• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Occupational opportunities and...
 Tasks common to institutional and...
 Exploratory experiences
 Occupational outlook
 Evaluation of individual inter...
 Bibliography
 Appendix
 Back Cover






Group Title: Bulletin Florida Dept. of Education
Title: A Resource guide for exploration of institutional and home management and supportive service occupations
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096230/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Resource guide for exploration of institutional and home management and supportive service occupations
Alternate Title: Exploration of institutional and home management and supportive service occupations
Physical Description: iv, 27 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Florida Department of Education
Donor: unknown ( endowment )
Publisher: Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Florida Department of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subject: Visiting housekeepers -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Hospital housekeeping -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Hotel housekeeping -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title: Explorations of institutional and home management and supportive service occupations.
General Note: "Florida pre-vocational home economics education."
General Note: "October 1973 ... reprint 1974."
General Note: Florida Department of Education bulletin 75 H-19
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida, Dept. of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Education Section.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096230
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22331326

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Occupational opportunities and requirements
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Tasks common to institutional and home management and supportive service occupations
        Page 4
    Exploratory experiences
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Occupational outlook
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Evaluation of individual interests
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Bibliography
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Appendix
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text














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A RESOURCE GUIDE


FOR


EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND


HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS








STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION SECTION


This reprint of a public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$112.65 or $.11 per copy to provide direction and resource materials
for Florida Home Economics teachers who are instructing in the pre-
vocational program.



FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS BULLETIN MAY BE SECURED THROUGH
MISS ALLIE FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR, HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION, KNOTT
BUILDING, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304








37 5- (7/














INTR O DUCTI 0 N



The pre-vocational program in Florida has three major purposes:


To provide students with an orientation to the many career oppor-

tunities available in the world of work.

To assist students in developing personal competencies important

to success in almost any occupation.

To provide students with exploration experiences in occupational

clusters according to their choice.

COURSE STANDARDS


Section: Home Economics Education

Accreditator Title: Exploration of Institutional and Home Management
and Supportive Service Occupations

Accreditator Code No.: 2797 TJ.S.O.E. No.: 09.0205

Course Objective: To provide students with opportunities to explore a
broad range of institutional and home management and supportive service
occupations and concepts that relate to this industry and to self-employ-
ment.

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with
opportunities to explore a broad range of institutional and home manage-
ment and supportive service occupations and concepts that relate to
this industry and to self-employment. Major concepts include awareness
of the operation of institutional and home management and supportive
service enterprises; planning and providing services for individuals
and groups, including those with special needs; equipment and materials;
and agencies and legislation related to institutional and home manage-
ment and supportive services. Concepts of management, consumer edu-
cation and safety are included as they relate to instruction.

Teacher-Student Ratio: 1 to 24

Facilities: Refer to VTAE Facility Standards Bulletin







SEPTEMBERR 1973


RECOMMENDED PRE-VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION

The Schema below follows the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Division guidelines for pre-vocational education


A STUDENT AT THE
SEVENTH GRADE LEVEL
MAY ENROLL IN



ORIENTATION
TQ
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONS
(6-9 WEEKS)

AND MAY ALSO ENROLL IN
PERSONAL
CAREER ORIENTATION

(6-9 WEEKS)

Course is a part of
c o m.prehensive
orientation involving
other occupational
categories and may be
a segment of a wheel.
(see note)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO SCHOOL
OFFERINGS


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12-18 WEEKS)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
NINTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO
SCHOOL OFFERINGS,
ANY OF THESE NOT
PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED IN



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12, 18 or 36 WEEKS)


* COURSE TITLES FOR HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS:
EXPLORATION OF THE OCCUPATION OF HOMEMAKING
EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE
SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


** EXPLORATION OF HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS


INCLUDES ALL OF THE ABOVE CLUSTERS


Note: A combination of these two courses could be equal to one semester of home economics reported under
code # 2701.











ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


PARTICIPANTS:


EDITOR:

DIRECTOR:

TYPIST:


Adelaide Wolfe, Home Economics Teacher
Deltona Junior High School, Deltona


Martha Lemons

Edna Warner

Elaine Muncy














TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction . . . . . . . . . . ii
Acknowledgements . . .. . . . . . iii
Table of Contents . . . . . . iv


Concept I Occupational Opportunities and
Requirements *. . . . . .1

Concept II Tasks Common to Institutional and
Home Management and Supportive
Service Occupations . . . 3

Concept III Exploratory Experiences . . 5
Sub-concept Laundry Procedures . . . . 7
Sub-concept Use and Care of Equipment and Supplies 9
Sub-concept Preparation and Service of Food . 11
Sub-concept Companion to the Elderly . . .. 13

Concept IV Occupational Outlook . . . . 15

Concept V Evaluation of Individual Interests 17


Bibliography . . * * * * .. . 19
Appendix . . * * * * 22






CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements
SUB-CONCEPT


1. The students will
identify oppor-
tunities and re-
quirements for
occupations in
home service
related occupa-
tions.


1. Collect clippings from newspapers and
magazines related to home service
occupations in homes, commercial estab-
lishments and institutions. Discuss in
class and put together a bulletin board.

2. Survey neighborhoods to determine indi-
vidual needs for services in the
community.

3. Make appointments to talk with area
business people about on-the-job require-
ments. Report to class.



4. Invite operators of businesses to class
to discuss requirements and advantages
of job opportunities.





Evaluation:

Evaluate the students on the basis of the
following:

1. Class discussion participation
2. Creativity in preparing a bulletin
board
3. Interest in finding clippings from
newspapers and magazines
4. Completeness in the survey of the
neighborhood to determine needs for
services
5. Reporting to the class on the inter-
view with a business person
6. Attentiveness in class while the
resource person is speaking on the
job opportunities





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Advanced training needed for the
following positions:
1. Household Management Specialist
2. Executive Housekeeper in
a. hotels
b. motels
c. hospitals



Skilled and/or semi-skilled at Job
Entry:
Housekeeping and Cleaning
1. Hospitals
2. Homes
3. Contract Cleaning Firms
4. Maid Service
Homemaker's Aides
Self-employment
1. Aide in Children's
Institution
2. Companion to Elderly
and Disabled
5. Home Catering
4. Marketing Service


.7


RESOURCES


-t


Hopke, William.
Encyclopedia of Careers
and Vocational Guidance,


Vol. II.


Pamphlets:
1. Fiuding Your Job
2. Countdown to the 70's

Dudnick, Phyllis.
A Job for You.

Handbook:
Occupational Outlook,


(1972-1975).


Pamphlet:
Household Employment
Training


Resource Persons:
1. Manager of Commercial
Laundry
2. Manager of Commercial
Laundry-Dry Cleaning
Establishment

Gibson, Mary.
The Family Circle Book of
Careers at Home.

Local Newspaper Want-Ads


Resource Person:
Member of a Civic Association


Singer Filmstrips:
1. Requirements in the
World of Jobs, SFA 122
2. Achieving Success in
World of Jobs, SFS 123.
5. Foundations for
Occupational Planning,
A 8895 SA.


Filmstrip Kit:
J. C. Penney's Career
Decisions.






CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Supportive Service Occupations
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
identify
problems that
relate to all
supportive
service
occupations.


2. The student will
understand that
spending habits
carry over from
personal life to
job situations.


3. The students will
recognize that
many tasks are
common to
several
supportive
service occupa-
tions.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Role-play tasks involved in specific jobs,
using a time schedule.
2. Analyze procedures for saving time, energy,
and supplies.
3. "Create" problem situations. Use the
7-steps approach to problem solving.
Determine solutions and alternatives.


1. Start a small "Where My Money Goes" note-
book.
2. Conduct "buzz" session listing ways an
employee can save money for his employer.
3. List "Sell a Service" and "Sell a Product"
jobs as ways to obtain more money.


1. Select jobs by teams. Demonstrate the
duties and responsibilities of each job.






Evaluation:

Evaluate the students on the basis of
the following:
1. How well he/she followed the time
schedule in role-playing a specific
job.
2. How well he/she solved a "problem
situation."
3. The completeness of the "Where My
Money Goes" notebook.
4. The student's contribution to ways
that an employee can help an employer
save money in his business.
5. How well he/she demonstrated the duties
and responsibilities of the job that
was chosen.


