• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Occupational opportunities and...
 Tasks common to occupations in...
 Exploratory experiences
 Occupational outlook in clothing...
 Evaluation of individual interest...
 Bibliography
 Appendix
 Back Cover






Group Title: Bulletin Florida Dept. of Education
Title: A Resource guide for clothing management, production and service occupations
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096231/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Resource guide for clothing management, production and service occupations
Alternate Title: Exploration of clothing management, production and service occupations
Physical Description: iv, 75 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Department of Education
Donor: unknown ( endowment )
Publisher: Florida Department of Education
Place of Publication: Tallhassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subject: Clothing trade -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida, Dept. of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Education Section.
General Note: Cover title: Exploration of clothing management, production and service occupations.
General Note: "Florida pre-vocational home economics education."
General Note: "October 1973 ... reprint 1974.
General Note: Florida Department of Education Bulletin no. 75 H-16
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096231
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22331525

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Occupational opportunities and requirements
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Tasks common to occupations in clothing management, production and service occupations
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Exploratory experiences
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Occupational outlook in clothing management, production and services
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Evaluation of individual interest in clothing management, production and service occupations
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Bibliography
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Appendix
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
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        Page 71
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        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Back Cover
        Page 77
        Page 78
Full Text















A RESOURCE GUIDE


FOR


CLOTHING MANAGEMENT,


PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS






STATE OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION


HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION SECTION


This reprint of a public document was promulgated at an annual cost
of $215.73 or $.23 to provide direction and resource materials
for Florida Home Economics teachers who are instructing in the pre-
vocational program.


FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS BULLETIN MAY BE SECURED THROUGH
MISS ALLIE FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR, HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION, KNOTT
BUILDING, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304










S7 5-, 0 0 `7 75-
36 OO 77 76-











INTR DUCTION


The pre-vocational program in Florida has three major purposes:


To provide students with an orientation to the many career opportunities

available in the world of work.

To assist studetns in developing personal competencies important to

success in almost any occupation.

To provide students with exploration experiences in occupational clusters

according to their choice.



This guide, Exploration of Clothing Management, Production and Service

Occupations, has been designed to provide assistance in teaching course code

#2742.

COURSE STANDARDS


Section: Home Economics Education

Accreditator Title: Exploration of Clothing Management, Production
and Service Occupations

Accreditator Code No.: 2742 U.S.O.E. No.: 09.0202

Course Objective: To provide students with opportunities to explore a
broad range of clothing management, production and service occupations
and concepts that relate to the clothing industry and self-employment.

Course Description: This course is designed to provide opportunities
for exploration of a broad range of clothing management, production and
service occupations. Major concepts of the course include personality
expression through dress; management of a clothing business; identifica-
tion of clothing occupations and the tasks involved in each; use of
creative abilities in sewing; understanding art principles as used in
.design of fabrics and garments; clothing market; employment opportunities;
legislation and agencies; and consumer concerns. Instruction includes hands-
on experiences which are basic to specialized proficiencies needed for
employment.

Teacher-Student Ratio: 1 to 20

Facilities: Refer to VTAE Facility Standards Bulletin





SEPTEMBER 1973


RECOMMENDED PRE-VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION

The Schema below follows the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Division guidelines for pre-vocational education


A STUDENT AT THE
SEVENTH GRADE LEVEL
MAY ENROLL IN


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO SCHOOL
OFFERINGS


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12-18 WEEKS)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
NINTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO
SCHOOL OFFERINGS,
.ANY OF THESE NOT
PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED IN



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12, 18 or 36 WEEKS)


* COURSE TITLES FOR HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS:
EXPLORATION OF THE OCCUPATION OF HOMEMAKING
EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE
SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


** EXPLORATION OF HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS
INCLUDES ALL OF THE ABOVE CLUSTERS


Note: A combination of these two courses could be equal to one semester of home economics reported under
code # 2701.


ORIENTATION
TO
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONS
(6-9 WEEKS)

AND MAY ALSO ENROLL IN
PERSONAL
CAREER ORIENTATION

(6-9 WEEKS)

Course is a part of
co m.prehensive
orientation involving
other occupational
categories and may be
a segment of a wheel.
(see note)











ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


PARTICIPANTS:


Kristi Speaker, Home Economics
Teacher, Apopka Jr. High School,
Apopka.


Carolyn Jones, Home Economics
Teacher, Crescent City Jr.-Sr.
High School, Crescent City.


Martha Lemons


Edna Warner


Elaine Muncy


EDITOR:


DIRECTOR:


TYPIST:












TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . .

Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . .


Concept I

Concept II


Concept III

Concept IV

Concept V


- Occupational Opportunities and Requirements .

- Tasks Common to Occupations in Clothing . .
Management, Production and Service Occupations

- Exploratory Experiences . . . . . .

- Occupational Outlook . . . . . . .

- Evaluation of Individual Interest in Clothing
Management, Production and Service Occupations


Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . .

Appendix . . . . . . . . . . .. .







..!lPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements
U I, -. CONCEPTT


OBJECTIVES


1. rhe students will
investigate the
job opportunities
in clothing
management
Production and
service
occupations.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Take the Pretest in the Appendix or devise
one of your own. Appendix #1
2. bring to class want ads from newspapers to
determine available jobs in clothing.
3. View and discuss bulletin board ideas.
Appendix #2
4. Use the grab bag technique. Draw a slip
of paper on which will be listed an occu-
pation. Use role-playing to illustrate the
occupation while classmates try to guess
which job the student is pantomining.
5. Play "Who Am I Today?" Appendix #3
Each student will have a placard over his
neck representing a career. The placard
hangs to the back so the student wearing
it cannot see what career he has. He
must ask questions which can be answered
with a yes or no. Examples: Do I work
with people? Do I work with my hands?
Does my work involve special training?
Must I go to school to get training?


6.
7.
8.


Create posters on fashion careers.
Play the Catco game. Appendix #3
Select for individualized study an occu-
pation of one's interest in clothing,
management production or services. Use
the library or provide resources in the
classroom. Report to the class by use of
panels, class discussions, symposiums or
role-playing.


9. Read and discuss Chapter 2 in Opportunities
in Clothing by McDermott.
10. Use guest speakers or tape-recorded
speeches of resource people from various
fields to discuss advantages and dis-
advantages of their jobs.
11. View film strips and films to study careers
in fashion buying, merchandising and
fashion modeling. Share with classmates
and teacher personal experiences involved
while shopping in various clothing or
fabric departments.






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


A. Merchandising, Fashion and Retailing
Occupations


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.


Salesperson
Stock Clerk
Comparison Shopper
Model
Buyer
Assistant Buyer
Fashion Illustrator
Showroom or Window Display Manager
Designer
Fashion Reporter
Bridal Consultant
Department Manager
Wardrobe distress


B. Industrial Occupations
1. Designing Room Occupations
a. Designer
b. Sample Stitcher
c. Pattern Maker
d. Pattern Grader
e. Laboratory Technician
f. Weaver
g. Researcher
2. Cutting Room Occupations
a. Hand Spreader
b. Machine Spreader
c. Marker
d. Cutter
e. Assembler and Bundler
f. Fitter
g. Floor Girl or Floor Boy
3. Sewing Room Occupations
a. Sewing Machine Operator
b. Inspector
c. Checker
d. Trimmer
e. Clipper

4. Tailoring Occupations
a. Tailor
b. Dressmaker
c. Bushelman
5. Pressing Occupations
a. Under Presser
b. Finish Presser


RESOURCES


Appendix #1
"Pretest"
Newspapers
Bulletin Board:
"Mobile"

Lemmon, Louise.
Fashion Careers.

Siegel, Margot.
Looking Forward to a
Career in Fashions.


Appendix /3
"Catco Game"


McDermott, Norris.
Opportunities in Clothing,
pp. 50-42.




Resource Persons:
1. Sales person in fabric
or ready-to-wear shop.
2. Worker in garment
factory.
3. Self-employed dress-
maker.
4. Alterationist in
ready-to-wear shop.
5. Trainee model from
fashion school.
6. Student in on-the-job
training program.


I







CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES

12. Dramatize the role of a salesman, store
manager or model.
13. Play the Scramble Gram in Merchandising
Careers. Appendix #4
14. Take a field trip to a nearby clothing
factory where the entire process can be
viewed. (If this cannot be done, then
you may be able to get your county A-V
department to make a film of the entire
process to be used in the classroom.)
15. Use the lap packet on industrial process.
Appendix #5
16. Distribute handouts covering careers.
17. Make local field trips to selected shops
and businesses such as dry-cleaning
establishments, garment factories,
department stores, fabric shops, and
laundries.
18. Acquire resource persons from the
businesses listed in #16 to speak to
students.
19. Work in groups to make maps of a community
area for use in locating businesses.
20. Make a large size map for a bulletin
board but keep smaller maps in the
folders for individual use.
21. Explain and discuss maps and locations
of businesses.
22. Mark on the large map with colored pins
the location of area businesses.
23. Do a written assignment on how available
clothing service centers are to
individual homes.
24. Contact home economists in business as
resource persons for class.
25. Use tapes of resource persons who are
unable to visit classes.
26. Conduct a buzz session between teacher
and students concerning the teaching
profession.
27. Invite an extension agent to be the
guest speaker.
28. Obtain samples of work compiled by pro-
fessional home economists such as pattern
books and extension pamphlets.
29. Take "Who Am I" quiz. Appendix #6







CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


6. Shipping and Service Department
Occupations
a. Repairman
b. Shipper
c. Packer
d. Supervisor


C. Sewing Occupation
1. Sorter
2. Checker
3. Presser
4. Alterationist
5. Seamstress


6. Draper
7. Slipcoverer
8. Laundry or Dry-
Cleaning Operator


D. Home Economists in Teaching and
Business Occupations
1. Public Schools
2. Adult Education
3. Colleges
4. Government Supported Agencies
5. Private Business Classes
6. Vocational Education
7. County Home Economics Departments
8. State Home Economics Departments
9. Major Appliance and Department
Stores
10. Fabric Shops
11. Hotels

It is evident from materials we have
received and from talking to clothing
buyers that clothing manufacturers are in
the process of standardizing all sizes.
Many customers are going to have diffi-
culty in being properly fitted when the
number of sizes available is greatly
diminished.
When women lose the great variety of
sizes now available in ready-made
garments, the demand for custom dress
making will increase.
There is even now a tremendous demand
for seamstresses and alterationists to
adapt the standard sizes to those hard-
to-fit people.
There will always be persons who desire
to have their clothes custom male. As
long as these conditions exist, there
will be a demand for clothing manage-
ment, production, and service
occupations.


Filmstrips:
1. A Career in Retail
Buying, #83731
2. A Career in Fashion
Distribution, #83356.
5. Retailing Serves the
Consumer, #82304.
4. Careers in Fashion
Merchandising, #3404.

