-
hold items. Exhibit and discuss with pupils.
(rug beater, iron, butter churner, popcorn
popper.)

14. Discuss "A Paid Job", the value of the
working wife.

15. Fill in the chart entitled "A Paid Job;
What It's Worth." (Content).




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


A PAID JOB: What's It Worth?
Suggested Outline for
Figuring Expenses Resulting
from Paid Employment of
Wives.

1. Income per week
Expenses Resulting from Job $


2. Taxes
Income, social security,
unemployment insurance
3. Personal Expenses
a. clothes
b. transportation
c. lunches
d. personal care
4. Office Expenses
a. parties
b. gifts
c. contributions
d. coffee breaks
5. Family Expenses
a. child care
b. laundry service
c. higher shopping costs
(prepared foods, fewer
sales items, less time
for hoiae canning,
freezing, preserving)
6. Other Expenses

Total of all expenses
7. Net Income per week
(What can be spent)
8. Net Yearly Income
(Weekly income times
weeks worked)


$

rS
Sf

$___







is____
$


RESOURCES


4


Periodical:
Sphere The Betty
Crocker Magazine, Jan.,
1973, pp. 46-48.












Periodical:
Penny's Forum. Spring/
Summer 1975, pp. 22-23.



Periodical:
Illinois Teacher.
Vol. XII, No. 4,
Spring 1968-69, p. 236.









Bratton, Esther Crew.
Home Management Is, p. 157


1





CONCEPT II Dual Role of Homemaker Changing Roles
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


2. The students
will analyze
shared respon-
sibilities that
relate to the
dual role.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Define shared effort.

2. Show transparencies on the shared dual
role.

3. Compile a list of tasks which might be
shared by both males and females. (mother,
father, teens)

4. Locate pictures from magazines demon-
strating shared efforts. (notebook)

5. Prepare a list of new responsibilities
of each family member when both parents
work.

6. Take part in a buzz session on the subject,
"When Mother Works." Relate your respon-
sibilities.

7. Make up a time schedule for the following
sharing situation.

Archie and Edith both are employed.
Archie's hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
from Tuesday to Saturday. Edith works part
time in the evenings as a sales girl from
5:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.. They have six year
old Jimmy and 14 year old Sue. Both are in
school. Eric is their oldest son. He
attends the morning session of high school
and works after school from 12:00 to 4:00
p.m.. The family owns one car but they
live close to the bus stop. Included in
the family is a fox terrier named Scooter.

List the family members who can help
with the tasks your teacher will give you.




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES




Make transparencies.





Teacher note:

Prepare a time chart
handout for pupils
showing family members,
time and job responsi-
bilities.







Suggested list for Activity #7.

1. breakfast
2. lunch
3. dinner
4. housekeeping
5. laundry
6. shopping car maintainence
7. transportation
8. pet care
9. study
10. social time for the family
11. yard care





CONCEPT III -Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Management


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will measure
and compare
expenditures
of money, time
and energy on
household tasks.










2. The students will
point out the ad-
vantages and dis-
advantages of
variable and
fixed incomes.











3. The students
will list ways
in which the
homemaker manages
money and needs
practical know-
ledge in its
use.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Do a management study by selecting a food
item, comparing the time, energy and cost
involved in preparation of the homemade
product vs. the convenience form.
2. Make a shopping list of groceries. Shop
by either going to several different grocery
stores or shopping with the use of newspaper
ads to compare prices.
3. Compare the time and energy spent in the
performance of a household task by using
two different methods.
4. Give some examples of how time and energy
can be substituted for money in gift giving.
5. Compare the cost of packing a nutritious
school lunch with buying a lunch at school.
6. Consider a variety of ways to use efficiently
time and energy in preparing school lunches.

1. Define expenditure and variable.
2. Give a number of examples of fixed and
variable income. Give the advantages and
disadvantages of each.
3. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages
of getting a set allowance and working for
spending money.
4. Discuss the responsibilities of parents and
students in regard to allowances. Answer
these questions:
a. What factors are considered in deciding
when to give a child an allowance?
b. On what basis is the amount determined?
c. Should the child be expected to work
for any or all of his allowance?
d. Should the parents have any control
over the spending -of the allowance?

1. Consider what knowledge -the homemaker needs
in the following:
a. bank account
b. savings account
c. utilities
d. credit cards
e. installment buying






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


IMPROVING YOUR USE OF TIME

1. Time schedule can help. Use the kind
of schedule that best suits your,needs

2. Match your activities to your values
and important goals.

3. Learn to make realistic estimate of
time and equipment.

4. Allow a long enough span of time to
get jobs done.

5. Develop a good method for a task
that you do often, then use it.

6. Find where you can decrease the
amount of time spent on a task by
increasing your skill.


Human Resources
Knowledge
Attitudes
Abilities
Skills
Non-Human Resources
Time
Money



INCOME Generally money received from
one's business, labor or
investments.






Wants are unlimited while income is
limited.


RESOURCES


Bratoon, Esther Crew.
Home Management, p. 292.






Bulletin Board:














Appendix #2
"Money Management"


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 195-266.


I





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Management


OBJECTIVES


4. Students will
differentiate
between wants
and needs of a
family.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


4


insurance
car maintenance
charge accounts
taxes
wills
social security


for minors


3. Draw profiles of the following in relation
to the homemaker's responsibilities.
a. bachelor living alone
b. two girls sharing an apartment
c. young couple with three children
d. retired couple

1. Solve the following problems related to
money management of families:
a. Susan was confused. Her friend, Jane,
said she was getting a new outfit for
the company dance. Susan and her
husband were saving money for a down
payment on a new car which they needed.
Susan wondered how Jane had money for
new clothes, "But, then," she thought,
"maybe Jane and her husband aren't
saving for anything. I would like a
new outfit, however."
Would you
1) stick to your goal of saving money?
2) "Keep up with the Joneses?"
b. The Jones have four children. Tina and
John are teenagers. Rob and Andy are in
grade school. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jones
work, but they complain that they never
have enough money. "We need to set
aside money for our children's education.
We also need a new stove, and we surely
could use another car," Mrs. Jones said,
"but we never have enough money for every-
thing. I don't know where all our money
goes."
Would you
1) decide on your family goals
and then plan your spending?
2) tell each family member to cut
down on his spending?





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES



Appendix #3
"Situational Shopping"

Appendix #4
"Free (?) Encyclopedia"

Appendix #5
"No Shoes for Tammy"

Appendix #6
"Broke Again"




Bulletin Board:
"How Do You Pocket
Your Money"
(Use an apron containing
several pockets which are
labeled according to ex-
penditures. Tuck play
money in pockets.)



Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
p. 208.






CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Management


OBJECTIVES


5. The students
will consider
the homemaker's
responsibility
in regard to
decision making




6. The students will
write a plan for
spending and
saving to meet
family needs and
goals.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


c. Do you think people with large incomes
have no money problems? This is not
always true. Mr. Anderson earns a large
income, but Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have
many debts that keep adding up. They
are just realizing that they have money
problems.
Would you
1) look for a higher paying job?
2) plan how you could spend more
wisely?
d. Linda and Larry are newlyweds. They
each belong to a tennis club. Linda
plays with her group on Tuesday nights.
Larry plays on Mondays. They play in
couple groups every other Saturday
night. Their activities cost them
$54.00 a month. About $30.00 goes for
food. "No wonder we don't have any
money left at the end of the month,"
Larry said; "we must do something about
it."
Would you
1) stop playing tennis?
2) cut down how often you play tennis?

2. Work the crossword puzzle on money
management.

1. Understand the steps in problem-solving.

2. Make a list of ordinary homemaker's problems.
Select one and set about to solve it.
Examples:
a. an unhandy kitchen
b. a tight budget for four

3. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of
"spur of the moment buying."

1. Discuss financial practices which are likely
to bring about financial crises or disasters.

2. Discuss your views about the use of money
management policies.

3. Plan a budget with a fixed income for the
following:
a. single person
b. married couple with no children
c. married couple with children
d. retired couple


__





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Steps in Decision Making:
1. State the problem.
2. Decide what to do about it.
5. Look ahead.
4. Make a choice.
5. Accept responsibility.





"A budget is not a financial straight
jacket. It is a plan to help you
control spending to insure maximum
satisfaction and return."


Wilhelms, Heimerl.
Consumer Economics,
July, pp. 44-52


Bulletin Board:
"Which Are You?"
Use coin shapes.
Label Sammy Thrift,
Betty Bargain, Charlie
Charge-it, Paula Planner,
Dotty Dreamer, and other
similar names





Cross, Aleene.
Introductory Homemaking,
pp. 255-245.


Bulletin Board:
Bull's-eye showing steps
of decision-making. Make
the solution the center.

Bulletin Board:
Steps in decision-making
shown in rising and
setting sun


"Consumer Reports"





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Management
I


OBJECTIVES


7. The students
will consider
the role of
advertising in
regard to
services and
goods purchased.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Select a list of advertised items.
Bring pictures of these advertisements to
class. Analyze and evaluate in regard to


information provided.
selling techniques.
emotional appeal.
factual claims.
general tastefulness.
sex appeal.
prestige.
beauty,
realism.
color,
packaging.


2. Rewrite the poorest ads.

3. Discuss the factors that influence people
to buy certain products.

4. Give some examples of TV advertising. List
the techniques used for eye and ear appeal.

5. Invite the manager from Better Business
Bureau to talk to class about false adver-
tising.

6. Sketch the design and write the words for
the advertisement of a product.

7. Compare advertisements of the same type of
clothing in different price ranges as found
in exclusive fashion magazines, newspapers,
standard mail order catalogues, and discount
catalogues. What appeal is emphasized in
each advertisement?





