• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Recommended pre-vocational home...
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Occupational opportunities and...
 Tasks common to food service
 Exploratory experiences
 Outlook in food and nutrition...
 Evaluation of individual interests...
 Bibliography
 Back Cover






Group Title: Exploration of food management, production and service occupations
Title: A Resource guide for food management, production and service occupations
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096229/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Resource guide for food management, production and service occupations
Alternate Title: Exploration of food management, production and service occupations
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Department of Education
Publisher: Florida Department of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subject: Food service -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Food service management -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida, Dept. of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Education Section.
General Note: Cover title: Exploration of food management, production and service occupations.
General Note: "Florida pre-vocational home economics education."
General Note: "October 1973 ... reprint 1974.
General Note: Florida Department of Education Bulletin no. 75 H-17, reprint 1974
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096229
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22331401

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page ii-a
    Recommended pre-vocational home economics education
        Page iii
        Page iii-a
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Occupational opportunities and requirements in food management, production and service
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Tasks common to food service
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Exploratory experiences
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Outlook in food and nutrition occupations
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Evaluation of individual interests in foods related occupations
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 29a
    Bibliography
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text















EXPLORATION OF FOOD MANAGEMENT,

PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


FLORIDA
PRE-VOCATIONAL
HOME ECONOMICS
EDUCATION






OCTOBER 1973
BULLETIN #76 H-17
Reprint 1974


*i ..-' E-r I -* -















A RESOURCE GUIDE


FOR


FOOD MANAGEMENT,


PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS








STATE OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION


HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION SECTION


This reprint of a public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$102.09 or $.11 per copy to provide direction and resource materials
for Florida Home Economics teachers who are instructing in the pre-
vocational program.


FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS BULLETIN MAY BE SECURED THROUGH
MISS ALLIE FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR, HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION, KNOTT
BUILDING, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304



















d- ; (










INTR DUCTION


The pre-vocational program in Florida has three major purposes:


To provide students with an orientation to the many career opportunities

available in the world of work.

To assist students in developing personal competencies important to

success in almost any occupation

To provide students with exploration experiences in occupational clusters

according to their choice.


This guide, Exploration of Food Management, Production and Service Occupa-

tion designed to provide assistance in teaching course code #2762.



COURSE STANDARDS


Section: Home Economics Education

Accreditator Title: Exploration of Food Management, Production and
Service Occupations

Accreditator Code No.: 2762 U.S.O.E. No.: 09.0203

Course Objective: To provide students with opportunities to explore a
broad range of food management, production and service occupations and
concepts that relate to the food industry and self-employment.

Course Description: This course is designed to include awareness of
the operation of food service enterprises; planning and providing food
service for individuals and groups including those with special needs; and
equipment, materials, agencies and legislation related to food service.
Instruction includes hands-on laboratory experiences which are basic to
specialized proficiencies needed for employment. Concepts in management,
consumer education, sanitation and safety are taught as they relate to
instruction.

Teacher-Student Ratio: 1 to 24

Facilities: Refer to VTAE Facility Standards Bulletin





SEPTEMBER 1973


RECOMMENDED PRE-VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION

The Schema below follows the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Division guidelines for pre-vocational education


A STUDENT AT THE
SEVENTH GRADE LEVEL
MAY ENROLL IN



ORIENTATION
TO
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONS
(6-9 WEEKS)

AND MAY ALSO ENROLL IN
PERSONAL
CAREER ORIENTATION

(6-9 WEEKS)

Course is a part of
co m prehensive
orientation involving
other occupational
categories and may be
a segment of a wheel.
(see note)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO SCHOOL
OFFERINGS


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12-18 WEEKS)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
NINTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO
SCHOOL OFFERINGS,
ANY OF THESE NOT
PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED IN



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12, 18 or 36 WEEKS)


* COURSE TITLES FOR HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS:
EXPLORATION OF THE OCCUPATION OF HOMEMAKING
EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE. GUIDANCE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE
SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


** EXPLORATION OF HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS
INCLUDES ALL OF THE ABOVE CLUSTERS


Note: A combination of these two courses could be equal to one semester of home economics reported under
code # 2701.














ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


PARTICIPANTS:


EDITOR:


DIRECTOR:


Martha Holt, Home Economics
Teacher, Memorial Jr. High
School, Orlando Florida

Florence Conway, Home Economics
Teacher, Creco Jr. High School,
Tampa, Florida


Martha Lemons

Edna Warner


Elaine Muncy


TYPIST:















TABLE OF CONTENTS

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .


Introduction .

Chart . . .

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents


Concept I

Concept II


Concept III

Concept IV

Concept V


- Occupational Opportunities and Requirements .

- Tasks Common to Food Management, Production and
Service Occupations

- Exploratory Experiences . . . . .

- Occupational Outlook . . . . . ..

- Evaluation of Individual Interests in Food .
Management, Production and Service Occupations


Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . .

Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . .











CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements in Food
SUB-CONCEPT Management, Production and service


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will classify
food service
jobs according
to occupational
areas.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Use pretest for recognition of jobs
related to food service. Appendix #1


2. Prepare a bulletin board suggestion for
food service occupations. Appendix #2


3. Complete the crossword puzzle, "Food
Service Occupations." Appendix #3


4. Bring to class want ads in the food
service areas. Use local maps; pinpoint
the work locations. Use yellow pages
in the phone book for locations.