Appendix #4
Scramble Gram
"Merchandising Careers"
Appendix #5
LAP PacKet
"Susan Gets a Summer Job"
Occupational Outlook
Handbook, pp. 621-629.
Pamphlet:
Career Opportunities for
You in the Fabulous World
of Fabrics


Bulletin Board:
Local Map
"Jobs in the Community" or
"What Our Community Has to
Offer"







Guest Speakers or Tapes

Pamphlet:
Careers at Simplicity


Professional Works:
Pattern Books, Extension
Pamphlets and Guide Books
Appendix #6
Quiz
"Who Am I?"







CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


I


2. The students
will identify a
variety of
occupational
requirements
including dif-
ferent levels
of knowledge
and skills in
the area of
clothing
management,
production, and
service occura-
tions.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Use the mobile in the Appendix. Outline
the occupation you prefer. Appendix #2
2. Distribute handouts on job titles with
description of educational requirements
and approximate salaries. (Teacher may
add to the list, since this is only a
sampling.) Appendix #7
5. Invite industrial executives or the
guidance counselor in your school or
nearby colleges to acquaint you with the
requirements of various occupations.
4. Invite experienced on-the-job students
to tell the class about their jobs.
5. Tape the students' voices as they discuss
their impressions of the various
occupations and their requirements.
6. Follow the taping by a playback. Clarify
any misconceptions you may have had
concerning the occupations.
7. Study the training requirements on the
handout. Appendix #8
8. Take the quiz on training requirements.
Appendix #8







CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Educational requirements and qualifica-
tions will vary for different careers.
The more complex and responsible the
job or position, the greater the amount
of training and experience is needed.

A consistent improvement of personal
qualities and job skills is necessary
to hold and advance in one's job.
I. Textile and Clothing Occupations
A. Occupations Requiring High School
Training
1. Fitter or Seamstress in
Clothing Factory
2. Clothing Service Aide
3. Dressmaker's Assistant
4. Dressmaker, Self-employed
5. Worker in a Laundry-Cleaning
establishmentt
6. Worker in a Garment Factory
7. Manager of a Coin Operated
Business
8. Sales Person in a Ready-to-
Wear Shop
9. Sewing Machine Demonstrator
10. Fashion Model
B. Occupations Requiring Advanced
Training or Higher Education
1. Research Assistant in a
Textile Laboratory
2. Textile Designer
5. Buyer in a Ready-to-Wear
Department
4. Fashion Designer
5. Fashion Journalist
6. Consultant to Manufacturers
of Laundry Products and
Equipment
7. Manager of a Ready-to-Wear Shop

II. Combination of Home Economics Areas
a. Teacher f. TV Demon-
b. Extension Worker strator
c. Editor, Publisherg. Homemaking
d. Advertising Consultant
Editor or Writer h. Writer of
e. Radio or TV Women's
Coordinator Columns and
Homemaking
Books


RESOURCES


Appendix #2
"Mobile"


Appendix #7
"Job Titles"





Guest Speakers





Tape Recordings




Appendix #8
"Training Requirements"


a







CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Occupations in Clothing Management,
SUCONCPT Production and Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


-j


1. The students will
demonstrate
knowledge of the
use and care of
equipment in the
clothing
management,
production, and
service
occupations.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Use your fellow classmates rather than
diagrams to illustrate lines and their
effect on your clothing. Wear plain
clothing of a dark color. Use grosgrain
ribbon or masking tape of varying widths
to do the different examples of lines.
2. Use magazines and catalogues to find
picture samples of line designs.
3. View the filmstrip, "Line in Your
Wardrobe."
4. Make a flower color wheel from construc-
tion paper. Primary colors may be illus-
trated with largest petals, the secondary
colors with the next largest petals and
intermediate colors with the smallest
petals. Construct your own designs if
you prefer.
5. Decide if your favorite color is the
best color for you to use by using fabric
swatches.
6. Take the quiz based on the handout, "Color
Definitions." Appendix #9
7. Place on the flannel board, one at a time,
six-inch circles of the primary and
secondary colors. Indicate what each color
means to you. Example: Red represents
a. hot g. excitement
b. fire h. danger
c. war i. vigor


d. love
e. stop
f. anger


j.
k.
1.


8. Blindfold half the students in the class.
Ask each to tell the texture of various
objects by touching them. Ask a second
group to specify the textures by merely
looking at the objects.
Compare the descriptions of the two
groups. Perceive how touch and sight
are related in describing textures.






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


It is suggested that teachers first
teach the tasks in each occupational
cluster and then proceed directly to
exploratory or hands-on experiences.
For example: First teach elements of
design, care of garments, labels, fibers
and fabrics, sociological and psychol-
ogical aspects of clothes. Then explore
the area of fashion, merchandising, and
retailing through related learning
experiences such as role-playing, shop
and selling procedures and field trips
to selected stores. After completing
this section return to the second
cluster and repeat the same process.
Correlation between tasks and explor-
atory experiences should provide more
interest for the students involved.


Fashion, Merchandising, and Retailing

Simple Elements of Design
1. All designs are created through
the use of line, form, color
and texture.
2. Clothing should be chosen
with the above factors in mind.


We can communicate with color as well
as with words.





Tactile
Texture is related to the sensation of
touch.


Visual
Texture is related to how one "thinks"
something would feel.


RESOURCES


4-


Old Magazines and Catalogues

Filmstrip:
Line in Your Wardrobe

McDermott and Norris.
Opportunities in Clothing,
pp. 43-92

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 255-265


Clayton, Nanalee.
Young Living,
pp. 32-68



Appendix #9
"Color Definitions"

Appendix #10
"Color Quiz"

Color Samples or
Fabric Swatches

Color Samples to Be
Used on the Flannel
Board

Bulletin Board:
"Feeling is Seeing"
(Attach to a bulletin
board a variety of
materials such as
fabric, balloon or
foil which students
may feel.)







CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Occupations in Clothing Management,
SUB-CONCEPT Production and Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


9. Make a list of texture words. Suggestions
are:


a. nail file
b. sticky tape
c. fake fur
d. styrofoam
e. waxed wood
10. Give your emotional
swatches possessing
properties:
a. even
b. uneven
c. rough
d. smooth
e. heavy
f. light
g. soft


f. marble
g. rubberized mat
h. wet clay
i. tissue paper

reaction to fabric
the following


h. hard
i. elastic
j. stable
k. fine
1. coarse
m. cold
n. warm


11. Distribute and study the handout entitled
"Care Labels."
12. Work in groups to check the hangtags on
your clothing. Read the "Care Instructions."
Determine the fiber content and read the
brand names. Appendix #11
13. Play the "Fabric Scramble Gram."
Appendix #12
14. Compile a simple pertinent vocabulary
list for this unit.
15. Unravel samples of fabrics to examine
yarns and fibers.
16. Use posters to show the manufacturing
processes of fabrics.
17. Distribute colorful boxes with labeled
fabric samples inside. Examine, learn
common names and answer these questions
about each sample:
a. Is it woven or knitted?
b. Is it suited to our climate?
c. For what activities would it be
best suited?
d. Do you have garments made of this
fabric?
18. Pick a fabric to buy and then explain
reasons for the choice.
19. Play the "Fabric Game, Sons and Daughters."
Appendix #13






CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Some of the physical properties of
texture can be related to certain
emotions.

Care Labels are valuable to all persons
in any of the Clothing Management,
Production, and Service Occupations
and to the consumer.

Many labels on hangtags now give you
information such as:
1. fiber content
2. size
3. brand names
4. shrinkage expectancy
5. price
6. special finishes
7. care suggestions

A working knowledge of textiles is
necessary to the worker and customer.
A fiber is a hairlike substance from
which yarns are made. The performance
of each fiber is dependent upon physical
and chemical properties.


Yarn Structure
A yarn is a grouping of fibers into a
continuous strand.

Fabric Construction
Fabric is made by assembling fibers
and yarns.

The steps in making most cloth from
natural fibers
1. fibers to yarn
2. yarn to fabric

The steps in making most cloth from
synthetics
1. fluid to filaments
2. staples to yarn
3. yarn to fabric

Knit fabrics stretch and woven fabrics
do not.

The common names of fabrics may be
helpful in consumer identification
and use.


Suggested Fabrics:
Tweed, Satin, Velvet,
Terrycloth, Tricot,
Bonded Knit, Lace,
Brocade, Burlap,
Organdy, Suede, Lame,
Spandex, Fake Fur.

Handout or Transparency







Pamphlet:
Care Labels Can Save
You Trouble and Money

Appendix #11
"Look at the Label"

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,


pp. 272-275.


Appendix #12
"Fabric Scramble Gram"
Kit:
J. C. Penney Company
Understanding Today' s
Textiles
(Contains filmstrips,
care of textiles, a set
of textile cartoons)
Fabric Samples
Charts
Consult any encyclopedia
Kit:
American Textile
Manufacturers.
Textile Teaching Kit
Appendix #13
Fabric Game
"Sons and Daughters"
Appendix #14
"Patch Work of Textiles"


----








CONCEPT II- Tasks Common to Occupations in Clothing Management,
SUB-CONCEPT Production and Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


20. View the filmstrip, Clothing Communicates.
21. Model your favorite outfit in the class-
room. (These may be worn or brought to
school depending on the dress code in
school. These garments do not have to
be made by the students.)
22. Stage the models. Write descriptions
of garments suitable for a fashion show.
(If the class is large and all students
cannot participate in the fashion show,
some students may write a report
acceptable for use in a newspaper.)
23. Select a current "designer" and consult
library resources for making a report
to the class on "secrets of success."
(For the more advanced student who is
interested)
24. Write or design possible ads that might
be used by local stores on radio, TV or
in newspapers. (optional)
25. Display briefly a tray of sewing
equipment before each individual. Ask
each one to write down all the articles
he/she remembered seeing. Give a prize
as an incentive for the most observant
person. Discuss the items on the tray.






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Posture and carriage influence the
appearance of the garment.


Industrial Basic Tools
1. Pattern
2. Seam Ripper
3. Bobbin
4. Pins
5. Tape Measure
6. Needles
7. Notions (thread, zipper, buttons,
snaps)
8. Scissors
9. Fabric
10. Tailor's chalk
11. Machine


Correct tools affect the quality of
work, construction, speed and appearance
of the finished garment.


I


RESOURCES


4


Filmstrip:
Clothing Communicates


Barclay, Champion
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 274-275, 279.


Appendix #15
Bulletin Board
"Tools of the Trade"







CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Occupations in Clothing Management,
SUB-CONCEPT Production and Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


26. Set out a tray of sewing items. Look
at each item and then explain what each
is and its use.
27. Demonstrate various ways of marking and
cutting material.
28. Practice using the electric scissors.
29. Visit a place of business where marking
and cutting materials are done.
30. Compare operation of commercial equipment
to home clothing equipment.
31. Observe the instructor as she threads
the machine, stops and starts the machine,
guides the fabric, winds the bobbin and
backstitches.
32. Practice under the instructor's super-
vision the operations as listed in
Activity #31.
33. Award to those who can perform the tasks
as listed in Activity #31 a "Driver's
License." Appendix #16
54. Bring to class cloth samples. Identify
the selvage edges, bias, lengthwise and
crosswise grain of the material. Save
these samples for future use.
35. Discuss the tools and skills of an alter-
ationist.
36. Discuss the tasks involved in the
occupation of alterationist and seamstress.
37. Plan to observe an alterationist at work
or observe a teacher demonstration.
38. Use paper patterns for basic alteration
practices. Examples of simple alterations
are
a. redrawing darts.
b. shortening or lengthening
waistlines, sleeves or hems.
39. Observe mending procedures performed by
the instructor.
40. Repair or alter garments in class using
simple methods such as changing the hem,
applying buttons and fasteners and
mending rips and tears.






CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Practice in the use of the sewing
machine contributes to accuracy and
speed. These are valuable assets
which aid in industrial careers.

The quality of construction is related
to the use and care of the sewing
machine at home and in industry.

Planning for individual and group
responsibilities will make the sewing
experience easier and more enjoyable.



Students need to know the difference
between ironing and pressing. Pressing
is the up and down movement; ironing is
one continuous back and forth motion.

Establish the "press as you sew" habit;
it helps to insure a better finished
product.


(Teacher may want to cover some
aspects of ironing and pressing
time.)


safety
at this


Sewing Services

Clothing Construction Skills

The students need to understand the
following fabric vocabulary:
1. Selvage
2. Bias
3. Crosswise and filling threads
4. Lengthwise and warp threads


Field trip to see
commercial and home
equipment.




Bulletin Board:
"Thread It Right"
(Oversized cutout
of sewing machine
head with threading
steps using yarn.)


Appendix #16
"Driver's License"

Fabric Samples







Alterationist at
work

Patterns

Display of Notions

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley and Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 297, 341.







CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Occupations in Clothing Management,
SUB-CONCEPT Production and Service


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


41. Select a student to start a story or
conversation dealing with an occupation
or area of home economics. Use a spool
on which have been wound different
lengths of yarn. These lengths of yarn
will indicate how long each student is
to speak. The first student starts
slowly pulling the first thread and
speaking. When he reaches the end of
the thread, the second student continues
the story as he pulls on the second
thread. The exercise is completed when
the spool of yarn is unwound.
42. Observe the instructor as she demonstrates
the techniques involved in giving a good
demonstration.
43. Present a skit showing good and poor
demonstration techniques.
44. Write a paragraph beginning with "I like
working with people because" or "I
would rather work by myself because."
Collect the unsigned paragraphs. Read
each one to the class. Guess who wrote
each.
45. Play the scramble gram,"Professional
Fashion Designers." Appendix #17






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


A. Seamstress and/or Alterationist
1. Alters ready-to-wear garments as
instructed.
2. Rips stitches from darts and seams
of sections to be sewed.
3. Operates sewing machine to sew
ripped sections to customer's
measurements.
4. Sews sections of garments such as
hems, sleeves or lining, using
needle and thread.
5. Presses garments using steam iron.
6. Fits garments on customers.
B. Before one is ready to alter a
pattern, a basic knowledge of pattern
markings is necessary. Include
symbols for these:
1. place on fold
2. straight of grain
3. cutting line
4. stitching line
5. darts
6. notches
C. Basic pattern alterations include
1. adjusting darts at bustline.
2. lengthening or shortening
hemlines and sleeves.
5. adjusting crotches, hiplines and
waistlines.
4. adjusting back waistlines.
D. Home Economists
1. are creative.
2. are effective speakers.
5. can demonstrate effectively.
4. enjoy working with people.
5. are self-motivated.
6. possess a broad background in all
related areas.
E. Professional Home Economists include
1. teachers.
2. extension agents.
5. home economists in private
business.
4. consultants.
5. demonstrators,


RESOURCES


4.


Filmstrip:
Fashion Design









Appendix #17
Scramble Gram
"Professional Fashion
Designers"








CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES

1. The students
will explore
tasks by con-
structing pro-
jects related
to skills needed
by persons in
the clothing
management,
production and
service
occupations.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Plan and prepare notebooks or folders,
individual fashion shows on cards, or
posters of a fashion show. (By this
activity students are coordinating a
fashion show, selecting which merch-
andise will be displayed, creating dis-
plays and doing other activities.)
2. Plan a classroom fashion show in which
the students model their favorite outfits.
3. Divide the class into groups to plan
scripts, staging music and the final
presentation. Write the scripts on the
backs of the posters to eliminate confusion.
4. Invite other teachers and parents to the
show.
5. Allocate a certain amount of money to each
student based on his imaginary income.
Allow each to go on a "shopping spree"
for clothing. Follow the guide lines for
spending as furnished by the teacher.
Stay within the budget.
6. Invite a fashion coordinator to visit the
class to explain job responsibilities.
7. Play the scramble gram, "Milady's Ward-
robe." Appendix #18
8. Write your own contracts using the form
found in the content. Below is a sample
contract:
I, promise to
construct a b beginning
and completing .
I agree to bring my own materials,
sew only during class time, and do
my own work. In payment for my work,
I will receive a grade based upon
the workmanship of my product and
how well I honored the stipulations
of my contract.
Signature of Student
Signature of Teacher
9. Work in the laboratory to construct
personal sewing project.






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


A. Merchandising, Fashion, Retailing
Related Occupations
1. Window and Store Display Person
2. Designer
3. Fashion Coordinator
4. Buyer
5. Model
6. Fashion Reporter
7. Wardrobe Mistress
8. Sales Person
9. Stock Clerk
10. Comparison Shopper
11. Department Store Manager

B. Sewing Services Related Occupations
1. Front Office Employee
2. Checker and Sorter
3. Stain Remover
4. Alterationist
5. Washing Machine Operator
6. Dryer Operator
7. Folder
8. Presser Ironer
9. Packager and Hanger
10. Sales Slip Preparer
A seamstress makes a verbal contract
with her customer. She agrees to
fitting dates and completion dates. For
this reason, teachers should teach
students to prepare written contracts
promising their intentions.
Ideas for personal sewing projects to
relate to occupational seamstress:
1. Shoulder bags 5. Hats and belts
2. Tank tops (may incorporate
3. Ponchos knitting, macra-
4. Unlined polyester me, crocheting.)
knit vest 6. Wall hangings
Ideas for demonstrations:
1. Removing stains
2. Preparing a hangtag
3. Threading machine
4. Winding a bobbin
5. Starting and stopping the machine
6. Hemming a dress
7. Pressing a seam
8. Hand washing delicate items
9. Taking measurements


RESOURCES


Fashion Magazines
Pattern Books
Catalogues


Favorite Outfits
of Students

Props and Scripts







Catalogues




Guest Speaker:
Fashion Coordinator


Appendix #18
"Milady's Wardrobe"

McDermott and Norris.
Opportunities in Clothing,
pp. 95-148.

Clayton, Nanalee.
Young Living,
pp. 175, 178, 208.

Textile Handbook,
pp. 72-90

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, and Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 295-308.


d








CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


2. The students 1. Conduct a class discussion on the questions
will role-play listed in the content concerning the
various positions organization of a company.
found in a typical 2. Elect a board of directors and officers
company. for the class company.
3. Discuss the finances involved in setting
up a company and decide upon the stock
certificates. (cost, design, how many to
sell)
4. Conduct a brainstorming session to decide
on the name of the company and the items
to be produced. Example:
If the product is a frog, the company's
name might be "Croak, Inc."
Appendix # 19
5. Sell shares of company stock.
6. Agree on a limited time for purchasing
shares.
7. Make a sample product. In this way the
student has some experience with all of
the assembly line and can make a decision
as to what job he can do best and likes
the best. Appendix #20
8. Start assembly line production of frogs
or other products.
(Ideas for Projects)
a. ien's Ties (stretch fabric)
b. Pillows
c. Bean Bag Frogs
d. Shoe Bags
e. Pajama Bags
f. Coin Purses
g. Aprons
h. Baby Bibs
i. Shoulder Bags
j. Wall Hangings
k. Wrist Pin Cushions
1. Mobiles or Other Toys
m. Appliques
n. Stuffes Animals (Frogs, Lady Bugs,
Monkeys, Mice)






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Organization of a company
1. What is a company?
2. What is needed to establish a
company?
3. What officers are needed for a
company?
4. How is a company financed?
5. How do you sell stock in a company?
For her own records, the teacher is
encouraged to make a form for company
officials to use when selling shares.
It should include: serial number of
share, name of purchaser, date, number
of shares bought, amount per share,
total money paid.

A. Design Room Occupations
1. Fashion Designer
2. Textile Designer
3. Artist
4. Pattern Maker
5. Pattern Grader
6. Sample Stitcher
B. Procedure
1. Sketch your design
2. Make your pattern
3. Stitch your sample

A. Cutting Room Occupations
1. Hand Spreader
2. Marker
3. Pinner
4. Piece Maker
B. Procedures
1. Lay ten inch strips of material
right sides together, match, cut
edges evenly.
2. Trace around cardboard pattern
.with pencil or pen.
3. Space, alternating the heads to
conserve fabric.
4. Place five pins, one in each arm,
one in each leg, and one in head.
5. Cut the frogs apart leaving enough
room for seam allowance.


RESOURCES


Orange County
Industrial Arts
Curriculum Guide.
Elements of Industry


Stock Company Information
Company's Name,
Price of Stock,
Date, Officers,
Signature, Owner's
Name, Company Emblem.


Appendix #19
"Example of Stock
Certificate"




Appendix #20
"Sample Patterns"

Cunningham.
Singer Sewing Book-
The Complete Guide
to Sewing.

Comstock, Nanina.
McCalls Handicrafts.

Periodical:
Forecast,
October 1972, pp. 35-40.

Pamphlets:
1. McCall's Have Fun
With Felt
2. Make It a Shoulder
Bag
3. Tool Storage -
Sports Car Style
4. The Sun's Up and
Shining
5. PJ Bag and Happy
Face Coin Purse


1


I







CONCEPT IV Occupational Outlook in Clothing Management,
SUB-CONCEPT Production and Services
SUB-CONCEPT


1. The students will
discover from
available data
the future
promise of
employment in
the Clothing
Management,
Production and
Service
Occupations.


1. Divide into groups to research for future
outlook in various categories of care
and service occupations.

2. Present to the class by way of skits or
oral reports the results of the research.
Create visuals to accompany the reports.