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


The following is from Teen Horizons At
Home and School. Lewis, Banks, and
Banks, p. 408.



HIGH PRESSURE SELLING refers to selling
techniques of intense, strong, persua-
sive nature which are difficult for
customers to withstand.

FALSE ADVERTISING is any advertising
which is misleading in a material
respect, including not only false rep-
resentation as to the benefits or
Results of using the commodity adver-
tised, or to its contents; but also the
failure to reveal any consequences
which are likely to follow from its use.


Advertising is a medium through which
the consumer can collect product infor-
mation and evaluate the integrity of
the seller.


Factors that influence buying are
1. income
2. keeping up with the Joneses
3. prestige and desire for social
approval
4. status symbols
5. power advertisements
6. influence of peer group
7. persuasion of salespersons
8. bargain sales
9. actual needs
10. trading stamps
11. premiums
12. testimonials
15. availability of goods
14. buying habits
15. customs
16. fashions


Bulletin Board:
"Stretch That Dollar"
"Make Money Behave"
"My Cost To My Family"

(Use rubber money and
around it list ways in
which family uses it.
"Stretch....")

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
P. 55.

Filmstrip with Cassette:
Now a Word from Our
Sponsor


Campbell, Sally.
Consumer Education in
an Age of Adaption.



Periodical:
Illinois Teacher, July-
Aug., 1971, Vol. XIV,
p. 276.



Resource Persons:
1. Better Business Bureau
Representative
2. Advertising Agent



Bulletin Board:
Prepare display of
advertisement which
indicate the following
features! emotional appeal,
business consumer, primary
and selective quality,
performance, education.






CONCEPT III- Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Consumer Education


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will compare
costs as related
to goods and
services received














2. The students
will investigate
various shopping
methods.



3. The students
will analyze
terminology used
on labels.

4. The students will
exhibit evidence
of their ability
to fill out
credit forms,
warranty cards
and to write a
check.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. List a number of commonly used home
appliances. Investigate the prices and
services provided at various stores.
Consider the following items:
a. personal service
b. brand names
c. store's decor
d. home delivery
e. credit
f. store's guarantee
g. installation service
h. service benefits
2. Define "Brand Name."
3. Collect four to six brands of canned peaches
or other fruits. Rate according to taste and
appearance. How did the price range compare
with the taste ratings?
4. Investigate the cost of trading stamps,
contests, and premiums in relation to the
store owner and the customer.

1. Select a household or personal item. Find
out how many ways you can buy this item.
2. Take the matching test, "Description of
Stores."
3. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of
ordering by mail.
4. Order five articles by mail.

1. Bring to class assorted labels used on
clothing. Study the meanings of the labels.
2. Experiment with fabric remnants to see the
results of disregarding the cleaning
instructions on the labels.

1. Investigate the regulations and agencies
provided to protect the consumer.
2. Prepare exhibit dealing with labeling for
consumer protection.
3. Fill out a credit application.
4. Write a check to a specific form for a
specific amount.
5. Select a small or large appliance. Secure
a warranty card provided by the instructor.
Fill it out.





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Descriptions
of stores


1. Purchase can be
made in various sections
of store.
2. Offers limited
selection of staple
articles and minor
purchases.
5. Limits the
purchases to a special
kind of merchandise.
4. Provides cata-
-logues for easy
selection.
5. Provides a large
volume, but few
services.
6. Provides quick
pick-ups of minor items
of clothing.
7. Provides self-
service purchases for
most family needs.
8. Offers exclusive
high style in accesso-
ries and speciality
items.
_9. Is a cooperative
store operated only for
groups who pay member-
ship fees.
10. Sells nationally
advertised articles
below suggested list
price.


Kind of
stores


A. Boutique

B. Closed-door
discount
store

C. Department
store

D. Chain ready-
to-wear store

E. Mail order
house

F. Neighborhood
store

G. Sample or
manufacture's
outlet

H. Specialty
shop

I. Discount
store

J. Super market

K. Yard goods
store

L. Drug store

M. Super-
discount
store


11. Sells only fabrics
and sewing accessories
needed by the hom seam-
stress.
12. Offers for resale
high style articles
that did not sell earlier.


RESOURCES


1*


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,


pp. 215-235.


Resource Persons:
1. Home Demonstration
Extension Agent
2. Home Economist
3. Appliance Demonstrator




Wanke, Wyllie, Sellders.
Consumer Decision Making -
Guide to Better Living,
pp. 61-90.


Medved, Eva.
The World of Food,
pp. 10-18.


Periodical:
Illinois Teacher of
Economics. Vol. V,
No. 1, Sept., 1961.





CONCEPT IV- Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT-Clothing and Textiles


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will exhibit
the ability to
identify common
textiles used in
clothing.

2. The students
will acquire
some skill in
determining
quality in
garments based
on cost, con-
struction, wear-
ability, and
care.





5. The students
will examine
the basic steps
in fabric
construction.

















4. The students
will acquire some
ability in
choosing and
combining colors
that are pleas-
ing to the
individual


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Examine a display of textile remnants
commonly used in clothing.

2. Select an expensive and an inexpensive
fabric sample. Compare and contrast.


1. Compare a well-made more expensive garment
with a cheaper, poorly-made one.

2. Develop a buying check list for each type
of garment that you might purchase.

3. Take a field trip to clothing stores for
men and women.
a. Observe range in quality.
b. Compare prices.
c. Study labels.
d. Visit clothing sales events.

4. Discuss, using Sears Flip Chart.


1. Develop a bulletin board "From Fiber to
Fabric."

2. Find scraps of cloth that are woven. Do
these things with them:
a. Pull a thread going lengthwise in the
fabric.
b. Pull a thread going crosswise in the
fabric.
c. Look for tiny squares that have been
formed where crosswise and lengthwise
threads meet.
d. Follow the grainline with a pencil.
e. Draw a line along the crosswise grain.
f. Look at a sketch of a weave that is
on the grain.
g. Look at the cloth on which you have
experimented. Is the weave on the
grain?

3. Pull some threads from a piece of cloth.
Separate the threads until you find the fibers

1. Use color bibs. Make individual color
analysis for each student. Keep color
analysis in notebook.
2. Bring in a picture of a fashion costume
which emphasizes your most becoming color.
20




CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


The twelve categories of synthetic or
man-made fibers are rayon, polyester,
nylon, acrylic, modacrylic, olefin,
acetate and triacetate, metallic, nytril,
rubber, spandex, and vinyl.

Standards used to judge clothing con-
struction apply also to buying ready-
made clothes.

Rating Sheet for Standards
of Construction
Key for Scoring: 1 Inaccurate or poor
construction
2 Average
3 Accurate
Seams:
1. Length of stitches is suited to
fabric.
2. Tension is even.
3. Seams are correct width.
4. Seams are stitched accurately.
5. Ends of stitching are fastened
backstitching.
6. Seams are pressed open.
7. Seams are finished.
Darts, Gathers, Pleats:
1. Darts gradually taper to a point.
2. Points of darts are backstitched
or tied.
3. Darts are correctly placed.
4. Bustline darts are pressed down.
5. Gathers and pleats are evenly
distributed and placed.
Zippers and Fasteners:
1. Stitching is parallel to seam line
not more than 3 inch wide.
2. Teeth and pull tabs are covered.
3. Hooks and eyes, if needed, are
correctly placed.
Facings:
1. Facings are clipped, lie flat, and
do not show on right side.
2. Facings are correctly under-
stitched to seam allowance.
3. Facings are tacked at seams.


T


RESOURCES


I


Fabric Swatches

Bulletin Board:
Display swatches of
fabric on a clothes
line.
Title: "Hidden Values-
What to Look for When
Buying Fabrics."

Pamphlet:
Your Clothing Dollar


Sturm and Grieser.
Guide to Modern Clothing,
pp. 158, 160, 162,
164, 166-180.


Sears Flip Chart





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences


- Clothing and Textiles


OBJECTIVES


5. The students
will relate line,
balance, pro-
portion, rhythm
and emphasis to
clothing
selection.


6. The students
will acquire
some knowledge
concerning the
selection of
fabrics suited
to the figure
and the pattern.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


5. Make a bulletin board of color harmonies.

4. Use a flannel board or fabric samples. Note
individual and class reactions to colors.
Discuss reasons for reactions.

5. Tie dye an article of clothing. Select the
colors according to likes and dislikes of
student and according to colors best suited
to skin tone and eye color.

6. Place three glasses of water on a white
colored table. Make primary colors by adding
red, blue, and yellow food coloring to water.
Experiment with secondary colors by mixing
the primary colors in empty glasses. Combine
secondary colors in the same way.


1. Place bands of crepe paper of various widths
vertically and horizontally on plain colored
garments. Note how appearance changes.

2. Trace or cut from magazines costumes which
show good and poor proportions. Label them
and mount on the bulletin board or place in
notebooks.


1. Use the overhead projector, small mannequins,
or bulletin board. Demonstrate how choice of
fabric can alter the apparent figure silhouette.


2. Choose a pattern.
pattern envelope.
suggested choices.


Study the information on
Discuss reasons for


5. View the filmstrip, "The Size is Right."

4. Demonstrate how to take correct body measure-
ments. Work in pairs and record your measure-
ments. Convert to your pattern size.