5. Play the game, "Fanco." Appendix #4


6. On the handout, add to the areas in food
service occupations. Appendix #5


I






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Information for File Card:
Restaurant and Cafeteria Occupations


1. Short Order Cook
2. Counter Worker
3. Waiter/Waitress
4. Cook
5. Cook's Helper
6. Hostess/Host
7. Pantry Supervisor
8. Pizza Worker
9. Bus Boy/Girl
10. Fast Service Worker
11. Cashier
12. Chef
13. Manager
14. Assistant Manager
15. Merchandising
Supervisor
16. Kitchen Supervisor


17. Kitchen Helper
18. Dishwasher
19. Sandwich Worker
20. Beverage Worker
21. Salad Worker
22. Soda Fountain
Worker
23. Chain Executive
24. Purchasing
Agent
25. Personnel
Director
26. Menu Maker
27. Director of
Recipe
Development


Occupations Related to Food Service


Business
1. Airline Stewardess
2. Food Tester
3. State Board of
Health Nutritionist
4. Extension Worker
5. Journalist
6. Teacher
7. Food and Drug
Inspector
8. Food Service
Supervisor
9. Caterer
10. Foods Demonstrator
11. Recipe Developer
Grocery Business
1. Meat Cutter-Butcher
2. Cashier
3. Stock Worker
4. Meat Wrapper
5. Produce Manager
6. Grocery Manager
7. Store Manager
8. Assistant Manager


Institutional
1. Dietition
2. Cook and
Assistant Cook
3. Kitchen Worker
4. Manager and
Assistant
Manager
5. Food Service
Supervisor
6. Kitchen
Supervisor
7. Purchasing
Agent

Other Occupations
1. Baker Cake
Decorator
2. Candy Factory
Worker
3. Vending Company
Employee
4. Dairyman/woman
5. Bottling Company
Employee
6. Foods Company
Employee


RESOURCES


1*


Appendix #1
Pretest
"Foods Occupations"

Appendix #2
Bulletin Board

Appendix #3
Crossword Puzzle
"Food Service Occupations"


Appendix #4
Game
"Fanco"


Bibliographies
Job Descriptions
Files

Wilkes, Doris.
Hospitality Education Program.


Pamphlets:
Career Briefs



Appendix #5
Chart
"Areas in Food Service
Occupations"


I






CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements in Food
SUB-CONCEPT Management, Production and Service


OBJECTIVES


2. The students
will identify
local, state
and other op-
portunities for
training.



3. The students
will investi-
gate opportu-
nities for
training in the
food service
areas.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Use the handout, "Make the Jump into
Foods." Classify according to training
needed. Use the "Steps to Careers in
Food Service" as a reference. Appendix #6





1. Take a field trip to
a. local high school food service
department.
b. local area vocational-technical
school.
c. junior college foods department.


2. Prepare a mobile using training center
as the core and food related courses
offered to complete the mobile.


3. Visit the cafeteria in small groups to
observe tasks being done by workers.
Study the check sheet prior to the visit.
Observe only one worker each. Check
the sheets after returning to class.
Appendix #7


4. Make tapes, slides or video tapes of
interviews with workers (all levels) in
foods related jobs. Learn the respon-
sibilities included in each particular
job and about training and experience
required for each job. Prepare the
questions in advance of the interviews.
Appendix #8, #9





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Investigate local training centers in
food services:
1. High school food service department
2. Local area vocational technical
department
3. Junior and community colleges
4. On-the-job training centers
5. Apprenticeships






Sample Evaluation

MATCHING: Place the correct number from
the right column in the
blank of the left hand column.

a. Bus Boy/Girl

b. Cook's Helper


c. Chef

d. Hostess

e. Dietition

f. Car Hop

g. Waiter

h. Waitress


1. Professional
level or
university

2. Skilled labor

3. Entry level
or apprentice

4. Technical level


i. Baker


Appendix #6
"Make the Jump into Foods"

Resources:
1. Local High School Food
Service Department
2. Area Vocational -
Technical Schools
3. Junior College Foods
Department









Appendix #7
Chart
"Observation at the School
Cafeteria"






Appendix #8
Chart
"Education Levels in Food
Service Occupations"



Appendix #9
Chart
"Job Levels in Food Service
Occupations"






CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Food Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will relate
principles of
sanitation,
safety and
ecology to food
industries.


2. The students
will relate
methods of
safety and
ecology to food
service indus-
tries.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Understand the meaning and the causes
of the following:
a. Trichinosis
b. Dysentery
c. Typhoid
d. Diptheria
e. Salmonella

1. Understand the importance of sanitary
handling and washing of table and cooking
ware:
a. loading and unloading the dishwasher
b. filling glasses and coffee cups
c. tasting food
d. wearing proper attire
e. storing table and cooking ware
2. Demonstrate sanitation principles through
use of the agar plate culture of finger-
prints.
3. Study the duties of Local, State and
Federal Food Inspectors.
4. Act out skit, "What You Can't See Won't
Hurt You, Much!"
5. List improper sanitation practices: blowing
nose over food, tasting with stirring spoon,
combing hair over food, wearing no apron
nor cap.
6. Demonstrate steps to follow in washing dishes:
a. using tray to carry dishes from table
b. scraping leftovers off dishes
c. stacking properly for efficiency and
safety
d. soaking flatware
e. placing flatware with handles up
f. placing rinsed glasses on rack
g. loading a dishwasher (if available)
h. rinsing (spraying) of racked dishes
-with hot water
i. using very hot, soapy water for best
cleaning
j. drying by air
k. cleansing of pans
1. leaving sink clean and sanitary


1





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Suggestions:
1. Compost wet garbage.
2. Collect glass, cans and paper for
recycling.
3. Purchase returnable bottles.
4. Rinse aluminum foil and aluminum pans
for reuse.
5. Substitute cloth articles for paper
ones.
6. Use paper products sparingly.
7. Save and reuse paper bags.
8. Place all litter in designated places.

Note:
1. Wax coated and plastic containers
cannot be recycled.
2. The basic strategy for control of
pests is to eliminate the conditions
under which they thrive. Select
insecticides with care and use with
caution.