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Teacher will research materials available
to find information on occupational out-
look for each career covered. (Outlooks
below)
Modeling a most glamourous occupation.
The number of people desiring to enter
modeling far exceeds the number of
openings. However, there is always work
for an outstanding model.
One possessing good grooming, poise,
an attractive figure, energy and plenty
of determination can become a successful
model.
Modeling will remain most competitive
through the 1970's with most new jobs
created because present models are too
old or they have been seen too many times
Male models may be employed as long
as twenty years. Female models are em-
ployed on an average of eight years.
Employment is not always permanent for
either.
Apparel Outlook Employment is expected
to increase moderately during the 1970's.
Opportunities will occur due to increase
in industry and the number of experi-
enced workers who will be leaving. The
large turnover is due to the fact four
out of five workers are women. Many
leave to marry and raise families. It
is estimated that 74,000 jobs are pro-
vided annually due to the deaths and re-
tirements of the large number of older
workers employed by the industry.
More clothing will be needed because
of increased population, availability of
more spending money, and a greater
amount of leisure time.
Merchanized equipment and other labor
saving devices will result in greater
output per worker. Some examples are
machines that position needles and turn
threads automatically. These machines
also position fabric pieces, stitch the
fabric and remove and stock completed
pieces.
Sewing machine operators will be in
greatest demand. Right now many tailors
are in demand and mechanics are needed
to operate these new machines.
Skilled personnel such as sample
stitchers and pattern makers are also
needed.


T


RESOURCES


4.


Encyclopedia of
Careers and Voca-
tional Guidance.
Vol. I, pp. 102-105,
681-692.
Vol. II, pp. 104-105,
126-128, 420-423,
580-581.


Siegal, Margot.
Looking Forward to
A Career in Fashion.



Occupational Out-
look Handbook.
1972-73 Edition,
pp. 525, 627, 245.
If copies are desired
write:
Bureau of Labor
Statistics, U. S.
Dept. of Labor,
1371 Peachtree St.,
NE, Atlanta,
Georgia 50309.



Cooper, Joseph D.
A Woman's Guide to
Part Time Jobs,
pp. 55, 240.







CONCEPT V Evaluation of Individual Interest in Clothing
SUB-CONCEPT Management, Production and Service Occupations
SUB-CONCEPT '


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
evaluate jobs in
terms of working
conditions,
immediate
rewards, long-
range rewards
and his/her
personal values
and goals.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Research the ways that your community
affects the available job opportunities.
Write a paper on the findings.
2. Discuss the class findings on how the
community affects the available job
opportunities and how the job
opportunities affect the community.
3. Bring to class listings in local news-
papers of job preferences in clothing
management, production and service
occupations.
4. Investigate the career in which you
are most interested.
5. Prepare a collage reflecting your
evaluation of the career you chose to
investigate.
6. Make a room display of the posters.
7. Evaluate each other's posters.
8. Take the Post Test as found in the
Appendix. Appendix #22


I






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


How the community affects job
opportunities.

Types of Communities:
1. small town
2. rural
3. suburban
4. urban

Kinds of Economic Areas:
1. agricultural
2. industrial
3. resort
4. residential
5. retirement

Condition of economic growth and decline


sources of information for the individual
to use in investigating job preference:
1. School and Public Library
2. School Guidance Office
3. Friends and Relatives
4. Employment Agencies
5. Newspaper Ads
6. Employees and Employers
7. Home Economics Department Files


Books, Bulletins,
Newspapers, Employ-
ers, Workers,
Guidance Magazines,
Catalogues



Appendix #21
Game
"Categories"





Appendix #22
Post Test
"Would You Rather?"












BIBLIOGRAPHY

CLOTHING


BOOKS

American Home Economioa Association. Textile Handbook. Washington,
D.C.i American Home Eoonomics Association, 1970.

Barclay, Marion! Champion, Franoaes Brinkley, Jeanne and
Funderbuok, Kathleen. Teen Guide to Homemaking. New Yorks
McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1972.

Clayton, Nanales. Young Living. Peoria, Illinois: Charles A.
Bennett Company, Ino., 1970.

Comatock, Nanina. The MoCalls Book of Handicrafts. New Yorks
Random House, Ino., 1972.

Cooper, Joseph 0. A Woman'a Guide to Part-time Jobs. Garden City,
New Yorks Doubleday and Company, Inc., 1963.

Cunningham, Singer Sewing Book The Complete Guide
to Sewing. New York, New Yorks The Singer Company.

Garner, Charlotte and Lemmon, Jean. The Maytag Encyclopedia of
Home Laundry. Newton, Iowae Webster Publishing Company,
Inc., 1973.

Gibson, Mary Bass. The Family Circle Book of Careers at Home.
Chicago, Illinois: Cowles Book Company, Inc., 1971.

Grieser, Edwina Haeley and Strum, Mary Mark. Guide to Modern
Clothing. New Yorks MoCraw-Hill Book Company, 1968.

Hopke, William E. Cad.). The Encyolopedia of Careers and
Vocational Guidance. Vol. I & Vol. II. Chicago, Illinois:
J.G. Ferguson Publishing Company, 1972.

MoDermott, Irene E. and Norris, Jeanne E. Opportunities in
Clothing. Peoria, Illinoisa Charles A.Bannett Company, Inc.,
1988.

Orange County Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide. Elements of
Industry. Orlando, Floridal Orange County Board of Public
Instruction.

Siegal, Margot. Looking Forward to a Career in Fashions.
Minneapolis, Minnesotae Dillon Press, 1970.









BIBLIOGRAPHY eoont.)


Spears, Charleezine Wood. How to Wear Colors. Minneapolis,
Minnesotas Burgess Publishing Company, 1965.

United States Department of Labor. Occupational Outlook Handbook.
Washington, D.C.s Government Printing Office, 1972-1973.


PAMPHLETS

Careers at Simplicity. Simplicity Pattern Company, Inc., Education
Division, 200 Madison Avenue, New York. 10016.

Care Labels Can Save You Time and Money. Federal Trade Commission,
6th and Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 30580.

Career Opportunities for You in the Fabulous World of Fabrics.
Textile Distributors Assooiation, Inc., 1040 Avenue of the
Americas, New York, New York. 10018.

Make It a Shoulder Bag. Educational Bureau of Coats and Clark, Inc.,
430 Park Avenue, New York. 10022.

McMurty, Rosemary; Spencer, Eleanor; Emery, Betsy and Tetro, Ray.
McCalls Have Fun with Felt. MoCalls Pattern Company, 230 Park
Avenue, New York, New York, 1973.

Tool Storage--Sports Car Style; The Sun's up and Shining; P J Bag
and Happy Face Coin Purse. Talon Consumer Education, 41
East 51st Street, New York, New York. 10022.


FILMS AND FILMSTRIPS:

A Career in Fashion Distribution. J.C. Penney Company, Inc.,
Educational and Consumer Relations, 1301 Avenue of the Americas,
New York, New York. 10019.

A Career in Retailing Buying. J.C. Penney Company, Inc.,
Educational and Consumer Relations, 1301 Avenue of the Amerioas,
New York, New York. 10019.

Careers in Fashion Merchandizing. Modern Talking Services, Inc.,
3 East 54th Street, New York, New York. 10001.

Clothing Communicates. J.C. Penney Company, Inc., Educational
and Consumer Relations, 1301 Avenue of the Americas, New York,
New York. 10019.

Fashion Design. # 408. Educational Dimensions Corporation, Box 146,
Great Neck, New York. 11023.










BIBLIOGRAPHY (cont.)


Job Opportunities in a Department Store. Society for Visual
Education, Inc., 1345 Diveresy Parkway, Chicago, Illinois.
60614. [# A612-5).

Line in Your Wardrobe. (Color, 68 frames) Films Assooiates of
California, 6736 Selma Avenue, Hollywood, California. 90028.

Retailing Serves the Customer. J.C. Penney Company, Inc.,
Educational and Consumer Relations, 1301 Avenue of the
Americas, New York, New York. 10019. C#62304).

The Sewing Machine, How to Thread; Basic Parts and Their Functionas
Learning to Guide Fabric. SVE, 1345 Oiversey Parkway,
Chicago, Illinois. 80614.

Understanding Today's Textiles. (Textile Fiber Personalities,
Care of Textiles, A Set of Textile Cartoons) J.C. Penney
Company, Inc., Educational and Consumer Relations, 1301
Avenue of the Amerioas, New York, New York. 10019.


PERIODICAL

Matsukawa, Sandra. "Sewing Projects from the Scrap Beg."
Forecast. October, 1972, pp. F-35, F-40.


POSTERS AND TEACHING KIT

American Textile Manufactures. Textile Teaching Kit. J.C.
Penney Company, Inc. Educational and Consumer Relations,
1301 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York. 10019.

Fashion Careers. (18 Posters, 11 inches by 14 inches, with
commentaries by Louise Lemmon). J. Weston Walsh Publishers,
Portland, Maine. 04104.







APPENDIX # 1
PRETEST


From the occupations listed below, place a check mark (x] in Front
of those you consider to be related to the textile and clothing
industry.


-1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.


Fitter or seamstress in clothing alteration
Electronics employee
Clothing service aide
Carpenter's helper
Plumber's helper
Dressmaker's assistant
Service station attendant
Library assistant
Dressmaker, selF-employed
Worker in a garment Factory
Worker in laundry dry-cleaning establishment
Hospital maintenance helper
Barber
Manager of coin operated dry-cleaning business
Sales person in dress shop
Car washer
Parking lot attendant
Dishwasher
Sewing machine demonstrator
Fashion model
Research assistant in textile laboratory
Textile designer
Cashier
Mail clerk
Buyer oF dresses For a department/dress shop
Fashion designer
Typist
Switchboard operator
Furniture hauler
Fashion journalist
Consultant to manufacturers oF laundry products
Manager oF dress shop
Home economics teacher
Ceramics worker
CheF
Cannery worker
Pen and pencil company employee
Welder
Nurseryman
Meat packer
Extension worker; home advisor
Advertising editor or writer
Textile mill worker
Child care worker
Domestic housekeeper
Demonstrator on T V
Homemaking consultant
Writer oF women's columns or homemaking books








APPENDIX # 2


BULLETIN BOARD MOBILE


The background for this bulletin board mobile is newspaper fashion
ads. Using handouts of similar information, form groups and discuss
this information. Students will give their own descriptions of
what they think the jobs are all about. Start with the major bar
and add minor ones using paperclips or small pieces of wire.

EXPLORING CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION, AND SERVICE
OCCUPATION


FASHION, MERCHANDISING, RETAILING
STOCK PERSONNEL
Assistant Buyer
Model
Buyer
Fashion Illustrator
Window Decorator
Designer
Customer Consultant
Comparison Shopper
Fashion Reporter
Fashion Consultant
Bridal Consultant
Department Manager
Wardrobe Mistress


SEWING SERVICES
Laundry-Dry Cleaning Operator
Sorters and Checkers
Alternationist
Seamstress
Draper
Upholstery and Slipcover Worker


INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS
DESIGNING ROOM OCCUPATIONS
Designer
Sample Stitcher
Pattern Maker
Pattern Grader
Laboratory Technician
Weaver
Researcher
Hand Machine Spreader
Marker
Cutter
Assembler, Bundler or Fitter
Sewing Room Occupations
Sewing Machine Operator
Inspector and Checker
Trimmer and Clipper
Tailor
Dressmaker
Bushelman
Finish Presser
Repairman
Shipper and Packer


(A similar display may be worked out using the careers of home
economists in business and teaching.)





