• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Recommended pre-vocational home...
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Self-concept
 Relationships with others
 Grooming and dress
 Personal nutrition
 Management of resources
 Employability
 Bibliography
 Back Cover






Group Title: Resource guide for personal career orientation
Title: A Resource guide for personal career orientation
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096228/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Resource guide for personal career orientation
Alternate Title: Personal career orientation
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Department of Education
Donor: unknown ( endowment )
Publisher: Florida Department of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subject: Home economics -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida, Dept. of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Education Section.
General Note: Cover title: Personal career orientation.
General Note: "Florida pre-vocational home economics education."
General Note: "Reprint 1974."
General Note: Florida Department of Education Bulletin no. 74 H-11
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096228
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22350777

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page ii-a
    Recommended pre-vocational home economics education
        Page iii
        Page iii-a
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Self-concept
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Relationships with others
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Grooming and dress
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Personal nutrition
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Management of resources
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Employability
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 31a
    Bibliography
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Back Cover
        Page 34
        Page 35
Full Text
















PERSONAL CAREER ORIENTATION







FLORIDA
PRE-VOCATIONAL
HOME ECONOMICS
EDUCATION






OCTOBER 1973
BULLETIN #75 H-11
Reprint 1974














A RESOURCE GUIDE


FOR


PERSONAL CAREER ORIENTATION











STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION SECTION


This reprint of a public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$102.32 or $.10 per copy to provide direction and resource materials for
Florida Home Economics teachers who are instructing in the pre-vocational
program.


FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS BULLETIN MAY BE SECURED THROUGH
MISS ALLIE FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR, HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION, KNOTT
BUILDING, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304








~37 ~f o o9~77~











INTRODUCTI ON


The pre-vocational program in Florida has three major purposes:


To provide students with an orientation to the many career oppor-

tunities available in the world of work.

To assist students in developing personal competencies improtant

to success in almost any occupation.

To provide students with exploration experiences in occupational

clusters according to their choice.




COURSE STANDARDS


Section: Home Economics Education

Accreditator Title: Personal Career Orientation

Accreditator Code No.: 2709 U.S.O.E. No.: 09.0299

Course Objective: To acquaint students with personal qualities and
characteristics necessary for success in the world of work.

Course Description: This course places emphasis on the need for a
positive attitude toward work and the dignity and value of all
legitimate occupational pursuits; determining and evaluating personal
interest and goals; forming a plan to develop a positive self-concept;
relationships with others; management of resources; personal nutrition,
grooming and dress; and concern for becoming employable. Opportuni-
ties are given for critical thinking, problem solving and decision-
making.

Teacher-Student Ratio: 1 to 24

Facilities: Refer to VTAE Facility Standards Bulletin






SEPTEMBER 1973


RECOMMENDED PRE-VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION

The Schema below follows the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Division guidelines for pre-vocational education


A STUDENT AT THE
SEVENTH GRADE LEVEL
MAY ENROLL IN



ORIENTATION

HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONS
(6-9 WEEKS)

AND MAY ALSO ENROLL IN
PERSONAL
CAREER ORIENTATION

(6-9 WEEKS)

Course is a part of
c o m.p re he nsive
orientation involving
other occupational
categories and may be
a segment of a wheel.
(see note)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO SCHOOL
OFFERINGS


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
NINTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO
SCHOOL OFFERINGS,
ANY OF THESE NOT
PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED IN



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12, 18 or 36 WEEKS)


* COURSE TITLES FOR HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS:
EXPLORATION OF THE OCCUPATION OF HOMEMAKING
EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE. GUIDANCE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF FOOD MANAGEMENT. PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE
SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


** EXPLORATION OF HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS
INCLUDES ALL OF THE ABOVE CLUSTERS


Note: A combination of these two courses could be equal to one semester of home economics reported under
code 2701.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT


FOR CAREERS
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS
(12-18 WEEKS)










ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


PARTICIPANTS:


EDITOR:


DIRECTOR:


Louise Baxley, Home Economics Teacher
Union Park Junior High School, Orlando


Elizabeth Thomas, Home Economics Teacher
Memorial Junior High School, Orlando


Martha Lemons


Edna Warner


Marsha Wilson


TYPIST:













Table of Contents


Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . ii

Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . i

Table of Contents . . . . . .. . . . .. . . iv


Concept I -

Concept II -

Concept III -

Concept IV -

Concept V -

Concept VI -


Self-Concept . . . .

Relationships With Others

Grooming and Dress .. .

Personal Nutrition . .

Management of Resources .

Employability . . . .


Bibliography

Appendix .