"What You Can't See Won't Hurt You,
Much!"
Sanitation Demonstration (skit)
Equipment: black light, fluorescent
paste, vaseline. Props: table, china,
glassware, silverware, towel.
Preparation: apply vaseline paste
mixture to fingertips five to ten minutes
Situation: Dramatize a waitress coming
to work. She goes to restroom, combs
her hair and fixes her makeup. She does
not wash her hands, sets the table,
handles tines of forks and rims of cups
and glasses. Results: Using black light,
pass it over the table she has set.
Every place the waitress touched shows
a white color fingerprint.
In food service establishments, all
dishes are rinsed or soaked in a germa-
cide solution. At home the dishes can
be soaked in a bleach water solution.
In an emergency a small amount of bleach
can be put into the drinking water.


RESOURCES


4


Pamphlet:
Health, Safety and Sanitation


Haines, Robert G.
Food Preparation for Hotels,
Restaurants and Cafeterias,
Chapter 2.


Film:
An Outbreak
of Staphylococcus Infection


Periodical:
Chicago Institutions Magazine,






CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Food Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES



7. Take the pretest, "Safety Is No Accident."
Appendix #10

8. Work in groups preparing for presentation
of skits on safety in the home, school or
on the job. Appendix #11

9. Enact good and bad safety rules.

10. Use Boo Boo Epitaphs. Develop bulletin
boards, posters, or original verses.
Appendix #12

11. Use the scramble gram, "Safety Terms" to
promote a discussion on the causes of
accidents. Appendix #13

12. Discuss the common causes of accidents:
a. rushing
b. fatigue
c. unsafe conditions
d. carelessness
e. thoughtlessness
f. inattention





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Avoid Causes of Accidents
1. Avoid Rushing:
a. Allow yourself time by starting
early.
b. Leave out non-essentials when
time is short.
c. Use good motion practices.
d. Avoid leaving too much for the
last minutes.
2. Avoid Unsafe Conditions:
a. Do not leave objects in pathways.
b. Close cabinet doors.
c. Do not leave spilled food on the
floor.
d. Avoid using faulty tools or
equipment.
e. Avoid crowded work areas.
f. Keep children from underfoot.
3. Avoid Fatigue:
a. Recognize fatigue and that it can
lead to an accident.
b. Prevent fatigue by using time and
energy wisely.
c. Avoid doing more than you can
do when you are tired.
4. Use Safety Precautions:
a. Recognize unsafe and hazardous
actions and situations.
b. Think through the job before
starting to work.
c. Follow instructions.
d. Read the manual carefully before
using a power equipment.
e. Keep your mind on what you are
doing.
5. Be Observant:
a. Observe a situation and become
aware of any possible dangers.
b. Observe proper methods when
being trained to work with
equipment, no matter how small
the tool.


4.


RESOURCES


Appendix #10
"Safety Is No Accident"


Appendix #11
"Safety Precautions for
School, Home and Work"



Appendix #12
"Boo Boo Epitaphs"







Appendix #15
Scramble Gram
"Safety Terms"


1






CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Food Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


5. The students
will demonstrate
the proper use,
care and main-
tenance of
equipment in
food related
jobs.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Divide into small groups. See which
group can build the longest list of tools
and equipment in food related jobs.

2. Show the advantages in time and effort
saved in using the proper tools in food
preparation. Examples:
a. Using a flour sifter that requires
the use of two hands or one that can
be operated with one hand.
b. Scraping carrots or potatoes with a
sharp knife or with a floating-
blade peeler.
c. Beating egg whites by hand beater
or using an electric mixer.

3. Do the scramble gram, "Kitchen Gear."
Appendix #14

4. Take a field trip to a restaurant making
slides of the kitchen equipment.
Appendix #15

5. Take the test, "Quiz on Kitchen Equipment."
Appendix #16

6. Watch a teacher demonstration on tools and
procedures to be used with hands-on
experience.

7. Become acquainted with the job card file
which gives tasks for the food occupations.
Appendix #20

8. Become familiar with institutional food
equipment and tools. Collect pictures,
and/or slides of the equipment listed in
the content.




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Broiler
Coffeemaker
Commercial Mixer
and Attachments
Deep Fat Fryer
Drink Machine
Dishwasher
Dough Roller
Grill
Ice Cream Machine
Malt Mixer


11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.


Ice Maker
Pressure Fryer
Range
Refrigerator
Freezer
Slicer
Stack Oven
Steamer
Steam Table
Trunnion


Small Equipment for Kitchen


Cheese Slicer
Dippers
Ladles
Food Choppers
Griddles
Knives
Salad Makers
Skillets
Special Pans
Toaster


a


RESOURCES


i


Appendix #14
Scramble Gram
"Kitchen Gear"




Appendix #15
Picture
"Institutional Equipment"


Resource Person:
Sales Representative of
Institutional Equipment


Appendix #16
Quiz
"Kitchen Equipment"


Appendix #20
"Tasks Which Give Direction
to Program Development for
Training by Specific Job
Title"


1.
2.
5.

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.


1.
2.
5.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.


Large Equipment for Kitchen






CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Food Service
SUB-CONCEPT


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


_______________________---I


4. The students
will investi-
gate, practice
and demonstrate
tasks in the
food related
occupations.


1. Demonstrate to the class one of the
following:
a. Individual cover: 1) Set an
individual cover following a guide.
2) Practice serving a customer.
3) Relate to a waiter/waitress.
b. Buffet Service: 1) Set a buffet
table. 2) Relate to a caterer.
c. Tray service: 1) Relate to cafeteria
and hospital service. 2) Review
"Food Preparation Plan Sheet" and
use this for hands-on experience.
Appendix #17
d. Discuss and identify the duties of
waiter/waitress, hostess/captain.
2. Relate actual cases or incidents that you
know whereby a waiter/waitress lost a good
tip and the restaurant lost a customer by
poor service and bad behavior.
3. Contrast through skits good and poor
restaurant service.
4. Comment on welcome and unwelcome customers
in a restaurant.
5. Role play the following situation as applied
to either waiter/waitress or host/hostess:
a. setting the table
b. greeting and seating the customer
c. handling and giving the menu
d. taking the order
e. giving the written order
f. giving the verbal order to the cook
g. carrying food to the table
h. serving the food
i. clearing the table
6. Discuss "side work" of a waiter/waitress.
a. emptying and refilling sugar bowls
b. filling salt and pepper shakers
c. filling condiment bottles
d. folding mapkins
e. arranging table decorations
f. cleaning ashtrays
g. dusting chairs
7. Collect menus from restaurants. Use as a
basis in making your own menus.