I






CONCEPT
SUb-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Management problems arise when it
becomes necessary to make decisions in
organizing, planning, controlling and
evaluating use of resources to achieve
certain goals. Decision-making involves
1. value judgments.
2. choices to be made.
5. goals to be set.
4, priorities to be established.
5. standards to be set.
6. resources to be used.
Human resources involve time, energy
and abilities.
material resources involve money,
possessions and community resources.
Important factors relevant to all
housekeeping jobs:
Safety in
1. preparing food
2. storing food
3. handling equipment
4. using cleaning agents
5. taking care of children
6. using first aid
7. preventing injuries
Maintenance in
1. knowing what must be cleaned
2. following proper procedures
3. using cleaning equipment
4. washing dishes
5. disposing of garbage
6. cleaning equipment for food
preparation
Sanitation in
1. preparing/storing food
2. handling supplies
3. cleaning bathrooms
4. caring for trash containers
5. handling soiled linens
6. handling sick room supplies
7. cleaning sinks
8. cleaning ranges
9. cleaning counters
10. cleaning kitchen floors
Economy in
1. planning amount & kind of food
2. using time, energy, money
3. using left over food
4. using supplies
5. using cleaning agents


IT-


RESOURCES


t


Fleck, Henrietta, et al.
Living With Your Family,


pp. 346-348.


Raines, Margaret.
Managing Living Time,
pp. 10-23.


Goodyear, Chapin.
Managing for Effective


Living,
Chapters 4 and 5.


Pamphlets:
1. Housecleaning,
Management and Methods
2. How to Keep Cleaning
Tools Clean
3. Equipment Instruction
Booklet
4. Simple Housekeeping
Tools Every Homemaker
Needs
5. 2ow to Take the Work
Out of Housework



Moore, Alma C.
How to Clean Everything.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
Chapter 8.





ONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The student will
identify
appropriate
cleaning equip-
ment necessary
for basic tasks
in home service.

2. The students will
recognize the
differences in a
variety of
cleaning supplies
for specific
cleaning tasks.












5. The students will
become efficient
in making a bed
and demonstrate
the necessity
for sanitary care
and storage of
bedding.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Work in teams. Compare tools and products
as to efficiency and cost.
2. List tasks as (a) fun (b) drudgery
3. Think of ways to make all tasks pleasant.
4. Prepare a demonstration of the proper use
and care of a certain piece of equipment.

1. Discuss uses of cleaning materials as to
efficiency and price.
2. Set up a display of cleaning materials
indicating their uses and cleansing
properties.
3. Clean specific surfaces using different
products for the same surface, for example:
a. Clean one window with vinegar and
water and another with glass wax.
Compare.
b. Polish one wood panel '.ith spray wax
and another with paste wax. Compare.
4. Evaluate advertisements.
5. Design bulletin boards showing such
information as use of color and eye-
catching features.
6. Bring to class silver, brass, copper and
pewter articles to be cleaned and polished.
Evaluate results.

1. Find bedding advertisements including types
of beds, fitted and flat sheets, cases, flat
and fitted blankets, comforters and spreads.
2. Prepare a display of bedding.
3. Discuss the steps in bedmaking.
4. Observe the teacher as she demonstrates
bedmaking. Practice bedmaking.
5. Demonstrate folding fitted and flat sheets
for ease of storage and ease in bedmaking.


Evaluation:
Evaluate the students on the following:
1. Teamwork
2. Demonstrations
3. Advertisement evaluations
4. Bulletin board
5. Proper bedmaking ability and display
6. Ability to fold and store bed linens


I




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Cleaning Equipment
1. Pails
2. Sponges
3. Poilet brushes
4. Polishers & Scrubbers
5. Vacuum Cleaner & Attachments
6. Wet mops
7. Dust mops
8. Cloths
9. Brooms & Dustpans
10. Brushes
Cleaning Supplies


Solvents 5. Bleaches
Deterrents 6. Stain removers
Abrasives 7. Polishers
Acids 8. Waxes


Specific directions must be observed in
using each type of cleanser on each
surface to be cleaned.
1. Floors and floor coverings
2. Walls and woodwork
3. Furniture
4. Windows
5. Metals
6. China and glassware
7. Counter tops

Bedmaking is a seven-day a week task.
The complete job needs to be done only
on the day the linen is changed. On
other days the bedding needs only to be
smoothed and straightened and the
pillows and spreads arranged. In hotels
and motels the complete job is done
daily.

