• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Home and farm water quality...
 Assessing the condition and location...
 Assessing the condition of your...
 Assessing your site
 Assessing your household waste...
 Assessing your household hazardous...
 Assessing your livestock and poultry...
 Assessing your fertilizer storage...
 Assessing your pesticide storage...
 Assessing your petroleum product...
 Survey






Group Title: Water quality bulletin
Title: Protecting your water quality through a home & farm assessment
CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096207/00001
 Material Information
Title: Protecting your water quality through a home & farm assessment
Series Title: Water quality bulletin - University of the Virgin Islands ; 1
Physical Description: 69 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Virgin Islands Resource Conservation & Development Council
University of the Virgin Islands -- Cooperative Extension Service
United States -- Natural Resources Conservation Service
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands
Place of Publication: Gallows Bay, St. Croix V.I
Publication Date: 1996
Copyright Date: 1996
 Subjects
Subject: Water quality management -- Virgin Islands of the United States   ( lcsh )
Groundwater -- Pollution -- Prevention -- Virgin Islands of the United States   ( lcsh )
Wells -- Management -- Virgin Islands of the United States   ( lcsh )
Cisterns -- Management -- Virgin Islands of the United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States Virgin Islands
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "September 1996."
General Note: "UVI Cooperative Extension Service, VI Resource Conservation and Development Council, Inc., USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service"--P. 1 of each section.
Statement of Responsibility: Virgin Islands Resource Conservation & Development Council, Inc.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096207
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Holding Location: University of the Virgin Islands
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 49936692

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PDF ( 8 MBs ) ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Home and farm water quality assessment
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Assessing the condition and location of your drinking water well
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Assessing the condition of your rain water collection system
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Assessing your site
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Assessing your household waste water treatment system
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Assessing your household hazardous waste management practices
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Assessing your livestock and poultry operations
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Assessing your fertilizer storage and handling practices
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Assessing your pesticide storage and handling practices
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Assessing your petroleum product storage facilities
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Survey
        Page 67
        Page 68
Full Text


Unersty the Virgin Islands
co.pwmiw 6offlion Serce
692-4080 (St Croix)
693-1080 (StL Thoms -St fohn)


Waier Quality
Bulletin # I
S.eptsrh 1996


j agagmre r e.. 44Asrs
j ; .; : -* 1,, 1 : _, !. ,,
t enuwARrE wMrwe

' -- ----.--


Nt grn .......R LJAT RZ .... .
...i -"- . - & : . ..


Reopucr -roqAe

PEsrlde & FAeriUflE
$roaAE MMNPLWS


'- .. ; .. . ;. - -'
*= 2i-,:,t.i onuetviono&Dewlopment Councl kt.
, .. 77, -.. .. .
aleg,44, in


0-







TAR2LG OF d t)TEGT,


Cp-T TwTiLET

Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment

la Assessing the Condition and Location of Your Drinking
Water Well

Ib Assessing the Condition of Your Rain Water Collection
System (Cistern)

2 Assessing Your Site

3 Assessing Your Household Waste Water Treatment System

4 Assessing Your Household Hazardous Waste Management
Practices

5 Assessing Your Livestock and Poultry Operations

6 Assessing Your Fertilizer Storage and Handling Practices

7 Assessing Your Pesticide Storage and Handling Practices

& Assessing Your Petroleum Product Storage Facilities

Survey








HOWHE


-3


PorecrW 0ou
ATEZ QUALirY


HOME FA&
ASSGSSHEMr





Si
6t


SFA2SH


WArEZ QUALiTr

ASSESSHErM


About 50-60 percent of
Virgin Islands' residents
use ground water or a rain
water collection system
(cistern) to supply their
drinking water needs,
These systems should be
designed to provide clean,
safe water, If water supply
equipment or storage
facilities are not built and/
or maintained properly,
they can allow bacteria.
fertilizer, pesticides,
animal manure, petroleum
products, or other
pollutants to contaminate
drinking water. These
contaminants can put your
family's health at risk.
Pollution is a serious threat
to scarce fresh water
supplies. You can help
protect your drinking water
by learning to recognize
potential sources of
pollution and by working to
reduce or eliminate them.


4AT- ef*J :-4OU


This Assessment has
been designed to make
you aware of conditions or
practices on your property
that increase the risk of
contamination to your
drinking water. It is divided
into eight sections so you
can easily identify
particular situations on
your property that may be
putting your drinking water
at risk.
If you answer Yes or do
not know the answer to
any of the questions in a
specific section of this
Assessment, you will be
directed to a factsheet in
this bulletin that will
provide more information
on that topic. These
factsheets will help you to
develop an Action Plan to
establish practices that
reduce contamination risks
to your drinking water
supply.


A PArM iS iP? 6O2AM FO. VOLUMAZY POLLUTiO PIZEVa61iO


UVI Cooperative Extension
Service


VI Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc.


USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service





























5 1'
J.' N


. ACCECGCCa THE COcNTioJ AULb LOCATiOe
OF M4CR WATEZ OAPPLM k CTEm

If your drinking water comes from the V, I. Water and Power Authority
(WAPA), continue to Section II. Assessing Your Site

A. WELL LJAT-R Lcr PI CQeMr
Is your water supply from a domestic well? If yes, continue with
the questions below. If no, go on to 8. Rainwater Collection
Systems.


YES
D
D

O
Dl



0

Dl

El


o 1. Do you have a well less than 50 feet deep?
O 2. Do you have a dug well or driven well, rather
than a drilled well?
o 3. Was your well built more than 50 years ago?
El 4. Has it been longer than three years since you
had your well water tested or did your water test
positive for nitrate and/or bacteria the last time it
was tested?
O 5. Does your well casing (well pipe) extend less
than 18 inches above the ground level?
D 6. Is there a hole or depression around your well
casing?
D 7. Can you see any cracks or holes in your well
casing?
O 8 Is your well downhill from any potential
contamination sources (septic system; pesticide,
fertilizer, manure, or petroleum product storage
area; or other pollution sources)?
O 9. Is your well located closer to potential pollution
sources than Virgin Islands code allows?
D 10. Are there abandoned wells on your property that
have not been properly plugged?


If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions in
this section, refer to the factsheet in this Bulletin titled Assessing the
Condition and Location of Your Drinking Water Well. This factsheet
contains valuable information and will help you develop an Action Plan to reduce
the risk of contamination to your drinking water supply.









rt. RAeh LJAreR COLLCrT(okJ C94C-rm-i (cd-rcr

Is your drinking water supply from a rain water collection system
(cistern)? If yes, continue with questions below. If no, continue to
Section II. Assessing Your Site.

YES NO
0 D1 1. Has it been over three (3) years since your
cistern was emptied and cleaned?
D 11 2. Has it been over one month since you treated
your cistern water with chlorine?
D D 3. Has it been longer than one month since you
cleaned debris from your roof and/or collection
system (gutters, pipes, cistern)?
O D 4. Is your roof made of or coated with toxic
materials (i.e., asbestos, lead paint, zinc, etc.)?
C C 5- Are there places on your roof, collection area, or
in your gutter system where water stands instead
of flowing into your cistern?
O D 6- Can animals or debris enter through the
screens) on your rainwater collection system?
O M 7. Has it been longer than two (2) years since you
inspected your cistern for cracks or leaks?

If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions in
this section, refer to the factsheet in this Bulletin titled Assessing the
Condition of Your Rain Water Collection System (Cistern). This factsheet
contains valuable information and will help you develop an Action Plan to reduce
the risk of contamination to your drinking water supply.



(Go to Next Section) a


13

.6 .



'. *r ,' ,
-' r' "' *l

. "





.
.. .. .^* .
.f. ;',L ,:,, .^, .. "'.,* '. ^
S':: i* "'4-. : r. ^ '*'' ,

:'.' .\ ^ ._r,,, .: ...








' *- ;* :? .



^ ^ '. : ,. '. ,





















N
* ~ ~-**












I 4'"



~*
K






I '4'
"4

-- ~.--~: A,.~. '0
'7',.




..14~,










i*Y'o A,


u. AgcCeCClA a MOti rre

YES NO
o 0 1. Has it been longer than five (5) years since you
updated or reviewed your resource conservation
plan?
O 0 2. Is your soil sandy or gravelly (does your soil drain
quickly)?
D D 3. Is your soil less than three feet deep (to rock or
caliche)?
O O 4. Is your water table less than ten feet from the soil
surface ?
O D 5. Are you losing your valuable topsoil to erosion?
O O 6. Does stormwater runoff from your property reach
surface waters (guts, ponds, coastal waters)?

If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions in
this section, refer to the factsheet in this Bulletin titled Assessing Your Site.
This factsheet contains valuable Information and will help you develop an Action
Plan to reduce the risk of contamination to your drinking water supply.

[Il. ACCECC^ M tc Z Ho "c-GHOL-b LJACT-G LJATCIZ

NICPOCAL CMCTEM


YES NO
D D


1. Do you have an on-site waste water disposal
system (septic tank with drainfield or seepage
pit)? (If you DO NOT have an onsite wastewater
system, continue on to next page i')


D1 O 2, Is your on-site waste water disposal system less
than 50 feet from any water supply system (well
or cistern)?
D ED 3. Is your on-site waste water disposal system less
than 25 feet from a surface water body (guts,
ponds, or coastal waters)?
O D 4. Has it been over three (3) years since you had
your septic tank cleaned out?
O O 5. Do you regularly use chlorine or chlorine-based
products for cleaning (for example, daily
application in the toilet bowl)?
o D 6. Do you dump grease, oil, or leftover household
chemicals down your drain?

If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions in
this section, refer to the factsheet In this Bulletin titled Assessing Your
Household Waste Water Disposal System. This factsheet contains valuable
Information and will help you develop an Action Plan to reduce the risk of
contamination to your drinking water supply.









IV. AC-SCCuCZ MIR cACc-l(&!l> 4ifAaARzx)a
JAC9T A h"AGHnEJIT PRACTIdeC

YES NO
1 0 1. Do you dispose of household products such as
furniture polish, paints, stains, and cleaners
and/or their containers on your property
(including down the drain)?
o0 2. Do you dispose of used petroleum products,
anti-freeze, or batteries on your property?
O E 3. Do you dispose of leftover or banned pesticides
and/or pesticide containers on your property?
DEl 4. Are any of these hazardous products stored near
your cistern, well and/or pump room, or
accessible to children and/or pets?
DEl 5. Has it been longer than one (1) year since you
reviewed or updated your emergency response
plan (emergency phone numbers, escape
routes, poisoning information)?

If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions in
this section, refer to the factsheet in this Bulletin titled Assessing Your
Household Hazardous WasteTfanagement Practices. This factsheet
contains valuable information and will help you develop an Action Plan to reduce
the risk of contamination to your drinking water supply.

V. AcEcaclwicz Moz L\EGcrToC A;b POULTYR
OP: R.AT )iO --

YES NO
O D 1. -Do you have livestock and/or poultry on your
property? (ff NO, go on to next page r)
El D 2. Do you house livestock and/or poultry within 100
feet of a water supply system (well or cistern) or
water body?
0 D 3. Do you store manure within 250 feet of a water
supply system (well or cistern) or water body?
El C] 4. Is your livestock and/or poultry facility located up-
hill from a water supply system (well or cistern) or
water body?
l 0a 5. Do you bury dead animals on your property?
D D 6. Do you spread manure on your gardens and/or
fields without adding it into your nutrient
management plan?

If you have answered Yes or do nor know the answer to any of the questions in this
section, refer to the factsheet in this Bulletin titled Assessing Your Livestock and
Poultry Operations. This factsheet contains valuable information and will help you
develop an Action Plan to reduce the risk of contamination to your drinking water
supply.


J r























~Q. ~4..
r
*1',




~It, ~

'H




V








I.>'.

'4


V1. Acccccac MCL4Z FfZT1ULaFZ CTORACC Ak~b


(If you DO NOT use fertilizers, including plant food, go to next page 1')

YES NO
C c 1. Has it been a long time (over three years) since
you tested your soil's nutrient content recently?
(in gardens, lawns, and/or fields)
D 5 2. is your soil sandy or gravelly? (does your soil
drain quickly)?
0D 3. Do you apply animal manure and/or crop
residues to your gardens, lawns, and/or fields?
O D 4. If the answer to number 3 is Yes, Are you
unsure of the nutrient content of the animal
manure you apply? (Have you not tested the
manure?)
0 C 5. Do you make fertilizer applications based on
maximum (hypothetical) garden or crop yields
rather than historical or actual yields?
D1 D 6 Do you apply all the fertilizer needed by the
garden. crop or landscape for the whole growing
season all at one time?
D D 7. Do you store fertilizer products on your property?
O D 8. Has it been longer than one (1) year since you
updated your nutrient management plan?