OBJECTIVES




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Good Behavior Characteristics of a
"aiter/Waitress
1. is prompt
2. is pleasant
3. keeps water glasses full
4. brings coffee pot around for refills
5. is attentive, but does not hover
6. can care for an accident with ease
7. is attentive to his/her tables


Information on Order Taking
1. Uses proper techniques.
2. Puts table numbers on tickets.
3. Uses abbreviations.
4. Writes legibly.
5. Inquires whether the check is
separate or combined.
6. Totals cost and adds tax correctly.
7. Does not keep customers waiting
for check.


Local Restaurants



Appendix #17
"Suggested Food Preparation
Plan Sheet"




Harris and Withers.
Your Foods Book,
pp. 267-296.


Pamphlet:
Waiter-Waitress


Hoyes, Anna C.
Waiter, Waitress, Hostess.



Film:
Occupational Education,


The Waitress


Guide:
A K-12 Resource Guide of
Food and Nutrition,
pp. 186-189.





CONCEPT II Tasks Common to Food Service
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


5. The students
will demonstrate
procedures for
specific food
related tasks
performed in
hands-on
experiences.




6. The students
will demonstrate
skill in the use
of recipes and
accuracy in
measuring and
weighing.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Work the handout scramble gram, "Do You
Know Your Cooking Terms?" Appendix #18

2. Identify less familiar cooking terms
through class discussion.

3. Identify tasks related to food occupations
through a demonstration of cooking
procedures.



1. Evaluate your knowledge on Cooking Terms
by using the puzzle in the appendix.
Appendix #19

2. Examine different standarized recipes to
become aware of information in recipes
such as symbols, abbreviations, directions,
equipment, weights, measurements,
temperatures, number served.

3. Demonstrate the use of scales. Point out
the convenience of scales for measuring
large quantities of ingredients.

4. Select a home recipe or institutional
recipe. Note the number of servings and
expand it for a specific number of servings.

5. Use the terms in the word search scramble
gram. Devise a check list to be given to
each person. Divide the check list into:
a. "Can Do"
b. "Have Watched"
c. "Don't Know"
d. "Familiar With Now"
At the end of the unit most students should
have checked "Familiar With Now" or "Can
Do" on all terms. Appendix #22

6. Work the scramble gram in the appendix.
Appendix #21





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Relate the terms used in cooking with the
procedures and tasks related to food
service occupations. Examples:
knead--------baker
grill--------short order cook


When using the scales, be sure to set
the dial at "0" after empty container
is set on scales.

Recipes, especially baked goods, should
not be more than doubled.


RESOURCES


Appendix #18
"Do You Know Your Cooking
Terms?"


Appendix #19
Crossword Puzzle
"Cooking Terms"



Pamphlets:
1. Handbook of Food
Preparation
2. Being a Food Service
Worker
3. She Learns About
the Use of Measurements
in Cooking


Library Books on
Institutional Recipes
Cafeteria Recipes














Appendix #22
Scramble Gram
"The Staff of Life"


Appendix #21
Scramble Gram
"Meat"


I





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT

1 ---1""*-


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
plan, prepare
and serve foods
typical of a
fast order food
establishment.























2. The students will
be instructed in
the correct
principles of
protein cooking.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Organize the group into a small corporation.
Investigate actual cost of establishing
the business.
a. possible items to sell: pizza,
candies, cupcakes, popcorn, candied
apples, sandwiches, hamburgers.
b. potential number of customers.
c. amount of help needed.
d. other overhead expenses.
2. Choose a short order product. Prepare
and sell it.
5. Check card file of tasks so that each
understands his/her task.
Short Order Cluster
Work in groups designating cook, cook's
helper, waitress, dishwasher, food
purchaser, etc.
Day 1 Teacher demonstration or teacher-
prepared filmstrip and student planning
using "Food Preparation Plan Sheet."
Appendix #17
Day 2 In lab groups prepare and serve
meat and egg dishes. Suggested dishes:
a. all types of eggs
b. hamburgers
c. pig-in-a blanket


1. Identify the foods in the protein group
by making a collage of high protein foods.
2. Demonstrate proper and improper protein
cookery. Note the difference.
a. Heat some cheese over high heat
and some cheese over low heat. Note
the difference.
b. Fry a meat patty over high heat and
one over low heat. Note the difference
in shrinkage.
c. Fry an egg over high heat and one over
low heat. Note the difference in
toughness.
d. Soft boil one egg and hard boil
another egg. Note the difference
in color.
5. Recognize the nutritive value of protein
foods and their place in the basic four.
4. View the filmstrip, Food Preparation Plan
Sheet. Discuss.
5. Work in lab groups. Prepare and serve meat
and egg dishes.


I





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Ideas to be applied to one or more of
the foods occupational cluster hands-on
experiences.
(Reference: Orientation to Home
Economics Occupations)
ORGANIZING A BUSINESS
Organize the class into a corporation.
Decide what is to be produced. Determine
the cost, production tasks and sales
promotion. Provide opportunity for the
students to buy stock, participate in
the production, promotion and sales of
the products. Examples:
1. individual pizzas
2. candies
3. cookies or cupcakes
4. popcorn balls
5. candied apples

PRINCIPLES OF COOKING PROTEINS
The World of Food, p. 117.
The principles of protein cookery require
the use of low temperatures. The low
temperature will coagulate the meat
protein and prevent toughening. Meats
are cooked only until they are done.
Overcooking as well as cooking at high
temperatures will cause toughness due to
overcoagulation. When protein over-
coagulates, juices are squeezed out and
the food becomes dry and toughened.
MILK
The World of Food, pp. 125-126.
The objectives of milk cookery are to
prevent
1. film or scum formation.
2. boiling.
3. scorching.
4. curdling.
EGGS
The World of Food, pp. 151-152.
Whether eggs are cooked alone or com-
bined with other foods, the principles
to observe are
1. use low temperatures to prevent
toughening, curdling, discoloring.
2. cook only until desired firmness
is achieved.