7
. . . . . 1

. . . . . 7

. . . . 15

. . . . . 19

. . . . 23

. . . . 27






Concept I: Self-Concept



OBJECTIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATION

1. The students will analyze 1. Make a collage using words, song titles,
themselves in light of their pictures, newspaper headlines, tickets,
own personal heredity and or other items which have special mean-
environment. ing to you.
2. Begin with "Who Am I?" to help discover
individual interests and abilities. (Ap-
pendix #1)

3. Read Introductory Homemaking, Chapter 1,
"Understanding One's Self", pp. 2-26.

4. Use hand-out, "Personal Coat Of Arms."
(Appendix #2)

5. Use hand-out1 "Test Your Maturity."
(Appendix #3)

6. Fill in the hand-out, "Who Am I?"
(activity with instruction in hand-out
stresses heredity and environment) (Ap-
pendix #4)

7. Make a list of the ways you differ from
one of your classmates.

8. Discuss how certain adults you know have
capitalized on physical characteristics or
have overcome physical handicaps.

9. Make a report to your class on current
articles which deal with the following
pros and cons:

a. Personality is an inherited char-
acteristic.

b. Music ability is an acquired char-
acteristic.

c. Obesity is an inherited character-
istic.

d. Immunity to disease is inherited.

e. A person with red hair is more temp-
eramental than a person with blonde
hair.

10. Read and discuss Unit 1, "Do You Know
Yourself?". (Maturity booklet. Use Logbook
and discussions in the teacher's guide.
This material is EXCELLENT.)










CONTENT111111 RESOURCES- I


The collages should represent the special interests
of each student and may be utilized as a teaching
tool for self-understanding.


Understanding one's self is the key to understanding
other people.


Self-analysis involves critical evaluation and recog-
nition of those qualities that the individual (1) may
be able to develop, improve, or change; (2) those which
he may be unable to change; and (3) some consideration
of sources of help for further study of himself.


Factors which contribute to the development of self.
a. Hereditary factors
b. Environmental factors
(1) Family customs and practices
(2) Family standards and values
(3) Relationships with family
(4) School and Community influences










Do You Know Yourself?

These stories help students look at themselves as they
really are and as they appear to others. Above all,
they encourage them to see themselves as unique and
important individuals.


_ __


Barclay, Champion, Brinkley,
Funderburk. Teen Guide to
Homemaking, pp. 2-26.


Cross, Allen. Introductory
Homemaking, pp. 2-29.


Appendix #1
"Who Am I!"

Appendix #2
"Personal Coat of Arms"

Appendix #3
"Test Your Maturity"





Barclay, Champion, Brinkley,
Funderburk. Teen Guide to
Homemaking, pp. 2-16, 50.

Appendix #4
"Who Am IF"




Barclay, Champion, Brinkley,
Funderburk. Teen Guide to
Homemaking.


Reiff, Florence, Steps in
Home Living, pp. 9-26.

Goodykontz. Maturity: Grow-
ing Up Strong. Scholastic
Book Services.


CONTENT


RESOURCES









OBJECTIVE


2. The students will develop an
awareness of the need for a
positive self-concept.




































3. The students will identify
personal qualities, attitudes
and behavior patterns which
contribute to employability.


Y __L_ C


LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATION


1. Read stories in Maturity: "Can You Face
Adversity?". "Do You Dare to be an In-
dividual?".

2. Use the skit, "The Magic Looking Glass.
(Appendix #5)

3. Use the following as an evaluation device.
In the center of the hand-out, "Is Your
Personality in Bloom?", fill in six person-
ality traits you admire most in a person.

4. Write your own idea of what is meant by a
self-concept.

5. Observe a positive day by

a. greeting one another with a positive
statement.

b. listing by buzz groups positive words
describing a person.

c. tabulating all the positive words from
the groups.

6. Describe a person who has a strong or
positive self-concept and yet is not conceited,
How does this person show you through person-
ality traits that he possesses a good self-
concept. (May use a famous person.)

7. Discuss how individuals are influenced by
people, events and situation in ways that
change their concept of themselves.

1. Discuss how personalities of famous persons
such as Bill Cosby and Anita Bryant have
changed over the years and what factors have
contributed to the changes.

2. Report to the class on an achievement you
have made, praise you have received, a
skill or talent you possess or happy ex-
perience you have had.

3. Report to the class on one of your most
embarrassing moments.

4. Use "Attitudes of Character." (Transparencies)

5. Join the "Compliment Club." Each class
member should plan to give three sincere
compliments each day. Report to the class
the effectiveness of your complement giv-
ing.


_ I --- ---








CONTENT


S"Can You Face Adversity?" The aim of this section
is to help one decide what he or she should do when
things go wrong, or when someone "bugs" you.





"Do You Dare To Be An Individual?" The aim of this
section is to help you decide whether you should try
to be an individual, expressing what you really think
and feel, or whether you should be just "one of the
crowd".

Your opinion of yourself is called your self-concept.

With a positive opinion of one's self, one does not
have to be afraid of what is new and different

The individual's perception of himself determines
how he will behave and the responses he receives
to his behavior in turn may change his perception
of himself.