If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions in
this section, refer to the factsheet in this Bulletin titled Assessing Your
Fertilizer Storage and Handling Practices. This factsheet contains valuable
information and will help you develop an Action Plan to reduce the risk of
contamination to your drinking water supply.









Ulf. AccGcccoa Mo(rz ?cgricc-rz CrcpwAc AUkb
NNAJbLi ?PZAdTlreccc

YES NO
O a 1. Do you use or store pesticides (including weed
and/or bug killer) on your property? If No,
continue to next page -.
O O 2. Do you mix, apply or store pesticides without
reading the label first?
O O 3. Are your pesticides stored on wood, gravel. soil,
or on a concrete pad without a curb?
0 0 4. Do you have pesticide containers that are
damaged, leaking, and/or rusting?
O O 5. Do you mix: apply or store pesticides within 150
feet of any water supply system (well or cistern)
or water body?
O O 6. Do you fill your sprayer container or tank directly
from a drinking water supply system (well or
cistern)?
O 0 7. Do you fill your sprayer container or tank with a
hose that does not have a check valve or put the
hose in the tank so that it is below the water line
during filling?
U D 8. Do you leave your sprayer container or tank
unattended while filling?
O 0 9. Do you rinse out your sprayer container or tank
near your water supply system (well or cistern) or
surface water body?
D D 10. Do you apply pesticides without recalibrating
your sprayer?
O D 11. Has it been longer than five (5) years since you
attended a pesticide applicator training course or
workshop?

If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions
in this section, refer to the factsheet In this Bulletin titled Assessing Your
Pesticide Storage and Handling Practices This factsheet contains valuable
Information and will help you develop an Action Plan to reduce the risk of
contamination to your drinking water supply.










VJIlL AxEcQrJc MO4CR PeTZrOLGc-i PRbolc T

CroRAEA FAcLITIGCC


YES NO
C a


1. Do you have a petroleum storage containers) or
tank(s) on your property? If NO, continue to


factsheets or survey e,
0 2. Is your petroleum storage containers) or tank(s)
less than 100 feet from a water supply or water
body?
C 3. If you have a petroleum storage tank, is it located


C0 O


underground?
4. Do you lack protection against leaks or spills
from your petroleum storage containers) or
tank(s) (no containment system, catch basin, or
concrete spill pad)?


D D1 5. Do you need to develop a method of record-
keeping to keep track of petroleum use?

If you have answered Yes or do not know the answer to any of the questions in
this section, refer to the factsheet in this Bulletin titled Assessing Your
Petroleum Product Storage Facilities. This factsheet contains valuable
information and will help you develop an Action Plan to reduce the risk of
contamination to your drinking water supply


= '4.


FOR HofE INFORAT/ON
TNhI a nment does not cover all potendia raim o yeor property that couid pact th qualky ( year
drWidi water. it s d*md to. mita an warmma of paberdal dsks to water quaity on yow property;
provide voluntary nhxodn to reduce polttion rifd: nd develop an acdon plan to prard yurw drnhdf
waKtr ipply. indikiihal areas and stabi may vary in reqdinmelu anm nliumm standa rd, fr ware supply
pretuaden. Mway check with yoau local effcs Ilsted In the mrftnna sectin of each workasht befor
aidnq changepi to year waer uaply ystem. Then am other. mon detalld, Fari''Sydltl *eA'Syt
prera iu avlable. If you havt spectl qukstlats 4SAbt pranctq y7ar drd dq wtr. cotmc yur Jocal
E jvnoin Srvlic OfAk. local USDA Natural gesrcesn C(onervaion Servk Offlk. or y wr local SW ,and
Water Ctmvadn DhnDtrict Ofm, You may also cotiact the Katoi al Fam4A'SytMme'A'Srst OSt at
8142 lined Lhrar, 550 ahbodak Drivm. Nadsi. Wbflawnin 53706-113. PI"e (608) 2 2-O014.
This document was publishied by the Urnversity of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service,
Kwame Garcia, Director of Extension Programs. This document was developed by Julie Wright,
Natural Resources Specialist University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service in
cooperation with the National Farm'A'SystH-omn'A'Syst Program, and is pattemed in a large part
after the National Farm'A'SystH-ornme'A'Syst Program document "Protecting Your Water
Through A Fant & Hame Assessment and the North Dakota Farrn'A'Syst Program developed
by North Dakota Extension Service. Contents of this publication constitute public property, No
endorsement of products or firms is intended, nor is criticism implled of those not mentorwd-. Issued
by the Virgrn Islands Cooperalive Externsion Service end the U.S. Department of Agriculture In
nfrtherance of the acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914. Extension programs and policies are consistent
with federal and state aws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, national
origin, religion. gender, age. disability or gender preference.
The F *ArmASyst Home'A'Syst Program It Funded nationally by; USOA Cooperative State
Research, Educedon rand Exterrsion Services, USDA Natural Resources Conservation S-ervie, and
the U.S. Environrmerntl Protection Agency. The program supports voluntary pollution prevention to
protect surface and ground water through a partnership with governmental agencies and the private
sector.










ASSSJC rN0e toF 0Uii
SwLOCAiOw OF 4OtWL


mw wn ia


TWO&f A






SA0

6


The o ion of your well I*
imported to consider when
tookinM poteial drindng
water aontmination You
should be cmnoerned about
the toe and condflon of
yourwI and the activities
aroun your well that may
act your drdk water
quaty.
Bacteria or telnts fron
fatlo'g septic syslem of
Blve tock; toxchemicls
from household hpaardous
wete, utier, pesticide, or
areescan alt enter yor weil
f ittls not builtor mrintalned
property. Somecontai-
iinta In water may only
affect appearnnce, while
souhns ucit as nicro
ete, nitrate, and toxic
chaicai can be hawrnul or
even tial.


Us this worksheet to
aess quesone you have
answered Ye to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing the Condition
and Location of Your
Drinking Water Well section
ofyoyur e* a fanm
meat. Thi. worksheet will
help you develop an Action
Plan to establish practices
that rwedu hete riks of
oontamninatlon to your
drinking water supply.


A PwAQJSWIP Pe0Wp4 -OP dUtWAV Pol WuroT W"EEW o


UvL Ce thEanaEftn
SOON


VI fasoi Camavt ownd
aWvpmmt Counc Inc.


USDAo Nel Rmoe
Coneaitin Swevicn












b dept of ytirw a important tof
consider son ooiking at ihe potentr at f&f^M~a J^ K t
fo groundwater oonterramrn .Sme


Conerw Ompootso emftialr woe sWei
thweaS thnat swfatrnre mor s likely to
crtaanifcstite sl 8hela se wnax lluBan thdedp j^Ji ^S si
aebtwth propeqlyMinS eaSings.
Mrilldwt wasitthpropety Iniallted casing ras
deeper Vv" matdg r driven we o and ave ;










m.h4Verna mremin typ.s of welt tug, Swan@ datle0s welt.
A dug well aisoenormallywiderthmn sireefeetand lioan built by hend. Thstyptofwell
has the greatet rsak of being
contaminated bec*au lt Is uaunfl --tu wtu~1a.-rt / ^ '^
law and often poo- protec- d tam
nefce wter mnas.
A dde wel is usually two Incheswide
or lee. and is typically nstaed onlyti
esw*ir elatively loosematerial
(sain^sw d). Because driven wasel
areusay shalw tlessthan50o that
deAp1the; lui arhninatmnton Is igwly
A drlledwe6ll thast property
stalled casing to usuallyte ea
sweacpowleto coantainatonoad s usuany atssafag












The age of yoturW W eale attA or to
contider when detennining the potental ato
drinking water contamninabon. Ciderwells
-re gneratly -hoow and man liUety tote
lotd Inan area thatnu may be downhillor
close to potential contamn*St Woams.
Thee wes may haatructural problem
such as iMn fquate or cfnde* capi.


As part of yourwell maintenance program,
you should est your well waer every year.
Water tneting s the only ae nyto Know
what subtaes -e present In your
ddhiftdngwater,

Somecoftainntmay r a-e
appafane, leathers, such as
boaeris, *te and towns ca be
ummelyhwnfldor sevan tlas
Consult the Department Healh or
the DPNRDivision of Ermronmepttal
Protection (DPe) to deternei what
poAutnts you rnightw latest foi,
and howtoae wate r swrample If
your sample is positive for bacteria
audor contains a high level of
ratea nswider testing for adWonal
Aionioh iWna4 Of


In assessi contamian potential, you
need 10to look at your well casing height.

DPNRt0EP recommendsh thate well
cainp ora (ethneI hasone) should
.proecatsIeamt 18 inches above ground and
have a swnary seaL

In add on bias subjectto flooding, the
topof tha cai cap, orew. coCrW should
be at least 2 teetabove the highest known
th~evaV=o.

There surrouding the wfl casing should
alsobesesed wMit clay s ior Sottw
- 8vnous anntalfia io ine
eng swell casing can directly d mnei
aontaminanhs to your dkMng water. Vigin
sland'mregulad n requie a casing depth
ofatiaetSeete- gbond u ora dug
welL Also, te top of thei wllcaing cannot
endin oaaaneant, pst, or oter aas
below ground level.














The ~on of sWeats
Wow an Watts dak of


othie sflac tths rouda o Wu r Wni
casing ilOweIWK tfeVurroWndi4AQ
tiandsep% It provides in arem ftr urfacuo

cracks bdr weS eauing. oPNft rseqnir l
nmwwls to haves concrt curb around
thPWSt0' O piAsntW Itfl


T-,epo .iott yorww BS enlmcap
Seesi t uinspocted periodically. WelS
m aom mnly cased wieh See plift or
Swr*clp-pt. w n, col, ps of Ate
bohS Wapee behmeen the casing
andte aps d dof th barufle 'fill ed wh
aou., moment, moncrte, or beitonte (cly)
,p, iM 'Th ^b^.lifi,.u pfy


p abould have a smnmed vent
4owansm sma en ere
FttianbsNitb enouWh soi-
waao 'airc to er wal.
Ipc SOnnWeIb -


-titpoalal, for ",wl a ig.
to coande or crackiand
be ncom -- denagd M, M
inspect b
*stiportina your
cracksan w too for t.)
su he ap4 bis
eouoe. Yauag
also nspetthe inside of them caing by
removing the well cap and shining a tght
around the inuidea (However, most weds hi
thiW Virgin lands are too Bman for ils.)

tfy Min haeashtow welL yop may r Sl be
able to detemine te oondtaoionh ryeoarn
casing. If you wa twotrrunning winthe
pmnp is not operating, chere could be a
ctbcktteslfthetwell casing.















Whser a wim tslp water just betow ground or
uudreds oBte r duep, sl locationis a crucial fety
*aor. A we dowh*itton a livestock yat a making
S Mproaum doma t r aor ailing ept systemrun a



pWat might fow Wc" # oftsot. ground. Min
....0- 1 s aqud arou Pwater flow On n the same
dlreaton atie siaceflow. Ifte aquier s upplyin
__r____ uwateris yo we t deep below the uretoqh
-p may be Mre #wasI* s thot W land stes.
cLomcin t Uose smea s pnlaep talesaereauiplanning
end conildertLan FafS such a dab*cton of a uffac
t*iga andrnd- watert ow are knportf When
planning tar new wv, try to locae ttu hi flm pol tln s. On editing wais that
e down hltrn comoninar.onalr mrmoving colednit states or det stafe.
war rnasltway from meawt.






