• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Recommended pre-vocational home...
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Occupational opportunities and...
 Tasks common in child care, guidance,...
 Exploratory experiences
 Occupational outlook
 Evaluation of individual inter...
 Bibliography
 Appendix
 Back Cover






Group Title: Bulletin Florida Dept. of Education
Title: A Resource guide for exploration of child care guidance and service occupations
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096227/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Resource guide for exploration of child care guidance and service occupations
Alternate Title: Exploration of child care, guidance, and service occupations
Physical Description: iv, 44 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Department of Education
Donor: unknown ( endowment )
Publisher: Florida Department of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1973
 Subjects
Subject: Child care services -- Vocational guidance   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: State of Florida, Dept. of Education, Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, Home Economics Education Section.
General Note: Cover title: Exploration of child care, guidance, and service occupations.
General Note: "Florida pre-vocational home economics education."
General Note: "Reprint 1974."
General Note: Florida Department of Education Bulletin no. 75 H-15
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096227
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22331420

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Introduction
        Page ii
        Page ii-a
    Recommended pre-vocational home economics education
        Page iii
        Page iii-a
    Acknowledgement
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Occupational opportunities and requirements in child care, guidance and service occupations
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Tasks common in child care, guidance, and service occupations
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Exploratory experiences
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Occupational outlook
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Evaluation of individual interests
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Bibliography
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Appendix
        Page 31
        Page 31a
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Back Cover
        Page 45
        Page 46
Full Text













EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE
AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS





FLORIDA
PRE-VOCATIONAL
HOME ECONOMICS
EDUCATION





OCTOBER 1973
BULLETIN #75 H-15
Reprint 1974












A RESOURCE GUIDE


FOR


EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE


GUIDANCE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS








STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION SECTION


This reprint of a public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $149.86
or $.14 to provide direction and resource materials for Florida Home Economics
teachers who are instructing in the pre-vocational program.



FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS BULLETIN MAY BE SECURED THROUGH
MISS ALLIE FERGUSON, ADMINISTRATOR, HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION, KNOTT
BUILDING, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304









37E coo 97
FC-73 H-






INTRODUCTION


The pre-vocational program in Florida has three major purposes:


To provide students with an orientation to the many career oppor-

tunities available in the world of work.

To assist students in developing personal competencies important

to success in almost any occupation.

To provide students with exploration experiences in occupational

clusters according to their choice.

COURSE STANDARDS


x Section: Home Economics Education

SAccreditator Title: Exploration of Child Care, Guidance and Service
Occupations

Accreditator Code No.: 2715 U.S.O.E. No.: 09.0201

'Course Objective: To provide students with opportunities to explore a
broad range of child care, guidance and service occupations, and con-
cepts that relate to the child care service industry and to self-employ-
ment.

Course Description: This course is designed to provide opportunities.
for exploring a broad range of child care, guidance and service occu-
pations. Major concepts include characteristics of children of differ-
ent ages; methods of communicating with children; awareness of the oper-
ation of child care enterprises in a variety of situations; planning
and providing services to children, including those with special needs;
selecting and using equipment, materials and activities in relation to
the developmental tasks of children; and child related agencies and
legislation. Instruction includes observation and hands-on laboratory
experiences which are basic to specialized proficiencies needed for
employment. Concepts of management, consumer education and safety are
included as they relate to instruction.

Teacher-Student Ratio: 1 to 24

Facilities: Refer to VTAE Facility Standards Bulletin
ii

|\
4







RECOMMENDED PRE-VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION


The Schema below follows the Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Division guidelines for pre-vocational education


A STUDENT AT THE
SEVENTH GRADE LEVEL
MAY ENROLL IN



ORIENTATION
IQ
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONS
(6-9 WEEKS)

AND MAY ALSO ENROLL'IN
PERSONAL
CAREER ORIENTATION

(6-9 WEEKS)

Course is a part of
c o m.pre hensive
orientation involving
other occupational
categories and may be
a segment of a wheel.
(see note)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
EIGHTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO SCHOOL
OFFERINGS


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER(S)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12-18 WEEKS)


AND MAY ELECT AT THE
NINTH GRADE LEVEL,
ACCORDING TO
SCHOOL OFFERINGS,
ANY OF THESE NOT
PREVIOUSLY ENROLLED IN


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR CAREERS
(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

*EXPLORATION OF ANY
HOME ECONOMICS
OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS)

(12-18 WEEKS)

AND/OR

**EXPLORATION OF HOME
ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS

(12, 18 or 36 WEEKS)


* COURSE TITLES FOR HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTERS:
EXPLORATION OF THE OCCUPATION OF HOMEMAKING
EXPLORATION OF CHILD CARE, GUIDANCE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF CLOTHING MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF HOME FURNISHINGS, EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
EXPLORATION OF INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORTIVE
SERVICE OCCUPATIONS


** EXPLORATION OF HOME ECONOMICS OCCUPATIONS
INCLUDES ALL OF THE ABOVE CLUSTERS


Note: A combination of these two courses could be equal to one semester of home economics reported under
code # 2701.










ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


PARTICIPANTS:


EDITOR:


DIRECTOR:


TYPIST:


Marianne Matthews, Home Economics
Teacher, Rockledge High School,
Rockledge

Jane Titshaw, Home Economics Teacher
Lakeview Middle School, Sanford


Martha Lemons

Edna Warner

Elaine Muncy











TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction . . . . . . .
Acknowledgements . . . ... ......
Table of Contents . . . . . . . . ..


ii
iii
iv


Concept I



Concept II


Concept III

Concept IV

Concept V


S Occupational Opportunities and
Requirements in Child Care, Guidance
and Service Occupations . .

- Tasks Common in Child Care, Guidance
and Service Occupations .. .

- Exploratory Experiences . ..

- Occupational Outlook .. . .

- Evaluation of Individual Interests .


Bibliography . . . . . .. ..
Appendix . . . . . . .







CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements in Child
SUB-CONCEPT Care, Guidance and Service Occupations.
SUB-CONJCEPT i


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
identify
opportunities
for jobs related
to Child Care
Services and the
requirements for
such occupations.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


4


1. Identify job opportunities at the local
level by looking at the want ads in the
newspapers.
2. Play following "Old Maid" directions.
One set of cards has pictures and/or
words illustrating child care careers.
Other set has names of child care careers.

3. View the film, Long Before Six. Students
will check job opportunities presented in
the film relating to child care.

4. Invite resource persons representing
careers in child care to speak to the
class or interview people who can
answer the following questions:
a. What are the advantages and dis-
advantages of their jobs?
b. What training is needed for the job?
c. What future advance is there for
students in this field?
d. What is the approximate capital
needed to set up one's own business
in child care?
e. What are the local regulations?
f. What are the main tasks involved?

5. Play the game, "Who Am I?" as it applies
to child care services.
Each student has a placard over his/
her neck representing a career. The
placard hangs in back where the wearer
can't see it. He/she must ask other
students who he/she is by asking questions
answerable by yes or no.
Examples: Do I work with my hands?
Do I work in the home?
Do I work in a school?
Is my work volunteer?
Refer to "Careers in Child Care."
Appendix #1, #2, #3.




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Employment in child care service
occupations is related to levels of
training of the employee.

Educational requirements and quali-
fications will vary for different
careers.

The more complex and responsible the
job or position, the greater the amount
of training and experience is required.

The exceptional child will need special
care.

The term "exceptional child" charac-
terizes the child whose intellectual,
physical, or social condition is seen
by society as differing from that of
the average child to such an extent that
special education programs are needed.
He may be gifted or he may have one or
more impairments or disabling condi-
tions. The term "handicapped" means
unable to compete successfully in all
areas of life or unable to adjust to
normal living conditions.

Types of exceptional children:
1. mentally retarded
2. physically handicapped
3. visually impaired
4. auditorially impaired
5. emotionally disturbed
6. minimal brain damaged
7. multiple handicapped
8. culturally deprived or
disadvantaged
9. gifted

Recent research has shown that the
largest percentage of exceptional
children are the mentally retarded.
For this reason, the needs of the
mentally retarded are continually
emphasized.


Bulletin Board:
Identify places for
employment opportunities
in child care by finding
appropriate pictures.
May be entitled: "Jobs
May Be There."


Film:
Long Before Six


Hopke, William E.
Encyclopedia of Careers
and Vocational Guidance.


Pamphlet:
Day Care 7 Administration.


Appendix #1, #2, #3
"Careers in Child Care"







CONCEPT I Occupational Opportunities and Requirements in Child
SUB-CONCEPT Care, Guidance and Service Occupations.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


_____________________________________ 4


2. The students will
identify local
and state
opportunities
for training.


1. Assign students to consult with the
following:
a. Chamber of Commerce: to discover
local educational institutions.

b. Local School Guidance Counselor:
to list high school training courses.

c. Local Community College or University


Counselors: to identify child care
training courses.


d. College and University Catalogues:
to list child care courses offered.


2. List ways to improve educational back-
ground and job skills.


3. Investigate on-the-job training opportun-
ities, vocational-technical schools and
junior colleges for ways of getting child
care training.


OBJECTIVES


I


m





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES



The following may
be contacted for
resource persons:

(tape presentations
for future use)

1. County Supervisor
of Kindergarten

2. Office of Equal
Opportunity
Personnel

3. Kindergarten Teachers

4. Child Care Qenter
Operators

5. County Welfare
Department Personnel

6. Community College or
University Personnel

7. Psychologists

8. Speech Therapists






CONCEPT II Tasks Common in Child Care, Guidance, and Service
SUB-CONCEPT Occupations


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will examine
responsibilities
involved in
meeting a
child's
physical needs.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Use the bulletin board and go over "Ocean
of Knowledge" to list responsibilities of
the child care worker.
a. Students may role-play responsibilities
at each station.
b. Collect pictures of responsibilities
at each station.
c. Compare responsibilities at each
station. Appendix #4

2. Give students oversized eating utensils
(stirring spoons and large bowl.) Have
them eat cereal reverse handed for de-
veloping patience and understanding with
the child who is learning to eat.)

3. View displays of appropriate eating
utensils for children.

4. Prepare a simple meal and serve to a child
or student.

5. Invite a nurse to talk on the care of
young children.

6. Discuss bedtime problems. Let each student
suggest a solution for each problem.

7. Exhibit children's clothing of different
sizes. Note the following characteristics
in the different items:
a. self-help features
b. type of fabric washabilityy, comfort)
c. workmanship
d. durability
e. attractiveness





CONCEPT


SIHB -CONCEPT


CONTENT


Family food habits and attitudes
influence children's food habits.

A child learns good table manners by
1. imitating.
2. being taught.
3. gaining approval.

Adequate rest is essential for growth,
but the amount of rest needed varies
with each individual.

Sleep habits are built in childhood.

Preparing a child for bedtime encourages
sleep and reduces emotional tension.

The type of clothing children have
influences their success in learning
to dress themselves.

Children need clothes that are durable
and easy to care for.

Behavior changes when a child's needs
are not being met or his routine is
inconsistent.


RESOURCES


Appendix #4
"Ocean of Knowledge"


Pamphlets:
1. Infant Care
2. Your Child from 1-6
3. Your Child from 6-12


Filmstrip:
Feeding Young Children


Transparency:
Care of Infants


Pamphlets:
1. A Safer World for
Babies and Toddlers
2. When Baby Is Ill
3. Baby's Eating and
Sleeping Habits
4. Infant's and Children's


Clothing


__


I







CONCEPT II Tasks Common in Child Care, Guidance, and Service
SUB-CONCEPT Occupations
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


2. The students
will recognize
growth and
development
patterns of
children.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Observe a child for an. assigned time
period.Record characteristics noted on
"Child Observation Check List."
Appendix #5

2. Compare the growth and development patterns
of observed children.

3. View the films-Terrible Two's and Trusting
Three's, Frustrating Four's and Fasci-
nating Five's. Observe the changing
characteristics of the preschooler.