Each person needs to be loved. The feelings of being
accepted in the home, school and community helps one
become secure.

The home environment influences one's self-concept
more than any other factor.

Understanding one's self (being able to analyze
abilities, interests and attitudes) is instrumental
in the selection of one's vocation.

The person who feels accepted tends to develop a
healtful self-concept and a good personality.

Personality Traits and Characteristics that contri-
bute to success on the job: Loyalty, honesty, fair-
ness, self-understanding, tolerance, courtesy, cheerful-
ness and patience, responsibility, consideration, ability
to listen, dependability, innovation, creativity, flex-
ibility, independence, security, self-involvement, moti-
vation, self-discipline, self-respect, enthusiasm, confi-
dence, sense of humor, tact.

Teacher will use reports of students to illustrate how
these situations build or tear down one's self-concept.


- ---- T- -- -I


RESOURCES


Goodykontz. Maturity:
Growing Up Strong, pp.
92-138.

Appendix #5
Skit
"The Magic Looking Glass."

Appendix #6
Hand-out and bulletinboard.
"Personality in Bloom."









Clayton, Noralee.
Young Living, pp. 48.



Cross, Aleene.
Introductory Homemaking,
pp. 2-29.






















Appendix #7
Bulletin Board
"Bowl 'Em Over."

Transparencies:
3-M Company, "Attitudes of
Character." Catalog #368.


"'I- l l . .








OBJECTIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATION

6. Put several proverbs or sayings on cards
and as each is shown discuss the traits
that are referred to by the author. Ex-
amples:


(a) Do unto others as you would have
them do unto you,(courtesy, loyalty,
honesty, dependability)

(b) Laugh and the world laughs with you.
(sense of humor, friendliness)

(c) The early bird gets the worm,(ambition,
enthusiasm, initiative & punctuality)

(d) A rolling stone gathers no moss.
(ambition, initiative)

(e) Success is 10% inspiration and 90%
perspiration. (ambition, willingness
to work)

(f) A task well planned is a task half
done. (foresight, neatness)


7. Discuss reasons why some
get the jobs they seek:

(a) lack of training

(b) wrong attitude

(c) unfriendly manners

(d) being late

(e) taking someone else
looking for a job

(f) careless appearance


people fail to


with you when








CONTENT RESOURCES











Concept II: Relationships With Others


OBJECTIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATION

1. The students will describe 1. Use check list "Things On Which My
the importance of effective Parents and I Don't Agree." (Appendix
interpersonal relationships #8) Make plans to solve problems.
in the world of work.
2. Read stories about you and your family
in Maturity.

3. Take on the role of a parent and list
basic rules for your teens. Discuss the
reasons why rules are different in different
homes. Arrange buzz groups with sectional
reports.(Appendix #9)

4. Use check list to discuss "Understanding
Parents." (Appendix #10)

5. Discuss the attitudes portrayed in the
film, "Parents Are People Too".

6. Describe the Walton family from the TV
show. Tell what attitudes, customs, habits
and responsibilities of the family members
you have observed. Explain why you de-
scribe this family as you do.

7. Define verbal and non-verbal communication.

8. Role play different forms of non-verbal
communication to transmit ideas such as:

(a) Elation
(b) Hostility
(c) Warmth
(d) Superiority
(e) Helpfulness

9. Role play possible misunderstandings due
to poor communications.

10. Plan an exercise in "Good Listening".
Each student must repeat what was said
by previous student before adding his or
her own comments.

11. Poll the opinions of parents and other
students on the following. Report to class.

(a) What does it mean to you to be
successful?









CONTENT~------rr---- RE SOURCESI _


The stories in Maturity about you and your family
are to help you think constructively about some of
the problems in family relationships, especially
those between parents and children.





In the changing world of work job success is attained
by the person who has an understanding of the impor-
tance of human relations.


Factors contributing to
relationships:


successful personal


Cooperation
Congeniality
Confidence
Concern
Commitment
Companionship
Consideration


Fhe things near and dear to you are the things you
ralue. A sound set of values is a great help in
guiding your life.


Appendix #8
"Things On Which My
Parents and I Don't Agree."


Goodykontz.
Maturity: Growing Up
Strong, pp. 44-57.

Appendix #9
"Role Playing"


Appendix #10
Checklist: "Understanding
Your Parents"

Film:
Parents Are People,Too.

Appendix #11
Bulletin Board
"Paint a Happy Home."

Barclay, Champion, Brinkley,
Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 25-41, 99-120.

Booklet:
"How to Live with Parents."
"Getting Along With Parents."


Cross, Aleene.
Introductory Homemaking,
pp. 110-123.








Barclay, Champion, Brinkley,
Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 55-58.