Isft
Besides bang uphi torn -nd pocu coe your wieisoWl nestnn


For ample Vint emas'guld t onsfequnigqmtts nkans i ce



DPNR MDivilots of Environental Protection c Pernits DiMit

















Abandoned wes am a haanrd and a di'. pathway for contsmlnwts
to nter the ground water. When you plug an abandon well on your
property, Virgin Islands guidelines should befoilwsd as closely as


Consul with t DPNR Division of Envivnena ProtectIon, teo
Department of Heat. your klocat USDA-NtS office the uvi
Cooperatw Extenson Service, or the UVI Water Reuones
Reseaethhnaltute for Wibormaton on the proper procedure to
dose your all. A j


psus~a&rbhanyans
-s ~-t ~p~is view qa~'a.


ta rw ttwnts*vsps Iwo W1~h 1SgSspm 1pl~ tih4 o0 11 1 ~ meo
CheoapmmadeSnSue Dmade ldivopsdonwflt it. Nime~t~i ggga FWiWgf~cWAq P''l Is pnwlti idtaj. gu
J ~ ~ ~ "W. WNWbAj .,Afbmf*.^J
aftr teNmnmI FC&6)~eua4omrsbt Pwgen~amnss Afma WrNnrflhwwup A eSiSa Mmnr****
UoempWrtOek* FWtrA' rrqu~emwapswee wea ong tine wrea coansues psurbdpnwet.e


- p m oek e lputt y N o a ni m m s n t a t n e 4 ma a r l b t f l fio 1w 1 9 4 t to m s f l m u uw e & uSp n s 1
blinmdsCoerS.Sulmn S*..a*santbu. Utde Wpbwtrp1,ene~a Mtiiwwto tie atE Sa 5.se 30.1814



P Ina nam ms ar.t p .ui a aM lma e. s .s. t s f n A..d r sq* Uf. ... m.n lit Oak. 3 SuXW
deem entr|mHiii ne1 byi 1M ftl i |i) io Mti i i dim |asiiuele, CMlitire1
ja melon Progm TindltfflloM^^^tweedb-op-ttyJul^^kWgh. k-MhAbs^Mteep^lease Mudelt ithAeelip o te legfna^.tend


8arw L NISUUIRnSOl S Camels blirm InfeSea t pfni iaseso *m nt aNe pews ~rn
pioblepropty. Noga a prau ohprsmatneBaostgaiwtnafl rthraeqhat imwuB paunet mgni. ealdey.pVut
&oonalorig>whtlggedr agdaiyegne
TlF~^A-StfttT^A"^PRAlpftm^nOreofb
voke"a Doklio premeila tD precumats eobw gud wboale t oe a eiglpisgormt gnasadtpiel
s






Accecclwa tHv CoJbnflnW A Jb LocAW &J aOP fOU bRiiusc WATEFR 6X-L

If You Anawrmd
Ye" to the Wh to thehat to Do Who to Call Other What You Did

Questions 123,4 Have yox water tstmd pamenF Heaut.DPNR
arMuaily for the most common Dv EviondSa
contaminants (nne- and P ...e ..DEP),U
bactera) to se If a problem Sel
actuay exift afer



Questions 56,.7 Measure wen-casing o make S*DL, PR-EP
sure 1t is haatc Uleo I, UVl I-VW USx A-
bonw the groanu surface. NRCS, *or liceed wet
Extend casing if necessary. ddier.

Fll in depression or hole and
creae a mound arounrid me
wel. Have viable holes in the
ceding repaired.
Questions 8.9 Relocate sources of Halfth Dep. DPNR-OWP,
contminants down hil from the UVI-CES, UVI-WRR. USDA-
well. NRCS or a licensed well

Question 10 Properly close all abandoned, Health Dept. DPNR-DEP.
wels on your property. UVI-CES, UVt-WRRI, or
USDAA4RCS.
Dept Of Heatl 77-1311 (SL Crobg; 7744880 (St. Thomas -S1 Joahn)
DPNR-EP, 77no (OL cnae 777-4577 ar 774-3320 (8L Thoms StL John)
UVI-CEl B62a-40 (8L Croix) 6903-10BD (St. Thomaum 8L John)
UVWfIRI-: 083-1083








AS6SiMW rEd 0MdirioM
OF MOU2 fR/WWArEZ

dOLLEC(iO Q6rEM

(diSrEM)


?20r6C1&6 4OUQ
eroe QVi W
ttu6P A
NOME i FAQH
ASSEHAEr






Si
j6
6


The condition of your rain
water collection system
(cistern) is an important
factor that could affect
potential contamination of
your drinking water supply.
You should be especially
concerned about the
condition and maintenance
of your cistern system.
Bacteria and nutrients from
failing septic systems or
livestock, and toxic
chemicals from household
hazardous waste, fertilizer,
pesticides, or petroleum
product storage areas can
all enter your cistern through
cracks or imperfections.
Bacteria and toxic
chemicals can also enter
cisterns from rooftops and
unscreened openings.
Some contaminants that
can enter cistern water may
only affect appearance,
while others such as


bacteria, nitrate, metals, and
other toxins can be very
harmful or even fatal.





This worksheet is designed
to give you information
about contaminants that can
potentially harm your
drinking water supply.
Use this worksheet to
address questions you have
answered Yes to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing the Condition
of Your Rain Water
Collection System section
of your Home and Farm
Wear Quality Assess.
meant. This worksheet will
help you develop an Action
Plan to establish practices
that reduce the risks of
contamination to your
drinking water supply.


A PATWefEiQ ?COa6AM FOR VOLUCr'IY POLLUrO P2E6W ioN


UVI Cooperaiv Extension
Service


VI Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc.


USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service










I M. ITA nEE NEOEve OVZ Trree EAs5 SiCE
MOUI ZC r Mg0j uIAS ePtrIED 2 LEANWE?

Your cistern water quality is directly dependent upon how you manage your collection system.
You should empty and clean your cistern every three to five years to remove sludge deposits.
This will minimize the amount of coliform bacteria and other contaminants in your drinking water.
Some people may need to clean their cisterns more often, depending on how much vegetation
is overhanging the roof or other parts of the collection system. Screens and downspouts need
to be inspected and cleaned on a more frequent basis, ideally once a month or after heavy
rainstorms.










2. wo s w.-.ee-a weZ. c: e
MOMrr4 SIMC fOU TjEAreV
'OUz C-:r." tf.s'r.e :.


You should add chlorine to the water in your
cistern on a regular basis to disinfect (kill
bacteria and other disease-causing
organisms) your water supply. Treat cistern
water with five fluid ounces of liquid chlorine
bleach per 1000 gallons of water monthly or
bimonthly, depending upon the frequency
and amount of rainfall or upon weekly testing
of the chlorine residual. If there is lots of
organic matter (leaves and other debris) in
the cistern, you may have to add chlorine
more frequently. For further Information on
chlorinating your cistern, contact the DPNR
Public Water Supply Supervision Program, or
the UVI Water Resources Research Institute.


MelO* SNjCE YOU CLEANWD
-PeAZi& FWHOM YOUIZ 20P

$YSrEM (DPAi*J5, 1P&PSr
.. COSTZ.. .


Your maintenance program should include
regular cleaning of rooftops (or other
collection surfaces), gutters, and pipes
leading to the cistern. This will prevent
clogging of the system and reduce bacterial
contamination. Roofs, gutters and screens
should be checked and cleaned every month
of debris.

You should inspect the collection system for
blockages and/or debris after every major
storm event. (Studies conducted in the Virgin
Islands have found leaf litter and other
organic debris left on rooftops and in gutters
and cisterns to be the primary source of
coliform bacteria in cistern drinking water).

STrees should be pruned
back so that branches
do not hang over
rooftops, gutters, or
.- other collection areas.









4. iS vyoU -ioOP MADE OF
o- 0 OAr&D wirrt roxic
WAT-rOJALS (l,. A s e5ro5,
LEAPt VAW r, 2 c, ErC.)i:

Many roof coatings, paints and collection
materials can contain toxic substances such
as zinc, copper, and lead that can
contaminate your cistern water. Asphaltic
compounds, glues or adhesives, and
elasometric roofing can contain volatile
organic compounds that can also get into
cistern water. Even temporary roof
coverings, such as tarps, may contain toxic
compounds or leach plastics Into cistern
water.

For example, galvanized roofing is a source
of zinc, roofs with copper flashing can have
high copper and lead concentrations, and
some roof coatings or paints may contain
lead. You should consider treating or
replacing your roof covering with coatings or
components that are made from nontoxic
materials. The DPNR Division of
Environmental Protection is in the process of
promulgating regulations requiring testing of
roofing materials for toxic compounds.

if you think your collection system may
contain or be treated with toxic materials, you
should have your drinking water tested. Call
the DPNR Division of Environmental
Protection, the Health Department, or a
private laboratory for information on getting
your cistern water tested.


5'. AZ& rEP7 E ?LACES OM
:YOvui 200ooF COLLEC iON
AEA, Orz i YouRZ SurrZE
svsres Wtve2E WATre
,STANf2S iereAP OF
FLOMk iN6WO I OUZ
..., -.....CiSTEg-I : .M"


Standing water on roofs, in the collection
system, or in improperly sloped gutters
creates birdbaths, mosquito breeding areas.
and stagnant water that can harm the quality
of water entering your cistern.

Inspect your system after a heavy rain to see
if you have any standing water. Reshape
gutter areas where water stands.














SCaEW(5) O ^) YOUP
AiN.WAr Ez cOLTLECrtON.. --



All openings to your cistern (including the
overflow) should be screened to prevent
animals and debris from entering. Check all
screens after major storms to remove any
debris that may have collected. ft is also a
good idea to fence any portion of your
collection system that may be accessible to
animals or children.


:47P ITS IT eE1N) LONJ6EZ
llrWJ TWO VEAIS SfiJCE YOU
iN"eS ePae T'OUz cii5reT N
FOr CC2ACKS 02. LEAKS7


Pollutants from failing septic systems,
livestock areas, or leaking petroleum storage
containers can enter cisterns through cracks
or leaks, contaminating your drinking water
supply. Check your cistern for leaks and
cracks on a regular basis, or especially if you
notice abnormal water loss. The presence of
tree roots in your cistem Is a good Indicator
that you may have cracks or leaks. Any
cracks or leaks found in the cistern should be
immediately filled and sealed.


FoRe HNO INFORMANW
This ausmntnt do not ca all potenaml risk on ywr property tht could impact thd qumty of your driving wfr. kI dlinewd t= create a
swa vn of poaenfri rhsu to ,mer qumlt on your property~ pro .de vtlnq sokluio to reduce polluton rls; end drwdop w action plan to
protect your drinklq w r spply. kMdhd r s a mnd asn mray aryin requirements on miium nstadrds for w r supply protection.
mwysp check owh yor local k es kWa d In the reference action of each worshneet before malne ductnge to your water supply syam. Then are
other, mon detailed, Fatrm'Pst*Ixnw'P*t prorams allable. If you hv pe ~lk qumstlo about protecting yur drnlw water,. contact
your local xIteon hrkei Olce local UMMNatural Aources Conmradn Seedc Ofice, or or local sll and War Conmenva l DIrict
Offiks. You may also cortem the Ndiona Farm*e*SplMne@*Sys& OMffice 1141 Sbimbeck ULbru, 0 Basbcock Orh HIadian, Whennsin S370-
293, PWh.. (640e 2 .62-4.
This document was published bythe University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service, Kwame Garcia, Director of
Extension Programs. This document was developed by Julie Wright. Natural Resources Specialist, University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service in cooperation with the National FarmnA'Syt/Hame*A'syst Program, and is patterned In a large part
after the National Farmn*ASyst/Hame*A'Sya Praram document "Profctffng Your W rtw Through A Farm & Horm Axsamennt
and the North Dakota FarrnA'Syst Program developed by North Dakota Extension Senrvice. Contents of this publication constitute
public property. No endorsement of products or firms is intended, nor is critidcim Implied of those not mentioned. Issued by the Virgin
islands Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in furtherance of the acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914.
Extension programs and pollces are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on non-riscriminaton regarding race, color,
national origin, religion. gender, age. disability or lender preference.
The Farm"A*Syst/Hmoe*A*Syst Program is funded nationally by: USOA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension
Services, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the U.S. Environmental Pratection Agency. The program supports
voluntary pollution prevention to protect surface and ground water through a partnership with governmental agencies and the private
sector.









ACCC9GiXc THi C ox)lTiOlJ OF '1O(AIZ R RAW LATGRIZ cOLLEfTIOJ Scrc-Ei (flcruTi )

If You Answered "Yes"
to the Following What to Do Who to Call Other What You
Questions References Did
Question I Empty and clean cistern UVI Cooperative Extension
every 3-5 years. Service (CES), DPNR Division of
Environmental Protection (DEP)
Public Water Supply Supervision
Program (PWSS), UVI-Water
Resources Research Institute
(WRRI), USDA-NRCS office, or
Conservation District (VICD) office
Question 2 Add chlorine to your cistern at UVI-CES, DPNR-DEP-PWSS,
recommended rates and UVI-WRRI, USDA-NRCS or VICD
intervals.
Question 3 Develop a regular UVI-CES, DPNR-DEP-PWSS,
maintenance schedule. UVI-WRRI, USDA-NRCS or VICD
Inspect after large storms.
Question 4 Cover with nontoxic material UVI-CES, DPNR-DEP-PWSS,
or remove toxic material. UVI-WRRI, USDA-NRCS or VICD
Question 5 Inspect gutters for places UVI-CES, DPNR-DEP-PWSS,
where water may stand. UVI-WRRI, USDA-NRCS or VICD
Question 6 Inspect and repair all UVI-CES, DPNR-DEP-PWSS,
damaged screens. Fence UVI-WRRI, USDA-NRCS or VICD
collection areas accessible to
animals and/or children.
PHONE NUMBERS:
UVI-CES: 692-4080 (St. Croix); 693-1080 (St. Thomas St. John)
UVI-WRRI: 693-1063
DPNR-DEP-PWSS: 777-4577 (all islands)
USDA-NRCS & VICD: 778-8699











ASe i 1ou~ reA


Korecri% ouQ
tfATE QUAUTrV
TPZOUWP A
HOME 9 FA
ASSSSHEMr


Lt4Y, 54-OOLU) YOU
8$ CO(JCE2IMipE?