5. Use the overhead projector to show differences
in figure types.

6. Compare the various features found in the
drawings on the pattern envelope. Discuss.


SUB-CONCEPT




CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Hems:
1. Hem is even distance from floor.
2. Hem is correct width all the way
around the skirt.
3. Correct hemming stitch is used.
4. Stitches are invisible on the
right side.
5. Single thread is used.
General:
1. Final pressing is well done
including hem.
2. Garment fits well.
3. General appearance is good.
4. Garment is completed on time.


Final scoring guidelines might be:
68-81 A
55-67 B Bulletin Board:
28-54 C "The Story of Fabric -
20-27 D from Fiber to Fashion"
Under
20 E
Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking.

The steps in making cloth from natural
fibers are: Nicholas, Heyne,
S. Trilling, Lee.
fibers----yarn---)fabric. Trilling, Lee.
Art for Young America,
pp. 75-82.

Greer and Gibbs.
Your Home and You,
pp. 298-309, 297-298.

Carson, Byrta.
How You Look and Dress.


Bulletin Board:
Using a large sunflower for
a color wheel, color the
largest petals with the
primary colors, the middle-
sized with secondary colors
and the smallest petals
with the intermediate colors.
Greer and Gibbs.
23 Your Home and You,
pp. 310-312.






CONCEPT III Exploratory Experience


- Clothing and Textiles


OBJECTIVES


7. The students
will become
familiar with
the techniques
involved in
preparing fabric
for construction.























8. The students
will acquire
some skill in
the use and care
of the sewing
machine.





9. The students
will acquire
some skill in
using a pattern.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1.


Take a square piece of fabric with or with-
out selvage. Identify lengthwise, crosswise
and bias grain.


2. Observe a piece of plaid fabric that has been
pulled off grain. Observe lines of the
weave. Get fabric on grain by
a. pulling diagonally.
b. pressing material with the grain.
c. stitching the crosswise ends,
dampening, and pressing.

3. Examine a sample of non-preshrunk fabric.
Measure a square and then wash it. Re-
measure piece when dry and observe the change
in size. Discuss importance of preshrinking
fabric.

4. Examine fabrics printed off grain. Discuss
how this affects the quality of the fabric.

5. Straighten raw edges by
a. tearing on the crosswise grain from
selvage to selvage.
b. pulling a crosswise thread.
c. basting along one crosswise thread
and then cutting.

6. Use the corner of a table to determine
straightness of grain.


1. Without threading the machine, practice
sewing straight and curved lines and square
corners.
2. Observe a demonstration on the proper way
to oil a sewing machine.

3. Earn the "Operator's Certificate" when you
have mastered the skills of operating the
sewing machine. Appendix #7


1. Demonstrate the use of pattern markings by
using scrap material and sample pattern pieces.

2. Place pattern, cut out, sew, and finish a
basic sewing project such as pillow or simple
clothing article.


SUB-CONCEPT





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


The pattern, color, and texture of a
fabric affect the appearance of the
silhouette.

The pattern envelope gives information
on fabric choices.

Measurements are the basis for deter-
mining figure types.

Figures are typed according to height,
contour, and bodily proportions.

Observe techniques students use to take
other measurements.

Check the selected pattern sizes.

Information on the pattern envelope
should be examined and understood
before the pattern is purchased.

Demonstrate terms such as grain,
selvage, and nap.

Grain line is the key to successful
clothing construction.

Check students' fabrics for straightness
before pinning on pattern.

Check oiling of machines.

The guide sheet gives most of the
necessary information for constructing
the garment.


McCall's Consultant

Pattern Envelopes

Greer and Gibbs.
Your Home and You,
pp. 355-358.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 124-129.

Pattern Books.

Pattern Envelopes or
Pattern Catalogues.







Carson, Byrta.
How You Look and Dress,
pp. 251, 253.

Guide Sheets of Patterns.

Greer and Gibbs.
Your Home and You,
pp. 541-545


Appendix #7
"Operator's Certificate"






CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Clothing and Textiles


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


3. Start with a rectangle of material. Shape
and stitch in darts to fit your figure.


10. The students
will utilize
skills for
basic construc-
tion.


1. Make slip cover for glasses:
a. Use 2 felt strips (35x7) curved on
one end.
b. Glue and use scrap felt pieces for
design.
c. Thread.
d. Sew large felt pieces together, turn
and press.
e. Glue on decoration.

2. Construct place mats for family members.
a. Include pockets for knives and forks, or
b. Include pocket to hold picture of
individual, or
c. Include something distinctive of the
person such as a monogram.

3. Construct a purse or shoe arranger to hang
in a closet.

4. Crochet jewelry, rings and necklaces.

5. Make a book of sewing samples.

6. Make a smock or apron for a young child to
wear at meal time or at play time.

7. Applique or embroider designs on slacks to
add decoration.

8. Make a tote-bag or carry-all.

9. Make an apron with pockets for cooking class.

10. Cut out from scraps and sew dress or jacket
bodice front. Using buttons, tape, rick-rack,
and scraps, experiment with decorating a
plain outfit.

11. Plan a "fix-it" day. Bring in an article of
clothing to be repaired.

12. Demonstrate basic skills of garment repair.





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Supplies: material, threat, tape
measure, decorative supplies.







Supplies: fabric, thread, hanger,
cardboard backing.









Use 2 pieces of heavy cardboard (15x16)
for cover. Each will be upholstered
with cotton for cushioning and fabric
cut to size of cover having cording at
edges. Use butcher paper for pages and
shoe strings or yarn to hold pages to-
gether. Decorate cover with pictures,
felt, yarn or scraps.









Have students bring garments from home
which need hem repairs. In class make
repairs with needle and thread using
the blind hem stitch.


Bailey, Dunn, Vansickle.
Steps in Clothing Skills,
pp. 311-315.

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 526-529.

Todd and Roberts.
Clother for Teens,
pp.,191-232.

Greer and Gibbs Workbook,
p. 55.

Greer and Gibbs.
Your Home and You,


pp. 284-285.





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Child Care


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. The students will 1. Practice correctly
practice skills a. holding and lifting a baby. (doll)
necessary to meet b. bathing a baby.
the basic needs of c. folding a diaper.
the young child. d. diapering a baby.
2. Investigate the many different types of
baby diapers on the market. Compare in
terms of comfort, absorption and cost.

3. Investigate the cost of baby diaper service.
4. Observe the exhibit of soaps and detergents
used in laundering baby garments.

5. Invite a sales person to explain features
to look for when buying children's clothing.
Some features are
a. large buttons.
b. front opening.
c. reinforced seams.
d. sturdy fabric.
e. easy care.

6. Investigate the cost of store bought baby food.
Make baby food using the blender. Compare
with the purchased baby food regarding time,
cost, color, taste.

7. Plan menus to meet the basic needs of a young
child of age.

8. Eat at home with an oversized wooden spoon
to get an idea of the problems babies have
when fed with regular spoon.

9. Solve the following problems:
a. Craig is angry because he must stop
playing with his truck to eat lunch.
Craig's mother should
1) put Craig to bed without lunch.
-T2) sympathize with him. Explain that
it-is time for lunch and that he may
play with the truck after lunch.
3) let him continue to play and feed
him later.
b. Craig has just painted the wall with
his water colors. Should his mother
1) give him a spanking?
X 2) have him help clean the wall?
3) throw the water colors away?
28





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Habits of cleanliness developed in
childhood are a basis for attitudes
of personal hygiene in the future.


T


RESOURCES


t


Cross, Aleene.
Intruductory Homemaking,
pp. 179-185.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 121-142.






Davis and Peeler.
Lesson in Living,
pp. 297-326.











Clayton, Nanalee.
Young Living,
pp. 54-76.





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Child Care


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


c. Dana is playing on the porch with
some toys. Craig stands off to one
side watching. Dana's mother should
X 1) encourage Craig to play by
trying to interest him in a toy.
2) take Dana inside.
3) tell Craig to play if he wants
to.
d. Craig and Dana are playing with
finger paint while it is raining out-
side. They have smeared paint over
the paper but seem unable to make a
design. Craig's mother should
1) say "make a house like this,"
and show them.
X 2) encourage them to try to draw
something they saw while riding in
the car, walking around the block or
watching TV.
3) clean up the mess and tell them
to find something else to do.

10. Take a field trip to a Day Care Center,
Kindergarten or Head Start Program. Observe
guidance of these activities at the place
visited.

11. Collect cartoons showing behavior problems
of the preschooler.

12. Make simple creative toys using odds and
ends of items. Examples:
a. paper bag mask
b. place mats
c. popcorn tree
d. magazine pictures for puzzles
e. car (two egg cartons)

13. Make a mobile for a baby crib.

14. Invite a resource person to speak on enter-
taining children.

15. Start a Service Project. -- Make a tote bag
and fill with books, games, puzzles, and
toys with which children like to play.
16. Plan and give a birthday party for a young
brother or sister.




CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Planning time for play activities is as
important as planning time for meeting
other needs of the child.


RESOURCES


4


Resource Persons:

Public Librarian

Nursery Teacher
Day Care Aide
Parent
Experienced Baby Sitter





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Food and Nutrition


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will recognize
some factors
which influence
individual food
choices.













2. The students
will acquire
some skill in
planning simple
menus with
texture, color,
and taste appeal
and that are
within the limits
of an average
family budget.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


I


1. Give pre-test on beliefs that affect food
choices. Discuss the questions following
the test.
2. Discuss how the Florida climate changes the
food choices of a family which has moved
from the North.

3. Distinguish between food fad, food fallacy
and food allergy.

4. Select a country and research the customs
and food habits of the country. Prepare a
display of dishes from that country to be
used in sharing sections.