-C-----------l ---- -. ^-I-


CONTENT


RESOURCES





EL WARNING EXPERIE N


(b) What is a good life?
(c) Do you have any special plans for
the future?
(d) Do you believe today's movies express
young people's feelings?
(e) What's wrong with the world today?
(f) How could we make this a better world
today?
(g) Why do you think young people turn to
drugs?

12. Analyze what is meant by the often used
statement, "More people are fired because
they can not get along with others than
for incompetence in job performance."

13. Participate in a "Talk Out" session about a
common problem. Consider facts, feelings and
attitudes.

14. Define values.

15. Define goals, short term & long term.

16. Make a list of your desires. Rank these in
order of importance. Analyze how your desires
are related to your values.

17. Use transparencies from 3-M Company, "Values
and Goals", #3022.

18. Discuss: Where do we get out values?
Why do we need to recognize our values?
Can values be changed?
Should people impose their values on
others?

19. Consider the use of the "Values Appraisal
Scale" as a means of analyzing your values,
then make a "Profile Value Chart."


OBJECTIVE





COTN RESOURCES___II ___


Values are learned from parents, peers, friends, church
community and are products of experiences.


A goal is an ambition one wishes to attain. Goals give
your life direction by making you act.



Values & goals are interrelated in decision making.



The basis, or rule, by which something is judged, is
called a standard.



Making wise vocational choices necessitates assessing
one's personal values and goals.


Appendix #12
Bulletin Board
"Where Did I Get My Values?"


Transparency:
3-M Company.
Goals. #3022


Appendix #13
Bulletin Boar
"Where Are Yot

Activities foi


Values and




d
u Heading?"

r Succeeding


in the World of Work.
"Values Scales", XIV
"Profile Chart", XV


- -C--l--l ----l~--rtl----I-UP N~LI~L~. I ~C(II~1LU~U111~~1


CONTENT


RESOURCES








LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS


2. The students will identify 1. Write the word "Friendship" on the chalk-
social skills which contri- board. See how many words you can find in
bute to employability. "Friendship" that describe the kinds of
friends you like best.

2. Discuss the importance of first impressions.

3. Complete the following statements, "Friends
help me.........", "A friend is..........".

4. Use hand-out, "Questionnaire on Friends."
Use as a basis for discussion.(Appendix #14)

5. Tape some interviews with students at school.
Ask them to comment on the qualities they
like and dislike in students. Play the tapes
so that the class may comment on the inter-
views.

6. Engage in a rapp session. The topic will be
"Qualities which make a person valued as a
friend and also tend to make him more employ-
able."

7. Identify some characteristics of people which
seem to cause them to lose friends and jobs.
The students might add to this list: uses
foul language, does not keep a confidence, is
too loud, steals, gossips, argues, has poor
manners, is selfish.

8. Keep the "Progress Record" for a period of
one week. (Appendix #15)

9. Make a bulletin board using the following:
"Act the way you want to be and soon you
will be the way you act."
"What you are going to be, you are now
becoming."

10. Take "Pre-test on Manners." (Appendix #16)

11. Make booklets for preparing skits. Examples:

(a) Making introductions.
(b) Using good table manners.
(c) Answering the telephone.
(d) Conducting one's self properly in
public.


__


BO ECTIVES












COTN RE SOURCES_ I_


People fail on their jobs mainly because of unde-
sirable personality traits and failure to get along
with fellow employees. Practicing rapport with
friends will help in establishing good relationships
on the job.

I. Personal qualities relating to friendship and
employability.


Health status
Strength, energy,
stamina
Age
Height & weight


e. Posture
f. Voice & Speech
g. Appearance, grooming
h. Physical handicaps


II. Psychological resources for friendships and
employability.

a. Mental health: self-confidence, optimism, free-
dom from fears, tensions, anxieties, freedom from
jealousies, resentments.
b. Intelligence: general intelligence, mechanical
ability, ability to follow directions.
c. Emotional maturity: self-discipline, judgment,
initiative, acceptance of criticism, dependabil-
ity, responsibility.
d. Attitudes toward people, things, school.
e. Character traits: honesty, integrity, fairness,
trustworthiness.

III. Social capabilities which influence friendships and
employability.


Ability to communicate
Enjoyment of people
Leadership
Consideration for others: empathy, courtesy
tact, loyalty, tolerance, acceptance of
differences, manners, patience, generosity.


IV. Habits which influence friendships and employability.


Neatness and cleanliness
Mannerisms
Use of time, punctuality
Management of money and energy


V. Interests and preferences which contribute to friend-
ships and employability.

a. Reading, recreation, clubs, community projects.


Cross, Aleene.
Introductory Homemaking,
pp. 21-30.


Appendix #14
Hand-Out
"Questionnaire on Friends."






Barclay, Champion, Brinkley,
Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
pp. 83-85.

Fleck, Fernandez, Munves.
Exploring Home and Family
Living, pp. 363-365.