APPENDIX # 3


CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
CATCO GAME
CATCO STANDS FOR CLOTHING AND TEXTILE CAREER OCCUPATIONS.
T I, __ _


A


1 I I I


FREE






Directions Use "Who Am I?" questions from the Appendix or devise
your own. The teacher may put a list of careers on the black-
board and each student can make his/her own CATCO card by writing
a different career in each space. If the career is anywhere on the
student's CATCO board when the teacher reads the"Who Am I?" question,
he/she marks it with a token. When a student has a vertical,
horizontal or diagonal line complete, he/she calls CATCO. A small
reward such as penny candy makes the game more interesting for the
students.


O


C


C


-I








APPENDIX # 4


SCRAMBLE GRAM
MERCHANDISING CAREERS


Find the words listed below
the merchandising fields.


since they are a very important part of


Accessories
Advertising manager
Application forms
Cashier
Chain
Receiving
Sales Personality
Supervisor
Department
Sales
Notions
Money
Style


Comparison
Labels
Ship
Boutique
Self
Customer
Job
Sell
Hangtag
Buyer
Stock
Retailing
Upholstery


shopping


Personnel
Manager
Copy
Copyboy
Charge plate
Credit
Display
Specialty shop
Clientele
Profits
Compare
Wise
Value












APPENDIX # 5

LAP Pack

"Susan Gets a Summer Job"




"Susan, wake upt Susan, it is time to get up. You will be

late for your first day on the job." Susan rolled over sleepily

and opened one eye. Her mother's voice made her realize that

having a summer job was going to be a problem right away in

just getting out of bed. As Susan began waking up, excitement

mounted as she thought of her new Job in the Sun City Clothing

Factory. She wondered exactly what to wear and finally decided

on her new green flowered blouse and skirt. She washed her face,

combed her hair, and brushed her teeth.

"Guess I'm ready to go - I'll have to catch that 7:30 bus,"

she said outloud to no one in particular and went into the kitchen

where her mother was finishing her cup of coffee. "Hi, Mom, are

you ready to go to work?"

"Yes, Susan, we are busy with inventory at the store and

people are shopping for.summer vacations. Good luck on your new

job today. Don't forget to be polite, smile, and try to listen

to what everyone tells you. You are going to begin working in a

fascinating industry," Susan's mother replied.

Susan finished her juice and took her last bite of toast in












her hand. She blew her mother a kiss and flew out the door. She'd

have to hurry to catch the bus.

The ride wasn't too long, and it was interesting seeing all

the busy people hurrying on and off. There was her stop. She

grabbed her lunch and purse and got up to get off with obviously

other employees of the Sun City Clothing Factory. As she reached

the main entrance, Susan slowed down and looked at the huge building.

Goodness, would she ever find her way around? Now whose office

was she to go to - Miss Marten, yes, it was Miss Marten. Here

was an arrow which pointed to her office. Susan smoothed her hair,

straightened her skirt, and then walked in the door. There was

an attractive girl working at the front desk who looked up and

gave Susan an encouraging smile as she entered the door.

"May I help you, please?"

"Yes," replied Susan. "I interviewed with Miss Marten last

week for a job and she said to report at eight o'clock Monday

morning, and - here I amI"

"Please go right on in. Miss Marten will be right with you."

Susan opened the door to Miss Marten's office and was rather

surprised to see Miss Marten with another girl and boy about her

age sitting in the office.

Miss Marten looked like a busy lady. Susan wondered if she

had a husband and three children to take care of like her mother

did at home.

"Good morning, Susan. Are you ready to start an interesting








summer at the Sun City Clothing Factory?"

"Good morning, Miss Marten. I'm eager to see whet I'll

be doing."

"Susan, I'd like you to meat Cynthia Howard and Johnny

Bryant. They will also be starting work here for the summer."

Susan smiled at the two young people and said, "Hi."

They smiled back. Perhaps they would have the same lunch breaks

and could get to know each other better.

"Sit down, Susan." Miss Marten took off her glasses and

looked at the three young people. "The apparel industry is an

important source of jobs for many workers who have different

skills and interests. Some of the jobs in this industry can be

learned in a few weeks. These will be the jobs you will probably

be falling into since you will be working only for the summer.

Other jobs, which you might return to after graduation take

several years to learn. The apparel industry is the nation's

largest employer for women in manufacturing - Oh, Johnny, you'll

see other men around here, also; so don't worry." CShe smiled and

put her lasses back on). "Four out of five garment workers

are women. Most sewing machine operators are women. Men

usually work in jobs such as being cutters, markers, pressers,

production managers, engineers, and salesmen--."

Susan felt puzzled. What were all these names - cutting,

marking, etc? Miss Marten must have noticed her confusion and

stopped. She started to speak.

"Now then, before I totally confuse you, let me tell you










what we are going to do this morning. I think the best way to

acquaint you with Sun City Clothing Factory would be a guided

tour through our plant. I'll let you see the factory in

operation and perhaps we will talk to some of the employees.

After we have done this, I'll assign you to your specific jobs.

Are you ready to go?"

"Yes," all three young people said together. They wanted

to see just what went on in this Factory where they were going

to spend their summer.

They left the office with Miss Marten and she began their

tour.

"Right now, we are in the business office complex of the

factory. Here we have secretaries. That's the president's

office." She pointed to a large official looking door with

gold lettering. Susan worked quietly by and wondered what the

president started out as - a cutter or marker.

"Remember, I mentioned salesmen. Here is where their offices

are. They take samples of our merchandise to various parts of

the country to sell it. Ok, this is our first room. This is

the Designing Room."

They walked into a large room with several smaller offices.

Miss Marten pointed to a woman busy at work with a drawing

board, pencils, and drawing paper. "That is Sara Strong. She

is one of our leading designers. Her job is to create original

designs for new types and styles of clothing. After a sketch

of a new design has been approved by the sales staff and








management, it goes on to this lady here - our Sample Stitcher.

Mrs. Anderson, would you tell these new employees what your Job

is?"

"Yes, Miss Marten. I take the designer's sketch and prepare

a sample garment. This, of course, takes quite a bit of skill

because I have to create the design by cutting, pinning, and

sewing the muslin onto a dress form. When I am finished, it is

passed on to the Pattern Maker, who constructs a full size

Master Pattern. The Pattern Maker takes apart my creation and

makes the pattern using heavy paper or fiber board. The last

position in our designing room is the Pattern Grader. The

Pattern Grader takes the master pattern and makes adjustments

to fit various sizes. The Pattern Grader is very often a man.

He measures the pieces and changes them to meet different sizes.

In some factories, a computer is used to help in the mathematical

figuring. A good knowledge of math is necessary to be a

Pattern Grader."

"Thank 'you, Mrs. Anderson," said Miss Marten. "Now we will

go into the next room. This is the cutting room occupations.

Johnny, it is possible you might land somewhere in this room."

Susan exchanged glances with Cynthia and Johnny. It would

take a lot of skill to be in the designing room. She knew she

wasn't ready for that.

Miss Marten was continuing their tour. "In the cutting

room the first people we see are the Hand Spreaders. These

people lay out neat bolts of cloth into exact lengths on the










cutting board. We also have Machine Spreaders who are aided

by machines in laying the cloth evenly back and forth across

the table. This man in front of us is a Marker. This is Mr.

Wilson. How are you doing today, Mr. Wilson?"

"Fine, Miss Marten. I'm busy tracing these new patterns

the designing room has sent me. I trace the fiber-board pattern

pieces on large sheets of paper and make several carbons of

these tracings. The pattern pieces have to be arranged so

there is enough distance between them for the cutter to work.

The marker has to make allowances for matching plaids, stripes

and other patterned fabric.

"Now then, at this table, we have Cutters busy at work.

The cutter cuts out the various garment pieces from layers of

cloth which are spread on the cutting table. He follows the

outline of the pattern with an electrically powered cutting

knife which cuts through all layers at once."

Susan looked at the layer of cloth the cutter was working

with. That cloth was nine inches high and he just zipped

around those patterns so fast. He must have been very exper-

ienced at his job.

"Johnny," Miss Marten was now addressing the boy in their

group. "You will work with the Assemblers. These people are

also called Builders or Fitters in some factories. You will

help bring together and bundle all garment pieces and accessor-

ies (such as linings, zippers, trimmings], needed to make a

complete garment. They identify each bundle with a ticket which








is used to figure the earnings of workers who are paid for the

number of pieces they produMs - You can see, Johnny, speed is

important because you are paid for the number of bundles you

produce. The bundles are now passed on to various sections of

the sewing room. Let's go there, too.

"CY:nthia and Susan, you girls will probably work in the

sewing room. Almost half of all apparel workers are Handsewers

and Machine Stitchers."

Susan gasped when they entered the sewing room. Miss Marten

noticed and smiled.

"There are a lot of sawing machines, aren't there, Susan?

And they don't look like your machine at home, do they? Sewing

Machine Operators use sewing machines that are generally heavier

and more capable of Faster speeds than the sewing machines Found

in the home. Sewing Machine Operators generally specialize in a

single operation such as sewing shoulder seams, attaching cuffs

to sleeves, or hemming blouses. In some factories such as ours,

Sewing Machine Operators work along the assembly line sewing only

one part of the garment. Sewing Machine Operators employed in

shops making high priced dresses and women's coats and suits may

perform all the machine operations on one garment. Our industrial

sewing machines do much of the work you might hand stitch at home;

however, we do employ Hand Stitchers. Hand Stitchers use needle and

thread to complete certain sections of the garment that cannot be

done by machine. In factories making higher priced clothing more

Hand Stitchers are employed.










"Susan, you and Cynthia may very well work in this room as

Work Distributors often called Floor Girls or Floor Boys. These

people move garment bundles from one sewing operation to another.

This saves the precious time of the more skilled Sewing Machine

Operators who do not have to get up from their machines."

Miss Marten paused a moment to greet some employees and then

continued to a table where several men and women were examining

garments very closely. She continued, "These are Inspectors and

Checkers. They check for problems such as skipped stitches or

bad seams. They mark these areas to be repaired before they are

passed on to the next sewing operator. Another Job you girls

might have is to be a Trimmer." Susan thought this person might

be a former barber because it looked as if he was operating a

pair of hair clippers. He trimmed all the loose threads by

shaving up the zipper, around the sleeves and down the seems.

"There now," Miss Marten said, "the garment is ready to go

to the Finish Presser. There are two types of pressing occupa-

tions actually, an Under Presser and Finish Presser. Under Pressers

press the garment while it is being constructed. They press collars,

shoulders, seams and pockets. Finish Pressers generally do

final pressing and ironing at the end of the sewing operation.

"Young people," Miss Marten said, "this pretty well completes

our tour. There are two more positions I want to tell you about.

They are the Tailors or Dressmakers. These people are able to

make garments from beginning to end. Bushelmen repair garments

that were rejected by the inspector.









"What do you think of the Sun City Clothing Factory?"

Susan replied, "I understand better now what it took to

make this outfit I'm wearing. A lot of hands worked on it."

Cynthia smiled and nodded.