4. Use as an alternative or for further
emphasis the chart, "A Word Picture of
Children." List the stages of child
development.

5. Observe children from infancy through five
and record observation on the chart, "A
Word Picture of Children." Appendix #6

6. Observe progression of motor development
in children as seen in transparencies.

7. View the films the second time. Observe
how children from two to five learn
a. to climb.
b. to play with others.
c. to play with toys.
d. to walk, run, to skip.
e. to talk.
f. to imitate adults.
g. to concentrate.
h. to ask questions.
i. to control behavior.
j. to dress themselves.





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


1. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE NEWBORN:
a. large head, blue eyes, small
nose and chin
b. long arms, longer than legs
c. toes spread out, rather than
curled
d. no visible teeth
e. weak muscles
f. weight 5-10 pounds
g. sneezes, hiccoughs, breathes
rapidly
h. hears
i. eyes do not focus
j. face turns red and all of
body moves when he cries

2. PATTERN OF DEVELOPMENT FOR THE MOST
IS AS FOLLOWS:
a. smiles, turns head
b. muscles develop strength
c. turns over
d. plays with hands
e. sits
f. uses thumb and forefinger to
pick up things
g. enjoys simple games and toys
h. is afraid of strangers
i. crawls
j. pulls up to stand
k. walks with legs apart and arms
out for balance

3. TODDLER TWO YEARS OLD:
As a toddler develops physically,
his increasing strength allows him
to explore his world independently.
He expresses his personality by
a. being curious.
b. getting into everything.
c. striving for independence.
d. saying "no."
e. beginning to socialize.


Appendix #5
"Child Observation
Check List"

Barclay, Champion,
Brinkley, Funderburk.
Teen Guide to Homemaking,
Chapter 7.


Fil
1.
2.
3.
4.


Mms:
Terrible Two's
Trusting Three's
Frustrating Four's


Fascinating Five's


Transparencies:
1. Growth and Development


Patterns
2. Growth Patterns in
Children


Appendix #6
"A Word Picture
of Children"

Davis and Peeler.
Lessons in Living,
Topic 2, "You and
a Child."

Bulletin Board:
(Pictures of children
to show characteristics
at each stage)

Chart:
How a Baby Grows


'v r I --s







CONCEPT II Tasks Common in Child Care, Guidance, and Service
SUB-CONCEPT Occupations


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


8. Divide the class into small groups to
compare notes on the film and for
discussion on learning abilities and
habits.

9. Write a paper summarizing why children
are thought of as the
a. terrible two's.
b. trusting three's.
c. frustrating four's.
d. fascinating five's.

10. Read the papers to the class. Discuss
the opinions of classmates.

11. Scramble pictures on a flannel board
of children and have the students arrange
pictures in the order of development.

12. Divide class into small groups. (Each
group will make a collage entitled, "A
Child's World.")





CONCEPT
SULII-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES

4. THE ThREE YBAR OLD:
a. is clumsy and roly-poly
b. is crawling, climbing, pushing
c. is curious, aggressive,
independent
d. has short interest span
e. is self-centered
f. feels, tastes, smells, listens,
looks
g. is tolerant, lacks judgment
h. rises early
i. needs to feel useful
j. needs help with books and
blocks

5. PRESCHOOLER THE FOUR AND FIVE
YEAR OLD
a. has direction and wants to
live up to expectations
b. imitates and imagines
c. is willing to share but unable
to deal with gang
d. is losing baby fat
e. talks a lot
f. attempts more than is able
to do
g. is inattentative, inconsistent
h. is full of energy
i. appears to be unable to behave
j. drops and loses things
k. likes to build and tear down
1. sings, asks questions
m. is imaginative, can play
quietly for a long time
n. watches everything, tries to
conform
o. is better coordinated, tries
to do for self
p. likes routine, success,
freedom
q. likes to take trips
r. plays well with others
s. uses simple tools
t. can learn to read and write,
tries hard
u. is inquisitive about grown-ups
and babies
v. can follow changing rhythms
w. has a longer attention span







CONCEPT II Tasks Common in Child Care, Guidance, and Service
SUB-CONCEPT Occupations


OBJECTIVES

3. The students
will recognize
responsibilities
involved in
caring for
children as
related to
health and
safety.


4. The students will
investigate the
differences
between
punishment,
discipline and
guidance.













5. The students
will identify
types of
equipment and
suitable play
things used in
child care.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Invite mothers to give a panel discussion
on "Safety for Children."
2. View "Safety for Children," 3-M trans-
parencies. Discuss health and safety pre-
cautions one should take when caring for
children.
3. Make posters on safety and health of
children.
4. Collect newspaper stories or magazine
articles regarding accidents with small
children that could possibly have been
avoided if the persons caring for the
children had been more alert.
5. Compile a set of safety rules to use when
taking care of children.

1. Collect and analyze cartoons on children's
behavior "Peanuts," "Family Circle," and
"Dennis the Menace."
2. List irritating behavior patterns of
children. Discuss reasons for such behavior
and ways to cope with the behavior.
3. Fill a box with slips of paper on which
have been written incomplete statements,
such as, "As for punishing children, I .
Each slip has on it something to do with
children. A student draws a slip from the
box, reads and comments. Discuss. Continue
until all the slips have been drawn.
Appendix #7
4. Practice using positive statements rather
than negative ones with children.
5. Participate in role-playing good and
poor conversations with children and/or
situations requiring discipline.
6. Use scramblegram on "Activities of Child
Care." Appendix #8

1. Find pictures of suitable equipment for
specific physical activities, such as
swinging, climbing, and crawling.
2. Visit a playground. Discuss equipment
used and its value for developing motor
skills. Recognize hazardous as well as
safety equipment for children.
3. Bring to class a toy/equipment and list
ways a child may benefit from using it.





CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


A knowledge of basic safety rules is a
responsibility of one who cares for
children.

Guidance in developmental activities is
essential for the health, safety and
development of the child.

