Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 12, Lot 27 Ribera Scripts
Title: Ribera slide-tape presentation as is 10/15/85
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096036/00004
 Material Information
Title: Ribera slide-tape presentation as is 10/15/85
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 12, Lot 27 Ribera Scripts
Physical Description: Interpretive outline
Language: English
Publication Date: 1985
Physical Location:
Box: 5
Divider: Block 12 Lot 27
Folder: Ribera Scripts
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
22 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Ribera House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 22 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.897022 x -81.313485
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096036
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: B12-L27

Full Text


Ribera slide-tape presentation as is 10/15/85

1. A Dutch printer in 1671 imagined that St. Augustine was a busy
port, with high steepled churches, and mountains nearby.


2. But a spanish resident a century earlier saw the town as it really
was; a rough frontier foothold for the Spanish Empire on the
North American coast.


3. Pedro Menendez de Aviles founded St. Augustine in 1565 as a base
from which to conquer and settle Florida


4. and by the end of the 1600s, Spain's influence had spread from
here to Tallahassee.


5. The English colonists who began to settle in North America much
later attacked Florida by land and by sea.


6. In 1672, Spain found the money to build a permanent stone fort,
the Castillo de San Marcos.


7. It was the only structure to survive a seige by the English in
1702.


8. The marauders also wrecked the native towns of the interior,
enslaving the christian Indians


9. and wiping out the rich cattle ranches.


10. In the early 18th century, St. Augustine and Pensacola were all
that was left of Spanish Florida.


11. With a new seawall and defense works, life here became more
secure.


12. Colonists on the Florida frontier were skilled at adapting
themselves to the environment.


13. For food they relied heavily on local sources, their gardens


14. their citrus trees


15. the tidal marshes






16. and the game that friendly Indians brought to sell.


17. They built their homes of local material, including coquina,
a shellstone quarried on Anastasia Island,


18. and tabby, a kind of oyster shell concrete.


19. Windowless north walls shielded the inhabitants from prevailing
winter winds


20. and open porches gave them a shady outdoor space for summer living.
Since Spain's soldiers married Indians, homelife showed the
influence of native customs,


21. yards were swept


22. oysters were gathered and shucked


23. corn was pounded into meal


24. and herbs were used for medicines as they had been for centuries.


25. Free blacks had their own community at Ft. Mose north of town.


26. As a garrison town, St. Augustine had always received military
supplies and provisions


27. during times of scarcity in the 18th century, the Spanish turned
to contraband trade


28. English merchandise, though usually illegal, became available in
local shops,


29. and privateers were a common sight in town.


O' 30. What was life like for the Spanish colonists here in the
\E 1740's and 1750's?


31. How did St. Augustine change after they left?


32. Step back into the past in our 18th century neighborhood where






guides in period dress recreate the daily life and crafts of
Spanish St. Augustine.


33. Those of you that have bought your tickets can begin your tour
across the street in the Gallegos House.


34. From there your path will lead through the yards,


35. houses,


36. and shops of a unique colonial community.


37. We invite those of you that haven't purchased your tickets yet
to do so at our ticket booth.


38. Bienvenidos, welcome to St. Augustine.


39. Credits


v ^






audio


30. What was life like for the Spanish
in 18th century St. Augustine?




31. How did life differ from the way you
live today?



32. Step back into the past in our 18th
century neighborhood where guides in
period dress recreate f-&e3 life as
it was here 250 years ago.



33. Tickets- are available and tours begin
across the street at the Gallegos
House.


34. From there your path will lead
through the homes

35. Gardens


36. working shops


cooking outside at Gallegos.
A woman tending the pot, a ch
looking on, and a soldier
animately talking while leanii
on his musket.

A family of tourists, with
interpreter, by Gallegos well
Child tourist drawing bucket
from well.

Two women sitting on mats on
de Hita loggia, chatting and
plaiting a black male
civilian and soldier are
standing and chatting in the
background.

Shot from Ribera gate looking
at entrance with new signs up
an interpreter at gate and
tourists going in.

Inside of Gallegos House


Shot across garden to
Gonzalez de Hita house with
man hoeing in garden


blacksmith's


37. and stores of colonial St. Augustine.

38. Bienvenidos, welcome to San Agustin
Antiguo, the state of Florida's
living history village 1f@r America's
oldest city. ^


inside Gomez store

group shot of many interpreteFrs


39. Credits


visual




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