These tasks are dependent upon
1. size of the bed and placement
in room.
2. size of the bedding.
3. types of bedding...fitted or
flat.
4. types of mattresses.

The care, folding and storage of bedding
is important to the end results of good
bedmaking.


RESOURCES


Bulletin Board:
(cleaning equipment)




Moore, Alma C.
How to Clean Everything,


p. 2.


Starr, Mary Catherine.
Management for Better


Living, pp. 250-255


Pamphlets 4, 5, 9, 10:
How-To Housekeeping
Leaflets


Newspapers, Current
Magazines, Catalogs

Bulletin Board:
"Buying Bedding"

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking.

Fleck, Henrietta, et al.
Exploring Home and
Family Living,
pp. 167-181.

Transparencies:
Steps in Bedmaking.


J




JNCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Laundry Procedures


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


______________________________________I


1. The students will
demonstrate
preparation of
soiled clothing
and linens for
laundry when
working as a
homemaker's
aide.


2. The students will
demonstrate the
proper use and
care of laundry
equipment.



3. The students will
demonstrate the
methods of
mending and
making minor
repairs to
garments.


4. The students will
demonstrate the
proper procedure
involved in
ironing and
pressing.


1. Discuss the health aspect of clean and
sanitary clothing and linens.
2. List steps in laundering
a. sorting
b. mending
c. spot removing
d. washing
e. drying
f. ironing or pressing


3. Remove
a.
b.
c.


various types of stains such as
grease d. ink
fruit e. coffee
lipstick f. tea


1. Use equipment instruction guides to
study the use and care of equipment.






1. List frequent repair jobs.

2. Prepare mending kit in class.





1. Demonstrate pressing and ironing equipment
used in industry and home:
a. ironing board e. sleeve board
with pad and cover f. pressing ham
b. dry iron g. press mitt
c. steam iron h. pressing cloth
d. steam-spray iron
2. Set up an imaginary laundry-dry-cleaning
establishment. Select a name. Divide the
class into groups to perform different jobs.
Checkers and sorters should make an inven-
tory. (Soiled clothing may be brought from
home. This project can operate for several
days until students get experience at each
job listed in #2 activity.)
3. Plan a field trip to a laundry or dry-
cleaning establishment.


OBJECTIVES






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Demonstrate the tools of laundering.

Emphasize the necessity of carefully
watching the weight and bulk of clothing
in reference to the capacity of the
worker.








Demonstrate the proper removal of
common stains including rust removers.


Obtain instruction manuals on different
types of laundry equipment.




Show how prompt repair eliminates
further damage and contributes to
good appearance.




Demonstrate that ironing is the
smoothing and drying of damp, washable
fabric with a sliding motion of the
iron.


Demonstrate that pressing is smoothing,
flattening of fabric with an up and
down motion of the iron.


Pamphlets and
Manufacturers'
Instruction Booklets.














McDermott and Nicholas.
Homemaking for Teenagers,
Book 2.
pp. 187-190, 198-202.





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Use and Care of Equipment and Supplies


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
research the
potential dangers
that exist in the
home.









2. The students will
demonstrate
skill in saving
time and energy.


LEARJ


IING EXPERIENCES


1. Make a survey at home of conditions that
could cause accidents.
2. Discuss in groups the causes, results and
prevention of accidents.
3. Demonstrate proper way to disconnect
electrical equipment.
4. Discuss danger of electricity.
5. Discuss safety in the bathroom.
6. Discuss storage of poisonous products.
7. Determine the precautions to be taken in
the use of cleaning materials.
8. Invite a fireman to class to discuss the
prevention of accidents and fire.


1. List housekeeping tasks and make time
schedules.
2. Perform tasks such as cleaning refrigerator,
sink, and bathroom using a time schedule
3. List some activities using both hands to
shorten work.
4. Illustrate correct and incorrect posture
for standing, walking, sitting, lifting,
and stooping.