CHECK POINTS TO HELP PREVENT ACCIDENTS:
1. Unused electrical outlets should
be capped or sealed with
electrical tape.
2. Keep crib side up and be sure it
is latched.
3. Never use thin plastic film as a
mattress cover.
4. Make sure crib, toys and other
things children might chew on are
coated with non toxic paint.
5. Be sure playthings are too big
to swallow.
6. Do not put large stuffed toys or
pillows in a crib.
7. Do not open windows more than 4-5
inches.
8. Never leave an infant alone on a
bed, bathing table, or chair.
9. Be sure door locks have an
outside release.
10. Shorten all drapery and venetian
blind cords.

To save time when accidents do occur,
familiarize yourself before hand with
the immediate steps to take (and not to
take) in an emergency. Keep an up-to-
date first aid kit chart pasted inside
your medicine cabinet and have a well
stocked first aid kit available. Keep
telephone numbers of your doctor, fire
department, ambulance and hospital
near the phone.
Certain types of behavior are typical
of children at given ages.
Consistency and routine simplify
guiding children's behavior.
Understanding children helps us to better
understand why they react as they do in
various situations.
Be friendly but firm.


j


RESOURCES


Pamphlet:
Pocket Guide to
Emergency Action

5-M Transparency:
Safety for Children


Bulletin Board:
1. "Stop for Hazards"
2. "Go for Safety"
(Place pictures on
either side of traffic
light)



Bulletin Board:
"Danger Watch Out"
(Show things to remember
when caring for young
children)

Appendix #7
"My Feelings About
Children"






Bulletin Board:
"Doorway to Discipline"
(Using doorway cutout,
list the components
of discipline.)


Appendix #8
"Activities of Child
Care"








CONCEPT II Tasks Common in Child Care, Guidance, and Service
Occupations
SUB-CONCEPT
.7


OBJECTIVES


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


I_1


4. Construct inexpensive play equipment.
Use:
a. sandbox
b. dish pan
c. spray can tops
d. funnels
e. crazy wheels (baby food jar lids
nailed on wood with pull cords)
f. cars
g. beads
h. painted spools
i. blocks (sanded and waxed)
J. puppets (paper bags, socks, felt,
wash-cloths, double knit scraps)

5. List many ordinary items that could be
made into useful, safe toys for children.







CONCEPT


SUB CONCEPT


CONTENT


r


Safety is the most important
consideration in buying special
equipment for children.


RESOURCES


Pamphlets:
1. Homemade Playthings
2. Beautiful Junk




Transparency:
Selection of Toys


Matterson, E. M.
Play and Playthings
for the Preschool Child.



Transparency:
Homemade Developmental
To ys.






CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students will
explore the
responsibilities
and pleasures of
a baby-sitter in
caring for
children. (f)


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Discuss characteristics a sitter must
acquire, such as
a. understanding and enjoying children.
b. assuming responsibility.
c. relating to persons other than
family members.
d. understanding self.
2. Conduct a panel discussion. Invite two
sitters and two children's parents to
discuss what each expects of the other
on a baby-sitting assignment.
3. Develop a child care code for sitters
and parents. Suggested items to include
are responsibilities of the sitter, the
sitter's parents, the parent-employer.
4. Prepare a "Surprise Kit" of no-cost toys
and play materials. Share ideas with the
class.
5. Suggested "hands-on-experience" for toy
making:
a. Cans in cans for stacking (cover
with contact)
b. "Learn How To" books (made from felt
or oil cloth using zippers, snaps,
buttons, etc.)
c. Bean bags of various shapes (create
a game of toss)
d. Rocks painted in different images/
shellac
e. Playdough objects, fingerpaints,
picture puzzles or pictures
6. Demonstrate making objects by folding paper.
Examples: torn paper dolls, trees, hats.
7. Demonstrate bathing, diapering and feeding
an infant. (big doll)
8. Get a baby-sitting job and keep a record of
what you learned about behavior of children.
Use "Check List for Babysitter."
9. Prepare an ad for a paper or hand bill to
pass out in the neighborhood selling your-
self as a sitter.
10. Set up baby-sitting bureau. Elect officers
and establish regulations of bureau.


I




CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


Jobs selected were chosen to represent
levels of training in child care work:
1. Baby-sitter(secondary or entry
level)
2. Day care assistant (postschool or
training)
3. Kindergarten teacher (college or
professional)

Teacher may choose others.



A young child is dependent upon the
baby-sitter for love and care when the
parents are away from home.

The care of young children is affected
by the kind of preparation the baby-
sitter has received.


Children's behavior patterns are
influenced by age, past experience,
physical conditions and the people
around them.
























17


T


RESOURCES


4.


Appendix #9
"A Successful
Baby-Sitter"


Pamphlets:
1. Sitting Safely
2. When Teenagers Take
Care of Children -
Guide for Baby-Sitters



Reiff, Florence M.
Steps in Home Living,
Chapter 7.


Bulletin Board:
"How to Get a Job
Baby-Sitting"



Sherman, Sharon.
Baby-Sitter's Guide.


Film:
Baby-Sitting: The
Job The Kids


Appendix #10
"Check List for
Baby-Sitting"








CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


2. Students will
explore the
responsibilities
and pleasures
in caring for
children.
(typical of a
Child Day Care
assistant)


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Interview a Child Day Care Assistant to
find out what responsibilities he/she
has at the center. Suggested questions
to ask are
a. How/Why did you start in the job?
b. What are specific responsibilities
and opportunities?
c. What is the rate of pay?

2. Chart the routines needed for house-
keeping-as observed in the Child Care
Center. Star the activities with which
children can assist. Discuss these
observations with classmates.

3. Use cassette or tape recorder to record
play groups at Child Care Center. Listen
to the tape as they consider play interest
and vocabulary of children. Listen to
the vocabulary the children use most
frequently while at play. Observe what
seems to amuse them the most.

4. Find recipes for finger paint and play
dough and compare costs of homemade
products with commercial products.

5. Assemble a touch and feel notebook of
different textures to present to children.
Example: wool, cloth, velvet, glass,
sandpaper.

