Citation
Mickler, Jacob E. to his Wife Sallie, November 5, 1860- Fernandina, Fla. (1 sheet, 3 leaves)

Material Information

Title:
Mickler, Jacob E. to his Wife Sallie, November 5, 1860- Fernandina, Fla. (1 sheet, 3 leaves)
Creator:
Mickler, Jacob E.
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Transcript

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Fernandina

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Mickler6nm

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Fernandina Florida
November the 5th 1860

My Dearest Sallie,

Oh, how impossible it is for me to depict to you what a sad, sad disap[p]ointment it has
been in my not receiving a letter from you my Beloved One. I arrived in this place this
afternoon and hasten to the post Office to received [sic]- what I was confident of
receiving [sic]- And- Behold my hopes and expectations was blasted. You cannot
conceive Dearest Sallie how exceedingly wretched the neglect of one mail causes me to
be. I have discovered Dearest, Dearest Sallie as I have repeatedly told you that life
without you for my wife would be a curse in not hearing from you should make me so
very [sic] miserable. This sad heart in my bosom is yours Sallie and Oh! how truly-
devote[d]ly and sincerely it throbs for you- for you alone. My object in writing to you
tonight Sallie is to try and describe [sic] how sadly, sadly disap[p]ointed I have been. I
intend to remain here until [sic] next mail and if disap[p]ointed Dear Sallie I will take the
Barosa for May Port. Why Sallie two or three disap[p]ointments like this so trivial it may
seem to some would run me crazy. You are Dearest Sallie Dearer to me by far than the
whole world and Oh! how anxious I am regarding your welfare [sic]. I wrote to you by
your Dear Father on my arrival here last Wednesday and I do sincerely pray that I may
have the pleasure of grasping his cordial hand this Wednesday. I expect Sallie you will
think that I am very hasty. Do not blame me my dear one because my love is bordering
on idolatry [it] makes me so anxious to hear from you. If I receive a letter by the next
mail which I expect I will not visit you then until Sunday or Monday. My best wishes to
all of your family. Oh! Sallie with what pleasure I look forward to our union- to call
you mine now makes me happy- to know- to know you are mine- mine forever
would make me happier- write soon Sallie to your

Affiance Husband
J. E. Mickler


Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009




Full Text

PAGE 1

Fernandina Florida November the 5th 1860 My Dearest Sallie, Oh, how impossible it is for me to depict to you what a sa d, sad disap[p]ointment it has been in my not receiving a letter from you my Beloved One. I arrived in this place this afternoon and hasten to the post Office to received [ sic ]— what I was confident of receiveing [ sic ]— And— Behold my hopes and expectations was blasted. You cannot conceive Dearest Sallie how exceedingly wretched the neglect of one mail causes me to be. I have discovered Dearest, Dearest Sallie as I have repeatedly told you that life without you for my wife would be a curse in not hearing from you should make me so verry [ sic ] miserable. This sad heart in my bosom is yours Sallie and Oh! how trulydevote[d]ly and sincerely it throbs for you— for you alone. My object in writing to you tonight Sallie is to try and discribe [ sic ] how sadly, sadly disap[p]ointed I have been. I intend to remain here untill [ sic ] next mail and if disap[p]ointed Dear Sallie I will take the Barosa for May Port. Why Sallie two or three disap[p]ointments like this so trivial it may seem to some would run me crazy. You are D earest Sallie Dearer to me by far than the whole world and Oh! how anxious I am regarding your wellfare [ sic ]. I wrote to you by your Dear Father on my arrival here last We dnesday and I do sincerely pray that I may have the pleasure of grasping his cordial hand this Wednesday. I expect Sallie you will think that I am verry hasty. Do not blame me my dear one because my love is bordering on idolatry [it] makes me so anxious to hear from you. If I receive a letter by the next mail which I expect I will not visit you then untill Sunday or Monday. My best wishes to all of your family. Oh! Sallie with what pleasure I look forward to our union— to call you mine now makes me happy— to know— to know you are mine— mine forever would make me happierwrite soon Sallie to your Affiance Husband J. E. Mickler Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009