Appendix #15
"Progress Record"



Appendix #16
Pre-Test
"Good Manners."


__ _ __ __


___ __


CONTENT


RESOURCES







OBJECTIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS


12. Take a post-test on manners.

13. Plan experiences (individually and as a
group) that will help develop more self-
confidence such as using a tape recorder
to hear how "voices" sound.

14. Demonstrate mannerisms which suggest a
lack of self-confidence.

15. Conduct a buzz session. Allow teams to
compete for thinking up ways of expressing
thoughtfulness. (Stress actions.)

16. Report to class on a "Dear.Abby" or "Ann
Landers" letter that refers to good manners.

17. Sponsor a courtesy week for the school:

a. Make posters.

b. Contribute to school newspaper

c. Prepare a skit for a program dealing
with courtesy.

d. Devise activities for homeroom use.






CONTENT RESOURCES


VI. Special skills and abilities which contribute to
friendships and employability.

a. Sports, art, music, cooking.

VII. Experiences and opportunities for developing
qualities for being a friend and employee.

a. Education and training
b. Activities at school, home, and in groups
c. Travel
d. Wage earning experiences
e. Acquaintances with variety of people
f. Financial resources








Concept III: Grooming and Dress


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS

1. The students will relate the 1. Use as a pre-test for students, "Quick
importance of good grooming Quizzes on Grooming." (Appendix #17)
and personal appearance to
employability and social 2. Make a notebook with pictures and articles
acceptance. on proper grooming habits. Select one
aspect to present to the class both orally
and visually.

3. Collect some good grooming articles and
stories for notebooks from Co-ed and other
magazines.

4. Provide a question box on personal topics
which students wish to have discussed.

5. Contribute to a "grooming" column in school
newspaper.

6. Divide into groups; each group select a
leader and formulate six important view-
points on how clothing communicates.

7. Discuss how choice of clothing and good
grooming can contribute to the following:

a. security
b. confidence
c. poise
d. popularity
e. friendliness
f. attractiveness
g. satisfaction
h. comfort
i. creativity
j. individuality
k. femininity (for girls)
1. masculinity (for boys)

8. Construct two bulletin boards one
illustrating necessary items for good
grooming and the other luxury items for
good grooming.

9. Play "Posture Raid" game. Designate student
judge who may call out "Posture Raid" any
time during class period. When "Posture Raid'
is called, everyone must freeze without hang"
ing positions. The student judges will criti-
cize their fellow classmates according to the
principles of good posture. Demonstrate the
principles of posture using the FSU trans-
parencies.










CONTENT


Suggestion to teacher: Use materials for
teaching and emphasize good grooming for
dark and light complexioned people.

Cosmetic company representatives are good
resource people.



Factors affecting clothing and personal appearance


Social Factors:

Acceptance by others
Group influence
Family influence
Cultural influence

Appearance can reveal:


age
sex
grooming habits
soci-economic class
sex role
self-image
culture
region
standard of living
activity or recreation, occupation
personality
health
mood


Physical Factors:

Grooming
a. body
b. teeth
c. skin
d. hair
e. hands
f. make-up

Health Habits
a. cleanliness
b. eating properly
c. exercise
d. sleep and rest
e. good posture


- I -T


RESOURCES


L


Appendix #17
"Avon's Quick Quizzes on
Grooming."(for girls & boys)

Spears, Charleszine.
How To Wear Colors with
Emphasis on Dark Skin.

Hand-out Avon: Teaching
Grooming to Teen-Age Girls
and Boys.

Bulletin board ideas from Avon:
"Rally to Good Grooming"
"Get Into Good Grooming--Have
More Fun"
"Ecology Begins With You"




Talman, Ruth.
Guide to Beauty, Charm and
Poise, pp. 49-54.


James, Barry.
Call Me Mister.

Poster:
"Be Natural and


Well-Groomed"


Barclay, Champion, Brinkley,
Funderburk. Teen Guide To
Homemaking, Chapters 4, 13
and 15.







OBJECTIVE


2. Students will identify the
elements that make clothing
attractive and acceptable.


t.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS


I -


10. View the film, Teenage Skin Problems.

11. Complete and discuss test on "Teenage Skin
Problems". (Appendix #18)

12. Recall an incident when you felt a person
was treated respectfully or disrespectfully
because of his or her personal appearance.

13. Repair loose or missing buttons, ripped
seams or hems.

14. Analyze yourself and answer the question,
"How can I improve the impression I give so
that I will be more employable?".

15. Invite a resource person to discuss the
relationship of personal appearance to
employability.






1. Write your favorite coloroon a slip of
paper. As the personality analysis for
each color is read in class, compare how
you feel about yourself in reference to
the description being given. (Appendix #19)

2. Use fabric or paper in a variety of colors
to make "collars" for student to try on.
Class will assist each other in an indiv-
idual color analysis.