6. List and play games appropriate for
various ages.

7. Select familiar fingerplays and teach to
the class. Learn some fingerplays that
would interest children at the Day Care
Center. Practice them on the class.


I





CONCEPT


SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT


INFORMATIONAL ITEMS AND ATTITUDES TAUGHT
IN THE CARE OP CHILDREN
A. QUANTITATIVE CONCEPTS
1. The teacher carefully guides the
children into systematic number
thinking, through counting blocks
or other objects, through taking
turns, etc. They gain under-
standing of cardinal and ordinal
meaning as well as the serial
order of numbers.
2. Children learn to understand more,
less, bigger, taller, smaller,
shorter, and heavier through
practical situations. They measure
one thing against another, for
example: "Two of these blocks make
one of those."
5. They learn before, after, now,
morning, afternoon, today, to-
morrow, yesterday. The names of
months become familiar and they
come to think of the year as a
succession of four seasons and a
recurrence of familiar holidays.

B. LANGUAGE TRAINING
1. Children are encouraged to talk
with the teacher and with others;
thus learning new words and skill
in communication. Vocabulary is
also built through carefully
planned new experiences accociated
with the appropriate words, group
discussions, language games, and
the telling and reading of many
stories and poems.
2. An interest in and desire for
reading is cultivated; attractive
and suitable books are made
available for the children's
enjoyment. They are taught the
proper care of books.

C. OTHER LEARNING
1. Music: Children learn to enjoy
listening to music, singing songs,
playing simple instruments,
creating music through rhythmic
responses.
2. Art: They learn to handle various
art materials creatively and
expressively.


RESOURCES


Filmstrip:
Play A Learning,
Medium for Preschool
Children


Bulletin Board:
"Play is the Business
of Children"
(Drawings or pictures
of children at play.)



Pamphlet:
Positions in Day
Care Centers





Taylor, Barbara.
A Child Goes Forth.


1


I







CONCEPT III Exploratory Experiences
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


3. The students will
explore the
responsibilities
and pleasures in
caring for
children.
(typical of a
kindergarten
teacher)


T


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


I.


1. Ask a librarian or effective storyteller
to demonstrate storytelling techniques.

2. Allow students to practice reading stories
out loud so that they can hold the
children's interest. Practice with a
cassette recorder.

3. Select a story to read to children. Read
or tell it using props such as flannel
board, puppets, etc.

4. Plan a daily schedule for kindergarten
children for
a. two hours.
b. three hours.
c. four hours.

5. Prepare educational materials or equipment
required to implement the daily plan.

6. Role-play a situation between the parents
and kindergarten teacher regarding be-
havior of their child in class room.

7. Suggest ways to get children to do what
you direct without using force.

8. Invite a kindergarten teacher to discuss
a. why and how they plan children's
activities.
b. games and toys for various develop-
mental levels.






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


3. Sensory Training: Through guided
observation, they learn to notice
differences and similarities in
color, shape, pitch. Visual
acuity and eye-hand coordinations
are taught through puzzles and
games and through study of
pictures. Auditory training comes
through music, language and other
activities.
4. Social Attitudes: They learn
favorable attitudes toward one
another, toward teachers, and
toward learning. They gain the
ability to function in a group,
to listen to one another, to
await one's turn, to cooperate,
to assume responsibility, to
concentrate on a task, and to
follow directions.

D. "SING ME A SONG"
Children often sing as they work
and experiment with sound and
rhythm as they play. They enjoy
having songs sung to them, espe-
cially songs about things with
which they are familiar. Tunes
that are catchy, easy, and have
bodily movement appeal to them.
They like to hear the same songs
over and over.

E. GUIDELINES FOR SELECTING PICTURES
FOR CHILDREN:
1. simple, little detail
2. heavy outline
3. one idea per picture
4. large, page-size pictures

(Coloring books as purchased should not
be distributed or used as an art
activity.)


Wagner, Gillaley,
Roth, Cesinger.
Games and Activities
for Early Childhood
Education.




Local Florida
Extension Office or
write to office at
Gainesville, Florida


Wylie, Jane.
A Creative Guide
for Preschool Teachers.







CONCEPT IV Occupational Outlook
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES


1. The students
will examine
the need for
neighborhood
Child Care
services.








2. The students
will recognize
that the changing
role of sexes
and changes in
society patterns
will greatly
affect jobs in
Child Care
Centers.


LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Poll representative neighborhood families
to see the need for better child care
services. Example of questions on poll:
a. Is there a need for child care
services in home?
b. How many children in the neighborhood
need care?
c. How often do the children need day
care services?
d. Who cares for the children?
e. How many hours a day do the children
need day care service?
f. How much does it cost per day to care
for a child at a day care center?

1. Discuss the following:
a. In a family of four (father, mother,
sister, brother) who should do the
following:
1) cleaning? Why?
2) laundry? Why?
3) dishwashing? Why?
4) gardening? Why?
5) caring for children? Why?
6) cooking? Why?
7) working outside the home? Why?
b. Between a boy and girl of dating age
who should do the following:
1) invite the other out? Why?
2) take the initiative concerning
affection? Why?
3) propose going steady, getting
engaged, or married? Why?
c. Should men or women have more oppor-
tunity for better salaries, promotion
and creative job opportunities? Why?
In which careers?
d. Are there some jobs that are definitely
associated with men and others with
women? Why? Who would be a
1) bricklayer?
2) nursery school teacher?
3) lawyer?
4) home economist?







CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT


CONTENT RESOURCES


Excerpts from:
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
i~APLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
WOMEN'S BUREAU
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20210
WE ANTICIPATE
Women to be employed in every occu-
pation and profession. Legislation is
assuring equal opportunity and pay,
regardless of sex, to a substantial
majority.
Financial assistance for advanced
training will be available.

WE FIND THAT
Nine out of ten girls will work
during their life time. Half the women
between 18-65 are in the labor force
and the percentage rises.
Sights of girls are limited and
unrealistic. Most girls have a
romantic image of life. They'can see
themselves rearing a family and living
happily ever after.
Quiet revolution in life patterns
presents a special challenge to those
counseling girls. Girls must be
prepared for their dual role as home-
maker and workers.