The physical characteristics
of your property can affect
your drinking water quality.
Some of these factors
include soil type, slope of the
land, depth and type of
bedrock, and depth to
ground water.
Some soil types are more
susceptible to ground water
contamination. Others are
more susceptible to erosion
that can cause surface water
contamination. If your water
supply system is located
down slope from potential
pollution sources, it is at a
higher risk of contamination.
Because most pollutant
breakdown occurs in the
soil, sites with shallow or
sandy soils, and soils over
fractured bedrock, will have
a higher potential to
contaminate groundwater.
Also, areas with high water
tables have a higher risk of
contaminating groundwater.


tsAr cYW MOU


Use this worksheet to
address questions you have
answered Yes to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing Your Site
section in your Home and
Farm Water Quality
Assessment. This
worksheet will help you
develop an Action Plan to
establish practices that
reduce the risks of
contamination to your
drinking water supply.


A PAVETW25iP P?06AM FOQ VOLU(rPAY POLLWUTOW PaVMrifO


UVI Cooperative Extension
Service


VI Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc.


USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service











rWW FWe 4AE25 5fIrC& 'Uu
OPDArED 0t. REVi6i/EW6 POurZ
5RESOUZCE dOfJSE2VATIONM.


The management practices you use will
influence your property as well as your
neighbors. If you do not have a resource
conservation plan, you should develop one.
The plan should address: soil, water, air,
plants, and animals and how they relate to
the eco-system. The plan should include
proper management of all areas around your
home, including your residence and all other
land uses. The US Department of Agriculture
Natural Resources Conservation Service
(USDA-NRCS), VI Department of Agriculture,
University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative
Extension Service (UVI-CES) or Department
of Planning and Natural Resources Coastal
Zone Management Program (DPNR-CZM)
can help you In developing a plan.


S642AV YLLY (P06' YOUZ SOL
D PZAiW QiaCKLYV)2


One key to your resource conservation plan
is knowing the type of soils on your property.
The soil provides a life support system for
growing plants, acts as a filter to reduce
ground water contamination.

Coarse textured soils such as sands are
more susceptible to ground water
contamination. These soils have larger pore
spaces between the soil particles, allowing
water to carry contaminants quickly to ground
water.

Finer textured soils such as silt loams and
clays slow water movement and provide
greater filtering. They allow bacteria and
other soil organisms to break down
contaminants before they reach ground
water. However, these types of soils are
more susceptible to surface water runoff and
may put surface water bodies at risk of
contamination.

To have your soil tested to find out what its
texture is, contact your local UVI-
Cooperative Extension Service office.










3. \S YOU(. SOiL LESS MAw
Tr4 E Peer pEEP (TO -OCK<
OP. CALTCUIE)7

The depth of soil over bedrock is an
important factor in reducing risk to ground
water. Generally, soils that are less than three
feet to bedrock are considered high risks to
ground water contamination.

The type of bedrock below the soils also
impacts ground water contamination risks.
Highly fractured rock structures, such as
limestone or caliche, can provide a direct
path for pollutants to enter ground or surface
waters.




4C iMSBm


4, JS vOc. w/AWr2. iA5LE
LE-S TnlA Tre FEET PROtM
rPE SO\L Sui2FACE


The depth to the water table under your
property may impact the water quality of your
well. Deeper aquifers generally have lower
pollution risks than shallow aquifers. Water
tables that are less than 10 feet from the
surface are generally considered to have high
contamination risk.

You should know how deep the water table is
under your property. If you do not know the
depth to groundwater and cannot measure It,
consult your well log or local well driller. The
well log contains a record of the material
drilled through and the depth to water. If you
do not have a well log, talk to the well driller or
previous property owner for more information.

In most cases, your ground water supply is
coming from water that soaks through the soil
and rock under your property. Your
management practices can directly affect the
quality of your drinking water supply.










5. AJZE YOU: LOSiTS 'ouZ
V/LUAeL rE T SOil ro



Soil erosion happens when water moves
across the soil surface, picking up and
moving soil particles. This process can be
accelerated with intensive land use and can
harm water quality with sediment, nutrients,
oils and grease, and other chemicals
attached to soil particles. Sediment Is the
most prevalent pollutant Impairing water
quality in the Virgin Islands.

Erosion of productive topsoil damages crops,
gardens and landscapes by removing the
nutrient-rich upper layer of soil that plants
need to thrive. Soil eroded from farms, yards
and construction sites can damage downhill
properties and block roadways. Eroded soil
silts-in harbors and channels, leading to more
frequent dredging. Finally, eroded soil
smothers coral reefs and seagrass beds,
clouds water and reduces visibility for sight-
feeding fish, impairs recreational use of
coastal waters (for swimming, bathing,
snorkeling, and diving), and harms fisheries.


By controlling erosion, you will help to protect
water quality and maintain the long term
productivity of your land. Soil erosion can be
controlled through the implementation of
conservation practices and/or best
management practices.

Most people feel that they are doing a good
job of controlling erosion on their property.
However, there may be ways to improve your
erosion control practices. If your resource
conservation plan is over five years old, it
should be reviewed to see If new
technologies can further reduce erosion. If
you do not have a resource conservation
plan, you need to develop one. USDA-
NRCS, DPNR-CZM, or UVI-CES can assist
you in developing or revising your plan.




















Runoff. from storm water, drainage, or
irrigation practices, can harm nearby surface
waters (guts, ponds, and coastal waters),
The level of Impact to surface waters is- -
determined by the amount of storm water _____ '_ _'--''
runoff, the distance to surface waters, the
land slope, the contaminants in the path of
the running water, and the conservation
practices you use.
















F HMOE INFOiwVmH
This a mWnt does not cower all potential risks an your property that cid Impact dt qaty of you' drinng water It Is designed a cre at an
awarnns of potential risio to mater quality on your propeny provide voluwary sobmlou to reduce pollution risks; and devemlop an adtion plan to
prutkl wur driddnlq vMtr supply. I itddual aras id states nmy vary in requimnwrits on minimum standard for water supply protection.
AmysT chedk with your kinl oE lihled in thde referenc sectton of Uach meduheat before mdnn changes o your water supply system. There are
t ert, nm de4Ailue Frni*P4yft/omtm*A*Sjt programs available. If you have spitfic questirs about protecting your drinking water, cwntct
yjr local Ensmian SerVkE Office, al USD NtnJl Renmes Cmnerwtian Serk Offi0ce, or Furaw hl Sail and Water Coamrvmatl District
Offct. You may als contact the National Fanrm'a*yt/ H wn fyst O aff t I8142 SLteIi h c Lhbrury, SS0 abock ODrn, Madison, Wiaconn 53706i
1293, fthoem r 262-I.024.
This document was publiaeed by the Unlversity of Ute rgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service. Kwame Garcia, Director of
Extension Prograrrms This document was developed by Ju'le Wright, Natural Resources Specialist, Urtiversity of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service In cooperation with the National Ferrr*A*SystHomeWA*eyst Program, and is patterned 4n a large part
after te National Farm'A*Wyst/Home*A'Syst Program document "Proaecrtng Your er Through A Fanm & Home AsseasmtenC
and Mie Norti Dakota Farm*A*Syst Program developed by North Dakota Extension Service. Contents of this pubIwation constitute
public property. No endorsement of products or firms is Intended, nor is criticism implied of those not mentioned Issued by the Virgin
Islands Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in furtherarnce of the acts of May B and June 30, 1914.
Extension programs and policies are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on norn-discrimination regarding race, color,
national origin, religion, gender, age, disability or gender preference.


6;.6S :cro iz IIATEZf


?P20O1EW2TY 12EAC44 SUePACE
.. ....


The Farm'A'Syst/Hoome'ASyst Program is funded nationally by USDA Cooperative state Reseasch, Education and Externson
Secrnces, USDA Nalural Resources Conservation Service, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The program supports
voluntary pollution prevention to protect surface and ground water through a partnership with governmental agencies and the private
sector.









Accnucc( MO&4R SmTC


If You Answered "Yes"
to the Following What to Do Who to Call Other What You Did
Questions References
Question 1,5,6 Develop or modify your USDA-Natural Resources
Resource Conservation Conservation Service
Management Plan to (NRCS), UVI-Cooperative
reduce soil erosion and Extension Service (CES), V.I.
impacts on water quality. Department of Agriculture
(DOA), or VI Conservation
District (VICD)
Question 2.3,4 Find out your soil type. USDA-NRCS, UVI-CES DOA.
Find out the depth to and or VICD
type of bedrock under your
property.

Find out the depth to your
water table.

Adjust your management
practices to reduce water
quality impacts.
PHONF NUMBERS:
DOA. 778-0997 (St. Croix); 774-5182 (StL Thomas St. John)
USDA-NRCS: 778-0699
UVI-CES: 692-4080 (SL Croix); 693-1080 (St. Thomas SL John)
VICD: 778-9838









ASSE55iN WJ6 0U

HOUSEOLP uASrE wArEQ

TEArHEwr Q6rE


WborEcIJC oi
WAraK OOZY
THOUGH A
NOH E FA2M







(6+


Virtually all suburban and
rural residents use a septic
system or some kind of on-
site waste water disposal
system. While these
systems are generally
economical and safe,
household waste water
contains contaminants that
may harm water quality.
Potential contaminants in
household waste water
include disease-causing
bacteria, infectious viruses,
household chemicals, and
excess nutrients such as
nitrogen.


Use this worksheet to
address questions you have
answered Yes to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing the Condition
and Location of Your
Household Waste Water
Treatment System section
in your Home and Frmnn
Water QuaWlty Assess-
ment. This worksheet will
help you develop an Action
Ptan to establish practices
that reduce the risks of
contamination to your
drinking water supply.


A PA Q5W-IeP POPeDA FOQ. VOLUWU r POLLUTM P2EVETiOJ


UVI Cooperative Extension
Service


VI Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc-


USDA Natural Resoures
Conservalion Service





















Household waste water
treatment systems are used
to treat and dispose of
waste water from the home.
A household waste water
treatment system that is
property built and maintained
will function far many years
and can minimize the
potential for ground and
surface water contamination.


/


Most states have made
seepage pits and cesspools
illegal because of their poor
ability to treat waste water.
However, many older homes
in the Virgin Islands may still
use these practices. If you
have one of these types of
systems, you may want to
contact the Department of
Planning and Natural
Resources Division of
Environmental Protection
(DPNR-DEP) or Department
of Health to ensure that your
system is working properly.

An individual household
waste water treatment
system, sometimes called a
septic system, typically
consists of a septic tank and
drain field. Waste water
from bathrooms, kitchen,
and laundry room is routed
to the septic tank where
liquids and solids are
separated.


A/S 0-


Soft solids such as grease
and soap float to the top and
form a scum layer. Other
solids settle to the bottom of
the tank where they are
partially decomposed by
bacteria.

Liquid from the septic tank is
discharged into the drain
field where harmful, disease-
causing microorganisms,
organic, and nutrients are
removed or broken down.

Some homeowners in the
Virgin Islands use systems
that separate out wash room
and bathroom sink and
shower waste water for grey
water irrigation use, For
more information on these
types of systems, contact
DPNR-DEP, USDA Natural
Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS) or the UVI
Cooperative Extension
Service (CES).

System design and location
are the two important factors
to consider when assessing
groundwater contamination
potential.


ttJTLEr A


OUETLE T-
AN-Fe m pip


her^g F1uL


qlprV'
























A primary concern related to
the location of your on-site
waste water disposal system
is a safe distance from your
water supply system. In the
Virgin Islands, private septic
systems (tanks and leach
fields) are required to be at
least 50 feet from a well or
cistem. Seepage pits must
be at least 100 feet away
from a water supply.
Contact the DPNR Division
of Permits or Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) to determine
minimum separation
distances for your system.


If your on-site waste water
disposal system is located
near a surface water body,
there is an increased chance
that it can harm water
quality. Discharges from
improperly maintained
systems may directly enter
surface waters, polluting the
water and causing a public
health hazard.

Virgin islands law requires
septic systems to be at least
25 feet away from surface
waters, however, a 100 foot
minimum distance is safer,


















Poor management of your
septic system Increases the
risk of your drinking water
becoming contaminated-
Proper maintenance is one
of the most important factors
in making sure a septic
system will function well over
a long period of time.
Maintenance involves
regular pumping and limiting
the types of materials
disposed to those that will
not damage your septic
system.