Evaluation:

Evaluate the students on the following:

1. Survey of home conditions that could
cause accidents
2. Participation in class discussions on
causes, results and prevention of
accidents
5. Schedule of household tasks with
accompanying time charts
4. List of activities showing how using
both hands can shorten the work time
5. Willing participation in posture skills





'0 CE EPT.
SUI.,- LXN(EPT


CONTENT


ilome Hazards:
1. Loose or slippery rugs
2. Furniture in traffic lanes
3. Slippery, wet floors
4. Common household products which
are poisonous
5. Hot spilled food
6. Extension cords
7. Hot pans

Discuss the proper handling and
suitable uses of cleaning materials:
1. Mild and strong soaps
2. Household ammonia
3. Salsoda and borax
4. Absorbent powders
5. Cleansers
6. Pumice
7. Steel wool
8. Furniture polish
9. Cleaning and polishing wax

Organize flexible time schedules.

Investigate for time and energy
saving techniques:
1. Organize tools and supplies.
2. Make a cleaning basket.
5. Use both hands for some tasks.
4. Allow for short rest periods.
5. Wear comfortable clothes.


Actualize that leisure time results
from the efficient use of time, energy
and equipment in housekeeping practices.

Determine that it is to everyone's
advantage to learn how to make the most
of one's energy and time.

Practice correct posture for it is
most important to appearance and comfort.








11


RESOURCES


1-


Guide:
The Bissel Guide to
Housekeeping for
Young Homemakers.

Filmstrip:
Let's Be Safe at Home

Resource Person:
Fire Department member





Pamphlet:
How to Make House-
cleaning Easier

Fleck, Henrietta.
Living With Your
Family, pp. 346-432.

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,


Chap. 9.


I -





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Preparation and Service of Food


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
plan as a home-
maker's aide
simple meals for
the family,











2. The students will
set the table
attractively yet
conveniently and
serve food
according to the
family custom.



5. The students will
practice timing
in meal
preparation.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


4


1. Plan a day's meals for an imaginary
family. Include market orders and cost
of food.
2. Role-play the family members and mother's
assistant in various situations such as
measuring, mixing and beating.
3. Plan and prepare cookies or a simple cake
for a snack.
4. Learn to use appliances for food preparation
found in the home such as:
a. blenders
b. waffle irons
c. mixers
d. micro-wave ovens
e. broilers

1. Assemble table appointments for various
services.
2. Demonstrate methods of service and evaluate
in relation to ease of service, space
arrangements, and attractiveness.
3. Collect magazine pictures showing various
table settings and make a bulletin board
display.


1. Plan and prepare a simple meal to include
a food that can be prepared the day before.
2. Complete the preparations for the meal, set
the table, serve the meal and clean up the
kitchen and dining area.


Evaluation:

Evaluate the student on the following:

1. Meal plans for the family
2. Role-play as mother's assistant
5. Planning and preparing a snack
4. Use of appliances
5. Demonstration of table services
6. Creativity in arranging bulletin board
on tale settings






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


When preparing meals or snacks for
others it is important to
1. consider family members.
2. have all menus written by the
employer and understood by the
employee.
3. follow the instructions of the
homemaker in regard to prepara-
tion.
4. be able to use the pieces of
available equipment.
5. be familiar with the storage
and care of all equipment.
6. be familiar with the proper
storage of food supplies.
7. explain your cooking limitations
to your employer.





Understand the types of food services:
1. buffet
2. plate, tray
3. formal, informal
4. picnic
5. cook out


Follow the directions of the employer.



When time is limited, plan preparations
that can be done ahead of time.


RESOURCES


Fleck, Henrietta.
Exploring Home and
Family Living,
Chapter 9.


Fleck, Henrietta.
Living With Your
Family, Chapter 8.



Pollard, Belle.
Experiences With Foods.

Lewis, Peckham, Hovey.
Family Meals and
Hospitality.


Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking.


Medved, Eva.
World of Food,
Chapters 3, 4,


5, 6.


Raines, Margaret.
Managing Living Time.







CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT Companion to the Elderly


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
study the charac-
teristics of
aging before
working as a
companion to the
elderly.


2. The students will
identify
physical and
emotional needs
of the aged.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Consult such professional people as
a. nursing home directors
b. nurses
c. doctors
2. Discuss characteristic behavior patterns of
the elderly and ways a homemaker's aid can
assist these people who live at home.


1. Compile a list of ways a homemaker aide can
help elderly people meet their needs.
2. Discuss the physical and emotional require-
ments of an aide who works with the aged.
Include in the discussion such topics as
a. acceptance of the elderly.
b. sense of humor.
c. kindness.
d. gentleness.
e. cheerfulness.
f. physical strength.
g. state of health of the aide.
3. Interview older family members and/or older
neighbors concerning the foods they eat.
Compare the findings with the minimum
Basic-4 requirements of the aged.
4. Plan an adequate meal for the aged.
5. Prepare and serve an attractive meal to an
elderly person.
6. Demonstrate how this meal can be packed and
safely transported to an elderly shut-in.


Evaluation:

Evaluate the student on the following:

1. Report to class after having consulted
a professional person
2. Participation in class discussion
3. List of ways an aide can help an elderly
person meet his/her needs
4. Report on the eating habits of an
elderly person
5. Planning and serving of a meal to an
elderly person on the basis of adequacy
and attractiveness





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Inform the students of the following
concerning the elderly:
1. Sight and hearing infirmities
2. Less efficient body functions
3. Chronic disease
4. Need for reduction in activities
5. Loss of interest in nutrition
6. Decrease in mental alertness
7. Apathy to people and surroundings
8. Symptoms of senility



Discuss the needs and problems of
the elderly:
1. Finding a satisfactory home
2. Adjusting to retirement income
3. Facing loss of friends and
family
4. Finding meaning in living
5. Keeping well
6. Using leisure time
7. Finding some suitable employment
8. Developing a hobby
9. Maintaining freedom and inde-
pendence
10. Seeking and finding companion-
ship


RESOURCES


I


Resource Persons


Arthur, Juliette D.
How to Help Older People:
You and Yours.


Riehl, Luise C.
Family Nursing and
Child Care.


Craig, H. T.
Thresholds to Adult
Living.


Pamphlet:
Food Guide for Older
Folks, 1970





CONCEPT IV Occupational Outlook
SUB-CONCEPT -


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
explore the
future of service
related
occupations as
well as the
skills and
specialties they
require.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Make surveys of job outlook using
resource materials available.

2. Prepare a report to be presented to
the class discussing specifically
service related occupations. Examples
are:
a. homemaker's aide.

b. maid.

c. laundryman.

d. seamstress.

e. cook.

f. caterer.









Evaluation:

Evaluate the students on the following:

1. Survey on job outlooks

2. Report to the class on a service-
related occupation






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


There are an increasing number of em-
ployment opportunities created by the
strong demand for private household
workers as a result of rising family
incomes and the added numbers of wives
and mothers working outside the home.



Businesses and institutions have a
constant need for trained people to be
hired as aides or as workers and
managers in custodial positions.



The outlook through the 1970's is
very favorable.


Wages vary with location.


Entry wages are minimum.


1~


RESOURCES


1*


Pamphlet:
Finding Your Job


Hopke, William E.
Encyclopedia of Careers
and Vocational Guidance,
Vol. II.


Handbook:
Occupational Outlook
Handbook,
1972-7(7 Elition.





CONCEPT V Evaluation of Individual Interests
SUB -CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
complete an
appraisal of his
interests in the
housekeeping and
homemaking jobs
available in the
service areas.


-T


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Complete the personal evaluation sheets
at the close of each exploratory ex-
perience and keep them available in the
cumulative folder.

2. Re-check frequently the list of personal
qualities necessary for employment in
supportive services.

3. Evaluate individual interests by com-
pleting the "Like Dislike" chart.









Evaluation:

Evaluate the student on the following:

1. Completeness of the personal evaluation
sheet

2. Ability to keep a well-organized
cumulative folder

5. Sincerity in completing the "Like -
Dislike" chart


I





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Supportive Service Occupations are
concerned mainly with the home except
where home related skills may be used
in business operations outside the
home. Most jobs in business require
secondary and post-secondary training.