ELEMENTS IN THIS NEW LIFE PATTERN
Life expectancy is rising.
There is an increase in teenage
marriages. Women have their last child
about 50 years of age and have 30-35
more years of active life.
Women and youth will provide the
largest source of new entrants into
the labor force.
About three million women were heads
of the family in 1970; more are
expected.
Analysis shows women's participation
in the labor force high in the early
working years and decreasing during the
childbearing years. This is followed
by an increase in each age category
thereafter until 55 or 60.


23


Pamphlet:
Minimum Standard for
Child Care Programs


U. S. Dept. of Labor.
Occupational Out-
look Handbook.


Periodical:
Forum. Fall/Winter, 1971,
pp7. 4-15.






Filmstrip:
Jobs and Gender








CONCEPT IV Occupational Outlook
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


e. Are your attitudes about male and
female roles the same as your parents'?
Different? Why?

2. Suggest places for employment in Child Care.
(May hand out appendix listing as follow-up.)

3. Discuss the growing public need for the
care of children, brought about by mothers
working outside the home.

4. Discuss factors affecting number and types
of occupations available in Child Care in
the future. Relate the factors listed
to local community:
a. Type of community: small town, rural,
suburban, urban.
b. Kind of economic area: agricultural,
industrial, resort, residential,
retirement village.
c. Conditions of economic growth and
decline: unemployment rate, turnover
of employees, income level, industry.








CONCEPT
S!ib;-CONCEPT


CONTENT


T


T


Girls should prepare for careers or
iobs in which they would like to work
for the remainder of their lives. They
should select fields that are satisfying
to them and that also challenge their
talents.

GIRLS AND WOMEN WORK FOR MANY REASONS
Single girls support themselves.
Widows or divorcees may have to
support themselves and their dependents.
Married women may work from
compelling economic need or to
supplement their husband's earnings due
to the rising costs in all areas.
Some women work for fulfillment.

IN ADDITION
Labor saving home equipment and
prepared foods shorten the time needed
for household tasks.
Increasingly women are seeking the
right to choose their contributions to
society.
Since so many are working, why do we
find so many in lower paying jobs? Is
it lack of education?
THE FACTS ARE
In 1969 women workers had median
earnings of $2,564.00 compared to
$6,899.00 for men.


An important part of the answer to the
disparity in women's educational
attainment and earnings lies in the
goals and aspirations of these women
when they were girls. Counselors,
teachers and parents can help girls
realize their new realities. Their
talents should be developed to the
optimum in whatever field they wish to
pursue.
Recent legislation has paved the way
for expanded facilities and services to
provide a comprehensive program for
exceptional children. Many programs
and services are focusing on education
and training for these individuals.


RESOURCES


Appendix #1, #e, #5
"Careers in Child Care"


Bulletin Board:
"Opportunities are
MUSHROOMING in Child
Care"
(Various shapes and
sizes of mushrooms are
pictured and labeled
from Job listings.)



Pamphlet:
Day Care Facts



Resource Persons:
Employment Service Personnel
Welfare Department Pers6nnel
County Agricultural Agent
Home Economics Agent
Newspapers and
Weekly Magazines







CONCEPT V Evaluation of Individual Interests
SUB-CONCEPT


OBJECTIVES LEARNING EXPERIENCES


1. Students will
evaluate their
own character-
istics as they
relate to
qualities
necessary for
success in Child
Care and Child
Guidance
occupations.


1. Write or tape a brief summary on "How I
Think I Would Benefit if I Were a

(Day Care Center aide, kindergarten
teacher, toy sales clerk, worker with
an exceptional child.)

2. Use the questionnaire, "Personal
Characteristics Necessary for Careers
in Child Care Services."
Conduct a self-evaluation.






CONCEPT
SUB-CONCEPT

J7


CONTENT


Continual improvement of personal
qualities and job skills is necessary
to hold and advance in a job.


RESOURCES


Appendix #11
"An Interest
Inventory for
Planning"




Appendix #12
"Personal Characteristics
Necessary for Careers
in Child Care Services"













BIBLIOGRAPHY


BOOKS

Barclay, Marion; Champion, Frances, Brinkley, Jeanne and
Funderburk, Kathleen. Teen Guide to Homemaking. New York:
McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1972.

Davis, Martha J. and Peeler, Yvonne M. Lessons in Living.
Bostons Ginn and Company, 1970.

Hopke, William E.,(ed.). The Encyclopedia of Careers and
Vocational Guidance. Chicago: J.G. Ferguson Publishing
Company, 1972.

Matterson, E.M. Play and Playthings for the Preschool Child.
Baltimore, Maryland: Penguin Books, 1967.

Reiff, Florence M. Steps in Home Living. Peoria, Illinois:
Charles A. Bennett Company, Inc., 1971.

Sherman, Sharon. Baby-Sitter's Guide. New York: Scholastic
Book Service, 1969.

Taylor, Barbara. A Child Goes Forth. Provo, Utah: Brigham
Young University Press, 1970.

U.S. Department of Labor. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1972-
1973. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.

Wagner, Guy; Gillaley, Laura; Roth, Bette Ann and Cesinger,
Joan. Games and Activities for Early Childhood Education.
Darien, Connecticuts Teachers Publishing Corporation, 1967.

Wylie, Jane. A Creative Guide for Preschool Teachers. New York:
Western Publishing Company, 1966.

PAMPHLETS

A Safer World for Babies and Toddlers. Johnson and Johnson, New
Brunswick, New Jersey. 08903. CFree)

Baby's Eating and Sleeping Habits. Johnson and Johnson, New
Brunswick, New Jersey. 08903.

Beautiful Junk. Headstart Project, Office of Equal Opportunity,
Washington, D.C.

Day Care Facts. U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, D.C.









PAMPHLETS Ccont.]

Day Care 7 Administration. U.S. Department of Health, Education
and Welfare, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

Homemade Playthings. Florida Agricultural Extension Service,
Gainesville, Florida.