Most properly-sized septic
tanks need to have the
solids pumped out every two
to three years. If a garbage
disposal is used, the septic
tank should be pumped out
more frequently. Pumping
frequencies are estimates,
the actual time between
septic tank pumping will
depend on the amount of
solids entering your tank.
Check with local septic tank
pumpers for more
information.


The excessive use of
chlorine as a household
cleaning product (especially
daily use in the toilet bowl)
can harm your septic
system.

Chlorine in your septic
system acts the same way
as in your cistern it kills
bacteria and other micro-
organisms. In your septic
system, the chlorine is killing
beneficial microorganisms
that break down ("digest")
the waste. These organisms
are necessary for your septic
system to work properly. By
killing these microorganisms,
you can cause your septic
system to fail.

There are many non-
chlorinated cleaning
products available that may
be used as an alternative.
Make sure to read the
product label before making
a purchase.



















You should always avoid dumping grease and oil
down your drain. They can plug the pipes or build up
in the septic tank. Keep a separate container for used
grease and oil. Property dispose of it with other
household garbage.

Household chemicals that are poured down the drain
can damage your waste water disposal system.
Bacteria naturally present in the septic system break
down the sewage. When household chemicals are
added to the system, they may destroy these
beneficial bacteria, reducing tie effectiveness of your
septic system. There are many cleaning products
available that are not toxic to your septic system.
Look for those labelled "septic-system safe or
"biodegradable.











FOR NOE IwMratWm
TI nammun dem n camr l poaula rts a your p upty St < A Impact tmd quaty oyr dr rd watr. It bd lmd an crea an
amssW (f potnlt riS toD wler qly llton r praprt. premlde shaluny Mas rs el ce peatioBn riukha ind dewltp m macb n Io
protect yrw hdrfuitg mer- mply., IndMiAW arm arnd tMan na T vary in NerUmes n dman onI i --sta n ar atOr ap p.rniado.
Alupms ch tw ,I Iur as cm Iated hi mifai sa- deach wedlesho haivu d ow~ to 1mw r n ueaqy spism. ThMn an
odlr, umoe deb.d4 Frm' sfMof i f lpw t pSugram amilbil. ymua spelUc questam abouA prsaring yewr drin uwr, count
your bcasl ea 'Smin lsi O1co, local USDA ktunal sources Cwoenoi Srice DEnc, or pir lOll m nd uw %o.r c.m Imtn District
fie. Yau n..r s cMent tw l ndwaln 'snr.ytfm iet PC0c em SwCon. Luonry, 550 hbck i, e. W5an W6-
This document was published by the Univeraity of the Virgin islands Cooperative Exte*nlon Service, Kwame Garca. Director of
Extension Programs. This document was developed by Julle Wright, Natural Resources Specialist, University of the Virgin islands
Cooperative Extenslon Service in cooperation with the NationaJ Fanr"A*Syst/Horne*A'sys Program, and d Is p Iatedn a large part
after the National FarmWA*Syst/HomneASyst Program document "PrA ctmng Your W1*r Through A Fam Hose Ass rp wot
and the North Dakota Farm*A*Syst Program developed by North Dakota Extension Service. Contents of this pu1caKeon constitute
public property- No endorsement of products or flrms is intended, nor is ortlclm implied of those not mentioned. nued by the Virgin
islands Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture In furtherance of the acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914,
Extensdon programs and policies are consistent wtth federal and state laws and regulations on non-discriminaton regarding race, color,
national origin, rel~ion, gender, age, disabilIty Of gender preference.
The Farm*A'Syt9Home*A*Syst Program is funded nationally by. USDA Coopenrtive State Research, Education and ExtAenson
Services, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The program supports
voluntary polution prevention to protect surface and ground water through a partnership with governmental agencies and the private
sector.









AccEgCDgc MawR HCLCHaLb WACTL WATER TRGAThmET CMcrGH


If You Answered "Yes"
to the Following What to Do Who to Call Other What You Did
Questions References
Questions 1,2,3 Know the location of your DPNR-Division of
waste water disposal Environmental Protection
system. (DEP) and Division of
Permits, Department of
Test drinking water for Health, or UVI-CES office.
bacteria and nitrate.

Learn more about your soil
type.
Question 4 Monitor septic tank and Local septic tank pumping
pump scum and sludge service, UVI-CES office, or
when needed. DPNR-DEP.
Questions 5,6 Limit use of chlorine or use DPW-Division of
non-chlorinated cleaning Environmental Services or
products. DPNR-DEP to determine
where these products can
Do not dispose of grease, be disposed of, or UVI-
oil or other household CES office for alternative
chemicals down your drain cleaning product
or toilet. information.
PHONE NUMBERS:
DPW Environmental Services Division: 773-1290 (St. Croix); 775-4844 (St. Thomas St- John)
DPNR-DEP: 773-0565 (St. Croix); 777-4577 or 774-3320 (SL Thomas St. John)
DPNR-Pernits: 773-1290 (St. Croix); 774-3320 (St. Thomas St. John)
Department of Health: 773-1311 (St. Croix); 774-6880 (St. Thomas SI. John)
UVI-CES: 692-4080 (St Croix); 693-1080 (St- Thomas St. John)









M060b* aC4e
Mov aW twuou0

setswxreS:


OFw`*t


- j ~ ~At ~~-j


,UW n uni


4 Zit~lY-i ii and


n- ,




































.4F


7=I7' sp.


-I I,: -.A~












w w y~w




0,wlli
































































w- r


. ..g ......... .. .
.... .....




5L
















































Wt























PwrOECriWS 40uz.
WArEQ QUMLITY
TPOU6I0 A
POM 9 FAPA

AS/SSdM6



'
jtj


ASSESSiU6 OUO

LivESTOCK A&P ?OULQRY
OF ? ir 5


tjw4lly SOULD You
E56 COJCE2EJJDp7
Livestock and poultry
operations on your property
can generate large amounts
of manure. This manure can
serve as a valuable fertilizer
resource incorporating
animal manure into the soil
provides nutrients and
improves texture. However.
when not managed properly,
manure can contaminate
surface and ground water
with bacteria, other micro-
organisms and nutrients.
When livestock manure is
concentrated, as it is in
bamyards, animal holding
areas, or feedlots, the risk of
polluting surface and ground
waters often increases.


wjArT CAM YOU
PO7
Use this worksheet to
address questions you have
answered Yes to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing Your Livestock
and Poultry Operations
section of your Home and
Farm Water Quality
Assessment. This
worksheet will help you
develop an Action Plan to
establish practices that
reduce the risks of
contamination to your
drinking water supply.


A PATWhE6WP P2D62A FPO VOLUWMr OY POLLUiOM ?2.VM 10


UVI Cooperative Extension
Service


VI Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc.


USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service










L OYOU (",AVE
LWrTOCK ANOP/OZ A
?OuLrI2Y ONJ YOU


Livestock and poultry farms can
pollute surface and ground waters
with bacteria, other micro-organisms
and nutrients.

Proper use of manures in gardens or
on fields can reduce fertilizer
purchases, improve soil quality, and
reduce pollution risks.

If you do not have a manure
management plan for your livestock
or poultry operation, contact the VI
Department of Agriculture, USDA
Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS), VI Conservation
District, or Cooperative Extension
Service.




2. bo you tOUse
SLiv ESTOC< D9/o2.
rouLrev 4tnrim. 0oo PEEr
OF A WAre S(UPLY
9YSrEM (WELL L02 csrcEzJ
O. WATER BOD5 Y.

All livestock operations should be
located at least 100 feet downhill from
private water supplies (including
abandoned wells) and 500 feet from
public water supply systems.

If you have a livestock operation on
your property you should be testing
your water annually for bacteria and
nitrate.










Manure is generally stored in either liquid, semi-solid or solid form. Each of these can be stored
safely, but require proper management to prevent water contamination. Contact the USDA-
NRCS, VI Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, or VI Conservation District
office for information on proper storage practices.
Of particular concern for water quality are existing wells that can provide a direct path for
contaminated surface water to reach the ground water. Long distances between manure
storage sites and your water supply are the best preventive measure that can be taken. Avoid
manure storage within 250 feet of your well or cistern.
Storage facilities should be designed to prevent unplanned off-site movement of manure.
Reducing the volume of stored manure with regular use of manure as a fertilizer can help to
reduce pollution risks.


3 oyou SrOZE MAWuZE Wi 250 ,EEr OF
'A WArEZ. 5UPLY SYSrEM (WELL oe CSTEeN)
oc. WcTreR BOVV


%FAIR a N 9 9 A
5 0 FF+
W2 a t Q-











ANCD/OR POULrT FACL
LOCATE-D UiTLL t. OP A
"wrTGZ SUPPLY- SYV TE
(WELL oeR CiaSrEl'. O12
SWAre BOVY?

Runoff from livestock areas can transport
animal manure to surface or ground waters
and cause water contamination. Runoff is
affected by slope, rainfall and maintenance of
the animal facility. Your animal facility should
be located downhill from your water supply so
that runoff will not drain toward the water
supply. Surface water runoff should be
diverted around the animal facility so that it
does not become contaminated wfth manure.



5 O YOU ...y . .AD'
S AI _AL6 t You. -:



Dead animal disposal on your property is a
potential water pollution risk. Decomposing
animals can be a concentrated source of
nutrients, bacteria and other potentially
harmful micro-organisms.

Develop a plan for proper disposal of dead
animals. Small animals can be best disposed
of by composting. A rendering service is
generally better for larger animals. Virgin
Islands law requires that dead animals either
be disposed of on your property or in a
sanitary landfill. It is Illegal to dispose of
dead animals in public dumpsters.


-act


-a
,,Z F.'O

CIDe






















Manure should be treated as a resource
rather than a waste product. Store manure in
an approved storage system until it can be
used to provide nutrients for your garden or
crops. Credit nutrients from all manures in
your nutrient management plan. Manure
nutrient content can be estimated or tested.
Contact the VI Department of Agriculture,
USDA-NRCS, or UVI Cooperative Extension
Service for further information.

Apply all manure with properly calibrated
equipment. Make sure you maintain records
of your manure applications.








Fo HMORE INFOWNMAW
This ssssment does not caer all potential risks on your property that nuld impact the quit of your drinkir1 wuter. N is desild to: creste an
awareness of potential risks to water qualky on your property; pride volunty solutions to reduce pollution risks; and develop an accon plan to
protect your drinking vuter supply. kviduaJ arnus and states may vuy In requifrmentm on miknum staUndwds for water supply protection.
Always check with your local offices ited in tin reference section of ach worksheet before mnakl chnguq to your water supply "sytm. There are
other, mare detailed, Farm'ASy tMHame'ArSyst propranS vallabl. If you have pecili quEsti about protecdnt your drinking water, contact
your local Etaslon lrvce Oflki. local USDA Natural iecurces Conseration Service Ofike, or your 4ocal Soil and Water Cnservation Dtrkt
011ice. You may also contmathe National forM*TPSyWrs/gaom*ASt Office at B142 Stmnbock Lbrary, 550 BIbcock Drive, Madisot Wisconsn 53706-
12n Phon (606) 26O2.4.
This document was published by the University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service, Kwame Garcia. Director of
Extension Programs. This document was developed by Julie Wright, Natural Resources Specialist, University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service in cooperation with the National Farmn*A'SystHome'A'syst Program, and is patterned in a large part
after the National Farm'A*Syt/Home'A'Syst Program document "Protectlng Your Watr Through A Farm & Home Assessment'
and the North Dakota Farm*A*Syst Program developed by North Dakota Extension Service. Contents of this puilication constitute
public property. No endorsement of products or firms is intended, nor is criticism implied or those not mentioned. Issued by the Virgin
Islands Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in furtherance of the acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914.
Extension programs and policies are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on non-dlscrlmlnation regarding race, color,
national origin, religion. gender, age, disability or gender preference.
The FarmnA'Syst/HomenA*Syst Program is funded nationally by- USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension
Services, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency The program supports
voluntary pollutlon prevention to protect surface and ground water through a partnership with governmental agencies and the private
sector,


6. YOU 5f'pGEAP
mAuUIZE ON You. LWWrS,
APDEMS AMD/O_ FIELDS
STr-IOUT APPniN6 'T.ir ro
vou.z MUTriET
rWAsGEMEWT ?LA?.









ACGCgCQiij 'joR LI&V TC, oC PaWLTrf &PCRATzc)C

If You Answered "Yes"
to the Following What to Do Who to Call Other What You Did
Questions References

Question 1,6 Develop a manure UVI Cooperative
management plan that Extension Service (CES),
treats manure as a VI Dept. of Agriculture
resource. (DOA), USDA-NRCS, VI
Conservation District, or
crop consultant.
Question 2 Test your water for nitrate DPNR Division of
and bacteria Environmental Protection,
contamination. Move Dept. of Health, or UVI
livestock area if possible. Water Resources
Research Institute.
Question 3 Use an approved manure UVI-CES, DOA, USDA-
storage system. NRCS, or VICD.
Question 4 Develop a runoff control UVI-CES, DOA, USDA-
system or move the feed NRCS, or VICD.
yard.
Question 5 Develop a dead animal UVI-CES, DOA, USDA-
disposal system. NRCS, or VICD.
PHONE NUMBERS:
DOA: 778-0997 (St. Croix); 774-5182 (SL Thomas St. John)
DPNR-DEP: 773-0565 (St. Croix); 777-4577 (St. Thomas St. John)
Health Dept.: 773-1311 (St. Croix); 774-6880 (St. Thomas St. John)
USDA-NRCS: 778-8699
UVI-CES: 692-4080 (SI. Croix); 693-1080 (St. Thomas St, John)
UVI-WRRI: 693-1063
VICD: 778-9838









ASSESSiI6 0IU2.

