Citation
Mickler, Sallie to her Husband Jacob E., September 11, 1860- May Port, Fla. (1 sheet, 3 leaves)

Material Information

Title:
Mickler, Sallie to her Husband Jacob E., September 11, 1860- May Port, Fla. (1 sheet, 3 leaves)
Creator:
Mickler, Sallie
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Transcript

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- May Port

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Mickler2nm

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May Port Florida
September the 11th 1860

Dear Mr. Mickler,

Yours dated September the 5th was received with much pleasure yesterday morning, and
oh! how anxious I am to see you. Time seems to approach so slowly since you left here.
The hours appear more like days to me. I am so lonesome now, since you have been
away, last Sunday the day you left here was the longest day I ever spent in my life or it
appeared so to me. Went to church in the forenoon and the afternoon I spent all alone in
the room where you slept, reading your letters over and over again and looking at your
picture, and wishing all the while that it was you instead of your picture. How much I do
miss you, how often I do think of you. It appears such a long time since you went away
from here.

How long do you think it will be before you can come to see us again? I hope not long. I
was so glad to get your letter, although I have seen you since it was writ[t]en and am all
ways [sic] glad to get letters from you, do write often. How I do love to read your letters,
when I get a letter from you I read it over and over again. I don't know whither Sister
and I will go to St. Augustine on the Barossa, if she goes. I don't care so much about
going since you are not going [sic]. Sister wants to go and I would too if you were
going but since you cannot be there I don't think I care any thing much about it. Florida
is quite well now. Remember me to all of your family when you see them. Have you
had the head ache any more since you left here? I hope not, but you looked so badly the
morning you left here that I thought that you were going to have it again, have you been
well? Let me know when you can come to see us again. I hope soon. You must let me
know when you leave St. Augustine for Fernandina in the Mary Louisa so as if you pass
in the day I will see you, won't you bring her in to see us, as you go by, so as I can see
you? It is not her that I care to see but you. Father and Mother and the rest of the family
all wishes to be remembered to you. What time did you get home the day you left here,
did you have a pleasant time? I will close hoping to hear from you soon. Farewell Dear
Jacob (if so I may call you) and believe me to be.

Ever yours,
Sallie A. Latimer


Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009




Full Text

PAGE 1

May Port Florida September the 11th 1860 Dear Mr. Mickler, Yours dated September the 5th was received with much pl easure yesterday morning, and oh how anxious I am to see you. Time seems to approach so slowly since you left here. The hours appear more like days to me. I am so lonesome now, since you have been away, last Sunday the day you left here was th e longest day I ever sp ent in my life or it appeared so to me. Went to church in th e forenoon and the after noon I spent all alone in the room where you slept, reading your lette rs over and over agai n and looking at your picture, and wishing all the while that it wa s you instead of your pict ure. How much I do miss you, how often I do think of you. It appe ars such a long time since you went away from here. How long do you think it will be before you can co me to see us again? I hope not long. I was so glad to get your letter, although I have seen you since it was writ[t]en and am all ways [ sic ] glad to get letters from you, do write of ten. How I do love to read your letters, when I get a letter from you I read it over a nd over again. I donÂ’t know whither Sister and I will go to St. Augustine on the Barossa, if she goes. I donÂ’t care so much about going since you are not agoing [ sic ]. Sister wants to go and I would too if you were agoing but since you cannot be there I donÂ’t thin k I care any thing much about it. Florida is quite well now. Remember me to all of your family when you see them. Have you had the head ache any more since you left here? I hope not, but you looked so badly the morning you left here that I thought that you were going to have it again, have you been well? Let me know when you can come to see us again. I hope soon. You must let me know when you leave St. Augustine for Fernandina in the Mary Louisa so as if you pass in the day I will see you, wonÂ’t you bring her in to see us, as you go by, so as I can see you? It is not her that I care to see but you. Father and Mother and the rest of the family all wishes to be remembered to you. What time did you get home the day you left here, did you have a pleasant time? I will close hoping to hear from you soon. Farewell Dear Jacob (if so I may call you) and believe me to be. Ever yours, Sallie A. Latimer Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009