5. Prepare dish peculiar to a foreign country.
Share with the class or invite the faculty
in for a tasting party.


1. Use food models. Plan a meal which is
monotonous in texture, color or taste. Show
how substitutes can make a more interesting
meal.
2. Plan three menus for different income levels.
Compare cost and nutritive value.
3. Figure cost per serving for many different
items. Set up a display.
4. Compare the cost of serving orange juice to
the family. Visit local supermarket to find
what is available. Which could be served for
breakfast at less cost but have the same
nutritive value.
5. Figure cost per serving of steak, ham, chicken,
liver. Compare cost per pound and cost per
serving.
6. Make a comparison study of costs of different
cuts of meat.
7. Bring in pictures and recipes of meat-
extender dishes. Figure cost of each dish.
Compare cost per serving with meat servings.
8. Compare costs of canned, frozen and fresh
vegetables.
9. Keep a record of time used in preparing
meals. Make a study on how time for that
preparation could have been saved.
10. Arrange a trip to a food market. Ask the
manager to explain factors involved in
pricing food at the market.
11. Collect samples of freeze-dried products
and compare with fresh products.





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


The individual's origin, nationality and
region affect his food choices.


Superstition, fallacies and fad diets
all play a part in the choice of food.


Individuals tend to choose foods with
which they are familiar.


.Climate and season affect the choices
of food.


Monotony in meals can be avoided by a
variety in texture, color, taste and
temperature.







Availability of money may affect the
family's choice of food.


The largest single factor in the cost
of a meal is the meat or meat substitute.


RESOURCES


Encyclopedias


Magazines


"Foreign Food
Recipe Books"

















Lewis, Peckham, Hovey.
Family Meals and
Hospitality,
pp. 106-120.


1


i





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Food and Nutrition


3. The students
will recognize
the importance
applying
nutritional
principles in
meal planning.


4. The students will
investigate ways
to make work in
the kitchen safe,
pleasant and less
time consuming'.




5. The students will
practice reading,
using and
adapting recipes.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


I


1. Plan mobiles demonstrating nutrients and
their contribution to the body.
2. Visit the library to locate pictures and
information about nutritional problems that
result from improper eating habits.
3. Examine a low-income menu to determine if
it meets nutritional requirements.
4. Use magazine pictures and mobiles to plan
menus using the Basic Four.
5. Plan a complete lunch for a family of four
spending only a certain amount. See that
nutritional requirements are met.


1. Make an exhibit of different kitchen tools.
2. Exhibit a picture of a kitchen that you
think has all the proper characteristics of
safety, pleasantness and convenience.
3. Make a sketch of a kitchen you think would
provide the best working conditions.
4. Work with a partner. Plan a kitchen con-
sidering the arranging of kitchen utensils
and storage for maximum convenience.


1. Study table of measurements and abbreviations.
2. Use table of measurements to divide a recipe
in half. Double a recipe.
3. Practice doing some correct measuring.
4. Experiment with correct and makeshift
measuring utensils. Use a flatware teaspoon,
then use a standard measuring spoon.
Measure some liquid; note the difference.
Use just any tin cup to measure a cup of
flour, then use a standard measuring cup.
Note the difference.
5. Develop a glossary of cooking terms.
6. Demonstrate the proper skills needed for
different cooking terms. Examples:
a. dicing
b. folding
c. grating
d. basting
e. blending
f. frosting
g. sifting
h. simmering
7. Prepare a family cookbook. Get favorite
recipes from relatives, neighbors, and
friends.


OBJECTIVES


T





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Each nutrient has specific character-
istics and functions in the body, and
the body's needs are different for
each although they are all interrelated.


Family and personal appearance problems
may be related to food habits.






The basic four is a guide which
simplifies the selection of foods that
provide needed nutrients.





Time, energy and material goods can be
saved by using the appropriate tools.





Understanding and using a recipe involves
knowing table measurements and
abbreveations.

Recipes may be adapted to produce
larger or smaller quantities.

The correct use of measuring equipment
assures accurate properties contributing
to successful results in food prepara-
tion.


RESOURCES


Davis and Peeler.
Lessons in Living,
pp. 5-15.


Medved, Eva.
The World of Food,
pp. 20-35.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 591-599


Duffie, Mary.
So You Are Ready to Cook,
p. 23.


Medved, Eva.
The World of Food,
pp. 58-56.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 402-404.


I


I





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Food and Nutrition


6. The students
will investigate
techniques of
food storage
which will
eliminate waste,
prevent food
poisoning and
preserve the
nutritive value
of the food.



7. The students
will plan and
prepare meals
which will
save time,
energy and
money.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Investigate what containers are the best
for refrigerator storage.
2. Develop a chart for storing food with
emphasis on perishable items.
5. Perform an experiment by comparing a small
bit of raw hamburger meat which has been
out of the refrigerator overnight to one
which has been properly refrigerated.
4. Place an uncovered quart of milk in the
refrigerator along with an uncovered raw
onion. Leave it there for the weekend. On
Monday taste the milk.

1. Collect and file family menus that will
save time, energy and money. Locate recipes
to accompany menus.
2. Plan and prepare an oven meal that will
require little attention.
3. Compare in cost, time and energy, homemade
biscuits with those ready-to-bake biscuits.
4. Compare a TV dinner with the same food cooked
separately. Evaluate the two in terms of
cost, time, and taste.
5. Prepare a tasty dinner from leftovers.
6. Make attractive garnishes for foods.
7. Make an attractive salad. Show different
combinations and arrangements. Use pictures
from magazines when actual food cannot be
used.
8. List many ways that breads can be used in
the preparation of meals.
9. Hold a baking contest. Allow each student
to bake the same item. Appoint judges
from another Home Economics class to evaluate
or invite the faculty to taste each item
and act as judges.





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Food storage may be classified as dry
and refrigerated.

Dry storage should be in a cool, dry
place. Containers should be moisture,
vermin and bug proof.


Bacterial and mold growth is inhibited
by cold.









Today's homemaker spends less time in
the kitchen. Food prepared should be
economical, nutritional, and easily
prepared.


T


RESOURCES


1--


Medved, Eva.
The World of Food.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
p. 408.



Lewis, Peckham, Hovey.
Family Meals and
Hospitality.






Cookbooks.





'ONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences


SUB-CONCEPT Food and


OBJECTIVES


8. The students
will discuss and
apply the rules
of etiquette as
they relate to
table setting
and manners,


Nutrition


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Arrange attractive displays of different
types of table settings.

2. Practice correct table setting for different
meals.

3. Invite someone who is adept at flower
arrangements to demonstrate his/her skill
to the class.

4. Make arrangements of table decorations
suitable for a small luncheon. Practice
receiving the guests for the luncheon.

5. Role play the following situation. A guest
spills food on himself/herself and fur-
niture. Demonstrate what the host/hostess
should do in this situation.

6. Role play proper introductions and pleasant
dinner conversation.

7. Display and compare various types of
invitations.

8. Write formal invitations and informal invi-
tations. Put them in a bag. Draw. Write
a response to the invitation.

9. Discuss the meaning of the French abbre-
viation, R.S.V.P.

10. Prepare an entertainment calendar for your
family.

11. Plan the meal and entertainment for a special
event observed in your family.

12. Collect interesting ideas for entertainments
and file them for future use.





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Beauty in table setting and good table
manners contribute to the pleasures of
dining.


Tableware should be placed to make the
meal easy to serve and easy to eat.






Three general types of meal service are
used: table service, plate service,
and buffet service.

It is the responsibility of the host
and hostess to make the guest feel that
he is welcome and that his presence is
a pleasure.

In case of an accident, the host and
hostess must first make the guest feel
comfortable.


family birthdays and anniversaries
special days and holidays
showers
teas and receptions
luncheons, banquets, buffet meals


RESOURCES


Medved, Eva.
The World of Food,


pp. 402-420.


Florist

Resource Person for
Houseware and China.




Etiquette Books








Lewis, Peckham, Hovey.
Family Meals and
Hospitality,
pp. 362-372.



Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
p. 460.


1


I





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences


- Housing and Home Furnishings


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


I


1. The students
will distinguish
between needs
and wants.













2. The students will
investigate how
natural resources
influence
housing in
different parts
of the world.


3. The students will
investigate the
elements and
principles of
design and their
influence on
creating beauty
in the home.


1. Discuss the factors influencing families
in selecting a place to live, such as:
economy, comfort, neighbors, convenience,
beauty, personal interests, prestige.

2. Discuss conflicting values that sometime
exist in a family making it difficult to
agree on selecting a home.

3. Write and present a skit based on a family
that is about to select a home. Include
reasons for the selection of the home.

4. Design a simple home plan which fits all
the ideas mentioned in "Families and Where
They Live."


1. Collect pictures which illustrate housing
all over the world. Show the influence of
natural resources on this housing.

2. Show how architectural designing is in-
fluenced by climate.


1. View a film or filmstrip on color in the
home and discuss the principles illustrated.

2. Discuss colors showing picture illustrating
which may be used to change the effect of
the following:
a. northern exposure
b. southern exposure
c. very small room
d. very large room
e. long and narrow room
f. high ceiling

3. Analyze by use of the color wheel the com-
binations of colors in the standard color
harmonies.


SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES

Food, clothing and shelter are basic
needs for all individuals.