3. Use silhouettes of the human figure to
illustrate the effects of line on one's
appearance.










CONTENT


What do you want your appearance to say?

That life is good?
That life is a bum deal?
That you like being you and doing what you
are doing?
That you don't like being you and what you
are doing?
That things are tough all over?
That you don't want to be disturbed?
That you're in a hurry?
That you're ambitious?
That you want to help people?

I*lhat's Your Message?




Being well-groomed results in increased self-
confidence and can mean the difference in
securing a job.



Clothes contribute greatly to one's appearance and
feeling of worth. Ralph Waldo Emmerson once said
that being well-dressed gives a feeling of inward
tranquility which all other forces are powerless to
bestow.


*1


RESOURCES


Film
Teenage Skin Problems
Florida State Board of Health.

Appendix #18
Test
"Teenage Skin Problems."


Bulletin Boards:
"Cure for Sick Clothes."
Directions Display devices
which ease clothing-wear
problems. For example:
you might display mending
tape, a clothes brush, and
iron-on patches.





Reiff, Florence M.
Steps in Home Living,
pp. 160-161.


Resource speakers: School
Principal, Personnel Manager,
Occupational Specialist









Appendix #19
"Personality Analysis
Chart by Color"



Pounds Thinner Patterns.
McCalls Pattern Company.


I





Concept IV: Personal Nutrition
ip i~ i ii


OBJECTIVE


1. The students will describe
how personal nutrition needs
may be met through food intake.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS


_ ~ ~ 4


1. Take Pre-Test on Nutrition. (Appendix #20)

2. Use posters of the Basic Four for class
discussion. (Posters can be obtained from
Family Circle Magazine.)

3. Use filmstrip, Go, Grow, and Glow.

4. Make bulletin boards or booklets illustrating
the following:

Foods to grow on (Protein).
Foods to glow on (Vitamins and Minerals).
Foods to go on (Carbohydrates and Fats).

5. Students will obtain nutritional information
from TV commercials or newspaper ads. Discuss
whether these are facts or fallacies.

6. Use resource person to speak to the class on
the importance of good nutrition.

7. Compile a list of foods you have never
eaten. Pick some foods from this list with
good nutritional values. Resolve to include
these in your diet.

8. Keep a diet for two days using the "Calorie
Subtractor" obtained from Fleishman's Mar-
garine Company.

9. Plan a day's menu using "Menu Planning."
(Appendix #21)

10. List individually five words that describe
a healthy person. Tabulate the class results
and note what descriptive words are most
frequently used.

11. Define a calorie and an empty calorie.
Classify foods as to high or low calorie
content.




_ __ I.


CONTENT


A. Basic Four Daily Food Groups
1. Milk Group 4 cups
2. Meat Group 2 or more
3. Vegetable-Fruit Group 4 or more
4. Bread-Cereal Group 4 or more

B. Food for Health and Appearance
1. Building and maintaining body tissue
2. Regulating body processes
3. Generating energy
a. Calories
b. Weight Control
(1) Gaining weight
(2) Losing weight
(3) Maintaining weight

C. Foods found in each group:
1. Milk-Cheese
all kinds of milk and cheese, ice cream
2. Meat-lean
eggs, peanut butter, dry beans, beef, pork,
lamb, luncheon meats.
3. Bread-Cereal
dry and cooked cereals, rice, noodles, corn,
wheat, all-types of flour.
4. Fruit-Vegetables
vegetables: green, yellow, potatoes, raw
and cooked.
fruits: citrus, yellow, and others, dry
canned and fresh.

D. Nutrients provided by foods:
1. Protein
2. Carbohydrates
3. Fats
4. Vitamins
5. Minerals


RESOURCES


_~~ -_ I __- ---------._


Appendix #20
"Nutrition Test"


Family Circle. July 1973.
Fleishman ad.
Basic 4 Foods, Poster
Family Circle Magazine
The Nutritional Awareness
Kit. (3 posters and 3
lesson plans) cost $3.00


Filmstrip:
Go, Grow, and Glow




Resource persons: Public
Health Nurse, Doctor,
Nutritionist, Home Economist,
School Lunchroom Manager.




Calorie Subtractor.

Appendix #21
"Menu Planning"


Reiff, Florence M.
Steps in Home Living,
pp. 69-70.








OBJECTIVE


2. The students will relate
nutritional status to employ-
ability for high level job
performance.


'I ~*


LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS


- I I----- ---II


1. Refer to the day's menu you planned. Pull
from the list of foods you used those that
can be used for light in-between snacks.

2. Evaluate students by post-test on nutrition.

3. Correlate the time of day when you begin to
feel tired with the grades you are making at
that hour of the day. What is the relation-
ship? Discuss the effect of eating habits
with performance on the job.