RESOURCES


Local Restaurants

School Lunchroom Manager

Hospital Dietitian


Eggs

Pamphlets:
1. Fried Foods for Menu Magic
2. How to Buy Meat
3. Proper Frying

Appendix #17
"Food Preparation Plan Sheet"





Medved, Eva.
The World of Food,
Chapters 7, 8, 9, 10, 11.


Harris and Withers.
Your Foods Book,
pp. 86-89, 181-184, 229-250,
238-243.


Barclay; Champion;
Brinkley and Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
Chapters 2, 21, 22.





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


5. The students will
plan, prepare,
and serve foods
typical to that
which a baker,
cake decorator
or caterer would
serve.


















4. The students will
be instructed
in the principles
of cereal cookery
and will put intc
practice some of
these principles.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1.


Plan, prepare, serve or sell baked products.
Use the Master Mix recipes for cakes and
muffins. Develop appropriate job titles for
the various tasks such as baker, baker's
helper, cookie decorator, sales person,
sanitation worker.


2. Plan, prepare and serve to a large group
a. pancakes or
b. sandwiches or
c. tarts or
d. hor 'dorves or
e. buffet dinner.
Develop appropriate job titles and assign
jobs for all the necessary things that must
be done. Keep an accurate account of all
expenses.

3. Collect illustrations for correct buffet
service.

4. Investigate the demand for caterers in
your area.



1. Use the "Word Search" puzzles for an
introduction to the Bread and Cereal groups.
Appendix #22, #25, #24

2. Make a collage of the various foods in the
Bread and Cereal group.

3. Review the principles of Bread and Cereal
cooking and the nutritive value of this
group.


I




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


MEATS

The World of Food pp. 177-198
Meat is cooked to improve its flavor,
change its color, make it more tender,
and destroy harmful organisms. When
meat is cooked the protein of the
muscle tissue or the lean, coagulates
and the protein of connective tissue
is softened.
Meats are classified into tender and
less tender cuts. The tender cuts
contain less connective tissue than
the less tender cuts, which come from
muscles frequently exercised. Moist
cooking is used for the less tender
cuts, dry for the more tender ones.
1. Cook at low heat
2. Cook until the meat is done; don't
overcook.


Master Mix Recipe

CEREALS

The World of Food pp. 109-110
The objectives of cereal cookery are to
improve flavor, soften the cellulose,
gelatinize the starch and produce a
product free of lumps. Starch determines
the cookery procedures used for cereals.



Instruct students in principles of
sandwich making and cutting.


1.V


Barclay; Champion;
Brinkley and Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,


pp. 416-417, 420-421,
442-447, 505.

Harris and Withers.
Your Foods Book,
pp. 225-228.




Film:
Home Sweet Home Style
(a modern bakery)


.Appendix #22
Scramble Gram
"The Staff of Life"


Appendix #23
Scramble Gram
"Bakeshop"

Appendix #24
Scramble Gram
"Let's Bake a Fruitcake"


Filmstrips:
Betty Crocker Series
1. Better Biscuits
2. Batter Breads
3. Muffin Making
4. Your Daily Bread

Pamphlet:
Quaker Quotes

Periodical:
What's New in Home Economics
and Practical Forecast,


Filmstrips:
Sandwich, Please
Sandwiches, Sandwiches,
Sandwiches





CONCEPT III- Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES

5. The students will
plan, prepare,
and serve foods
typical of a
food tester,
salad maker,
produce manager.













6. The students will
recognize the
principles of
fruit and vege-
table cookery.












7. The students will
plan, prepare,
and serve foods
typical of dairy
workers, soda
fountain workers,
and dietitions.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Work the "Fruits and Vegetables" scramble
gram. Appendix #25
2. Construct a collage of the fruit and
vegetable groups.
3. Collect pictures of unusual fruits and
vegetables.
4. Play Fruit-Vegetable bingo.
5. Classify fruits and vegetables as to
a. color (red, yellow, green, white)
b. edible parts (stem, root, leaf, flower,
fruit, seed)
c. nutritive value (vitamins, minerals,
cellulose)
d. uses, (raw, cooked, casseroles,
salads, main dishes)
6. Recognize the need for knowledge in buying
and storing fruits and vegetables.

1. Take half a package of a frozen vegetable and
cook it according to directions. Improperly
cook the second half of the package. Compare
taste, texture, appearance. Do the same with
cans of vegetables.
2. Demonstrate how to create an attractive
relish tray. Demonstrate how to make a meal
more attractive by the use of fruit and
vegetable garnishes.
3. Study the classification of salads.
4. Collect pictures of salads as appetizers,
accompaniment dish, main dish, dessert.
5. Plan, prepare and serve a salad.
6. Investigate the need to know how to buy and
store fruits and vegetables. Learn how to
get the most for your money and to retain
nutrients in fruits and vegetables.

1. Work the hand-out scramble gram, "Cheese
Party." Appendix #26
2. Throw a cheese tasting party to become
familiar with a variety of cheeses.
3. Investigate the film kit Kraft's Teaching
Kit on Cheese.




