Citation
Mickler, Jacob E. to his Wife Sallie, December 7 ,1862 - Tampa, Fla. - Transcript

Material Information

Title:
Mickler, Jacob E. to his Wife Sallie, December 7 ,1862 - Tampa, Fla. - Transcript
Creator:
Mickler, Jacob E.
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Transcript

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Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Tampa

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Mickler19nm

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Tampa, Fla. Dec 7t, [18]62


My Darling Wife

The mail has just arrived and I have received a letter from you my precious one dated
Nov. 28th. How happy it makes me my sweet one to hear that you all are enjoying good
Health. I am truly sorry to hear that Charlie has been so dangerously sick. I am
confident my Dolly will do for him as for her own. The loss of him would be a great loss
to Ma- that you know so I need not tell my Dolly what to do for she will do her best.
Your Father and myself are well and at work every day. At first Darling I used to get so
tired. Now I do not. I am getting more accouston [accustomed] to it. We have got one
of the vessels nearly ready and will have the other ready for sea by the 18th I hope. I do
not think Darling we will leave this place before the 21st or 22nd of this month. I hope we
will spend our Christmas in Havana. We will get both Smacks ready and leave together
[sic] for Cuba. It is Sunday morning Darling and I am going to Church after I have
finished] this letter to you my sweet wife the mail leaves here about 2 o'clock this
evening. I would have written to you last night my Darling but I expected a letter from
you by today's mail and was not disappointed. We are now painting the Smacks and
when we paint thier [sic] names upon there [sic] stems I will let you know which one I
and your Father will go in. We do not expect to return in the same vessels as they draw
too much water and carry too little. We will dispose of them and purchase two others of
less drawft [draft]. I expect Darling the one we will return in will endeavour to run into
Nassau river with a cargo of Salt- and the other will try and get into St. Marks near
Tallahassee. Oh Darling what quantities of Oranges we get here. I wish you all had
some we have now some two or three dozen in my trunk. Your Father and myself I know
have eat[en] some eight or ten dozen since we have been here. We b[u]y them for three
or four cents apiece. Oysters and Fish we have on the table at every meal. I generally eat
nothing else. In regard to the blockading vessels of this port there is only one My Darling
and that is a sailing bark and she we don't care anything about as we will leave here in
the night. Your Father sends a great deal of love to you all Darling and he is so lonesome
especially today. My love to all Darling- and you must continue to write to me my sweet
One. I will write to you again about next Friday or Sunday- good bye Darling for the
present.

Your Husband
Jacob E. Mickler


Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009




Full Text

PAGE 1

Tampa, Fla. Dec 7th, [18]62 My Darling Wife The mail has just arrived and I have receiv ed a letter from you my precious one dated Nov. 28th. How happy it makes me my sweet one to hear that you all are enjoying good Health. I am truly sorry to hear that Ch arlie has been so dangerously sick. I am confident my Dolly will do for him as for her own. The loss of him would be a great loss to Ma— that you know so I need not tell my Dolly what to do for she will do her best. Your Father and myself are well and at work ev ery day. At first Darling I used to get so tired. Now I do not. I am getting more accouston [accustomed] to it. We have got one of the vessels nearly ready and will have th e other ready for sea by the 18th I hope. I do not think Darling we will leave this place before the 21st or 22nd of this month. I hope we will spend our Christmas in Havana. We w ill get both Smacks ready and leave togeather [ sic ] for Cuba. It is Sunday morning Darli ng and I am going to Church after I have finish[ed] this letter to you my sweet wife the mail leaves here about 2 o’clock this evening. I would have written to you last ni ght my Darling but I e xpected a letter from you by today’s mail and was not disappointed. We are now painting the Smacks and when we paint thier [ sic ] names upon there [ sic ] sterns I will let you know which one I and your Father will go in. We do not expect to return in the same vessels as they draw too much water and carry too little. We will dispose of them and purchase two others of less drawft [draft]. I expect Darling the one we will return in will endeavour to run into Nassau river with a cargo of Salt— and the other will try and get into St. Marks near Tallahassee. Oh Darling what quantities of Oranges we get here. I wish you all had some we have now some two or three dozen in my trunk. Your Fath er and myself I know have eat[en] some eight or ten dozen since we have been here. We b[u]y them for three or four cents apiece. Oysters and Fish we ha ve on the table at every meal. I generally eat nothing else. In regard to the blockading vessels of this port there is only one My Darling and that is a sailing bark and she we don’t ca re anything about as we will leave here in the night. Your Father sends a great deal of love to you all Darling and he is so lonesome especially today. My love to all Darlinga nd you must continue to write to me my sweet One. I will write to you again about next Friday or Sundaygood bye Darling for the present. Your Husband Jacob E. Mickler Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009