Infants' and Children's Clothing. Consumer Education Division,
Sears, Roebuck and Company, Chicago, Illinois.

Infant Care. U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

Minimum Standard for Child Care Programs. State of Florida,
Division of Family Services, Jacksonville, Florida. [Free]

Pocket Guide to Emergency Action. Public Information Department,
National Safety Council, 425 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois. 60611. [Free)

Fuaitions in Day Care Centers. U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, D.C.

'Sittirg, Safely. Gerber Products Company, Fermont, Michigan. 49412.

When Baby Is Ill. Johnson and Johnson, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
08903.

When Teenagers Take Care of Children-Guide for Baby-Sitters.
U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

Your Child from 6 to 12. U.S. Department of Health, Education and
Welfare, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

Your Child from 1 to S. U.S. Department of Health, Education and
Welfare, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

FILMS and FILMSTRIPS

Baby-Sitting: The Job-The Kids. (2 parts/ 7C-100 402, $35.00)
Guidance Association, Pleasantville, New York. 10570.

Feeding Young Children. National Dairy Council, 111 Canal Street,
Chicago, Illinois. 60606.

Frustrating Four's and Fascinating Five's. Florida Health Dept.,
Box 210, Jacksonville, Florida.

Jobs and Gender. (2 parts/ 7C-103 349, $35.00), Guidance
Association, Pleasantville, New York. 10570.

Long before Six. Department of Public Welfare, Jaojeonville,
Florida.









FILMS AND FILMSTRIPS (cont.)

Play- A Learning Medium for Preschool Children. J.C. Penney, Company,
Inc., 1301 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York. 10019.

Terrible Two's and Trusting Three's. Florida Health Department,
Box 210, Jacksonville, Florida.

TRANSPARENCIES

Care of Infants. Clasatoons Co-ed/Forecast, 904 Sylvan Avenue,
Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Growth and Development Patterns. 3-M Visual Products, Box 300,
St. Paul, Minnesota.

Growth Pattern in Children. Visual Masters, Co-ed/Forecast, 904
Sylvan Avenue, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Homemade Developmental Toys. Classtoons, Co-ed/Forecast, 904
Sylvan Avenue, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Safety for Children. 3-M Visual Products, Box 300, St. Paul,
Minnesota.

Selection of Toys. 3-M Visual Products, Box 300, St. Paul,
Minnesota.

Periodical

Silverman, Dr. Saul A. "Changing Roles of Men and Women." Forum,
Fall/Winter, 1971, pp. 14-15.

CHART

How a Baby Grows. Johnson and Johnson, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
08903.






































APPENDIX












APPENDIX # 1
CAREERS IN CHILD CARE

COLLEGE

Nursery School or Kindergarten Teacher
Home Economics Teacher
Welfare Home Economist
Research Speoialist
Child Guidance Counselor
Child Care Center Director
Communications Director of Radio, Television, Journalism
Child Care Center Social Director
Special Education Teacher


POST SECONDARY

Head Start Supervisor
Recreational Supervisor
Research Assistant
Self-employed Person
Child Day Care Assistant
Nursemaid
Toy Designer


SECONDARY

Child Day Care Worker
Teacher's Aide
Kindergarten Aide
Nursery School Attendant
Self-employed in Home Care of Children
Helper in Children's Hospital Ward
Assistant in Recreational Center
Assistant in Children's Library
Salesclerk for Children's Toys, Clothing, Furniture
Toymaker
Foster Parent
Playroom Attendant
House Parent
Head Start Worker
Exceptional Child Aide
Baby-sitter












APPENDIX # 2
CAREERS IN CHILD CARE


BUSINESS


Child Day Care Assistant
Child Day Care Worker
Communications Person in
Nursery School Attendant
Play Room Attendant
Research Assistant
Recreational Assistant
Research Specialist
Recreational Supervisor
Sales Clerk
Self-employed Person
Toy Designer
Toy Maker

HOME

Baby-sitter
Exceptional Child Aide
Foster Parent
Governess
Nursemaid
Self-employed Person
Toy Maker


Radio, Television, Journalism


INSTITUTION

Assistant in Children's Library
Assistant in Recreational Area
Child Care Center Director
Child Day Care Assistant
Child Day Care Worker
Child Guidance Counselor
Church School Worker
Exceptional Child Aide
Head Start Aide
Head Start Supervisor
Helper in Hospital Ward
Home Economics Teacher
House Parent
Kindergarten Aide
Nursery or Kindergarten Teacher
Nursery School Attendant
Research Assistant
Research Specialist
Teacher's Aide












APPENDIX # 3
CAREERS IN CHILD CARE

PROFESSIONAL

Child Care Center Director
Child Care Center Social Director
Child Guidance Counselor
Communications Director of Radio, Television, Journalism
Home Economics Teacher
Nursery School or Kindergarten Teacher
Research Specialist
Special Education Teacher
Welfare Home Economist

TECHNICAL

Assistant in Children's Library
Assistant in Recreational Center
Child Day Care Assistant
Governess
Head Start Supervisor
Nursemaid
Recreational Supervisor
Toy Designer

SKILLED

Exceptional Child Aide
Foster Parent
House Parent
Kindergarten Aide
Self-employed in Home Care of Children
Teacher's Aide

ENTRY

Baby-sitter
Child Day Core Worker
Church School Worker
Head Start Aide
Helper in Children's Ward
Nursery School Attendant
Playroom Attendant
Sales Clerk for Children's Toys, Clothing, Furniture
Toymaker







Appendix # 4


11e


Lunch
Lane


OCEAN of KNOWLEDGE



AM
*reak-t'a+st


PM


STr' ressy


O
\ TetW. 0


S-T7ter
.tt-er O
Toutn 4
Color 'o
'Boold
Harbor






0 Resvi Ile


Big Meal
3unc i on










APPENDIX # 5

CHILD OBSERVATION CHECK LIST

Directions: Observe a young child. Use the following checklist
to help you in your observation and to answer the questions with
the reasons indicated. Write YES, TO SOME EXTENT, or NO in each
blank.