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Fruits and Vegetables:
From the four or more servings a day,
one serving should come from the vitamin
C rich fruits and vegetables.
Nutrients in Fruits and Vegetables:
Vitamin C Cirtus, cabbage, broccoli,
strawberries. It is water soluble. It
is needed every day.
Vitamin A Dark green, yellow and
orange colored. Contains a compound
which allows the body to make vitamin A.
It is fat soluble.
Vitamins E & K Green leafy fruits
and vegetables. Water soluble.
Vitamin B Complex Fruits and
vegetables. Water soluble.
Iron Leafy vegetables, dried fruits.
Water Juices ani juicy fruits.
Carbohydrates Plants which contain
a large amount of sugar and starches.
Protein When found in plants, it is
incomplete.
Develop a Fruit and Vegetable Bingo Game.
Check card files for each of the jobs
in this cluster.
Fruits and vegetables are susceptible to
vitamin loss, changes in color, flavor,
texture and shape. Therefore, select
and prepare fruits and vegetables with
three goals:
1. preserve nutritive value
2. preserve and enhance flavor and
texture
3. preserve and enhance color and shape
Basically, cook fruits and vegetables
1. in smallest amount of water. (B and C
are water soluble).
2. in closed containers. (except strong
flavored)
3. in large or whole pieces.
4. with skins when possible.
5. with high heat only until tender.
6. without soaking.
7. using cooking liquids in soups and
sauces.
8. without adding baking soda.
Salad Hints:
1. Plan salads for pleasing color,
flavor and texture.
2. Select cold, clean, crisp, fresh
fruits and vegetables.
3. Leave skins on when possible.


RESOURCES


t


Appendix #25
Scramble Gram
"Fruits and Vegetables"

Harris and Withers.
Your Foods Book,
pp. 128-130, 243-245.

Barclay; Champion;
Brinkley and Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 432-454, 436-437.

Lewis; Banks and Banks.
Teen Horizons.

Guide:
A K-12 Resource Guide to
Foods and Nutrition,
pp. 164-167, 258-260.

Pamphlet:
Salad Facts

Filmstrips:
1. Song of a Salad
2. What Makes a Good Salad
Good
3. Mayonnaise Makes the Salad
4. Lights, Camera, Lettuce


Medved, Eva.
The World of Food,
Chapter 16.

Kit:
Let's Get Organized

Appendix #26
Scramble Gram
"Cheese Party"

Film Kit:
Kraft's Teaching Kit on Cheese





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


8. The students will
investigate the
principles of
milk and cheese
cookers, and the
buying and
storing of milk
and cheese.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Adapt Tic-Tac-Tel. On poster paper,
overhead, or chalkboard make 9 large
squares -- 3 across and 3 deep. The
squares may have in them words or pictures
related to any area of foods under study.
In food preparation, for example, the words
or pictures in each square might be meat,
eggs, custard, cake, rice, etc. One student
will be "0" and the other "X". Each student
will select a category and the teacher will
present a problem in relation to the cooking
of the food selected.
For example, "From what is cottage cheese
made?". If the student answers correctly,
he is given a choice of where to place his
"X" or "O". The one to get 3 of the symbols
in a horizontal, verticle or diagonal
line wins.

2. Take a field trip to a local dairy.

3. Plan, prepare, and serve beverages con-
centrating on the use of milk and ice
cream. Develop appropriate job titles.

4. Invite a dietition to speak to the class.

5. Show films concerning dietitions and their
work.

6. Invite the school lunchroom manager to
talk to the class. Find out about her
training and responsibilities in planning
school lunches.

7. View the film strip from Carnation.

8. Make a collage of the different foods in
the milk group.





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


4. cut fruits and vegetables just before
using.
5. Dip bananas and apples in orange or
lemon juice to keep them from
turning brown.
6. Avoid soaking ingredients in water.
7. Hand tear salad greens.
8. Add dressing just before serving.
9. Keep tightly covered until serving
time.

Students should be familiar with the
many varieties of milk and their uses.

Introduce students to milk and cheese
cookery.

If a trip is feasible, contact your
Dairy Council or local dairy for
information.

Cheese is made from milk by the
thickening, or coagulation of milk
protein. Some types of cheese are soft,
hard, semi-hard and those like cottage
cheese.
Examples of cheese are as follows:
Swiss Brie
Processed American Port Salut
Mozzarella Goya
Parmesan Gruyere
Brick Gouda
Roquefort Bel paesa
Romano Cottage
Blue Cream
Limburger Ricotta

Familiarize the students with the
difference between Cheese and Cheese
Food.
Use "special diets" as handouts to show
the variety of diets planned by a
dietition.
Check card file for dietition and aides'
tasks.
Check with the personnel director of a
local hospital for names of former
dietitions who may now be homemakers in
the community.


23


Tic-Tac-Tel
Examples:

raw cheese light
cream
butter whole sour
milk milk cream
custard dry yogurt
milk


Filmstrips:
1. Carnation's Using
Evaporated Milk in the
Classroom and Kitchen
2. Teen Time Cooking

Pamphlet:
Convenience Cookery

Free Materials:
Carnation Food Service Center.
Carnation Company,
Los Angeles, California 90036.


Filmstrip:
Sparkling Taste Treats



Appendix #27
"Special Diets"


Films:
1. The Search for Meaning
2. Toward the Victory of Health





CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


Dietition Cluster

9. Plan menus in which milk is either the
basic or a "hidden" ingredient. Using
reference books, write menus in the
correct form. Distribute to classroom
"patients".

10. Select a classroom "patient". Plan
menus for this patient.

11. Do the nutrition crossword puzzle.
Appendix #29




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Milk in the Basic 4
Children need a quart or more of milk
a day. Teen-agers need at least a
quart a day.
Milk is an excellent source of
Calcium Vitamin D (when added)
Phosphorus Riboflavin
Thiamine B Vitamins
Protein
Terms Applied to Milk:


Pasteurized
Homogenized
Certified
Buttermilk
Evaporated
Condensed
Skimmed


Raw Sour
Skim
Flavored
Half and Half
Cream
Dried
Whole


Milk is needed for strong bones and teeth
Students should be aware of the nutritive
values of milk and its place in the
Basic 4 grouping.
Milk: Its Forms and Uses
Many people dislike milk. Here is an
opportunity to show how a dietition (or
Mother) can help people get this require-
ment of milk in their diet. Examples:
Milk can be used in the place of water in
cooking cereals, or used in soups.
Adding 4 T. of dry milk to one cup of
fluid milk gives twice as much nutritive
value.
Menus should be planned not only with
nutrition in mind but also with thought
to attractiveness and texture. This is
even more true for the dietition working
with sick people whose appetites are
often poor but are in need of proper
nutrition for a quick recovery.