Provide "Like Dislike" chart for
student evaluation.




































19


RESOURCES


Pamphlet:
National Committee
on Household
Employment



Refer to Resources:
Concept I



Appendix #1
"Tests"












BIBLIOGRAPHY


BOOKS

Arthur, Juliette D. How to Help Older Peoplel You and Yours.
New York: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1960. ($5.95)

Barclay, Marion; Champion, Frances; Brinkley, Jeanne; Funderburk,
Kathleen. Teen Guide to Homemaking. McGraw-Hill Book
Company, 1972.

Craig, Hazel T. Thresholds to Adult Living. Peoria, Illinois:
Charles A Bennett Company, Inc., 19B9. ($7.12)

Dietz, Betty Warner. You Can Work in the Health Services. The
You Can Work Books. New York: The John Day Company, 1970.

Dubnick, Phyllis. A Job For You. Austin, Taxas: Steck-Vaughn
Company, 1967.

Fleck, Henrietta; Fernandez, Louise; Munves, Elizabeth.
Living with Your Family. Englewood Cliffs, New Jerseys
Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1965.

Fleck, Henrietta. Exploring Home and Family Living. Englewood
Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1985.

Gibson, Mary Bass. The Family Circle Book of Careers at Home.
Chicago: Cowlees Book Company, Inc., 1971.

Goodyear, Chapin. Managing for Effective Living. New York:
John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 19S5.

Hopke, William E., (ad.). The Encyclopedia of Careers and
Vocational Guidance. Chicagot J.G. Ferguson Publishing
Company, 1972.

Kimbrell, Grady and Vineyard, Ban S. Activities for Succeading
in the World of Work. Bloomington, Illinoiss McKnight
and McKnight Publishing Company, 1972.

Lambeck, Ruth. Teenage Jobs. New York: David McKay Company,
Inc., 1972.

Lerner, Lillian and Maller, Margaret. Marie Parrone, Practical
Nurse. Chicago: Follett Publishing Company.

Lewis, Doris; Peckham, Gladys; and Hovey, Helen. Family Meals
and Hospitality. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1960.












Ludwig, Amber C. The Bissell Guide to Housekeeping for Young
Homemakers. New York: Bantam Books, Inc., 1967.

McDermott, Irene E. and Nicholas, Florence W. Homemaking for
Teen-Agers--Book 2. A Consumer Education Text.
Peoria, Illinois: Charles A Bennett Company, Inc.,
1970.

Medved, Eva. The World of Food. Boston: Ginn and Company, 1970.

Moore, Alma C. How to Clean Everything. New York: Simon and
Schuster, 1981.

Pollard, Belle. Experiences with Food. Boston: Ginn and Company,
1964.

Raines, Margaret. Managing Living Time. Peoria, Illinois:
Charles A. Bennett Company, Inc., 1964.

Starr, Mary Catherine. Management for Better Living. Boston:
0. C. Heath and Company, 1963.

FILMSTRIPS

Career Decisions. J.C. Penney Company, Inc., Educational Relations,
1301 Avenue of the Americas, New York. 10019.

Let's Be Safe at Home. North Carolina State Board of Health Film
Library, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Requiirements in the World of Jobs. (SFA 122). Achieving Success in
the World of Jobs. CSFS 123). Foundations For
Occupational Planning. (A8895SA). S.V.E.- Society
for Visual Education, Inc., 1345 Diversey Parkway,
Chicago. 60614.

PAMPHLETS

Countdown to the 70's. Florida Department of Education, Knott Bldg.,
Tallahassee, Florida. 32304. [Free])

Finding Your Job. Vertical File. Finney Company, Minneapolis,
Minnesota. 55426.

Food Guide For Older Folks. U.S. Department of Health, Education
and Welfare, Washington, D.C.

Helping Families Manage Their Finances. Food Guide for Older Folks.
The Older American. U.S. Government Printing OFFice,
Washington, D.C. 20402.