4. Show filmstrip, Breakfast for B.J.
Pillsbury Company.


- I -- I










COTN RESORCE


I. Poor Diet and Job Performance
A. Poor appearance, no job
B. Illness, absenteeism
C. Absenteeism, loss of job
D. Lack of energy.
1. Tardiness
2. Lower output
E. Fatigue
1. Accidents
2. Poor disposition


A vibrant, health person is usually attractive.
If a person is radiant with health and is full
of energy, people will generally find him at-
tractive and want to be around him.

Proper food will provide energy and health to
enable a person to be alert, efficient and
pleasant on the job.

The person is the sum total of what he eats.
Proper food provides good teeth, clear
complexion, bright eyes and energy for
studying, playing and working.


Appendix #22
"Snacks"














Filmstrip:
Breakfast for B.J.
Pillsbury Company


- -- I I


CONTENT


RESOURCES






Concept V: Management of Resources


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS


1. The students will apply
principles of management to
the use of personal resources

























2. The students will relate
the principles of management
to time and energy.


1. Take the pre-test on "Decision Making."
(Appendix #23)

2. Show the transparency on the decision
making process from J.C. Penney kit:
"Decision Making for Consumers."

3. Make a list of some decisions students
face and apply the decision making process.

4. Use transparency, "Types of Resources",
to determine personal resources of indi-
viduals. (Appendix 25)

5. Bring to class pictures, poems, cartoons
or songs to illustrate how teens meet
their needs or satisfy their wants.

6. Distribute the decision-making hand-out.
(Appendix #24)

7. Play, Game of Life, (Monopoly type game
that can be purchased)




1. Conduct management exercise on handing
out papers.








CONTENT RESOURCES


SDecision


making process:


(1) State your problem clearly.
(2) List the obstacles that stand in the way of
solving this problem.
(3) List the assets in your favor that will help
you in solving this problem.
(4) List possible solutions. Put down all the
possibilities you can think of.
(5) Try to figure out what the results of each
of these solutions would be.
(6) Choose the solution that seems best to you
and put it into action.
(7) Evaluate the results of that action.


Decision making is judgment made consciously after
weighing the facts and examining the alternatives
and their outcomes.


Demonstrate a simple lesson in time saving management
and efficiency. This can be done simply by two different
methods of handing out papers. Select two students as
class monitors. Instruct one monitor to letter the rows
or desks and number the students. He/She will give to each
student a sheet of paper instructing the students to write
on his/her paper the following:


name
row or desk letter
student number


The other monitor will hand a paper to each student with
instructions to have only the student's name written on
his/her paper.

Each monitor will gather his/her own papers. The monitor
who has the papers with just a student's name on each
paper will shuffle the papers and proceed to hand them
back by calling out each name and walking to that student
with the paper. Time this procedure.

The monitor who has the lettered and numbered papers will
first organize the papers by rows or tables. He/She
will then hand to someone in that row or at that table
the papers that belong there. They can then be distri-
buted by number. Time this procedure. Announce the time
results. Recognize other time saving factors resulting
from distributing the papers by number.


Appendix #23
Pre-test
"Decision Making."

Booklet:
"Discovering Yourself."
SRA

Kit:
"Decision Making for
Consumers."


Appendix #24
"Team Decision


Making."


Appendix #25
Transparency:
"Types of Resources."








OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS


3. The students will identify
the need for developing a
personal budget.


1. View the filmstrip, Budgeting.


2. Play "Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is."
(Appendix #26)

3. Exchange true stories on foolish spending
of money.

4. Complete "I was given $25.00, I plan to
use it.................".

5. Calculate the cost of absenteeism by using
"I Was Absent." (Appendix #28)

6. Plan a field trip to the local bank. During
the visit ask the banker to discuss the sav-
ings program and how to start a savings
account.








CONTENT RESOURCES

Filmstrip:
Budgeting


Appendix #26
"Put Your Money
Mouth Is."


Where Your


Appendix #27
Bulletin Board
"Pocket Your Money Wisely."

Appendix #28
"I Was Absent."




Concept VI: Employability ____


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND EVALUATIONS

1. The students will identify 1. Discuss some of the satisfactions people
reasons for working and types derive from work such as:
of work people do,
Money
Desire to create things
Association with peers
Security
Recognition and status
Service to others
Fulfillment of religious responsibilities

2. Define aptitudes and abilities.

3. Prepare a bulletin board showing jobs
requiring different types of skills and
aptitudes such as:

Mental skills
Mechanical skills
Manipulative skills
Other abilities and aptitudes

4. List and classify jobs pertaining to
management, production, processing, dis-
tribution and service.

5. Play the game: "He Said, She Said."

a. The purpose of the game is to identify
and discuss various attitudes toward
work, such as: Work is honorable,
dignified and necessary." "Work is
lowly" "Work gives meaning to life"
"All play and no work makes Jack a
a dull boy" "Without work man is
unhappy" "No man needs sympathy because
he has to work."

b. Divide class into groups.

c. Let each group formulate their own
statements and put on flash cards.

d. Members of group will determine who
has what attitude.

e. Let students discuss the pros & cons
of each statement formulated and why
one may have such attitudes toward
work.