Ideas for uses of milk:
1. Mix milk with one package of pre-
sweetened Koolaid. Milk is substi-
tuted for the one quart of water.
2. Make instant hot chocolate by mixing
instant cocoa with dry milk and water.


Game:
Career Game


Harris and Withers.
Your Foods Book,
pp. 23-30, 231-344.


Barclay; Champion;
Brinkley and Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,


pp. 419-426.


Guide:
A K-12 Guide for Food and


Nutrition,
pp. 160, 176.


Lewis; Banks, and Banks.
Teen Horizons.
p. 453.




Appendix #28
"A Dietition's Day"


Appendix #29
Crossword Puzzle
"Nutrition Post Test"





CONCEPT IV Outlook in Food and Nutrition Occupations
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
investigate the
opportunities
for placements
in food service
industries.


2. The students will
investigate job
advancement in
food services
and identify our
changing society
as it relates to
food service
occupations.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Design and draw a flow chart for an
occupation of your choice in food service.
2. Make an overhead transparency or bulletin
board using "Functionally Integrated
Career Progression Model For a Food Service
Facility." Appendix # 30


1. Play "Food Occupations Chutes and Ladders."
Appendix #31
2. Use "Employment Outlook" section in each
job area.
3. Analyze our changing society and how it
will affect
a. packaging (space and undersea living).
b. processing (freeze dry).
c. cooking methods (radar).
d. serving.
e. shopping for food.
f. substituting food.
g. government agencies.
4. Compare changes in the foods industry that
have taken place in the students' life time
with that of adults such as teachers,
parents, grandparents.
5. Choose an area in food service or pre-
paration and report to the class on the
future employment outlook.
6. Write a skit (Lost in Space is a good
example) using ideas and research related
to foods of the future.
7. Invite a retired person or grandparent to
speak to the class on changes that have
taken place in the world of foods.
8. Design a
a. kitchen of the future
b. grocery store of the future
c. restaurant of the future
9. Investigate freeze dried foods at camping
stores and department stores.





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Example that students can make:

manager


grocery
manager


assistant manager


produce
manager


meat manager
(butcher)


meat
wrapper


stock
worker


bag boy






Some changes in our society

1. working mothers
2. eating out
5. technological know-how
4. shortage of resources
5. population growth
6. interest in better health
7. awareness of the needs of other people
8. more leisure time
9. changing family patterns
10. internationalism


RESOURCES


Appendix #30
"Functionally Integrated
Career Progression Model
of a Food Service Facility"
(Chart V)

Appendix #31
"Food Occupations Chutes
and Ladders"

Lewis; Banks and Banks.
Teen Horizons,
Chapter 26.

Medved, Eva.
The World of Food,
Chapter 1.


U.S. Dept. of Labor.
Occupational Outlook
Handbook,
1972-75.



Science Teacher

Private Camping
Supply Stores


I






CONCEPT V Evaluation of Individual Intrests in Foods
SUB-CONCEPT Related Occupations


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
discuss the good
and the bad
aspects of food
service and food
related jobs.






2. The students will
measure their own
interest in Food
Service
Occupations.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. List and discuss the good and bad points
of food service jobs.

2. Act out a good and bad aspect of a food
service.







1. Take the interest test in food service
occupations. Appendix #32

2. Take the Post Test, "Food Service
Occupations." Appendix #33


I





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Positive side

1. free meals
2. work in groups (companionship)
3. many positions available
4. uniforms provided and cleaned
5. health and accident coverage
6. ability to work to higher levels
7. on the job training
8. little training or experience needed
for entry
9. community technical or vocational
training centers nearby
10. satisfaction of serving and helping
meet a person's basic need for
nutrients.


Negative side


standing
heat
split shift
night work
holiday work
weekend work
low pay for entry jobs
heavy lifting
burns, cuts (accidents)


NOTE: Not all disadvantages or advanta-
ges are viewed the same by each person.
Some people prefer to stand while others
may wish to be seated on the job.

Have each child schedule a conference to
go over his score or interest area.
Take into consideration during this time
his ability and on what level he could
enter this occupation. Example:
Entry salad worker.
Professional recipe developer
Technical chef


I


RESOURCES


Appendix #32
Interest Test
"Food Service Occupations"


Appendix #33
Post Test
"Food Service
Occupation Test"






Card Files with Job Levels.


I_









BIBLIOGRAPHY


BOOKS

Barclay, Marion; Champion, Frances; Brinkley, Jeanne
and Funderburk, Kathleen. Teen Guide to Homemaking.
New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1972.

Haines, Robert G. Food Preparation for Hotels, Restaurants
and Cafeterias. Chicago, Illinois: American Technical
Society, 1968.

Harris, Florence L.and Withers, Rex Todd. Your Foods Book.
Boston: D.C. Heath and Company, 1964.

Lewis, Dora S.; Banks, Anna and Banks, Marie. Teen Horizons
at Home and School. New York: The MacMillan Company,
1970.

Medved, Eva. The World of Food. Boston: Ginn and Company,
1970.

Shenk, Carol. Sue, a Self-Paced Learning Package. She Learns
about the Use of Measurements in Cooking. New York:
Frank E. Richards, 1971.

U.S. Department of Labor. Occupational Outlook Handbook.
Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Labor,
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C., 1972-1975.

Wilkes, Doris. Hospitality Education Program. Tallahassee,
Florida: School of Business, Florida State University.
32506.

BOOKLETS

Being a Food Service Worker. Hospital Research and Educational
Trust, Robert J. Brady Company, Washington, D.C.
($4.50)

Food Industry Careers. Institute of Food Technologists,
176 West Adams Street, Chicago, Illinois. 60600.