Factors which make a house attractive
are affected by the age, value, and
previous care given to the house.
Craig, Hazel.
Characteristics which contribute to the Homes With Character,
attractiveness of a house include clean- PP. 57-69
lines of the home and neighborhood.
FAMILIES AND WHERE THEY LIVE

Families live in different kinds of
houses. Some live in large houses, some
in-small ones, some in apartments, some
in mobile homes, some in houseboats.
Whatever type of house a family has
there are certain things that are needed.
Will you check the following list of
those which you think are most important
to have. A place ....................
1. for each member to be by himself
sometimes.
2. to cook and serve the meals McDermott and Nicholas.
3. for children to play Homemaking for Teenagers,
PP. 67-74.
4. to sleep and relax 67-74.
5. for visiting
6. to entertain friends
7. to keep one's personal posses-
sions
8. to have one's own way to arrange_
9. to protect one from the weather
and danger
10. for the family to work and play
together
11. to show off to neighbors and
friends
12. of beauty



The place where a family selects to live
and work is affected by activities the
family enjoys.





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Housing and Home Furnishings


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES

4. Bring empty soap boxes, soap wrappers and
empty cleaning containers. Discuss how
much influence you think the color of the
packaging tends to influence buying.

5. Read Vance Packard's Hidden Persuaders.
Cite examples from the book those things
concerning color that have influenced many
to buy or not to buy.

6. Cite examples to show that color has a
psychological effect on people.

7. Make a list of verbal states showing their
verbal colorations. Examples:
a. feeling blue
b. growing green with envy
c. becoming purple with rage
d. feeling in the pink (good fortune)
e. seeing red (anger)
f. casting a jaundice eye (yellow look)

8. Find descriptive expressions relative to
personality for the following colors:
a. Red
1) vital
2) enthusiastic
3) extroverted
4) fearless
5) dramatic
b. Blue
1) good judgment
2) cool headed
3) executive ability
4) idealistic
5) perfectionist
6) lofty
7) cool in personal relationships
c. Yellow
1) warm-hearted
2) faithful
3) well-planned
4) well-organized
5) cheerful
d. Purple
1) artistic
2) subtle
3) well-poised
4) gentle
5) peaceful





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Art Principles
Color





Texture used in a room will affect the
apparent size and amount of light re-
flected or absorbed and will have an
influence on the emotions of the
occupants.

In decorating it is well to remember
that one color has to be the star. There
will be one or two featured players.
The star and the featured players are
the colors you choose for walls, floors,
draperies, bedspreads, sofa. Use accent
colors, but never make the star jealous.

Balance in a room produces a feeling of
rest and equilibrium.

A feeling of unity is achieved in a
room when the furnishings and back-
grounds are related in size, design,
color and texture.


-r


RESOURCES


Film:
Color Newsreel.

Filmstrips:
Introduction to Color.
Color in a Girl's Room.
Color in Home Furnishings.


Goldstein and Goldstein.
Art in Everyday Life,
pp. 169-210.


Fundamental Procedures


in Home Furnishings.
pp. 5-20.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 215-217.

Craig, Hazel Thompson.
Homes With Character,
pp. 115-125.

Pamphlet:
Dow Chemical Co.
"Make A Date to Decorate"

Film:
Discovering Texture



Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 218-219.





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Housing and Home Furnishings


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


e. Orange
1) frisky
2) boisterous
3) outgoing
4) merry-maker
5) good worker
6) accepts a challenge and
proves you are wrong
f. Green
1) friendly
2) sympathetic
3) tolerant
4) mathematically minded
g. Brown
1) conservative
2) reliable
3) thrifty
9. Research what psychologists have discovered
concerning people's reactions to colors.
Examples:
a. A well-balanced person usually dreams
in color rather than black and white.
b. Blue is calming and relaxing.
c. Red is exciting and even disturbing
when you are tense.
d. Light green is easy on the eyes and is
used on the walls in operating rooms of
many hospitals and also for the uniforms
and surgical gowns.
e. Gray is the best color to use in a room
for brainwashing.

10. Exhibit materials of different texture.
Decide on the mood of each texture.
11. Put a number of different textured articles
in a bag. Pass the bag around the room
allowing each one to put his hand in the bag
to feel the articles. Let each describe his
reaction.
12. Dip fabrics of the same fiber but of differ-
ent texture into the same dye bath. Dem-
onstrate how texture affects color.
13. Discuss the meaning of balance and how it
is achieved.
14. Bring to class a display showing correct
balance.
15. Show how the principle of harmony can be
applied to the following:
a. placing furniture in a room
b. placing scatter rugs
c. choosing colors
d. combining lines
e. combining textures
44






CONCEPT

SUB -CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES






CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences


- Housing and Home Furnishings


OBJECTIVES


4. The students
will acquire
ability in
selecting,
combining and
arranging
household
furnishings and
accessories.
























5. The students
will practice
some principles
of furniture
arrangements.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Arrange in the most efficient way areas
of the classroom for certain activities.
2. Become acquainted with the terms commonly
associated with windows.
5. Show filmstrip on window treatment and
discuss the principles applied.
4. Display pictures and identify different
types of windows such as casement, double
sash, awning, picture, jalousie.
5. Display by various methods different window
treatments, such as glass curtains, cafe
or Dutch style, ruffled tie-backs, draperies,
draw draperies.
6. List the factors to consider before selecting
curtains or draperies.
7. Discuss curtain and drapery fabrics suitable
for different uses. Display these fabrics
and give reasons for suitability.
8. Make a list of suggestions for trimming
curtains and draperies.
9. Show filmstrips on fabrics suitable for a
bedroom. Discuss the advantages and dis-
advantages of each one used.
10. Select fabric and make curtains for bedroom
windows.
11. Select a swatch of fabric for a window
treatment. Explain where it can be used
and the reason for the choice.


1. View the filmstrip on arranging furniture
and discuss the principles applied.
2. Make a list of suggestions for the arrange-
ment of furniture. Identify each for com-
fort, convenience, safety, or beauty.
5. Discuss arrangements of furniture for
storage, study, leisure activities, dressing,
entertainment. Discuss how furniture may
be arranged to form interest centers in the
bedroom for usefulness and attractiveness.


SUB-CONCEPT





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Make an objective test on the art
elements and principles of design or
give an essay test on the student's
knowledge and ability to apply the
elements and principle of design.

Appropriate arrangements of furniture
and other equipment contributes to
efficiency of work spaces.

Use model furniture and arrange for
maximum efficiency.


Many factors determine what window
treatment will be used.
1. number
2. location


3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.


type
size
view
light
use of room
scheme of room
cost
care required


When selecting fabrics for curtains and
draperies, consider such factors as
ease of laundering, durability, draping
quality, effect of sunshine, abrasion
resistance.




When selecting fabrics for curtains and
draperies, consider such factors as
1. ease of laundering
2. durability
5. draping qualities
4. effect of


RESOURCES


I


Filmstrip:
How to Select Window
Treatments

Kit:
Kroehler Home Furnishings
Classroom Kit



Geuther, Guthrie, Morton.
The Home, Its Furnishings
and Equipment, pp. 153-179.




Craig, Hazel Thompson.
Homes With Character,
pp. 241-255.


Filmstrips:
Fabrics in a Girl's hoom
Decorating Ideas for Your
Window



Filmstrip:
Decorating Made Easy



Craig, Hazel Thompson.
Homes With Character,


pp. 145-158.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,


pp. 222-225.


Greer and Gibbs.
Your Home and You,


pp. 414-415.


Filmstrip:
Furniture Arrangement Ideas -
Your Key to Good Decorating


1





ONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Housing and Home Furnishings


OBJECTIVES


6. The students
will practice
designing
floral
arrangements.






7. The students
will acquire
some knowledge
and develop some
skills related
to the con-
struction and
renovation of
household
furnishings.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


4. Collect and display pictures on a bulletin
board that show how furniture is arranged
to be both useful and attractive.
5. Try out different arrangements of furniture
and accessories in your bedroom and report
to class the results.
6. Discuss the importance of traffic patterns.
Show by diagraming how furniture may be
placed to create traffic lanes from one
entrance of a room to another.
7. Observe and chart traffic patterns in one
room at home. Write a report and suggest
possible furniture rearrangement.
8. Design a shoe-box bedroom made to scale
using odds and ends and scraps.


1. Invite a garden club member to demonstrate
floral arrangements.
2. View a filmstrip on floral designing.
3. Plan for committees to take turns in creat-
ing arrangements for the home economics
department.
4. Create floral arrangements for special
seasons of the year.


1. Design and construct articles for the home
such as bookends, desk accessories, plaques,
tackboards, calendars, decoupages.
2. List interesting inexpensive presents
which would brighten up a room.
3. Discuss some of the resources in the
community which one could use in making
attractive accessories for the home.
Consider what one might find in the fields,.
on a hillside, at the seashore, near a
stream or in a woods. Follow-up
discussion with an exploration field trip
to find various things of beauty.





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Careful arrangement of furniture will
add to the comfort, convenience, safety
and beauty of the home.









Natural traffic lane formed by existing
structural openings and family activ-
ities affect furniture arrangement.

















Well arranged flowers, plants, twigs
or leaves contribute to the interest
and beauty of a room.


Filmstrip:
Arranging Furniture
in a Girl's Room

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,


p. 219.


Filmstrip:
Furniture Arrangement Ideas


Clayton, Nanalee.
Young Living, p. 278.

Craig, Hazel Thompson.
Home With Character,
pp. 71-93, 186-198.


Pamphlet:
Your Home Furnishings Dollar


Filmstrip:
The Story of Flowers
(in 2 parts)



Craig, Hazel Thompson.
Homes With Character,
pp. 223-230, 317-525.