F621 il62S rOlA66 9

AWPLiWG P2ACriC65


utrSZ QUAWr
TPOC A
HOME i FVA&
A55655MWr


Pt
j4~
6


Fertilizers play an important
role in gardening and agri-
culture. They increase crop
production dramatically.
However, when commercial
fertilizers are applied to
gardens, fields, and lawns
they can pollute both ground
and surface waters with
nitrate. The other primary
elements of commercial
fertilizer, phosphorus and
potassium, are not usually a
threat to ground water, but
can harm surface water
quality.
The public health standard
for the maximum allowable
amount of nitrate-nitrogen in
drinking water is 10 milli-
grams nitrate per liter of
water (mg/1, equivalent to
parts per million for water
measurement). Nitrate
levels exceeding this
standard have been found in


many wells in the United
States. High nitrate levels
can be a risk to infants,
causing "blue-baby disease"
(methemoglobinemia).


Use this worksheet to
address questions you have
answered Yes to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing Your Fertilizer
Storage and Handling
Practices section of your
Home and Farm Water
Quality Assessment This
worksheet will help you
develop an Action Plan to
establish practices that
reduce the risks of
contamination to your
drinking water supply.


A WAMf25TiP M600t FOQ VOLUWrAIY


UVI Cooperative Extension
Service


VI Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc.


POWLLU ?V6tW0W
USDA Natura Resources
Conservation Service



















A key first step in any nutrient plan is to
identify existing levels of soil nutrients- This
will help you determine how much fertilizer
you need to add to your garden, lawn or field
for optimum plant growth. You should test
your soil at least once every three years and
maintain a record of previous soil tests for
each area. If you use a more intensive
cropping system such as double cropping,
you may want to consider testing every year.
Contact your local UVI Cooperative Extension
Service office for information on testing your
soils' nutrient content.


(A) Top 2 in.
(B) Unmnixed


Coarse textured soils such as sands are
more vulnerable to ground water
contamination. Sandy soils have larger pore
spaces between soil particles. Thus water
soaks in and travels through the soil quickly
increasing the risk of contaminating ground
water.

Finer textured soils such as sift ioams and
days slow water movement and provide
greater filtering. They act as a natural filter.
allowing bacteria and other soil organisms to
break down contaminants before they reach
ground water. However, these types of soils
pond more quickly, creating more surface
water runoff that may contaminate surface
water bodies (guts, ponds, coastal waters).

Soils with high organic matter content also
help to reduce risk to ground water.

If you do not know what soil types are on your
property, contact your local Natural Resource
Conservation Service (NRCS) office.
Conservation District office, or Cooperative
Extension Service to get a detailed soils map.
Manage your soil testing and nutriert
applications by soil types. Keep accurate
records of fertilizer applications by sod type
for each plant/crop and for each gardenrfield.




















Consider all sources of applied nutrients in
determining how much fertilizer to apply. If
you are applying animal manure or are
incorporating residues from a previous
planting or crop you will need to adjust your
current nutrient budgets to include these
Inputs. Organic matter and previous crop
residues will affect nutrient availability. See
your local Cooperative Extension Service
office, NRCS, Conservation District, or crop
consultant to adjust for these inputs.


NKttT VNORRY,


rijFA,% I


Manure can provide all or a large portion of
your crop's nutrient needs. Be sure to credit
nutrients from all manure applications (from
this year as well as previous years) in nutrient
budgets. Store manure in a facility that will
prevent contamination to both ground and
surface water.

Use accurate testing to determine the nutrient
content of your manure. Monitor manure for
changes In nutrient content when emptying
storage facilities. Be sure manure application
equipment is calibrated and functioning
properly.


fl

'I-
C -
till *4l~


4-. S.


AV 0.
t


*










i' .' -

--. .-





Use realistic yield goals. Yield estimates that
are too high will result in soil nutrient levels
beyond those needed by the plants and could
result in excess nutrients polluting ground
and surface waters.

Do not base nutrient recommendations on
yields greater than 10-20 percent above the
average crop yield from the last three years.
Keep accurate records.


"' ". ;





NOU


Whenever possible, time your fertilizer
applications to fit crop needs. Apply fertilizer
when the plants are actively growing. Use
split applications of nitrogen on sandy soils.
Keep accurate records of all fertilizer
applications.


If stored properly in a secure location,
fertilizers pose little danger to ground water or
surface water. Small quantities (plant food)
should be stored in a well-sealed container in
a dry area secure from children and pets
(such as a shed). Fertilizers should not be
stored near your cistern or the pump for you"
drinking water. Since synthetic fertilizers are
made from petroleum products as are
plastics, place small packages in a glass or
other impervious container (not plastic).

Large quantities of liquid fertilizers used for
farming or landscaping should be stored on
an impermeable floor such as concrete. Tne
floor should have a curb that will hold up :
125% of the volume stored in case of a spll.
A concrete mixing and loading pad with
secondary containment should be provided
for all liquid fertilizers. Dry bulk fertilizer piwes
should be stored on an impermeable surace
under cover or in a building. Treat a fertizer
mixed with a pesticide as a pesticide. Locate
fertilizer storage areas at least 100 feet
downhill from your water supply. Be sure ail
fertilizer storage is secure from children-
animals and vandalism.













"^' '-"* .." : ...* -. . :.




Use realistic yield goals. Yield estimates that
are too high will result in soil nutrient levels
beyond those needed by the plants and could
result in excess nutrients polluting ground
and surface waters.

Do not base nutrient recommendations on
yields greater than 10-20 percent above the
average crop yield from the last three years.
Keep accurate records.


-
-j O-E. O ML-, a



Whenever possible, time your fertilizer
applications to fit crop needs. Apply fertilizer
when the plants are actively growing. Use
split applications of nitrogen on sandy soils,
Keep accurate records of all fertilizer
applications.


':eouga ?2Oppe^


If stored properly in a secure location,
fertilizers pose little danger to ground water or
surface water. Small quantities (plant food)
should be stored in a well-sealed container in
a dry area secure from children and pets
(such as a shed). Fertilizers should not be
stored near your cistem or the pump for your
drinking water. Since synthetic fertilizers are
made from petroleum products as are
plastics, place small packages in a glass or
other impervious container (not plastic).

Large quantities of liquid fertilizers used f*r
farming or landscaping should be stored on
an impermeable floor such as concrete. Tne
floor should have a curb that will hold up =c
125% of the volume stored in case of a spdl.
A concrete mixing and loading pad with
secondary containment should be provided
for all liquid fertilizers. Dry bulk fertilizer pes
should be stored on an impermeable surface
under cover or in a building. Treat a fertnizer
mixed with a pesticide as a pesticide. Locate
fertilizer storage areas at least 100 feet
downhill from your water supply. Be sure ad
fertilizer storage is secure from children.
animals and vandalism.




















If you over-fertilize your garden, lawns, or fields you are
potentially impacting the water quality in your area. If you
do not have a detailed nutrient management plan, you
need to develop one. This plan will specify the amount of
nutrients your plants or crop need to thrive. The plan
should be realistic and include all potential sources of
nutrients (Including animal manure and plant residues) that
your garden, crop or lawn will need for the entire growing
season. It should also provide information on your soils'
nutrient content.



















FA NOEINFRNOmw
Ti ams ent dam not conr all potential rlkm an yuir prorty that odd hct ti qual y of r *ki wr. k depd az aut an
w af poateial riks to watr quality on yaur prap prwn aawmatrty siutls o t reduce pBa r MaW d p -m a pn to
praect ynr drinklg waru mipply. Ind a dual ae u anta msa vry in ruV mnmmn eril i mum satd tfor wear s upl prmeMtion
AImysI ch. with Voar hal diim itd hi the rnhece mtiaof ehi waMkilut hiMr mnfath d TO y a -pply lm hr nr
oater, more deiteed, FnrA5paI m re&Srst programs siAb V you hp m apmuk qmtow b peanctin pYur drinks -, contact
yota local taeno SOnicm O kce., hal UtSOA NEtni Aror I c Cosran Srna Omi, Or peFr hel Sa id Watr Ca n- r Ptctk
Offi m You nay amo cntan the Nationl Fumn*PlSyt/ i'om *Spt Office at BI Sombock Lbnrry,. 0 Asbmrck bDrim. Nlmm, Wc ln 53706
IM3 Hits (08) 262IM44.
This document was published by trie University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Servc, Kwame Garcia, Octor of
Extension Programs. This document was developed by Julle Wight, Natural Rewurces Specialt, University of the V in Islands
Cooperative Extension Service in cooperation with the National Farm'A'Sytul-Home*A*syst Program, and is pattern r. a large par
after the National FamN'A'Syst/Home*A*Syst Program document "PtoeAdng Your tter Through A Farmn e Assossmw rr
and the North Dakota Farm*A'Syst Program developed by North Dakota Extension Service. Ccrtnts of this publkiCon acnstitute
public property, No endorsement of products or finir is intended, nor is criticism implied of nwe rnot mentioned. bty the Virgin
Islands Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in furtherance of ie acts of May 8 arc Aune 30, 1914-
Extension programs and policies are cotestent with federal and state lws and regulations on non-discriinatilon iueading race, colcw,
national origin, religion, gender, age, disability or gender preference.
The Farmn*ASyst/Home*AWSyst Program Is funded nationally by: USDA Cooperative State Research, Educmtion arc sEension
Services, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the U.S. Environmental Protectui Agency. The prFra supports
voluntary pollution prevention to protect surface arid ground water through a partnership w't 2cvemmental agencos arc the private
sector.








AccgccuJc 4rzv FERTLIaIER CroRAaG AkJb HJAktoua PFZACTCeeC


If You Answered "Yes"
to the Following What to Do Who to Call Other What You Did
Questions References
Question 1 Test your soils at least UVI Cooperative
every 3 years. Extension Service (CES),
Dept. of Agriculture (DOA),
or crop consultant,
Question 2 Get a detailed soils map of USDA-NRCS or UVI-CES.
your fields.
Question 3,4 Test your manure. Credit UVI-CES, USDA-NRCS,
all nutrient sources. or V.I. Conservation
District (VICD), or crop
consultant.
Question 5,6 Use realistic crop yield UVI-CES, USDA-NRCS,
goals. Apply fertilizer DOA, VICD or crop
based on crop needs. consultant.
Question 7 Develop an approved UVI-CES, USDA-NRCS,
fertilizer storage system. DOA, or VICD.
Question 8 Develop a nutrient UVI-CES, USDA-NRCS,
management plan. DOA, VICD or crop
consultant.
Pi IONL NUMLuLIs:
UVL-CES: 692-4080 (St. Croix); 693-1080 (St- Thomas St. John)
USDA-NRCS: 778-8699
DOA: 778-0997 (St. Croix); 774-5182 (St. Thomas St. John)
VICD: 778-9838


























PoreOiN6 40UZ
LArEZ QUALM
TZOuAP A
HOME g FAPJ





45^MM


ASSEI5555IG OUQ

PSTiCIPE ro2e6 2

HA PLINJ5 ?A CTiCES


Lm S4IOULW YmOU


Pesticides play an important
role In gardens and on
farms, eliminating unwanted
weeds and insects.
However, pesticides must be
stored and handled safely to
protect both people and
water quality. Two major
areas of concern related to
pesticides are (1) storage
practices and (2) handling
practices, including mixing,
loading, application, and
disposal.
Pesticides work by interfer-
ing with the life processes of
weeds and insects. Some
pesticides can also interfere
with human life processes
(be toxic to humans).
Pesticides are usually not
present in water supplies in
concentrations high enough
to cause acute health effects
such as chemical bums.


nausea and convulsions.
Instead, they typically occur
in very small amounts, but
can cause chronic health
problems (such as cancer,
birth defects, etc.) from
prolonged exposure.