Housecleaning Management and Methods. How to Keep Cleaning Tools
Clean. Simple Housekeeping Tools Every Homemaker
Needs. How to Take the Work out of Housework.
University of Florida Extension Service, Gainesville,
Florida.










Household Employment Training. U.S. Deaprtment of Health, Education
and Welfare, Office of Education, U.S. Printing Office,
Washington, D.C. 20402.

Housekeeping Management Assistant. Home Economics Instructional
Material Center, P.O. Box 4067, Texas Tech. University,
Lubbock, Texas. 79409.

How to Make Housecleaning Easier* Consumer Service Department,
Johnson Wax, Racine, Wisconsin.

National Committee on Household Employment. 1346 Connecticut
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.

Occupational Outlook Handbook. (1872-73 ad.) Department of Labor,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.





































APPENDIX











Read each
Cl)


C2)


APPENDIX

WHAT KIND OF WORK WOULD YOU LIKE?

job characteristic below:
Mark with an (x) in column one if it is a characteristic
YOU WOULD LIKE.

Mark with an CX) in column two if it is a characteristic
YOU WOULD NOT LIKE.

Not
Like L-a Iike


1. Work in which you would do an identical task
every day.


2. Work in which you have a variety of activities.


3. Work in which you would be on your feet most of
the time.


4. Work in which you develop several skills.


5. Work that demands imagination and resourcefulness


6. Work in which you are seated most of the time.


7. Work at which you try to please customers.


8. Work that is located in a busy, unglamorous place.


9. Work in which your job would be only part time.


10. Work in which there is
deadlines.


a great pressure to meet


11. Work where type of dress does not matter.


12. Work in which no decisions are necessary.


13. Work that demands rapid production.


Ccont.)







APPENDIX (cont.)


eW L.ke
14. Work where neat dress is required.


15. Work in which you may do some spelling.


16. Work where a uniform is required.


17. Work done by machinery.


18. Work where there is opportunity for advancement.


19. Work that must be done in a business establishment


20. Work in which you have responsibility for
handling money.


21. Work that is scheduled by customer demand.


22. Work done by hand.


23. Work that includes completion of a product.


24. Work that involves only one part of something.


25. Work where noise is always present.


26. Work that allows you to be alone most of the time.


27. Work where competition is always keen.


2B. Work that requires a specific number of hours
per week.


29. Work for which you are trained in one skill.


30. Work in which salary is guaranteed.


Ccont.)


3 ~


Not
I 11-_










APPENDIX (cont]


31. Work in which many others are present.


32. Work that allows opportunity for overtime.


33. Work in which your speed, ability and output
determine salary.


34. Work in which maintenance of customer goodwill is
essential.


35. Work that gives satisfaction from having
improved something.


36. Work that is in a clean, well-decorated
establishment.


37. Total "like" checks.


38. Total "dislike" checks.

39. Name the jobs in supportive services
according to your "dislikes'.'


which you should avoid


C .


40. Name the jobs in supportive services
according to your "likes".


which you would enjoy


41. Personal Characteristics Necessary for Careers in Care of the
Elderly and Disabled. Answer "yes" or "no"

Do you have the desire to


_meet different people?
understand and work with people?
help people become more
productive? 26


take part of the
responsibility for
the pleasure and
comfort of others?
do a job well?


Not
Like


Like


+









AFFENDIX (aoont.)


Do you have


Do you






Are you


a real love for people?
a sensitivity For people and problems?
a sincere respect For individuals?
a tolerant understanding oF human shortcomings?
a sense of service and obligation to people?
a capacity For teamwork?
high standards of truth, loyalty and personal dignity?
a cooperative attitude?


use good judgment in decision-making?
have pride and interest in your work?
communicate effectively with people of all ages?
make and keep Friends easily?
handle your own aggressions and Fears wisely?


physically energetic?
alert and polite?
poised and self-confident?
emotionally stable?
sympathetic and patient?
generous with your time and talents?
willing to accept criticism and advice?
neat and well-groomed?
dependable, prompt, and punctual?
optimistic?
cheerful with a sense of humor?


















































































.-. : DEPARTMENT
OF'EDUCATION
-.Tallahassee. Florida

FLOYD T CHRISTIAN
., COMMISSIONER




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