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences


SUB-CONCEPT


- Housing and Home Furnishings


OBJECTIVES


8. The students
will develop
some skills and
methods needed
in caring for
the home.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Share experiences with family members in the
improvement of the home such as planting
flowers, cutting grass, painting, refinishing
furniture, making curtains, bedspreads, or
other articles.

2. Devise a system for keeping the home
economics department clean and orderly.

3. List large pieces of cleaning equipment that
would be desirable to have in the home.
Discuss the uses of each. Suggest alterna-
tives when these pieces are not available.

4. Invite a representative from a local firm
to demonstrate the use of large pieces of
cleaning equipment.

5. Discuss why cleaning equipment operates
more efficiently if given recommended care.

6. Demonstrate efficient methods of


sweeping
dusting
waxing
cleaning windows
cleaning the oven
defrosting the refrigerator
changing bed linens
cleaning silver


7. Use different types of cleaning products.
Compare cost and efficiency.


1





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Numerous attractive articles for the
home may be made inexpensively by using
orange juice cans, contact paper, styro-
foam, old magazines, fabric scraps and
trimming.


Make attractive storage aides such as
pencil and crayon holders
covered or decorated boxes for
scissors















Homes may be improved when family members
cooperate in various projects.


Cleaning is facilitated by proper choice
of cleaning equipment.

Observe the effectiveness of the
cleaning system.

There are several acceptable methods
and supplies for accomplishing each
cleaning task.


Fleck, Fernandez, Munves.
Exploring Home and Family
Living, ch. 18.

Barrows and Justema.
Living Walls.

Childcraft Series.
The How and Wny Library.

Periodicals:
Child Life, Childhood
Education, Instructor,
Children's Highlights
for Children.






Decorating Ideas.
Spring, 1969,
Sherwin Williams.

Craig, Hazel Thompson.
Homes With Character,
pp. 421-451.

Starr, Mary Catherine.
Management for Better
Living, pp. 237-255.


Lewis, Burns, Segner.
Housing and Home
Management, pp. 111-120.

Peet, Louise.
Young Homemaker's
Equipment Guide, pp. 162-180.

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Honemaking,
p. 215.

McDermott and Nicholas.
Homemaking for Teenagers,
pp. 139-152.





CONCEPT IV Evaluation of Values and Interest
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will relate
their interests
in the field of
home economics.


2. The students
will relate
personal
qualifications
needed for the
working world as
well as for the
occupation of
homemaker.















3. The students
will relate
skills needed
for the occu-
pation of home-
macer to the
world of work.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. View slides of different jobs in home
economics. Discuss interest in each.




1. List your qualifications for being a
congenial family member.
2. List your qualifications for getting and
holding a job.
3. Compare the two lists.
4. Act out in a minute drama good and/or bad
qualifications needed for jobs and family
living.
5. Interview a career girl and homemaker in
relation to rewards, qualifications and
sacrifices. Compare the two in a pre-
sentation to the class.
6. Consider this problem. Susan leaves her
personal articles all over the house. Her
mother has to put them away. What effect
will Susan's habits have on her perform-
ance on a job?
7. Invite a work experienced person in your
school to discuss problems which have
occurred on the job. Ask him/her to tell
why most people lose their jobs.

1. Take the test, "Check your Salable Work
Habits." Evaluate how good an employee
you would be.
2. Invite teenagers who now are wage earners
to discuss qualifications needed to hold
a job.
3. Invite a representative of the home service
department of your local utility company to
talk to you about the most essential qual-
ification for holding a job.
4. Invite a food service person to discuss
qualification of a good employee.
5. Invite a personnel manager to talk to the
students on the qualities which most affect
employability.
6. Interview guidance personnel or persons in
business to secure information concerning
careers.





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Personal qualifications required for
employment are the same as those re-
quired for being a good family member.

Personal qualities which contribute to
job success:
1. dependability
2. calmness
3. patience
4. good health
5. initiative
6. emotional stability
7. promptness
8. honesty
9. appropriate job behavior
10. ethical practices
11. pride in work
12. willingness to accept supervision
13. ability to take constructive
criticism
14. ability to make decisions
15. ability to follow instructions
16. ability to work with others
17. desire to learn
18. cheerfulness
19. willingness to do your share of
the work
20. personal cleanliness


Stages of Developing an Industry
Similar to Developing a Home:
1. establishing the enterprise
2. managing the system
3. researching human needs
4. developing goods and services
5. preparing to produce goods and
services
6. producing goods and services
7. selling in the family or industry
8. distributing goods and services
9. controlling profit and/or loss
(problems in enterprise and
family)


Bulletin Board:
"What Are You Cut Out to Be"
Put a row of male and
female paper dolls on
the board. Write the
name of a different
home economics occupation
on each.



Resource Person:
Work Experienced Person













Pamphlet:
Career Set
Finding Your Job

Mills, Nancy.
Home Economists in
Action.

Grady and Vineyard.
Succeeding in the World
of Work.

Transparencies:
Teacher provides class
presentation of the
home compared with the
business.


Appendix #8
"Home-Business"














BIBLIOGRAPHY


BOOKS

Bailey, Annetta; Dunn, Lucille; Vansickle, Wanda. Steps in
Clothing Skills. Peoria, Illinois. 61614: Charles
A. Bennett Company, Inc., 1970.

Barclay, Marion; Champion, Frances; Brinkley, Jeanne; and
Funderburk, Kathleen. Teen Guide to Homemaking.
New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1972.

Barrows, Claire M. and Justema, William. Living Walls.
New York. 10022: The Wall Covering Council.

Bratton, Esther Crew. Home Management Is. Boston: Ginn
and Company, 1971.

Campbell, Sally R. Consumer Education in an Age of Adaptation.
Chicago: Consumer Information Service, 1971.

Carson, Burta. How You Look and Dress. New York: MoGraw-Hill
Book Company, 1969.

Clayton, Nanalee. Young Living. Peoria, Illinois: Charles
A. Bennett Company, 1970.

Craig, Hazel Thompson. Clothing, a Comprehensive Study.
New York: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1968.

Craig, Hazel Thompson. Homes with Character. Boston:
D.C. Heath and Company, 1970.

Cross, Aleene. Introductory Homemaking. Philadelphia:
J. B. Lippincott Company, 1970.

Davis, Martha and Peeler, Yvonne. Lessons in Living. Boston:
Ginn and Company, 1970.

Diller, Phyllis. Phyllis Oiller.s Housekeeping Hints. New
York: Doubleday and Company, Inc., 1966.

Duffie, Mary. So You Are Ready to Cook? Minneapolis, Minnesota:
Burgess Publishing Company, 1964.

Dunn, Lucille; Bailey, Annetta; Vansickle, Wanda. Steps in
Clothing Skills. Peoria, Illinois: Charles A. Bennett
Company, Inc., 1970.










Favorite Recipes of Home Economics Teachers. Montgomery, Alabama:
Favorite Recipes Press, Inc., 1963.

Fleck, Henrietta; Fernandez, Louise; and Munves, Elizabeth.
Exploring Home and Family Living. Englewood Cliffs,
New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc., 1965.

Geuther, Hilda; Guthrie, Virginia; Morton, Ruth. The Home, Its
Furnishings and Equipment. Dallas: MacGraw-Hill Book
Company, 1970.

Goldstein, Harriet and Goldstein, Vetta. Art in Everyday Life.
The MacMillan Company, 1964.

Greer, Charlotte C. and Gibbs, Ellen P. Your Home and You.
Boston: Allyn and Bacon, Inc., 1965.

Kimbrell, Grady and Vineyard, Ben S. Succeeding in the World
of Work. Bloomington,Illinois: McKnight and McKnight
Publishing Company, 1970.

Lewis, Dora S.; Burns, Jean 0.; Segner, Esther F. Housing and
Home Management. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1969.

Lewis, Dora S.; Banks, Anna K.; Banks, Marie. Teen Horizons at
Home and at School. New York: The MacMillan Company,
1970.

Lewis, Dora S.; Peckham, Gladys; Hovey, Helen S. Family Meals
and Hospitality. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1972.

McDermott, Irene; Norris,Jeanne; and Nicholas, Florence.
Homemaking for Teenagers. Book 1 and Book 2. Peoria,
Illinois: Charles A. Bennett Co., Inc.,1972.

Medved, Eva. The World of Food. Boston: Ginn and Company, 1970.

Mills, Nancy. Home Economists in Action. New York: Scholastic
Book Services,1968.

Nicholas, Heyne and Trilling, Lee. Art for Young America.

Peoria, Illinois: Charles A. Bennett Co., Inc., 1967.

Noeflin, Ruth* Careers in Home Economics. Toronto, Canada:
The MacMillan Company, 1970.

Peet, Louise. Young Homemaker's Equipment Guide. Ames, Iowa:
Iowa State University Press, 1970.

Pollard, Belle L. Experiences with Food. Boston: Ginn and
Company, 1964.

Starr, Mary Catherine. Management for Better Living. Boston:
0.C0 Heath and Company, 1963.










Strum, Mary Mark and Grieser, Edwina. Guide to Modern Clothing.
New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1968.

Todd, Elizabeth and Roberts, Frances. Clothes for Teens. Boston:
D.C. Heath and Company, 1969.

Wanke, Roman F.; Wyllie, Eugene 0.; Sellders, Beulah E.
Consumer Decision Making. Guide to Better Living.
Dallas: Southwestern Publishing Company, 1972.

Wilhelms, Fred; Heimerl, Ramon; and Jelley, Herbert M. Consumer
Economics. Dallas: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966.