Name of child observed Age
Place
Length of time child was observed
Activities of child at the time of observation


PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
has good color
has bright eyes

appears to be the
correct weight for
his height

has good posture

has teeth; how many?

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

walks with ease of motion
____active and energetic
goes up or down stairs:
How?_
rides tricycle
toilet trained
laces and ties shoes
dresses himself
uses table silver
uses crayons

has play equipment which
allows for exercises
Types


plays games what kinds?



enjoys toys prefers


sleeps well:
how long? _


Naps: how long?


SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
is friendly with
me
is friendly to
strangers
plays with other
children
can take turns
has a sense of
humor
can share with
others
likes pets

_plays well alone


MENTAL DEVELOPMENT
notices people

says words
is interested in
new words
speaks clearly
likes books
asks many
questions
can learn little
finger games
notices color,
texture, form,
size


tires easily$ reasons


-1







APPENDIX # 5 oont.)

imitates grown-ups in play activity how?


likes to explore
has short attention span
has long attention span
can be taught games
uses imagination: how?



EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
seems secure
is afraid of new experiences
is afraid of dogs
is afraid of the dark
is afraid of strangers
cries when parents leave
shows love to pets, dolls, stuffed animals
shows signs of jealousy

____ gets angry quickly
has temper tantrums
can wait for attention
shows pleasure with attention














APPENDIX # 6

A Word Picture of Children


Infant 2-yr. old 3-yr.old 4-5 yr. old


Physical
Development


Intellectual
Development



Emotional
Development



Social
Development












Appendix # 7

MY FEELINGS ABOUT CHILDREN

Here are some incomplete statements about children. Each
statement describes a particular kind of behavior problem.
You are to finish the statements by describing what you think
would be the best way to treat each particular problem.



1. I think the child who never finishes eating on time should

2. I think the child who continually Fights with other childr
should....

3. I think the child who daydreams most of the time should...

4. I think the child who loses his temper when he does not ge
his way should....

5. I think the child who is.timid and shy should....

6. I think the child who continually disobeys should....

7. I think the child who cries when his parents leave him
with a baby sitter should.....

8. I think the child who will not share playthings should....


Discuss your answers with the teacher.


en


t











APPENDIX # 8

ACTIVITIES OF CHILD CARE

BEDT I MEZ PWUH


These are words to be found in the scramble gram.


toys
bathe
songs
stories
games
art
playground
swing
talk
safety
discipline


Fingerplay
music
ball
rest
toy
love
read
meal
bat
hat
big


(There may be other words, also.)


walk
message
nap
dress
records
bottles
snacks
bedtime
diaper
play/
bandage












APPENDIX # 9
MOBILE


A Successful Baby-Sitter
I I


Personal
Characteristics


Information
Needed from Parents


Behavior and
Grooming
i ----I- I


Examples


Must like children
Be dependable
Be responsible
Be professional R ethical
Have sense of humor


Important phone numbers -
Doctor
Police
Where parents can
Be reached
Types of refreshments or
food to give to child


Arrive on time
Look neat and clean
Keep telephone conversa-
tions to a minimum
Do not raid employer's
refrigerator
Have own "carry aids"
for baby-sitter's kit


-- ~- -










APPENDIX # 10

CHECK LIST FOR THE BABY-SITTER


Directions: Check with an Cx) your answer in the appropriate
column.


QUESTIONS

1. Was I interested in this child?


YES


SOMETIMES


2. Did I show a desire to learn more
about children?

3. Did I cooperate with the parents in
handling their child?

4. Did I set a good example?

5. Did I supervise play intelligently?


6. Did I show tolerance and patience?

7. Did I select toys and other play
materials wisely?

8. Did I help this child to develop good
play habits?

9. Did I help this child to develop
habits of independence?

10. Did I understand why he cried?

11. Was I fair when he quarreled with his
friends?











APPENDIX # 11

*AN INTEREST INVENTORY FOR PLANNING

Directions: The questions below will help you decide what your
interests are concerning children. Place a check
mark Cx) in the column that best represents your answer.

QUESTIONS YES NO. SOMETIMES


1. Do you beby-sit?
2. Do you know how to be a good baby-sitter?
3. Do you Feel at ease with children? __
4. Do you like children and want to have them
around you?
5. Do you know what to expect of children of
different ages?
6. Do you know which toys are best for
children of different ages?
7. Do you know which games and stories
children like?
8. Can you tell a story so it would be
meaningful to children?
9. Do you know how to direct children's
play? --
LO. Does all music have the same effect on
a child?
L1. Are some TV programs too exciting for
children?____
12. Should a child be picked up when he
cries?
L3. Doyou know how to care for a child
in a temper tantr-um?
L4. Do you know how much a child should eat?
L5. Do you know how to change a diaper?

L6. Do you know how to dress a baby?

L7. Can you give baby his bottle or feed
him correctly? .
L8. Are you safety-conscious regarding home
accident? -----










APPENDIX # 12


PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS NECESSARY FOR CAREERS IN
CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Do you have the desire to

meet different people?
understand and work with people?
help people become more productive?
take part of the responsibility for the pleasure and
comfort of other people?
do a job well?

Do you have
a real love for people?
_a sensitivity for people and problems?
a sincere respect for individuals?
____a tolerant understanding of human shortcomings?
a sense of service and obligation to people?
high standards of truth, loyalty and personal dignity?
an inquiring mind which is.ourious about life?
a capacity for teamwork?
initiative?
a cooperative attitude?

Do you
use good judgment in decision-making?
have pride and interest in your work?
communicate effectively with people of all ages?
make and keep friends easily?
handle your own aggressions and fears?

Are you
physically energetic?
alert and polite?
__ poised and self-confident?
,emotionally stable?
sympathetic and patient?
voluntarily generous?
willing to accept criticism and advice?
neat and well-groomed?
dependable, prompt, and punctual?
___optimistic?
cheerful with a sense of humor?


























































































DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee Florida

FLOYD T CHRISTIAN
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