Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 12 Lot 22 Salcedo House Study
Title: B12 L22 Salcedo House Study
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00096027/00002
 Material Information
Title: B12 L22 Salcedo House Study
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 12 Lot 22 Salcedo House Study
Physical Description: Report
Language: English
Creator: Harman, Joyce Elizabeth
Publication Date: 1974
Physical Location:
Box: 5
Divider: B12 L22 Salcedo History
Folder: B12 L22 Salcedo House Study
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
42 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Salcedo House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 42 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.896515 x -81.313407
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00096027
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: B12-L22

Full Text
* .


STATE OF FLORIDA
S. BPtpartment of #tate
P. O. BOX 1987
ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA 32084


DIVISION OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS
RICHARD IJOICK) STONE 7 HISTORIC ST. AOUSTNSM.
*KCRITAIV OP STAT May 6s 1974 PiR[SIEVATION SOANO






Miss Joyce E. Harman
74 B Marine street
St. Augustine, Florida 32084
Dear Miss Harman:
The following manuscripts prepared by you as Historian of
the Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board will not be
published or copyrighted by the Board, but the material
contained therein will be available for use by researchers
subject to the customary professional standards and ethics:
1. Population Chronology and Report on First Spanish Period.
2. Provisioning Chronology and Report on First Spanish Period.

3. Salcedo House Study.
4. Benet Family Study.
5. Circa 1750.
6. St. Augustine, 1839 1841.

Sin ere


J hn W. Griff Director
Hi ric St. Augustine
Preservation Board
JWG:jh





, L ^^^^








THE SALCEDO HOUSE
(Rocque 44)


This site belonged to Alfonsa de Avero at the end of the First Spanish Period

(1763). She had a stone house on the lot which was situated on Calle Real or what

is now present-day Saint George Street. Alfonsa de Avero was one of several

sisters living on Saint George Street with their respective families in 1763. One

of her sisters was married to Don Raymundo de Arrivas and lived next door to the

south. Another sister on Saint George Street was married to Joachin Blanco who

held the post of Guarda Almacen de Municiones y Petrechos (Keeper, Storehouse

of Munitions and Provisions) and was therefore Keeper of the garrison's supplies.

The sisters and their families left, however, in 1763. The Treaty of Paris in

1763 ended the French and Indian War, the last of the intercolonial struggles. Spain

in order to get back Cuba which had fallen to the British during the war ceded

Florida to Great Britain.

The site had several owners during the brief British Period (1763-1783).

Alfonsa de Avero's property was incorporated into a grant known as No. 3 Rainsford

Block -- the grantee was Andrew Rainsford, a sawmiller and a draughtsman in the

British Army. He left the Province and the property was sold to pay his debts.

Thereafter, it was owned by Thomas Stone, a Virginian and a trader; Leonard

Cecil, an Englishman; and Robert Johnston, a Loyalist, who left Saint Augustine,

which had become a Loyalist refuge, and went to the Bahama Islands at the end of

the British Period.

Pedro Jose Salcedo, Captain and Commander of the Royal Corps of Artillery

bought the Rainsford Grant (Rocque 44, 45, 46) early in the Second Spanish Period.








He sold part of the grant (Rocque 45 and 46) in 1792 and kept our site (Rocque 44)

where he lived with his wife until his death on August 28, 1795. After his death

his widow returned to Havana.

From January 20, 1796 until the end of May, 1796, a Negro General or

Caudillo of the Auxiliary Troops of the Island of Santo Domingo lived in the house.

Thereafter, it was rented for a number of years.

Pablo Sabate, a Minorcan, bought the property in November, 1805. Sabate

who had come to Saint Augustine with the Minorcans in the British Per iod was a

farmer and fisherman in his younger days. He acquired considerable property

during his eight4some-year life which spanned the British, Second Spanish, and

American Periods.


Joyce Elizabeth Harman
Historian
Historic Saint Augustine
Preservation Board

May 6, 1974

ROUGH DRAFT
(with full footnotes and appendix)








The Salcelo House
(Rocqie 44)


This site belonged to Alfonsa de Avero at the end of the First Spanish Period

(1763). She had a stone house on the lot which was situated on Calle Real or what
1
is now present-day Saint George Street.

Alfonsa or Ildefonsa de Avero was the oldest of six daughters and one son

born to Victoriano de Avero, a Canary Islander, and his wife, Maria Francesca

(sometimes del Valle) Garcia de Asevedo of Saint Augustine. She was born in

Saint Augustine on February 14, 1713 -- her Godfather was Captain Don Bernardo

Nieto de Carvajal. Her six younger sisters were all born between 1715 and 1726 --

Juana (March 19, 1751), Antonia (March 3, 1717), Manuela (April 25, 1719),

Francisc Gabriel (August 29, 1721), Ursula (October 30, 1723), and Maria (January 17,

1726). The Royal Accountant, Don Francisco Menendez Marques was a Godfather

to several of the Avero children. Their father, Victoriano de Avero, died in 1727

and his widow did not remarry until 1738 when she married Don Christoval de la
2
Torre de Borjes, a native of Port of del Principe in Cuba. [ ? ]

The year of Alfonsa de Avero's birth saw the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht

by the European colonial powers and brought some semblance of peace to the

troubled Southeast. The Treaty ended the conflict known in the New World as

Queen Anne's War and in the Old World as the War of the Spanish Succession

(ca. 1701-1714).

This conflict had brought devastation to Spanish Florida. Prior to the out-

break of the war, the Presidio had a population of about 1, 600 residents, including

some 350 military personnel, their families, the friars, a few Royal officials,







3
plus some Indians and Negroes. Many of the inhabitants were Criollos (native-

born Saint Augustinians of Spanish ancestory). The Floridians had developed local

sources of food supply such as cattle ranches in outlying areas of the province.

Their encroaching English neighbors, however, came from Carolina in 1702 to lay

siege to the Spanish Presidio. The Floridians fled to the Castillo de San Marcos

where they held out.

The English under Governor James Moore of Carolina were unable to defeat
5
the Spaniards, but they destroyed much of the town, the ranches, and the farms.

Worst of all, perhaps, the English stirred up their Indian allies and an ensuing

decade or so of Indian depredations hindered the rebuilding of Florida's farms and

ranches and practically eliminated the local sources of food supply for Florida
6
which was reduced to the land within the lines and under the cannon of the fort.

The years immediately prior to Alfonsa de Avero' s birth were years of want and

scarcity and strife with the nearby English. After the Peace in 1713, conditions

improved somewhat since, strangely enough, the Floridians began to import much-
7
needed supplies from the nearby English colonies.

Alfonsa de Avero grew up in a period between two of the intercolonial wars,

a period in which the territory effectively controlled by the Spanish in the South-

east had been considerably reduced from earlier times as a result of the struggle

between England, France, and Spain for territory in North America. On May 8,

1729, at the age of sixteen she married Fernando Rodri'guez de Cabrera, the son

of Simon Rodrfguez and Elena de Cabrera of the Isle of Tenerife in the Canaries.

They apparently had only one child who died in 1731. Rodrfguez himself died

sometime between 1731 and 1734.


-2-








The young widow married Francisco Peres de la Rosa, a native of Saint

Augustine, on June 28, 1734. They had six children between 1736 and 1747 --

Estephania (?), Maria (January 6, 1736), Isadora (January 19, 1738), Juan

(December 2, 1740), Pablo Juan (July 2, 1744), Joseph Valentine (February 20,
8
1747).

During the years when Alfonsa Avero de Perez de la Rosa was raising her

family, Spain and England were twice again at war in the Old World and the New.

The War of Jenkins' Ear which broke out in 1739 between Spain and England

merged into the war in Europe known as the War of the Austrian Succession and

in 1744 the entrance of France into the American phase of the war developed into

the struggle known as King George's War. This conflict brought the English under

James Oglethorpe to Spanish Florida in 1740 and 1742. Both times the English

failed to take the Spanish Presidio.
9
The Southeast was relatively peaceful then for the next twenty years. The

Spanish Presidio at Saint Augustine traded increasingly with its English neighbors

and was probably better supplied than at any time in its history. The population
10
by 1763 totaled around 3, 000.

Several of the Avero sisters lived on Saint George Street by 1763. Alfonsa

de Avero's next door neighbor to the south was her sister Ursula de Avero. This

sister had married for the first time at the age of fifteen. At that time she married

an Infantry Lieutenant Don Diego Repilado, a native of Palermo, Sicily born of

Spanishlarents from Estremadura. Ursula de Avero had made a good catch -- he

was both an officer and a peninsular. The couple had five children -- Juan

(September 4, 1739), Francisca (February 17, 1741), Lucia (December 17, 1743),








Maria Ana Rosalia (December 1, 1745), and Joseph Felix (November 22, 1746).

Between 1745 and 1748 Ursula lost two children and her husband.

On August 16, Ursula de Avero married Raymundo de Arrivas, a native of

Arabelo. He too was both an officer and a peninsular. He was a Second Lieutenant

of the Second Infantry Company in 1752 and by 1759 was a First Lieutenant drawing

a salary of 528 pesos a year. They had seven children -- Francisco Xavier

(March 25, 1749), Vicenta (April 7, 1751), Antonio (May 5, 1753), Ana Josepha

(June 7, 1755), Josepha Maria (March 9, 1757), Manuel (December 27, 1758), and

Tadeo who was born in Havana in 1767.

Across the street from Alfonsa and Ursula de Avero was a third sister Juana

de Avero. She was married for the first time on August 20, 1731, at the age of

sixteen to Simon de Morales. Morales was a native of Havana, the son of a Canary

Islander. They had apparently only one child who died in 1732. Sometime, there-

after, Morales himself died.

On December 30, 1736, his widow married Geronimo de Hita y Salazar, a

soldier and a native of Saint Augustine and one of the thirty some grandsons of

Governor Pablo de Hita y Salazar. Geronimo de Hita was not a great social success

in a town where military rank was of such importance. He and his wife had six

children -- Marfa Basilia (December 28, 1736), Simon (April 28, 1739), Francisca

(April 9, 1742), Leocadia Maria (December 14, 1744), Eugenia (?), and Maria

Isabel (September 11, 1748).

A fourth sister, Antonia de Avero also resided on northern Saint George

Street. In fact, she and her second husband Blanco owned three houses here. Born

on March 3, 1717, Antonia de Avero married first Captain Don Joseph Guillen, a


-4-








native of Cartagena on April 26, 1735. They had a large family, too, -- Rosa

(December 12, 1736), Francisca (April 11, 1738), Barbara (December 5, 1739),

Augustin (June 9, 174__), Victoriana Isadora (April 21, 1743), and Flora (A) who

died unmarried in 1736. On December 20, 1743, Joseph Guillen died.

The widow of Guillen married Joachin Blanco, a native of Avila, on March 25,

1753. Blanco held the post of Guarda Almacen de Municiones y Pertrechos and

therefore had the duty of managing the garrison's supplies. Blanco thus belonged

to the "administrative elite" of Saint Augustine. The marriage was a success in

terms of social status at least for Antonia de Avero. She and Blanco apparently

had only one child born on February 26, 1755.