VISUAL AIDS

Career Set, Finding Your Job. Finney Company. Att. Lee Drery,
P.O. Box 8922, Orlando, Florida. 32800.

Fabric Swatches. Fabrics Round the World, Inc. 270 West 38th
Street, New York, New York. 10018.

Flip Chart. Sears Roebuck and Company. 675 Ponce de Leon Avenue,
N.E., Atlanta, Georgia. 30308.

Hoover Home Institute, The Hoover Company. North Canton, Ohio.
44720.

Home Furnishing Kit by Kroehler. Consumer Education Division,
Kroehler Manufacturing Corporation. Department FHE-5-68,
666 Lakeshore Drive, Chicago, Illinois. $6.00. (Check
must accompany order.)


FILMS AND FILMSTRIPS

Arranging Furniture in a Girl's Room. McGraw-Hill Book Company.
Film Department,New York, New York.

Color in a Girl's Room. McGraw-Hill Book Company. Film Dept.,
33 West 42nd Street, New York, New York. 10018.

Color Newsreel. Sherwin-Williams Paint Company. (Contact your
local store)

Decorating Ideas For Your Windows. Meredith Publishing Company.
1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa.

Decorating Made Easy. Sears, Roebuck and Company. 875 Ponce
de Leon Avenue, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia. 30308.

Discovering Texture. Film Association. 11014 Santa Monica
Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.










Fabrics in a Girl's Room. McGraw-Hill Book Company. Film
Department, 330 West 41st Street, New York, New York.

Furniture Arrangement Ideas- Your Key to Good Decorating.
Meredith Publishing Company. 1716 Locust Street,
Des Moihes, Iowa.

How to Select Window Treatments. Sears Consumer Information
Services Department. 703--Public Relations, Chicago,
Illinois. 60611.

Introduction to Color. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Film Dept.
330 West 42nd Street, New York, New York. 10018.

Let the Buyer Beware. X211. Eye-Gate House, Inc. 146-01
Archer Avenue, Jamaica, New York. 11435.

Now a Word From Our Sponsor. Eye-Gate House, Inc. 146-01
Archer Avenue, Jamaica, New York. 11435.

The Size Is Right. McCalls Sewing Filmstrip Service. 114 East
31st Street, New York, New York. 10016.

The Story of Flowers. I and II, Colorado FlowerGrowers
Association, Inc. 901 Sherman, Denver, Colorado. 80203.

The World of Work-Vocational Opportunities. Eye Gate House, Inc.
School Equipment Distributors. 6 Marlborough Street,
Montgomery, Alabama.

BOOKLETS. PAMPHLETS AND MISCELLANEOUS

Betty Crooker's Flair with Frostings. General Mills, Inc., 400
Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 55440.

Brown, Helen,et al. "The Changing Roles of Women." Illinois
Teacher for Contemporary Roles. X, No.2 (CFb.,19BS-67),
24-38.

Caragher, Kay. "Free C?) Encyolopedias." Illinoia Teacher for
Contemporary Roles. XV, No. 2 CNov.-Dec.,1971), 102.

Childoraftu The How and Why Library. 1971 Edition, Vol.9, Field
Enterprises Eduoational Corporation, Merohandise Mart
Plaza, Chicago, Illinois. 80854.

Chilman, Catherine S. "Changing Sex Roles and the Quality of
Contemporary Society." Penne'sa Forum. (Fall/Winter,1970),
B9.

"Crossword Puzzle." Illinois Teacher for Contemporary Roles.
VI, No.3 (Nov., 1962), 136-137.










Decorating Ideas. Sherwin-Williams. 101 Prospect Avenue, N.W.,
Cleveland, Ohio. 44101. (Spring,1989 .

Freel, Ruth. "Broke Again." Illinois Teacher for Contemporary
Roles. XV, No 2 [Nov.-Dec.,1971), 98.

"How Can the Dual Function of Vocational Home Economics Be
Realized?" Illinois Teacher of Home Economics. V,
No. 7 [March,1962), 322.

Kleiman, Carol. "Dream the Possible Dream." The Betty Crocker
Magazine. (Jan., 1973), 46-48.

Make a Date to Decorate. Dow Chemical Company. Midland,
Michigan.

Manning, Mary Beth. "No Shoes for Tammy." Illinois Teacher
for Contemporary Roles. XV, No.2 CNov.-Dec., 1971),
100-101.

Manno, Anne. "Breads around the World." Forecast. VIII
[March, 1973), F-14.

"Marriage Mock-Up." MoCalls. (July, 1973], 22.

Smith, William M., Jr. "The Family Roles of Modern Man."
Illinois Teacher for Contemporary Roles. X, No.l
[Fall, 1966), 1-17.

Through the Looking Glass. Proctor and Gamble Company.
Box 322, Cincinnati, Ohio.

"What Do Your Students Know?" Illinois Teacher for Contemporary
Roles. V, No. 1 [Sept., 1961), 41.

Wilson, Gretchen Groth. "What are Your Attitudes?" Forum.
J.C. Penney Co., Inc. [Spring/Summer, 1973), 22-23.

Your Clothing Dollar. Household Finance Corporation.
Prudential Plaza, Chicago, Illinois. 60601.

Your Home and Furnishings Dollar. Household Finance Corporation.
Prudential Plaza, Chicago, Illinois. 60601.






































APPENDIX













APPENDIX # 1




PROFESSIONAL

Designer

Home Economist

Interior Decorator

Purchasing Agent

Dietitian


OCCUPATIONS

of

HOMEMAKER


SUPPORTIVE

Seamstress

Clothing Maintenanoe Worker

Nurse

Giftwrapper

Florist's Aide

Rug Cleaner

Drapery and Slipcover Aide

Cook

Food Demonstrator

Caterer








APPENDIX # 2
MONEY MANAGEMENT


CROSS PUZZLE

Crossword puzzles may be used as an interest approach to introduce
a unit or as a type of evaluation at the end of a unit. Students may
devise puzzles and exchange them for solving as an incentive to
increase vocabulary. Following is an example of a crossword puzzle
to be solved with terms related to money management.


Illinois Teacher of Home Eoonomioa. VI, No. 3
(Nov., 1962).







APPENDIX # 2


MONEY MANAGEMENT

GUIDE to PUZZLE
ACROSS

1. A medium of exchange
4. A process which is made up of many decision-making activities
directed toward certain goals
8. Resource affording relaxation and enjoyment
12. Money paid for the use of the government
14. What a person must be to manage money well
15. Fuel for # 10 down
16. Person responsible for my management of money
17. All that you may have after a fire in building not covered by 22
down
18. To benefit from money you should it
22. Powers to buy or borrow or trust
23. Salary or wages
24. You need to do this to get the most For your money
25. What you must do to reach goals
26. Yours and mine
27. The person responsible for your management of money
28. Amount of a charge or payment with reference to some basis
of calculation
30. An institution for receiving and lending money
31. When purchased probably represents the largest total outlay of
money in a lifetime
34. May be attained when money is well managed
38. A mental survey
39. Determine the value of
40. To put money to use by purchase or expenditure, in something
offering profitable returns

DOWN

1. A conditional conveyance of property to a creditor as security
2. A single unit or individual
3. To gain as by labor or service
5. Teen-ager
6. That left after all bills are paid; or additional expense
7. Flesh food for which money is used
9. Money on hand
10. Car
11. To guarantee against risk of loss or harm
13. Gained from planned use of money
19. A mode of transportation for the commuter
20. What you expect to attain by attending school
21. Contract, in written form, when you decide to #11 down
24. Compensation
29. That which is owed
32. What you need to assure you of having money to manage
33. Purchase
34. You may do it for a wanted item
35. Money or cash income
36. Affirmative
37. Where coins are made





APPENDIX 3
SITUATION SHOPPING CHECK LIST

Directions: After studying each shopping venture, select the best
choice or choices of market places for purchasing the
product. Place a check C ) under the name of the appro-
priate market place. Then explain the reasoning behind
your decision.

VENTURE MARKET PLACES REASONING
L
a
L -P L 0
o C >b >1 0 I
&4 0 0 4P 3 1 C 4P
0 E -< -4 L on C
4 Ca o0 4E 3
C LeO -40 3I 1 Itl O0
*.4 .L OL EL -4L LO OL
0 Dn o0 E0 -40 0-4 O
zC BP OP OP W ON *' -4
o am cI rn n _m an c an _
1. Jan needs some personal grooming
items. She has time and trans-
portation but has little money
this month. Where should she go?

2. Molly has a toddler and infant
twins. She has little time to
spare and irregular means of
transportation. One luxury she
allows herself is a good brand of
cosmetics which she can get in
spite of these problems. How
does she get it?

3. Fran wants to buy a 3-piece suit,
but has fitting problems with
average ready-made clothes. Money,
time and transportation are not
critical factors. She likes a
store where she feels less rushed
and has more personal attention.
Where should she go?

4. Pam lives in the country near a
small town. SHE has duties which
keep her busy when she's not at
school. She has saved money for
a good dress, but has limited
transportation and little time to
visit the nearest city, 60 miles
away. Where will she get the
dress?

5. Sue received a set of sheets as
a wedding present from another
city. She has adequate time and
money but laoks transportation to
go to the original store. Where
might she find matching sheets
like the wedding present?







APPENDIX # 4
FREE C?) ENCYCLOPEDIAS

Kay Caragher
Lisa graduated From high school in June. She lived in a small
town. She got a job as an aide in a hospital there. Her picture was
in the local paper with those of the other new aides. Then she began
to get calls From many salesmen.