"All right," Miss Marten replied, "let's go back into the

sewing room and cutting room and I'11 assign you your positions.

It will take a while to catch on to your job, so be patient,

work hard, and come to me if you have any problem."













Questions Over Story of Susan


1. What was the name of the clothing factory where Susan was
going to work?

2. Did Susan's mother work?

3. Why would a mother who worked outside of the home have more
to do than a mother who was only a homemaker?

4. What advise did Susan's mother give Susan about her new job?

B. How was Susan going to get back and forth to work each day?

6. What time did she start work?

7. Who was in charge of personnel?

6. Do only girls work in clothing factories?

9. What positions might men hold?

10. Name one of the occupations in a clothing factory that would
require experience and skill.

11. Name one occupation in a clothing factory an unskilled worker
could hold.

12. What is the nation's largest employer of women?

13. Who works in the designing room?

14. Who works in the cutting room?

15. Who works in the sewing room?

16. Name the two kinds of Jobs that pressers can hold.









Terms used in the Story of Susan

Find the correct words for each definition and place the words
in the blanks.

1. Examine garments for proper workmanship.


2. Prepares sample garments from designers sketch.


3. Use sewing machines and usually specialize in a single opera-
tion.

4. Remove loose threads and lint from garments.

5. Generally do final pressing at end of sewing operation.


6. Able to make garment from start to finish, usually men's
clothing.

7. Lay out neat bolts of cloth into exact length on cutting
board.

8. Adjusts master pattern into various sizes.


9. Creates original designs for apparel factories. _

10. Takes sample garments to sell to various parts of the
country.

11. Owns and operates factory business.

12. Press particular garment parts such as collar, seams, or
pockets.

13. Can construct a garment from start to finish.


14. Constructs a full size master pattern from sample stitcher's
garment.

15. Trace the fiber-board patterns on large sheets of paper.


16. Handles records and correspondence for business office.


17. Bring together and bundle garment pieces and accessories to
pass to sewing room. ---










Terms continued


18. Cuts various garment pieces from the layers of oloth.


19. Aided by machines in laying the cloth evenly back and
Forth on the table.





Place all the circled letters in the order they were given and
Find out about what we have been studying.

- I I I






APPENDIX # B
QUIZ
WHO AM I?


This quiz may be used as an evaluation technique and as a poet test.
You may also use these questions for content when playing the
Clothing Management Production and Service Occupation Bingo game.

COMPLETION: Below you will find "Who Am I?" questions similar to
the types I have been giving you. All the words or careers used
are listed at the end of the quiz. Write your answers in the
blanks before each number.


1.



2.



3.


I am a homemaker with 2 small children. I
make clothes for people and they pay me for
each finished article. Who am I?

I work either in a small shop or back room of
a department store. I repair, alter or change
hemlines of clothes for people. Who am I?

I must be polite and courteous on the job. I
work 8 hours a day Monday through Friday and
sometimes on Saturday, Sunday and holidays. I
must know my merchandise and keep my counter ii
order. Who am I?


4. I must diet constantly and be very well groomed
for my Job. My work sounds glamorous but it is
irregular and uncertain. I spend many hours
under hot lights. Who am I?


5.





B.



7.




8.


9.


I am in charge of the ladies' sportswear depart-
ment. I order all the articles we sell. I am
also in charge of all the employees in the
department. I sometimes go to places like New
York on buying trips. Who am I?

I make an article from start to finish. I take
men's measurements and from these I make suits
and coats. Who am I?

The temperature is extremely hot where I work.
I work with huge steam irons and washing
machines. I sometimes collect money and deliver
merchandise for the customer. Who am I?

Fashion starts with me. I work with paper and
pencil to create new clothing. Who am I?

I write articles for fashion magazines and
newspapers. I try to be aware of all the
newest fashion trends. Who am I?







APPENDIX # 8 [cont.)


10.





11.






12.






13.





14.


15. I do the Final pressing of clothes made along
the assembly line. I have a knowledge of
machines and am handy with all types of tools.
Who am I?


I handle all sorts of mechanical problems in a
clothing Factory. Who am I?


I create an article of clothing using the
designer's sketch. I pin and out by draping
material on a dress form. Who am I?


I operate a large electric cutting knife which
outs through many layers of fabric. I work very
rapidly as an experienced person. Who am I?


I am in charge of the costumes used in
theatrical productions. I examine costumes,
clean and mend them. Who am I?


I keep merchandise on the shelves of depart-
ment stores. I handle shipments as they come
inkeeping large quantities in a stock room.
Who am I?


I work in the cutting room in a Factory. I am
in charge of placing many layers of material
on the cutting table. When I am done, the
material is about ten inches deep. Who am I?


I put garment pieces, trims, and all accessories
needed to make an article of clothing and I tie
them into a bundle. Who am I?


I operate a large industrial sewing machine in a
Factory. I usually do one specific task all day.
Who am I?


16.



17.





18.






APPENDIX # 6 (oont.)


19.







20.





21.





22.







23.


OCCUPATIONS USED IN QUIZ


Repairman
Model
Sewing Machine Operator
Laundry-Dry Cleaning Worker
Hand or Machine Spreader
Seamstress
Tailor
Finish Presser
Sales Person
Alterationist
Stock Clerk
Wardrobe Mistress
Bundler


Buyer
Fashion Reporter
Designer
Draper
Home Extension Agent
Cutter
Fitter
Assembler
Sample Stitcher
Consultant for Major Company
Private Business Instructor
Public School Teacher
Home Economics Teacher


I own a drapery shop. I go to people's homes,
take measurements, help them select material and
decorating ideas. I then construct the draperies
in my shop. Who am I?


I am in charge of instruction of careers in home
home economics to Junior high and secondary
students. Who am I?


I own and operate a fabric business and also
conduct classes teaching special construction
techniques. Who am I?


I am hired in the county to work with 4-H and
home demonstration clubs. I present adult
programs from time to time for the education
of the community. Who am I?


I present programs oF information For my company's
products. I might work For Talon Zippers, Singer
Sewing Machine or other companies. Who am I?









APPENDIX # 7

JOB TITLES


Foreword:


Cluster jobs in textiles and clothing are similar to
those in the foods area in that frequently employ-
ment in top jobs is achieved by progressing step by
step From "no education or experience required"
through the various stages of learning on-the-Job
as more skills are mastered.


Job Title


Description


Educational
Requirements


Remuneration


Owner-Operator
garment manu-
featuring
factory


The same weight of
responsibility for
the operation of a
profitable enter-
prise rests here as
with other owner-
operator type of
management estab-
lishments. Included
are:
1. Acquiring the
original premises
and equipment.
2. Setting up
financial structure.
3. Hiring and process-
ing staff and other
workers.
4. Establishing outlets
for products.
5. Requiring records
for all activities.


College degree
or long exper-
ience.


Flexible
salary
profit
sharing
an eye on
tax benefits.


Kinds of tailors High school
includes required. Some
1. Alterations tailor hire appren-
(retail stores and tice trainee.
dry cleaning) Two year commu-
2. Custom tailor [adapts nity college
pattern to special courses speed
needs of customer.) advancement.
He cuts, bastes, sews,
fits and eventually
finishes the garment.
3. Shop tailors are
usually known by the
type of work they do,
such as coat basters


$70.00 to
$125.00 to
start.
Master tailors
up range of
$7,000.00 to
$12,000.00
per year.


(oont.)


Tailor


_








Appendix # 7


[cont.
or sleeve tailors,
etc. They may set in
sleeves by machine,
hand sew canvas linings
in suits and coats,
stitch shoulder padding
or baste collars to
coat bodies.


1. Makes a master: pattern
from approved sketches
and designs of the pro-
Fessional designer.
2. Assists in making
patterns for various
sizes put together by the
pattern grader.
3. Is able to use drafting
instruments, rulers, etc.
4. Makes allowances for pleats,
tucks, seams, yokes, and
shrinkage.


Must be good
in math. Uses
both geometry
and trigonom-
etry. Some
physically
handicapped
are acceptable


Hand embroiderer
Knitting
instructor


1. Requires good hand/eye Skilled
coordination and manual training anc
dexterity, particularly practice
facility of the fingers.
2. Is frequently combined
with sales in department
stores selling needle-
point, threads, and yarns
used in various needle
work projects.
3. Must have respectful
attitude toward precision
and perfection.
4. Must have knowledge of
cleaning methods recommended
for specific fibers and yarns.
5. May advise customers on
blocking techniques.
6. Should have experience before
ownership of business.
7. Develops knowledge of stock
and names of colors and suitability
of purpose of finished product.


Small
salary
or
commission


Assistant
wardrobe
mistress


1. Keeps garments and
accessories in useable
condition.
2. Cleans, spots, mends,
repairs, replaces buttons,
hooks, eto.


Natural
inclination
more import-
ant than
schooling.
Skills can be
learned on
the job.


Minimum
wage to
start.
Private
home
work
probably


Pattern maker


$80
to
$85
wk.


_ _









Appendix # 7 (cont)


Assistant
wardrobe
mistress


3. Maintains order and
organization in the wardrobe
4. Knows proper and effiiaent
use of equipment used in
connection with clothing,
underwear, hosiery, shoes,
Jewelry, gloves.
5. Has some knowledge of
cosmetics, wig care and
manicuring.
B. Aide in putting on and
taking off garments when
called upon.


less
than at
movie or
TV studio
costume
department


Wardrobe 1. Supervises assistants in
mistress performing respective duties
listed above.
2. Is usually assistant before
becoming wardrobe mistress.


1. Cute various garment pieces
from layers of cloth spread
on cutting tables.
2. Uses electrically powered
knife which outs through all
cloth layers at once.[up to
9 inches deep)
3. Is responsible for proper use
and care of equipment which
in turn depends on knowledge
and Judgment respecting
aynthetio and natural fiber
fabrics.


High school $75
not required wk.
but is an Work
asset.Most usually
training is on piece
acquired on rate
the Job with basis
pay. Many
start as bun-
dle boy or
shipping
room helper.


1. Uses various types of
steam machines or hand
irons to flatten seems
and to shape garments.
2. May specialize in one
type such as shirt collar
presser*
3. Specializes on
particular garment parts.
4. Does final pressing and
ironing as a Finish Presser
at the end of the sawing
operation.


High school
not required
but desirable.
Training is
usually on
the Job.


$43-
$75 wk.
Work
usually
done
on
piece
rate
basis
except
in dry-
cleaning
places.


Garment
butter


Presser









Appendix # 7 Coont.


Sewing machine
operator


I. Is classified by type High school
of machine used diploma not
a. single needle required, but
b. double needle desirable.
or by work performed
a. collar stitcher
b. cuff racker
c. sleeve finisher
2. Uses machines much
heavier and faster than
home machines.
CTypioally, garment bundles
pass through sewing room
where eaah operator performs
one or two operations
on each piece and passes the
bundle on to the next
operation. Handicapped are
highly employable.)


Minimum
wage
guarantee
plus cents
per piece.
$82 wk.
average.