The four Avero sisters and their approximately two dozen children lived in

an area of "Fairly decent" houses near the fort. The location of a house in a

Spanish colonial town indicated the social status of the owner. The most desirable

location was on the main square. However, it has been suggested that the presence

of the Castillo de San Marcos as the main structure in Saint Augustine made the area
11
near the fort the second most desirable location.

The fort had successfully held out against the English in 1702, 1740, and 1742,

but the Treaty of Paris in 1763 turned Florida over to Great Britain. The Treaty

ended the last of the intercolonial struggles known in America as the French and

Indian War and in Europe as the Seven Years' War and brought to an end almost a

half century of colonial warfare. Spain had not entered the war until January, 1762,

and Spanish Florida held out even though the colony was short of supplies since the

English cut off the trade with their Spanish neighbors. Cuba, however, fell to the

English and in order to get it back Spain sacrificed Florida.
I








The Saint Augustinians seemed "Dissatisfied at St. Augustine's being given
12
up. But most of them left the colony. The population of some three thousand

evacuated the province leaving behind their homes. Some of the unsold houses

and lots were left in the care of Jesse Fish, an agent for the trading company of

William Walton in New York who had resided in Saint Augustine for a number of

years. Alfonsa de Avero's name does not appear in his accounts, however.

The site had several owners during the brief British Period (1763-1783). The
13
first documented owner for this period is Captain Andrew Rainsford. The British

Government granted to him in 1767 lot and buildings known as No. 3 Rainsford

Block. The grant contained 6/10 of an acre -- its east side forming part of Saint

George Street, north skirting vacant land, west Spanish Street, and south on vacant
14
lots.

DeBrahm's "List of Inhabitants of East Florida, their Employs, Business

and Qualifications, from 1763 to 1771" shows that Rainsford was married, a saw-
15
miller, a draughtsman in the army, and that he left the province. On August 1,
16
1770, his grant was sold at auction by court order to pay his debts.

Rainsford apparently went to New Brunswick, where he became a resident of

that colony. After the Revolution, a Andrew Rainsford was Receiver-General and

Assistant Barracks master of the colony. He died in 1820 at the age of eighty-six

at Fredericton. Four of his sons supposedly held military commissions in the
17
British service at one time.
18
Thomas Stone bought Rainsford's grant at the 1770 auction. Stone was a
19
trader and lived in Saint Augustine. A Virginian and a Protestant, described in

Spanish records as a Lutheran, he was married to Maria Thompson. The Stones

had a son, Thomas Ranson Stone, born about 1768 in Virginia.

-6-








The son either stayed in Sairt Augustine at the end of the British Period or

left and returned later. For Thomas Ranson Stone was baptized a Catholic early

in the Second Spanish Period (April 18, 1789) as was Sara Jones, a native of

Savannah, Georgia, and widow of Joseph Savi whom he married on May 6, 1789.

They had a son, Francisco Mateo del Rosario Stone, born October 4, 1789, in
20
Saint Augustine -- the grandson of the first Thomas Stone from Virginia. The

younger Stones do not appear in the 1793 Spanish Census so they may have later

left the province.

Thomas Stone Senior sold the property to Leonard Cecil on March 19, 1783.
21
Cecil was British. A Leonard Cecil of Maryland went to England and met in July,
22
1779, in London with other Loyalists at the Crown and Anchor Tavern. Whether

this is the same Leonard Cecil is uncertain. In any event, Cecil did not keep the
S23
property for very long at all. He sold it in April, 1783, to Robert Johnston.

Robert Johnston was a Loyalist who left Saint Augustine at the end of the

British Period. He went to the Bahama Islands where he settled on Cat Island with
24
his thirty-four Blacks. Johnston presented a claim in the Bahamas for a lot and

2 houses in Saint Augustine valued at -:450 Os Od and sold for 115 13s 6d at the

time of the evacuation. His claim for the difference of 334 6s 6d was found

valid.

East Florida had remained loyal to Great Britain during the Revolutionary

War. Samuel Adams and John Hancock were burned in effigy in the Plaza after
26
the news of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence reached Saint Augustine,

and the colony soon became a Loyalist refuge. Loyalists flocked to East Florida
27
and swelled the population to an all time high of over 17, 000 before the Treaty

-7-








that ended the War returned the colony to Spain and most of the British left. The

Minorcans, who had come to Saint Augustine from New Smyrna about the same time

as the outbreak of the Revolutionary War remained along with a few others into the

Second Spanish Period (1784-1821).

When Robert Johnston departed from East Florida, he left his property in

charge of an agent named William Slater. Slater was a native of England and a

merchant and public storekeeper. Married and the father of two children, he had

five hundred acres of land on the Saint Mary's River, a house and grounds where

he lived on Charlotte Street, and slaves and horses.

Governor Patrick Tonyn appointed him to be a public vendue master at the

end of the British Period. With evacuation at hand, land, houses, and other

property had to be appraised and disposed of as at the end of the First Spanish

Period twenty years earlier. The property, however, soon glutted the market and

was sold at low figures. Before Slater departed for the Bahamas himself he sold
28
Johnston' s property.

Don Pedro Jose Salcedo bought the property from Slater on November 22,

1784. Salcedo acquired the site on Saint George Street bounded on the west by

Spanish Street, south by the heirs of Raymundo Alonso de Arrivas, and north by

Jayme Clac [ James Clarke]. The lot or lots had three houses of masonry and wood

fronting on Saint George Street which were deteriorated and badly treated [ ?] and

therefore uninhabitable -- one apparently being the "former house of Alfonsa de
29
Avero. Salcedo promised to return the property to Robert Johnston or his heirs

at the same price if the English should again take over Saint Augustine -- this was
39
effective for one year only.


-8-








Pedro Jose Salcedo was a Captain in the Royal Corps of Artillery and Comnra nder

of the detachment stationed in Saint Augustine at the beginning of the Second Spanish

Period. He was from Granada, but may have cone to East Florida by way of

Havana. He married Maria Rodriguez Galan in Havana on March 20, 1785, by

proxy, and on April 20, 1786, their marriage was ratified in Saint Augustine with

Thomas Hassett officiating and Don Mariano de la Roque, Captain of the Engineers
31
in East Florida, and his wife as witnesses.

Most of the British population left East Florida after its transfer to Spain.

The population dropped from an estimated 17, 375 to somewhere between 3, 000 to

6,000 residents. Minorcans, a few British and other foreigners, Spanish residents,

Floridanos from the First Spanish Period and the garrison made up the population
32
at the beginning of the Second Spanish Period.

Salcedo and his wife moved into a home on our site (Rocque 44) sometime

prior to 1793. In 1788 Salcedo still owned the three lots on Saint George Street

(Rocque 44,45, and 46). Rocque 44 now had a two story masonry house, in good

condition, on it. Salcedo also owned in 1788 a house of wood and slats with a palm
33
roof, in bad condition, on a lot of the King's on Spanish Street (Rocque 31). In

1790 Salcedo owned the three properties on Saint George, but no longer had the house
34
on Spanish Street. Then in 1792, Salcedo sold Rocque 45 and 46, the former to
35
Maria Triay and the latter to Antonio Usina. This left Salcedo with only the one

site (Rocque 44).

The 1793 Spanish Census confirms the fact that the site (Rocque 44) was the

home of Salcedo and his wife. Salcedo was #129 on the Census and #128 to the south

was Don Tadeo de Arrivas, the son of Don Raymundo de Arrivas and his wife, Dona
36
Ursula de Avero, and #130 to the north was Maria Triay (Rocque 45.)








The Census shows too that the Salcedo household consisted of Salcedo, his

wife, two young girls and two slaves. The girls were agregada or associated.

They were Maria Josefa Welch, the daughter of Juan and Juana Allen, both of

Ireland, who was sixteen years old and Catalina Ximenes, the daughter of Rafael
37
and Maria Ramillora both of Minorca, who was eight years old. Both girls were

baptized with Salcedo as one of their sponsors. Maria Welch who had been born in

New York was baptized on March 6, 1792 at the age of 14 with both Salcedo and his

wife as sponsors for her. Catalina Ximenez was baptized on January 16, 1785, at
38
the age of six days with Salcedo and Antonia Selort as her sponsors. The younger

girl' s parents with four other children lived in Saint Augustine in 1793, but the
39
family of the older girl does not appear in the Census of that year. Sal cedo and

his wife apparently had no children of their own.

Their home must have been fairly comfortable for its time and place. It was

a two story masonry house with stairs, balcony, courtyard, kitchen, henhouse,

other necessary outbuildings, and a small orchard or garden patch. It also had
40
glass for the windows.

Salcedo both a Captain and a Commander of a Military Detachment and a

peninsular was fairly well off and a member of the garrison society such as it was.

A man in eighteen century Saint Augustine who had eight good shirts plus four old
41
ones could not have been too badly off.

Pedro Jose Salcedo died on August 28, 1795, leaving only his widow. She

returned to Havana shortly thereafter taking their three slaves with her.

His estate consisted of the house, the three slaves (an eighteen year old Negro

named Maria del Carmen and her two small children, a three year old daughter


-10-








named Maria Josefa and a one year old Mulatto son named Juan Nepomuceno), and

his clothes, which included a dress coat of new cloth with a blue taffeta lining,

breeches, shirts, etc. <

Salcedo apparently left no will. Don Juan Fernandez Remedios, also a Captain

of the Royal Corps or Artillery in Saint Augustine, became Juez Comisionado (Judge

Commissioner) of the legal proceedings pertaining to the estate and Joe Antonio

Yguinez became the apoderado attorney or proxy of the widow who was in Havana.

The clothes -- except for a few items that were very old -- were sold in

January, 1796, for a total of 111 pesos and 1 real. The house, however, which was

valued at 3, 971 pesos and 2 reales in 1796 was not sold until 1805. The widow did

not agree with an appraisal and Tadeo Arrivas claimed a portion of the Salcedo

property for himself and other heirs of Raymundo Arrivas.

A Negro General or Caudillo of the Auxiliary Troops of the Island of Santo

Domingo lived in Salcedo's house from January 20, 1796 until the end of May, 1796,
42
at the disposition of the Government. The Negro, Jorge Viazour, had a pension

of three thousand pesos from the Crown for his services. He must have come to

Saint Augustine sometime between 1793 and 1796 since he does not appear in the

1793 Census.

Viazour stayed in Saint Augustine after he moved out of Salcedo's house since

he died here in 1801. When he died he had a big funeral at the parish church with a

Mass. The Governor, Senior Lieutenants, all officials and persons of distinction

attended, plus a guard of sixteen to twenty free Negro Militia. They buried him at
43
Campo Santo.


-11-







On June 21, 1796, Salcedo's house was rented out. The property apparently

remained a rental property for a number of years thereafter, for the site was not
44
sold until late in 1805.

Pablo Sabate bought the property at public auction on November 22, 1805, for

the sum of 1, 500 pesos. He paid 700 pesos in cash and the remaining 800 pesos

was taken care of in the form of a promissory note held by the Military Detachment

of the Royal Corps of Artillery. At the time of this sale the southern boundary of

the property which Tadeo de Arrivas had disputed was settled. Arrivas was paid
45
100 pesos in the settlement.

Sabate was a native Minorcan who must have come to the New World as a

young child. His family settled first at New Smyrna and then moved to Saint

Augustine along with other Minorcans during the British Period (ca. 1777). He

married Antonia Ortegas, also a native of Minorca, on June 9, 1781, with Father

Camps officiating.

The Sabates had a large family -- Miguel (April 5, May 9, 1784), Catalina

(September 22, 1786), Ana (September 20, 1788), Sebastian (October 24, 1790),

Pablo (February 6, 1793), twins Juan and Antonia (July, 1795), Eleuteria Catalina

Ana (January 3, 1798), Eusebia Sabate ( 1800), and Ramon (August 31, 1801).

Their daughter, Eleuteria Catalina Ana Sabate married Antonio Alvarez in
46
January, 1818. Alvarez served both in the Second Spanish and American Periods

in various capacities. Under the Second Spanish administration he was clerk in
47
the Secretary's office from 1807 to the change of flags. During the American

Period he held a number of positions -- President of the Board of Alderman, Keeper
48
of the Public Archives in East Florida, and Mayor of Saint Augustine for instance.

His family also owned the Oldest House on what is now Saint Francis Street.


-12 -








Pablo Sabate was a farmer and a fisherman. In 1783 he had a house in the
49
Greek settlement and one and one-half acres of land, the land he apparently
50 51
rented. The house on Spanish and Cuna was nra de of wood and covered with palm.

His household in 1793 was made up of his wife, children, mother-in-law, and one
52
slave, a Catechumen (person studying the Christian doctrine in order to be baptised).

Sabate owned the two houses by the end of 1805 -- his old home on Spanish and

Cuna plus the Salcedo house on Saint George. Whether he actually ever lived in

the house on Saint George Street is at present uncertain. However, the Spanish

Census of 1813 shows his daughter Ana and her husband, John Geiger, living in the
53 54
Salcedo house -- other sources state that the couple still lived there in 1824.

The Geiger's daughter, Susan, married John Lott Phillips, a prominent resident of

Saint Augustine who served in a number of positions in the American Period --

Clerk of Circuit Court, Judge of Probate Court, and President of the Board of County
55
Commissioners.

Sabate also acquired additional property both inside and outside of Saint

Augustine. In 1809 he bought a large tract of land (lover 2,000 acres) known as

Casacola. Granted to him in the Second Spanish Period, the United States later

confirmed his ownership. He also purchased 200 acres at San Diego at a place

called Plantage de Arroz de Clark (Clark's rice plantation). The United States

confirmed this too. However, the United States rejected his claim to a 2, 500 acre
56
tract, west of Casacola, granted to him by Governor Jose Coppinger in 1818.

Pablo Sabate spanned three distinct periods in Florida's history he first

came to Saint Augustine during the British Period, he stayed on in the Second

Spanish Period, and lived into the American Period. Starting out as a farmer and


-13-








fisherman, he lived in a modest house of wood covered with palm. Sebate served
57
in the Provincial Militia under the Spanish. The Minorcan died on April 27,

1834, at the age of eighty some. He left a "numerous circle of friends and
58
relatives to deplore his loss. He left too "Valuable real and some personal

estate" in the County of Saint Johns, East Florida. In addition to considerable

property, his estate included Negroes, horses, crockery and glass ware, "jamayca"

rum, American Gin, Whiskey, common rum, Spanish doubloons and silver money.

He left no will. His son-in-law Antonio Alvarez and his son Ramon Sabate took

out Letters of Administration to settle the estate, which included the property on
59
Saint George Street.


-14-








NOTES


1. Key to Map of San Agustin de la Florida by Juan Joseph Eligio de la Puente,
January 22, 1764, (D #66), translation by Albert C. Manucy at Saint Augustine
Historical Society (hereafter cited as SAHS).

2. Cathedral Parish Records (Saint Augustine), (hereafter cited as CPR);
SAHS, Biographical File, (hereafter cited as SAHS Biog. File); Charles W. Arnade,
"The Avero Story: An Early St. Augustine Family with Many Daughters and Many
Houses, Florida Historical Quarterly, XXXX (1961), pp. 10-13, (hereafter cited as
Arnade, "Avero Story").

3. John R. Dunkle, "Population Change as an Element in the Historical Geog-
raphy of Saint Augustine, Florida Historical Quarterly, XXXVII, (July, 1958), 8.

4. William Roscoe Gillaspie, "Juan de Ayala y Escobar, Procurador and
Entrepreneur: A Case Study of the Provisioning of Florida, 1683-1716" (unpublished
Ph.D. dissertation, University of Florida, 1961), p. 13, (hereafter cited as
Gillaspie, "Ayala"); Charles W. Arnade, "Cattle Raising in Spanish Florida, "
Agricultural History, XXXV, (July, 1961), 5; Royal Cedula to Governor and Royal
Officials of Florida, September 30, 1700, SC, AGI 58-1-23/58 (SD836), Madrid, 3
pp.; Governor J. DeZuniga to the Contador, November 29, 1700, SC, AGI 58-2-8
(SD858), St. Augustine; John Jay TePaske, The Governorship of Spanish Florida,
1700-1763 (Durham: Duke University Press, 1964), p. 78 (hereafter cited as
TePaske, Governorship of Spanish Florida); Charles W. Arnade, The Siege of Saint
Augustine in 1702 (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1959), p. 9 (hereafter
cited as Arnade, Siege).

5. Arnade, Siege, pp. 6, 22, 24, 55, 58, 60; Governor Zuniga, St. Augustine,
November 6, 1702, SC, AGI 58-2-8/26 (SD 858 [?]), pp. 13040-13033 [filed under
1707]. SAHS has transcript; Luis R. Arana, "Military Manpower in Florida, 1670-
1703, El Escribano, VIII (April, 1971), 43, 59; Mark F. Boyd, trans., "The
Siege of Saint Augustine by Governor Moore of South Carolina in 1702 as Reported
to the King of Spain by Don Joseph de Zuniga y Zerda, Governor of Florida, "
Florida Historical Quarterly, XXVI, (April, 1948), 350.

6. Gillaspie, "Ayala, p. 13; John R. Brodhead, et al, eds., Documents
Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York ( 1887, IV,
1048); Governor Francisco de Corcoles y Martinez to Crown, November 30, 1706,
NC, AGI 58-1-27/104 (SD840), St. Augustine, 3 pp., microfilm copy at SAHS
(NC 10-59); Royal Officials of Florida to Crown, November 10, 1707, NC, AGI
58-1-34/11 (SD 847): Florida, 14 pp., microfilm copy at SAHS (NC 11-14).

7. Gillaspie, "Ayala, p. 112; Joyce Elizabeth Harman, Trade and Privateering
in Spanish Florida, 1732-1763 (St. Augustine Historical Society, 1969), pp. 83-91.

8. CPR; SAHS Biog. File; Arnade, "Avero Story. "


-15-








9. TePaske, Governorship of Spanish Florida, p. 154; Charlton W. Tebeau,
A History of Florida, (Coral Gables: University of Miami Press, 1971), p. 70.

10. Verne E. Chatelain, The Defenses of Spanish Florida, 1565-1763 (Washington,
D. C.; Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1941), p. 87.

11. CPR; SAHS Biog. File; Arnade, "Avero Story. "

12. South Carolina Gazette (Charleston), April 23-30, May 14, 1763.

13. Plan of the Town of St. Augustine: James Moncrief, March 1, 1765, Enc.
with Gov. Grant at the Lords of Trade, PRO CO5/540 pp. 178-209. Public Record
Office, London, Colonial Office, Florida 8 [ ?].

14. Library of Congress, East Florida Papers (hereafter cited as EFP),
Escrituras, July 16, 1784 to February 26, 1787, Bundle 366, p. 82v, Sale, Nov. 22,
1784, microfilm copy (reel 169) and also Briefs at SAHS.

15. List of Inhabitants of East Florida, Their Employs, Business and
Qualifications, from 1763 to 1771, by William Gerard DeBrahm, Manuscript in
Harvard College Library, copy at SAHS. (Hereafter cited as DeBrahm, List of


16. EFP, Escrituras, Bundle 366, p. 82v, Sale, Nov. 22, 1784.

17. Lorenzo Sabine, Loyalists of the American Revolution, II (Boston: Little,
Brown and Company, 1864), 208. (Hereafter cited as Sabine, Loyalists.)

18. EFP, Escrituras, Bundle 366, p. 82v, Sale, Nov. 22, 1784.

19. DeBrahm, List of Inhabitants. Au f5

20. CPR.

21. EFP, Escrituras, Bundle 366, p. 82v, Sale, Nov. 22, 1784. See original
document for statement that Cecil was British.

22. Sabine, Loyalists, I, 299.

23. EFP, Escrituras, Bundle 366, p. 82v, Sale, Nov. 22, 1784.

24. Wilbur Henry Siebert, ed., Loyalists in East Florida, 1774 to 1785, Vol.
II: Records of Their Claims for Losses of Property in the Province (Deland: The
Florida State Historical Society, 1929), p. 361. (Hereafter cited as Siebert,
Loyalists II.)

25. Siebert, Loyalists, II, 263.


-16-








26. Wilbur Henry Siebert, ed., Loyalists in East Florida, 1774-1785, Vol. I:
The Narrative (Deland: The Florida State Historical Society, 1929), pp. 35-36.
(Hereafter cited as Siebert, Loyalists, I.)

27. Charles Loch Mowat, East Florida As A British Province 1763-1784
(Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1964), p. 137. (Hereafter cited as
Mowat, East Florida As A British Province.)

28. Siebert, Loyalists, II, 19, 147, 187, 266, 419; EFP, Census Returns, 1784-
1814, Bundle 323A, Spanish Census of 1783, microfilm copy (reel 148) and also
photostats at SAHS.

29. EFP, Escrituras, Bundle 366, p. 82V, Sale, Nov. 22, 1784; EFP,
Escrituras, Bundle 366, p. 105, Cession, January 14, 1785. Microfilm copy (reel
169) and also briefs at SAHS.

30. EFP, Escrituras, Bundle 366, p. 93, Sale, Dec. 14, 1784, microfilm
copy (reel 169) and also briefs at SAHS.

31. CPR: SAHS Biog. File.

32. Mowat, East Florida As A British Province, pp. 64, 136-37, 147.

33. Key to the Detailed Plan of the City of San Agustin, East Florida, April 25,
1788 by Mariano de la Rocque. Translated by Eugenia B. Arana for the SAHS in
1961. (Hereafter cited as Rocque.) See Rocque #'s 31 and 44-46.

34. EFP, Assessor's Inventory, 1792-1806, Quesada, Inventories, assessments,
and sale at public auction of the houses and lots of the King, 1790-91. See square
12, #'s 100-102. (Hereafter cited as Quesada.)

35. EFP, Escrituras, Bundle 368, pp. 442v-444v, Sales ,May 24, 1792.

36. EFP, Census Returns, 1793 Spanish Census, #'s 128,129,130. Photostats
at SAHS.

37. EFP, Census Returns, 1793 Spanish Census, #129. Photostats at SAHS.

38. CPR, SAHS Biog. File.

39. EFP, Census Returns, 1793 Spanish Census, #136. Photostats at SAHS.

40. EFP, Records of Testamentary Proceedings, 1756-1821, Bundle 304,
Document #12, Testamentary Proceedings of Pedro Jose Salcedo, Jan. 12, 1796,
pp. 4-10, 20, 25, 31-35. Microfilm copy (Reel 136) and also briefs. (Hereafter
cited as Testamentary Proceedings of Salcedo.); Rocque, block 7, #44.


-17-








41. Testamentary Proceedings of Salcedo, pp. 4-10.

42. Ibid., pp. 1-10, 13-14,49, 27-30, 23-25, 32-33.

43. EFP, Records of Testamentary Proceedings, 1756-1821, Bundle 306,
Document #2 [?], Testamentary Proceedings of Jorge Viazour, July 15, 1801,
pp. 1-4, microfilm copy (Reel 138) and also Briefs at SAHS.

44. Testamentary Proceedings of Salcedo, pp. 31-35.

45. Testamentary Proceedings of Salcedo, pp. 49 ff., 54, 56.

46. CPR, SAHS Biog. File.

47. SAHS Biog. File.

48. SAHS Biog. File.

49. EFP, Census Returns, 1783 Spanish Census, ph. 32, and 1786 Spanish
Cei sus, #88. Photostats at SAHS.

50. EFP, Census Returns, 1785 (?) Spanish Census. Photostats A7SAHS.

51. Rocque, Block 6, #28; Quesada, Square 16, #135.

52. EFP, Census Returns, 1793 Spanish Census, #173. Photostats at SAHS.

53. EFP, Census Returns, 1813 Spanish Census. Photostats at SAHS.

54. St. Johns County [Florida], Courthouse Records, Deed Book E, p. 16,
May 1, 1824.

55. SAHS Biog. File.

56. Works Projects Administration, Division of Community Service Programs,
Historical Records Survey, Spanish Land Grants in Florida, (hereafter cited as
Spanish Land Grants in Florida)t Vol. I: UnconfirmedClaims (Tallahassee: State
Library Board, 1940), pp. xxviii, 273; Spanish Land Grants in Florida, Vol. V:
Confirmed Claims S-Z, pp. 1-2; U. S. Congress, American State Papers, Public
Lands, (hereafter cited as American State Papers), Vol. vi: (Washington, D. C.,
Gales and Seaton, 1860), p. 72.

57. Spanish Land Grants in Florida, Vol. IV: Claims Confirmed K-R, p. 51

58. Florida Herald (St. Augustine), May 1, 1834, p. 3.

59. St. Johns County [Florida], Courthouse Records, Superior U-1, Usina
et ux vs Arnau et al [ re estate of Pablo Sabate], ca. 1840.


-18-









APPENDIX







1764 Key to the Map of San Agustin de Florida January 22, 1764 by Juan

Joseph Eligio de la Puente translated by Albert C. Manucy.



Puente Block D #66

Alfonsa de Avero, Stone house 12- varas N to S 70 varas E to W








1764 List of Properties Sold by Puente to Fish in 1764, Papeles de Cuba,

Legago 372, Seville, Spain

Alfonsa Avero or Ildefonsa

Nothing









Fish Account Book


Apparently not sold to Fish


A 0,







1765 Plan of the town of St. Augustine: James Moncrief, March 1, 1765,

End. with Gov. Grant at the Lords of Trade PRO C05/540 PP 178-209. Public

Record Officer London, Colonial Office, Florida 8 [ ?]



Capt. Rainsford

plus pt of Kipp & Spanish Adjutant [ ?]








(East Fla) Papers July 16, 1784 to Feb. 26, 1787 Escrituras Bundle 366

p. 82 v Sale Nov 22, 1784, Rainsford Block No. 12



Win. Slater agent of Robt. Johnston Pedro Josef Salcedo lot on George St.

fronting E and the back W. Bounded W by Spanish St. S by heirs of Raymundo

Alonso de Arribas; N by Jayme Clac [Diego Clarke ? ] also 3 houses on same

lot fronting on George St., uninhabitable, bought by said Johnston in 1783

from Leonard Cecil. (Several docs. accompanying one Certificate of

Howard that in 1767 Brit. Govt. granted to Andrew Rainsford lot and buildings

known as No. 3 Rainsford Block, containing 6/10 of an acre, its E side forming

part of George St. N skirting vacant land, W spanish St., and S on vacant

lots. Aug. 1, 1770, sold at auction to Thos. Stone, by court order to pay

Rainsford's debts; Stone sold to Leonard Cecil on Mar. 19, 1783, April 1783

Cecil sold to Robt. Johnston.

Block 12, Rocque 44, 45, 46


at .1







East Florida Papers, Escrituras, July 16, 1784 to Feb. 26, 1787, Bundle 366,

p. 93 Sale Dec. 14



Pedro Josef Salcedo referring to purchase from Robt. Johnston of lot with 3

houses on George St. promises if English should ever again occupy the city,

to return said property to Johnston or his heirs at the same price he paid.

(Note this takes effect for 1 year only.)



Block 12 Rocque 44, 45, 46







East Florida Papers, Escritures, July 16, 1784, to February 26, 1787,

Bundle 366, Document p. 105.


Cession January 14 1

Josef (Jesse ?] Fish having bought from Raymundo Alonzo de Arrivas a

house and lot on Governor's Street, bounded north by former house of Alfonza

de Avero, South by Dona Antonia de Avero and in front by said Street; this

deed having recited in due form that the seller had received full amount of

the taxes amounting to 3462 pesos which amount has not been paid -- Fish

relinquishes the house to anyone who holds it, the sale being void. This

cession accepted by Thadeo de Arrivas, son of Raymundo and agent for his

mother, Raymundo's widow.


'% I








1788 Key to the Detailed Plan of the City of San Agustin of East Florida

25 April 1788 by Mariano de la Rocque Translated by Eugenia B. Arana for

The St. Augustine Historical Society 1961



Block 7 #44

Two story masonry house, in good condition, owned by Don Pedro Josef

Salcedo; with Deed and land that it cites.


Smap-a-so indicates- fences etc. See key and map







1790-91 Quesada, Inventories, assessments, and sale at public auction of

the houses and lots of the King



Sq. #12 #102 (is R44)

#100, 101, 102

Houses and lots of Pedro Salcedo with deed







East Florida Papers, Escritures, 12 Jan 1791-20 Dec. 1792, Bundle

1792

p. 442v Sale May 24 Pedro Jose Salcedo Antonio Usina, house of stone and

wood, bounded N side by James Clark, S by Maria Triay, W (which is back)

by Spanish St., E by St. Geo St. Bought with others for Wm. Slater Nov 22,

1784 #101 Block 12 Lot 26 ?



1792

p. 444v Sale May 24 P. J. Salcedo Maria Triay house and lot 14 yds frontage

and same in depth; bounded N by Antonio Usina; S by another house of

Salcedo's; W by Spanish St.; E by St. George St. Bought of Wm. Slater as

agent of Robert Johnston Nov 22, 1784.








Inventory of Estate
January ia.4, 1796


Casa y Esclavos La en que vivia y propria del nominado difto____ una
P.S.
negra nombrada Maria del Carmen Como de edad [de ?] diez y ocho anos 250


Una negrita hija de la ante dicha nombrada Maria Josefa de edad de tres
P.S.
ano s 100


Un Mulatico [ ? ] tambien hijo de la supra dicha nombrado Juan Nepomuceno
P. S
de un ano de edad 50


Una casa Valunda en tres mil novesientos setenta y un pesos, dos Reales

segun por menor consta del a valvo hecho por los dos citados Maestros

Mayores, Jose


Lorente y Martin Hernandez formado [ ?] de los mismos del que se
da P. s R M
acompana copia legaliza. 3971 2 Reales

Ropa de su uso -

Una Casaca de Pano

nuevo con el farro de Tafetan de la misma

color vien averiado en quin& pesos 15


Un frague de grana

con farro de Tafetan Azul en nueve pesos 9


Un par de calzones negros de Pana de medio uso

en tres pesos 3








P.s R

Una chupa de Grana de medio uso en dos pesos 2


Una Yd. de Fela. de color Canario en catorze

Reales 1 6

4402 "

C
Dos Sentros de Maon [?]

usados en seis pesos 6


Un sentro de mosolina usado en tres pesos 3


Uno Yd. Viejo en un peso 1


Uno Yd. Viejo en un peso 1


Un Centro de Mosolina Viejo en un peso 1


Otro Yd. de Yrlanda de medio un en tres pesos 3


Otro Yd del Mismo uno en Veinte Rs 2 4


Otro Yd usado en un peso 1


Otro Yd Viejo en Seis rs 6


Uno Yd de Mosolina en tres pesos quatro rs 3 4


Un par de calzones y chupa de Yrlanda en un peso 1


Una chupa de Yrlanda de medio uno en dose rs 1 4







P. s R M


Un par de Calzones de Raso [ ?] negro del mismo

uso en veinte rs 2 4


Dos pares de Calzonsillos buenos de Yrlanda en

diez y ocho Rs 2 2


Dos Yd de Bretana en catorser r 1 6


Dos Yd de Yd en el mismo precio 1 6


Un Bolante de Bretana usado

en dose rP 4435 4
1 4


Uno Yd de Bretana en vcinte y dos rs 2 6


Uno Yd de Yrlanda fina con su botonadura en

quarenta rs 5


Uno Yd usado en veinte rs 2 4


Ocho camisas buenas a quatro ps 32


Quatro Yd Viejas en seis ps 6


Dos pares de medias de algoclon usados a nueve

Reales 2[?] 2


Dos pares Yd. unas de hilo a seis rs 1 4







PO R M

Un par Yd de hilo un pesos dos rs 1 2


Dos pares de calzetas en seis rs 6


Dos par. s de med.s usadas en ocho rs 1


Un par de Calz. s de Punto agufa [ ? ] en tres reales 3


Quatro Corvatas de Mosolina a quatro reales 2


Quatro Yd de Estopilla a tres reales 1 4

Total 4495 7


Los luales referido vienes dijeron [1 word ?] los peritos los havian Fasa

[ ? ] do con tocla legalidad, segun su just valor ascendiendo el total a

quatro mil quatrocientos noventa y cinco pesos y siete rs y lo firmaron [ ?]

con dicho Sor [ ?]

[begin 9 rt. handside]

de que yo el intrascripto [ ?] Escribano doy fee Juan Fernandez Remedios

- Bernardo Segu{ Juan Villalonga Senal de [?] Cruz Jose Lorento -

Martin Hernandez Pedro Fremio Anterni [?] Jose de Zubrzarreta

Escribano de Govierno y GuerialRelacion de X4o que importa el Abohio [ ?]

de la Casa del Capitaln del Real Cuerpo de Artilleria Don Pedro Salcedo,

hecha por los Maestros Mayores de Albanileria, y Carpinteria de esta Plaza
a saver
a saver


33







Ps Rs

Por dos mil y cien varas Planas del Solar de

cicha casa a uno y medio Real [ ? ] vara 393 6


Por cincuenta y ocho varas de Manposteria del

Festero que mira a la Calle a tres pesos quatro

S
rr vara 203


Por Freinta y quatro de Yd de la Portada a

tres p.s quatro r. s vara 119


Por nueve de Yd del sitaron del Patio a dos

p.s quatro rs vara 22 4


Por tres pilares del Colgadizo de de la casa a

seis pesos cos da [ ?] uno 18

756 2

(beg. p. 9 rt. handside]

del frente 756 2


Por sesenta y tres varas de manposte ria de

la pared interior de la casa a tres p. s

quatro rs vara 220 4


Por sesenta y tres varas de Yd de la pareel

exterior de lasa a tres pesos quatro reales

vara 220 4


,ta








Ps Rs


Por diez y seis varas ? or vara y media de

Ydem del sitaron de la sala a dos pesos

vara 33


Por quince varas de Yd del Festero que divide

la cosina a tres pesos vara 45


Por dos varas de Yd de la Escalera a tres pesos

vara 6


Por sesenta varas de Yd de la chimenea,

hornillas [?], y hornos, a tres pesos quatro

Reales vara 210


Por tres varas de Yd del pretil de Patio a dos

pesos quatro r. s vara 7 4


Por noventa y dos varas de suelo de la casa y

colgadizo a seis Reales vara 69


Por ochenta varas de suelo de los quartos que

hazen frente [ ? ] a el Patio a quatro reales

vara 40

1607 6

De la Madera y Herraje Por una puerta de la

Casa con su marco y sus herrajes 10


Por tres Yden de Yden de Peines [?]

[Beg. p. 10 left side] Ps Rs
re la Bta 10
Ci -






Ps Rs


con sus Marcos y

Morduras 50


Por dos Ydem de medias Vidrieras con veinte

vidrios coda una 43[ ?]


Por ocho ventanas con sus Vidrieras y herrajes 100


Por una Escalera con su Balanstrada 40


Por una Alasena [ ?] con su Puerta y herraje 8


Por un Balcon con su Balanstrada y sus Peines 60


Por unas molduras y senefa de la casa 30


Por un Suelo de Fablas de Treinta pies de largo

y quinze de ancho 60


Por un Cielo Vaso [ ?] de Treinta Pies de largo,

y diez y nueve de ancho 64


Por otro Yden que cubre la Escalera 34 4


Por el Fecho de la Casa 157 L?]


Por una Cosina de veinte Pies de largo y trese

Yd de largo de madera y dos Pies de alto 92


Por dos Puertas 8



Por dos Ventanas 4






Ps

Por un Techo 56


Por una Casa de Tablas de treinta y tres pies

de largo y veinte


816 4


[beg p. 10 rt. side]


del frente


y dos Yd. de ancho y su colgadizo


Por tres Puertas


Por quatro Ventanas


Por un piso de Fablas de treinta y tres pies de

largo y veinte y dos Yd de ancho

i
Por un Fecho de dicha casa


Por una Cosina


Por una Casita de Tablas


Por la obra de mano de Carpinteria y Maderas

de la Casa


Por dos Esquineros en los angulos interiors


52


100


160


324


719


del aposento de la Casa


20










Resumen


Ymporta La Albanileria


Yd la Carpinteria y herraje


Suma


total


Ps Rs


Z363 4


1607 6


2363 4

3971 2







Testamentary Proceedings of Salcedo
pp. 4 10

Inventory of Estate
January, 1796


House and Slaves The house belonging to the said deceased and in.
which he was living.

P.5 R.s
A fIegro named Maria del Carmen about
eighteen years of age 250

A Negro daughter of the above - -
named Maria Josefa, three years of age 100

A Mulatto son also of the above - -
named Juan Nepomuceno, one year of
age 50

A house valued at three thousand, nine hundred
and seventy one pesos and two reales by the
two cited Senior Masters, Jose Lorente and
Martin Hernandez - legal copy of their
appraisal accompanies. 3,971 2

His /Salcedo's/clothes

A dress coat or musketeer's coat of new
cloth with a taffeta lining of the same
color (blue) /?/ damaged -
15 pesos 15

A frague /?/ of scarlet with blue taffeta
lining at 9 pesos 9

A pair of plush, velveteen, or corduroy
black trousers or breeches of medium or
average use at 3 pesos 3

A scarlet waistcoat, jacket or military
frock of medium use at 2 pesos 2

A Canary-colored cloth waistcoat, jacket,
or military frock at 14 reales 1 6

4,402 i
Two Sentros /?/ of Maon /?/ used at
6 pesos 6

A sentro /?/ of used muslin at 3 pesos 3


A ditto old at 1 peso







p. S


A ditto old at 1 peso 1

A centro /?/ of old muslin at 1 peso 1

Other ditto of cotton or woolen cloth
or fine Irish Linen of medium use at
3 pesos 3

Other ditto of the same use at 20 reales 2 4

Other ditto used at one peso 1

Other ditto old at 6 reales 6

A ditto of Muslin at 3 pesos 4 reales 3 4

A pair of breeches or trousers and
waistcoat or jacket of cotton or woolen
cloth or fine Irish Linen at 1 peso 1

A waistcoat or jacket of cotton or woolen
cloth or fine Irish linen of medium use
at 12 reales 1 4

A pair of black satin breeches or
trousers of same use at 20 reales 2 4

Two pairs of good men's drawers or shorts
of cotton or woolen cloth or fine Irish
linen at 18 reales 2 2

Two ditto of ,fine linen made in
Brittany at 14 reales 1 6

Two ditto of ditto at the same price 1 6

A used fine linen coat /?7 at 12 reales 1 4
4,435 4

A ditto of fine Brittany linen at 20
pesos and 2 reales 2 6

A fine ditto of woolen or cotten cloth
or Irish linen with its set of buttons
at 40 reales 5

A used ditto at 20 reales 2 4

8 good shirts at 4 pesos each 32

4 old ditto at 6 pesos 6

2 pairs of used cotton stockings at
9 reales 2 /7 2






P.5


2 pairs ditto one of yarn or linen
or thread at 6 reales 1 4

A pair of ditto of yarn or linen or
thread 1 peso 2 reales 1 2

2 pairs of hose /.7 at 6 reales 6

2 pairs of used stockings I/ at 8 reales 1

A pair of hose Z.7 of mesh agufa /Z/ at
3 reales 3

Four muslin neck-ties, cravat, or scarfs
at 4 reales 2

4 ditto of finest part of hemp or flax,
fine cloth, cotton, cambric at 3 reales 1 4

Total 4,495 7


The appraisers affirm that the just value of the property is as above
14,495 P.S 7 R.S'

Then follows appraisal of house made by Senior Masters of Masonry and
Carpentry of this place.


P.5 R.s

For 2100 varas ground of the lot of said
house at 1- reales a vara 393 6

For 58 varas of Masonry of the
that faces on the street at 3 pesos
4 reales a vara 203

For 34 of ditto of the large door or gate
at 3 pesos 4 reales a vara 119

For 9 of ditto of the of
the Courtyard at 2 pesos 4 reales a vara 22 4

For 3 pilars of the shed, shed roof,
gallery of the house at 6 pesos each one 18

756 2


ll I


R.s







P.S R.S


Carried forward ,756 2

For 63 varas of masonry of the interior
walls of the house at 3 pesos 4 reales
a vara 220 4

For 63 varas of ditto of the exterior
walls of the house at 3 pesos 4 reales
a vara 220 4

For 16 varas and of ditto of the parlor
at 2 pesos a vara 33

For 15 varas of ditto of the front ?7
that divides the kitchen at 3 pesos
a vara 45

For 2 varas of ditto of the stairs at 3
pesos a vara 6

For 60 varas of ditto of the chimney, stove,
small ovens, and ovens at 3 pesos 4 reales
a vara ''- '-o 6ev~ f 1u1 ovA T ay210

For 3 varas of ditto of rail, fence, wall
of courtyard at 2 pesos 4 reales a vara 7 4

For 92 varas of floor of the house and
shed, shed roof, gallery at 6 reales
a vara 69

For 80 varas of floor of the rooms that
front on the Patio at 4 reales a vara 40

1,607 6


Wood door of the house with its frame and
ironwork 10

/ For 3 ditto of ditto of Peines /?7 with
their frames and moulding 50

For 2 doors with 1ialf?7 glass with 20
glass panes each one 43

For 8 windows with their glass and iron-
work 100

For stairs with their balustrade 40

For a pantry or storeroom with its door
and ironwork 8


t I, f






P.s R.s


For a balcony with its balustrade and
its Peines /?1 60

For moulding and trimming of the house 30

For a board floor 30 feet long and 15
feet wide 60

For a flat ceiling or roof 30 feet long
and 19 feet wide 64

For other ceiling that covers the stairs 34 4

For roof or ceiling of the house 157 / j

For a wooden kitchen 20 feet long,
13 feet wide, and 2 Lor 12?7 feet high 92

For 2 doors 8

For 2 windows 4

For a roof or ceiling 56

For a house of boards 33 feet long and

816 4

/Cbeg p 10-2

22 feet wide and its shed, shed roof,
or gallery 156

For 3 doors 12

For 4 windows 4

For a board floor 33 feet long 22 feet wide 52

For roof or ceiling of said house 100

For a kitchen 160

For a small house of boards 324

For the carpenter's work and the wood of
the house 719
For 2 corner pieces in the interior angles
of the Coedroiff) of the house 20

Summary 2,363 4
Price of the Masonry 1,607 6

Price of the carpentry and ironwork 2,363 4
3,971 2








Retasacion de la Casa perteneciente a los bienes del Capitan del R.1 Cuerpo

de Artilleria Don Pedro Jose Salcedo Difunto que

en virtud de Decreto puesto en los autos de sus Ynventarios: y corresponde

solo a Carpinteria a saver [ ? ]


Por tres Puertas de Tableros con sus marco y

Herraje [ ?]

Por cinco Ventanas con sus marcos, vidrieras,

ojas [?], y herraje [?]

Por dos Puertas de medias Vidrieras con sus

Marcos, y Herraje [?]

Por dos Ventanas de Vidrieras, ojas, y

Herraje [ ?]

Por una Escalera Vidriera, y forro

Por un Piso de Tabla

Por un Cielo raso de Tabla

Por un Fecho

Por tres Eguineras [ ?]

Por Cenefas, y otras Molduras

Por una Cocina

Por una Casa de madera con su Comedor, piso,

y Escalera

Por las dos Puertas de la Calle, y Cercas

Total

San Ag.N dela Florida 3 de Novembre de 1797

Juan Purcell


24



18

70

60

64

120

30

9

42



140

80

757 4


. a f








Testamentary Proceedings of Salcedo
p. 20
/November 3, 1797/


Reappraisement of the house pertaining to the property of the Captain

of the Royal Corps of Artillery, Don Pedro Jose Salcedo deceased that

A/?7 /?.7 in virtue of decree put in

the records of your inventories and pertains only to the carpentry to

wit:


p.s


R.s


For three doors of wood with their
frame and ironwork


For 5 windows with their frames,
glass, ?7. and
ironwork

For two doors of /or partitionwallj middle,
half?/ glass with their frames and
ironwork

For two windows of glass 7___
and ironwork

For stairs, glass, and cover /-7

For a floor of boards

For a flat roof or ceiling of boards

For a ceiling

For three corner-pieces

For border or trimming and other
moulding

For a kitchen

For a house of wood with its dining
room, floor and stairs

For the two doors on the street, and
fence or wall

Total
Saint Augustine, Florida, November 3, 1797.


Juan Purcell


I I -


24


18

70

60

64

120

30


9

42


140


80

757




AVA /ASC/,\ AE"I L& X / -e

Pesos


Primeramente por dos Puertas de la Calle con

sus Cercas [?] de Tablas quarenta pesos

Ya [?] por dos marcos con sus Puertas y

herraje, Treinta y ocho pesos quatro reales

Ya [?] por cinco marcos de Ventana con sus

ofas [?[ herraje, y Vidrieras ochenta pesos

Ya [?] por dos Esquineros diez y ocho pesos

Ya [?] por un armario con Vidrieras

Ya [? ] por una guarnicion de chiminea [ ? ] y

cenefa, diez pesos quatro reales

Ya [?] por una Escalera con su pasa mano y

balaustres diez y seis pesos quatro reales



(continued on p. 26 (left hand side))

Sum de la buelta

Yu [?] por un Cason [?] de la Escalera con

su cielo rasco y una Ventana con su Vidriera

Veinte y quatro pesos

Yu [ ? ] por un marco y Puerta con su herraje

doce pesos

Yu [?] por dos Marcos con sus Puertas de

Vidrieras, Veinte y ocho pesos

Yu [ ? ] por un piso de tablas cenquenta y ocho

pesos


Ye & AP-Meftju-A K-'-(
1'^e- g c e e C
SA "-c~a I, e
rr


16 4

215 4


.1 .







Yu [ ? ] por un cielo raso de Tablas Se Senta

y cinco pesos 65

Yu [ ?] por dos marcos de Ventana con sus

ojas [ ?] y Vidrieras diez y seis pesos 16

Yu [ ?] por un Balcon con sus Balaustres y

tableros cinquenta y cinco pesos 55

Yu [ ? ] por el Techo de la Casa ciento quarenta

y dos pesos 142

Yu por una Cozina de Tablas quarenta y cinco

pesos 45

Yu por una Casita de Madera con veinte y seis

pies de [?] largo, catorce de ancho, y siete

de alto, ciento quarenta y seis pesos 146

Yu por un ballinero, una necesaria, y Zercas

de rejones [ ?] quarenta p. s y seis reales 40 6

847 [blurred ?]

Ye [?] no resultando [?] otra cosa que tasar [?] se con cluio esta deligencia

q _____ firmaron dhos [ ?] Sre [ ?] ___[ ?] y el Perito de que doy


Signatures Remedeos Jose Antonio de Yuiniz [ ? ] Antonio Llambias Antenu [ ?]

Jose de Zubizarreta de


aI I








Testamentary Proceedings of Salcedo
p. 25
Tune 8, 1798, Saint Augustine7


New Appraisal P. s R.s

First for doors or gates of the street
with their fence or wall of boards -
quarenta pesos 40

Now -(? for two frames with their
doors and ironwork-treinta and
ocho pesos quartro reales 38 4

Now /?_7 for five frames of windows
with their / 1/7
ironwork and glass ochenta pesos 80

Now ZV for two corner pieces diez
and ocho pesos 18

Now Z'7 for a wardrobe with glass panes 12

Now /. for a decoration for chimney .J7
and border or trimming, 10 pesos
4 reales 10 4

Now f?7 for stairs with their handrail
and posts or balusters 16 pesos
4 reales 16 4

215 4

L^Continued p. 267
Sum of the other side of page 215 4

Now Z17 for a large house with stairs,
its flat ceiling or roof and a window
with its glass 24 pesos 24

Now L/?/ for a frame and door with its
ironwork 12 pesos 12

Now /17 for two frames with their doors
of glass, 28 pesos 28

Now /Z/ for a floor of boards 58 pesos 58

Now 7/ for a flat ceiling or roof of boards-
65 pesos 65
Now Z/7 for two frames of windows with their
L?7 and glass 16 pesos 16


26-10






P.S R.s
Now /?/ for a balcony with its
balusters and boards 55 pesos 55

Now 1/J for the roof or ceiling of
the house 142 pesos 142

Now / for a kitchen of boards -
45 pesos 45

Now Z7 for a small house of wood,
26 feet long, 14 feet wide, and
7 feet high 146 pesos 146

Now A>J for a henhouse, privy, and
- fence or wall of split wood -
40 pesos 6 reales 40 6

847 blurredd/

/ This new appraisal was ordered. It is signed by Don Juan de los
Remedios, Captain of the Royal Corps of Artillery and Judge
Commissioned for the testamentary proceedings; Don Jose Antonio de
Yguiniz, interim treasurer of the Royal houses and Agent or Attorney
of the widow Dora Maria Galan; and Antonio Llambias, Master Carpenter
and Appraiser.,7







THE SALCEDO HOUSE
(Rocque 44)


This site belonged to Alfonsa de Avero at the end of the First Spanish
Period (1763). She had a stone house on the lot which was situated on Calle
Real or what is now present-day Saint George Street. Alfonsa de Avero was
one of several sisters living on Saint George Street with their respective
families in 1763. One of her sisters was married to Don Raymundo de Arrivas
and lived next door to the south. Another sister on Saint George Street was
married to Joachin Blanco who held the post of Guarda Almacen de Municiones
y Petrechos and was therefore Keeper of the garrison's supplies. The sisters
and their families left, however, in 1763. The Treaty of Paris of 1763 ended
the French and Indian War, the last of the intercolonial struggles. Spain in
order to get back Cuba which had fallen to the British during the war ceded
Florida to Great Britain.

The site had several owners during the brief British Period (1763-1783).
Alfonsa de Avero's property was incorporated into a grant known as No. 3
Rainsford Block -- the grantee was Andrew Rainsford, a sawmiller and a
draughtsman in the British Army. He left the Province and the property was
sold to pay his debts. Thereafter it was owned by Thomas Stone, a Virginian
and a trader; Leonard Cecil, an Englishman; and Robert Johnston, a Loyalist,
who left Saint Augustine, which had become a Loyalist refuge, and went to the
Bahama Islands at the end of the British Period.

Pedro Jose Salcedo, Captain and Commander of theRoyal Oorps of
Artillery bought the Rainsford Grant (Rocque 44,45, 46) early in the Second
Spanish Period. He sold part of the grant (Rocque 45 and 46) in 1792 and
kept our site (Rocque 44) where he lived with his wife until his death on
August 28, 1795. After his death his widow returned to Havana.


From January 20, 1796 until the end of May, 1796, a Negro General or
Caudillo Of the Auxiliary Troops of the Island of Santo Domingo lived in
the house. Thereafter, it was rented for a number of years.

Pablo Sabate, a Minorcan, bought the property in November, 1805. Sabate
who had come to Saint Augustine with the Minorcans in the British Period was
a farmer and fisherman in. his younger days. He acquired considerable property
during his eighty-some-year life which spanned the British, Second Spanish,
and American Periods.


Joyce Elizabeth Harman
Historian, Historic Saint Augustine
Preservation Board
March 25, 1974


ROUGH DRAFT








The Salcedo House
(Rocque 44)

This site belonged to Alfonsa de Avero at the end of the First Spanish Period

(1763). She had a stone house on the lot which was situated on Calle Real or

what is now present-day Saint George Street.


Alfonsa or Ildefonsa de Avero was the oldest of six daughters and one son

born to Victoriano de Avero, a Canary Islander, and his wife, Maria Francesca

(sometimes del Valle) Garcia de Asevedo of Saint Augustine. She was born

in Saint Augustine on February 14, 1713 -- her Godfather was Captain Don

Bernardo Nieto de Carvajal. Her six younger sisters were all born between

1715 and 1726 -- Juana (March 19, 1715), Antonia (March 3, 1717), Manuela

(April 25, 1719), Francisco Gabriel (August 29, 1721), Ursula (October 30,

1723), and Maria (January 17, 1726). The Royal Accountant, Don Francisco

Menendez Marques was a Godfather to several of the Avero children. Their

father, Victoriano de Avero, died in 1727 and his widow did not remarry until

1738 when she married Don Cy)ristoval de la Torre de Borjes, a native of

Port of del Principe in Cuba.


The year of Alfonsa de Avero's birth saw the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht

by the European colonial powers and brought some semblance of peace to the

troubled Southeast. The Treaty ended the conflict known in the New World as

Queen Anne's War and in the Old World as the War of the Spanish Succession

/ (ca. 1701-1714).


This conflict had brought devastation to Spanish Florida. Prior to the out-

break of the war, the Presidio had a population of about 1, 600 residents,







including some 350 military personnel, their families, the friars, a few .

Royal officials, plus some Indians and Negroes. Many of the inhabitants

were Criollos (native-born Saint Augustinians of Spanish ancestory). The

Floridians had developed local sources of food supply such as cattle ranches

in outlying areas of the province. Their encroaching English neighbors,

however, came from Carolina in 1702 to lay seige to the Spanish Presidio.

The Floridians fled to the Castillo de San Marcos where they held out.


The English under Governor James Moore of Carolina were unable to defeat

the Spaniards, but they destroyed much of the town, the ranches, and the

farms. Worst of all, perhaps, the English stirred up their Indian allies and

an ensuing decade or so of Indian depredations hindered the rebuilding of

Florida's farms and ranches and practically eliminated the local sources

of food supply for Florida which was reduced to the land within the lines and

under the cannon of the fort. The years immediately prior to Alfonsa de i

Avero's birth were years of want and scarcity and strife with the nearby

English. After the Peace in 1713, conditions improved somewhat since,

strangely enough, the Floridians began to import much-needed supplies from

the nearby English colonies.


Alfonsa de Avero grew up in a period between two of the intercolonial wars,

a period in which the territory effectively controlled by the Spanish in the

Southeast had been considerably reduced from earlier times as a result of

the struggle between England, France, and Spain for territory in North

America. On May 8, 1729, at the age of sixteen she married Fernando







Rodriguez de Cabrera, the son of Simon Rodriguez and Elena de Cabrera of

the Isle of Tenerife in the Canaries. They apparently had only one child who

died in 1731. Rodriguez himself died sometime between 1731 and 1734.


The young widow married Francisco Pere,s de la Rosa, a native of Saint

Augustine, on June 28, 1734. They had six children between 1736 and 1747 --

Estephania (?), Maria (January 6, 1736), Isadora (January 19, 1738), Juan

(December 2, 1740), Pablo Juan (July 2, 1744), JosepK Valentl'nV(February 20,

1747).


During the years when Alfonsa Avero de Perez de la Rosa was raising her

family, Spain and England were twice again at war in the Old World and the

New. The War of Jenkins' Ear which broke out in 1739 between Spain and

England merged into the war in Europe known as the War of the Austrian

Succession and in 1744 the entrance of France into the American phase of the

war developed into the struggle known as King George's War. This conflict

brought the English under James Oglethorpe to Spanish Florida in 1740 and

1742. Both times the English failed to take the Spanish Presidio. t ',


The Southeast was relatively peaceful then for the next twenty years. The

Spanish Presidio at Saint Augustine traded increasingly with its English

neighbors and was probably better supplied than at any time in its history.

The population by 1763 totaled around 3,000.


Several of the Avero sisters lived on Saint George Street by 1763. Alfonsa

de Avero's next door neighbor to the south was her sister Ursula de Avero.








This sister had married for the first time at the age of fifteen. At that time

she married an infantry lieutenant ,Don Diego Repilado, a native of Palermo,

Sicilyborn of Spanish parents from Estremadura. Ursula de Avero had

made a good catch -- he was both an officer and a peninsular. The couple

had five children -- Juan (September 4, 1739), Francisca (February 17, 1741),

Lucia (December 17, 1743), Maria Ana Rosalia (December 1, 1745), and

JoseWjphFelix (November 22, 1746). Between 1745 and 1748 Ursula lost two

children and her husband.


On August 16, Ursula de Avero married Raymundo de Arrivas, a native of

Arabelo. He too was both an officer and a peninsular. He was a Second

Lieutenant of the Second Infantry Company in 1752 and by 1759 was a First

Lieutenant drawing a salary of 528 pesos a year. They had seven children --

Francisco Xavier (March 25, 1749), Vicenta (April 7, 1751), Antonio (May 5,

1753), Ana Josepha (June 7, 1755), Josepha Maria (March 9, 1757), Manuel

(December 27, 1758), and Tadeo who was born in Havana in 1767. By 1763

they were living next door to Albnsa de Avero and her family.


Across the street from Alfonsa and Ursula de Avero was a third sister

Juana de Avero. She was married for the first time on August 20, 1731, at

the age of sixteen to Simon de Morales. Morales was a native of Havana,

the son of a Canary Islander. They had apparently only one child who died

in 1732. Sometime, thereafter, Morales himself died.


On December 30, 1736, his widow married Geronimo de Hita y Salazar, a

soldier and a native of Saint Augustine and one of the thirty some grandsons

-4-







of Governor Pablo de Hita y Salazar. Geronimo de Hita was not a great

social success in a town where military rank was of such importance. He

and his wife had six children -- Marfa Basilia (December 28, 1736), Simon

(April 28, 1739), Francisca (April 9, 1742), Leocadia Maria (December 14,

1744), Eugenia ( ? ), and Maria Isabel (September 11, 1748).


A fourth sister, Antonia de Avero also resided on northern Saint George

Street. In fact, she and her second husband owned three houses here. Born

on March 3, 1717, Antonia de Avero married Captain Don Joseph Guillen, a

native of Cartagena on April 26, 1735. They had a large family, too, --

Rosa (December 12, 1736), Francisca (April 11, 1738), Barbara (December 5,

1739), Augustin (June 9, 174 ), Victoriana Isadora (April 21, 1743), and

Flora (A) who died unmarried in 1736. On December 20, 1743, Joseph

Guille'n died.


The widow of Guillen married Joathin Blanco, a native of Avila, on March 25,

1753. Blanco held the post of Guarda Almacen de Municiones y Petrechos

and therefore had the duty of managing the garrison's supplies. Blanco thus

belonged to the "administrative elite" of Saint Augustine. The marriage

was a success in terms of social status at least for Antonia de Avero. She

and Blanco apparently had only one child born on February 26, 1755.


The four Avero sisters and their approximately two dozen children lived in

an area of "f airly decent" houses near the fort. The location of a house in

a Spanish colonial town indicated the social status of the owner. The most

desirable location was on the main square. However, it has been suggested

-5-








that the presence of the Castillo de San Marcos as the main structure in

Saint Augustine made the area near the fort the second most desirable lo-
10
cation.


The fort had successfully held out against the English in 1702, 1740, and 1742,

but the Treaty of Paris in 1763 turned Florida over to Great Britain. The

Treaty ended thelast of the intercolonial struggles known in America as the

French and Indian War and in Europe as the Seven Years' War and brought

to an end almost a half century of colonial warfare. Spain had not entered

the war until January, 1762, and Spanish Florida held out even though the

colony was short of supplies since the English cut off the trade with their

Spanish neighbors. Cuba, however, fell to the English and in order to get it

back Spain sacrificed Florida.


The Saint Augustinians seeny "Dissatisfied at St. Augustine's being given up."

But most of them left the colony. The population of some three thousand

evacuated the province leaving behind their homes. Some of the unsold

houses and lots were left in the care of Jesse Fish, an agent for the trading

company of William Walton in New York who had resided in Saint Augustine

for a number of years. Alfonsa de Avero's name does not appear in his ac-

c ounts, however.


-6-







The site had several owners during the brief British Period (1763-1783).

The first documented owner for this period is Captain Andrew Rainsford.

The British Government granted to him in 1767 lot and buildings known as

No. 3 Rainsford Block. The grant contained 6/10 of an acre -- its east

side forming part of Saint George Street, north skirting vacant land, west

Spanish Street, and South on vacant lots.


DeBrahm's "List of Inhabitants of East Florida, their Employs, Business

and Qualifications, from 1763 to 1771" shows that Rainsford was married, a

sawmiller, a draughtsmen in the army, and that he left the province. On

August 1, 1770, his grant was dold at auction by court order to pay his debts.


Rainsford apparently went to New Brunswick, where he became a resident

of that colony. After the Revolution, a Andrew Rainsford was Receiver -

General and Assistant Barracks master of that colony. He died in 1820 at

the age of eighty-six at Fredericton. Four of his sons supposedly held
12--
military commissions in the British service at one time.


Thomas Stone bought Rainsford's grant at the 1770 auction. Stone was a
13
trader and lived in Saint Augustine. A Virginian and a Protestant, described

in Spanish records as a LutherAtaj he was married to Maria Thompson. The

Stones had a son, Thomas Ranson Stone, born about 1768 in Virginia.


The son either stayed in Saint Augustine at the end of the British Period or

left and returned later. For Thomas Ranson Stone was baptized a Catholic

early in the Second Spanish Period (April 18, 1789) as was Sara Jones, a







native of Savannah, Georgia, and widow of Joseph Savi whom he married on

May 6, 1789. They had a son, Francisco Mateo del Rosario Stone, born

October 4, 1789, in Saint Augustine -- the grandson of the first Thomas

Stone from Virginia. The younger Stones do not appear in the 1793 Spanish

Census so they may have later left the province.


Thomas Stone Senior sold the property to Leonard Cecil on March 19, 1783.

Cecil was British. A Leonard Cecil of Maryland went to England and met

in July, 1779, in London with other Loyalists at the Crown and Anchor Tavern.

Whether this is the same Leonard Cecil is uncertain. In any event, Cecil

did not keep the property for very long at all. He sold it in April, 1783, to

Robert Johnston.


Robert Johnston was a Loyalist who left Saint Augustine at the end of the British

Period. He went to the Bahama Islands where he settled on Cat Island with

his thirty-four Blacks. Johnston presented a claim in the Bahamas for a lot

and 2 houses in Saint Augustine valued at j450 Os Od and sold for 115 13s 6d

at the time of the evacuation. His claim for the difference of f 3-34 6s 6d was

found valid.


East Florida had remained loyal to Great Britain during the Revolutionary

War. Samuel Adams and John Hancock burned in effigies in the Plaza after

the news of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence reached Saint

Augustine, and the colony soon became a Loyalist refuge. Loyalists flocked

to East Florida and swelled the population to an all time high of over 17, 000








before the Treaty that ended the War returned the colony to Spain and most

of the British left. The Minorcans, who had come to Saint Augustine from

New Smyrna about the same time as the outbreak of the Revolutionary War

remained along with a few others into the Second Spanish Period (1784-1821).


When Robert Johnston departed from East Florida, he left his property in

charge of an agent named William Slater. Slater was a native of England and

a merchant and public storekeeper. Married and the father of two children,

he had five hundred acres of land on the Saint Mary's River, a house and

grounds where he lived on Charlotte Street, and slaves and horses.


Governor Patrick Tonyn appointed him to be a public vendue master at the

end of the British Period. With evacuation at hand, land, houses, and other

property had to be appraised and disposed of as at the end of the First Spanish

Period twenty years earlier. The property, however, soon glutted the market

and was sold at low figures. Before Slater departed for the Bahamas himself

he sold Johnston's property.








Don Pedro Jose Salcedo bought the property from Slater on

November 22,, 1784. Salcedo acquired the site on Saint George Street

bounded on the west by Spanish Street, south by the heirs of Raymundo

Alonso de Arrivas, and north by Jayme Clac [James Clarke,. The lot or

lots had three houses of masonry and wood fronting on Saint George

Street which were deteriorated and badly treated [?] and therefore

uninhabitable -- one apparently being the "former house of Alfonsa de

Avero." Salcedo promised to return the property to Robert Johnston

or his heirs at the same price if the English should again take over

Saint Augustine -- this was effective for one year only.



Pedro Jose Salcedo was a Captain in the Royal Corps of Artillery

and Commander of the detachment stationed in Saint Augustine at the

beginning of the Second Spanish Period. He was from Granada, but may

have come to East Florida by way of Havana. He married Marla Rodriguez

Galan in Havanaon March 20, 1785, by proxy, and on April 20, 1786, their

marriage was ratified in Saint Augustine with Thomas Hassett officiating

and Don Mariano de la Roque, Captain of the Engineers in East Florida,

and his wife as witnesses.



Most of the British population left East Florida after its trans- ,uv

fer to Spain. The population dropped from an estimated 17,375 to wD

between 3,000 to 6,000 residents. Minorcans, a few British and other

foreigners, Spanish residents, Floridanos from the First Spanish Period

and the garrison made up the population at the beginning of the Second

Spanish Period.








Salcedo and his wife moved into a home on our site (Rocque 44)

sometime prior to 1793. In 1788 Salcedo still owned the three lots on

Saint George Street (Rocque 44,45, and 46). Rocque 44 now had a two

story masonry house, in good condition, on it. Salcedo also owned in

1788 a house of wood and slats with a palm roof, in bad condition, on a

lot of the King's on Spanish Street (Rocque 31).. In 1790 Salcedo owned

the three properties on Saint George, but no longer had the house on

SSpanish Street. Then in 1792, Salcedo sold Rocque 45 and 46, the former

to Maria Triay and the latter to Antonio Usina. This left Salcedo with

only the one site (Rocque 44).



The 1793 Spanish Census confirms the fact that the site (Rocque

44) was the home of Salcedo and his wife. Salcedo was #129 on the

Census and #128 to the south was Don Tadeo de Arrivas, the son of

Don Raymundo de Arrivas and his wife, Dona Ursula de Avero, and #130

to the north was Mari'A Triay (Rocque 45).



The Census shows too that the Salcedo household consisted of

Salcedo, his wife, two young girls and two slaves. The girls were

agregada or associated. They were Maria Josefa Welch, the daughter of

Juan and Juana Allen, both of Ireland, who was sixteen years old and
J /
Catalina Ximenes, the daughter of Rafael and Maria Ramillera both of

Minorca, who was eight years old. Both girls were baptized with

Salcedo as one of their sponsors. Marla Welch who had been born in

New York was baptized on March 6, 1792 at the age of 14 with both

Salcedo and his wife as sponsors for her. Catalina Ximenez was

baptized on January 16, 1785, at the age of six days with Salcedo and

Antonia Selort as her sponsors. The younger girl's parents with four








other children lived in Saint Augustine in 1793, but the family

of the older girl does not appear in the Census of that year. Salcedo

and his wife apparently had no children of their own.



Their home must have been fairly comfortable for its time and

place.. It was a two story masonry house with stairs, balcony, court-

yard, kitchen, henhouse, other necessary outbuildings, and a small

orchard or garden patch. It also had glass for the windows.



Salcedo both a Captain and j Commander of a Military Detachment

and a peninsular was fairly well off and a member of the garrison

society such as it was. A man in eighteen-century Saint Augustine

who had eight good shirts plus four old ones could not have been too

badly off.









Pedro Jose Salcedo died on. August 28, 1795, leaving only his

widow. She returned to Havana shortly thereafter taking their three

slaves with her.


His estate consisted of the house, the three slaves (an eighteen

year old Negro named Maria del Carmen and her two small children, a

three year old daughter named Maria Josefa and a one year old Mulatto

son named Juan Nepomuceno), and his clothes, which included a dress

coat of new cloth with a blue taffeta lining, breeches, shirts, etc.







Salcedo apparently left no will. Don Juan Fernandez Remedios,

also a Captain of the Royal Corps of Artillery in Saint Augustine,

became Juez Comisionado (Judge Commissioner) of the legal proceedings

pertaining to the estate and Joe Antonio Yguinez became the apoderado

attorney or proxy of the widow who was in Havana.



The clothes -- except for a few items that were very old -- were

sold in January, 1796, for a total of 111 pesos and 1 real. The house,

however, which was valued at 3,971 pesos and 2 reales in 1796 was not

sold until 1805. The widow did not agree with an appraisal and Tadeo

Arrivas claimed a portion of the Salcedo property for himself and other

heirs of Raymundo Arrivas.


A Negro General or Caudillo of the Auxiliary Troops of the Island

of Santo Domingo lived in Salcedo's house from January 20, 1796 until

the end of May, 1796, at the disposition of the Government. The Negro,

Jorge Viazour, had a pension of three thousand pesos from the Crown -

for his services. He must have come to Saint Augustine sometime between

1793 and 1796 since he does not appear in the 1793 Census.


Viazour stayed in Saint Augustine after he moved out of Salcedo's

house since he died here in 1801. When he died he had a big funeral at

the parish church with a Mass. The Governor, Senior Lieutenants, all

officials and persons of distinction attended, plus a guard of sixteen

to twenty^ free Negro Militia. They buried him at Campo Santo.



On June 21, 1796, Salcedo's house was rented out. The property

apparently remained a rental property for a number of years thereafter/

for the site was not sold until late in 1805,








Pablo Sabate bought the property at public auction on November 22,
1805, for the sum of 1,500 pesos. He paid 700 pesos in cash and the
remaining 800 pesos was taken care of in the form of a promissary note
held by the Military Detachment of the Royal Corps of Artillery. At
the time of this sale the southern boundary of the property which Tadeo
de Arrivas had disputed was settled. Arrivas was paid 100 pesos in the
settlement.


Sabate was a native Minorcan who must have come to the New World
as a young child. His family settled first at New Symrna and then moved
to Saint Augustine along with other Minorcans during the British Period
(ca. 1777). He married Antonia Ortegas, also a native of Minorca, on
June 9, 1781, with Father Camps officiating.


The Sabates had a large family - Miguel (April 5, May 9, 1784),
Catalina (September 22, 1786), Ana (September 20, 1788), Sebastian
(October 24, 1790), Pablo (February 6, 1793), twins Juan and Antonia
(July, 1795), Eleuteria Catalina Ana (January 3, 1798), Eusebia Sabate
( -- 1800), and Ramon (August 31, 1801).


Their daughter,. Eleuteria Catalina Ana Sabate married Antonio
21
Alvarez in January, 1818. Alvarez served both in the Second Spanish

and American Periods in various capacities, Under the Second Spanish

administration he was clerk in the Secretary's office from 1807 to the

change of flags. During the American Period he held a number of

positions - President of the Board of Alderman, Keeper of the Public

Archives in East Florida, and Mayor of Saint Augustine for instance.

His family also owned the OldestHouse on what is now Saint Francis


Street.









Pablo Sabate was a farmer and a fisherman. In- 1783 he had a house

in the Greek settlement and one and one-half acres of land, the land

he apparently rented. The house on Spanish and Cuna was made of wood

and covered with palm. His household in 1793 was made up of his wife,

children, mother-in-law and one slave, a Catechumen (person studying

the Christian doctrine in order to be baptized).



Sabate owned the two houses by the end of 1805 - his old home

on Spanish and Cuna plus the Salcedo house on Saint George. Whether
iN
he actually livedrthe house on Saint George Street is at present

uncertain. He also acquired additional property both inside and out-

side of Saint Augustine. In 1809 he bought a large tract of land

(over 2,000 acres) known as Casacola. Granted to him in the Second

Spanish Period, the United States later confirmed his ownership. He

also purchased200 acres at San Diego at a place called Plantage de

Arroz de Clark (Clark's rice plantation). The United States confirmed

this too. However, the United States rejected his claim to a 2,500

acre tract, west of Casacola, granted to him by Governor Jose

Coppinger in 1818.



Pablo Sabate spanned three distinct periods in Florida's history -

- he first came to Saint Augustine during the British Period, he stayed

on in the Second Spanish Period, and lived into the American Period.

Starting out as a farmer and fisherman, he lived in a modest house of

wood covered with plam. Sabate served in the Provincial Militia under

the Spanish. The Minorcan died on April 27, 1834, at the age of eighty

some. He left a "numerous circle of friends and relatives to deplore




'7



his loss." He left too "Valuable real and some personal estate" in

the County of Saint Johns, East Florida. In addition to considerable

property, his estate included Negroes, horses, crockery and glass ware,

"jamayca" rum, American Gin, Whiskey, common rum, Spanish doubloons and

silver money. He left no will. His son-in-law Antonio Alvarez and his
OF
son Ramon Sabate took out LettersaAdministration to settle the estate,

which included the property on Saint George Street.







SOURCES
(A very rough draft, I have not indicated obvious sources like Puente which
are in Appendix anyway)

1.. Cathedral Parish Records (CPR); Saint Augustine Historical Society
,Biographical File (SAHS Biog. File); Arnade, "Avero Story".

2. John R. Dunkle, Population Change as an Element in the Historical
Geography of Saint Augustine, Florida Historical Quarterly, XXXVII,
(Tuly, '1958), 8.

3. Gillaspie, "Ayala," p. 13; Royal Cedula to Governor and Royal
Officials of Florida, Sept. 30, 1700, SC, AGI 58-1-23/58 (SD 836)
Madrid, AGI 58-2-8 (SD 858), St. Augustine; Charles W. Arnade,
"Cattle Raising in Spanish Florida," Agricultural.History, XXXV,
(July, 1961), 5.

4.. Arnade, Siege, p. 22; Gov. Zuniga, St. Aug., Nov. 6, 1702, SC, AGI
58-2-8/26 (SD 858 0-7, pp. 13040 -13033 L filed under 1707,7. SAHS
has transcript; Luis R. Arana, "Military Manpower in Florida, 1670 -
1703% El Escribano, V 111 (April 1971) 43, 49; Arnade, Siege, pp.6
24, 55, 58, 60; Mark F. Boyd, trans., "The Siege of St. Aug. by
Gov. Moore of S. Carolina in 1702 as reported to the King of Spain
by Don Joseph de Zuniga y Zerda, Gov. of Fla., Fla. Hist. 0k,
XXVI, (April, 1948), 350.

5. Gillaspie, "Ayala," p. 13; John R. Brodhead, et al, eds., Documents
Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York (____
1887), IV, 1048; Gov. Francisco de Corcoles y Martinez to Crown,
Nov. 30, 1706, NC, AGI 58-1-27/104 (SD 840) St. Aug., 3 PP. copy at
SAHS; Royal Officials of Florida to Crown, November 10, 1707, NC,
AGI 58-1-34/11 (SD 847), Fla. 14 pp., copy at SAHS.

6. Harman, Trade & Priv., 83-91,

7.. CPR; SAHS Biog File; "Avero Story".

8. TePaske, 154; Te beau, 70.

9. Chatelain, 87.

10. CPR; SAHS Bio. File; "Avero Story".

11. South Carolina Gazette, April 23 30, May 14, 1763..

12. Sabine

13. De Brahm

14. CPR.

15. 1784 Sale in original document says he was British.

16. Sabine.


17. Siebert II, 361.







18. Siebert II, 263.

19. An article by Siebert.

20. Siebert II, 419, 147, 266, 187, 19, 1783 Sp. Census.

21. CPR, SAHS Bio File.

22. Mowat,. p. 64, 156 37, 147.

23.. CPR, SAHS Biog. File

24. Test. Proceedings of Salcedo

25. Test. Proceedings of Salcedo and of Viazour.

26. Test. Proceedings of Salcedo, p. 49.

27. CPR, SAHS Biog File.

28. SAHS Biog File

29. Ibid.., and East Fla Herald, 1/6/1823; Herald, 8/15/1833; Herald
11/14/1833.

30. 1783 Sp. Census

31. Sp. Census (1785?)

32. ,Sp. Census 1793.

33. Sp. Land Grant & Territorial Papers.

34. Ibid

35. Herald, May 1, 1834.

36. St. Johns County, Superior U-l, Usina et ux vs. Arnau et al.




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