One night, Lisa was Just Finishing the dishes when her doorbell
rang. It was a salesman. He said he was Mr. Dean From the Smith
Book Company. He wanted to show her a set of encyclopedias. Lisa
let him come in.

Mr. Dean showed her a picture of the set of books. He also gave
her a copy of one of the books to look at. Then he began his sales
pitch.He told her all the good points of the books. He then told her
this was a once-in-a-life-time offer. He would give her the $200.00
set Free if his company could use her name and home town in their ads.
Lisa didn't have a set of encyclopedias. She thought this was a good
offer. She told Mr. Dean she would accept his offer. AFter she agreed,
Mr. Dean told her she would also have to agree to keep the set up to
date. To do this, she would have to purchase the yearbook each year
For ten years. This would only cost her $33.75 a year. Lies thought
this was reasonable. She signed the agreement. Mr. Dean thanked her
and left.

Lisa was pleased with her Free books. She couldn't wait to get
them. The next day her Friend Paula came to visit her. Lisa told
Paula all about the books.

Paula said, "I have a set of encyclopedias. They aren't From the
same company but I only pay $10.00 For my yearbooks." Lisa was
amazed. Paula told Lisa to get pencil and paper and they would Figure
out how much Lisa would be paying For the ten yearbooks.

$33x.70 They Found she would be paying $337.50 in ten years. Paula
$337.50 would get ten yearbooks For $100.00. They Figured some more.
If Lisa's set cost $200.00 and the yearbooks were $10.00 a
piece, the total cost For the set and ten yearbooks would be
$300.00. Lisa was.paying $37.50 more than the books cost by
10 taking this offer.
10 Lisa said to Paula, "I never dreamed I'd be paying so much.
100 I thought I was getting the set Free. I don't want them now.
+200 They are not worth it. Do I have to take them since I signed
$300 the agreement?"
$337.50 Paula said, 0 No, you don't have to take them. There's a new
-300.00 law in our state. You can break the agreement if you do it
$ 37.50 within three days."

Lisa thanked Paula For coming over to see her. Lisa wished she
had done some Figuring before she signed the agreement. IF she had,
she wouldn't have to write a letter. The next time she would think
before she signed anything.
Caragher, Kay. 'Free ?]) Encyclopedias."
Illinois Teaoher XV, No 2C0ot., 1972].
64





APPENDIX # 5
NO SHOES FOR TAMMY
Mary Beth Manning

Shirley and Larry had had a Fight over their many bills. Shirley
was Feeling sad. She decided to cheer herself up by going shopping.
Shirley took her baby, Tammy, and drove to town. She saw a large
"Sale" sign on a dress shop window.

Shirley decided to look at the dresses on sale. She parked the
car, took Tammy, and went into the store.

"May I help you?" asked a clerk. "We have many lovely dresses
on sale."

"I really don't need a dress," answered Shirley. "I just want
to look."

"We are glad to have you look. Do you like something blue?"
asked the clerk. "Here is such a pretty one. You wear a size 10,
don't you? It will look nice with your blond hair."

"Well I really don't need a new dress," replied Shirleyj "but
it is pretty. Such a lovely shade of blue."

"Why not try it on?" asked the clerk. "You don't have to buy it.
I would like to see it on you."

Shirley decided to try on the dress. It was her size and a
perfect Fit.

"The dress is pretty," she said. "I do like it on me."

"You should buy it, my dear," urged the clerk. "The sale is
only for today. You should not pass up such a good buy."

"How much is the dress?" asked Shirley.

"Just $15.00," replied the clerk, "a real bargain. It is
marked down from $25.00."

"All right, I'll take it," decided Shirley.

She opened her purse and paid for the dress. Larry had just
cashed his paycheck the night before. Shirley had her household
money For the next two weeks.

Shirley went happily out of the store. She held Tammy in one
arm and the dress box under the other.





Manning, Mary Beth. "No Shoes for Tammy."
Illinois Teacher For Contemporary Roles.
XV, No. 2 [Nov.-Dec., 1971], 100-101.






APPENDIX # 6


BROKE AGAIN
Ruth Freel


"Two lousy dollars What a bank belanoel" said Sally to her-
self.

Sally had a reel problem. She was going to her beat Friend's
baby shower. She needed a gift.

"I wanted to give Linda something really nice for the baby,"
Sally thought. "She has been such a good Friend to me. She and
Jim don't have too much money to spend. And now I have only two
dollars What can I do with two dollars?"

Sally had graduated from high school in June. Jobs were scarce,
but she had Finally landed a Job as a checker in a super market.
Somehow her pay didn't seem to go very Far. She was broke most of
the time. Sally always wanted to be doing what her friends were
doing. One of her new Friends at the super market had talked Sally
Into going to the beach For the week-end even though she knew she
could' afford to go.

That week-end at the beach had cost her more than she had
planned on spending. Besides the cost, it had rained most of the
time and she didn't meet any cute boys. All in all, the week-end
had been a Fizzle.

Two weeks ago Sally had bought a car. All the girls she work-
ed with had cars. "Why shouldn't I have one, too?" she reasoned.
The car had taken all her savings. It had taken many hours of baby-
sitting to earn the $400.00 she had spent on the car.

"Mother warned me,tool" Sally thought. "She told me I should
wait awhile before I bought a oar."

Then came a large dentist bill. Sally's mother came to the
rescue and paid the dentist's bill. Sally had agreed to pay her
mother back in weekly payments.

"Mother is one little lady who wouldn't be in this mess," Sally
said to herself. "She always seems to be able to plan her money.
I can't let her know what a bind I am in. What can I do? I'm
supposed to be grown. And look at mel Maybe by morning I'll get an
idea."

Somehow the next morning things did not seem so bad. "Mrs.
Allard, my home economics teacher, wouldn't be stuck this way,"
Sally thought. "She had zip. Her hair was getting grey. Guess
she was pretty old-maybe 40. But she could make a lot out of
nothing. And could she ever solve problems. What would Mrs. Allard
do in a case like this? I could knit a baby Jacket if I had time.
But I don't have time."








APPENDIX # 6


Suddenly an idea came to Sally. "Why, of course," she
thought. "I did the bulletin board which said, 'It is when you
give of yourself that you truly give' I know what I'll do. I'll
buy a nice baby card and I'll write on it






Dear Linda,

I know you and Jim
will want to go out once
in awhile afterthe baby
comes. You can trust the
baby with me. A gift
for the baby-to-be
So, I, Sally, promise with warment wishes
you twelve hours of free For every happiness
baby sitting.

With love,

Sally
















Freel, Ruth. "Broke Again," Illinois Teacher
For Contemporary Roles. XV, No.2 [Nov.-Dec., 1971).












APPENDIX # 7


OPERATOR'S CERTIFICATE


Each student, after passing the written examination and the practical
examination, is given an operator's license.



Practical Examination


Name
Threading Machine
1. Thread upper part
2. Thread bobbin
3. Pick up thread
4. Place threads


Starting to Sew
1. Place material under
pressure foot
2. Exert gradual pressure
on control
3. Start using balance wheel


Sewing
1.
2.
3.


Make a straight seem
Make a curved seam
Make a square corner


.1


Removing Material
1. Slow down speed
2. Place thread take-up
at highest point
3. Pull material back
4. Leave thread 4 to 6


Using
1.
2.
3.


Machine
Open machine
Wind bobbin
Close machine


inches


Stitching
1. Sew 10 stitches per inch
2. Sew 12 stitches per inch
3. Sew 16 stitches per inch


This Certifies That


is licensed to operate a sewing machine
in school.

Date Issued



Official


'


"







APPENDIX # B
HOME--BUSINESS CHART


FAMILY


1. Signing contract
(marriage]
2. Locating a place
3. Setting up objectives

1. Establishing roles
2. Establishing eco-
nomic base credit
(loans)

1. Needing love
2. Needing a sense of
belonging

1. Providing education
2. Providing work
experiences
3. Creating hobbies

1. Planning For resources
2. Buying and selling
goods
3. Buying and providing
services

1. Preparing and caring
For housing, children,
clothing, Food, and
protection

1. Getting along with
others
2. Accepting responsi-
bilities

1. Distributing
products (money, Foods
clothing)
2. Changing jobs
3. Expanding

1. Meeting emergencies
2. Paying taxes
3. Budgeting
4. Planning For retirement


COMPARE WITH


ESTABLISHING
THE
ENTERPRISE


MANAGING THE
SYSTEM



RESEARCHING
HUMAN NEEDS


DEVELOPING
GOODS AND
SERVICES


PREPARING TO
PRODUCE GOODS
AND SERVICES



PRODUCING GOODS
AND SERVICES



SELLING IN THE
FAMILY OR INDUSTRY




DISTRIBUTING
GOODS AND
SERVICES



CONTROLLING
PROFITS AND LOSSES
(problems in the
Family and
business)


Signing contracts
Locating a place
Setting up
objectives (goals]

Establishing roles
Establishing eco-
nomic base(credit
and loans)

Meeting emotional
needs


Providing training
programs


1. Planning For
resources
2. Buying goods and
services


1. Producing goods
and services



1. Getting along
with others
2. Accepting
responsibilities
3. Selling products

1. Getting products
to market
2. Changing location
3. Expanding

1. Meeting emergencies
(strikes, Fires,
budgets, taxes,
accidents,
hospitalization,
retirements)
























































































DEPARTMENT
.OF EDUCATION
S Tallahassee. Florida

S -LOYD.T CHRISTIAN
COMMISSIONER


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