W"7 CAM you


Use this worksheet to
address questions you have
answered Yes to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing Your Pesticide
Storage and Handling
Practices section of your
Home and Farm Water
Quality Assessment. This
worksheet will help you
develop an Action Plan to
establish practices that
reduce the risks of
contamination to your
drinking water supply.


A PAiTW62Ni? PIZO6AM FO. VOLUrfA.ZY POLLUTION PV6TIOiO


UVI Cooperative Extension
Service


VI Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc.


USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service










Z. .o La A oRcrozu -
PWcncI>rC 6a 'wszbR PRowZnf I


Before you make a decision about storing
pesticides, you need to balance cost,
expected use, and risks associated with
storing pesticides. Risks associated with
storing pesticides include leaking containers,
inadequately protected storage sites, and
disposal of unwanted or unusable pesticides.
You can safely store pesticides in small
quantities (such as weed-killer, bug spray,
flea and tick removal products, etc.) by
keeping them in their original container in a
dry, secure area, out of reach of children and
pets.

Even in large quantities, pesticides can be
stored without threat to water quality. On the
other hand, relatively small amounts of
chemicals may pose a significant hazard to
surface and ground
\ waters if stored in an
inadequate facility
/or location.


2... i-:, : -; "1.Z .-



-c.- *.fR e .


Before buying, storing, or applying any kind of
pesticide, read the label to make sure the
product will do what you want it to do. Be
sure it can be applied safely and that you
have all the necessary safety equipment.

Always follow the instructions on the label for
proper use and storage of the product. The
label also provides additional Information
such as the re-entry period (how long you
must keep people and animals out of the
building, yard, or field), first aid, and other
hazards.


The storage facility should be located
downhill from your water supply and other
sensitive areas- If you store pesticides on a
regular basis, you should consider building a
properly designed storage system with a
concrete floor, secondary containment, and a
temperature and humidity-controlled
environment. In all cases, make sure your
pesticides are protected from vandalism and
secured from children and animals.










J.- ARE PGC^cn<^ccr CTOaRAVEL, COt., OR oR A
deld RGTE PA WMITHO-T A &ARffMt


Containment is very important in the event of an accidental spill, especially if you store large
quantities of pesticides for landscaping or farming use.

Small quantities of pesticides should be stored in a dry area, inside a second container such as
a metal or heavy-duty plastic bucket or tub that can hold the quantity of pesticide stored should
the original container leak. Pesticides should be stored in an area secure from children and
pets.

For large quantities of stored pesticides, they should be kept in a
separate shed from the home. The floor of the pesticide storage
site should be made of sealed concrete or some other easily
cleaned, non-permeable material and should hold a minimum
of 125% of total stored volume. Carpeting, wood, soil, and
E. |other absorbent floors should not be
A used because they are difficult or
S ...impossible to decontaminate in the
case of a leak or spill.

For easier clean-up, shelving and
pallets should be made of non-
absorbent material such as plastic or
metal. If wood or fiberboard materials
are used, they should be coated or
covered with plastic, polyurethane or
epoxy paint.















A major concern about the condition of pesticide containers is the potential for leaks and spills.
If you have containers that are rusting or have holes or tears, the pesticide should be used or
disposed of immediately. You should monitor your pesticide storage area for leaks.

Be careful to keep all pesticides in their PF.STcl De
original containers with their proper labels, S4OUD S-E
Information on the pesticide label is RoPFERLy
invaluable for proper cleanup, disposal, and P SPOSED
emergency action if the pesticide is spilled or
leaked. Information about pesticide disposal
programs for old and unused pesticides can
be obtained from the UVI Cooperative
Extension Service, VI Department of
Agriculture, DPW Division of Environmental
Services, or DPNR Division of Environmental
Protection.


5. 'iu0 hWix, AfPPVL u. TORfZ P-CrWebG) Ur.lt 150 FG e-F AJ.f
IAATE(Z CMIPL CTre (eoe. ogf 6ctCcrU) OR aWcG WATME?


Mixing, loading, storing, or applying
pesticides near or directly uphill from your
water supply system is not recommended.
Use a secondary water source on a
properly constructed mixing and Joading
pad; or field mix and load with a nurse tank
to reduce risks. Pesticides should always
be stored in a secured, spill-proof area or
facility away from your water supply's pump
room, or for large quantities, downhill from
your water supply.

Pesticides should also be mixed, applied
and stored away from surface waters to
prevent contamination from spills or leaks.












Fftl-l A bWAftoJC ttizATGE -Q*



Filling your sprayer directly from your drinking
water supply system is not recommended.
Your drinking water supply has a greatly
increased chance of being contaminated if
you fill your sprayer directly from it. Using a
secondary water source such as a holding or
nurse tank will eliminate this risk.

When filling directly from your water supply,
the mixing and loading area should be at
least 150 feet downslope from your drinking
water supply.

Although this will reduce risks from spills, it
will not prevent back-siphoning. Back-
siphoning happens when the flow of water is
reversed, possibly taking some of the
pesticide back into the well.




Fm iS...

PREVENTION)


;VALWE aZU THE MaCE. 10 TH
-TCk cc THAT a-l & Low THw



Always keep your water hose or pipe raised
ABOVE the level of the pesticide mixture.
This will prevent water and pesticides from
being drawn back into your water supply if the
pump fails or is shut off. A back-siphoning
device or check valve should always be used
when filling with a pesticide tank. These can
be found at a farm supply store, hardware
store, or irrigation supply outlet. They are
relatively inexpensive and reduce the risk of
contamination to your drinking water supply.














...NOT THIS

sipmotWED BACK( uT
SWAreR suPLy)













.1uATTjb 4E .- IL .& L LUC


You are responsible for the proper mixing and
loading of all the pesticides you use. When a
sprayer tank is left unattended, the risk of
contamination from spills or over filling
increases. Repeated pesticide spills due to
tank overflow allows pesticides to concentrate
in the soil and increases their potential to
move Into surface or ground waters. There is
also a risk of back-siphoning pesticides
directly into the water source if the pump
should stop while filling the tank.
Careful loading and mixing of pesticides
will reduce the risks to
water quality and -
human health. I ILO ,PrI t ni


9. N9 'bow RvJW- OUT 4I
CPRAMWeIR AOWTAlJJR O TAVC
QGAR qoc4 uATER CuI'PPL9 CSreTM
(wGLL oiz rTh eCP J) OR A WATrZ
; .


After pesticide applications, clean all
equipment used. Cleaning should be done
away from your drinking water supply system
and surface water bodies (guts, ponds,
coastal waters). The rinse water should be
used In the next spray mix or it should be
applied to the field you just finished spraying.
A clean water tank or nurse tank on the
sprayer is a convenient way to have clean
water in the field to wash out
n your sprayer.



















The use of calibrated equipment can be as
important as the selection of the pesticide you
are applying. Calibrating your equipment will
reduce problems such as drift. non-uniform
coverage, failure of the pesticide to reach a
targeted organism, and exposure to non-
target organisms,

Before calibrating your sprayer, make sure
your equipment can apply the product
according to the label rate. Each spray
nozzle should handle within 5 percent of
volumes required. Proper calibration of
appropriate equipment ensures that
pesticides are applied uniformly according to
label rates.


,-. : lr: .. ... - i J -. ,- ..' -. .. .-* .r."f -. "











order to apply restricted use pesticides. ALL
.- ,. .* :.. .:-:, .-- -' *I .. **^ ., ,,,^ *.: ,
Certified. private individuals applying -



The Virgin Islands has regulations requiring
an applicator to be trained and licensed in
order to apply restricted use pesticides. ALL
commercial pesticide applicators must be
certified. Private individuals applying
restricted use pesticides must also be
certified. Certifications (both commercial and
private) are only valid for 4 years, then
applicators must become re-certified.

However, if you are applying any pesticides.
you should consider taking an applicator
training course and obtaining your
certification. Contact your local Cooperative
Extension Service for information on classes
to become a certified pesticide applicator.


FmO MOm MFOSMw At
Thls amni t dons not owv d paianel rs m yur property ic ilnnpuipt wt quty of yer drhhg rstr. k dKeaied to: cre an
WeaUWIN of pensam riem an mter qulky an W t proeoty prowe baa wh iam to r*ded i posinon ra. and di per n a action plan to
protect yor drinlhg efar mipply. Iondhiktal arsis am stAte my ry riqureoentW On ininmu Omiirds Ifre W supply prttion.
Ahps dmek inth yar iocal Sir.f sted iIn thrIm enc iac of edh workiat beran cumy duo es n yaw ter supply system. Thmtu a
Etenr, ms dproas, FarnfpASyst/jeae*-ASn progrunum idhal. If you hat spn cc qusntimn shma pronictli Vorw d.rdq gnher, c nnact
yaw urcal btrlon ser gice lo.etWtal USDA lM lralt Roarmen Cwnsrvon S.ank. 0.a, or yme SIll and Watr Cmurystion Dirt
OfGm. Vou.y *so. contt te Nastida Fsa.n'i s mtr*aW ys% oGte at 1402 s.A.h ulLi Ubray, M5 Eaod ri., Mr&.n., Wmcdn 5.7W
tM "WMe j6M 2MIK24.
This document was published by tie Universeity of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extenrsion Service, Kwame Gardia. Director of
Extension Programs. This document was developed by Julle Wright Natural Resources Specialist, University of the Vlrgin islands
Cooperative Extension Service in cooperation with the National Farm'AnSyt/Hom*A*yst Progranm, and is patterned in a large part
after the National FarrA'SyW-Home'A"Syst Program document "Protectfring Yow Wtir Thiough A FaWrm Hornme Asesswrmnr
and the Nort Dakota FarrfA'Syst Program developed by North Dakota Extenion Service Contents of this publication constitute
public property. No endorsement of products or firms is Intended, nor is criticism Implied of those not mentioned. Issued by the VWgin
elands Cooperative Extension Servicoe and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in furtherance of the acts of May l and June 30, 1914.
Extension programs and policies are consistent with federal and state Jaws and regulations on non-discrimInation regarding race. color.
national origin, religion, gender, age, disabilIty or gender preference.
The FamnA'SystlHome*A*Sysr Program is funded nationally by USDA CooperatIve State Research, Education and Exerision
Services. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The program supports
voluntary pollution prevention to protect surface and ground water through a partnersnhp wiri governmental agencies and the private
sector










ACCFCCW( 40i PCTgcnIcbG CrT6oRAtG AN 3 HAkbuLiG PrTAcrTcGC

If You Answered "Yes"
to the Following What to Do Who to Call Other What You Did
Questions References

Question 1 Always read the label. VI Department of Agriculture
(DOA), UVI Cooperative
Extension Sorvico (CES), or
crop consultant,
Question 2 Assess type and quantity of pesticide to UVI-CES, DOA, USDA-
be stored. NRCS, or Conservation
District office (VICD).
Questions 3,4 Develop a pesticide storage and handling UVI-CES, DOA, USDA-
plan. Dispose of unused products NRCS, or Conservation
according to label instructions District office (VICD)
Questions 5,6,7,8.9 Try not to fill pesticide sprayer directly UVI-CES. DOA, local farm
from drinking water supply (well or or hardware store.
cistern). Use a hydrant (located at least
150 feet from water supply), or a water
holding lank.
Question 10 Make sure your fill hose has a backflow UVI-CES or private crop
device and is not below the waler tank consultant for calibration
level, training,

Get pesticide applicator training and UVI-CES.
become certified. Always read pesticide
label.

Spread rinse water on crop field or lawn.

Check your equipment on a regular basis
Always calibrate sprayer prior to applying
pesticides. Never leave spray tank
unattended.
PI IONF NUMBERS:
DOA: 778-0997 (St. Croix); 774-5182 (SI Thomas SL John)
UVI-CES: 692-4080 (SI. Croix); 693-1080 (St. Thomas St John)
USDA-NRCS: 778-8699
VICD: 778-9838










ASSESS 65 0U2

PTEOLEUH POPUCr


ro02A66 FACiLiTi65


KZOTECrJ6 4Ou0


TUQou0 A
HOHE & tFA
ASSESSM T'J


wrv S4louLv eobu
ee cocqceqseern


Storage of petroleum
products such as motor fuel
and oil present a threat to
public health and water
quality,
According to estimates by
the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, nearly 1
out of every 4 petroleum
underground storage tanks
in the United States may
now be leaking.
A few quarts of gasoline in
the ground water may be
enough to severely pollute
your drinking water supply,
as well as your neighbors'.
Low levels of petroleum
chemicals in water cannot
be detected by smell or
taste; yet the seemingly pure
water may be contaminated
to the point of harming
human health.