Handbook of Food Preparation. National Restaurant Association,
1530 North Lakeshore Drive, Chicago, Illinois.

Problem-Solving Safety and Sanitation in School Food Service.
American School Food Service Association, P.O. Box 30095,
Denver, Colorado. 80210.








FILMS

An Outbreak of Staphylococcus Infection. Communicable Disease
Center, U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare,
Jacksonville, Florida. (free)

Home Sweet Home Style. American Institute of Baking, Consumer
Service Department, 400 East Ontario Street, Chicago,
Illinois.

Kraft's Teaching Kit on Cheese. Kraft Foods, P.O. Box 986,
Dayton, Ohio.

Occupational Education, The Waitress. (117-C) Eye Gate House,
146-01 Archer Avenue, Jamaica, New York. 11435.

The Search for Meaning. Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc.,
3 East 54th Street, New York, New York. 10022.

Toward the Victory of Health. Modern Talking Picture Service,
Inc., 5 East 54th Street, New York, New York. 10022.

FILMSTRIPS

Betty Crocker Series
Better Biscuits.
Batter Breads.
Muffin Making.
Your Daily Bread.
Betty Crocker, Dept. 360, 400 Second Avenue South,
Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Lights, Camera, Lettuce. General Foods Company, 250 North
Street, White Plains, New York. 10602.

Mayonnaise Makes the Salad. General Foods Company, 250 North
Street, White Plains, New York. 10602.

Safety in the Kitchen. McGraw-Hill Text Films, 330 West 42nd
Street, New York. 10036.

Sandwich, Please. Wheat Flour Institute, 14 East Jackson
Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 60604.

Sandwiches, Sandwiches, Sandwiches. Pepperidge Farm, Inc.,
General Offices, Norwalk, Connecticut. 06852.

Song of the Salad. (Color, 104 frames) H. J. Heinz Company,
Box 28, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Free.

Sparkling Taste Treats. American Bottlers of Carbonated
Beverages, 1128 Sixteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.









FILMSTRIPS (cont.)

Teen Time Cooking. Carnation Company, Public Relations
Department, Los Angeles, California. 90036.

Understanding Cooking Terms. (40 frames) McGraw-Hill Book
Company, Film Department, 330 West Forty-Second Street,
New York. 10036.

Using Evaporated Milk in the Classroom and Kitchen. Carnation
Milk Company, Public Relations Department, Los Angeles,
California. 90036.

What Makes a Good Salad Good? General Foods Corporation, 250
North Street, White Plains, New York. 10602.

GAMES

Career Game. State Department of Health, Tallahassee,
Florida. 32306.

The Nutrition Game and the Calorie Game. Graphics Company,
P.O. Box 331E, Urbana, Illinois. 61801.

GUIDES

A K-12 Resource Guide of Food and Nutrition. State of Florida
Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida. 32506.

Hoyes, Anna C. Waiter, Waitress, Hostess. University of
Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.

Training Program for Food Service Workers. Wage Earning
Program, Home Economics Education, University of Kentucky,
Lexington, Kentucky.

KIT

Let's Get Organized. Tupperware Home Parties, Division of
Dart Industries, Inc., North Highway 441, Kissimmee,
Florida.

PAMPHLETS

Bakers. Number 21. Science Research Association, 259 East
Erie Street, Chicago, Illinois. 60600.

Be a Salad Expert. Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., Englewood Cliffs,
New Jersey.








PAAPHLETS (cont.)

Being a Food Service Worker. Hospital Research and Educational
Trust, Robert J. Brady Company, Washington, D.C.

Bus Boys. Number 192. Science Research Association, 259
East Erie Street, Chicago, Illinois. 60600.

Career Briefs. Careers, Inc., Largo, Florida. 33310.

Careers for Youth in the Food Service Industry. National
Restaurant Association, H.J. Heinz Company, Pittsburg,
Pa.

Confectionery Industry Workers. Number 171. Science Research
Association, 259 East Erie Street, Chicago, Illinois.
60600.

Convenience Cookery. Evaporated Milk Association, 910 -17th
Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006.

Food Borne Illness-Cause and Prevention. Food Service Guides,
P.O. Box 709, Rocky Mount, North Carolina.

48 Ways to Foil Food Infections. Channing L. Bete Company,
Inc., Greenfield, Massachusetts.

Fried Foods for Menu Magic. Proctor and Gamble, 2261 Spring
Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. 45214.

Frozen Food Industry Worker. Number 123. Science Research
Association, 259 East Erie Street, Chicago, Illinois.
60600.

General Principles of Food Sanitation. Food and Drug
Administration, Publication No. 16, Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, D.C.

Health, Safety, Sanitation. Florida State Board of Health,
Tallahassee, Florida.

How to Buy Meat. Swift and Company, 43 West 61st Street,
New York. 10023.

How to Make a Salad. Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., Englewood Cliffs,
New Jersey. Free.

Knox Salad Book. Knox Gelatin Company, Johnston, New York.

Proper Frying. Swift and Company, 45 West 61st Street,
New York. 10025.








PA.vi HLETS (cont.)

Quaker Quotes. The Quaker Oats Company, Chicago. 60654.

Salad Facts. The Lipton Kitchens, Thomas J. Lipton, Inc.,
800 Sylvan Avenue, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. 07632.

Salad Secrets. General Foods Corporation, White Plains, New York.

Training Yourself for Fast Food Service. Rand Tower Restaurant
Hotel Aids, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 55402.

Waiter-Waitress. U.S. Department of Health, iducaion and
Welfare, Publication, No. OE-87046, Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

Your Responsibility for Safety. A National Safety Council
Publication, National Restaurant Association, Chicago.


PERIODICALS


"Canned Salmon Sandwiches." What's New in Home Economics and
Practical Forecast, September, 1965, Englewood Cliffs,
New Jersey.

Richardson, Treva M. "Sanitation for Food Service Workers."
Chicago Institutions Magazine, September, 1969, 1801
Prairie Avenue, Chicago. 60616. ($3.95)

























































































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