1. Holds key position in any retail High school


operation since he selects the
goods carried in the store.
2. Master-minds the retail selling
program for goods he purchases.
3. Works as assistant buyer before
becoming full-fledged buyer.
4. Must know both merchandise
and nature of customers.
5. Buys from salesmen who come
to him as well as going on
buying trips to big centers.
6. Will likely spend timk,
selling to keep abreast of
trends.


diploma $60 to
minimum $100 wk.
requirement. Most
Needs math, buyers
art and $150 wk.
public Some get
speaking. $235 wk.
College
degree in
business
administration
highly
recommended.


Buyer


Trainee










Appendix # 7 (oant.)


1. Is primarily engaged in High school
wearing and demonstrating Special
apparel of all types in training at
retail or wholesale places, modeling or
large department stores charm school
or for clothing manufacpur- needed. Can
ere. benefit from
2. Can work as a free-lano some college
worker on short assign- work.
ments through agencies or
by direct application.
3. May pose for fashion
photographers, working in
department stores, at fairs,
exhibitions, for TV commercials,
etc.
4. May pose for artists on free-
lance basis.


1. Marks, sorts, operates
washing machines, extrators,
dry machines and pressers.
2. Operates shakers to remove
creases and wrinkles from
flat work.
3. Operates feeders to feed flat
work into pressing machine
rollers.
4. Operates folders to fold
pressed Flatwork.
5. Irons clothing on different
types of machines to press
different parts of clothing.


No high
school
education
required.
Is trained
on the Job.
A basic
commercial,
vocational
or home
economics
course
recommended.


Model


$100 wk
Full
time


Laundry
worker


$35-
$47
weekly








APPENDIX # 8

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS


Direction



A.
B.
C.
0.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.
M.
N.
0.
P.

Q.
R.
S.
T.
U.
V.


Write C1) in the blank for Professional; write 12)
in the blank for Skilled and write ([3 in the blank
for Semi-skilled.


Clothing Service Aide
Dressmaker Assistant
Fashion Journalist
Homemaking Consultant
Garment Faotory Worker
Manager of Dress Shop
T V Clothing Demonstrator
Textile Factory Worker
Fashion Designer
Textile Designer
Seamstress
Dress Shop Buyer
Teoaher [secondary, college]
Home Advisor
Manager of Dry-Cleaning or Laundry Business
Dressmaker, Self-Employed
Clerk (Stock)
Model
Research Assistant in Textile Laboratory
Sewing Machine Repairman
Window and Department Display Manager
Salesperson


as











APPENDIX # 9


COLOR DEFINITIONS


1. Hue---the name given to a color Family
2. Value---the amount of lightness or darkness in a color
3. Tint---hues with more lightness
4. Shade---hues with less light
5. Intensity---the strength of a color
6. Neutrals---white, black and gray
7. Color Wheel---a color chart showing primary, secondary and
intermediate colors
8. Primary Colors---red, yellow, blue-all other colors may be
mixed from these
9. Secondary Colors---orange, green, purple-each combines two
primary colors
10. Intermediate Colors---the product of mixing a primary and a
secondary color
11. Warm Colors---colors that make you feel warm as red, orange
and yellow
12. Cool Colors---colors that make you Feel cool as blue,
green and violet
13. Monochromatic Harmony---combining different values on one hue
14. Analogous harmony--combining hues occurring next to each
other on the color wheel
15. Complementary harmony---combining colors opposite each other
on the color wheel


ACTIVITIES

A. Using fashion magazines and old pattern books, Find costumes
depicting monochromatio harmony, analogous harmony and
complimentary harmony. Include your three pictures in the
LAP Pack when you hand it in. You may design and color your
own pictures if you desire.










Appendix # 9 Ccont.]
Color Definitions




B. Choose one primary color and vary it according to tints
and shades in the diagram below.


add black


f__original
hue


\add white


I I I I I A A









APPENDIX # 10

COLOR QUIZ

1. Black, white and gray are called 8_- _ colors.

2. A name that is given to the oolor family is _

3. Red, orange and yellow are _ Qolors.

4. Combine primary and secondary colored to get
--0- colors.

5. 0_ colors are blue green and violet.
6. A chart showing all the colors is called a 0- - -

7. Color combinations of color next to each other are referred
as having(_ ------- harmony.

8. Combining different values on one hue is
-0 -----------harmony.
9. Red, yellow and blue are 0 _ colors.

10. --0- is the lightness or darkness of a color.

11.. is-------- the strength of a color.

12. Orange, green and purple are ------ 0 colors.

13. Hues with less light are _0



Unosramble the ciroled letters to Find another color harmony.

harmony








APPENDIX # 11


(Below the title use samples of hangtags and care labels from
bolts of fabric or clothing.)


(Students can make a hangtag similar to this for their own
garments or their assembly line items after they have finished.)


at ~t~~;b~~l








APPENDIX # 12


FABRICS SCRAMBLE GRAM


Astrakhan
Batiste
Bunting
Calico
Camel's Hair
Cashmere
Cheesecloth
Chiffon
Chinchilla
Chintz
Corduroy
Crepe De Chine
Flannelette
Fleece
Gabardine


Gingham
Grosgrain
Horsehair
Huckaback
Jacquard
Jersey
Lawn
Leatherette
Linen
Lisle
Madras
Marquisette
Matting
Mohair
Net


Pique
Quilting
Rayon
Sateen
Seersucker
Serge
Sharkskin
Tapestry
Tarpaulin
Ticking
Tulle
Tweed
Twill
Velure
Velvet


KOLDEEWTAMOH


QUARD
TTAML
BSQUM
EEBAX
GEAOC
RRTBG
OSIAV
SUSXS
GC TLI
RKEPC
AEXOO
IRRRN
NDS IA
UEDPK
HREBA
ASLIN
TSARD
XRAYO
UQKCA


AWA
HRI
GCN
NVE
ILA
GXE
KUS
QAO
CGC
HNH
EII


AIRANIKD
CHIFFON
AHSLEMAC
ETBRKXLO
CEELF VL
CMQONF IU
HEMUILWI
ERGEKATL
EUNXSNZT
SLITKNLI
EEKUREEN
CVCLALAG


TTNLIILHE
LNCOUTEST
AUHT Z AOKT
RBIHENPWE
ENLLEVGRO
AMLIAVLVA
NDAVRWOEC
BAKCUHNLV


TP
HE
EA
RC
EE
TK
TB
EA


FIND-WORD


E J AC
LGNI
SCAN
I J X E
IJXE
LENT
ERAT
ESHE
NEKS
I YAI
HDRU
CCT
EHSR
DIAA
ENB M
PTCR
EZOA
RYIB
CRAR
XGYE









APPENDIX # 12


FABRIC SCRAMBLE GRAM


Fabrics of the Seamstress --- whether it's silk or burlap, the
skilled seamstress can make a dress look like a million. Help
her by finding all 40 fabrics.


SATEEN
IHCRET
LOANOL
KPIRWK
VLPWKT
BVGROS
ULACEF
RKVYI0
LOLHRA
AOCLMG
PSOEHM
VNDACR
PIMAOP
RAYONV
GNUTNA


EETEV
ONNEY
00RVP
TENEV
TORWA
FCHAS
KNGLY
LIEDV
NTNYL
AAVIR
GSLGL
ONAIR
DNWVR
ZTNIH
HSENI


Acrilan
Burlap
Chambray
Chiffon
Chintz
Cotton
Crepe
Cretonne
Dacron
Fiberglass
Flannel
Gingham
Gros


Lace
Lame
Linen
Madras
Matelasse
Muslin
Nainsook
Nylon
Olona
Organdy
Organza
Orlon
Pima


Polyester
Ratine
Rayon
Rep
Sateen
Serge
Shantung
Sharkskin
Silk
Task
Twill
Velveteen
Wool
Satin


LE
EL
SD
RS
SK
TL
RE
H N
SN
LA
HL
SF
P U
CE
TA


VM
AE
EG
HR
LE
Y S
AS
RA
BL
MG
AR
HE
C B
MI
RF









APPENDIX # 12

FABRIC SCRAMBLE GRAM


Directions:


The following words are included in the chart.
Put a circle around the appropriate letters.


natural
cotton
wool
silk
linen
man-made
warp
weft


rayon
nylon
dacron
dynel
lycra
sanforized
mercerized
sanforlan


sanforset
satin
plain
twill
jacquard
pile
knitting
felting


EN
RD
UR
RA
C Y
00
TN
T I
OL
NE
C B
D T
FA
AD
C W
T W
RO
JA
PR
CE
ER
TL
T I


LE
NA
SA
IT
LY
KS
OC
OT
OL
PI
IN
WE
NN
NG
CR
S T
ED
AR
Z D
ED
AD
RI
IS


bonding
weaving
solution
stock
yarn
piece
printing


OK
RS
LA
LN
IF
NO
0 R
EL
KA
NN
NG
WT
E0
AR
VA
IL
NE
GY
MN
ET
IO
NG
TS









APPENDIX # 13


FABRIC GAME

SONS AND DAUGHTERS


"Getting to Know Fabrics"
This game can be used to acquaint students with basic textiles.
You may start by having each student cut out twenty paper dolls
and by putting the list of "daughters" on the board. You may
have your samples cut and put in a large container. The object
of the game is to match the textile sample with the correct doll.


1. Banker's Daughter
(Checked)

2. Dog Catcher's Sons
(Houndstooth Check)

3. Convict's Daughter
(Stripe)
4. Fisherman's Son
(Net)

5. Undertaker's Daughter
(Felt)

6. Organist's Son
(Organdy)

7. Government Official's
Daughter
(Red Tape or Braid)
8. Highway Engineer's
Daughter
(Corduroy)

9. Barber's Daughter
(Mohair)

10. Nitwit's Daughter
(Knit) ,


11. Milkman's Son
(Jersey)
12. Farmer's Daughter
(Denim)

13. Locksmith's Daughter
(Key)
14. Baseball Player's Son
(Ball and Bat)

15. Landscaper's Daughter
(Flower)
16. Shepherd's Son
(Wool)

17. Chemist's Daughter
(Polyester)

18. Laundry Worker's Son
(Terry Cloth)

19. Plantation Owner's
Daughter
(Cotton)

20. Sleepyhead's Son
(Flannel)









APPENDIX # 14


PATCHWORK OF TEXTILES


This bulletin board can be used to display the textile samples
you would like your class to know and understand. You may also
add care instructions.


9r11 A
At
7*4




---I APPEN""X U 15 |
TOOLS OF THE TRADE STEFS IN THE FACTORY RELATED CAREERS
(FROG)
r-- -- ----------
STOCK CERTIFICATES ORGANIZE THE BUSINESi 30ARD OF
DIRECTORS
CHAIRMAN OF TH
BOARD
.--.- ~PRESIDENT
I L Mo.A EL VICE PRESIDENT

Sl~k I SECRETARY
TREASURER


SAFETY


ENGINEER


I
I


I
I


4Thi I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


DESIGN
OCC


ING
UPAT


A. SKETCH
DES IGN


OOM
ONS

YOUR


FASHION


DESIGNER


TEXTILE
DESIGNER
ARTIST


E




B. MAKE YOUR APPENDIX # 15 Coont.)
B. MAKE YOUR I
PATTERN PATTERN MAKER
PATTERN GRADER
1. TRACE YOUR FROG
DESIGN ON POSTERBOARD.
YOU SHOULD HAVE 8.
I I






------- ----TR B^ ------^ _ _. . _ ._------
4-1 SAMPLE SAMPLE STITCHER

I. SELECT YOUR FABRIC
2. SCRAPS MAY BE USED
FOR SAMPLE FROGS.
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
SC. CONSTRUCT A
SAMPLE SAMPLE STITCHER

9I. SELECT YOUR FABRIC
2. SCRAPS MAY BE USED
FOR SAMPLE FROGS.
I I






I I
I I
I I




CUTTI


NG
OCC


A. LAY 10 INCH STR
OF MATERIAL RIGHT S
TOGETHER MATCHING C
EDGES EVENLY.


IPS
IDEI
UT


B. TRACE AROUND THE
t CARDBOARD PATTERN WITH MARKER
y)PENCIL SPACING ALTER-
NATING THE HEADS TO
\_ CONSERVE FABRIC.


ROOM
UPATIONS


APPENDIX # 15 Ccont.)
HAND SPREADER




C.


PLACE


5 PINS;


ONE i
i


IN EACH ARM, ONE IN
EACH LEG, AND ONE IN
THE HEAD. CUT FROGS
APART BEING SURE TO
LEAVE SPACE FOR SEAM
ALLOWANCE.


APPENDIX # 15 Ccontr
PINNER


PIECEMAKER


S /I : L''./ ; sU : I
.--..----------.. --SEWT-RO----O--PATI-ON
ISEW ING MACH INE
A. STITCH AROUND FROG OPER
LEAVING AN OPENING OPERATOR
BETWEEN KNEE AND WAIST.








I I


I I




-R.
FOR


EXTRA


STRENGTH


R EST I T ARM


I I
I 1
eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee i .. .. i I I I I


C. TR IM SEAM .3/8


ALL THE WAY
FROG.


AROUND


I TN UH;
THE,


CUTTER


----------------------- L
D.. CL IP FROGS AT ARMS
TOES, WAIST, AND
SBE-TWEEN LEGS.


I I


CL IPPER


~EST1TE ARM


APPENDIX # 15
REST PITCHER


?Went .1


L'7


I
`~J




I I
H. GLUE EYES OR SEW
THEM ON. EYES ARE
BALL FRINGE. GLUE
//CENTER EYE BALL FROMI
FELT OR SCRAP FABRIC.
I I
-------------------------- -- -- - -- - -
II. CHECK WORK. MAKE
MINOR REPAIRS.
I
II


APPENDIX # 15 (cont.)
EYE SEWER AND
GLUER






INSPECTOR
CHECKER
BUSHELMAN


------ ------ ------ r -- ---"-------- -
J. PREPARE CREATIVE I PACKAGER
HANG TAGS OR PRICE STOCK CLERK
TAGS. WRAP IN PLASTIC SALESMAN
WRAP AND TAPE. EITHER SECRETARY
SSELL IN SCHOOL SHOP
BOOKKEEPER
OR HAVE SECRETARY
KEEP A RECORD OF PEOPLE
OF PEOPLE CHECKING
OUT FROGS TO SELL.

to I
It _J
I I ~ 7 ; 4 4 .





FOR THIS SIZE FROG i


SUGGESTED
suede


FABRICS:(use


cup FILLING


two colors


APPENDIX # 15 Coont.)
IS ALL YOU NEED
for each frog)


crushed
velour
polyest


velvet


S+I h,
/Ihy l









APPENDIX # 16


CHECK LIST:
Threading sewing
machine

Starting and stopping
machine successfully
Guiding the fabric
Winding the bobbin

Back stitching

Total

Grand Total


3 2 1
Good Fair Poor Comments













L


(11 points required to obtain a license.)


has performed the necessary

tasks successfully and, therefore, is entitled
to hold a sewing machine operator's license. It
may be revoked at any time because of unsafe
sewing habits, abuse of the equipment or other
bad habits which have been agreed upon by the
class and teacher.


T










APPENDIX # 17


SCRAMBLE GRAMS

PROFESSIONAL FASHION DESIGNERS


Many of the fashion designers listed below are household names.
Most will play major roles in shaping future fashion trends.


LENAHC
OBALMA
BWPERT
YLLONN
ENNAID
RO IDFX
YMRRLT
HAEENA
CYDELA
NALNPK
EASEAN
VGRHEL
ILNDIA
GMRD IN
SAINTL
SELIAS


TIM
NCF
GAZ
COH
NAY
LUM
OUD
IEB
ENT
ORT
RCE
AOH
GCL
NOA
URE
LBE


S E-
JT
AP
C B
KN
BB
JE
JO
A I
NZ
EA
GO
E I
LD
NT
RT


GWQ
SAR
CCI
ASS
PRL
AKW
LNE
ADI
NJN
IE B
ASE
RVR
T JG
ICH
TCH
ERK


Fashion Designer Word List


Aldrich (Larry)
Arden (Dorothy)
Balmain (Pierre)
Beene (Geoffrey)
Berk (Gene)
Blass (Bill)
Cardin (Pierre)
Cashin (Bonnie
Chanel (Coco)
Connolly (Sybil)
Dee (Lilly)
Ed (Joe)
De La Renta (Oscar)
Dior (Christian)
Elias (Crika)
Fabiani
Fogarty (Anne)
Givenchy
Godfrey (Margaret)
Jack (Gassy)
Joris (Victor)
Dahn (Ben)
Khanh (Emmanuelle)


24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
50.
51.
52.
55.
34.
55.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.


Klein (Anne)
La Roche (Guy)
Luba
Mia
Mr. Dino
Muir (Jean)
Olga
Patou (Jean)
Fertegaz
Finky and Dianne
Pucci (Emilio)
Pulitzer (Lily)
Ricci (Nina)
Saint Laurent (Yves)
Sanchez (Fernando)
Smith (Willi)
6ylbert (Viola
Traina (Teal)
Trigere (Pauline)
Ungaro (Emanuel)
Valentino
Wacs (Ilie)
veinberg (Chester)


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
15.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
25.







APPENDIX # 18


MILADY'S WARDROBE


Apron
Bikini
Blazer
Blouse
Boots
Brassiere
Cape
Cardigan
Coat
Dress
Dungarees
Evening Gown
Girdle
Gloves
Handbag
Hats
Jacket
Jumper
Loafers
Negligee


NWO
OVN
ROF
PBU
AVB
N W 'S
OIB
EBU
WRE
IST
GT B
AGI
BDP
RRC
NOT
SFL
SXR
HOS


Nightgown
Oxford
Pant Suit
Pantyhose
Parka
Peignoir
Poncho
Scarf
Shawl
Skirt
Slacks
Slip
Slip On
Slippers
Stockings
Stole
Sweater
Swimsuit
Tunic
Vestee


GNI
BIB
WRR
AET
IEE
EM K
WRC
ASA
MUJ

ENS
RAC
SKA
SLR
ESF
REL
DPL
ERA


NEVER
CEME
SBOG
DPLI
ALYL
H T E G
APEE
NRPN
DRSW
BLHO
APAG
GPW T
HRLH
P O.RG
POII
OTSN
RCHW
GNUD


L A
C B
F R
h S
U
I V
U 0
NL
I G
C G
D S
ET
EA
NH
IC
OA
PT
PA









APPENDIX # 19

STOCK CERTIFICATE


CROAK, INC.


is the owner of
(Name of purchaser) (Number of shares)

shares at twenty-five cents a share in Croak, Inc.






Date

Class period

Stock serial number


(Secretary)



(Director of the Board)









APPENDIX # 20

KNIT TIE PATTERN

(Use these dimensions to devise your own pattern from freezer
paper or newsprint.)


60"


Need 54 yard of 60" knit material. Select fabric that does not
need matching.

Use 3 inch seam allowances.

Steps in Construction:

1. Sew end seams, right sides together. Press seams open.

2. Press seams up in a triangular fashion as seen by broken
lines on sample of pattern.

3. Fold right sides together and pin. Stitch Y inch seam from
the end of the triangles as shown in this sketch.



4. Turn - using a large safety pin.

5. Press tie. It is a good idea to make a cardboard the size
of the finished tie. This can be inserted into the tie
when pressing, thus preventing the seams from showing through.

6. Slip stitch both ends that are still free.

7. Press the entire tie.








APPENDIX # 22
CHECK LIST

WOULD YOU RATHER?

Before each statement, think, "Would you rather?" Read all the
statements from A through N. Decide on the job you would most
enjoy doing and put a (1) in the blank before the letter. Put
a (2) in the blank before the letter of the job you would next
enjoy doing. Continue until you have chosen all the jobs in
the order you would enjoy doing them 1 through 14.

Vould you rather
A. Work along an assembly line doing one specific job in
construction of a garment?
B. Sew the entire garment yourself?
C. Sell the garment to a customer?
D. Design the garment?
E. Model the garment?
F. Make minor repairs in the garment such as sewing on buttons,
adjusting hems, etc.?
G. Design and test the fabric for a garraent?
H. Arrange a window display of the garment?
I. Make the pattern for the garment?
J. Assist in care of the garment?
K. Vrite an article on the construction of the garment?
L. Demonstrate to others the construction of a garment?
_M. Run your own business to sell the garment?
N. Repair the machine used in garment construction?

If you have numbers 1-5 on letters A D_, I, G N_,
perhaps a career in the Apparel Industry is for you.

If you have numbers 1-5 on letters C E, H_, M_, perhaps
a career in Fashion Merchandising and Retailing is for you.


If you have numbers 1-5 on letters B', F J_, perhaps a
career in the Sewing Services is for you.


If you have numbers 1-5 on letters K_ L_, M_, perhaps you
would like to become a Professional Home Economist.


What area of Clothing Management Production and Service
Occupations has this checklist told you that you would be
most interested in?





APPENDIX # 23

C A T E IES


CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION SKILLED OR ATTITUDES
SEWING TOOLS UNSKILLED JOBS
AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS PROFESSIONAL JOBS FOR WORK


Cushion for Pinse
C Comparison Shopper o or PnCooperative Cutter
or Carbon


M Manager of Store or
M Manchine Repirmn Measuring Tape Manages Time Marker
Machine Repairman


Pleasant or
P Pattern Designer Pins or Pattern Ple t or Presse-
Personality

'^,
S Seamt Scissors or Sewing Machine
S Seamstress Smiling
Sewing Machine Operator


Accessories For
O Alterationists Accessories Ambitious Assembler
Sewing Machine


[Using the assigned categories of letters - list an item or name under
each category heading that begins with the letter to the left. Set a time
limit of five minute. This may be used as an evaluation device.]







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