CONTENT

The different types of jobs make up a chain which
is called the "World of Work."

The world of work is the process of supplying man's
needs and wants in the form of products and services.

An appreciation of the world of work in a democratic
society helps one to understand the vital contribution
made by each worker.

Changes in families from producing units to consuming
units have created opportunities for total family
employment outside the home.


~ __ ___ T


RESOURCES







OBJECTIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCED AND EVALUATIONS


2. The students will conduct a
self-evaluation.


1. Evaluate yourself as to your job success
traits by

a. "What Do You Have To Offer?"
(Appendix # 29)
b. "My Job Success Traits."
(Appendix #30)
c. "Self-Analysis Rating Scale."
(Appendix #31)

Evaluation: Students will evaluate the
collage made at the beginning of this unit.
"What does the collage tell me about myself?"










RESOURCES


_~ __n ~~~~__


Appendix #29
"What Do You Have To Offer?"


Appendix #30
"My Job Success Traits"

Appendix #31
"Self-Analysis Rating Scale."


CONTENT


"


--- ---


-81------












BIBLIOGRAPHY


BOOKS

Barclay, Marion S.; Champion, Frances; Brinkley, Jeanne; Funderburk, Kathleen.
Teen Guide to Homemaking, New York: McGraw Hill Book Company, 1967.

Clayton, Nanalee. Young Living, Peoria, Illinois: Charles A. Bennett Company,
Inc.,1970.

Cross, Aleene. Introductory Homemaking. New York: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1970.

Fleck, Henrietta; Fernandez, Louise; and Munves, Elizabeth. Exploring Home and
Family Living, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1965.

Goodykontz. Maturity: Growing Up Strong. New York: Scholastic Book Services,
Division of Scholastic Magazines, 1971.

James, Barry. Call Me Mister. Bronx: Milady Publishing Company.

Kimbrell, Grady and Vineyard, Ben S. Activities for Succeeding in the World
of Work. Bloomington, Illinois: McKnight & McKnight Publishing Company,
1972.

Spears, Charleszine. How to Wear Clothes with Emphasis on Dark Skin. Minneapolis,
Minn.: Burgess Publishing Company, 1965.

Reiff, Florence M., Steps in Home Living. Peoria, Illinois: Charels A. Bennett
Company, Inc., 1971.

Tolman, Ruth. Guide to Beauty, Charm and Poise. Bronx, New York: Milady
Publishing Company.


BOOKLETS, PAMPHLETS, MISCELLANEOUS

Decision Making for Consumers. J. C. Penney Kit. J. C. Penney Company, Local
Store.

Discovering Yourself. Science Research Associate, 259 East Erie Street, Chicago,
Illinois.

Ecology Begins with You

Get into Good Grooming

Have More Fun

Rally to Good Grooming

Teaching Grooming to Teen-Age Girls and Boys. Avon Book Division, The Hearst
Corporation, 959 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York. 10019.









BIBLIOGRAPHY (CONTINUED)


"Fleishman Ad." Family Circle (July, 1973), 488 Madison Avenue, New York,
New York, 10022.

Getting Along with Parents. Science Research Associates Inc., 259 East Erie
Street, Chicago, Illinois.

How to Live With Parents. Science Research Associates Inc., 259 East Erie Street,
Chicago, Illinois.

"Nutritional Awareness Kit." Three posters and three lesson plans, $3.00,
Family Circle Magazine, 488 Madison Avenue, New York, New York. 10022.

Pounds Thinner Patterns. McCalls Pattern Company, 230 Park Avenue, New York,
New York, 1973.


FILMS AND FILMSTRIPS

Breakfast for B.J. Color. The Pillsbury Company, Educational Department,
Minneapolis, Minnesota. Free.

Budgeting. Grolier Education Corp., 843 3rd Avenue, New York, New York.
10022.

Go. Grow, Glow. Color. Carnation Company, Mary Blake Department, FM-94 Los
Angeles, California. Free

Parents Are People Too. Florida State Board of Health, Tallahassee, Florida.

Teenage Skin Problems. Florida State Board of Health, Tallahassee, Florida.


TRANSPARENCIES

Attitudes of Character. Printed Originals, Cat. No. 368, $1.25; Prepared color
Transparencies, Cat. No. 868, $33.00, 3-M. Visual Products, Box 300, St.
Paul, Minnesota.

Posture Transparencies. Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.

Values and Goals. Printed Originals, Cat. No. 3022, $1.25; Prepared Color
Transparencies, Cat. No. 3522, $33.00, 3-M Visual products, Box 300, St.
Paul, Minnesota.



















































































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