Petroleum fuels contain
many potentially toxic com-
pounds such as ethylene
dibromide (EDB) and ben-
zene. EDB is a carcinogen
(cancer-causing agent) in
laboratory animals, and
benzene Is considered a
human carcinogen. Once
these contaminants leak into
the soil and ground water
they can be very difficult and
expensive to remove.

.,:- .CAN0 PO "': *.


Use this worksheet to
address questions you have
answered Yes to or do not
know the answer to in the
Assessing Your Petroleum
Product Storage Facilities
section of your Home and
Farm Water Quality
Assessment. This work-
sheet will help you develop
an Action Plan to establish
practices that reduce
drinking water supply
cnntaminationn risks


A PAC2TW.SiP ?K-02A FOP VOLUTArY POLLUltO ?P2.EVENiOr


UVI Cooperative Extension
Service


Vg Resource Conservation and
Development Council, Inc.


USDA Natural Resources
Conservation Service










I. O YOU "UAVE A T4ErOLEuM SrOa A6E eONrrAiJEM2(5) 02
rAWK(5) ON! vYOu.0 i2.OPErzTh

Assessment surveys from Farm*A*Syst (Farm Water Quality Assessment) Programs across
the country have shown petroleum storage to be the most frequent high risk identified. If you
have a petroleum storage container or tank on your property, or If you have waste oil to discard
from car or generator maintenance, you need to assess your storage and disposal methods to
guard against contamination of soil, ground and surface water.

Containers or tanks that are no longer in use should be removed from the property. The Virgin
Islands uses Federal regulations regarding the removal of buried and above ground petroleum
storage tanks. Consult with the DPNR Division of Environmental Protection (DEP) before you
dispose of storage containers, modify your current system, or remove a petroleum storage tank.

Waste oil is classified as a "special waste" in the Virgin Islands (in order for WAPA to be allowed
to bum it along with standard oil). Waste oil contains toxic chemicals, cancer-causing hydro-
carbons, and heavy metals (lead, zinc, arsenic, chromium, cadmium) that are harmful to human
health and the environment. Dumping of used (or waste) oil in storm drains, guts or on the
ground pollutes our beaches, surface and ground waters.
Used oil in the garbage seeps through landfills into ground
water, mangrove lagoons, and the sea.

C Small quantities of used oil (5 gallons or less) generated by
| individuals changing oil in their vehicles or generators will
Sbe accepted by the Department of Public Works' (DPW)
| j Used Oil Collection Program. DPW will NOT accept
S, r used oil in containers greater than five gallons or from
Businesses. Businesses that generate waste oil must
have It collected and transported to an EPA-approved
disposal site by an approved waste oil hauler.

DPW WILL accept used oil In sealed containers (5 gallons or less) at the following locations:

St. Crolx; DPW facilities in Anna's Hope, 8 am 5 pm weekdays.
St. John: DPW facilities in Susannaberg or the Coral Bay Fire Station, 8 am 5 pm weekdays.
St. Thomas: Bovoni Landfill, 6 am 6 pm every day, or the Tutu Fire Station, 8 am 4 pm weekdays.

DPW may add collection locations to make proper disposal of used oil easier for the public. To
find out about additional locations, contact DPW Division of Environmental Services or the UVI
Cooperative Extension Service.

DPW WILL NOT accept waste oil mixed with anti-freeze, solvents, paint, paint thinner,
carburetor or parts cleaner. To find out how to dispose of these other products, contact the
DPW Division of Environmental Services or DPNR Division of Environmental Protection (DEP).
Petroleum products should be properly stored In a dry area safe from access by children or
pets. Proper storage includes a secured container on an impervious surface at least 100 feet
away from your drinking water supply (including pump room) and surface waters.










2. is you 'TrwOLEUwM
STOA0C9 c-O0rAWIJe&EQ5)
OE TAM<(5) LESS rTlA -
100 PFEr FiO2M A WArTE
SUP'Lv O WATrB&o9Y2

Your petroleum storage area should be
located a minimum of 100 feet down
slope from your water supply system.
This will help protect your water supply
from both leaks and spills. Your
petroleum storage container(s) or
tanks) should also be located at least
25 feet from buildings and heavy traffic
areas. Check with DPNR-DEP for
specific regulations on petroleum
storage,


3, IF YOU lAVE A PErOLEUM
5 TO(A0 E. TrAMK, iS iT LOCATED



Petroleum tanks that have been buried more than
15 years can be a high risk to ground water quality.

Most underground storage tanks are made out of
steel and contain little or no protection to prevent
corrosion. Highly corrosive conditions such as
saline, wet, or acid soils (typically those found In the
Virgin Islands) can significantly increase the rate of
corrosion of these tanks.

The Virgin Islands uses Federal regulations
regarding the removal of buried tanks. Consult with
DPNR-DEP about procedures and assistance In
removing a buried tank.









4. W You LACK PrOTECTrOo
.WGAiST LEAKS O. SiLLS rFzPO
VOUi 9eri-OLeu 2 STORAeE
coMrP tJ E(5) oZ TAIK(5) (NO
CONrAiMHNrr, CArC- BASVi, OQZ
COjC.rerG SPILL PAP, rANK
iSOlT POULE-44ULLEPD)

Whether you have above ground or under ground
storage you need to develop a system that guards
against leaks and spills. Equipment should be
fueled on a concrete pad that has secondary
containment (like a curb).

All petroleum storage containers and areas should
be secured from children, pets, and vandalism.
Under ground tanks should be protected against
corrosion. Above ground tanks should be made of
high quality steel and have a secondary
containment system that can hold 125% of the total
volume of petroleum stored. Tanks that are used
or designed for under ground storage should not be
used for above ground storage. Small storage
containers should be sealed and stored in an area
with an impermeable base (concrete, metal or
heavy-duty plastic) and containment (like a curb).


















Develop a monitoring system to keep accurate records of fuel
delivery and usage. Regularly monitoring your fuel use and
comparing it to the measured amount of fuel in the container or
tank can help you detect a leak. This is one of the easiest ways to
detect leaks in under ground storage tanks. Monitoring fuel use
does not require a lot of time or money and can help you detect a
leaking storage container or tank before serious losses occur.

4L An easy way to monitor your fuel use is
Sto have a pre-marked
Stick to measure the level
of fuel in your storage
IS r -- container or tank.
Check the level of fuel in
the container or tank
before you withdraw fuel
to make sure that the
level has not changed
since your last use.
r | If the level changes
between
withdrawals, then
your container or tank may be leaking.


FOR NMOE IANFOMAHMO
This asasurma do noc mr ml potutial risks an your property tilt could impact the quality of your drinking wa tr. It Is dlegned to create an
swawns of pontial rhis to war qaity on yearo property; proi. voluntary solludam to reduce pollution risi; and dwlop an actioden plan to
protect our drinlln mter supply. hnIlviud rans end statm may vary in requirenmts on mi nninimm tanrdi for water supply protection.
Always ck with your local a1k1 PtAd In the refernce a tion of ench vwlishrt bofor nuidng dcanges to your asieupnpl sytam. Thi are
other, mnor detaRld FarmIwAst/omWA'S program. s labie. V you hIMe Ipcflc queMbihn abMdu pruacdring yur drfkldn wmte, cWeat
yar local Etetlen Servic 01fce local USDA N twia Resurces Ctmervniwon Service 0icW or yoer local 5o and Water annervtdon D0strict
ofuei You muo ay nect the Naminal Farm*A*SAystlomeA*Syt Ofle at 1142 Steenbeck Lbrary 550 abcock Drih, Hadlson, Wi coin 53706-
MI2 Mahli fb) U62-024.
This document was published by the University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service, Kwame Garcia, Director of
Extension Programs. This document was developed by Julie Wrightl Natural Resources Specialist, University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service In cooperation with the National Farm'A'SystHone'A'syst Program, and ts pattemed In a large part
after the National Farrn*A*SysHomrne*A*Syst Program document "Protecing Your Wer Through A Farm & Home Assnwmenr
and the North Dakota Farm*A'Syst Program developed by North Dakota Extension Servioe. Contents of this publication constitute
public property. No endorsement of products or firms is Intended, nor Is criticism Implied of those not mentioned. Issued by the Virgin
Islands Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture In furtherance of the acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914.
Extension programs and policies are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color.
national origin, religion, gender, age, disability or gender preference.
The Farm'A*SystHormn*A*Syst Program is funded nationally by: USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension
Services, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Serice, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency The program supports
voluntary pollution prevention to protect surface and ground water through a partnership with governmental agencies and the private
sector.


5. bO VYOU fEEi rO PVELOP A METrO
or IZCORDK6EP1Ni rpo kCEEP ? ACK OF
? Er2oLGeM USE?









AccEccwx tlAPz PETROLgun PRObLTr STORAGE FAtcllTEC


If You Answered "Yes"
to the Following What to Do Who to Call Other What You Did
Questions References
Questions 1,5 Develop a regular mainten- DPNR Division of
ance program to check tanks Environmental Protection
for leaks, damage, etc. Review (DEP), DPW Division of
your plan for spill and leak Environmental Protection,
protection. Properly dispose of UVI Cooperative Extension
waste oil. Service (CES)

Monitor fuel usage.
Question 2 Plan to move your tank. DPNR-DEP
Question 3 Change to above ground DPNR-DEP
storage.
Question 4 Construct a secondary DPNR-DEP
containment system, store
petroleum products properly.


PHONE NUMBERS:
DPNR-DEP: 773-0565 (St, Croix): 777-4577 or 774-3320 (SI, Thomas St. John)
OPW Divison of Environmenlal Services: 773-1290 (SI. Croix); 776-4844 (St. Thomas St. John)
UVI-CES: 692-4080 (St. Croix); 693-1080 (81. Thomas Sl. John)









3 HO1e O FAZ WArE2 QUALirY

L-B- ASSESSHEMr CUQVCY
We would like to take this opportunity to say Thank you! For participating
in this Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment Pilot Project The
experience we gain from this project will be very helpful in organizing
Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment programs throughout the
United States, as well as in other countries all over the world. In order to
make improvements to this program, we would like to know what you
think of this assessment and we invite you to share any ideas you may
44 have for improving it.
Please take the time to answer the following questions in this survey.
You do not need to provide personal information like your name or
address your assessments and worksheets will be kept confidential.

I. When was your Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment completed?
(month/year)

2. Were you able to complete your Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment without
help?
Yes No
If you answered no, who helped you?

3. Was the Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment easy to follow?
Yes No

4. Approximately how much time did you spend completing your Home & Farm Water
Quality Assessment?
(hours)

5. Did you learn something new from completing your Home & Farm Water Quality
Assessment? On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being not helpful and 10 being extremely
helpful, circle the number that most closely describes your feeling about this
Assessment.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Not Helpful Extremely
Helpful Helpful

6. Would you recommend that others complete a Home & Farm Water Quality
Assessment?
Yes __ Maybe No

7. As a result of your Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment, do you plan to make
changes on your property and/or around your home?
Yes Maybe No




UNIVERSITY OF VIRGIN 18LANDS


3 3138 00175 2715


8. What type of changes are you planning to make?
Structural Management None

9. Please circle Yes or No in the following table to indicate which sections of the
Assessment you completed; and indicate whether any changes are planned and/or
completed.

Worksheet Changes
Completed Planned

Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment Y/N Y/N

Assessing the Condition and Location of Your Drinking Water Well Y/N Y/N
Assessing the Condition of Your Rain Water Collection System Y/N Y/N
(Cistern)

Assessing Your Site Y/N Y/N

Assessing Your Household Waste Water Disposal System Y/N Y/N

Assessing Your Household Hazardous Waste Management Practices Y/N Y/N

Assessing Your livestock and Poultry Operations Y/N Y/N

Assessing Your Fertilizer Storage and Handling Practices Y/N Y/N
Assessing Your Pesticide Storage and Handling Practices Y/N Y/N

Assessing Your Petroleum Product Storage Practices Y/N Y/N


10. If you plan to make changes, please check the type of assistance you may need.
No assistance needed Cost share assistance
__ Technical assistance Engineering or design
Other (specify)


11. If you do not plan to make changes In situations that may threaten your drinking water
supply, please indicate why (check all that apply).
__ Too expensive Too time consuming
Do not feel it will make a difference Need more information and/
or assistance
Other (please specify)

12. How can this Home & Farm Water Quality Assessment be improved? Please list your
suggestions and comments below.


Digitally signed
I by UVI Library
nrlDN:cn=UVI
SU V I I I y Library, o=St
Croix, c=VI
Validity Date: 2002.06.03
unknown 12:21:56 -0700




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs